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SUMMER 2020 Volume XXXII Number III

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The Archangel Newsletter (USPS 015-033) is published liturgically seasonally by Saint Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church. POSTMASTER: Please send address changes to the Archangel, Saint Michael And All Angels Church, P.O. Box 12385, Dallas TX 75225-0385

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A MESSAGE FROM THE theRECTOR

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CONGRATULATING OUR SENIORS!

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SAINT MICHAEL STATUS UPDATE

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12 VIRTUAL COMMUNITY: HOW TO ENGAGE US ONLINE 13 MISSION & OUTREACH: HELPING THE COMMUNITY DURING THE PANDEMIC 15 CAMINO DE SANTIAGO 16 FORSAKING NORMAL 18 [PHOTOS] CARING the FOR THOSE IN NEED

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20 HONDURAS THREADS: A LOOM OVER THE HORIZON 22 [RECIPES] MAKE THOSE 4TH OF JULY PIES! 24 ZOOM VIDEO CONFERENCING CHEAT SHEET 26 GRANT THEM ETERNAL REST

During this pandemic we have found ourselves Zooming though space and time working desperately to connect with one another and make virtual that which was physical. And amidst bad video signals, shadow faces, disconnections, and background noise, zoom video chat has helped us maintain a measure of connection with our community and colleagues.

CLERGY FULL-TIME CLERGY

SUNDAY STREAMING SERVICES

The Rev. Dr. Christopher D. Girata, Rector

9 AM CDT

The Rev. Kenneth H. Brannon, Vice Rector

11 AM CDT Contemporary Worship

The Rev. Dr. Eric Liles, Associate for Formation The Rev. Greg Pickens, Associate for Pastoral Care The Rev. Robert A. Scott, Associate for Worship & Liturgy PART-TIME CLERGY The Rev. Canon Michael Harmuth, Sunday Assistant The Rev. Amy Heller, Sunday Assistant The Rev. Bob Johnston, Associate for Contemporary Worship The Rev. Tim Kennedy, Sunday Assistant The Rev. Mary Lessmann, Associate for Spiritual Growth The Rev. Dr. Hiltrude Nusser-Telfer, Pastoral Care Assistant The Rev. Canon René Somodevilla, Pastoral Care Assistant

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Traditional Worship

visit saintmichael.org/live

CONTACTS PRIEST ON CALL (214) 232-7512 Main Parish Number (214) 363-5471

Jubilee Park & Community Center (214) 887-1364 907 Bank Street Dallas, TX 75223 St. Michael’s Woman's Exchange (214) 521-3862 SMWE FAX (214) 522-1933 5 Highland Park Village Dallas, TX 75205 Episcopal Diocese of Dallas (214) 826-8310 Episcopal Diocese FAX (214) 826-5968 1630 N. Garrett Avenue Dallas, TX 75206


SAINT MICHAEL STAFF Monica Awbrey Rob Baber Ross Badgett Julia Dietz Beckel Katherine Bowen Dianne Boyd Rev. Kenneth H. Brannon Justin Brooks Robert Butler Nozar Daryapayma Kathy Davis Jill Delabano Hannah Fisher Netra Fitzgerald Bonita Frederick Rev. Dr. Christopher D. Girata Steven Haal Rev. Canon Michael Harmuth Dr. Margaret (Meg) Harper Travis Harvey Rev. Amy Heller Carol Hicks Diane Hollie Angelia Hunter Madelyn Ivy Adam Jones Rev. Robert (Bob) Johnston III Susan Kalen Cheryl Kaschak Elizabeth Keogh Tiffany LaMotte Rev. Mary Lessmann Rev. Dr. Eric J. Liles Chris Love Caroline Marak Santos Martinez Christi Morrow Chase Monson Tricia Morris Rev. Dr. Hiltrude Nusser-Telfer Collen O'Hara Darla Osterhaut Rev. Greg Pickens Edgar Porras Owen Reid Marco Reyes Monica Rosser Jonathan Ryan Elsa SanJuan Rev. Robert A. Scott Dollie Smith Rev. Canon René Somodevilla Celise Stephenson Tish Visinsky Regan Wallace

Assistant Choirmaster Director of Finance Mgr of Electronic Communication Music Administrator Asst. to Pastoral Care Asst. to Worship & Liturgy Vice Rector Director of Contemporary Music Assistant Director of Facilities Director of Facilities Childcare Asst. to CFM & Youth Ministries Asst. to Adult Formation & Parish Events SMES Head of School Weekend Receptionist Rector Director of Communications Priest Associate for Worship Associate Director of Music & Organist Graphic Design & Production Priest Associate for Worship Extended Care Director Receptionist Accountant Asst. Dir. of Children & Family Ministry AVL & Technology Manager Associate for Contemporary Worship Executive Asst. to the Rector Accountant SMES Admissions & Community Relations Coord. Director of Youth Ministry Associate for Spiritual Growth Associate for Formation Bookshop Manager Stewardship Manager Sexton Mission & Outreach Coordinator Asst. Director of Youth Ministry Director of SMES Priest Associate for Pastoral Care Executive Director of Operations Accountant Associate for Pastoral Care Sexton Organ Scholar Sexton Special Assistant to the Rector Director of Music & Organist Sexton Associate for Worship & Liturgy Sexton Priest Associate for Worship Database Manager, Parish Records Director of Parish Life Director of Children & Family Ministries (CFM)

