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Staff list as at 31 March 2012 CAPE MENTAL HEALTH including the Administration Department, Donor Development Department, Finance Department, Corporate Social Work, Garden Cottage, Learning for Life, MindMatters SA, Sexual Abuse Victim Empowerment (SAVE), Social Development Services, Public Education and the Volunteers Programme Christopher Adonis • Rochelle Bailey • Carol Bosch • Wayne Bruton • Aadilah Buhardien Beth Chaplin • Ingrid Daniels (Director) • Theresa Daniels • Stacey de Kock Feroza de Leeuw • Beverley Dickman • Ntombentle Dlokovu • Gillian Douglas Ferial Edwards • Sandra Ellis • Joyce-Lyn Esterhuizen • Taryn Feinberg • Tabile Figlan Yvonne Foster • Lindy Graham • Karen Hans • Derick Houston • Jeanine Hundermark Amina Jacobs • Faranaaz Jacobs • Colleen Jephthah • Jeffeynore Jordaan • Ekin Kench Gadija Koopman (Deputy Director) • Nokuthula Krwece • Sharon Malander Zukiswa Malgas • Susan Manson • Esterline Martin • Nolwando Matebese Noxolo Matoman • Pumza Mbanzi • Stella Mbwana • Caroline Mills • Maleeka Mokallik Avril Norton • Kulthum Roopen • Lucinda Saal • Sharon Santon • Birgit Schweizer Andreas Selela • Sheila Selfe • Nokothula Shabalala • Gail Shapiro • Steven Sityo Teri-Sue Smith • Elroy Solomon • Albert Vallay • Brigitte van der Berg • Jenny Walters Nadine Williams • Chesna Zietsman PSYCHOSOCIAL REHABILITATION (PSR) including Fountain House SA, the Rainbow Foundation and Kimber House

SPECIAL EDUCATION AND CARE CENTRES including Erika, Heideveld (previously Bonteheuwel and Ethembeni) and Imizamo Yethu Ester Aloni • Ntombekhaya Banzi • Xoliswa Buqa • Bernidine Chilwane • Alma Dammert Nomavenge Diko • Nomawethu Dotwana • Nomaneli Hlangu • Faith Jones Ndileka Jovile • Thandi Kente • Thami Majodina • Mzendaba Mathokazi N Shiela Mguda • Nomakwezi Mhlawuli • David Monakali • Nombongo Mpateni Ntombomzi Mzolisa • Khanyisa Ngobeni • Denzil Prins • Gwen Rosen Igshaan Samsodien • Joyce Sethole • Kutala Soqaga • Mtobeli Soqaga • Thokazi Tyutu TRAINING WORKSHOPS UNLIMITED (TWU) including TWU Training Workshops in Athlone, Mitchells Plain, Retreat and Khayelitsha (Nonceba), Garden Pot Centre, the Siyakwazi Integration Company and the Eagles Project Faisal Bawa • Thomas Bezuidenhout • Kirsten Blignaut • Norman Blignaut Emma Blommaert • Thozama Boni • Craig Chambers • Gwendoline Daniels John Daries • Faith de Klerk • Pauline Groepes • Chantal Hess • Calvin Isaacs Cecilia Jackson • Russell Jones • Veliswa Lungaphi • Thembeka Mabe • Nomava Malaya Tasneem Manuel • Andile Mayila • Jacqueline Mbwana • Agnes Meintjies Simon Mngomeni • Denzil Murtz • Sandra Nicolaai • Shamila Ownhouse George Philander • Kathy Plessie • Stéphan Pretorius • Shavonne Samaai Berenice Tempers • Santie Terreblanche • Janine Williams

Roshan Abrahams • Jenna-Lee Boer • Claudia Cogill • Hazel Cox • Faldelah Fillander Suzanne Solomons • Nondibane Mdyidwa • René Minnies • Nocawe Mxobo

Cape Mental Health Board President: Dr Mandla Tshabalala • Vice-President: Mr Ken Sturgeon Members: Gary Pond (Chairperson) • Hombakazi Zide (Deputy Chairperson) Alan Crisp (Treasurer) • David Lotz (Legal Advisor) Patrick Ntsime (Development Bank of SA) • Phumla Satyo (WCED) Shona Sturgeon (President of the S A Federation for Mental Health) Gwendoline Daniels (Consumer Representative: Intellectual Disability) Oscar January (Consumer Representative: Psychiatric Disability)

Honorary Psychiatrists Dr Sean Baumann • Prof. Tuviah Zabow

REG. NO. 003-264 NPO • PBO REFERENCE NUMBER 18/11/13/4456 ADDRESS 22 IVY STREET OBSERVATORY 7925 POSTAL ADDRESS PRIVATE BAG X7 OBSERVATORY 7935 SOUTH AFRICA TEL +27 21 447 9040 • FAX +27 21 448 8475 EMAIL info@cmhs.co.za • WEBSITE www.capementalhealth.co.za

all about ability Annual Review 2011/2012


about disability 4%

of South Africans live with intellectual disability As Cape Mental Health approaches its centenary in 2013, we are renewing our efforts to bring about a mind-shift in society, to challenge the stigma and prejudice that persons with mental disabilities encounter almost daily, to remove the environmental and structural barriers that prevent their full participation in society, and to improve their access to services.

