Page 1

CONTENTS 1. Introduction 2. Chairman’s Report 3. Director’s Report 4. Treasurer’s Report 5. Mission statement of the organisation 5.1 Mission 1: To provide a children’s crisis counselling helpline Projects: Crisisline 5.2 Mission 2: To work to reduce the prevalence of child abuse Projects: Siyakhanisa Prevention and Outreach Programme Fifa 2010 Child Trafficking Programme Gold Peer Educational Programme Positive Parenting Programme 5.3 Mission 3: To offer therapy to those affected by child abuse Projects: Orphaned and Vulnerable Child Programme Court Support Programme Sex Offenders Programme Victim Empowerment Programme Overnight Support Counsellor Programme Child Protection Programme Therapeutic Database 5.4 Mission 4: To advocate and develop capacity on children’s right Projects: Advocacy and Networking Capacity Building 6. Monitoring and Evaluation Department 7. Admin & HR Department 8. Annual Events 9. Fund Development 10. Donor list


11. Verification of report 12. Audited Financial Statements


 
 
 



INTRODUCTION The Childline KZN team has once again touched, changed and developed the lives of those who have had to endure unimaginable suffering. We have comprehensive programmes in place to deal with abuse, neglect and exploitation, focusing not only on bringing perpetrators to book, but also on helping children, their families and communities to rebuild their lives; protecting victims, educating and raising awareness in order to prevent child abuse, neglect and exploitation. We have continued to: SPEAK….on behalf of children LOBBY….on matters affecting the well-being and safety of children ADVOCATE….for the rights of children REACH….out to children in distress EMPOWER….communities in terms of reporting of child abuse Childline is celebrating 25 years of service to children and their families this year. 25 years ago, a need arose for a specialized non-sectarian and non-racial help line for children and their families who had experienced some form of abuse. Professionals such as social workers, teachers, nurses and psychologists sacrificed their spare time to assist and initially heed the crisisline. By 1990 many of these volunteers needed to take a well-earned break and the need to replenish the complement of voluntary crisis counselors increased. In 1987 the treatment unit of Childline was initiated when a number of professionals expressed concern at the lack of specialized treatment services for abused children. These concerns were also reflected by the support of the general public for the development of a therapy centre. We uphold our promise to the Province of KZN, to:

VISION “The development of a society free of child abuse in which every person takes responsibility for promoting the protection and rights of all children”

MISSION    

To provide a children’s crisis counselling helpline To work to reduce the prevalence of child abuse To offer therapy to those affected by child abuse To advocate and develop capacity on children’s rights

We thank our staff, our partners, friends and Board for the sustainability of Childline. We urge you to become a friend of Childline KZN. 



REPORT BY CHAIRPERSON To

our

guest
speaker,

members
of
the
Board,
The
Director
and
staff,
distinguished
guests,

well
wishers,
good
 afternoon
and
greetings
from
the
Chairman’s
Desk.
 In
celebration
of
Women’s
month,
on
behalf
of
the
Board
of
Childline,
to
you
who
are
mothers,
wives,
daughters
 and
role
models,
we
salute,
honour
and
applaud
you
for
the
women
that
you
are.
Many
of
you
walk
out
of
our
 doors
at
4pm
only
to
commence
another
job
when
you
reach
home.
It
is
a
concept
that
can
never
be
understood.
 We
are
blessed
to
have
you,
who
are
strong,
determined
and
dedicated
individuals
among
us,
at
Childline.

 The
business
year
2010
‐2011
has
been
one
that
was
characterized
by
much
activity
internally.
When
you
are
part
 of
an
Organisation
such
as
Childline,
no
day
is
ever
the
same,
whether
you
are
part
of
the
staff
composite
or
you
 occupy
a
seat
at
the
Board.

The
finance
committee,
in
conjunction
with
the
Director,
worked
effortlessly
in
the
 past
year
to
ensure
financial
stability
and
sustainability
of
Childline
provincially.
Financial
stability
and
sustainability
 has
been
our
motto
or
anthem,
which
we
began
reciting
from
2006.
If
one
has
regard
to
our
financial
reports
since
 then,
 it
 remains
 patently
 clear
 that,
 since
 the
 year
 2006
 till
 2010,
 we
 were
 able
 to
 ensure
 that
 our
 financial
 obligations
were
timeously
met,
whilst
posting

significant
surpluses.

 Our
 surpluses
 remained
 healthy
 over
 these
 years
 at
 a
 time
 when
 institutions
 around
 us
 were
 reducing
 staff,
 alternatively
closing
their
doors.
We
continued
to
challenge
tough
financial
times,
so
to
ensure
that
we
remained
 at
the
forefront
financially.
However
I
have
no
doubt
in
my
mind
that,
the
Treasurer
this
year
will
not
be
the
bearer
 of
adverse
news
when
he
delivers
his
report.


Survival
however
is
not
and
cannot
remain
the
function
or
objective
 of
either
the
Director,
finance
committee
or
the
Board.
As
an
integral
component,
it
remains
the
responsibility
of
 us
all,
to
ensure
stability
internally.
As
part
of
a
team,
it
remains
the
core
function
of
every
member
of
the
staff
 composite,
 to
 ensure
 that
 clients
 and
 casework,
 are
 dealt
 with
 in
 the
 most
 proactive,
 professional
 and
 efficient
 manner
possible.

 This
would
be
applicable
to
the
timeous
compilation
and
delivery
of
reports
whenever
required,
or
to
the
concise
 capturing
of
related
information
whether
it
be
statistics
or
file
notes.
This
in
turn
allows
us
to
ensure
the
effective
 delivery
of
reports
to
our
funders
and
donors,
which
in
turn
results
in
timeous
funding.
From
discussion
with
the
 Director,
it
became
apparent
that
Funders
many
of
which
reduced
funding
to
other
role
players,
elected
to
remain
 in
partnership
with
us.
This
in
my
view
is
largely
attributable
to
the
very
fact
that,
they
remained
most
impressed
 with
 the
 quality,
 relevance
 and
 imprint
 of
 Childline
 KZN.
 Whilst
 attempts
 have
 been
 made
 by
 some
 within
 the
 greater
 network,
 not
 only
 to
 impugn
 on
 this
 cordiality
 with
 funders,
 but
 also
 to
 covertly
 engage
 in
 discussion
 in
 some
 or
 many
 respects,
 some
 of
 us
 remain
 determined
 at
 the
 Board,
 not
 to
 permit
 such
 unacceptable
 conduct
 from
such
individuals.
In
that
regard
we
will
continue
to
ensure
that
governance
at
Childline
KZN,
remains
firm.
 The
increasing
caseload
at
our
offices
culminated
in
a
decision
to
expand
into
new
premises.
With
this
in
mind
we
 elected
 to
 support
 the
 purchase
 of
 additional
 premises,
 situated
 on
 Percy
 Osborne
 Road.
 I
 can
 confirm
 that
 the
 sale
of
such
premises
has
been
finalized,
and
we
are
presently
taking
transfer
of
such
property.

We
envisage
that
 this
 building
 would
 also
 serve
 as
 a
 training
 centre
 and
 for
 project
 purposes.
 Most
 important
 though,
 is
 that
 this
 building
 will
 remain
 the
 proud
 ownership
 of
 Childline
 KZN,
 as
 opposed
 to
 that
 of
 any
 funder.
 This
 in
 our
 view
 remains
an
accolade,
in
that
it
is
a
first
among
the
network

structures,
that
a
provincial
office
owns
fixed
property.

 At
this
juncture,
the
Board
extends
its
gratitude
to
our
Director,
for
her
persistent
efforts
in
securing
the
requisite
 funding
for
such
purchase
and
for
her
greater
vision
of
the
brand.




Our
dominant
and
credible
presence
in
this
industry,
continues
to
place
Childline
KZN
as
experts
insofar
as
court
 cases
 are
 concerned.
 It
 is
 not
 an
 uncommon
 occurrence,
 for
 our
 services
 or
 opinion
 to
 be
 sought
 by
 Presiding
 Officers
in
courts
or
the
Office
of
the
Family
Advocate.
This
serves
to
indicate,
that
the
expertise
held
internally,
is
 widely
recognized
and
relied
upon.

 Whilst
 we
 have
 always
 remained
 proud
 and
 supportive
 of
 our
 staff
 component,
 we
 have
 and
 will
 continue
 to
 reiterate,
their
role,
function
and
purpose.
Performance
management
within
all
spheres
of
the
staff
structure,
has
 and
 will
 continue
 to
 be
 an
 area
 of
 great
 emphasis,
 to
 enable
 us
 to
 sufficiently
 reward
 and
 recognize
 those
 achievers
 who
 do
 us
 proud,
 yet
 mentor
 and
 coach
 those
 who
 require
 encouragement
 to
 excel.
 However
 many
 success
 stories
 of
 the
 children
 assisted,
 is
 attributable
 to
 the
 greater
 calling
 of
 our
 staff.
 At
 this
 point
 I
 am
 reminded
 of
 an
 occasion
 when
 the
 Director
 appeared
 at
 a
 committee
 meeting,
 visibly
 
 moved
 by
 the
 fact
 that
 project
or
outreach
staff
had
braved
torrential
rains
and
flooded
roads,
and
waded
in
such
waters,
to
reach
out
to
 children.
It
is
moments
like
this,
that
make
me
proud
to
belong
to
team
like
this.

 We
 have
 and
 will
 continue
 to
 conduct
 assessments
 insofar
 as
 our
 operations
 are
 concerned,
 with
 a
 view
 of
 ensuring
 that
 optimal
 performance
 is
 achieved.
 Our
 aim
 is
 to
 properly
 and
 effectively
 service
 our
 clients
 with
 perfection.
 Discipline,
 order
 and
 service
 delivery,
 remains
 high
 on
 our
 agenda
 and
 we
 will
 persist
 with
 holding
 those
accountable,
who
need
to
be
held
accountable.
We
had
over
the
past
year,
reasons
to
terminate
the
services
 of
two
employees,
one
at
a
managerial
level,
and
the
other
at
an
administrative
level,
who
held
the
view
that
they
 were
 above
 the
 rules
 of
 Childline.
 These
 employees
 embarked
 on
 a
 destructive
 course
 to
 bring
 the
 brand
 into
 disrepute.
 However
 in
 keeping
 with
 our
 firm
 hand
 on
 employees,
 the
 Board
 adopted
 a
 robust
 approach
 which
 culminated
 in
 such
 termination
 of
 services.
 Our
 view
 is
 quite
 simple,
 if
 you
 earn
 a
 salary
 then
 all
 obligations
 relevant
to
your
employment
must
be
properly
discharged,
irrespective
of
the
position
that
one
occupies.

 Curtailment
 of
 unnecessary
 expenditure
 has
 perpetually
 featured
 prominently
 on
 our
 list
 of
 priorities
 and
 will
 continue
 to
 do
 so
 for
 many
 a
 year
 to
 come.
 Monitoring
 of
 all
 expenditure
 has
 thus
 far
 added
 weight
 to
 our
 financial
 success.
 However,
 there
 is
 always
 a
 new
 project,
 assignment
 or
 area
 of
 need,
 that
 constantly
 requires
 support.
 Our
 Director,
 has
 to
 date
 worked
 tirelessly
 during
 office
 hours
 and
 after
 hours
 to
 ensure
 that
 Childline
 KZN
remains
afloat
and
very
credible.
Your
expertise
and
dedication
cannot
go
unnoticed,
hence
today
Linda,
the
 Board
salutes
all
your
efforts
and
sacrifices
thus
far.
I
note
again
your
willingness
at
the
end
of
2010,
to
accept
a
 reduced
salary,
so
that
members
of
your
staff
could
receive
their
year
end
bonuses.

 Again,
against
the
backdrop
of
such
occurrences,
I
am
proud
to
serve
as
Chairman
of
the
Board.
Many
of
you
have
 seen
me
since
2006,
deliver
the
Chairman’s
Report,
and
wonder
why
would
anybody
do
this
free
of
remuneration,
 and
often
sacrifice
many
a
late
evening
in
meetings
and
the
like.
The
answer
is
that
even
at
Board
level,
we
want
 to
ensure
that
in
whatever
way
possible,
we
too
can
make
a
difference.

 To
 the
 Board
 members,
 I
 raise
 my
 hat
 to
 your
 efforts
 and
 ever
 ready
 capability
 to
 execute
 your
 duties.
 It
 is
 this
 team
spirit
that
makes
the
Board
room
an
exciting
place
to
be,
even
after
hours.
It
has
been
a
privilege
to
have
 served
as
Chairman
for
the
past
five
years,
to
an
Organization
that
has
done
so
much
to
make
a
difference
in
the
 lives
of
children
of
this
province.
I
trust
that
in
years
to
come,
the
vision
and
foundational
imprint
of
Childline
KZN,
 will
be
documented
and
recognized
as
was
the
efforts
of
Prof.
Winship.
 I
thank
you.
 Mervyn
Sigamoney
 CHAIRMAN
OF
THE
BOARD.



REPORT BY DIRECTOR It was not long ago that the idea of SA hosting the FIFA Soccer World Cup was just a dream, the event has come and gone and when you read this report, it would have been long past, and all that we have are the memories - a consolidation for all on the lessons learnt, and a legacy for all. But out values for the event can be remembered in words like teamwork, contribution, excitement, communication and swift coordination. It’s an event that carried a legacy, a legacy of values and partnership that should continue to permeate and eventuate in every form of service delivery to children.

Childline
celebrates
25
years
and
we
need
to
look
at
another
legacy‐
a
legacy
of
partnerships
that
was
 created
by
all
those
who
established
and
grew
Childline

–
it
is
the
legacy
that

incorporates
service
 delivery
organisations,
government,
donor
organisations,

communities,
the

media,
individuals

 themselves,
all
who
have
collectively
contributed
to
the
sustainability
and
effectiveness
of
Childline.
And
 most
importantly,
credible
governance,
with
a
structure
under
an
expert
chairmanship
who
is
a
 visionary
and
an
astute
businessman.

 
At
Childline
all
our
work
and
processes
have
been
inspired
by
certain
principles:

 ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐

Ensuring
that
every
child
receives
the
best
possible
service
 Putting
communities
and
their
needs
first

 Measuring
our
impact
 Involving
and
engaging
communities
on
their
needs



To
that
end,
we
have
ensured
assessments
and
research
done
by
staff,
our
customers,
our
callers
on
the
 crisisline
and
our
databases.
We
have
been
able
to
assess
what
works,
what
hinders
and
what
are
the
 emerging
trends
and
needs
of
clients
that
need
to
be
addressed.

 
 Staff
have
been
engaged
in
several
strategic
processes
over
the
year
in
the
form
of
questionnaires
and
 sessions.
The
process
provided
a
reflective
and
evaluation
process
to
determine
exactly
what
staff
can
 do
to
collectively,
to
improve
the
functioning
and
organizational
efficiency.
As
a
result
of
the
outcome
of
 the
questionnaires
much
planning
took
place
‐

a
performance
management
system
was
developed,
job
 descriptions
 updated,
 more
 resources
 were
 obtained,
 like
 computers
 and
 a
 new
 building.
 Staff
 was
 engaged
 in
 training
 on
 legislation,
 monitoring
 and
 evaluation,
 personality
 self‐assessments,
 and
 our
 counselors
were
included
in
a
learnership,
to
ensure
professional
delivery
by
all
staff.

