Page 1

Engelska C (steg 7) för gymnasiets studieförberedande program och komvux

Engelskan står i centrum, inte bara som ett världsspråk utan även som ett globalt kulturellt fenomen. Blueprint C Version 2.0 lyfter språkinlärningen till att också spegla hur språket påverkar oss och framtiden, och ger eleven verktyg att ta del av detta. Christina McKay, Micke Brodin, Jeanette Clayton och Christopher Webster har tillsammans många år som lärare bakom sig, i kombination med lång erfarenhet som författare. Övriga komponenter: • Lärarhandledning 47-90493-8 • Facit 47-09197-3 • Lärar-CD 47-90494-5

M C Kay • Brodin • clayton • webster

Blueprint C Version 2.0 är sista steget innan fortsatta studier eller arbete. Här faller allt på plats och språkets olika verktyg används tillsammans; att jämföra och analysera går hand i hand med att tala och skriva – summan blir större än de enskilda delarna.

BLUEPRINT C

BLUEPRINT C – VERSION 2.0

BLUEPRINT C steg 7

VERSION 2.0

Christina M C Kay Best.nr 47-09196-6 Tryck.nr 47-09196-6

Micke Brodin jeanette clayton christopher webster

0_OMSLAG.indd 1

10-10-14 12.16.39


isbn 978-91-47-09196-6 © 2010 Christina McKay, Micke Brodin, Jeanette Clayton, Christopher Webster och Liber AB Redaktion Cecilia Stern Frisenfelds, Anna Granlund Formgivning Eva Jerkeman Bildredaktion Marie Olsson Produktion Anna Törnqvist Göpel Granskning och utprövning Helena Heijdenberg, Nina Ellmark, Grace Rose, Michael Knight Andra upplagan 1 Tryck Kina 2011 Repro Repro 8 AB, Stockholm

Kopieringsförbud Detta verk är skyddat enligt upphovsrättslagen. Kopiering utöver lärarens rätt att kopiera för undervisningsbruk enligt BONUS-avtal är förbjuden. BONUS-avtal tecknas mellan upphovsrättsorganisationer och huvudman för utbildningssamordnare, t.ex. kommuner/universitet. Den som bryter mot lagen om upphovsrätt kan åtalas av allmän åklagare och dömas till böter eller fängelse i upp till två år samt bli skyldig erlägga ersättning till upphovsman/rättsinnehavare. Liber AB, 113 98 Stockholm Tfn 08-690 90 00 www.liber.se Kundservice tfn 08-690 93 30, fax 08-690 93 01/02 e-post: kundservice.liber@liber.se

001-224 1_BlueprintC.indd 2

BILDFÖRTECKNING

Omslag Ulf Rennéus/Mary Square Images 7 Jewel Samad/AFP/Scanpix 12–13 Thure Wikberg/Scanpix 17 Oxford Cartographers/Stone/Getty Images 21 Rolf Bruderer/Masterfile/Scanpix 27 1984. AKG/Scanpix 32 Dmitry Beliakov/Rex Features 39 Newscast project/Scanpix 41 Rod Lord 45 Nathan Evans/Millennium/Scanpix 46 Ty Milford/Masterfile/Scanpix 52 Wuthering Heights. Tom Hardy & Charlotte Riley, 2009. ITV/Rex Features 57 Mario Quadros/AP/Scanpix 60 Solent News/Rex Features/IBL 65 Bram Stoker’s Dracula. Keanu Reeves, 1992. Everett Collection/IBL 73 Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images 75 v, h Ferrari Press Agency/Scanpix 79, 81 Aarre Rinne/iStockphoto 85 Alice in Wonderland. Mia Wasikowska, Michael Sheen, Johnny Depp, Alan Rickman, Matt Lucas, Anne Hathaway, Helena Bonham Carter & Stephen Fry, 2010. Walt Disney Pictures/Everett Collection/IBL 86 Robert Harding Images/Masterfile/Scanpix 94 The Son of Man. ©René Magritte/BUS 2010. Christie’s Images/Corbis/Scanpix 97 Eat Pray Love. Julia Roberts, 2010. © Columbia Pictures/Everett Collection/ IBL 103 Ephotocorp/AGE/Scanpix 105 Martin Parr/Magnum/IBL 109 Justin Sullivan /Getty Images 115 Alan Crowhurst/EPA/Scanpix 117 Philip Scott Andrews/AP/Scanpix 123 Eric Reed/AP/Scanpix 129 Chris Mattison/AGE/Scanpix 134–135 Stefan Zaklin /Getty Images 145 Berit Roald/Scanpix 151 Photo Researchers/IBL 159 © Succession Picasso/BUS 2010 Bridgeman Art Library/IBL 164 Geray Sweeney/Corbis/Scanpix 179 Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead. Yevgeny Stychkin & Anatoly Bely. SharifulinValery/ ITARTASS/Corbis/Scanpix 192 Paul Grover/Rex Features/IBL 196 Giovanni Simeone/Folio 202 Mohamed Dahir/AFP/Scanpix 213 Jane Eyre, 1996. Miramax/Everett Collection/IBL

