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HAPPY Lennart Peterson, Chris Sutcliffe, Kjell Johansson, Kristina Bergman

HAPPY Textbook Year 8

8

YEAR

HAPPY är Gleerups kompletta läromedelspaket i engelska för grundskolans senare del 7-9

HAPPY – ett läromedelspaket med digitala möjligheter. Happy Year 8 består av sex komponenter som kompletterar varandra: Textbook Year 8

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Cd Year 8

Workbook Year 8

4067761-7

Student´s Web Year 8 4067775-4

Handy Helper Year 8 4067764-8

Författare till HAPPY är: Lennart Peterson Chris Sutcliffe Kjell Johansson Kristina Bergman

40677594.2.1_000-000_omslag.indd 2-3

4067762-4

Teacher´s Web Year 8 4067774-7

Lennart Peterson, Chris Sutcliffe, Kjell Johansson, Kristina Bergman

Med intressanta, underfundiga texter väcker Happy läslusten hos eleverna. Komplettera den tryckta boken med en innehållsrik webb som låter dig individanpassa undervisningen.

2012-12-07 09.26


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Contents 1. Let´s Talk Family

..................................... 4 Mother and daughter ........................................ 5 What are your parents like? ......................... 6 They Make Me Blush! ........................................ 8 My Parents Know what Is Best for Me! ... 10 Barnardo’s Gave Me My Life ...................... 13 Are You a Normal Teenager? ................... 16

2. Let´s Talk Incredible ........................... 18 My Dad’s a Magician ........................................ 20 The Trick that Went Wrong ..................... 22 Super Intelligence ............................................. 25 Records ….............................................................. 28

The One That Got Away ................. 30 3. Let´s Talk Australia ............................ 32 Adventures of a Backpacker ...................... 34 Dreamtime ............................................................ 36 Ned Kelly: Hero or Villain? ........................ 39 Walkabout ............................................................. 42 Waltzing Matilda ................................................ 46

4. Let´s Talk Getting Around .... 48 Having Your Own Car ................................... 50 In the Wild, Wild West.................................. 53 Hot Wheels .......................................................... 56 The Rocket ........................................................... 58 Real Walking! ........................................................ 60 Thanks for Nothing! ....................................... 60

6. Let´s Talk Friends ................................. 78 Problems, Problems… ................................... 80 C U l 8 r .................................................................. 83 Just friends? .......................................................... 85 Watching a Murder .......................................... 88 Are You a Perfect Friend? ........................... 92

Ex Poser .................................................................... 94 7. Let´s Talk New York ........................ 96 An Englishman in New York ...................... 98 A New York School ..................................... 101 The Golden Door of America ............... 104 Ground Zero .................................................... 106 New York, New York .................................. 111

8. Let´s Talk Movies

.............................. 112 My Kind of Movies ......................................... 114 Stunt Girls ........................................................... 117 Murder, My Dear! ........................................... 119 Bollywood .......................................................... 124 Tyrannosaurus Rex ....................................... 127 The First ... ......................................................... 130

Abomination.................................................. 132

The Christmas Gift .................................. 62 5. Let´s Talk History.................................. 64 The Gunpowder Plot ..................................... 66 The Great Fire of London ........................... 70 Christmas in the Trenches ......................... 73 Do You Know These Famous People? ..... 77

Reading for Pleasure

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y l i m a F k l a 1. Let´s T Jenny: Where do you think you’re going, looking like that? Pam: What do you mean? There’s nothing wrong with how I look! Jenny: You look ridiculous in that short skirt and those high heels. Pam: They’re very fashionable and very expensive and I paid for them, so I’m going to wear them whatever you say. Jenny: Where are you going this evening? Pam: I don’t know yet. I’m going round to Lorna’s house and then we’ll decide where we’re going. Jenny: Just be sensible, please. Make sure you don’t get into any trouble. Pam: Look, we know what we’re doing. We’ll be fine. Jenny: I’ll wait up for you. Pam: There’s no need for that. I’ve got my key. I’ll try not to wake you up when I get back. Jenny: Are you sure you’ve got enough money? Have you got your mobile? Why don’t you ring me later? Pam: Look. Just stop worrying about me for once! Jenny: I can’t stop worrying about you. After all, you are my mother!