 
 We
always
strive
to
ensure
internal
promotions
and
motivate
staff
to
believe
in
their
potential.
It
is
 preferable
to
also
promote
internally.
Hence
more
staff
are
carrying
projects
effectively
and
in
a
growing
 organisation
we
have
had
to
diversify
our
structure.
To
name
some,
Khanyisile
has
returned
to
the
 organisation
and
has
been
promoted
to
junior
manager;
Vanespri
has
been
promoted
to
Data
Quality
 Officer;

Nthabiseng
is
providing
parenting
programmes
with
Nomvula
coordinating
those
programmes;

 Nonhlanhla
and

Marilyn
have
been
team
leaders
on
the
Crisisline;
Zama
a
team
leader
for
the
outreach
 programmes;
Kasturi
is
the
OVC
coordinator
and
Pravisha
was
promoted
as
Operations
Manager.
 
 “When
we
are
dealing
with
people,
let
us
remember
we
are
not
dealing
with
creatures
of
logic.
We
are
 dealing
with
creatures
of
emotion,
creatures,
sometimes
bustling
with
prejudices
and
motivated
by
 pride
and
vanity.”

So
we
had
to
sadly
terminate
the
services
of
2
staff
members
and
dismiss
1,
who
did
 much
harm
to
the
staff
and
the
organisation.

 



Despite
the
internal
assessments
and
commitment
to
improving
service
delivery,
we
have
experienced
 staff
turnover,
some
staff
have
gone
on,
to
higher
salaries
and
positions
which
Childline
cannot
compete
 with.
There
is
considerable
pressure
in
the
NGO
world
to
ensure
sustainability.
The
global
financial
crisis
 has
reduced
funding
by
many
international
funders.
Furthermore
there
are
strategic
shifts
by
donors
 themselves
which
creates
uncertainty
for
organisations.
Against
these
challenges
Childline
KZN
has
 attempted
to
strive
for
not
only
sustainability
but
ensured
sound,
verifiable
practices
and
impactful
 service
delivery.

 I
would
like
to
commend
all
staff
members
for
their
commendable
contribution
to
the
organisation,
 without
an
enthused
and
vibrant
team,
this
report
would
not
have
been
possible.
Some
have
certainly
 strived
for
definite
results,
to
name
a
few,

Romaana
for
the
highest
number
of
calls
taken
on
the
 crisisline
for
several
months;
Nokwethemba
for
her
diligence
and
highest
statistical
output
on
the
 therapeutic
statistics;
Nthabiseng
for
excellent
reports
on
the
parenting
programme;
Jackie
on
her
 excellent
compilation
on
therapeutic
reports;
Kasturi
and
Vanespri
on
their

excellent
preparation
for
 the
OVC
monitoring
and
evaluation
process;
Kitty
on
her
diligent
preparation
for
her
monitoring
and
 evaluation
for
the
sex
offender
programme;
Pumla
for
her
attempt
to
ensure
production
on
the
gold
 peer
programme;
Nomvula
for
her
output
and
her
enthusiasm
and
Kudzai
for
her
attempts
to
ensure
 staff
get
debriefed.
There
are
many
more
that
require
credit
–
to
all
the
staff
well
done.

 Once
 again
 a
 word
 of
 gratitude
 to
 our
 board
 members,
 who
 have
 spent
 tireless
 and
 long
 evenings
 studying
 documents
 and
 ensuring
 proficiency
 through
 the
 varied
 sub‐committees
 of
 the
 board,
 that
 being
the
human
resources,
legal
and
finance
committees.

 
 Everyone
and
every
organization
has
values.
It
is
apparent
from
the
analyses
of
the
questionnaires
and
 the
commitment
of
staff
that
we
are
living
our
values.
So
this
year
we
can
urge
you
to
celebrate
with
us
 ‐
25
years
of
service
delivery
to
KZN
and
to
celebrate
that
our
values
and
our
actions
are
in
alignment.

 
 We
thank
you
all,
our
networking
partners,
our
donors,
members
of
the
community
who
report
cases:
 for
your
confidence,
contribution
and
commitment
to
Childline
in
ensuring
that
together,
we
serve
the
 best
interests
of
children
in
this
province.

 

 Linda
Naidoo
 DIRECTOR



REPORT BY TREASURER


Indeed,
in
South
Africa
most
charities
rely
on
corporate
giving
rather
than
the
generous
individuals.
This
 dynamic
means
they
are
more
vulnerable
to
economic
cycles.
However,
I
am
pleased
to
report
that
not
 withstanding
the
challenging
economic
times,
Childline’s
financial
position
is
indeed
strong.
 It
is
through
the
combined
efforts
of
our
Director,
staff
and
the
Board
that
Childline’s
operations
and
 related
spending
levels
are
consistently
monitored
throughout
the
year.
Childline
always
operated
with
 diligence
and
has
maintained
the
most
efficient
and
effective
governance
and
service
levels.
 To
the
Board
of
Childline
and
to
those
that
support
our
organization,
it
gives
me
great
pleasure
to
 present
my
financial
report
for
the
year
ending
31
March
2011.
 Childline
had
a
remarkable
year
in
financial
terms,
supported
by
exceptional
donations
and
funding
as
 well
as
controlled
spending
at
all
levels.
 The
operating
results
and
state
of
affairs
of
the
organization
are
fully
set
out
in
the
attached
financial
 statements
which
were

audited
by
BDO
South
Africa
Incorporated
and
do
not
in
our
opinion
require
any
 further
comment.


Surplus funds at the beginning of the period totalled R3 206 947.00 Income received for the period totalled R6 282 553.00 Expenses for the period totalled R6 025 258.00 Surplus funds at the end of the period totalled R3 463 742.00 
 Once
again,
we
are
happy
to
report
a
surplus
for
the
year.
The
net
surplus
for
the
year
ending
31
March
 2011
is
R256
795.00,
compared
to
31
March
2010,
which
was
R442
712.00.
 The
journey
into
the
future
will
not
be
easy
but
I
am
reasonably
confident
that
we
shall
overcome
any
 obstacle.
New
opportunities
present
themselves
almost
daily.
This
can
be
both
a
blessing
and
a
 challenge,
but
we
meet
the
challenges
in
a
deliberate
and
prudent
manner
and
have
created
a
financial
 foundation
for
Childline
that
will
perpetuate
the
organization
for
years
to
come.
 In
closing
I
wish
to
thank
my
fellow
Board
members,
Director
Linda
Naidoo
and
staff
of
Childline
for
their
 support.
Also,
a
special
thank
you
to
BDO
South
Africa
Incorporated
for
attending
to
the
2011
audit.
 


Norman Moodley Treasurer 
 
 



CRISISLINE PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES The 24/7 Toll free Crisis Helpline provides an accessible and immediate service to all children in and around KwaZulu Natal whenever and wherever they may require help. The crisisline is free of cost to all children and any adult, whether professional, parent or community member who may have concerns about children. The Crisisline enables them to contact a trained counsellor in any situation of need using a landline and cellular phone. It allows children to express their concerns and talk about issues that affect their best interest. Counsellors offer the following services:

crisis
 intervenfon


empowerment
 &
 encouragement


support
 &

 advice


counselling


Most often the callers call back to thank the counsellors as they were rescued as a result of Childline’s intervention. The counsellors also ensure that whoever calls the Crisisline receives the best possible service. Every case is tracked, followed-up and advocated for in the best interests of the children. BREAKDOWN OF VARIOUS PROBLEMS REPORTED ON THE CRISISLINE As follows the different categories of cases that we received on the Crisisline and the various counselling services that are being offered. Family relationships Commercial exploitation Poverty Legal issues Disabilities Behaviour problems Suicide Emotional abuse Adoption

Health problems Depression Bullying Homelessness HIV/AIDS Teenage pregnancies Abandonment Physical abuse Foster care

Refugee children Trauma Neglect Discrimination Trafficking Substance abuse Sexual abuse Sexuality

Tollfree crisisline - 08000 555 5


WHAT WE DID A total number of 271 339 calls were received. Below is a breakdown of the calls that were received for the period of 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011. Table 1:

March


10837


February


18118


January


22415


December



30407


November


29911


October


26615


September


29100


August


29024


July
 June


25655
 17520


May


15925


April


15812



 Table 2: Prevalence of cases received on the Crisis Line


Subtance
abuse
 5%
 School
problems
 Sexuality
 5%
 5%
 Poverty
 Health
 2%
 2%


Types
of
calls


Neglect
 10%


Abuse
 50%


Homelessness
 2%
 HIV/AIDS
 2%
 Commercial
 Behaviour
 expliotafon
 problems
 7%
 10%


As illustrated above the highest prevalent problem is the abuse of children.

EMERGING TRENDS Orphaned children have become targets for ill-treatment and neglect. Family members are becoming the alleged perpetrators in more and more of the cases received on the Crisisline. We find orphans as victims in cases of sexual, physical, emotional abuse, neglect, stigmatization or rejection due to their HIV status. Rape of children is also increasing at an alarming rate, especially involving orphaned children, whereby uncles and grandfathers would take advantage of children. Children may have no one to report to and would be ignored or ill treated if they where to report the matter. Reporting the matter sometimes results in physical abuse and these children are more likely to remain silent especially if the abuser is the bread winner. Mental Illness and Suicide The 24 hour Crisis line offers an immediate and unique service to families, friends and persons with mental illness or those contemplating suicide. We have counselled and helped people to determine if the behaviour they were observing warranted further professional consultation and linked them with relevant service providers for intervention. Teenagers in crisis Teenagers ranging from 14-18 years have often utilized the toll free line as they often experienced difficulties and struggle to cope with life, low self esteem, confusion and despair over challenges. The purpose of this teen link was to prevent teenage violence, drug abuse, behavioural problems, family and relationship problems, pregnancy, sexual transmitted diseases and depression by supporting and empowering youth to make healthy and self respecting decisions on their own. This link also provided youth with a confidential and safe place to vent anger and frustrations, express fears and anxieties and seek comfort and support. Some parents were not equipped to deal with the emotional crisis their children were experiencing. HIV/AIDS Although educational awareness pertaining to HIV /AIDS is conducted in the communities, people still lack knowledge and through monitoring a number of calls, we observed that there is still an increase of calls regarding HIV / AIDS


Child Neglect Caregivers still continued to abuse their children by withholding food from them, leaving them unsupervised, forcing them to do the chores without resting, often remaining unbathed and medically untreated. Some of these children head child headed households. Child Headed Households In the Crisis line we have found that a number of children running the child headed households are abused by the person given the responsibility to oversee them. We find some children not attending school, not receiving food or clothes and being generally neglected and made to survive on their own without the government grant. Case scenario- the child is sixteen years old and has three younger siblings. They live with their mother in a small house in a village near Umtata. The sixteen year old child is the man of the family. His father was very sick and passed away two years ago. Now his mother is also sickly and cannot take care of her children and there are no adults to look after the children. He makes sure that they all eat some breakfast, get dressed, wash and brush their teeth and then go to school. He takes the younger sister to the local crèche before he goes to school and also has to prepare and give his mother some food and makes sure she has some water to drink. In the afternoons, he checks on his mother, helps his brother and sisters to clean the house, wash their clothes and cooks supper which is only phuthu and water with sugar as that is the only thing they have in the house. He has had to grow up very fast and make sure that all things his mother used to do still gets done even though sometimes it is very hard to run the household. Whoonga – Whoonga is a drug that is a mixture of heroine and other drugs. Abusing whoonga is on the increase amongst the youth. Children are using the drug for recreation and because it is less expensive than other drugs and easily accessible. Parents have been contacting the crisisline to complain about their children’s uncontrollable behaviour when abusing this drug.

STORIES OF IMPACT A concerned neighbour called the Crisis Line and informed the counsellor about children in serious need of rescue. According to the caller the children were being abused by both their parents. The parents, who were said to be unemployed, are drug addicts. On that day the mother had dowsed both children in paraffin and then attempted to set them alight. The mother had suffocated one of the children because the child was crying of hunger, until the child turned blue. The children then ran to their neighbour for assistance before any more harm could come to them. The neighbour immediately called the Crisis Line for assistance. The counsellor immediately took down all the case details. The neighbour was asked to keep the children with her till the social workers arrived. The counsellor then contacted the area child welfare and spoke with the manager regarding the matter. The case details were sent to the manager who sent the social worker immediately on a home visit. The following day, the counsellor did a follow up with the concerned neighbour who informed the counsellor that the social worker had come, removed the children and placed them in temporary safe care. The mother was arrested and charged with neglect of her children. According to the social worker the mother is undergoing rehabilitation and parental skills training. The children are in temporary safe care and receiving therapy to cope with their ordeal.


The child concerned and her younger siblings were left unattended by the grandmother who had gone to church whilst their mother was hospitalized. It was reported that the neighbour seized the opportunity, as the children were unattended and came into the house, grabbed a child, and then raped her. The child’s private part was severely damaged. The counsellor tried to probe for more details and information from the caller however, the caller did not have complete details of the child concerned. The counsellor asked the concerned caller to obtain as much as possible information about the children. The caller called back with the child’s full details and the counsellor phoned the department of social development. The counsellor requested them to urgently attend to the matter. The manager promised the counsellor that she would immediately send out the social worker to the child`s home. The counsellor also contacted the area police station, explained the child’s situation and then requested immediate intervention as the child was at risk. Later on, the counsellor received a call from the caller informing the counsellor that the police and the social worker came simultaneously and the child was taken to the hospital for medical examination and treatment as her private parts was severely damaged. An appointment was also scheduled for the child to attend therapy at Childline. The alleged perpetrator was arrested pending further investigation into the case. The children are currently attending therapy and are placed in foster care.

TESTIMONIES Child 1: “I phoned Childline reporting my father who was sexually abusing me. The counsellor I spoke to was very kind and understanding and did not judge me for not reporting sooner. Today my confidence is restored and through therapy from Childline I am now more at peace with myself and have forgiven those who have hurt me. I am now moving on with my life”. Child 2: “Childline came into my life when I was grieving my mother’s death; fear prevented me from focusing on my life and my studies. Now I am able to focus on my bright future with confidence. The counsellor helped me in such a way that I have regained myself, Childline counsellors are my heroes.” Child 3: “A 16 year old, would like to thank Childline for changing my life. I was truanting from school and doing drugs. I phoned a counsellor who was willing to listen to my stories. The counsellor did not judge me. She was very kind and she assisted me through counselling and advice. I am attending school again and staying away from the drinking alcohol daily. Childline has made a difference in my life. Thank you so much.