10-10-14 12.38.11


TEXTS

English – The International Shark? 8 “There is No Word For Goodbye” (Mary TallMountain) 12 The House on Mango Street (Sandra Cisernos) 15 English: A Drop in the Bucket? 17 So English Is Taking Over the Globe. So What. (Noam Cohen, New York Times) 20 FOCUS ON LISTENING: 1984 (George Orwell) 27 Globalization – A Hot Potato 31 FOCUS ON MUSIC: “Californication” (Red Hot Chili Peppers) 38 FOCUS ON LISTENING: The Hitch-Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (Douglas Adams) 41

CONTENTS

The Shark 7

WORDSHOP

Synonyms and near synonyms Loan words In-text citation Style and syntax Imagery and idioms

Things That Go Bump In the Night 45 TEXTS

Why Do People Like Being Scared? (Queendom.com) 46 Gothic 51 FOCUS ON LISTENING: CBC’s The Current: Vampire Culture 57 Victorian Sexual Morality 59 Dracula (Bram Stoker) 64 The Gothic Subculture 72 FOCUS ON MUSIC: “Bela Lugosi’s Dead” (Bauhaus) 73 FOCUS ON LISTENING: Twilight (Stephanie Meyer) 75 “The Raven” (Edgar Allan Poe) 78 WORDSHOP

Use of commas Subject-verb agreement Homophones, homographs and homonyms

3

1_BlueprintC.indd 3

10-09-28 09.41.08


Wherever You Go, There You Are 85 TEXTS

A Fish Out of Water 86 FOCUS ON MUSIC: “An Englishman in New York” (Sting) 93 Eat, Pray, Love (Elizabeth Gilbert) 96 FOCUS ON LISTENING: My Cleaner (Maggie Gee) 103 FOCUS ON LISTENING: Touch the Dragon (Karen Connelly) 105 I’m A Stranger Here Myself (Bill Bryson) 108 WORDSHOP

Neologisms -ships Metaphor and simile

Mind Your Manners 115 TEXTS

Generation Me (Jean Twenge) 116 FOCUS ON MUSIC: “Help Save the Youth of America” (Billy Bragg) 122 To the Lighthouse (Virginia Woolf) 129 Bad Manners 134 “This be the Verse” (Philip Larkin) 136 Writing the University Application Letter (Hugh Gallagher) 141 WORDSHOP

Poetic effects Puns Euphemisms, colloquialisms, slang

Literary Criticism 145 TEXTS

Why Be So Critical? 146 FOCUS ON MUSIC: “Closer To Fine” (Indigo Girls) 151 WORDSHOP

Dictionary definitions

4

1_BlueprintC.indd 4

10-09-28 09.41.08


Modernism 156 TEXTS

Modernism 156 Ulysses (James Joyce) 162 “The Second Coming” (W.B. Yeats) 166 WORDSHOP

American/British English

Postmodernism 171 TEXTS

Postmodernism 171 Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (Tom Stoppard) 177 “Thoughts About the Person from Porlock” (Stevie Smith) 183 WORDSHOP