2020 VESTRY Jay Lipscomb John Ellerman Blair Oden Kathy Kelley Scott Wilson Ginger Brown

Senior Warden Junior Warden Warden-at-Large Treasurer Chancellor Clerk

George Baldwin, Jane Greene, Kyle Moore, Anna Paccone, Hallie Lawrence, Stacey Malcolmson, Steve McKenney, Richard D'Antoni, Louise Griffeth, John McFarland, Jr., Darrel Rice, Erica Sartain

Exp 2020 Exp 2021 Exp 2022 Exp 2020 Exp 2021 Exp 2022

2020 DIOCESAN DELEGATES

John McFarland, Tricia Stewart, Kay Whelan Terry Demler, J.C. Snead, Scott Wilson Michael Blachly, Mary Henderson, Kelly Nichols Reddell alternates: Ed Blessing, Katherine Blachly, Ross Vick Heather Lorch, Jack Rubarth, Blair Oden Michael Reddell, David Henderson, Eric Gilmour

FROM the EDITOR When I arrived in New York City and began the circuitous navigating to my new "apartment", I exited the Holland tunnel and received a much closer view of that which I had seen from a distance: the still-smoking, ashen look of the effects of 9/11. That year in the city will go down as one of the worst and best years of my life. Not knowing anyone, and being super knowledgeable when I was setting up the move, I chose an outstanding 5th floor walkup at 129th and Lenox Ave in what I quickly learned was Spanish Harlem. The whole place was 65 ft2. The front door opened partially before hitting the twin-size bed in the far corner. I was nauseous. In those days I had no idea that walking two blocks across Malcolm X Blvd was like going to a different country—in fact every two blocks was a new country. My grand adventure was a nightmare. One of the reasons, I believe, that Harry Potter was such a success, was the character's magnetic drawing in of the audience's care and affection. I didn't really note anyone reading or watching that was pulling for Voldemort. Statistically, I'm sure there must have been someone.... But was it all Harry? Sure, he was good. At least well-intentioned. But would he have been so beloved had he not encountered and grappled with the turmoil of Voldemort?

Oh Crap. Now I see where he's headed with all this. The Yin-Yang thing. Perhaps, but with a Jesus twist. No way I would have characterized my NYC journey as both good if the story ended with the above. Similar to Harry, who met Sally, I mean Ron and Hermione, I met a few wonderful friends that to this day I keep up with. While I started in my shoe-box at 129th & Lenox, I ended up in a larger shoe-box at Central Park West. Ultimately, that time felt in a way as if I were holding my breath, watching life happen in the distance, except for the undeniable moments of adventure: every ride on the subway, learning that Cheesy Pizza on 100th delivered all night long, exploring the underground tunnels of the collapsed subway near Cortlandt Street and finding workers clearing the debris like moles clearing a home—that time was filled with incredible highs and depressing lows. Sound familiar? For any that have been following, the Presiding Bishop, Michael Curry—in addition to his "Way of Love" series—has been releasing short, thoughtful and encouraging videos each week as part of his "Habits of Grace" series. This week's is particularly timely in that it touches on this dichotomy I believe most of us are experiencing during this time of Voldemort-19: he pulls from Luke 6, "Blessed are you who are poor, for yours is the kingdom of God. Blessed are you who are hungry now, for you will be filled. Blessed are you who weep now, for you will laugh." Like our lives, currently, Luke advocates that there is always another side to experience. That we are cared for, even if we don't feel like it. What is your experience right now? Are you stir-crazy? Depressed? Doing great? (some are...) Lonely in isolation? It won't last. Let the temporary nature of this be the first ray of light to any darkness you feel in this pandemic quarantine. Then look around and glean more light from friends and family—even if on a screen— and build your case for laughter. We will still weep. That's okay. But we'll also laugh. See pg. 12 for all the ways to be encouraged and connected with the parish. Read Luke 6 with me and renew your commitment to do more than survive, but to thrive. And maybe check out a little laughter available on YouTube that Bishop Curry advocates. Search for "Quarantine with Bishop José". You're welcome.