20%

of South Africans will experience mental illness in their lifetimes

the biggest monitory group

in our country is that of people with mental ill-health and mental disability

Cape Mental Health − all about ability On 20 March 2012 Cape Mental Health led a march to the Western Cape Legislature to highlight the plight of persons with intellectual disability. Seven-year-old René of Manenberg was amongst the marchers, hair neatly done in ponytails and sporting her ‘new kid on the block’ bib. She may not have understood what all the fuss was about, but the march was held to uphold the human rights of persons with intellectual disability. René attends our new Heideveld Special Education and Care Centre — she enjoys the activities in the classroom, the sand therapy, building blocks and puzzles, and being massaged. She can eat on her own, walks with support, and understands when people speak to her. She can’t talk yet and relies on others to interpret her needs, likes and dislikes. Her future is uncertain, but we believe in her right to participate fully in all aspects of society and in opportunities for development. It is for this ‘new kid on the block’, as well as for thousands of persons with intellectual disability and psychiatric disability in the Western Cape, that Cape Mental Health has chosen the tagline ‘all about ability’. This reflects our belief in identifying and nurturing ability, no matter how modest, and in seeing possibility where some may only see challenges and obstacles.

this group is LESS LIKELY to • enjoy safe and suitable housing • access public transport and amenities • receive effective support and care • obtain appropriate, quality education • generate income or be employed

and is MORE LIKELY to be • poor and reliant on social security • socially isolated and rejected • neglected, abused, and denied justice • deprived of play and leisure activities • denied a say in matters that affect them


About 2011/2012 The past year has placed Cape Mental Health at the forefront of a dynamic movement to promote global awareness of mental health issues. Our reach has extended beyond the boundaries of the Western Cape to national and International levels. We played an important role in hosting the ‘African Footprint in Global Mental Health 2011’ World Mental Health Congress, and flighted our 17th Cape Town International Kite Festival which celebrated ‘One Sky, One World - Mental Health for All’ - all in one week! We flew to congresses in Germany and Sweden to further our international partnerships, and were invited by the ICCD, an international clubhouse movement for people with psychiatric disabilities, to provide support to the development of the first clubhouse in Ghana. “In 2007 South Africa was one of the first countries to sign and ratify the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its optional protocol − but now, more than four years on, and despite progress in legislation specific to the rights of persons with disabilities, our country is still a long way off from providing them with the social justice, equal treatment and protection that are their constitutional rights.

We adopted the slogan ‘all about ability’ and incorporated this into our logo. In addition, our ‘kite motif’, which originated with our annual kite festival, was adopted by the SA Federation for Mental Health and our 16 ‘sister’ mental health societies as a symbol of upliftment and recovery. We received monitoring and evaluation visits by the Departments of Health, Social Development, and Agriculture — and enjoyed visits from various funders and stakeholders in the disability sector. The feedback has been gratifying and has spurred us on to even greater heights in 2012/2013.

“Our focus therefore has to be on improving access to mental health care, realizing the potential of people with mental disabilities, and empowering them so that they can be advocates for themselves and speak on behalf of those who are not able to do so.”

“Cape Mental Health is a well functioning organisation … It has relevant policies and legislative prescripts in place. Its financial practices are sound and promote transparency and accountability. The Board members and Management Committee understand their roles and responsibilities. The management also ensures that corporate governance is promoted.”

Ingrid Daniels, CMH Director

Extract from the Monitoring & Evaluation Report of the Monitoring and Evaluation Directorate of the Department of Social Development (M & E Team: Metro South region) on the performance monitoring conducted on 26 and 27 October 2011

“We view disability as a human rights issue and believe that people with mental disabilities should be afforded the same rights as every other citizen. “This poses a challenge to us to do everything in our power to promote greater understanding of the needs of persons with mental disabilities. If people with disabilities can access skills training and employment opportunities, the burden on State resources would be reduced as they will no longer rely solely on social security grants. We need to equip our service-users for a meaningful, socially-responsible and economically active future.” Gadija Koopman, CMH Deputy Director


African Footprint in Global Mental Health In 2009 the SA Federation for Mental Health won the bid to host the 2011 World Mental Health Congress of the World Federation for Mental Health. Over the next two years the Local Organising Committee, capably led by Ingrid Daniels, Director of Cape Mental Health, ensured that the congress was the most successful world mental health congress yet, and that Africa could leave its footprint in global mental health. A full programme included 14 keynote lectures, 18 symposia, 86 free papers, 11 workshops, 4 video presentations, over 10 parallel sessions daily, 2 film evenings covering 4 South African films with a mental health theme, an Art Exhibition by mental health service users showcasing 60 exhibits, a Gala Dinner at The Gold of Africa Museum in Cape Town, and 7 tours to 22 mental health facilities as far afield as Atlantis. The theme of the congress, African Footprint in Global Mental Health, prompted a focus on issues such as poverty, HIV/AIDs, and the African ethics of interconnectedness, as well as global phenomena like terrorism, tsunamis and migration. The congress placed the spotlight on the global burden of disease crisis and sent out an international call to upscale and prioritise mental health services in lower and middle-income countries. Prof. Brian Robertson of the University of Cape Town and Chairperson of the Scientific Programme reported that anxiety and depression are the most common mental health problems in South Africa: 1 in 10 women and 1 in 20 men will have an episode of depression in their lifetime. Yet there are simply not enough mental health facilities to meet this overwhelming need for effective mental health services. Over 1000 delegates registered and attendance varied between 800 and 900, consisting of psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, medical practitioners, researchers, policy makers, concerned citizens and consumers. There were 485 delegates from South Africa of whom 30 were from Cape Mental Health. The congress was preceded, on 17 October, by the 2nd Summit of the Global Movement for Mental Health. Prof. Vikram Patel and other leaders of the Global Movement presented on the issues of mental health globally, with specific focus on low and middle-income countries. The meeting concluded with the launch of the Second Lancet Series on Global Mental Health.