DRAWINGS BY CHILDREN – CHILDREN’S VIEWPOINT ABOUT ABUSE

The Siyakhanisa Prevention and Outreach Programme Meaning “enlighten” PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES The objectives for the programme are:

To
capacitate
the
youth
to
become
future
responsible
Leaders
 To
insfll
awareness
on
Child
Abuse,
Neglect,
Exploitafon
and
Children’s
 Rights.
 To
empower
the
community
to
take
responsibility
for
the
protecfon
of
their
 children



The following services are rendered within the programme:

 Learners workshops, in order to raise awareness on issues regarding child abuse, neglect and exploitation

 Community programmes, to strengthen communities and give them a crisis resource for help and support (08000 55 555)

 Educator workshops  Crisis intervention: 2010 Fifa World Cup  Emergency debriefing for victims of child abuse, neglect and exploitation  Mall awareness events

CONTENT OF EACH PROGRAMME Programme 1: Learners were addressed on the following content: Forms of abuse Rights and responsibilities Sexually responsible behaviour Mxit issues Human Trafficking

Teenage Pregnancy Understanding and responding to issue of Bullying Child pornography Crime Prevention HIV/AIDS

Programme 2: Teachers The programme was run by the outreach team. The educators were active participants in developing collages, role plays and discussions. The content of the programme was as follows: Sexual myths Sexual attitudes Cultural barriers Aspects of child participation Developing empathy Child Abuse Neglect and Exploitation Positive discipline Dealing with disclosure and reporting procedures Programme 3: Communities Communities were provided with skills and knowledge on the protocol of Child Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of Children. Role of Childline and Programmes Offered Signs and symptoms of abuse Reasons for children not disclosing The reporting process Stress Management Addressing trauma

Identification of the different types of abuse Managing disclosures in children The healing process How to discipline Children Positive parenting


OUR PARTNERS The following government sectors partnered with outreach team during Child Protection Week, 16 Days of Activism and awareness programmes: • • • • • •

Department of Social Development: Ezakheni, Ladysmith, Kranskop, Harding, Ethekwini, Kwa Maphumulo Department of Health Department of Education South Basin Area SASSA Department of Community Safety and Liaison SAPS

WHAT WE DID The outreach team implemented the programmes in various districts in the KZN province. resources were distributed to the different communities, e.g. pamphlets, posters, and badges.

50000

A total number of 45 997 learners were reached, while 2183 community members, 269 educators and 320 children at various children’s homes were educated and empowered in terms of child abuse, exploitation and neglect. As follows a graphic presentation of the areas visited and different target groups reached.

“A person never stands so tall as one who kneels to help a child”

Chart
Title
 18000
 16000
 14000
 12000
 10000
 8000
 6000
 4000
 2000
 0


LEARNERS
 AMAJUBA


PMB


MALLS


SPECIAL
NEEDS
 SCHOOLS


UGU
DISTRICT


SISONKE
DISTRICT


ILLEMBE
DISTRICT


ETHEKWINI


ZULULAND


COMMUNITY
MEMBERS
 EDUCATORS
 CHILDREN'S
HOMES



Graph 1: The graph outlines that the highest number of learners and community members were reached in the Ethekwini district. The outreach team had further rolled out the programme to Special needs learners in the Province. As follows schools, clinics and communities that were contacted RESOURCE

RESOURCE

RESOURCE

Josini Primary School Embuyiselo Primary School KwaBamba High School Inkuthazelo Primary School Ezibukweni High School

Isiphingo Primary School Hillview Primary School Allipore Primary School Dloko High School Emafezini J.P School

Jozini Clinic

Ndongeni Senior Primary School Montclair Senior Primary School Khethamahle Junior Primary Ukukhanyakwelanga Junior Primary Parkvale Primary School

Umlazi AA Clinic Kwamashu Poly Clinic Stanger Heights Primary Kwa Mbonambi Maphumulo Combined School Isithundu Clinic

Poly Clinic Amaoti Combined School Overport Clinic Mushane Primary School Isihlangusabasha Primary School Umyeka High school Umngeni Primary School Makhapha High School Hlengimpilo Primary School Bongumusa Primary School Amahlongwa Primary Zamazisa Primary School Amatikwe Clinic King George Hospital Amaklongwa Primary School Hlangabeza Primary School Entabeni Combined Primary School Hluzingqondolts Primary School Thembalethu Primary School Zuzokuhle Primary School Khamangwa & Umeyeka HS Inanda Clinic Nkanyiso day care centre Sakhimuzi Primary School Inanda Newtown A SASSA Nombuso High School Inanda Glebe Primary School

Joel Primary School

Roseland Primary School

Kwa-Gumbi Primary School Port Shepstone Primary School Gamalakehe Commecial High School Olwandle High School

Resmount Primary School Clay Haven Primary School Klaarwater Clinic Newlands West Clinic Lances Road Clinic Lamontville Clinic Bayview Clinic Valley View Clinic Entabeni Clinic Zamaziza Primary School Nsongansoga Primary School Mqungebe Primary School

Masosha High School Sister Jones High School V.N Naik school for the Deaf Open Air School Umlazi Mega City Bridge City Mall Varsity Collage Klaarwater Clinic Collingwood Primary School Dumela Primary School Ukwensakwethu Primary School Mgada Primary School

Joel Primary School

Richmond Primary School

Xhonywa Primary School Mushane Primary School Danisa Secondary School Bamshela Simunye, Mgezengwana Primary School Nsonono Combined School, Entabeni Combined School Newlands West Clinic Mhawu High School Kwenzakwethu Primary School Seminary Cllinic Inanda

Greenfield place of safety Sos Children’s Home Pmb Ester Home Shelter Khayalethu Home Pmb Children’s Home

EMERGING TRENDS

Sobantu Youth For Christ Ithongase Primary School Tafelikopo Primary School Senzokule Primary School


Orphans The outreach team found very high numbers of orphans in the areas in which programmes were being provided. Being an orphan placed the child at risk for abuse, exploitation and neglect. •

Teen Pregnancy The schools targeted had an alarmingly high rate of teen pregnancy. Teenage pregnancy seems to be one of the contributing factors to school dropout. Communities in the rural areas still believe that it is taboo to talk about relationships and topics related to sexuality. Thus the children use their own knowledge obtained from the media and their peers and sometimes become victims of myths related to sexuality.

Unemployment Through the programme the outreach team found unemployment as a contributing factor towards child abuse and neglect. Jozini is one of the operational areas where unemployment is rife thus the community is affected by high rates of poverty, prevalence of teenage pregnancy, substance abuse, transactional sex and dependence on social grants for sustainability.

HIV/AIDS In all the schools that were visited there seemed to be an alarming number of orphans and this, according to the educators, might be due to high rates of poverty and HIV/AIDS. A number of learners have disclosed being infected with HIV/AIDS. From the workshops facilitated, it appeared that women are having difficulty using condoms because when they insisted that it be used, they are accused of having multiple relationships by their partners. Their inability to negotiate on condom use has made them more susceptible to HIV infection.

Poverty In all the schools that were targeted, it was observed that there are feeding schemes aimed at aiding children living in poverty stricken families who, had it not been for the feeding scheme would have gone hungry. It was observed that in a number of schools children were behind in their grades. Education is not seen as a priority. Depending on the child’s background, other responsibilities such as looking after siblings or earning money for food for the family seem to take precedence over attending school and school work. Social grants are very common and a number of families survive only on these grants.

Crime Community members have indicated that most crimes are unreported. This is due to three reasons; people are scared of reporting cases as this may place them in danger, they are unfamiliar with the reporting process and cases reported are never prosecuted.

Domestic violence and substance abuse This seemed to be prevalent in many areas. We also found that there is still a lot of gender based violence in these areas.

Polygamy This still seems to be an acceptable way of life in some communities as some people do not see it as a risk to HIV infection.

Minor children getting married at a younger age. Children are still exploited in many communities and are even made to get married at a young age. This is not seen as a violation of human rights in the community, but a way of life.

STORIES OF IMPACT


In a school in near Durban, a child had reported a case against the cleaner of the school who had sexually abused learners. Childline provided services and implemented a programme to help children with disclosure and the case was prosecuted. The offender was found guilty. However, the children were being blamed for their disclosure and this created an uncomfortable atmosphere in the school. Childline was invited to address the tense atmosphere and the issues of stigma, during which time more children disclosed that they were also exposed to abuse. These matters were referred to the local SAPS and feedback is being constantly given to our social workers who provide therapy to these children.

The Outreach team was involved in emergency debriefing that took place at Park Hill High School. A call was received through the crisis line with regards to a child who had been run over by a bus and 57 learners had witnessed the incident. According to the teacher who called, the learners were in a traumatic state. The learners described the event as an unforgettable experience. The learners described the incident in detail, even making reference to the sound of the bus hitting and crushing the body. The Outreach team provided trauma debriefing to the learners.

It can be hard growing up and not knowing what is right or wrong or who to talk to. But Childline KZN will always be there for you, whether we hear you on the phone or speak to you in person... – Challenge me Booklet


FIFA 2010 MILLIONS OF EYES WILL BE WATCHING THE WORLD CUP, WHO WILL BE WATCHING OUR CHILDREN

During the months of June/July 2010, South Africa hosted the FIFA Soccer World Cup, the largest sports event in the world. Government and non-profit organisations serving children and the general public expressed concern about the safety of children at Fan Fests. Children could be exploited for sex tourism, be at risk when persons indulge in excessive amounts of alcohol, get separated from their parents and caregivers or could be removed by from the Fan Fests by anyone. The implementation of Child Friendly Spaces (CFS) was driven by a partnership made up of: • •

UNICEF South-African national non-governmental organisations skilled in the field of child protection

As part of the FIFA initiative, Childline KZN’s Outreach and Awareness Team embarked on a campaign to reach both the rural and peri-urban areas in and around Kwa Zulu Natal. Childline’s objective was to: • • • •

To provide safe, supervised environment where children at risk can have access to temporary care To provide structured and planned child appropriate activities within a protected environment Emergency tracking and reunification services provided for lost children and unaccompanied minors in and around the Fan Fest To provide onsite specialized child protection services and/or referrals for children identified as affected by abuse, neglect and exploitation

During the Fifa World Cup 2010, Childline KZN reached out to various safe parks and shopping malls in the KZN Province. Staff was trained on standard operating procedures. Offices were open and staff availed themselves for duty on a 24 hour basis. Staff also disseminated pamphlets to spectators and children at the stadium in order to raise awareness on child safety. PARTNERSHIP WITH MR PRICE Childline partnered with Mr Price, whereby all children lost while visiting Mr Price stores were linked up to Childline and thereafter, services were provided to reunify them with their families.

WHAT WE DID SAFEPARKS Childline KZN provided services at 5 Safe Parks in and around rural areas in KZN, driving distances of more than 500 kms per trip. Extensive planning and evaluation went into the provision of protection


services at each safe park. Childline activities were also presented to other stakeholders at the parks such as NACCW. The outreach team reached 1050 children during the FIFA world cup safe parks. They were educated on issues such as human trafficking, types of child abuse, neglect and exploitation. The following safe parks were reached: Richard Bay Harding Kokstad

Nqutu Umbumbulu area (2 safe parks) Vulumehlu

Bergville Msinga Ndwedwe

CHALLENGES: • • •

The outreach projects were conducted at deep rural areas where limited resources are available to the community. The target areas were far apart and the team travelled over long distances and for long hours. The children in these rural areas are affected mostly by emotional abuse which has caused deep scars. They did not have the confidence to complete the activities, therefore the outreach team tried hard to engage individual children with sensitivity and patience Case study: A young girl who was six years of age had lost both her parents when her home was burnt down. She could not write or draw as she has not been attending school and lacked stability and security as she was being moved from one family to another.

STORIES OF IMPACT The activities that were facilitated to the children were child friendly and age appropriate. One of the activities involved a story about a Lion and the hole. This activity facilitated disclosure of abuse. One child who is an albino expressed his feelings on how the story of the lion and the hole had related to him. He explained how it sometimes hurt him when he is isolated by his peers and neighbours’ because of his appearance.


OUTREACH TO SHOPPING MALLS

The Outreach team also targeted the three malls during the FIFA World Cup to create awareness regarding: Human trafficking, types of child abuse, neglect and exploitation of children. The malls that were targeted were: Bridge City mall, Westwood Mall and City View mall. A challenge was that most of the malls needed exhibition fees and this has made it difficult for the team to reach its target. The children were entertained by illustrations, puppet shows and face painting. Most of the community members had limited knowledge of Childline Services and were given more information of our services and reporting procedures for any form of abuse and exploitation against Children.

STORIES OF IMPACT A teenage school girl had approached an outreach program facilitator about someone who had approached her and told her that she is attractive and that they are working for a modelling agency and was looking for beautiful girls. The teenage girl admitted to the facilitator that she had given the person her number and was excited at the prospect but after having heard about human trafficking, she was concerned she might be falling into a trafficking trap. The incident took place in Durban Sun Coast Casino. Childline facilitator advised that the girl report the matter to the SAPS and not take any calls from unknown numbers. The teenage girl had notified Childline after a week that no one as yet had contacted her, that SAPS was informed and that these people might still be in Sun Coast scouting for more vulnerable teenage girls. Our facilitator is currently getting feedback from the girl on any further developments and all information is relayed to the SAPS. SAPS are currently monitoring all activity at Sun Coast Casino.


GOLD PEER EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMME

Gold Peer groups during outreach activities .

PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES: •

To impart knowledge to the peer educators so that they are able to fulfil the following roles: o o o o

To role model health enhancing behaviour To educate their peer educators with the right information To recognise peers and community members in need and to be able to refer them to the relevant centres of help To advocate for human rights

Childline partnered with Generation of Leaders Discovered (GOLD) to:  Reduce the number of new HIV infections among youth through the promotion of safety and health – enhancing behaviour in both HIV infected and uninfected youth.  Mitigate the impact of HIV/AIDS on youth, orphans and vulnerable children, families and communities.


 Develop capacity and leadership within selected community organizations that target youth from communities with : - A high incidence and prevalence of HIV and AIDS. - High numbers of orphans and vulnerable children. - A high incidence of youth risk behaviour. The programme is based on the belief that every person is unique and created with and for a purpose. The programme aims to help young people understand this and to bring together influential teenagers to become change makers and positive role models in their schools through an intensive training and mentorship programme. Through the Childline GOLD programme, young leaders (called peer educators) use the power of peer pressure in a positive way. They influence their peers to have vision and hope for a brighter future and to adopt health enhancing behaviours that will enable them to reach their full potential and create positive change. The GOLD model targets young people to address the risk behaviours and beliefs that are at the root of the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The Gold Peer Modules are: Community Action, Leadership, Sexual & Reproductive Health, Communication Skills, Gender relationships & Rights and Self Development GOLD has four different tracks of peer education – junior, senior, mentor and lead peer educators. The junior track are the Grade 10’s, the Mentor track are the Grade 11’s and Grade 12’s are the lead peer educators. Each track gives peer educators more responsibility, increases their self-esteem and gives them stronger experience in communicating and making decisions. Each year, they gain more experience in reaching their peers with important messages and activities. The Gold Peer Programme was rolled out in the Inanda and Chatsworth areas. The following schools were targeted:

INANDA

Kwamangwa High School UMyeka High School

CHATSWORTH Shallcross Secondary School Crossmoor Secondary School Woodhurst Secondary School Chatsworth Secondary School

WHAT WE DID This year has been both encouraging and challenging at the same time in that we have been able to recruit a strong and passionate team of facilitators who are driven and self motivated. One of the


outcomes of their skills development was their production of sketches, one of which was presented at the 2010 AGM. We have been able to deliver a total of 32 sessions in all the schools and reach 455 learners. These learners have in turn reached an additional 1365 learners via school presentations, school talk groups and strategic chats. Peer educators would interact with other learners and community members and they would then refer them to service providers for assistance.