A MESSAGE FROM THE RECTOR

NOW IS THE TIME FOR CHANGE

W

e are quickly sliding into the summertime, and even though the heat has not yet descended upon us, there is a change in the air. Summer will bring with it a certain relief from the rhythm and rush of the school year, but this year, that relief will be very different. Over these past two months, I have found our common sense of unity remarkable. Surveys of American adults across the country showed levels of generosity and agreement that we have not experienced since 9/11. We have done remarkably well, but we have now entered what I have been calling “the second phase” of our response to the novel coronavirus. In this second phase, it will be easy for us to lose the unity we felt in April and become disagreeable about what we should and should not do moving forward. I hope we’re better than that. Just last week, I was reminded of just how much we have been through in our nation and in our world. I had the privilege of presiding over the graveside service of Bob Brackbill who, before his death, was our oldest living member at 100 years. Bob’s long life made his death sad and joyful at the same time, and his warmth and hopeful spirit made his graveside service especially uplifting. This hopefulness was emphasized in the small bulletin prepared for the service, where a handwritten note from Bob had been scanned and printed on the inside cover. The note read simply, “Thank you God for these 100 wonderful years. I am very grateful. I love

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THE ARCHANGEL | SUMMER 2020

you.” Born in 1919, just imagine all that Bob lived through. And yet, at the very end of his life, he was at peace, resting in ultimate gratitude for the gift of life. I tell you that story not to make you sad, but to inspire us all to remain focused on the big picture, the long game, on God. It’s so easy for us to experience hardship and begin to look inward, losing ourselves in the process. When people experience difficulties, especially as a big group, they often begin to seek spiritual connections they do not have. Whether you’ve lost your car keys, had a big fight with a loved one, or are experiencing a pandemic, it’s normal to seek after a spiritual truth when life is hard. Church communities, especially Episcopal church communities, often seek God in the very sacred, sacramental actions we share. We have been taught and conditioned to find God in those extremely special moments. Sacraments are outward and visible signs of inward and spiritual grace given by Christ. I am convicted in the truth of God’s presence in the mystery of the sacraments, and rooting ourselves in them is a very good habit! However, we can find God in many places outside the sacraments, especially in one another. In seminary, Dr. Greg Jones, one of my professors, spoke about holy friendships and the idea has stuck with me. Holy friends are not common, and perhaps they’re not even the people we first choose to be around, but holy friends are the people we really need in our lives. Dr. Jones described holy friends as the people who “challenge the sins we have come to love, affirm the gifts we are afraid to claim, and help us dream dreams we otherwise would not dream.” They’re the people


WEDNESDAYS IN JUNE who tell us the truth, the people who stick with us when the going gets tough, and those who help us imagine a truly better future.

Holy friends challenge the sins we have come to love. We are all physically separated from one another and that tends to give us time in which we can lose ourselves. Perhaps we scroll through too much social media, allow ourselves to drown in too many news stories, or succumb to fear in ways we had never imagined. Whichever way we “sin,” none of it is good for us. Holy friends remind us that it’s ok not to be ok, and when everything is not fine, however we feel is normal. Holy friends affirm the gifts we are afraid to claim. When we look back at hard periods in our collective history and hard periods in our personal histories, we find that the one constant is change. Change will happen to each of us, no matter what. Just think about this current quarantine. There are people baking like they never have before (seriously, sourdough is the breakout star of quarantine!). There are people sewing face masks for strangers when they’ve never sewed before. There are people riding their bikes, waving to neighbors, decorating their front steps, and showing kindness to strangers every day. Love your gifts, share your gifts, no matter what they are, even if your gift is making the perfect loaf of sourdough. Holy friends help us dream dreams we otherwise would not dream. Change will happen in our world, and I believe the time for change is now. What our world was before this virus was not good enough. The inequality, insecurity, and pain of our neighbors and our world was not OK, and now this crisis gives us a chance to right those wrongs. What problem did you think was too big? What issue did you think you couldn’t impact? What box had others put you in that no longer fits? The moment to change the world is now, and we can be part of that change. We may be separated, but we are not alone. We are surrounded by good and generous people, and we can find the holy friends we need to change the world for the good. Together, we can turn this ship, we can right so many wrongs, and we can be the change we hope to see. And I’m grateful to have holy friends to walk with me.

RECTOR’S SUMMER STREAMING BIBLE STUDY Join Us Online!

Led by Rector Chris Girata Wednesdays 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. facebook.com/cgirata The Rector’s Bible study (RBS) will take a short break and return for the month of June with a special weekly study on the book of Philippians! Then, the RBS will go on summer break until the Fall. Stay tuned for more details and don’t forget you can still watch and listen to the recordings, link below.

Questions? Email Meredith Rose, mrose@saintmichael.org

Watch previous episodes on demand, at our website: saintmichael.org/rectorsbiblestudy

THE ARCHANGEL | SUMMER 2020

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CONGRATULATIONS CLASS OF 2020! While your senior year was cut short in many ways, we at Saint Michael wish to celebrate you and all your accomplishments. You have lots to be proud of and your church is cheering you on from afar! We wish you all the best in your next adventures, you will be in our prayers and look forward to hearing all about your successes going forward. Happy Graduation!