“The congress has provided a platform for us to promote interventions that are aimed at improving mental health and alleviating poverty through advocacy, the implementation of mental health policies, mental health promotion, early childhood development, psychosocial rehabilitation, skills training and creation of employment opportunities.” Ingrid Daniels, WMHC 2011 LOC Chair

“I have to express my appreciation to all persons here in Cape Town for their participation in such a wonderful conference and the hard work of the Organising Committee in making this Congress a success.” Deborah Wan, President, World Federation for Mental Health, 2011-2013

17-21 October 2011 CTICC, Cape Town

Reach 61

the number of countries represented

520

the number of African delegates out of 1000

77

the number of delegates from developing countries

257

the number of mental health care users attending

“Dear Ingrid, I wish to congratulate you and your team on a very informative and successful congress. Those health professionals that missed the congress must be poorer for the experience. It was a delicious melting pot of a variety of mental health professionals which produced an exquisite cuisine of recovery and rehabilitation.” Dr Tyrone Burgess, New Zealand


March for Human Rights for persons with intellectual disability On Tuesday, 20 March 2012, Cape Mental Health led a march to the Western Cape Legislature (ahead of Human Rights Day) to highlight the plight of persons with intellectual disability and to deliver a memorandum to Premier Helen Zille. The memorandum called for the recognition and realisation of the human rights of persons with intellectual disability. South Africa has made great strides in policy and legislation with respect to the principle of inclusion of people with disabilities. We think particularly of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa (No 108 of 1996), the Integrated National Disability Strategy (1997), The Promotion of Equality and Prevention of Discrimination (Act 4 of 2000), The White Paper on Special Needs Education (July 2001), The Employment Equity Act (Act No 55 of 1998), and the Mental Health Care Act (Act 17 of 2002). Sadly, despite the promulgation of these laws and the adoption of policies, people with intellectual disability are still being discriminated against. Children with severely and profoundly intellectual disability are not yet being afforded access to basic education by the Department of Education, and the subsidy received from the Department of Health has thus far not kept abreast of inflation. Furthermore, inadequate resources and a lack of protocols by the Department of Education make the early detection of learners with learning disabilities impossible. The result is that learners in the 14– to 18-year age group are without the opportunities to which the Bill of Rights entitles them. The Employment Equity Act of 1998 promotes affirmative action of people with disabilities in the workplace and, in support of this, government has set the target that 2% of the work force should be people with disabilities. To date, however, less than 1% of the South African work force comprises people with disabilities. Women and children with intellectual disability who are survivors of sexual assault experience extreme difficulty in accessing the justice system as they are often not regarded as credible witnesses. If it were not for Cape Mental Health’s Sexual Abuse Victim Empowerment (SAVE) programme, these complainants would not be afforded their day in court. Premier Zille addressed the assembled group from Cape Mental Health, undertaking to do her very best to ensure that everybody has access to equal rights. She highlighted that the government has limited means to address many needs and that the government’s job would be easier if society succeeded in drastically reducing the burden of preventable disease. Turning to Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) which is 100% preventable, she stated that even within the disability sector, prevention is a key weapon. “The Western Cape and Northern Cape have the highest incidences of FAS in the world. If women drink while they’re pregnant, they damage their babies’ brains which results in intellectual impairment and we must prevent that.”

“We must start spending much more money on the diseases and conditions that people can’t prevent and disability is one of those conditions. It will take an effort from all quarters of society, driven by strategic partnerships, to tackle the social ills that both contribute to the incidence of disability and drain resources away from service provision to support unpreventable disability.” Premier Helen Zille

The memorandum is being studied by the Human Rights Advocateur in the Office of the Premier in order to make recommendations to the Premier and relevant departments in the Western Cape Government on how to address the points raised.


Heideveld heralds a new era in special education and care Cape Mental Health celebrated the opening of its new Heideveld Special Education and Care Centre on Tuesday, 29 November 2011, with invited guests, funders, parents, children and staff. This was the culmination of six years of researching best practice models in facilities for children with severe and profound disabilities, meticulous planning, and fundraising for what had seemed like an unattainable target. The official opening of the centre was an emotional occasion, celebrating the right of children with disabilities to attend a facility in a community-based environment that is custom-made for their care and education. Doubly disadvantaged by disability and poverty, these children stand little chance of receiving the professional care and education they deserve or developing to their full potential without the services provided by organisations such as Cape Mental Health. The Heideveld centre provides a secure, enabling and compassionate environment in which 60 children with severe and profound intellectual and physical disabilities can advance their abilities. The new centre replaces two centres that previously operated from rented accommodation in Athlone and from prefabricated buildings in Guguletu. Children who had previously attended these centres are bused in from the surrounding communities. The children benefit from fully equipped classrooms, snoozle rooms for multi-sensory stimulation, a sunny play area, a wellequipped kitchen and laundry to facilitate school feeding, and bathroom facilities that suit their particular needs. A comprehensive developmental programme includes individual assessment and skills development by trained and skilled staff, specialist support and clinics, and the provision of much-needed parent relief and support.

Above left to right: Elinor Kern of Tshikululu Social Investments representing the Anglo American Chairman’s Fund; Amelia Jones, Chief Executive Officer of the Community Chest of the Western Cape; Ingrid Daniels, Director of Cape Mental Health; and Prof. Alfred Nevhutanda, Chairman of the National Lotteries Board

The team responsible for bringing our dream to fruition consisted of CMH staff, in partnership with Robyn Millenaar of Millenaar Architects and Miles Warren of Hope & Warren Quantity Surveyors who both provided an excellent and professional service. The appointment of Power Construction made for a remarkably glitch-free project. Generous funding of R5 million from the National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund (NLDTF) as the primary funder and a grant of R2 million from the Anglo American Chairman’s Fund as secondary funder made this capital project possible. Anne-Marie and Mario Delicio of Dematech SA made a generous contribution towards equipping the playground of the centre. We are profoundly grateful to these funders who recognise the rights of our children to education and choose to invest in their development and potential.