-isms

Postcolonialism 189 TEXTS

Postcolonialism 189 FOCUS ON LISTENING: On Seeing England for the First Time (Jamaica Kincaid) 196 FOCUS ON MUSIC: “Somalia” (K’naan) 201 WORDSHOP

Irony

Feminist Criticism 207 TEXTS

Feminst Criticism 207 Jane Eyre (Charlotte Brontë) 213 Wide Sargasso Sea (Jean Rhys) 217 WORDSHOP

Inclusive language, pronoun problems, gender-neutral titles

Blue Pages 225 Wordlist 255 5

1_BlueprintC.indd 5

10-09-28 09.41.08


Foreword Blueprint C 2.0 will help you develop all the skills required by your pre-university English course curriculum, such as understanding and producing theoretical, scientific and literary English, critical reading and thinking in English, and understanding social issues and cultural differences in the English-speaking world. Blueprint C 2.0 is an up-grade of Blueprint C. Layout and instructions have been simplified and homogenized. Some texts and a whole chapter have been replaced by completely new material, and Focus on Music pieces have been added. Compared to Blueprint A and B, the new Compare & Analyze level of exercises takes comprehension and critical thinking a step further. Blueprint C also has Wordshops, which take up various linguistic topics ranging from grammar details to irony. These are followed by Wordshop Work exercises to help consolidate your understanding. The Word Work exercises have been moved, and are provided in the Teacher’s Book. The Blueprint C Blue Pages introduce Reader’s Roadmap, a companion to the well-known Writer’s Workshop and Speaker’s Corner. In Reader’s Roadmap you’ll find advice to improve your reading efficiency - useful in later university or working life. The Teacher’s Book for Blueprint C 2.0 has a number of valuable complements to the main book, providing a wide range of extension materials to suit a variety of needs and interests. These include suggested class activities, expanded and additional Wordshops with accompanying exercises, and extensions to the Writing, Speaking and Reading materials in the Blue Pages. These include illustrative writing samples, laboratory report guidance, and help with critical reading of statistics. The linguistic and literary glossary from the original Blueprint C can be found in the Teacher’s Book. Words underlined with red dots in this book are the ones explained there. In this new version of Blueprint C we have for the sake of clarity and consistency used American standards of spelling and vocabulary in all the book’s own texts. Literary extracts have, however, been reproduced in the English used by the original author. Congratulations – you are stepping onto the launch pad, and the count-down has started for your lift-off through the orbit of Blueprint C 2.0 to the English-speaking universe beyond. Enjoy the trip, and make use of the supplies we have packed for you. 6

1_BlueprintC.indd 6

10-09-28 09.41.08


THE SHARK

7

1_BlueprintC.indd 7

10-09-28 09.41.08


So English Is Taking Over the Globe. So What. New York Times – Ideas & Trends, August 6, 2006 By Noam Cohen

vid the world, the linguist Da sed last WHEN its president propo that ing say Graddol cites figures rds like month to ban English wo ple 500 million to a billion peo izza,” “helicopter,” “chat” and “p either as ], 06 speak English now [20 ntry to Iran became the latest cou language. 5 a first or second ead of English 5 try to fight the spr Under a plan he calls the ge. But as a de facto global langua ntries World English Project, cou und with interest in English aro age of ant adv would recognize the , not the world growing stronger introEnglish as a global tool and cul can eri Am by ked sto weaker – truction earlier in 10 duce English ins and advertising, the 10 tural influences ites, there schools. As a result, he wr ple peo ng you of ers mb nu increasing speakers could be “two billion new the in developing countries and .” of English within a decade ong other spread of the Internet, am per pro t tha But the danger is guists factors – there are some lin overwhelmed by the 15 English will be it? ht fig y wh : say o wh 15 and others akers, he English of non-native spe s, English, Instead, the argument goe t English acknowledged. “This is no the of m for r ple sim the ly particular have as we have known it, and n-native language used by most no foreign taught it in the past as a . ced bra em be uld sho speakers, ote. “It is a new 20 language,” he wr fight “It’s a lost cause to try to 20 resents phenomenon, and if it rep y, Lév es qu Jac d sai e,” tid against the probably any kind of triumph it is the Swiss who studies globalism at by native not a cause of celebration in gy olo hn Tec of te titu Federal Ins speakers.” FrenchLausanne and is a native nce – Leave it to a native of Fra 25 t jus is ed, add he h, glis En 25 speaker. 1990’s a country that itself in the tongues. the latest in a line of global English briefly required that 3,000 lan r the ano n bee e hav “It could nch ones – words be replaced by Fre Latin, guage; it was Greek, then r English to suggest that this simple h.” glis En is it w no French, n-Paul Nerrière, 30 be codified. Jea In a report for the British 30 I.B.M., a retired vice president of t tha dy bo nt me ern gov a Council, It uses a calls his proposal Globish. around promotes English culture