VIRGINIA ELIZABETH BAKER

EMILY GRACE BERRYMAN

VICTORIA GRACE BILLINGS

ELIZABETH STEVES CARRIE

WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA

UC SANTA CRUZ

WASHINGTON & LEE UNIVERSITY

JAMES GRANT CARRINGTON

OLIVIA CHRISTINE CONNER

RYAN MILLER DEITCH

LILLIAN GRACE DERR

TRINITY UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA

DEPAUL UNIVERSITY

SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY

EDWARD HOWELL DOCKERY

ZACHARY PHILLIP EWING

JOHN CADE FERGUSON

ELIZABETH BARNETT FOSTER

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA

UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI

WASHINGTON & LEE UNIVERSITY

THE EPISCOPAL SCHOOL OF DALLAS

PARISH EPISCOPAL SCHOOL

THE EPISCOPAL SCHOOL OF DALLAS

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HIGHLAND PARK HIGH SCHOOL

HIGHLAND PARK HIGH SCHOOL

HIGHLAND PARK HIGH SCHOOL

PARISH EPISCOPAL SCHOOL

HIGHLAND PARK HIGH SCHOOL

HIGHLAND PARK HIGH SCHOOL

THE EPISCOPAL SCHOOL OF DALLAS

HIGHLAND PARK HIGH SCHOOL

HIGHLAND PARK HIGH SCHOOL


LUKE FOSTER GAMBRELL

CLAIRE SUZANNE HENSARLING

SAMANTHA ADELE HOFFMAN

JACKSON BREVARD HOOVER

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS

BAYLOR UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA

CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

GRACE EVELYN JUDIN

PATRICK MARTIN KELLEY

ALEXANDER DRUIN KONRADI

OLIVIA ELLIS KUGLER

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS

SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY

HOBART & WILLIAM SMITH COLLEGES

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS

ALLISON MAJORS

RYAN WILLIAM MICHLEWICZ

ALEXANDER COLE MOORE

RACHEL MARGARET MORROW

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY

TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY

DEPAUL UNIVERSITY

SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY

SARAH ROSE MORROW

GERRIT BURNS PARKER III

BROOKS T PATRICK

CHRISTOPHER WILTON PETERS

EMORY UNIVERSITY

BOSTON UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS

UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI

HIGHLAND PARK HIGH SCHOOL

THE EPISCOPAL SCHOOL OF DALLAS

BOOKER T. HIGH SCHOOL

THE EPISCOPAL SCHOOL OF DALLAS

PARISH EPISCOPAL SCHOOL

THE EPISCOPAL SCHOOL OF DALLAS

PARISH EPISCOPAL SCHOOL

THE EPISCOPAL SCHOOL OF DALLAS

PARISH EPISCOPAL SCHOOL

THE EPISCOPAL SCHOOL OF DALLAS

HIGHLAND PARK HIGH SCHOOL

LAKE HIGHLANDS HIGH SCHOOL

HIGHLAND PARK HIGH SCHOOL

HIGHLAND PARK HIGH SCHOOL

THE EPISCOPAL SCHOOL OF DALLAS

HIGHLAND PARK HIGH SCHOOL

THE ARCHANGEL | SUMMER 2020

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CHARLES EDWARD RUBARTH

JACKSON GARLAND SINGHAL

JOHN ROBERT SMITH

WILLIAM BOONE SNYDER

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY

TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS

CARTER LEIGHTON WALTERS

JOHN STACKHOUSE WILSON

MARGARET RAMSEY WILSON

SPENCER CATHERINE WYNNE

FORDHAM UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA

TEXAS CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY

AUSTIN COLLEGE

ST. MARK’S SCHOOL OF TEXAS

JESUIT COLLEGE PREP

ST. MARK’S SCHOOL OF TEXAS

SHELTON HIGH SCHOOL

HIGHLAND PARK HIGH SCHOOL

THE EPISCOPAL SCHOOL OF DALLAS

HIGHLAND PARK HIGH SCHOOL

RICHARDSON HIGH SCHOOL

JUNE 1 "Christianity and Mental Health" With Ryan Casey Waller

JUNE 8 "Christianity and pornography" With dr. ken wilgus

JUNE 15 "Christianity and politics" With bishop kai ryan

Hot Topics & Cold Beer mondays in june at 6:30 p.m.

JUNE 22 "Christianity and race"

With Rev. dr. Matthew Burdette and Rev. Dr. Christopher d. Girata

saintmichael.org/pub20 | #smaapubtheology

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SAINT MICHAEL STATUS UPDATE KEN BRANNON, Vice Rector

"What's our status?" As the one tasked with COVID-19 response at Saint Michael, this is a question I hear often. Before I answer the question I think you want me to answer, here's the response I aspire to: What's our status? All is well. Not just “pie in the sky” well or “denial of reality” well, but really and truly well. "But how can you say that? A novel coronavirus has exploited our defenses, leaving many of us sick, scared, or worse. Society shut down for a while and we still can't worship together. How can you say 'all is well'?"