“It’s hard being a parent of a disabled child, but I am happy to pay school fees for my son to be able to attend a centre of such quality.“ Mrs Josephine July, mother of eighteen-year-old Anton

“Every one of these little ones has the potential to do and be something. We don’t know what that is. We can only provide them with opportunities to develop their personality, talents, mental and physical abilities so that they can realise their full potential.” Gadija Koopman, CMH Deputy Director


Right to Education for children with mental disability The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability (CRPD) was adopted on 31 December 2006. South Africa, with one of the best Bill of Rights in the world, signed and ratified the Convention on 30 November 2007. But despite Article 24 - Right to Education of the UN CRPD, children with severe and profound intellectual disability have remained excluded from education provided by the Department of Education. By excluding them from State schools on the basis of a straight line IQ cut-off, through the allocation of considerably less funding by the Department of Health per learner than that allocated for children with mild to moderate intellectual disability or for children without a disability, and by not providing an approved educational programme for special care centres or accredited training courses for caregivers, the government has failed them. Years of lobbying initiated by Cape Mental Health and taken further by the Western Cape Forum for Intellectual Disability (WCFID) led, finally, to a landmark judgment on 11 November 2010 by the High Court of South Africa (Western Cape High Court, Cape Town). The judgment (Case no: 18678/2007) ruled that the State, by failing to provide quality basic education for children with mental disabilities, had violated their rights to education, equality, dignity and protection from neglect and degradation. The Court ordered the State to take reasonable measures to ensure that “every child in the Western Cape who is severely and profoundly intellectually disabled has affordable access to a basic education of an adequate quality” and to report back to the Court on its progress towards implementing the order. The Right to Education Task Team was formed, comprising the WCFID and Mental Health NGOs like Cape Mental Health, and meets on a monthly basis with the newly constituted Interdepartmental Task Team of the Provincial Government to establish what progress is being made by the various government Departments, viz. Health, Education, Social Development, and Public Works and Transport, in implementing the High Court ruling. The Right to Education Task Team has decided to adopt and implement the Learning for Life skills training model that we have developed and refined over many years at our special education and care centres as a curriculum for all Special Care Centres. It has also recommended that Learning for Life plays a vital role in the training of all care centre staff in the province where appropriate. In addition, the Department of Public Works has indicated that it intends using the building design of our new Heideveld Centre as a model for the construction/upgrading of other facilities in future.

“Cape Mental Health carries an enormous responsibility to right the wrongs of the past and provide our children with severe and profound intellectual disability with the best education and care that we can provide. As human rights activists we recognise their inalienable right to receive appropriate and quality services — we have to ensure that every barrier which limits access to education is removed, and that their education benefits from being an integral part of mainstream education planning.” Ingrid Daniels, CMH Director

Above left to right: Sershan Naidoo, Divisional Manager: Beneficiary & Player Relations, & Media Liaison, National Lotteries Board/National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund; and Ingrid Daniels, CMH Director


Figure Wise

Profile of CMHS Board (11)

Profile of CMHS Employees(125)

3 347

Gender

Gender

the number of index service-users who benefit from our direct services

25

20%

100

80%

15 061

the total number of people reached by our holistic family-focused interventions

R20.5 million

Board members with disabilities 4 (2 consumer representatives)

the total expenditure budget for Cape Mental Health in 2011/2012

488

the human resources driving Cape Mental Health — including Board members, staff, volunteers and Learnerships

R1 million

the cost of keeping a fleet of vehicles on the road

7.2%

33% African

41

Population distribution 4

African

2

Coloured

5

White

52% Coloured

65 15% White

19

Educational profile (National Qualifications Framework) 44% NQF Level 1 (GET)

55

Learnerships (100)

0.1 %

the percentage of service-users who pay for our services

9

Population distribution

72%

the portion of our budget allocated to staff costs/professional fees

Employees with disabilities

22% NQF Levels 2-4 (FET)

27

34% NQF Levels 5-8 (FET)

43

Occupational Categories x10 persons with disabilities

14

11%

22 13 7

Project Managers/Coordinators

18% 6%

Health Professionals/Psychologists

49 20

Social Workers

Social Auxiliary Workers

10%

39% 16%

Health Professionals/Psychologists

Admin/Technical Staff


Profile of CMHS Volunteers (252)

Profile of CMHS Beneficiaries Gender

CMHS Intervention Levels & Beneficiary numbers

Countries of origin (9 countries) South Africa

217

Germany

23

USA

4

Scandinavia

5

Canada

1

Belgium

1

UK

1

52%

Life Skills Training 48%

Information Dissemination

Counseling

33% African 55% Coloured

210

Volunteer Programme

1

Psycho-social Rehabilitation

18

Training Workshops Unlimited

8

Special Education & Care

15

501 1 009

Early Intervention

Population distribution

Programme Placement (5 focus areas) Kite Festival

Prevention

10% White 2% Asian

2 293

Early Childhood Development

233

Family Support

155

Support Groups

320

Service-user Empowerment

498

Income generation

687

Age groups (4 categories) Alternative Care

Age groups (4 categories)

16% Children

0 - 18

Under 18

22

19 - 25 years

152

26 - 35 years

41

35 and older

37

Group Homes

40% Youth

19 - 30

43% Adults

31 - 65

7,836 hours (980 work days) 1% Older persons

65+

Placement of SAGE Net/ Weltwaerts Volunteers (50) First half of financial year: 6 at Cape Mental Health & 26 country-wide Second half of financial year: 2 at Cape Mental Health & 16 country-wide

Mental Health Profile

4%

56% Persons with Intellectual Disability 40% Persons with Psychiatric Disability Persons with emotional adjustment problems

19


Cape Mental Health’s Project of the Year 2011 Cape Mental Health leads the way in the field of self-advocacy by persons with mental disability in South Africa. It is appropriate then that the Self-Advocate Supporters at Cape Mental Health were awarded the Project of the Year Award for 2011.