CHALLENGES: • •

There was not adequate time deliver all sessions due to academic commitments. Some schools in the Chatsworth area had a problem with the recruiting process as well as not getting approval to run sessions during school hours. The facilitators in the Inanda area experienced problems with transport as they lived far away from the school and also had to attend extra school classes on weekends Due to Peer educators drop out, targets were not achieved.

EMERGING TRENDS: Inanda Area: •

• • •

Community members are very reluctant to report any form of violation of their rights, whether it is abuse or crime that is committed against them. The community is unaware of the process of reporting report crimes. The area is under the management of an ‘Inkosi’ (chief) which means that he needs to be consulted for approval of any intervention in the area and he was not always available for consultation. Teenage pregnancy in the area is very high. Drug and substance abuse, unemployment and poverty are some of the challenges this community is faced with. There is a high rate of sexual offences to children in this area.

Chatsworth area: • •

This area is faced with a high rate of substance abuse The rate of teenage pregnancy is increasing Proximity to schools is challenging.

STORIES OF IMPACT An 18-year-old male who had been in the peer education programme for 3 years shares his story: He lives with his mother and sister in the Maphephetheni area and he had been going to a local High School. He had shown tremendous commitment to the programme and passion for the youth. It was for this reason that he was chosen to be a Lead Peer Educator at Childline KZN. He had grown from being a reserved young man to being an expressive leader. We are proud of him and he is a living proof of what the programme can do for the youth.


A 17 year old male peer educator doing grade 11 at Shallcross Secondary, had shown signs of leadership in the school and had been actively involved with projects in the school. He was a junior peer educator and he had been vigilantly attending sessions and became involved in other projects in the school. He then became involved in the Bold leadership programme that is involved with sub Saharan countries. He was chosen to represent South Africa in Washington D.C as a youth leader. In his interview with the ILANGA newspaper, he said that if it had not been for the Gold programme he would not have realized his potential.

POSITIVE PARENTING PROGRAMME

Two facilitators addressing parents at a local clinic regarding positive parenting

PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES The parenting programme was introduced in August 2010. The objectives of the programme are:


To
empower
and
develop
skills
of
parents
and
caregivers
on
posifve
parenfng
to
 prevent
any
form
of
abuse,
neglect
and
exploitafon
of
children


To
provide
support
to
parents
and
caregivers
whose
children
have
been
exposed
to
 sexual
exploitafon


The content of the parenting programme are: Abuse: sign and symptoms

Coping mechanisms

Child development

Childline & supporting services

Positive discipline

Sexuality

HIV/AIDS Child-headed households & protection Referrals for identity documentation & grant applications The project was implemented by 2 project facilitators, who were based at: 

Pietermaritzburg sub-office, serving Pietermaritzburg and surrounding areas

Durban Head Office, serving the Umlazi area

WHAT WE DID A total number of 820 parents and caregivers had attended the parenting workshops that were rolled out in various areas of the KZN Province. As follows a breakdown of the areas where the workshops were rolled out:

AREAS
 Axis
Title


400
 300
 200
 100
 0


AREAS


INANDA


UMLAZI


DURBAN


MAPHUMULA


PBM
AND
 SURROUNDINGS


158


327


71


13


249


Graph
1:

The
highest
number
of
parents
and
caregivers
that
attended
the
parenting
workshop
was
from



the
Umlazi
area.
 VERBAL FEEDBACK FROM PARENTING WORKSHOPS 

Parents and caregivers have showed enthusiasm in attending the workshops offered, as they are aware that it will personally benefit them and the communities they reside in

The project has facilitated education and awareness of physical, emotional and sexual abuse, as well as aspects of parenting skills. Parents and caregivers had indicated that they had been empowered with knowledge, which made a positive difference in communities

Parents and caregivers have indicated that they now understand the different forms of abuse as well as the signs and symptoms to look for in vulnerable children.

It has become evident that the workshops have opened communication channels between parents/caregivers and children and thus children’s voices are being heard.

Parents and caregivers have indicated they realize that it is the responsibility of the community to look after those children who are HIV positive. They have indicated that prior to the workshop they were not familiar about the importance of medical treatment from an early stage.

The facilitators noted that parents and caregivers were shocked to hear that boys could be victims of sexual abuse. This is an example of how education and awareness can be so beneficial in communities.

Childline services were outlined and the benefits of play therapy were explained in order to encourage parents and caregivers to refer victims of sexual abuse to Childline. Parents and caregivers welcomed and were excited about the Child Justice Project (minor boys who molest other children or who display sexualized behaviour). Parents reported that these boys need also therapy in order to become productive community members.

Parents and caregivers have asked Childline to continue presenting workshops in the community and have indicated that the workshops should take place on the weekend, as many parents work in the week and are thus unable to attend these workshops.

Parents and caregivers further indicated that they gained knowledge regarding child development and the needs of children in different life stages

Parents and caregivers realized the importance of educating their children on protection and not exposing their children to circumstances that are not in their best interest

WRITTEN FEEDBACK: EVALUATION FORMS (53 forms were completed) 

Parents and caregivers indicated that the workshop content was sufficient and understandable. They also related that the topics were applicable to everyday situations.


Parents and caregivers indicated that they gained knowledge about different kinds of abuse, as well as how to communicate to your child. Parents indicated that they now realize the importance of communication with children.

Parents and caregivers gave feedback that they would prefer the workshop to be longer – time was not sufficient. Parents further indicated that workshops must be moved to weekends to accommodate parents that are working.

Parents and caregivers all responded positively that they are able to share the information with neighbours and family members.

Parents and caregivers complained about the progress of criminal case and the lack of feedback from the SAPS. Parents are also dissatisfied that they are not informed about bail conditions of alleged perpetrators and release of perpetrators from jail. Parents and caregivers further indicated that they receive no assistance from the SAPS when the alleged perpetrator or his family harasses the victim or the victim’s family. Parents and caregivers further express their dissatisfaction for the delay of the DNA results.

CONCERNS RAISED BY PARENTS DURING THE WORKSHOPS 

During the parenting workshops, parents and caregivers view their dissatisfaction with the SAPS in terms of their children’s case development and the lack of communication thereof by investigating officers.

Parents and caregivers are angry due to the alleged perpetrators being granted bail, without any notification to the victim and their families

Alleged perpetrators or their families harass and threaten the victims and their families into withdrawing cases

Parents and caregivers reported minor boys that molest children are not part of a rehabilitation programme. These boys do not show remorse for their behaviour and in most instances continue with their behaviour

SUCCESS STORIES A young mother attended the parenting workshop at Prince Mshiyeni Hospital. After the workshop, the mother waited patiently to have a private discussion with the facilitator. When she started to talk to the facilitator, she cried uncontrollably. The


facilitator allowed her to cry before she addressed the mother. The mother told the facilitator that she is so overwhelmed by the information received at the workshop today. She disclosed the following: “She herself was sexually abused as a teenager by a well-known community member. As a result of the sexual abuse, she fell pregnant and gave birth to a beautiful baby girl. She had never disclosed to anyone that she was a victim of sexual abuse. One day she received a call to return home urgently as something had happened to her daughter. Upon arriving at home she found her baby girl covered in blood – an unknown man had sexually abused her. She recalled how guilty she felt as she was not able to protect her child. This incident has also brought flashbacks of her own abuse. The parenting workshop was the turning point – she needed help herself. Her daughter is receiving therapy from a social worker at Childline”. After the mother disclosed her story to the facilitator, an appointment was made for her to received therapy from a social worker. The mother is currently attending therapy to manage her own trauma.

A teenage child reported to the social worker that she was sexually abused by her older brother. She is now afraid that he might abuse her younger siblings. She has not disclosed the abuse to anyone, because she was threatened by her brother that he will kill her. The girl attended a number of therapeutic sessions, before she was able to disclose the abuse to her mother. In a supporting environment, the girl told her mother of the abuse. The mother was so shocked upon receiving the news, that she started screaming at her child (girl). The mother’s first reaction was that she did not believe that her son would be capable of abuse. The social worker intervened in the matter and the mother attended a couple of supportive sessions. The mother had realized that she was not supportive towards her daughter an apologized for her behaviour. Mother and daughter are now building on a healthy relationship that is based on trust, love and respect.


VICTIM EMPOWERMENT PROGRAMME PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES Childline KZN has developed age specific therapeutic programmes, which are utilized to facilitate disclosure and the healing process for children of abuse. The therapeutic process allows children to develop trust and build a relationship with the social worker, which in turn enables victims to disclose abuse in a safe environment and thus promoting the start of the healing process. Social workers ensure that therapeutic intervention is adequately planned to meet the developmental needs and the therapeutic goals for each individual child i.e. trauma therapy if a child has been abused, bereavement, if a child has suffered a loss, HIV/AIDS support, court support, forensic assessments, adult survivors etc. Childline KZN ensures that this is addressed with both parents and victims as part of therapy. The aim of services rendered is to empower children to function optimally and acquire coping skills. An adult survivor (of sexual abuse) resource policy and procedure file has been compiled and is being successfully utilised in order to empower and promote healing for vulnerable adults who have been sexually abused as children. The core services are:





Therapeufc
intervenfon
to
children
who
have
been
sexually
abused Support
services
to
Adult
survivors
of
childhood
abuse
 Forensic
assessments


Support
services
to
vicfms
and
families
of
child
abuse,
neglect
and
exploitafon
 Court
support
and
preparafon


Therapeutic Services are easily accessible in the different communities. Services are rendered from 12 satellite offices. Headquarters Durban Inanda Ndwedwe Umlazi (Prince Mshiyeni Hospital) Maphumulo KwaMashu (Mahatma Ghandi Hospital) Pietermaritzburg Chatsworth Crookes Hospital) Ladysmith Grey’s Hospital

Phoenix Scottsburg (GJ


WHAT WE DID NEW REFERRALS/CASES A total number of 1515 new child abuse cases were referred to Childline KZN during this reporting period. As follows a breakdown of the referrals received in respect of the different sub-offices:

NEW
REFERRALS
 KWAMASHU
 LADYSMITH
 MAPHUMULO
 INANDA
 MAHATMA
GHANDI
HOSPITAL
 GJ
CROOKES
 CHATSWORTH
 UMLAZI
 PMB
 NDWEDWE
 DURBAN


18
 55
 49
 59
 47
 157
 58
 572
 122
 32
 346


Graph 1: The graph indicates that the Umlazi sub-offices received the highest number of referrals (38%) during this reporting period. INDIVIDUAL SESSIONS WITH CHILDREN A total number of 5191 individual sessions were conducted with child abuse victims during this reporting period. As follows a breakdown of the individual sessions with child abuse victims in respect of the different sub-offices:


INDIVIDUAL
SESSIONS


KWAMASHU


137


LADYSMITH
 MAPHUMULO
 INANDA
 MAHATMA
GHANDI
HOSPITAL
 GJ
CROOKES
 CHATSWORTH


223
 178
 83
 185
 247
 192


UMLAZI


2039


PMB
 NDWEDWE
 DURBAN


762
 331
 814


Graph 2: The graph indicates that the Umlazi sub-office rolled out the majority of individual sessions (39%) during this reporting period. It must be noted that several offices were faced with a high turnover of social workers, which had an effect on service delivery. The Inanda, Mahatma Ghandi and KwaMashu social work posts were vacant for several months.

INDIVIDUAL SESSIONS WITH PARENTS OR CAREGIVERS A total number of 3492 individual sessions were conducted with the parents and caregivers of child abuse victims during this reporting period


PARENTS/CAREGIVERS


KWAMASHU
 LADYSMITH
 MPAHUMULO
 INANDA
 MAHATMA
GHANDI
HOSPITAL
 GJ
CROOKE
 CHATSWORTH
 UMLAZI
 PMB
 NDWEDWE
 DURBAN


103
 96
 87
 80
 105
 113
 116
 1642
 378
 319
 453


Graph 3: The graph indicates that the Umlazi sub-office had the highest number of sessions with parents or caregivers (47%). It must be noted that several offices were faced with a high turnover of social workers, which had an effect service delivery. The Inanda, Mahatma Ghandi, Umlazi and KwaMashu social work posts were vacant for several months. . CURRENT CASELOAD The current caseload is 3019.


CASELOAD
 KWAMASHU
 LADYSMITH
 MAPHUMULO


73
 54
 82


INANDA


236


MGMH


226


GJ
CROOKES
 CHATSWORTH


122
 49


UMLAZI


1435


PMB
 NDWEDWE
 DURBAN


385
 65
 292


Graph 4: The above graph outlines that Umlazi has the highest number of registered service recipients.

NEWS FROM THE SUB-OFFICES


DURBAN HEADQUARTERS

The headquarters are based in Durban, and is well equipped with therapeutic toys and a video recording system. Social workers can record all therapeutic sessions. Three social workers are based at this service point, rendering individual play therapy and group work to victims of abuse.

EMERGING TRENDS • • •

Abuse of children from informal settlements has increased drastically. An increase in demanding and challenging custody cases has been noted. Lack of feedback and follow up cases by the SAPS has resulted in children not being safe.

UMLAZI – PRINCE MSHIYENI HOSPITAL This is our busiest office. Umlazi is on the coast of Kwazulu-Natal, southwest of Durban. The wider Umlazi area has a population of 750 000 people. HIV/AIDS is a significant problem in the area. Umlazi has seen increased private and government investment which resulted in the construction of new shopping complexes, primary and secondary schools, technikons and libraries. The Umlazi satellite office of Childline is based at Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital, in Ward C4. It is a TCC. Two doctors carry out medical examinations of the victims and two SAPS officers assist with reporting cases. Four social workers from Childline provide therapeutic counselling and psychosocial help to the victims and facilitate group work sessions three times per week. EMERGING TRENDS • • • • • • • • •

The alleged perpetrators are becoming younger in age. Increase in cases whereby victims are drugged and then sexually abused. Increase in reported cases where victims were sexually abused by neighbours. Increase in reported cases where the perpetrator’s family bribed the victim’s family to withdraw the criminal case. The age group up to 14 years are high risk. Increased number of males being sodomised by older boys. Conviction rate still low – “out of my caseload of 550 cases, only 2 cases reported a conviction –” reported a social worker. Parents do not value the need for therapy, once the case is withdrawn in court; the child no longer attends therapy. Increase in cases reported, where social networking sites (M-xit, facebook) are a factor.