ridiculous – löjlig high heels – höga klackar fashionable – modern wear – ha på sig (wore, worn) sensible – förnuftig make sure – se till (made, made)

there’s no need for that – det behövs

inte worry about – oroa sig för for once – för en gångs

skull after all – trots allt

certainly not– absolut inte simple – enkel responsible – ansvarig safety – säkerhet act – uppföra sig care for – bry sig om reason – anledning explain – förklara explanation – förklaring shut up – hålla tyst (shut, shut)

4 Family

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Mother and daughter (written by a Birmingham schoolgirl)

‘Stay out till eleven?

‘I can look after myself,

Certainly not!

I’m twelve, nearly thirteen.’

At your age

‘The way you act

I was in by eight,

you sound like you were sixteen.

In bed by nine.’

I care for you. Try to understand. There is a reason. I can explain!’

‘At your age I was ...’ Same old words.

A reason.

I only asked a simple question,

An explanation.

and I get a history lesson.

They both mean the same: I should shut up.

‘But all my friends ...’

I’m just too young...

‘Your friends aren’t my children. I’m responsible for you. It’s for your own safety.’ ‘I can look after myself,

5 Family

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A

What are your parents like? How well do you get on with your parents? Even if the answer is “very well”, there are probably times when you just wish they would leave you alone. 5

get on with – komma (got, got) överens probably – förmodligen leave alone – lämna ifred (left, left) phrase – fras

10

Parents all over the world use a number of special phrases when they’re talking to their teenage sons and daughters. This HAPPY questionnaire helps you find out what your parents are like. Do the test in your Workbook page 8.

questionnaire – frågefor-

mulär pass – klara av,

bli godkänd exam – större prov awful – förfärlig tidy – städa get off – h. sluta (got, got) använda hang out with – hänga ihop (hung, med hung)

+ HOW OFTEN DO YOUR PARENTS SAY 1. Don’t be late home! 2. If you don’t do your homework, you’ll never pass any tests or exams. 3. You don’t call that awful noise music, do you? 4. No, you can’t! You’re too young. 5. Why don’t you listen when I’m talking to you? 6. You don’t know how lucky you are. When I was your age… 7. When are you going to tidy your room? It looks as if a bomb’s hit it! 8. You can’t have everything you want! 9. How much longer are you going to look at yourself in that mirror? 10. We only want what’s best for you! 11. You’re not going to go out looking like that, are you? 12. Do you think this place is a hotel? 13. Get off the phone! 14. I don’t want you to hang out with …

6 Family

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always often sometimes never

always often sometimes never

HAVE A LAUGH On the train. Susie: Mum, what was the name of the last station we stopped at? Mum: I don’t know – can’t you see that I’m reading? Susie: Well, that’s too bad because little Benny got off there.

Daughter: Mummy, does God use our bathroom? Mummy: No, darling, why do you ask? Daughter: Because every morning Daddy bangs on the door and shouts, ‘Oh God, are you still in there’!

knock over – välta ladder – stege

Tim: Mum, come out. I’ve knocked over the ladder at the side of the house. Mum: I’m busy, Tim. Run and tell your father. Tim: He already knows. He’s hanging from the roof.

Mum: Why is Nick crying? Kevin: Because I won’t give him my piece of cake. Mum: What about his own piece? Kevin: Well, he cried when I ate that too.

7 Family

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Y

always often sometimes never

A


A

They Make Me Blush! HAPPY asked some teenagers to tell us about things their parents do that embarrass them. This is what they said.

blush – rodna embarrass – genera parents’ evening – föräldramöte subject – (skol)ämne

E

very parents’ evening at school my dad asks all the teachers what he can do to help me in my subjects. He writes everything down in a little book. Then he tries to help me. It never works as he was at school years ago and knows nothing. Damien, 15, Nottingham, England

pick up – hämta wear – ha på sig (wore, worn) coat – rock act – agera,

spela en roll pleased – nöjd

M

y dad came to pick me and two friends up from a party. I’d told him to wait in the car and we would come out. But instead he marched into the party and shouted my name over the DJ’s microphone. He was wearing his pyjamas under his coat! I wanted to die!