Shamila Ownhouse (left), Carol Bosch, and Santie Terreblanche (right) were nominated for their work as self-advocate supporters, empowering service-users to have their voices heard at the SA Federation for Mental Health and Cape Mental Health Boards, various meetings, conferences and networks. This winning team performed this function, believing in the right to self-determination of persons with intellectual disability and preparing them to participate in meetings, follow procedures and be involved in decision-making. These tasks were performed with excellence, supported by the values of human rights and a commitment to removing the barriers that limit service-users’ participation in decisions that impact on their dignity.

This nomination is unusual on two accounts. Firstly, the staff supporters do not belong to a separate project, but carry out the functions of self-advocate supporters in the course of their respective job descriptions. Secondly, the nomination was made by a service-user, Gwendoline Daniels — an act which in itself testifies to the success of their self-advocacy work. Santie Terreblanche, General Manager of Training Workshops Unlimited (TWU), became a convert to self-advocacy when she attended the Lebenshilfe Exchange in 2005 to Berlin, Germany. Subsequently Cape Mental Health developed a policy on ServiceUser Participation in the South African context — in particular the role of the supporter and the structures needed to integrate this at programme and project level.

Self-advocacy — from principle to practice Service User Participation is now entrenched at TWU. Trainees receive advocacy training and opportunities to participate in decision making on the management and running of the TWU Workshops through trainee committees that are fully operational at our Athlone, Retreat, Khayelitsha and Mitchells Plain Workshops. A staff supporter supports the elected committee members as required at each Workshop and at the monthly meetings of the committees. The TWU Trainee Council, consisting of all the Chairpersons of the different Trainee Committees and the Community Group, meets quarterly with the TWU General Manager, accompanied by their individual supporters. The Chairperson of the TWU Council, Gwendoline Daniels, is supported in representing persons with Intellectual Disability on the Board of Cape Mental Health, the South African Mental Health Advocacy Movement (SAMHAM), and on the Board and Executive Committee of the SA Federation for Mental Health. Gwendoline is not a ‘token’ Board member; she takes full responsibility for her duties and was a worthy recipient of the S A Federation for Mental Health’s Special Achievement Award last year for service-user participation in the mental health field.

“It’s hard to be the supporter because it’s not about you; you are there to assist you but you shouldn’t overstep the mark. Beforehand you can assist with preparation for the interview or meeting or conference, but in the actual situation you must sit back and let that person be in charge. You must shine the light on service-users and enable them to take their full place in the congregation. You as the supporter should be almost invisible.”

“It’s all about EQUAL opportunities for persons with intellectual disability, not PREFERENTIAL treatment. Both extremes of either excluding service-users or giving them preferential treatment — work against their integration. To be fully integrated and treated equally they have to take responsibility, they have to learn about the social norms and the rules that govern interactions.” Santie Terreblanche, General Manager of TWU

Shamila Ownhouse, Siyanceda and Learnerships job coach


Cape Mental Health service-users with psychiatric disability run the Cape Consumer Advocacy Body (CCAB), a self-advocacy initiative, chaired by service-user Oscar January, with 34 members serving on the General Committee and 6 on the Executive Committee. Highlights for Oscar and Gwen this past year included being sponsored by Cape Mental Health to attend the World Mental Health Congress 2011, and participating in the Provincial Mental Health Summit hosted by the Western Cape Government in Mitchells Plain in February 2012. Gwen was also invited to participate in OpenForum 2012 — Money, Power & Sex: The paradox of unequal growth — which was organised by the Open Society Foundation for Southern Africa in collaboration with its sister Open Society Africa Foundations. Although the subject of Access to Justice was not one that Gwen could speak on from personal experience, she did the necessary research and rehearsed her responses to the questions beforehand with her supporter, Carol Bosch, so that she could represent women with intellectual disability. And even when the interviewer changed the questions, Gwen was able to respond appropriately — with Carol at her side as supporter in case she needed any assistance. Self-advocacy was the focal issue this past year at Garden Cottage, a group home for 8 women with intellectual disability. Carol Bosch, the Garden Cottage Manager, instituted a quarterly House Committee meeting to facilitate feedback about the programme and ensure that residents are determinants of the quality of services rendered to them. This included an assessment by the residents, using an interview questionnaire which was specially adapted in order to be accessible to them.

Residents Chantal and Dianne attended quarterly Self-Advocacy meetings coordinated by the Western Cape Forum for Intellectual Disability, where the focus last year was on the Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities, and then shared the knowledge they gained with the other residents with the help of their supporter, Carol. All the residents participated in the life-skills workshops which included self-advocacy, self defence and self-care.