20

1_BlueprintC.indd 20

10-09-28 09.41.15


job native speaker, but get the n and nya Ke a done between, say, te a busia Korean trying to naviga p at ness deal or asking for hel ck-in. For nephew, 5 the airport che r/sister”; there is “son of my brothe you cook kitchen is “room in which casually your food”; chat is “speak za, howto each other.” Pizza is piz bish considers it to 10 ever, since Glo like taxi be an international term, or police.

THE SHARK

00 words, limited vocabulary of 1,5 erica, taken from the Voice of Am ich can among other sources, wh to express be put together clumsily ed thoughts. Little 5 more complicat plexities concern is given to the com ses that of grammar, and he propo same speakers of Globish say the make up thing in different ways to s in pronunciation. 10 for difficultie in The typical conversation to a Globish could be grating

21

1_BlueprintC.indd 21

10-09-28 09.41.15


R E A D & R E A CT

1. What factors are stoking interest in English around the world,

according to the article? 2. Describe Jean-Paul Nerrière’s invention and explain why he

invented it. 3. List two pros and two cons of Globish as described in the

article.

R E F L E CT & S H A R E

1. The article mentions that Iran tried to ban certain English

words. Do you think that nations should try to put a stop to English influences? Why, or why not? 2. What differences can you find between the Globish text of the

Gettysburg address and the original text? Which one do you prefer? Why? 3. What effects will Globish have on the creative use of English in

the future? What could happen to poetry, literature, song lyrics, drama, or film? 4. Do you think Globish will catch on? Why or why not?

C O M PA R E & A N A LY Z E

Choose another text in Blueprint C (some suggestions include Globalization – A Hot Potato on p. 31, or Victorian Sexual Morality on p. 59 or Postcolonialism on p. 189) and try translating a paragraph into Globish. The list of 1,500 words can be found online. How difficult was this to do? What was lost? What was gained?

FURTHER STUDIES

Esperanto is an example of an earlier effort to create an international language. You aren’t speaking it now, are you? So, what happened? Do some research on Esperanto. Find out about who created it, what it was intended to be used for, who uses it, and why it did not catch on as an international language.

24

1_BlueprintC.indd 24

10-09-28 09.41.18


WORDSHOP

In-text citation

In the text, Cohen often refers to what somebody else has expressed. Sometimes this is done by using that person’s exact words – called verbatim citation, and sometimes the person’s words or thoughts have been rephrased in Cohen’s own words – called paraphrase citation. When you write your own essays, reports or articles, you will inevitably be citing other writers/speakers to give your work greater authority and academic credibility. You can mix your use of verbatim and paraphrase citation, but whichever you use, you will need to find ways of varying the reporting words s/he says/said. (Note that for paraphrase citations you will always write the word that after your reporting word.) Here are some of the reporting words used in Cohen’s text, plus a few more. he said, he acknowledged, he wrote, he writes, he proposes that, (which) he calls, he considers, he added, he cites (figures), they say, the argument goes, they suggest, they assume, they argue, s/he admits, s/he agrees, s/he appears to believe, s/he believes, s/he claims, s/he comments, s/he concedes, s/he counters, s/he deliberates, s/he expresses it, s/he holds that, s/he indicates, s/he muses, s/he notes that, s/he observes, s/he postulates, s/he professes that, s/he wishes us to believe that,

THE SHARK

s/he would have us believe that, which s/he names/dubs

25

1_BlueprintC.indd 25

10-09-28 09.41.18


FOCUS ON MUSIC:

Californication By Red Hot Chili Peppers

5

10

15

20

Psychic spies from China Try to steal your mind’s elation Little girls from Sweden Dream of silver screen quotations And if you want these kind of dreams It’s Californication

ontier e the fi nal fr Space may b basement a Hollywood in e ad m ’s But it spheres you hear the Cobain can station off station to gs n so g n gi n Si r away eron’s not fa 5 And Ald ation It’s Californic

It’s the edge of the world And all of western civilization The sun may rise in the East At least it settles in the final location It’s understood that Hollywood sells Californication Pay your surgeon very well To break the spell of aging Celebrity skin is this your chin Or is that war you’re waging [Chorus] First born unicorn Hard core soft porn Dream of Californication Dream of Californication

who praise ised by those ere Born and ra ody’s been th yb er ev n o ti la opu Control of p and tion mean on vaca 10 I don’t [Chorus] ry rough road leads to a ve n io ct u tr es D n reeds creatio But it also b guitar are to a girl’s es ak u q h rt And ea bration other good vi an st ju e ’r 15 They e world ldn’t save th u co es av w And tidal rnication From Califo

20

l eon very wel Pay your surg g spell of agin To break the e rest Sicker than th st There is no te aving hat you’re cr But this is w [Chorus]

25

Marry me girl be my fairy to the world Be my very own constellation A teenage bride with a baby inside Getting high on information And buy me a star on the boulevard It’s Californication

38

1_BlueprintC.indd 38

Space – the final frontier famous quote from the TV series Startrek Cobain lead singer in Nirvana (died 1994) the spheres (poetic) the sky Alderon Princess Leia's planet in the fictional universe of Star Wars

10-09-28 09.41.21


THE SHARK 39

1_BlueprintC.indd 39

10-09-28 09.41.22


R E A D & R E A CT

1. Which two words are combined to create Californication?

What does each word mean by itself? What meaning do they create together when combined in Californication? 2. What is the connection between Hollywood and

Californication? 3. Surgeons are mentioned in verses 3 and 9. Why are surgeons so

important here? What do they do?

R E F L E CT & S H A R E

1. Why do “Little girls from Sweden dream of silver screen

quotations”? What are they talking about here? Is it true? 2. What do you think is meant by: “It’s the edge of the world and

all of western civilization”? 3. Why can’t tidal waves save the world from Californication? 4. What do they mean when they sing “everybody’s been there

and I don’t mean on vacation”? 5. There are several references to space in the song. Find them

and discuss what they mean and what they have to do with Californication.

C O M PA R E & A N A LY Z E

1. Look at the wordshop on neologisms (p. 91) and find which

type of neologism the word Californication belongs to. 2. What’s the link between Californication and globalization?

40

1_BlueprintC.indd 40

10-09-28 09.41.25


FOCUS ON LISTENING:

The Hitch-Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy By Douglas Adams

Listen to the first programme of this well-known radio series, which has also been turned into novels and other forms of entertainment. You’ll meet Arthur Dent in a difficult situation in his everyday life in England, unaware that he is about to begin a colossal space adventure. You may find that even the global environment can seem parochial, if we expand our horizons far enough! To aid your comprehension of the programme, be sure to turn to the vocabulary list on p. 256.

parochial small-mindedly provincial

bild?

41

1_BlueprintC.indd 41

10-09-28 09.41.26


Eat, Pray, Love By Elizabeth Gilbert

At 34, Elizabeth Gilbert’s life was a smoldering mess. A painful divorce, a catastrophic rebound romance and a bout of depression left her in search of some answers to life’s biggest questions. She decided to embark on a year of solitary travel to Italy, India and Indonesia. She tells us that “I wanted to explore the art of pleasure in Italy, the art of devotion in India and, in Indonesia, the art of balancing the two.” In this excerpt, we find her in Rome, experiencing the art of pleasure and wondering just how she compares with the slick, well-dressed Romans she sees around her.