Grishma, 14, Swansea, Wales

M

y mum tries to act my age – not hers! She always wears the same sort of clothes as me and she talks to my friends about boys! Someone once told her that we looked more like sisters than mother and daughter. I’ve never seen her look so pleased! Paula, 15, Pretoria, South Africa

8 Family

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A

W

henever I invite anyone home my parents always insist that we have a meal with them. They spend the whole time asking my friends how they are doing at school and what lessons they like. Then they spend days telling me I should be more like my friends. John, 14, Belfast, Northern Ireland

whenever – när … än invite – bjuda in

M

y mum doesn’t let me eat school lunches. She says that they’re unhealthy and makes me a healthy packed lunch. One day I forgot to take it. I was standing at the bus stop when she rode up on her bicycle, with my lunch box, shouting “You forgot this, darling!” She was wearing a bathrobe.

Tracie, 14, Glasgow, Scotland

insist – envisas med meal – måltid spend – tillbringa, (spent, spendera spent) unhealthy – ohälsosam packed lunch – matpaket bathrobe – badrock trendy – trendig, inne realize – inse keep – h. hålla på (kept, kept) wave – vinka

M

y dad plays drums in a local pop group. He thinks he’s really cool with his long hair and “trendy” T-shirts. He doesn’t realize that hippies left Planet Earth in the 1970s. Once his group played at a friend’s party. Dad kept waving at me. People asked me if I knew him. I said I’d never seen him before in my life! Wesley, 14, Ottawa, Canada

9 Family

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B

My Parents Know what Is Best for Me! Shashi and Gita are two Indian girls who live in Mumbai. Shashi is 15 and her cousin Gita is 14. HAPPY : How do Indian girls spend their free

time?

Mumbai – (tidigare)

Bombay secret – hemlighet arranged – h. ordnat,

bestämt marriage – äktenskap common – vanlig

5

Shashi : I like to go to the cinema. We make more films in India than anywhere else in the world. There are over 800 new films a year. I’d like to see them all! Gita : I’m not as mad on films as Shashi. I like watching TV and surfing the net. Shashi : Once a week we both go to a dance class.

10

Gita : And I also go to classes in painting and singing. I guess I’m artistic! HAPPY : Do you ever date boys?

15

Gita : No! Dating in India does not happen much. Most Indian parents don’t let their daughters date boys. Shashi : My parents would go mad if they ever found out I was dating someone.

20

Gita : Sometimes girls date boys in secret. But I wouldn’t want to do something my parents wouldn’t like. HAPPY : At what age do people get married in

India? Gita : Women usually marry at 18 and men at 21. 25

Shashi : That’s the normal age in cities and towns. In villages in the country it’s often younger. HAPPY : Will you have arranged marriages?

Shashi : Yes. Arranged marriages are very common in India. My parents will look

H

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B

for a suitable husband for me. They will look for someone who is of the same religion and who has a good job. 5

Gita : Of course, parents also look for a man who will be a good husband and look after his wife and his family. My parents know the sort of person I am and they will find me someone I will learn to love.

suitable – passande matchmaker–äktenskps-

HAPPY : How will they arrange this? 10

15

mäklare

Shashi : They may use a matchmaker, usually an old woman, or go to a marriage agency. Or they may look through advertisements in newspapers and magazines. Gita : We will both have a large dowry, which will help our parents to find us good husbands.

marriage agency – äktenskaps-

förmedling advertisement – annons magazine – veckotidning

H

dowry – hemgift

An Indian wedding ceremony.

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B

HAPPY : What is a dowry?

Gita : A dowry is money or gifts, which my family will give to my future husband and to his family. 5

gift – present

HAPPY : Doesn’t anyone marry for love in

future – h. blivande unfortunately – tyvärr,

10

rare – ovanligt trust – lita på agree – hålla med

15

might – skulle kanske fewer – färre divorce – skilsmässa decide – bestämma

(sig)

India? Gita : Yes, some people do, mostly in the cities, but it’s quite rare in the country.

olyckligtvis harder – svårare

experience – erfarenhet

Shashi : Unfortunately if a family doesn’t have money, it means that it will be harder for them to find a husband for their daughters.