“We have taken self-advocacy to a new level at Garden Cottage, with residents being able to give honest and, if they so choose, anonymous feedback. The outcome of the interview questionnaire is that certain measures have been put in place to improve service delivery and management at the project. It all begins with little steps — if you listen to service-users and take their comments and complaints seriously, no matter how minor the issue, they become more comfortable and confident in speaking up. Finding their voice is a rite of passage — and they can surprise you if you afford them the opportunity to voice their opinions.” Carol Bosch, Senior Social Worker and Garden Cottage Manager

Declaration Cape Mental Health’s belief in the ability of mental health users resonated in the Declaration made on 21 October 2011 by the Consumers/ Users/ Survivors who attended the 2011 World Mental Health Congress. The Declaration called for mental health support for every individual that includes ‘psychosocial, respectful, and recovery-orientated services’ as well as ‘properly trained and mentored peer support workers.’ It ended with the following statement by Danelle du Preez, a South African service-user: We, the Consumers, Users, Survivors… state together that we can and do go on to live full and contributing lives: We are not weak, we are not broken, we are not damaged; we are whole, we are strong, we are proud, we are recovering, and above all, we are human. “I was really thrilled that the international consumers/users [at the World Congress] were astonished at the relationship they found between the professionals and the consumers [in South Africa], and that the consumers clearly felt they had a voice here, and were active in advocacy.” Shona Sturgeon, President of the SA Federation for Mental Health and CMHS Board Member


Worthy of work “I was 23 years of age when I was first diagnosed with a mental illness. I was admitted to Lentegeur Hospital and when I was discharged and returned to work, my employer at the time said that I had absconded from duty, and there I was, without a job. I never knew about my rights — all they did was pay out my salary and then I had to look for work. And every time I disclosed my disability, that was it.” Twenty years on, Russell Jones has walked a long road to wellness and to employment as Supervisor of Siyakwazi. This is a project that offers employment opportunities, and allowances equal to market-related wages for hours worked, for young adults with intellectual disability where they develop skills in car washing, garden services and cleaning. His duties involve client liaison, supplying quotations, providing on-site supervision, and doing administrative work such as updating the sales journal, feeding into TWU’s balanced scorecard, and planning for the month ahead.

“There are days that are really challenging – especially when I take Siyakwazi trainees to a new contract and we need to get things right. Trainees with intellectual disability need supervision, for example with setting the lawnmower at the correct height. “I think having a disability myself makes me more understanding and patient. I treat the trainees with a lot of respect.” Russell Jones, Employee of the Quarter 2011

Russell started attending Fountain House SA in 2002, a Cape Mental Health work skills and rehabilitation centre for adults with psychiatric disabilities. After working in the paper-making workshop unit for two years, he then went on to the Transitional Employment Programme (TEP) and was placed on contract at Foschini where he collected empty boxes for recycling. In 2005 he joined BeadAbility, a poverty alleviation project for persons with disabilities where his skills enabled him to earn twice the amount that he had been earning at Foschini. Beading then became his lifeline and he speaks proudly of being able to make customized keyrings. After a further stint of administrative work at Fountain House he was invited to interview for a position at Training Workshops Unlimited. “I started as the Admin and Sales person for Garden Pot Centre at Athlone Training Workshop on 24 July 2006. The staff was warm and friendly and treated me with respect, and thanks to the skills development and mentoring I had received at Fountain House, I am permanently employed in a managerial position and in one of the best phases of my life.” Russell lives in a group home run by ComCare and speaks with enormous appreciation of the homely environment, the fact that he can talk to other residents about things that matter, and that there is a housemother who sees that the home runs smoothly. Once a month on a Saturday he attends the Way of Life Support Group at Fountain House where members with psychiatric disabilities talk about problems they are encountering at work and in their personal lives. He especially loves the group outings, and a recent visit to the V & A Waterfront, coffee at Mugg & Bean and a bite to eat at Ocean Basket receive special mention.

Work Wise 42%

the percentage of youth under the age of 30 who are unemployed

22.2%

the unemployment rate in the Western Cape (PERO 211), compared with the national average of 23.2%

2%

the target set for the employment of people with disabilities in the public and private sector

80%

the estimated unemployment rate for people with disabilities in South Africa

619

the number of adults with intellectual disability who benefited from the training and career path at Training Workshops Unlimited during the review period

245

the number of adults with psychiatric disabilities who accessed the Fountain House work skills rehabilitation and work placements programme during the review period


We remember a special Board member In November 2011 Cape Mental Health received the sad news that Jennifer Septoe had passed away after a very brave, 18-month illness. She was a great friend to the organisation, serving loyally in the respective roles of CMHS Board member, ViceChairperson and Chairperson. “Jennifer leaves an unforgettable legacy of compassion and commitment. She sowed seeds of love, filling the lives of others with hope and meaning. She lived life to the full, never forgetting others, never forgetting those with mental disability.” Ingrid Daniels It is largely thanks to Jennifer’s commitment to Garden Cottage, that the Inner Wheel Club of Claremont supported this group home for women with intellectual disability over many years, nurturing the women to achieve greater independence and confidence, and funding upgrades at the cottage to provide a comfortable and homely living environment for them. The organising committee of the Kite Festival held many meetings in the Septoe’s home and Jennifer was the ever-gracious, generous and charming hostess, even hosting international kiters as if they were personal friends (which, indeed, they became). We remember an elegant lady with a great heart.