SCOTTSBURGH – GJ CROOKES HOSPITAL Scottsburgh is 58km south of Durban. The population is approximately 180 030. Childline is the only organisation rendering therapeutic services in the area. The social worker is based at GJ Crooks


Hospital on Tuesdays, at the Crisis Centre. This office serves the following communities: Park Rynie, Scottburgh, Pennington, Sizels, Ifafa, Baxely, Mthwalume, Umzinto, Emagabheni, Hibberdene, Pumula, Banana Beach, South Port, Sea Park, Umtentweni, Oslo Beach, Umkomaas, Umgababa Areas, etc EMERGING TRENDS • •

There has been an increase in cases reported where family members committed sexual abuse. Family members of the victim were afraid to report the abuse, due to conflict that can arise in the family. The victims did disclose the abuse to either a teacher or other community members. An increase in the number of cases where the victim was abused by a stranger was further noted CHATSWORTH

The Chatsworth sub-office is situated in Arena Park, Chatsworth. This satellite office currently occupies the premises of Chatsworth Community Crisis Centre on Tuesdays to render services. This centre is centrally situated and is accessible by public transport. The total population of Chatsworth is approximately 750 000. According to the SAPS in Chatsworth, reported cases of abuse against women and children have escalated drastically. All reported cases of abuse perpetrated against children are referred to Childline for therapy. Childline has made great strides in rendering psychosocial services in the area. EMERGING TRENDS •

Previously, families were reluctant to report abuse, but a drastic change has been noted and more people are now reporting cases of abuse. Even if parents fail to report the abuse, the extended family, neighbours or friends are now reporting the abuse. INANDA

Inanda is 24 km from Durban and forms part of the eThekwini municipality- the Greater Durban Metropolitan Municipality. Geographically, Inanda is near KwaMashu and Ntuzuma. Childline provides services on: Mondays at the Prophet Isaiah Shembe One Stop Centre, Tuesdays at the Department of Social Development, and Thursdays at Ohlange Child Welfare One social worker is based at this service point on the above mentioned days EMERGING TRENDS: • •

Younger children (under 6 years) are the most vulnerable age groups of sexual abuse The overnight councillor, based at Mahatma Ghandi Memorial Hospital, reported that the highest number of cases attended to after hours are from the Inanda area. MAPHUMULO


This area is predominantly rural comprising mostly of tribal land (99, 49%) which is administered by the Ingonyama Trust on behalf of local communities as constituted under The Ingonyama Trust Act of 1996. The most pressing needs identified in this area are: Lack of water Lack of housing Poor sanitation and electricity Poor telecommunication The need for improvement of social facilities and services Inadequate town planning & nature conservation Poor agricultural development

Our social worker operates from the satellite--office, situated at the Department of Social Development in Maphumulo and Bhamshela. EMERGING TRENDS Community members lack knowledge about sexual abuse and therefore do not see the need to report and refer children for therapy Most children, who attend therapy, are due to the court requesting a social worker’s report. If a case has been withdrawn, the child stops attending therapy sessions. Very few cases were set for trail and no convictions were reported. Matters are not properly investigated or addressed, which resulted in perpetrators still remaining in the same community as the victim.

• • •

PIETERMARITZBURG We is situated at 383 Bulwer Street, Pietermaritzburg and has been operational since 1998. This office is staffed by 2 social workers, an office co-coordinator, an outreach facilitator and an administrative clerk. We serve the District Municipality of Umgundgundlovo, which has the following local municipalities: Msunduzi, Mshwati, Umgeni, Mpofana, Impendle, Mkhambathini and Richmond. EMERGING TRENDS • • •

The number of children that have been abused in informal settlements have increased drastically. Lack of feedback and follow up cases by the SAPS has resulted in low convictions An increase in referrals of young children who display with sexualized behaviour.

LADYSMITH Ladysmith with a population of 225,452 is a city in the Uthukela District Municipality. It is 230 kilometres north-west of Durban . Two staff members from the Pietermaritzburg office, attend to clients at this office on a Thursday. One staff member attends to the intake and another provides psychosocial services. Two offices and a waiting room are made


available by the commander of the FCS. The clients are transported to and from the office by the investigating officers. EMERGING TRENDS • • •

The numbers of children that have been abused in informal settlements have increased drastically. An increase in referrals of young children who display with sexualized behaviour. Parents are in need of support groups.

NDWEDWE Ndwedwe local municipality lies parallel with and is approximately 20 km inland from the Kwa Zulu Natal coast. The municipality extends over 1 076km and consists mainly of poor black communities whose livelihoods depends on subsistence farming. The population of the area is approximately 156 020. The sub-office is based at the Department of Social Development. The social worker visits the satellite office three times a week viz. Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. The social worker works closely with other departments in the area ensuring that a holistic service is provided. EMERGING TRENDS • •

An increase was noted in children being subjected to sexual abuse due to their parents not taking care of them. An increase in the number of children being raped by relatives.

PHOENIX – MAHATMA GHANDI HOSPITAL This satellite office assists clients from Tongaat, Verulam, Phoenix , Newlands and surrounding areas. Services are rendered 3 days a week viz. Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. Services to victims of abuse and their families are provided by a Multi-Disciplinary Team of the Thuthuzela Care Centre which ensures that clients receive a holistic service. EMERGING TRENDS • •

Most abusers of children are people that are known, blood related and trusted by children. Owing to the late reporting of sexual abuse, many victims contract HIV as they do not seek medical attention timeously. There is a game that is played by primary school children in the Newlands area. The name of the game is, “Rude game.” This game entails children participating in sexual activity with each other. KWAMASHU

Kwa Mashu includes Lindelani, Ntuzuma, Quarry Heights and the Siyanda informal settlement. It has a population of 500 000 people. Hostels in the area accommodate those who are employed in the Durban area. However, because they are occupied by people from a variety of different backgrounds, there is a great deal of violence and Kwa Mashu is now known as the murder capital of South Africa. The majority of abuse takes place in these hostels and within the immediate neighbourhoods of hostels. The new satellite office which was launched in November 2006, is situated at the Kwa Mashu Police Station. One social worker is based at this service point rendering services two days per week.


SOCIAL WORKERS INVOLVEMENT IN OUTREACH PROGRAMMES 16 DAYS OF ACTIVISM The Umlazi social workers participated in an outreach programme during the 16 Days of Activism. All stakeholders in the Umlazi area worked together on this programme. The activities were: 2010/11/25: Launch of the 16 Days of Activism programme. 150 guests attended the launch. All departments and NGO’s addressed the guests in terms of their involvement in Victim Empowerment. 2010/11/26: Awareness campaign at shopping centre and taxi rank, educating the community about child protection. 2010/11/29: 6 Clinics were visited and community members were educated about child abuse and protection. 2010/11/30: Different wards were visited at Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital. 2010/12/01 A candlelight prayer was held for all the HIV/AIDS victims. A guest speaker addressed the community about HIV/AIDS and protection issues.

• • • • •

PRESENTATIONS • • •

A presentation was done at Nelson Mandela School of Medicine on how to report child abuse. A presentation was done at Highway Hospice on human trafficking. A presentation was conducted during the Isibindi Programme of NACCW at Durban Children’s Home on Childline Services.

GROUPWORK • •

A play group was held with children under the age of 5 years that were victims of sexual abuse. A support group was held for adult survivors. 4 Members attended the support group.

STORIES OF IMPACT 7 males aged 3- 7 years old from Newlands were referred by Child Welfare. Out of the 7 that were referred, 4 are attending therapy. After meeting with the parents of the victim’s it has become evident that all 7 boys had been abused by the same perpetrator. Symptoms of abuse have included bedwetting and lack of bowel control. When the parents initially observed that the children were soiling themselves, they began holding traditional ceremonies in order to solve the problem. Following advice and support from Childline KZN the parents understood that the symptoms were as a result of the trauma of the abuse and now feel that they are able to support their children appropriately. The children have since overcome their self blame, sense of powerlessness and sense of loss and betrayal towards themselves and others. A 17-year-old female was sexually assaulted by 3 strangers. She was shot during the assault and as a result was partially paralyzed. In therapy, she has been assisted in managing her anger and violation, the perpetual fear for her safety, her self-worth, and her sense of powerlessness. Therapy has assisted her to boost her self- esteem which has been evident from her improved participation in therapy sessions as well as being decisive and able to set goals for herself. With the assistance of the Police, all 3 perpetrators have been arrested. A 15-year-old female victim of sexual abuse was referred by Child Welfare. Since attending therapy, the impact of intervention has been noted by the fact that she no longer is withdrawn,


feels stigmatized, socially isolated or a misfit with her friends. Following therapy, she informed the social worker that she has made 3 friends at school, she feels more confident and she is no longer afraid of the abuser. 3 Children from one family were severely sexually abuse by a community member. The social worker felt the Justice System had failed this family as the investigating officer ignored the family’s cry for help and the family continued to be intimidated by the alleged perpetrator. The social worker intervened by calling the station commander, outlining the concerns. Thereafter, the case was set for trail, after two years of no progress. The alleged perpetrator was sentenced to life imprisonment. This was a great achievement because the social worker took the initiative not just to render psychosocial services to the child, but also to liaise with and pursue the case with the relevant stakeholders. A quote by the caregiver: “…if it was not for Childline, justice would not have been served…” A 16 year old girl, who was sexually abused by her step uncle presented with poor self esteem, was emotionally withdrawn and displayed suicidal behaviour. As she continued with her therapy sessions the social worker noted that her self esteem had improved and her confidence had grown. She also had the courage then to report the case to the SAPS and is now doing well. A 13 year old girl who was sexually abused by her step grandfather came to our offices very traumatized. The child could not concentrate at school and she was collapsing. The school referred the girl to Childline. A trusting relationship was built with the child and she became confident. The child was also prepared to testify in court. The girl testified with confidence and the perpetrator was sentenced to 5 years imprisonment.

GROUPWORK – STORIES OF IMPACT In an adult survivor group, the members have grown emotionally through therapy, but also have made remarkable improvements in their personal lives e.g. one member has started a sewing business, another member is busy writing a book about being an adult survivor. “I have learned to open up more…to express myself. I look forward to see everyone, because they understand where I come from, how I feel…With this group I feel like I am making a difference just by supporting and been supported…” “…it is nice to know that I can have a good cry in front of you and not feel bad. You have let me know that no matter how alone I feel, I am never alone. I feel like I fit in with you ladies like I am accepted in society…”

POEM – BY ADULT SURVIVOR OF CHILDHOOD SEXUAL ABUSE From time to time I ask myself “Have I arrived at all?”


I started out so long ago that I am not certain I recall where I was going “Life’s a journey”, so I have heard I have taken tickets for the trip, but every time I am almost there the places give me the slips and I am disillusioned I use a map to find a way but maps are hard to read and while I am searching for a clue my mind is going to seize – I can’t remember Would I achieve my destiny If I really know the way If journeys end was in my gasp would be sure to say “ I knew where I was going” I am taking my long walk to freedom holding my head up high with a smile... not putting my head down in shame!!!

From - Me

COURT SUPPORT PROGRAMME PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES Families tend to rely on social workers and the court support counsellor for information regarding their criminal cases, confusing terminology, the role of the justice system and court procedures. The programme assists in strengthening the support system for the child, as informed parents are more willing and able to see cases through to their conclusions. The programme aims to empower children and their families.


One court support counsellor is based at the Durban Magistrates Court where support services are rendered to child victims and their families at the V and K courts. All social workers integrate court support to victims through therapy to assist with forensic assessments and impact assessment reports. The Objectives of the Programme are: -

Court preparation Court support Facilitating disclosure Referrals to the victim empowerment programme

WHAT WE DID As follows the outcome of the court support programme at the Durban court:

419
PARENTS
 Support
 AND
 to
 CAREGIVERS
 parents

 SUPPORTED


Support
 488
CHILDREN
 WERE
 to
 SUPPORTED
 children







28
CHILDREN
REFERED
 TO
THE
THERAPEUTIC








 Referals
 DEPARTMENT
FOR
 INTERVENTION


CRIMINAL CASES OUTCOMES

Outcomes
of
court
cases
 Withdrawals
 28%


Convicfons
 37%
 Aquited
 35%


Graph 1: The graph illustrates that 37% of the cases supported at the Durban Court had an outcome of conviction.

CHALLENGES  An increase in children that are mentally challenged who need to testify. The court support counsellor reported that it is a challenge to prepare these children to testify in court

 Parents do not make provision for lunch or refreshments for their children. Children wait long hours before they are called to testify and are often hungry and tired.


SUCCESS STORY A child had to testify at court. The court support counsellor reported that she was so scared and fearful. The child indicated to the NPA that she does not want to testify any longer. The child cried continuously, begging her parents to take her home. The court support counsellor attended to the child, using various counselling techniques. Finally, the child was able to testify and the perpetrator was sentenced to 30 years. The parents and the child was relieved that justice has prevailed.

LET T ER T O MY DA D I would like to ask you this: “Why did you rape me?”. How would you feel if I am HIV positive. I am afraid, because I do not know my status. Why you do not love me, because I love you. Why did you bring me into this world, if it is gonna be like this? I do not know what to say to you...but you out of my life and my heart. Why did you not want to tell me about my mom? You knew she was death...but you did not tell me. I thought you were going to be a good father, but you weren’t...which mean you hate me. From – not your child, just ME!

OVERNIGHT SUPPORT PROGRAMME PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES


The overnight support counsellor is a new post that was created in order to render debriefing services to child victims of abuse, neglect and exploitation. Children that arrived at the TCC display symptoms that is trauma related, e.g. crying, withdrawn, numb, angry, etc. Parents or caregivers of child abuse victims also display trauma related symtoms, e.g. angry, confused, emotional, crying, etc. The counsellor used various skills and therapeutic tools to render support services to both children and their families. The overnight counsellor is based at the TCC Mahatma Ghandi Memorial Hospital on night shift.

WHAT WE DID During this reporting period a total number of 63 sexually abused children and 18 adult victims received debriefing services. Further, the counsellor had rendered support services to 63 parents and caregivers whom accompanied their children to the TCC centre.

18
 8


13
 6


0
‐
6
 7
‐
12
 years
 years
 12
‐
17
 adults
 years
 
 Graph 1: The diagram shows that the age group, 0 – 6 years, has a high reporting rate of sexual abuse. 18 of the 32 children were under the age of 6 years. The youngest child was a baby of 7 months. The diagram further indicates that a high number of adult rape victims have also received counselling services from the overnight counsellor.

03:00
‐
06:00
 00:00
‐
03:00
 21:00
‐
00:00
 18:00
‐
21:00


Series
1
 0


5


10


15


20


25


30


Graph 2: The diagram outlines that from the 45 cases that were reported in March 2011, the highest number of cases was reported between 18:00 to 21:00. Only two cases were reported between 03:00 – 06:00, and these two children were below the age of 5 years.

CHALLENGING CASE The overnight counsellor reported that one evening a child victim was brought in due to sexual abuse. The parents of the child were extremely disturbed, e.g. crying, blaming themselves, etc. While the counsellor was busy with the parents, she heard a lot of noise in the waiting room. The alleged perpetrator’s family came to the TCC and


started to scream at the parents and child victim and eventually both families started to physically attack each other. The child was highly traumatized by this. The counsellor had to call the hospital security to remove the family of the alleged perpetrator.

DRAWINGS – CHILDREN TELLING US ABOUT THEIR CONCERNS

ORPHAN AND VULNERABLE CHILDREN (OVC) PROGRAMME PROGRAMME OBJECTIVES The programme aims to address the urgent need to reach out to vulnerable women and children who are at acute risk of being abused. The primary beneficiaries include OVCs and their caregivers and parents. The objectives of the programme are:


Render
psycosocial
support
 to
OVCs
 Render
psychosocial
support
 to
parents
and
caregivers
 To
create
awareness
and
 educate
the
communifes
 on
HIV/AIDS,
child
 protecfon
and
 management
of
abuse,
 neglect
and
exploitafon


The programme was rolled out in 11 Districts in the KZN Province. The project was supported by PEPFAR and the US Consulate funding. Childline KZN has recognised the urgency of addressing the growing needs of children orphaned or made vulnerable by HIV/AIDS and providing comprehensive care. Our goal is to help these children and adolescents grow and develop into healthy, stable and productive members of society. The project has been implemented at GJ Crooks Hospital, Grey’s Hospital, a satellite office in Ladysmith and in the Durban area. The Crisisline was also part of this project.