I

5

10

15

20

step off the train a few days later to a Rome full of hot, sunny, eternal disorder, where – immediately upon walking out into the street – I can hear the soccer-stadium-like cheers of a nearby manifestazione, another labor demonstration. What they are striking about this time, my taxi driver cannot tell me, mainly because, it seems, he doesn’t care. “Sti cazzi,” he says about the strikers. (Literal translation: “These balls,” or, as we might say: “I don’t give a shit.”) It’s nice to be back. After the staid sobriety of Venice, it’s nice to be back where I can see a man in a leopard-skin jacket walking past a pair of teenagers making out right in the middle of the street. The city is so awake and alive, so dolled-up and sexy in the sunshine. I remember something that my friend Maria’s husband, Giulio, said to me once. We were sitting in an outdoor cafe, having our conversation practice, and he asked me what I thought of Rome. I told him I really loved the place, of course, but somehow knew it was not my city, not where I’d end up living for the rest of my life. There was something about Rome that didn’t belong to me, and I couldn’t quite figure out what it was. Just as we were talking, a helpful visual aid walked by. It was the quintessential Roman woman: a fantastically maintained, jewelry-sodden fortysomething dame wearing four-inch heels, a tight skirt with a slit as long as your arm, and those sunglasses that look like race cars (and

96

1_BlueprintC.indd 96

10-09-28 09.41.53


5

10

probably cost as much). She was walking her little fancy dog on a gem-studded leash, and the fur collar on her tight jacket looked as if it had been made out of the pelt of her former little fancy dog. She was exuding an unbelievably glamorous air of “You will look at me, but I will refuse to look at you.” It was hard to imagine she had ever, even for ten minutes of her life, not worn mascara. This woman was in every way the opposite of me, who dresses in a style my sister refers to as “Stevie Nicks Goes to Yoga Class in Her Pajamas.” I pointed that woman out to Giulio, and I said, “See, Giulio, that is a Roman woman. Rome cannot be her city and my city, too. Only one of us really belongs here. And I think we both know which one.”

WHEREVER YOU GO, THERE RE Y YOU OU A ARE RE

Ç

97

1_BlueprintC.indd 97

10-09-28 09.41.54


WORDSHOP

–ships

1. Elizabeth Gilbert writes: “the sexual self-confidence disaster of

my last relationship”. Note the use of the suffix –ship. What change in meaning does it bring to the root word, e.g. as in partner/ship? 2. Write a sentence in which you use both friend and friendship. 3. Now write three more sentences, similarly using some of these

words. champion, censor, dealer, dictator, leader, member, musician, premier, sponsor, owner 4. Relation/ship is different from the other –ships above.

Relation = 1) a person you are genetically related to, and 2) a connection between two or more people or things, organizations, countries etc., e.g. international relations, customer relations, the relation between input and output. Now, choose relation or relationship to fill in the following gaps. a) All my friends and … are coming to the party. b) Ann and John have a very loving … c) Did he and his boss have sexual …? d) I was hoping for a more intimate … e) I’ve had enough of … – I’m perfectly happy living a single life. f) In … to your inquiry, we can make the following offer. g) Labour … were under strain during the economic recession. h) Let us focus on the role of the USA in global trade … i) The … between obesity and diabetes has been well researched. j) There is a mathematical … k) This weather bears no … to anything we experienced in Africa. l) We have excellent working business … with this company. m) What exactly is your … with Gerry? n) You need to demonstrate the clear … between cause and effect.

102

1_BlueprintC.indd 102

10-09-28 09.41.54


FOCUS ON LISTENING:

My Cleaner By Maggie Gee

Mary Tendo was once the housekeeper and caregiver for the Henman family, but left her job to go back to her native Uganda. Now, Vanessa Henman, a middle-aged, middle-class London professor, has a problem. Her 22-year-old son, Justin, is too depressed to get out of bed. Justin says the only person who can cheer him up is Mary. The book explores the clash of cultures and classes that occurs when Mary comes to work for the Henmans again. In this excerpt, Mary tells us what she thinks of her life as a cleaner in England, and compares it to

WHEREVER W HEREVER Y YOU OU G GO, O, THERE YOU ARE

the life she once knew in Uganda.