“I will not die an unlived life. I will not live in fear of falling or catching fire. I choose to inhabit my days, to allow my living to open me, to make me less afraid, more accessible, to loosen my heart until it becomes a wing, a torch, a promise. I choose to risk my significance; to live so that [that] which came to me as seed goes to the next as blossom and that which came to me as blossom, goes on as fruit.” Dawna Markova


Cape Mental Health’s Employee of the Year 2011 “In today’s world of work people change jobs more frequently, whether motivated by the desire for change or a bigger paycheck. So when I reveal that I am in my 16th year at Cape Mental, people may think I lack ambition or a sense of adventure. “In defence of my long service I need to say that I have not been complacent in any way. Having served as Head of the Administration Department in my first three years at CMHS and now in my second stint of managing the Donor Development team, I continue to face fresh challenges and set higher standards for myself. I have stayed long enough to take responsibility not only for the successes, but also for the disappointments that have followed in the wake of some of my decisions. I remain humbled by the work of our social workers, rehabilitation workers, trainers, and care workers — and inspired by the excellent leadership and proud history of the organisation.” Over the years Sandra Ellis has managed the Public Education portfolio, chaired the Employment Equity Forum, made a contribution to the Training and Development Strategic Unit and the Advocacy and Marketing Pillar, and been a pivotal member of the organizing committees of the CMH Conference in 2008 and the 2011 World Congress of the World Federation for Mental Health. She has been part of an enthusiastic team that developed the ‘corporate image’ of the organisation, our marketing materials and training manuals, the CMH logo and, more recently, the development of our new slogan ‘all about ability’. Her contribution as a fundraiser has spanned raising funds for operational costs, working on capital projects, running mail campaigns, securing gifts in kind, and helping a committed team to host the Cape Town International Kite Festival each year.

“After 15 years in the teaching profession my education really began when I joined the NGO sector. My contact with mental health professionals and service-users has enriched me considerably, and deepened my resolve to make a difference to the lives of some of society’s most vulnerable people.” Sandra Ellis, Donor Development Manager

“It is gratifying to have been nominated as Employee of the Year 2011, not because of my years of service, but because of the quality and quantity of my contribution. It is doubly rewarding to know that Cape Mental Health values its support staff in the Administration, Finance and Donor Development Departments, even though we are not in the front line of direct service delivery.”

Credits Author and Editor

Sandra Ellis, Cape Mental Health. sandra@cmhs.co.za

Photographers The Annual Report and Audited Financial Statements for the 2011/2012 financial year are available on request.

We acknowledge Gavin Withers Photography for the photos on the front cover, the 2011 World Mental Health Congress, the official opening of the Heideveld Special Education and Care Centre, and those of Russell Jones and the residents of Garden Cottage at Athlone Training Workshop. The talented Shamila Ownhouse of Cape Mental Health took the photos of the march for Human Rights for persons with intellectual disability. Sandra Ellis took the photos of Ingrid Daniels, Director, and of the Self-Advocacy team of supporters who won the Project of the Year Award.

Design and Layout

We acknowledge with gratitude the professional service of Imago Visual. www.imago-visual.com


Acknowledgements We thank all those contributors whose financial support, expertise, gifts-in-kind and voluntary services this past year have helped us to develop the ability of our service-users.

State Subsidies Our principal benefactors are the Department of Social Development and the Department of Health who together fund 6 of our programmes and play a vital role in our organisation’s sustainability.

The National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund The NLDTF Sports and Recreation Sector allocated R50,000 for sport equipment for TWU.

The Community Chest of the Western Cape As the largest beneficiary of the Community Chest, we appreciate the sustainability funding, donations-in-kind allocation and the opportunity to participate in area forum meetings and conversation series. The Chest’s support is true to its vision of ‘Hope Restored.’

Bequests We honour the passing of loyal friends who left bequests to Cape Mental Health: • Dorothea M S Yates • L E Stroud • Ronald Oxley Bell • Max Marin. Prof. Jakes Gerwel of African Monarch made a generous gift in memory of a dear colleague, the late Mandy Roux.

Corporate Social Investment Family Trusts & Foundations

We continued to benefit from previous funding from the NLDTF Charities Sector with funds brought forward to 2011/2012: R5 million had been allocated for the construction of the Heideveld Special Education and Care Centre, and a grant of R1,404,272 received in February 2011 benefited a range of our services over a two-year period. We await feedback on the application we submitted in March 2011.

The following grants exceeding R10,000 were received from: • Carl & Emily Fuchs Foundation • Anne Kreitzer Will Trust • Rolf-Stephan Nussbaum Foundation • Frank Robb Charitable Trust • Syringa Trust • Allan & Gill Gray Trust • Douglas Jooste Trust • C & E Harding Trust • Rawbone Trust • Schwarz Upliftment Trust • St Ola’s Trust • The Philip Schock Charitable & Educational Foundation • Kurt & Joey Strauss Foundation • IQRAA Trust • T Berwitz Trust • Stella & Paul Loewenstein Trust • Anne Harris Trust • Lynette Croudace Trust • Clifford Harris Trust • J E T Lee Will Trust • T S Berwitz Will Trust

Cape Mental Health has enjoyed a long partnership with the NLDTF and is grateful for the significant investment it has made in our mental health services in the past decade.

We are enormously grateful to all the trusts and foundations, trustees and administrators, who supported us so loyally and generously this past year.

PriceWaterhouseCoopers made a grant in support of Training Workshops Unlimited. Cape Mental Health has enjoyed the support once again of the Momentum Fund and the FNB Fund Community Care Programme. 1st for women trust came on board as primary funder of the Sexual Abuse Victim Empowerment programme. The Anglo American Chairman’s Fund had previously allocated funding for the Heideveld Centre capital project. These CSI funds are managed by Tshikululu Social Investments, whose advisors and officers provide the benchmark for grant management in the industry.

Foreign Funders AusAid ensured that our MindMatters programme continued its work at Ocean View Senior and Zeekoevlei Secondary Schools. The Atlantic Philanthropies Director/Employee Designated Gift Fund once again supported the Eagles Project in Mitchells Plain. The Evangelical Lutheran Kirchen supported our Special Education and Care Centres. These funders deserve special mention for investing in our vulnerable children and youth.