WHAT WE DID OVCs were identified via school awareness campaigns, referrals from community members, etc. Psychosocial services were provided to OVCs, e.g. therapeutic intervention, debriefing, counselling, risk assessments, etc. Parental workshops were facilitated throughout the KZN Province. Community members were trained on the management of child abuse, neglect and exploitation, HIV/AIDS, etc. During this reporting period: • • •

5510 orphaned and vulnerable children were identified and services were provided 606 parents received psychosocial services 3596 community members were trained

EMERGING TRENDS •

Community members in some communities have indicated that it is a norm for young girls to be married to older men.

Children fall pregnant at a young age and thus stop attending school. This results in children returning as adult learners (some cases the learners are 25 years)


• •

Through observation and discussion with community members, it has become evident that 8- 14 members in a family live together in a household unit. Caregivers do not seek medical attention for children who are HIV positive, even though they have a Clinic nearby. Community members indicated that they are scared of the stigma in the community attached to HIV/ AIDS. When children are sick or diagnosed with HIV, caregivers keep the children away from school without taking them to receive medical attention and will then send them back to school when they have recuperated.

Children are the future...let’s make it a brighter one

OFFENDERS PROGRAMME The Offenders Programme is divided into the:


• • •

Boys who are victims Child Justice Programme Adult Offenders Programme.

The two programmes will be outlined separately for this report.

CHILD JUSTICE PROGRAMME The objectives of the project are:

Managing
 sexualised
 children


Awareness
 and
 preventafve
 services


Support
 services
to
 parents
and
 caregivers


Therapy
and
rehabilitafve
 services
to
children
who
 present
with
inappropriate
 sexualized
behaviour
 With the increasing rate of sexual offences by children, Childline has developed programmes in response to this. The sex offender treatment programme is in line with the Child Justice Act. The Child Justice Programme is designed to focus on the experiences of boys who have been traumatized and provide a preventative, responsive and therapeutic purpose to address and prevent abuse in our society. Abuse can be devastating and can impact on children behaviourally, emotionally and psychologically. Therapeutic intervention is offered to boys enabling them to cope and heal from past traumas, to correct or address any maladjustment and to work towards optimal, well-adjusted lives. Therapeutic Services are easily accessible in the different communities. Services are rendered from Durban Headquarters, Pietermaritzburg sub-office and 2 satellite offices, namely GJ Crooks Hospital and Prince Mshiyeni Hospital. The main focus of the program is the offenders:

To
take
 responsibility
for
 their
behavior


TARGET GROUP

To
demonstrate
 empathy
for
their
 vicfms


To
develop
a
 comprehensive
 relapse
prevenfon
 plan.



Children from different sectors participated in the Child Justice Programme. The target group was: Children who have been abused Parents and caregivers of the children Children from institutions Low functioning children Children who present with inappropriate sexualized behaviour

WHO REFERS CHILDREN TO THE PROGRAMME Community
 8%


Referrals
received
from
 SAPS
 14%
 Insftufons
 11%
 Probafon
officers
 7%
 Voluntary
 60%


Graph 1: The above graph represents the referral sources of boys who are attending therapeutic services. The number of boys attending the programme on a voluntary basis has increased compared to other referral sources. The parents are becoming more aware of the importance of therapy and they motivate their boys to attend the individual sessions.

PARTNERSHIPS WITH INSTITUTIONS There were 9 institutions involved in referring boys who were sexualized or abuse to the project. The institutions who partnered with the project in the current year are: NAME OF THE INSTITUTION Umthombo Street Children Mother of Peace Valley View Place of Safety St. Vincent Child and Youth Care Centre William Clark Garden Child and Youth Care Centre St. Theresa ‘s Child and Youth Care Centre I Care Hope Centre SOS Children’s Village Greenfields Child and Youth Care Centre

WHAT WE DID NEW REFERRALS During this period under review 129 new referrals were received from various stakeholders such as probation officers, Child and Youth Care Centres, SAPS and from community as follows. A breakdown of referrals received from each satellite office:


PMB
 9%


NEW
REFERALS


GJ
CROOKES
 5%
 PRINCE
 MSHIYENI
 22%


DURBAN
 64%


Graph 2: The pie diagram represents the number of new referrals received for the year. The Durban office receives more referrals compared to other sub- offices. INDIVIDUAL SESSIONS WITH BOYS During this period under review 331 sessions with children were done. As follows a breakdown of the sessions per satellite office:

PMB
 3%
 GJ
CROOKES
 4%
 PRINCE
MSHEYENI
 22%


SESSIONS


DURBAN
 71%


Graph 3: The above diagram shows the total sessions conducted with the clients. As there is an increase in the number of clients at Durban office the sessions provided for the clients are more comparing to other sub-offices. As there was a shortage of staff at Pietermartizburg office, the number of sessions conducted is low. AGE GROUP OF CHILDREN THAT RECEIVED SERVICES FROM CHILDLINE Number of children presenting with sexualized behaviour: 58 Number of children who abuse other children: 94 Age group 0-6 Yrs 7-11Yrs

Sexualized Behaviour 14 42

Children who molest other children 0 0

Total 14 42


12-15 Yrs 16-18 Yrs TOTAL

2 0 58

70 24 94

72 24 152

Graph 4: Above table is the graphical representation of the boys attending the therapy sessions at Childline based on their age. The numbers of children in the age group of 12-15 years who attend the therapy are more compared to 0- 11 and 6-18 years.

NEWS FROM THE DIFFERENT SERVICE POINTS DURBAN

The Child Justice Project provided services at Durban Central office. Clients were referred from Institutions, Criminal Justice System and SAPS attend sessions at this office. The total number of group sessions conducted for the year is 87. The number of parenting sessions conducted was 2.

PIETERMARITZBURG Childline PMB sub office is situated in Bulwer Street. The project provided services to children presenting with inappropriate sexualized behaviour. The children were referred by various stakeholders such as SAPS, Probation officers, NICRO, NGO’s and NPO’s. The children from Sweetwater, Imbali township, Mpophomeni and Greenwood received services at the sub office. The number of new referrals received for the year is 23. PRINCE MSHIYENI HOSPITAL Prince Mshiyeni hospital is situated in Umlazi, Durban. Umlazi is a densely populated municipality with informal settlements. Various service providers, e.g. Municipality, SAPS, NPA and DSD together with the staff of Prince Mshiyeni hospital recognised a need for the services and approached Childline KZN during 2010 as a partner to deliver this service. The Child Justice Project provided individual therapeutic services and group therapy for the boys who are presenting with inappropriate sexualised behaviour. One staff member is based here once a week, on a Monday afternoon The total number of clients receiving services at this sub office is 23. G J CROOKES HOSPITAL G J Crookes hospital is situated in Scottburgh. The project provided services to children presenting with inappropriate sexualised behaviour in the surrounding areas of Amandwe, Ezembeni, Dududu, Braemar, Kwanquolo and Umthwalume.. The total number of cases are12. Services at the sub office are provided on Fridays,


EMERGING TRENDS •

Majority of children in the child and youth care centre are victims of abuse which remains unaddressed and a great majority of these boys are orphans. Some display introverted behaviour, unable to express their feelings and emotions, are easily manipulated by other children, feel rejected and thus develop poor self esteem and sometimes demonstrate uncontrollable anger.

An increase in low functioning children. The therapist needs to be innovative and creative in developing a treatment plan for each child. Activities during the individual and group sessions needed to be carefully chosen in order to meet the treatment goals.

Increase in cases where perpetrator is known to the victim. Sibling incest cases are on the increase. Reported cases show that the perpetrators are also neighbours and family.

Increase in the number of same sex cases.

Increase in the children accessing cell phones and the internet and therefore increase in exposure to pornography.

Long term clients not keeping their appointments is one of the major challenges and it is recommended that therapy should be mandated by Court or be part of a developmental plan.

ADULT SEXUAL OFFENDERS PROGRAMME The main objective of the adult offenders programme is to rehabilitate adults who have committed sexual crimes against children to prevent re-laps. The total number of 11 new referrals was received for the year. The current caseload is 20 adults. The cases have been referred by the Criminal Justice System. The clients who are attending the programme have to complete the individual assessment sessions and is compulsory to attend the group therapy programme. The therapeutic services are provided at Durban Central Office. A total number of 131 sessions was conducted with clients. 43 group sessions were conducted in this reporting period. The clients who are attending the therapy sessions are mostly from the Durban area.

AGE GROUP OF THE OFFENDERS

Sexual
abuse
 6
 4
 2


Sexual
abuse


0
 25‐30
yrs
 30‐40
yrs
 40‐50
yrs
 50‐60
yrs
 60‐70
yrs



Graph 5: The above graph represents the distribution of clients attending the therapy sessions based on their age. It can be stated that the highest number of clients who are attending the therapy are between 40-50 years 


STORIES OF IMPACT
 An 8 year old child was sexually abused by his step father, who was the sole breadwinner of the home. The mother did not respond favourably to the child reporting the incident to her. The child then disclosed the abuse to his class teacher. The teacher made efforts to contact the mother, who did not respond. Deterioration in the child’s school progress was noted by the teacher. The teacher then referred the case to Childline KZN. When the child came to Childline he was depressed, angry and distrustful. During his individual sessions at Childline, considerable changes in his attitude and behaviour were noted. The child openly spoke about the abuse and took corrective steps to his recovery. The class teacher also reported that there is positive impact on the child’s school work, as well as his interactions with his peers. A Child was referred to Childline for therapy as part of the diversion programme. It was alleged that he sexually abused his ten year old cousin. During his first contact at Childline, he was nervous and very reluctant to disclose any information. His negative attitude towards therapy was clearly evident. During therapy the child gradually began to trust and disclose pertinent information to the therapist. He informed the therapist that he was exposed to domestic violence and a mother who called him belittling names such as stupid and beat him up. His mother would use him to vent her frustrations. After intensive therapy the child has acknowledged his inappropriate behaviour towards the victim. Therapy sessions were rendered to his mother on how to cope and provide positive discipline and support the child. The Child’s relationship with his mother has improved and he is able to communicate with his family more effectively.

Childline KZN are always thinking of you, and working towards a better, safer world, but you can be the master of that too!!! - Challenge me booklet


CHILD PROTECTION PROGRAMME The child protection programme is a therapeutic programme for sexually abused children. Children were seen by a social worker during individual and group sessions. The Core Principals of the programme were: • • • •

Multi-disciplinary teamwork Best interest of the child Working in the life-space of the child Creating a consistently “holding” environment for the child

During the Child Protection Programme, the core team consists of the following partners: • • • •

Isibindi CYC mentors CYCWs from Isibindi project areas Therapists Children’s centre senior and support staff

WHAT WE DID During this reporting period, 3 Child Protection programmes were rolled out. As follows the outlay: DATE

WHERE

CHILDREN PARTICIPATED

13 – 17 December 17 – 22 December 13 – 17 December Total:

Durban Children’s Home Kimberley Eastern Cape

24 17 21 62 children

All the children were victims of sexual abuse. The children are from the deep rural areas, where specialized therapeutic services are not available. 3 Individual and 2 group sessions were conducted.

CHALLENGES   

The children were very scared to interact with the social workers. They clung unto their caregivers and cried when left alone. Language barrier in Eastern Cape (Xhosa speaking children) and Kimberley (mostly Afrikaans speaking children). Children are not prepared by their social workers in terms of the programme and therefore children are under the impression they are on a holiday camp. This had a great impact on disclosure and participation during individual and group sessions.


STORIES OF IMPACT A family of 3 girls attended the programme. All 3 girls were sexually abused by their maternal uncle. The 2 older girls were so afraid to disclose due to fear of intimidation. The younger girl did disclose that her uncle sexually abused her from the age of 7 years. She is now 10 years old. It was also reported that the eldest girl fell pregnant, but was forced to have an abortion. The maternal uncle was arrested and is in custody at the moment. The girls had received therapy to help them cope with the trauma of the abuse.

THERAPEUTIC DATABASE To date approximately 6900 cases have been captured for the period 2010 to 2011, encompassing old closed cases and current cases. These cases included cases where children received psychosocial services for any form of exploitation neglect or abuse. Other categories of cases include: • • •

adult survivors of childhood abuse, young children under the age of 10 years who exhibited sexualised behaviour and Adult sex offenders.

Prior to a case being closed, details of the case is updated such as, • • •

the outcome of the case, whether the perpetrator had been arrested, The safety of the child.

It is easier to track cases and report on the status of the case because the cases are continuously updated. If a file has been misplaced or destroyed, the database would be able to provide all the relevant details. This is particularly important because quite often case enquiries come up by the prosecutor long after the therapeutic sessions are completed and the social workers concerned have left the organization. EMERGING TRENDS •

• • • •

Over 90% of the cases reported were child abuse, neglect and exploitation. The other cases related to child sex offenders, adult survivors, teenage pregnancies, child-headed households, substance abuse and child prostitution. There was an increase of cases of sexualized behaviour of children under the age of 10 years. This was evident in both the wider community and in the Children’s Institutions. This trend of inappropriate sexual behaviour was caused by a number of reasons. These include: These children were exposed to sexual activity and pornography. Pornography was easily accessible with the advances in technology. Most children had access to cell phones and computers. Children were sexually abused themselves and now tended to experiment with each other. This was more evident in the institutions where the children were placed initially because of sexual abuse. There has also been an increase of very young victims of sexual abuse. The victims are between the ages of 1 and 5 years. There have also been 5 cases of adult female survivors of sexual abuse seeking help many years after the abuse occurred.