As a result, in cooperation with the Bishop, we are finding new ways to worship, learn, build community, and care for those in need: • • •

• •

Because, as the burial anthem in the prayer book reminds us: For none of us has life in himself, and none becomes his own master when he dies. For if we have life, we are alive in the Lord, and if we die, we die in the Lord. So, then, whether we live or die, we are the Lord's possession. Our status has nothing to do with our circumstances, and everything to do with the One who made us and loves us and calls us by name. We rest securely in God. That's what I believe on my better days. Now back to your original question: "What's our status?" I think you mean, "When can we come into the building, pray in the chapels, and see our friends again?" Despite what you see on the athletic field behind the church and in the bars in Uptown, the virus is still spreading in Dallas and we don't yet have herd immunity. Until we do, or a vaccine is developed, there are practices we can take to reduce the risk of becoming infected: stay home when we are sick, wash our hands, avoid touching our faces, keep physical distance, and yes, wear masks. We may not love doing these things, but these actions have been shown to slow the spread of the virus.

• • •

Live stream worship on Sunday morning continues to be our primary form of worship. Excellent formation activities for the whole family may be found online. Beginning Pentecost Sunday, May 31, and continuing indefinitely, we will be distributing Holy Communion in Saint Michael Chapel on Sunday afternoons. Because outdoors is safer than indoors, the Farmer's Market will resume on Saturday, June 6. We continue to find ways to serve our neighbors, including meals for Austin Street Shelter, grocery collection for Jubilee Park, fabric for Honduras Threads, and donations to the Relief Fund. Saint Michael Episcopal School will set its own policies in light of best practices and the local school district. Committals and weddings may be held outdoors with groups up to 10 people. Soon, we will open the church building to some staff and small groups up to 10. Everyone entering the building will need to disinfect their hands, maintain physical distance, and wear masks. These aren't just good ideas; they're also required by the Bishop.

So what’s our status? On a practical level, we’re figuring out how to be Church in new ways. On a spiritual level, we’re grounding ourselves in God. Either way, it’s clear to me that “the kingdom of heaven is at hand.” Blessings,

The Rev. Kenneth H. Brannon Vice Rector

In addition, the virus is most dangerous for those over 65 and in high-risk health groups; that's a good portion of our congregation. THE ARCHANGEL | SUMMER 2020

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Saint Michael Cares That is a value that drives our ministry decisions, both in our Christian discipleship and in the way we show love to our most vulnerable neighbors. During this global pandemic, Saint Michael has raised $38,078 to help relief efforts, and our focus has been helping meet the needs of those with food insecurities. While this new initiative is still expanding and growing, we’re proud to be working with VNA Meals on Wheels and Jubilee Park to feed those who don’t have enough food—but we can do more! Please consider joining the cause by donating to the Saint Michael Relief Fund, online at saintmichael.org/relief, or via Text-to-Give (text “Give” to  855.703.9385 to set up your account, then at any time afterwards, simple text a dollar amount and “relief”). Thank you for your help!

EASTER DAY OFFERING LOCAL

PROJECT MOSES

A mission founded by parishioners to highlight the truths of human trafficking and share the Light of Christ with its survivors.

THISTLE FARMS NATIONAL

Led by Rev. Becca Stevens, Thistle Farms declares that love is the most powerful force for change in the world, by building a movement that connects survivors, customers, advocates, and communities. We light the way for women seeking sanctuary by providing housing and meaningful jobs.

THE ANGLICAN CENTRE IN ROME INTERNATIONAL

The Anglican Centre in Rome is the permanent Anglican Communion presence in Rome. It is a living symbol of our Communion's commitment to the full visible unity of the Church. It stands for our desire to work collaboratively with all Christians for justice and peace in the world and for the flourishing of all God's children whatever their origin or status.

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THE ARCHANGEL | SUMMER 2020

$23,694


PATRIOTIC SUNDAY JULY 5 Join us for a special day of worship as we celebrate our nation's Independence Day! We may not be able to have our "Pie for the 4th of July" celebration—but that doesn't mean we can't have pie! SEE PIE RECIPES BEGINNING P. 22!

VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL AUGUST 3-7

! w o n s n a l p e mak

9 AM - NOON We invite all children ages 4 (as of September 1, 2020) through rising 5th graders to join us for an awesome week! This adventure will help kids begin or deepen their faith by following in footsteps of the Hebrew people after God lead them out of Egypt. There will be crafts, Bible lessons, snacks, and so much more! DID YOU MISS THE FIRST REGISTRATION? No worries, a secondary registration period will be available July 5-19. Also, don't forget to volunteer! VBS would not be possible without an army of volunteers and we thank all who are willing to share their time and talents. Email Regan Wallace, rwallace@saintmichael.org to volunteer or for questions, or visit saintmichael.org/vbs. THE ARCHANGEL | SUMMER 2020

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VIRTUAL COMMUNITY

HERE ARE MANY WAYS TO CONNECT ONLINE & STAY ENGAGED WITH THE PARISH!