Gifts in Kind

Health and Welfare SETA The HSWETA approved funding for 100 Learnerships over a 12-month period commencing in March 2012.

Generous donors included: • Amanzimtoti Upliftment Project • Cape Town Community Housing Company • The Clothing Guild • Distell • Flexitrade • Glaxo Smith Kline • H M Removals • Lewis Stores • Liberty Promenade • MGI Bass Gordon • Mobility Aids • O Grady’s • Operation Shoebox • Parmalat/Simonsberg • Peninsula Beverages • Personal Trust • Pretoria Portland Cement • Pinelands Presbyterian Church • Two Oceans Aquarium • Woolworths Kenilworth Centre


Staff list as at 31 March 2012 CAPE MENTAL HEALTH including the Administration Department, Donor Development Department, Finance Department, Corporate Social Work, Garden Cottage, Learning for Life, MindMatters SA, Sexual Abuse Victim Empowerment (SAVE), Social Development Services, Public Education and the Volunteers Programme Christopher Adonis • Rochelle Bailey • Carol Bosch • Wayne Bruton • Aadilah Buhardien Beth Chaplin • Ingrid Daniels (Director) • Theresa Daniels • Stacey de Kock Feroza de Leeuw • Beverley Dickman • Ntombentle Dlokovu • Gillian Douglas Ferial Edwards • Sandra Ellis • Joyce-Lyn Esterhuizen • Taryn Feinberg • Tabile Figlan Yvonne Foster • Lindy Graham • Karen Hans • Derick Houston • Jeanine Hundermark Amina Jacobs • Faranaaz Jacobs • Colleen Jephthah • Jeffeynore Jordaan • Ekin Kench Gadija Koopman (Deputy Director) • Nokuthula Krwece • Sharon Malander Zukiswa Malgas • Susan Manson • Esterline Martin • Nolwando Matebese Noxolo Matoman ��� Pumza Mbanzi • Stella Mbwana • Caroline Mills • Maleeka Mokallik Avril Norton • Kulthum Roopen • Lucinda Saal • Sharon Santon • Birgit Schweizer Andreas Selela • Sheila Selfe • Nokothula Shabalala • Gail Shapiro • Steven Sityo Teri-Sue Smith • Elroy Solomon • Albert Vallay • Brigitte van der Berg • Jenny Walters Nadine Williams • Chesna Zietsman PSYCHOSOCIAL REHABILITATION (PSR) including Fountain House SA, the Rainbow Foundation and Kimber House

SPECIAL EDUCATION AND CARE CENTRES including Erika, Heideveld (previously Bonteheuwel and Ethembeni) and Imizamo Yethu Ester Aloni • Ntombekhaya Banzi • Xoliswa Buqa • Bernidine Chilwane • Alma Dammert Nomavenge Diko • Nomawethu Dotwana • Nomaneli Hlangu • Faith Jones Ndileka Jovile • Thandi Kente • Thami Majodina • Mzendaba Mathokazi N Shiela Mguda • Nomakwezi Mhlawuli • David Monakali • Nombongo Mpateni Ntombomzi Mzolisa • Khanyisa Ngobeni • Denzil Prins • Gwen Rosen Igshaan Samsodien • Joyce Sethole • Kutala Soqaga • Mtobeli Soqaga • Thokazi Tyutu TRAINING WORKSHOPS UNLIMITED (TWU) including TWU Training Workshops in Athlone, Mitchells Plain, Retreat and Khayelitsha (Nonceba), Garden Pot Centre, the Siyakwazi Integration Company and the Eagles Project Faisal Bawa • Thomas Bezuidenhout • Kirsten Blignaut • Norman Blignaut Emma Blommaert • Thozama Boni • Craig Chambers • Gwendoline Daniels John Daries • Faith de Klerk • Pauline Groepes • Chantal Hess • Calvin Isaacs Cecilia Jackson • Russell Jones • Veliswa Lungaphi • Thembeka Mabe • Nomava Malaya Tasneem Manuel • Andile Mayila • Jacqueline Mbwana • Agnes Meintjies Simon Mngomeni • Denzil Murtz • Sandra Nicolaai • Shamila Ownhouse George Philander • Kathy Plessie • Stéphan Pretorius • Shavonne Samaai Berenice Tempers • Santie Terreblanche • Janine Williams

Roshan Abrahams • Jenna-Lee Boer • Claudia Cogill • Hazel Cox • Faldelah Fillander Suzanne Solomons • Nondibane Mdyidwa • René Minnies • Nocawe Mxobo

Cape Mental Health Board President: Dr Mandla Tshabalala • Vice-President: Mr Ken Sturgeon Members: Gary Pond (Chairperson) • Hombakazi Zide (Deputy Chairperson) Alan Crisp (Treasurer) • David Lotz (Legal Advisor) Patrick Ntsime (Development Bank of SA) • Phumla Satyo (WCED) Shona Sturgeon (President of the S A Federation for Mental Health) Gwendoline Daniels (Consumer Representative: Intellectual Disability) Oscar January (Consumer Representative: Psychiatric Disability)

Honorary Psychiatrists Dr Sean Baumann • Prof. Tuviah Zabow

REG. NO. 003-264 NPO • PBO REFERENCE NUMBER 18/11/13/4456 ADDRESS 22 IVY STREET OBSERVATORY 7925 POSTAL ADDRESS PRIVATE BAG X7 OBSERVATORY 7935 SOUTH AFRICA TEL +27 21 447 9040 • FAX +27 21 448 8475 EMAIL info@cmhs.co.za • WEBSITE www.capementalhealth.co.za

all about ability Annual Review 2011/2012


Cape Mental Health Annual Review