• •

• •

• •

• •

It was identified there was an increase of 25% in cases of sexual abuse in the Umlazi area. 111 children between the ages of five years old were sexually abused by strangers especially in Umlazi. The victims were too young to even describe the alleged offenders. This created a dilemma for the parents and the police. Most of these cases were withdrawn in court. Parents generally became disillusioned with the entire judicial system and were reluctant to even report the matters to the police. An alarming trend was that children were given drugs and alcohol by the perpetrators before they were sexually abused. Some of the children did not even remember the abuse, thus these cases were not reported to the police. This essentially meant that the perpetrators were free to abuse again using the same modus operandi. Due to poverty in most of the areas, many victims were lured by the offenders with promises of food or money. The children were approached by unknown people who offered them food. The children were then taken to the perpetrator’s house and sexually abused. About 50% children between the ages of six to 12 years were sexually abused while they were out with their friends or playing outdoors. These children were approached by unknown men, often more than one, forcibly taken to nearby bushes and gang-raped. Almost 75% of the victims of sexual abuse were abused by someone they knew, whether it was a family member or someone in the community. The children were often too afraid to disclose the abuse and the abuse continued over a period of time. The children often felt that they would not be believed. Often children felt more comfortable disclosing the abuse to another person like teachers or neighbours. Children were often disclosing the abuse to teachers therefore teachers need to be trained on recognizing the symptoms of abuse and the procedures to follow. Another disturbing trend in Umlazi was when house burglaries were comitted, children were raped in front of family members. A 14 year old child was sexually abused by three men who broke into the house. The perpetrators abused the child in front of the child’s mother. Children were also being threatened by the alleged perpetrators that they would kill their parents if they disclosed the abuse Mentally challenged children were increasingly becoming victims of sexual abuse. These children did not understand what had happened to them. It was only when parents noticed blood stains on the child’s underwear, only then was the child taken for a medical examination and the abuse confirmed. These children were unable to identify or describe the offenders. Children who were asking for directions were at risk. An eleven year old child was sexually abused after being given incorrect directions by a stranger. He then followed her, lured her to a dumping ground and sexually abused the child. Parents were experiencing difficulties contacting the investigating officers. There was generally a lack of feedback from the police regarding the cases. This indicated there was a lack of investigation on the part of the investigating officers. Parents were becoming increasingly frustrated with the police. The police often did not provide the parents with feedback following a bail hearing. When bail was granted, the police were not imposing bail conditions. This resulted in perpetrators returning to the area in which the child lived and intimidating the witnesses. This traumatized the child further. In Umbumbulu, children were abducted and abused over a couple of days. A 9 year old child went to school on a Friday and was abducted by an unknown man. He took her to his house and sexually abused her until he released her Monday morning to go to school. She was blindfolded so she was unable to lead the police to the house. Another 15 year old child went to visit her friend. She was abducted by 3 men and raped over a period of 8 days. 50% of sexual abuse on girls between the ages of 12 to 16 years in Umlazi was perpetrated by current and ex -boyfriends between the ages of 14 and 16 years. Parents were often in denial when abuse occurred thus depriving the child of medical attention. Some parents were afraid to check the child’s HIV status after rape. Sexual abuse by prominent members of the community was a concern in Umlazi. A three year old child was sexually abused by a Pastor who is also the owner of the crèche. After this case came to light, many other parents came forward alleging that the pastor had also abused their children.


Suicide or attempted suicide was another disturbing trend emerging in 2 areas, Sydenham and Verulam. The child was sexually abused by her biological father from at the early age. She attempted suicide 3 times. She only responded to therapy once her father was arrested. Another child disclosed to her Principal that she had been sexually abused by her maternal uncle for the past 2 years. Once her peers became aware of the abuse, the child was shunned and teased at school. The child tried to commit suicide by slitting her wrists

ACHIEVEMENTS •

Tracking and locating cases through a database system e.g. by typing in a child’s name, the relevant details of the child are immediately accessible.

It also enabled the organization to keep track of the social worker that was assigned to a particular case. Cases are transferred from one worker to another should the worker leave the organization or has been assigned to another sub-office. The database listed previous and current therapists. Other categories have been identified for inclusion in the database i.e. trafficking, child abduction, child pregnancies, and child headed households. It is hoped that the database will be updated soon.

Monitoring and evaluation of cases is possible.

Establishing trends and concerns and guided service delivery.

Month-end statistics indicate the number of cases captured, trends observed and the number of referrals received and allocated.

When the cases were captured, detailed recordings were made of the area in which the abuse had occured, the type of abuse and the age of the child. At the end of the month, trends and challenges are noted. GRAPHICAL PRESENTATION OF STATISTICS FOR 2010 AND 2011

Victims per age group Age

Female

Male

Unknown

Total

Less than 1

23

5

1–6

1427

218

14

1659

7–9

1125

266

11

1402

10 – 12

1014

176

10

1200

13 – 15

1324

123

6

1453

16 - 18

821

48

9

878

19 – 21

33

9

22 – 30

30

30

31 – 40

15

15

41 – 65

4

66+

3

Unknown

135

28

42

3

7 3

35

13

183


Total

5,954

883

63

6900

Graph 1: The age group 1 – 6 years is the highest number of registered children on our database.

VicBms
per
Age
group
 4%


3%
1%
00%
 %
 1%
2%


Less
 than
1
 1
–
6
 7
–
9


24%


12%


10
–
12
 13
–
15
 16
‐
18


21%


20%
 12%


Graph 2:

An outlay of the above table – illustrating that the age group 1 – 6 years has the highest number of registered clients.


vicBms
per
area
 Below
6
years
 0
 548


DBN‐UMLAZI
 DBN‐PHOENIX
 DBN‐NEWLANDS
EAST/W


52
 32
 56


DBN‐INDWEDWE


82


DBN‐UMBUMBULU
 DBN‐LAMONTVILLE
 DBN‐KWAMASHU
 DBN‐KWAMAKHUTHA


30
 16
 34
 154


DBN‐INANDA
 DBN‐CHATSWORTH


44


DBN‐AMANZIMTOTI



36


Graph 3:

The above graph outlines that the highest number of registered clients in the age group 1 – 6 years are from the Umlazi area.

MESSAGES FROM THE CHILDREN...

Thank
you
Childline,
you
have
helped
me
to
smile
again...
 8
yrs)


(girl,


I came to Childline to talk about the sad feelings in my heart and now I feel better...(girl, 5 yrs) Thank
you
to
my
social
worker.

You
are
the
best!!!

(boy,
9
yrs)



ADVOCACY & NETWORKING & RESEARCH Through advocacy and networking, Childline KZN has set out to: Advocate and contribute to policy development to make sure this is in the best interests of children. Train volunteers and service providers in the management of abuse. Advocate and develop capacity on children’s rights. Contribute whether by research or otherwise to the body of empirical knowledge on issues relating to prevention and treatment of abuse. Ensure effective and just management of abuse by working in collaboration with relevant stakeholders and by co-ordinating all interventions at family and inter-professional levels. Advise the public on the way forward.

• • • • • •

THE MEDIA RADIO

27 radio shows with East Coast Radio, SABC, Ukhosi FM, Highway Radio, Radio Lotus, Gagazi NEWSPAPERS

84 articles with the following newspapers: The Mercury

The Daily News South Coast Herald Tabloid Rising Sun Sowetan The Witness The Post Sunday Tribune Sunday Times Saturday Independent The Berea Mail Drum

THE ISSUES COVERED RELATED TO

• -

Abandoned babies, informed communities and children of Childline’s services, Jules Secondary School incident – prevalence of sexual violence in schools, impact of sexual abuse on children in relation to various cases was highlighted, 16 days of activism – meaning thereof and impact,


-

the prevalence of abuse in the province, concerns and advise to matriculants, missing Children – presented on what can parents do in diverse situations to protect their children and what are the protocols for missing children, male circumcision Child pornography –prevalence and impact

EXPERT WITNESS AT COURT  

provided testimony on 3 cases to assist in prosecution of sex offenders Testified for the state to assist in prosecution of a stepmother who killed her step-child

NETWORKING MEETINGS KZN PROVINCIAL ADVISORY COUNCIL Childline is an attendee at KPAC general forum and as part of a task committee ensures that children issues, by the Municipality and KZN Advisory Council are given a focal inclusion and priority. A letter was also sent to the Premier by the task committee listing concerns on children in the province. Our monthly statistics for the crisisline is presented at KPAC to address the trends affecting children in the province in order to formulate a relevant preventative response HUMAN TRAFFICKING / PROSTITUTION / PORNOGRAPHY AND BROTHEL TASK TEAM MEETING Childline is an active member of this committee and has ensured implementation of programmes in schools and in the training of service providers on trafficking. A DVD on trafficking was developed for distribution to schools. A sex workers protocol has been developed as well on how to address children who are involved in sex work. PROVINCIAL VICTIM EMPOWERMENT FORUM Childline participated in developing an implementation plan for the province and provided feedback to the 4 Chakras on evaluation of DSD. Local victim empowerment structures have been supported in various districts in the province DIRECTORS FORUM Directors of various NGOs assemble to address issues of funding, management and governance KZN INTERSECTORAL CHILD CARE AND PROTECTION PLAN: FIFA WORLD CUP 2010 During the World Cup, Childline was an active member in the Provincial task team and was the only NGO that partnered with the Provincial Department of Social Development in providing after hours services to children in their crisis plan, in reporting to FIFA via the Province. Engagement with municipalities on the safe park for Durban was also ensured but did not materialize due to the lack of planning on structure for the safe space YESINGANE NETWORK


Childline is part of Yesingane Network and was tasked to address KPAC on the lack of direction and coordination in children’s issues. The aspect of implementation of PMCTC and HCT in the province was discussed. This was addressed by requesting Nomusa Kunene to address this issue as a guest speaker at the Childline AGM and thereafter Childline committed to a task team to address a letter to the Premiers office on the above issues. PROVINCIAL CHILD JUSTICE FORUM Childline participated in the Provincial Child Justice Forum meetings to address challenges pertaining to the implementation of Child Justice Act; development of 1-stop centre and probing the conditions of children awaiting trial. Childline was also accredited for the child sex offender programme CHILDLINE SOUTH AFRICA The director is on the board of management of Childline SA and on the task team to address the fundraising and constitutional issues of Childline SA. Several face to face meetings and teleconferences have been arranged to discuss service delivery issues. HWSETA Childline KZN is a full accredited training provider and is involved in regular meetings with the HWSETA on service requirements. INTERNATIONAL VICTIM EMPOWERMENT CONFERENCE Childline presented a paper at the International Victim Empowerment Conference in September on: the trends and on Understanding boys and Men who perpetrate Sex Offences against children: Experiences in therapeutic intervention that have implications for crime prevention and service delivery in SA. This paper was also accepted at the International Conference of CCWA in November, however due to the lack of funds, the paper was not presented. Due to the interest in this paper, the director was requested to do full day training for the Provincial VEPF to diverse stakeholders in October 2010. LAUNCH OF THE EDENDALE TCC Childline was asked to be a guest and do an address at the launch of Thuthuzela Crisis Centre at the Edendale Hospital – and Childline was regarded as the lead partner representing the NGO sector to the National Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development as well as to the MEC for Health. PROVINCIAL PROTOCOL ON CHILD ABUSE, NEGLECT & EXPLOITATION Childline arranged meetings with different stakeholders to update a Provincial Protocol on CANE. The purpose of the protocol would resolve some of the current problems experienced by victims, e.g. poor coordination, poor management of child protection, lack of resources, legislative changes, secondary trauma, addressing the best interest of children, training, etc ABSA CSI – WOMAN WHO LEAD Childline had an exhibition at the Woman Who Lead event as a selected ABSA CSI partner during the month of August


None of us, including me, ever do great things. But we can all so small things, with great love, and together we can do something wonderful. - M other Teresa

CAPACITY BUILDING Childline KZN has adopted a culture to develop the capacity of staff, in order to enhance service delivery in the Province. Although it was not possible to involve all staff for external training courses or workshops, skills transfer was always on the agenda of staff meetings. Staff that had the privilege to attend a training course had to come and train the remainder of the staff. As follows an outlay of courses and workshops staff attended:

Course Content

Who attended & Number

Course Content

Who attended & Number

INTERNAL TRAINING HR and the workplace 4/5/2010

All staff

Monitoring & Evaluation

Inner values 19/5/2010

All staff

Therapeutic tools 2011/02/11

Preparation for FIFA 2010 9/6/2010

Therapeutic Staff

Data quality assurance 3/3/2011

Admin sector

Team building 22/9/2010

All staff

PMB staff

Score cards, appraisals 21/10/21

Senior management

Data quality management – Pmb 04/03/2011 Durban 11/03/2011 Indicators for reporting 18/03/2011

Time management 26/10/2010

All staff

Court preparation

Therapeutic staff

Child Protection 19/11/2010

41 Staff attended

All staff Therapeutic staff

Therapeutic

EXTERNAL TRAINING Victim and Support Empowerment

1 Staff member from Crisis line

17 – 28/05/2010 Commercial exploitation of children 18/6/2010 Traditional medicine in the Era of T.B,HIV and Aids – 29/06/2010

All staff

1 Crisis line staff member

Child protection & participation 3-4/11/2010 8-9/11/2010 New Children’s Act

4 Staff members

All staff


Disabilities and HIV – 27/07/2010

Crisis line

Sexual offences 30 July 2010

All staff

HIV/AIDS prevention – 26/10/2010

1 Crisis line staff member

Monitoring & Evaluation 16-19/11/2010 Update on HIV counselling and testing 29/03/2011 Traditional medicine

1 Staff member 1 Crisis line staff member

1 Crisis line staff member

22/02/2011 Management development 08/11/2010

Senior management

VOLUNTEERS Olive Leaf Foundation 15/6/2010

10 Volunteers

MEETINGS Our Director, Linda Naidoo and staff attended a number of conferences and workshop aimed at improving service delivery to abused children on both national and provincial levels, as well as changing policies and legislation that govern critical issues. At the same time, these crucial networking platforms provided important opportunities to gather information and educate people and organisations about Childline and its services.

DEBRIEFING & TEAM BUILDING Regular debriefing was provided to staff, especially from the crisisline and therapeutic departments. Ms Cathy Hasleu, social worker in private practice, avails her services to Childline KZN on a pro bona basis. Thank you Cathy – your services are of benefit to staff.

TEAM BUILDING On 22 September 2010 the Success Company provided a team building for all staff. The team building was in the form of a mini survivor, and all staff participated actively...and ENJOYED it.

ACCREDITED TRAINING PROVIDER Childline is a HWSETA Accredited training provider. This enables the organisation to provide a full learnership on community health care. The learnership is for 1 year and qualifies a person as a community health care professional. Candidates will obtain all student guides and will be assessed, moderated and provided with an internship within the organisation. HWSETA regards this learnership as one of the most relevant learnerships in view of the current shortage of skills in the health care profession. The learners attended classes twice a week (16:00 – 17:00) and Saturday classes (07:00 – 13:00). FEEDBACK FROM LEARNERS


I was so excited when I received my results. I was given a second change to re-write on module. Khulekani Ngema

The moment I heard of the learnership – community health development – I was so excited. I always wanted to enrol for this course, but was not able to afford it. After our Director, Linda Naidoo told me that I can be part of the training, I was so happy. In beginning I had some challenges with the learning, but I managed to pass my subjects and am so grateful for this opportunity. – Jabulile Thabethe

RESEARCH During the year under review, Childline KZN has embarked on 3 surveys, in order to improve service delivery. As follows a brief feedback on the outcomes of the surveys:

CUSTOMER SATISFACTION QUESTIONAIRE Childline KZN had embarked on an evaluation of our services at various outreach points. Parents and caregivers completed a questionnaire and the data was thereafter analyzed. The clients rated the services regarding: reception area, waiting area, staff that attended to them and service delivery. Clients were able to give input how to improve services as well. The ratings in the questionnaire are: A = excellent – E= poor •

RECEPTION AREA:

12
 10
 8
 6
 4
 2
 0


A
 B
 C
 D
 FRIENDLY


ATTEND
IMMEDIATELY
 FELT
COMFORTABLE


E



Graph 1: Clients rated the service they received at the reception area as overall satisfactory. They indicated that they are greeted in a friendly manner and attended to immediately. Clients did indicate that they felt comfortable, when they were attended to. •

WAITING AREA:

14
 12
 10
 8
 6
 4
 2
 0


A
 B
 C
 D
 E
 CHILD
FRIENDLY


BOOKS/TOYS


CLEAN
TIDY


Graph 2: Clients rated waiting period, before the social worker or facilitator attended to them, as overall excellent. They felt the area is child friendly, clean and had sufficient toys and reading material. •

STAFF

14
 12
 10
 8
 6
 4
 2
 0


A
 B
 C
 D
 E


Graph 3: Clients responded that the treatment they received from the staff is overall excellent. The areas where staff can improve are the time the social worker or facilitator respond to them, as well as staff keeping to appointment times. •

SERVICE DELIVERY


10
 8
 6
 4
 2
 0


YES


Graph 4: Clients responded that the service they received at Childline KZN was satisfactory and adequate. Clients felt that their matter was dealt with in a confidential and private matter, as well as being conducted in the language of their choice. CRISISLINE SURVEY

A survey was recently conducted by the crisis line aimed at identifying community needs, client satisfaction and service delivery. The survey was administered randomly by the counsellors through their interactions with callers to a sample group of 22 people from various areas in KZN. The recommendations of the survey were as follows: ORGANISATION / STAKEHOLDER CHILDLINE

SAPS

DEPARTMENT OF WELFARE

RECOMMENDATIONS • More awareness campaigns need to be conducted. • Address the issue of parent involvement in therapeutic and treatment services was possible. • The need for more satellite offices so that services are more accessible. • Work more effectively with witnesses. • Be clear about how to respond to cases of abuse. • There is a great need for police to display a willingness to help and assist. • Police need to be more efficient. • Callers feel as though they are been harassed by police when reporting abuse and indicated that this issue needs to be addressed. • Work together effectively and cooperatively with other stakeholders. • Give feedback. • Be active. • The rate of response to reports of abuse needs to be addressed. • Continuum of care. • Offer more counselling and support. • Improve service delivery and response times. • Be trained effectively on relevant legislation and how it should be implemented. • Work effectively with other stakeholders.