20

25

Shashi : I know some people find the idea of arranged marriages strange. I don’t. I trust my parents and I know they will find me someone suitable. They have much more experience of the world than I do. Gita : I agree. My parents know what is best for me. If I had to choose for myself I wouldn’t know what sort of things to look for in a husband. I might just go for good looks. Shashi : I’m looking forward to my marriage. And remember that there are far fewer divorces in arranged marriages than in marriages where the young couple have decided themselves.

12 Family

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C

Barnardo’s Gave Me My Life

5

Not everyone is fortunate enough to have a family. In Victorian Britain many children who were orphans or who came from broken homes got help from Dr Barnardo’s. Who was Dr Barnardo and what did he do? be fortunate – ha tur enough – nog orphan – föräldralös broken home – splittrad

familj childhood – barndom © Barnardo's Image Archive.

youth – ungdom

10

15

20

seem – verka troublemaker – bråkstake easily – lätt bored – uttråkad pass – klara

Thomas Barnardo was born in Dublin in 1845. Not much is known about his childhood and youth. He seems to have been a bit of a troublemaker at school and he was easily bored in lessons. He didn’t pass any exams and left school at sixteen.

exam – prov, examen preach – predika missionary – missionär continue – fortsätta

Just before his seventeenth birthday, Barnardo became what we would now call a “born again Christian”. He started teaching Bible classes at a school for poor children in Dublin and began preaching in the YMCA*. In 1866, aged twenty-one, Barnardo decided to become a missionary. He wanted to work in China, but first he decided to go to London to be trained as a doctor. There he lived in a poor part of the city called Stepney. He continued to do missionary work among the poor people. One night he met a young boy called Jim Jarvis. This meeting changed Barnardo’s life – and the

* YMCA – Young Men’s Christian Association = KFUM-kristliga föreningen av unga män

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C

lives of many young boys and girls in the years to follow.

5

homeless – hemlös condition – förhållande

10

dressed in – klädda i rags – trasiga kläder warmth – värme doorway – port(gång) starve – svälta beg – tigga

15

raise – samla in within – inom dozen – dussin (12 st) physically – fysiskt shelter – husrum

20

trade – yrke

25

30

35

40

Jim took him to the places where poor, homeless children slept. Barnardo was shocked by the terrible conditions Jim showed him. Children were dressed in rags and were lying together for warmth in old, empty buildings and open doorways. Jim told him of life on the streets of London and how children were starving and had to beg for food or become thieves. Barnardo was so shocked by what he had seen and heard that he decided to try to help the poor children of London. In 1866 he started his first ‘ragged school’ in a donkey stable at Hope Place. It was called a ‘ragged school’ because the clothes the children wore were ragged. By March 1868 Barnardo had raised enough money to start his first ‘home’, also at Hope Place. After receiving a £1,000 donation (then a huge amount of money) from a supporter in the same year, he decided not to go to China but continue his work in London instead. In 1870 Barnardo opened his first home for boys at Stepney Causeway. Within seven years there were more than a dozen homes for boys, and in October 1873 Barnardo opened the first home for girls. Three years later he opened a Village Home for Boys, which took in more than 1,000 orphans. Barnardo worked as hard as he could to raise more money. When he died in 1905 more than 8,500 children were living in the 96 homes he had set up around the UK. About 1,300 of them were physically handicapped. The homes gave the children food and shelter, and they learnt a trade. Thus, when the children left the homes and started to live on their

H

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C

own, they could make enough money to look after themselves.

5

10

Barnardo continued to open more ‘ragged schools’. One school, the Copperfield Road Ragged School, taught and gave breakfast and dinner every day to 1,075 children between the ages of 5 and 10. 2,460 children went to the school’s Sunday school, attending church services and studying the Bible as well as eating a hearty Sunday lunch – which might possibly have been their only decent meal of the week.

make money – tjäna pengar (made, made) attend – delta i

15

church service – gudstjänst hearty – riklig decent – ordentlig community – samhälle;

samfund disadvantaged – som har det

dåligt ställt slogan – valspråk © Barnardo's Image Archive.