SUNDAY WORSHIP

To contact Worship: Rev. Bob Scott, bscott@saintmichael.org 9 & 11 AM SUNDAY WORSHIP saintmichael.org/live JOY: A CHILDREN'S SERVICE click here

LIVE & ON DEMAND

ON DEMAND

YOUTH GROUP FIRST SUNDAY EACH MONTH Will meet with Chase and Tiffany via Zoom every Sunday evening. Middle school meets from 4-5 p.m. and high school gathers from 5:30-7 p.m. Email Chase or Tiffany for a Zoom link. YOUTH HS GIRLS' SMALL GROUP Will meet with Tiffany on Tuesday mornings beginning at 11 a.m. Email Tiffany for details.

PASTORAL CARE

CFM

To Contact Children & Family Ministries: Regan Wallace, Director, rwallace@saintmichael.org Madelyn Ivy, Asst. Director, mivy@saintmichael.org

To Contact Pastoral Care: Fr. Greg Pickens, gpickens@saintmichael.org Katherine Bowen, PC Assistant, kbowen@saintmichael.org

Summer formation for all begins June 21, and July 5-Aug 2. Join Children and Family Ministry for this 6-week formation time during the formation hour, 10 a.m. on Sundays. Children of all ages are welcome as we focus on the book of Acts, and the lives of Jesus' disciples after Jesus' death, resurrection, and ascension. Fun activities, a goofy video, and amazing friendships are just a few of the great things to expect!

Our Pastoral Care Team is hard at work reaching out to people in need! Email Katherine with any questions.

As we are not able to meet at Saint Michael for classes due to the health crisis continues, we will be utilizing Zoom for our classes to gather digitally. Registration for these classes will be opening soon so be looking for it! These classes and lessons will be available through the CFM newsletter and through the CFM webpage, saintmichael.org/cfm

JUNE 21, JULY 5-AUGUST 2 GET TO KNOW YOUR CLERGY

YOUTH

To Contact Youth Ministries: Tiffany Lamotte, Director, tlamotte@saintmichael.org Chase Monson, Asst. Director, cmonson@saintmichael.org YOUTH SUNDAY SCHOOL (Middle School and High School) JUNE 21-AUGUST 9 Streamed LIVE on the Youth Ministry Facebook and Instagram profiles by Chase and Tiffany every Sunday morning beginning at 10 a.m. Visit either profile to watch the videos on-demand after they have aired.

ADULT FORMATION

To Contact Adult Formation: Fr. Eric Liles, eliles@saintmichael.org Hannah Fisher, Assistant, hfisher@saintmichael.org

Join us online as we delve deeper in to our knowledge of our Saint Michael clergy! Learn more about their lives, ministry, and what drives them. CHURCH NEXT NEW! Online Learning for Saint Michael Parishioners! Want to learn more about our faith during this time of physical distancing? Summer is the perfect time! Welcome to “ChurchNext”, an online Formation tool to help you grow in your faith, seeking understanding. Saint Michael has curated a rotating library of resources for you to enjoy at your leisure. To access the library, contact Hannah Fisher at hfisher@saintmichael.org. To view all the ways to join Formation online, including, CFM, Youth, and more—vist our online live formation page.

Saint Michael offers many ways to stay informed and engaged with our parish community—we look forward to seeing you! saintmichael.org/LIVE /CFM /YOUTH /LIVEFORMATION /C19


M I S S I ON & O U T R E AC H

H E L P I N G T H E C O M M U N I T Y D U R I N G T H E PA N D E M I C

WHAT SAINT MICHAEL IS DOING AUSTIN STREET CENTER Saint Michael and All Angels cooks and serves dinner monthly to clients at The Austin Street Center. During the pandemic, Austin Street is keeping 250 people safe in their shelter and serving them breakfast, lunch and dinner. Saint Michael is not only providing a monthly dinner, but also additional meals for their clients due to increased demand. A small team of volunteer cooks is preparing these meals. Additionally, families or small church groups may make meals or snack bags for 250 clients at their homes and deliver them to Austin Street. July dates are available at this time. Contact Libby Card for more information or to schedule a date. libby.card@austinstreet.org

ies and donations for the Jubilee Park and Community Center neighborhood. Through our efforts, SMAA has provided groceries and essential items to more than 300 families. This week, SMAA volunteers shopped for parishioners who made donations and provided food for an additional 60 families. Many thanks for everyone who provided groceries and monetary donations for this effort. To stay up to date on all the current ways to be involved in our Mission & Outreach efforts, visit our M&O Service Ops page:

saintmichael.org/serviceops

#SMAACARES: If you or someone you know is in need of assistance during

ST. PHILIP’S SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY CENTER Aunt Bette's Community Food Pantry has reconfigured their food service from the pantry to increase volunteer and client safety. Clients will receive pre-packaged boxes of food from the North Texas Food Bank. We are relying on staff and a few volunteers to place the boxes of food in client cars. To help, contact parishioner David Cowling at: davidcowling0100@gmail.com