ORGANISATIONAL RESEARCH TO ASSESS PERFORMANCE & STRATEGY


PURPOSE: To improve performance and ultimately service delivery. The research brought together 3 forms of inquiry. The first of which was 2 questionnaires, 1 of which was administered in March (anonymous contribution) and subsequently in April 2010 (staff identified), which provided both self-assessment & organizational assessment. Feedback of research results was presented to all staff in June 2010, to allow critical conversations to ensure performance management. Groups were formed to brainstorm their standards of operation and how to improve service delivery in August 2010, at the Lambert Hall and staff were refreshed with bunny chows, classic to KZN. RESULTS There was consistency in the responses in the first and second questionnaires by the staff members, which depicted that the staff were open and trusting to convey their responses whether they were identified or not. The questionnaires included questions that reflected factors that hindered staff performance and factors that enhanced services but also required that staff reflect on the contribution that they could make individually, to the efficiency of the organization and in their own individual performance. Q

ITEM

1

DO YOU IDENTIFY AND SUPPORT THE VISION AND MISSION OF THE ORGANISATION DO YOU THINK YOU ARE PERFORMING AT YOUR BEST WHAT WOULD ASSIST YOU TO IMPROVE YOUR PERFORMANCE TRAINING SUPERVISION RESOURCES MONTHLY APPRAISALS FEEDBACK ON MY PERFORMANCE ADDITIONAL OPPORTUNITIES TEAM BUILDING EXERCISES DO YOU TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE CONTINUOUS DEVELOPMENT OF THE ORGANISATION DO YOU THINK YOU SHOULD TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ORGANISATION WHAT CAN YOU DO TO IMPROVE THE FUNCTIONING OF THE ORGANISATION DEVELOP TEAM SPIRIT GETTING TO KNOW THE STAFF VOLUNTEERING TO BE INVOLVED IN TASKS BEYOND YOUR WORKLOAD PARTICIPATE IN MEETINGS PROVIDING FEEDBACK RESOLVING CONFLICT PERFORMING AT HIGHER LEVELS DO YOU UNDERSTAND WHAT PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT IS DO YOU THINK PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT WILL BE TO YOUR DETRIMENT OTHER OBTAIN ACCESS TO SUPERIORS ALWAYS BELIEVE IN MOTIVATING OTHERS

2 3

4 5 6

7 8 9

RESPONSE YES 33 32

RESPONSE –NO

%

0

100

1

97

30 25 25 19 21 21 21 33

91 76 76 58 64 64 64 100

33

100

28 22 21 27 26 20 24 31 0

85 67 64 82 79 61 73 91 100% No

2 33

1 1

Analysis: More achievers than underachievers. Positive attitude, motivated. There was a great need to improve and grow and obtain and give feedback and be supported and affirmed; to be productive and give to the organization, because they were passionate and committed. Most believed they were achievers and the climate provided them with opportunities to achieve. Comments indicated that most attempt to overachieve and comments were positive. Personal planning, time management and ability to manage workload appeared to be one of the critical groupings in assisting staff achieve highly. Supervision appeared to be the next most critical factor in staff performing. This issue was rated similarly to the motivation, passion, commitment, dedication and positive attitude


shown, which helped staff perform at higher levels. Furthermore what was striking is that staff did not expect the supervisors to fulfil all their needs but attempted to self-learn. It was noted that when staff tried to self-learn and use the library they were more motivated and had positive attitudes. This converged into hard work and working as a team to support each other. Most mentioned that their supervision was an integral part of their team, which indicated their openness to supervision and obtaining support. The responses were very diverse for those who responded that they achieved well. The openness to selfassessment was impressive. Most staff appeared to constructively assess their performance and were able to validate what contributed to their performance. Some were motivated and achieved as a result of the positive feedback and the positive change that they obtained from their clients. Others benefited from the training that they were exposed to in the respective programmes. Others believed that their maturity, exposure to new methods like M & E influenced them positively; and others mentioned that the organization’s accountability and credibility helped them to achieve. The positive aspects of the research was that it was practical and change-oriented and that it could be immediately implemented. It also allowed for all to participate in both group activities and individually, to ensure maximum and collaborative participation, and hence own the process of change. It also allowed for the reflection of determining the strategic planning and action of the organization and the ability to fine tune our business plans. The strategic process was to encourage co-operative action inquiry. 


MONITORING & EVALUATION DEPARTMENT Monitoring and evaluation is a crucial component. The definition of the two processes are:  

Monitoring: In its simplest terms, monitoring is collection and analysis of data to track project implementation. (PACT 2005) Evaluation: In its simplest terms, evaluation is the collection and analysis of data to assess the impact of the organization’s work. (PACT 2005)

The two processes are interlinked to each other – as one tracks the project progress, one also assesses the impact that the project creates. Impact and evaluation have been measured using following tools:

the


DATA VOICE A Data Voice System continues to prove to be a valuable monitoring instrument. All calls are recorded on the Data Voice computer programme. This enables the organisation to monitor service delivery and staff rapport and behaviour. The recordings are also used to track cases as well as for training purposes. DATA BASE Statistics are generated from the database; this also enables the organisations to track the progress of staff on a daily basis. Trends are also noted and service delivery and turnover times are monitored. MAN 3000 This is a telephone management system that allows the organisation to keep a record of every incoming and outgoing call. Through the effective use of this system we are able to predict peak and off peak times of the day and the patterns and trends of calls. The system is also used to generate statistical data. PARTICIPANT REVIEWS, SITE EVALUATION FORMS AND USER REVIEW FORMS These forms assist in assessing service delivery. It also highlights how staff had excelled and their areas for growth, through the eyes of our clientele. MONTHLY PROGRAMME Each worker has a monthly plan that clearly outlines all activities that needs to be rolled out during this month. This is also a self assessment tool for workers, in order to monitor time management, project management, performance, priority management, etc MONTHLY REPORTS Monthly reports are submitted to Department managers, which assisted to track the progress of the project. It further assisted to address concerns raised by both parties, but also the evaluate staff’s performance.

ATTENDANCE REGISTERS, These registers assist to verify data and monitor the progress against the project indicators – are we reaching targets. SUPERVISION A platform was created for staff to attend monthly supervision in order to measure staff performance, but also to measure the progress and impact.


Drawing by a child

ADMIN & HR DEPARTMENT A comprehensive review of organisational policies ongoing consultation through the HR team and phased implementation approach are done in close liaison with the Management Board. We embarked on the review of organisational policies with the ultimate aim to manage organisational performance on a day to day basis to improve service delivery. During this year under review, a system of monthly appraisals were introduced, as well as the scorecard system. This had enable middle management to track performances of staff, but also allowed staff to contribute and track their own successes.

ANNUAL EVENTS STAFF YEAR END FUNCTION On 01 December 2010 the Staff Christmas Party was held at the Buds on the Bay restaurant in Durban. On arrival staff members were welcomed


with a refreshing glass of cocktail juice. Once the initial introductions were complete and the starters were consumed, the staff members were treated to a fun filled afternoon of games and dances prior to the main course. After the thrills and frills of the games with some exciting dances performed by staff members, we then sat down to a sumptuous meal. Once we had completed our meals it was a time for a treat and each staff member was given a present from their “secret partner”. The afternoon concluded with messages of goodwill. ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING – 2010 Childline KZN’s AGM was held at the Moses Madiba Stadium. Entertainment provided was exciting and spontaneous, in the form of informative sketch and songs. Speeches were delivered by the director of Childline KZN, Ms Linda Naidoo, Chairman Mr M Sigamoney and Treasurer, Mr S Moodley. The vote of thanks was conveyed by Pravisha Pooran. The meeting ended with light refreshments. CHILDREN’S CHRISTMAS PARTY This is one of the most sought after event on the Childline calendar. The annual children’s Christmas party was held on the 11 December 2010, at the Livingstone Primary school grounds. The day’s activities were arranged by the Outreach Team, who was supported some staff members. Children were entertained by Trixie the clown, and danced to the tunes by Zindix Promotions who sponsored the music and sound for the day. Children and their families were treated to refreshments throughout the day. A fully enjoyed lunch, of Steers burgers and KFC together with dessert was provided by the two generous sponsors. Our major sponsor for the day was “Friends of Illovo”, who not only provided gifts and refreshments for the day, but also provided families with Christmas Food Hampers. The Christmas party was a great success and made possible through the generosity of our kind sponsors. Christmas Parties were also held at the Prince Mshiyeni Hospital, Maphumulo area and GJ Crookes Hospital. Children were treated with sweets, refreshments and entertainment.

Sponsors of Christmas Party

FUND DEVELOPMENT


With the rising cost of living, high fuel prices and the increase in the unemployment rate it is difficult to raise funds without the acknowledgement of the public and the private sector. We are indeed grateful for the little assistance that we receive every day and it is truly gratifying to know that children send their allowances and treats to help the many clients we see each day.

It’s encouraging to note that the list of our Donors are increasing and there are many individuals that never want to be recognized, but it takes a special person who takes the time to give our children a little hope, even if it’s just a treat.

Sweets From Heaven has been providing us with wonderful support by accepting the distribution of collection cans to all their branches in KwaZulu-Natal. They also engage with the organisation, in supplying much needed treats for the children and it is good to know that children are rewarded for their bravery whilst awaiting their sessions afterwards.

CHILDLINE KZN AND BEE All monetary and non-monetary contributions made to Childline KZN are recognizable under the Social Economic Development (SED) pillar within companies BEE scorecard. Since our beneficiary base contributes greater than 75% black children, one would be eligible to claim the full value of the contributions made to our organisation. This would allow companies to obtain BEE points easily, while making a lasting difference in the live of communities.

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. – Margaret Mead DONOR LIST This acknowledgement is of our generous donors who have made some contribution in kind and funds to Childline KZN. We would like to extend our sincere gratitude in any way whatsoever. No matter how big or small the donation, it made a huge difference in the lives of our children and their families.


DONORS National Lottery Board Childline SA OXFAM Nedgroup UNODC Department of Social Development Australia Aid PEPFAR US CONSULATE E A Stewart Trust Maritzburg Auction Durban Round Table No 2 Khetiwe Construction Dr JA Soodyall A Beare Fondation S Ram Sumer GA Horn Regal Security Embury College Greater Good SA Durban Girls High Spescom Canon Bioscope Filling Tiago Trading Gettaphix Telkom Plumbing and General Kayser Baird The Clean Team Sweets From Heaven Ashika Reddy Myvin Pretorious Kuben Pillay Mr AA Sayaana Musgrave Centre ABI Phoenix Depot Morningside Rotary Club Neville Smith: United Church of God Party Zone SA Marketing Mr R Miller (Pmb) Minolta- Gary Goadsby Rajen Naidoo Mr/Mrs Sewpaul Zindix Production

Victor Daitz Foundation Reed Elsevier RTI Gold Peer Department of Education Department of Health ABSA Foundation IOM

Fairfield Dairies USAID Nedbank Limited Community Chest Investec Telkom Round Table No 2 DGMT

Y Govender Follow the Child Asha Devi Dindial FFS Refiners Sibaya Casino FNB Trust Edge Kids Palace Shopfitters SR Moody UK La Lucia Library H Frederiksen Maris Stella High Health Spas Bolt & Nut Cargo Carriers RD Ramlal

DP van Dokku Penzance Primary School Rock Construction J Wilsworth Charity Circle (Winners Family) Arthur Field Illovo Suger Westiville Girls High M Sigamoney Antonio Braz Trust Herdboys South African Sugar Association

Absolute Air Weddings and Functions K Chetty (Marcus) Allan Kruger

Cincinatti Time Chubb Analog & Digital

Sri Sathya Sai Organisation East Coast Radio Jenisha Mahara Colour C: Mr Silvanis Chetty Trish Besnard: Indian Ocean Discovery Health- Durban Condor Security Steers Florida Red Alert Security Marcus Thaver: Pick n Pay DLI Hall: Greshe Pather Firzana Asmal Printmarc Corporate Imaging Makro- Rossburgh Friends of Illovo

Impson Logistics Ezethu Logistics Ashini Naidoo

Carlene and Kerry Sharp Brian Naidoo and Family Ashwin Ramroop Simba: Neren Ramkubare Nandos: Field Street, Durban Kimberly Schaller Allan Lofstrand Durban South Toyota Tony Miller Production Livingstone Primary School Mr Martyn Walters Kevin Dhanapalan Mondi Paper Growth Point Properties KZN Group


 


VERIFICATION OF AGM REPORT This
report
was
compiled
by
the
various
team
leaders
and
checked
by
the
co‐ordinators
and
managers



Kitty
Kuriakose,
Kudzai
Muhwati,
Zamagela
Magoso,
Nonkululeko
Bhengu,
Althea
Walters,
Jacqueline
 Naidoo,
Kasturi
Naidoo,
Logan
Naidu,
Phillipe
Bouffe,
Vanespiri
Pillay,
Linda
Naidoo,
Nonhlanhla
Kaunda,
 Pravisha
Pooran,
Roomana

Mohammed
,
Marilyn
Ntuli,
Ntabiseng
Hlatshwayo.
 The
information
was
verified
by
Vanespiri
Pillay,
data
quality
officer,
by
referring
to
various
source
 documents:


• • • • • • • • • • •

Therapeutic & crisisline database Attendance registers School attendance registers Monthly statistical reports by staff members Caseload registers Monthly reports compiled by staff members NFD reports Daily activity forms Hospital claims Child identification forms Referral forms

Layout
and
final
compilation
of
this
document
by
Jackie
Naidoo.
 
 Authorization
of
this
document
by
Linda
Naidoo


Childline KZN Annual Report  

Annual Report

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