103 1 10 03

1_BlueprintC.indd 103

10-09-28 09.41.55


Generation Me By Jean Twenge

American author Jean Twenge says that today’s youth are “more confident, assertive, entitled – and more miserable than ever before”. Generation Me, she says, includes anyone born in the 1970s, 1980s, or 1990s. Twenge tells us that today’s young people “take it for granted that the self comes first”, and uses her book to examine the ramifications of this widespread narcissism. In this excerpt, she takes up the question of manners and etiquette, and wonders just how “kids today” stack up when it comes to minding their Ps and Qs.

PART I

N

5

10

15

20

Labor Day a public holiday first Monday in September

ot caring what others think may also explain the decline in manners and politeness. Because we no longer believe that there is one right way of doing things, most of us were never taught the rules of etiquette. Although it’s fine to wear white shoes after Labor Day and use whatever fork you want, most etiquette was developed to provide something often lacking in modern life: respect for other people’s comfort. “Society has gotten increasingly callous and me-centered, and we’re fed up with [the results],” says Corinne Gregory, founder of a class called the PoliteChild. Diane Diehl, who runs a similar class, agrees. “Kids are being encouraged by pop culture to be disrespectful and self-destructive, and their parents are frightened and looking for help.” A high school teacher told me that she noticed her students don’t “clean up nice” – they find it difficult to not swear and to speak more formally when necessary. They talk to older people and authority figures the same way they talk to their friends. A business book relates the story of a company founder who visited one of his shops and asked a young employee how she was doing. “Well, a little hungover this morning, but okay,” she replied. Basic consideration for others seems to be on the wane as well. I am continually amazed at how many people drive down the street blasting music from their car stereos, often with their windows

116

1_BlueprintC.indd 116

10-09-28 09.42.09


5

10

MIND YOUR MANNERS

15

rolled all the way down. Some drivers soup up their car engines so they will make even more noise. Others will carry on loud conversations in hotel hallways at all hours of the day and night, or will allow the room door to swing open and then slam shut so loudly that the walls shake. In both of these situations, the perpetrators seem not to realize – or care – that their actions are disturbing dozens – and sometimes hundreds – of other people. It goes beyond manners – people today are less likely to follow all kinds of social rules. Business professor John Trinkaus finds that fewer people now slow down in a school zone, and fewer observe the item limit in a supermarket express lane. More people cut across parking lots to bypass stoplights. In 1979, 29% of people failed to stop at a particular stop sign in a New York suburb, but by 1996 a stunning 97% of drivers did not stop at all. In Trinkaus’s most ironic finding, the number of people who paid the suggested fee for lighting a candle at a Catholic church decreased from 92% to 28% between the late 1990s and the early 2000s. In

117

1_BlueprintC.indd 117

10-09-28 09.42.09


Engelska C (steg 7) för gymnasiets studieförberedande program och komvux

Engelskan står i centrum, inte bara som ett världsspråk utan även som ett globalt kulturellt fenomen. Blueprint C Version 2.0 lyfter språkinlärningen till att också spegla hur språket påverkar oss och framtiden, och ger eleven verktyg att ta del av detta. Christina McKay, Micke Brodin, Jeanette Clayton och Christopher Webster har tillsammans många år som lärare bakom sig, i kombination med lång erfarenhet som författare. Övriga komponenter: • Lärarhandledning 47-90493-8 • Facit 47-09197-3 • Lärar-CD 47-90494-5

M C Kay • Brodin • clayton • webster

Blueprint C Version 2.0 är sista steget innan fortsatta studier eller arbete. Här faller allt på plats och språkets olika verktyg används tillsammans; att jämföra och analysera går hand i hand med att tala och skriva – summan blir större än de enskilda delarna.

BLUEPRINT C

BLUEPRINT C – VERSION 2.0

BLUEPRINT C steg 7

VERSION 2.0

Christina M C Kay Best.nr 47-09196-6 Tryck.nr 47-09196-6

Micke Brodin jeanette clayton christopher webster

0_OMSLAG.indd 1

10-10-14 12.16.39

9789147091966  

VERSION 2.0 Christina M C Kay Micke Brodin jeanette clayton christopher webster steg 7

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you