VNA MEALS ON WHEELS We have transitioned to a combination of hot, frozen and shelf stable meal delivery. All clients will receive notification of the new schedule. We will utilize VNA staff only for in-person deliveries. Beginning Monday, April 6, we utilized the mobile app for virtual delivery where volunteers will have the ability to call clients and provide client feedback. VNA will contact current volunteers with more information about this program. To become a new volunteer, please register and add that you are a member of the Saint Michael and All Angels parish team. REGISTER HERE.

JUBILEE PARK AND COMMUNITY

this time of crisis, please call our 24/7 Priest-on-Call line: (214) 232-7512

During this difficult time, Saint Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church is committed to helping our neighbors in need. Following are some of the steps we have taken and some of the volunteer opportunities still available. The order in Dallas County requires everyone, especially those in high-risk health categories, to stay at home. No one should leave home except for the “essential activities” defined in the order. “Providing basic necessities to economically disadvantaged populations” is one of the essential activities: Click here to view Dallas County Order

Even so, volunteers should understand that they leave home at their own risk, that the organizations listed below are responsible for complying with all relevant government orders, and that the infection-control procedures listed in the order should be followed.

Thank you to all of our parishioners who have donated grocerTHE ARCHANGEL | SUMMER 2020

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JOIN US FOR SEASON 9! Volunteering, Information, Questions: Contact SMFM Director Tricia Stewart farmersmarket@saintmichael.org, or 214-675-0586.

JUNE 6

O P E N I N G D AY ! ! SATURDAYS 8 A.M. - NOON | NORTH LOT 8011 DOUGLAS AVE. DALLAS TX 75225

WINNER

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BEST NEIGHBORHOOD FARMERS MARKET

2017

PANDEMIC RESPONSIBILITY: The safety of our vendors, volunteers and customers is our highest priority. We will be following the safety guidelines mandated by the CDC, State of Texas, Dallas County, City of Dallas, and Episcopal Diocese of Dallas.

+SOCIAL DISTANCING APPLIES

+NO EATING/SAMPLING ON SITE

+WEAR FACEMASK

+COMMON SEATING REMOVED

+HAND SANITIZE AT BOOTHS

+FEELING ILL? PLEASE STAY HOME

+ONLY TOUCH PURCHASES

+AT RISK? PLEASE STAY HOME

+ALL VENDORS WILL BE REGULARLY CLEANING BOOTHS

Online ordering is available from our vendors, directly from our SMFM website. Follow us on Facebook & Instagram for the latest updates!

SaintMichaelsMarket.com

@saintmichaelsmarket


Camino By The Rev. Mary Lessmann

the trek would return with a scallop shell as a talisman 15/16 72 198,879 and proof of their journey. 115 81 17,292 Walking the Camino de Santiago continues to be a popular pilgrimage today. In 2019, almost 350,000 pilgrims set out nother beautiful day in northfrom popular starting points across western Spain. We check our Europe to make their way to Santiago backpacks and put on our hikde Compostela. Most travel by foot, ing shoes and, after saying our prayers some by bicycle, and a few travel as together, begin to walk the trail where some of their medieval counterparts we left off yesterday afternoon. And did, on horseback or by donkey. Of our spiritual – and physical – journey all the various Camino routes, the continues. Camino Frances is the most popular. It begins on the French side of The Camino de Santiago, also known the Pyrenees and continues for 780 as the Way of St. James, is a pilgrimage kilometers to Santiago. Walking this across northern Spain culminating route can take about six weeks. Howat the shrine of Saint James in the ever, there are many spots along the cathedral of Santiago de Compostela. way from which you can begin your Pilgrimage to Santiago began in the journey, all concluding at the cathe9th century after the discovery of the dral of Santiago de Compostela. remains of St. James the Great and has continued ever since. During the The Camino de Santiago is a walking medieval period, the pilgrimage was retreat – an opportunity to be at one supported by the Roman Catholic with God and with God’s creation. church, and church-staffed hospitals After our inaugural trek in 2019, Saint arose along the trail a day’s walk apart Michael and All Angels will be returnto serve those on the journey. The ing to walk the Camino de Santiago scallop shell, commonly found on the in September of 2021. This women’s nearby Galician shore, has long been pilgrimage will be led by The Rev. Mary the symbol of the Camino de Santiago. Lessmann and Margaret Spellings. Over the years, those who completed Week 1/Week 2 Pilgrims

Camino Trail Miles Walked

Total Steps Taken

Kilometers Walked, Per Group

Total Miles Walked

Total Calories Burned

A

We’ll fly to Madrid and transfer by bus to Sarria, where we’ll begin our walk on September 16. We will cover the last 115 kilometers of the Camino, ending in Santiago de Compostela. Each day for a week we’ll walk anywhere from 9 to 14 miles and will stay in small hotels along the trail each evening. Those who wish to attend will need to be physically up to the demands of the journey. Our pilgrimage group will train for the Camino in 2021 leading up to our trip in September. An informational meeting for this pilgrimage will be held on Sunday, September 20 at 12:15 .p.m in the Parlor. If you would like to learn more about this women’s pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela, please plan to join us. If you have any questions, please contact The Rev. Mary Lessmann at mlessmann@saintmichael.org.