20

The last Barnardo’s Home closed over 30 years ago, but the organisation is still looking after young people like Jim Jarvis. Today Barnardo’s works with over 140,000 children and their families within the community, through more than 360 projects based all over the United Kingdom. Barnardo’s continues to help disadvantaged children, teenagers and their families and fulfilling its slogan – “Giving children back their Future”.

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A N U O O R Y M E R A EENAGER? AL T Take the HAPPY Test to find out!

tidy – städa, göra

i ordning offer – erbjuda sig do the ironing – stryka furious – rasande ruined – förstört for ever – för alltid polish – putsa arrange – planera behave – uppföra sig marvellous – underbar suit – passa truth – sanning

1. One day you get home from school to find your mother has tidied and cleaned your room. Do you a. thank her very much and offer to do the ironing after tea? b. get furious and say that now it will be impossible to find anything and your life has just been ruined forever? c. tell her she forgot to polish the mirror?

behind their back – bakom

deras rygg shop assistant – affärs-

biträde opinion – åsikt

2. You have arranged to go out for the afternoon with some friends when your parents tell you that your Auntie Alice is coming to visit and you have to stay in. Do you a. ask your parents to give you money to behave well? b. say ‘How nice!’ and offer to bake a cake? c. shout at them and say that none of your friends will ever speak to you again and your life has just been ruined forever?

3. You are shopping with a friend who is going to buy an expensive jacket. Your friend thinks the jacket is marvellous. You think it is horrible and doesn’t suit your friend at all. Do you a. tell your friend the truth and risk him/her saying you’ve just ruined his/her life forever? b. let your friend buy the jacket and look forward to laughing at him/her behind their back? c. ask the shop assistant for his/her opinion?

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4. You and your best friend both want to go out with the same person. Unfortunately this person invites your best friend to a party. Do you a. start spreading lies about them? b. wish them both much happiness for the future? c. stay in your room listening to Bon Jovi or any other of your favourites and feeling they’ve just ruined your life forever? 5. Your young brother has borrowed your favourite, very expensive T-shirt and somehow he managed to get grease from his bike all over it. Do you a. tell him not to worry about it and to stop crying? b. tell him that if he doesn’t buy you another one exactly alike immediately you will ruin his life forever? c. tell him you’re going to put all his clothes where he can't find them until he buys you a new one? 6. You are out with friends when your mother comes rushing over and gives you a big hug and kiss. Do you say a. “How lovely to see you, Mummy!”? b. “Who is this mad woman?” ? c. “You wait. When I get home.Your life. Ruined. Forever.” ?

unfortunately – olyckligtvis invite – bjuda in spread lies – sprida lögner (spread, spread) happiness – lycka future – framtid borrow – låna worry – oroa sig immediately – omedelbart until – tills hug – kram mad – galen

Scores: Question 1: Question 2: Question 3: Question 4: Question 5: Question 6:

a – 1; b – 3; c – 2 a – 2; b – 1; c – 3 a – 3; b – 2; c – 1 a – 2; b – 1; c – 3 a – 1; b – 3; c – 2 a – 1; b – 2; c – 3.

Now turn to page 136 to see if you are a normal teenager.

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HAPPY Lennart Peterson, Chris Sutcliffe, Kjell Johansson, Kristina Bergman

HAPPY Textbook Year 8

8

YEAR

HAPPY är Gleerups kompletta läromedelspaket i engelska för grundskolans senare del 7-9

HAPPY – ett läromedelspaket med digitala möjligheter. Happy Year 8 består av sex komponenter som kompletterar varandra: Textbook Year 8

4067759-4

Cd Year 8

Workbook Year 8

4067761-7

Student´s Web Year 8 4067775-4

Handy Helper Year 8 4067764-8

Författare till HAPPY är: Lennart Peterson Chris Sutcliffe Kjell Johansson Kristina Bergman

40677594.2.1_000-000_omslag.indd 2-3

4067762-4

Teacher´s Web Year 8 4067774-7

Lennart Peterson, Chris Sutcliffe, Kjell Johansson, Kristina Bergman

Med intressanta, underfundiga texter väcker Happy läslusten hos eleverna. Komplettera den tryckta boken med en innehållsrik webb som låter dig individanpassa undervisningen.

2012-12-07 09.26

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