Camino de Santiago Information Meeting Sunday, September 20 12:15 p.m. in the Parlor

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FORSAKING NORMAL REV. CHRIS GIRATA, Rector

I

can hardly believe it’s already May. I imagine many of you are like me: the last few weeks—even couple months— have seemed to float by in a haze. The weirdness of this phase of our common life has changed so much about the way we behave that some of our neighbors are getting impatient. I’ve heard many people say they want life to go back to normal, but I’m pretty sure we’re not going back to normal. The desire to go back to the past is often an expression of fear. We naturally fear what we do not know, and a different way of living in the future is, by definition, an unknown. If I were to consider the future simply as a void where any and all possibilities are equally probable, I’d be scared, too. However, I don’t think anything is possible. Instead, I think, or perhaps hope, that we can improve upon the past for the good of everyone.

or more benefits or advantages. Perhaps you took many of those privileges for granted. Did you like your job? Could you pay your bills? Did you live in a stable home? Were you treated well while shopping? Did people value your opinion? If you answer yes, to those questions, I would say that you were, in the technical sense, privileged. Most Americans could not say yes to even those basic ideas. Before you react defensively to my suggestion of privilege, let me ask a simple, human question: Should everyone have the opportunity to answer “yes” to the majority of the questions I ask? If you think they should, then perhaps we can agree that the normal many people seek is not the normal with which we should be satisfied. Moving forward, we will all be asked to make changes to the way we used to live. Perhaps those asks will be simple and episodic, like wearing a face mask while shopping for groceries. Perhaps those asks will be most significant, such as supporting measures to

"The desire to go back to the past is often an expression of fear. We naturally fear what we do not know, and a different way of living in the future is, by definition, an unknown." Our previous normal was not good enough for me. If you like the way things were before our world was shaken by this virus, then I submit to you, with as much gentleness and grace as I can muster, that your desire to return to the old normal is born out of very real privilege. And, I recognize that it is sometimes dangerous to use the word privilege. However, If you were deeply satisfied with the status quo of just a few short months ago, comfortable with almost everyone in your life, then I believe you were, and perhaps still are, extremely privileged. Unfortunately, privilege has been politicized, even weaponized, by some, leaving it bearing so much more weight than it should. For me, I’m using this word in its strictest sense: having or enjoying one

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improve public schools. I’m pretty certain those asks will come regularly, and we may find ourselves feeling frustrated with being asked to change. However, I have one simple ask of you: Would you be willing to take a moment and consider whether you can change in order to help someone else? The bottom line about the next few weeks, months, and years is that we will all be asked to shift out of our comfort zones. We will all be asked to support new behaviors that might feel like an inconvenience. Yet if we are willing, we might find that with each ask, we have the opportunity to change a small aspect of our privileged lives in order to make a significant, positive impact of the lives of our neighbors. Small acts can make big ripples. If those big ripples help a lot of people, accepting those small changes might just be worthwhile.


ing soon! m o c s n g i ard s WOSM Y

The C left th hurch ha s e bui lding #beth . echu rch

saintm

ichae

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CARING FOR THOSE IN NEED

LEFT TO RIGHT

Books donated by SMAA / SMES to United to Learn. Saint Michael parishioner, Carol Goglia, is the President of United to Learn—a non-profit that partners with DISD to assist in learning. They were able to distribute 3,202 books to families from 27 DISD elementary schools! Madison Visinsky participated in the youth note-writing coordinated by the Youth Department. In return, she received several notes back from parishioners! The Jubilee Park drive to provide food for families need was a huge success! OPPOSITE

Saint Michael Episcopal School wrapped up the 2019-2020 school year with a parking lot car parade! The SMES teachers cheered on and waved as many of the school families drove through to say goodbye for the summer! And a special THANK YOU was made to outgoing SMES Head of School Amy McMahan and her family.

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A LOOM OVER THE HORIZON

I

t was picked up by an Intercargo Express truck. Placed in a container. Trucked to Houston. Put on board a ship. Unloaded in Honduras at the Puerto Cortez docks. Passed through customs without a hitch (gracias a Dios). Trucked to Tegucigalpa. Delivered to Reva. Patty Reyes de Fajardo who will hold on to it until the COVID-19 virus subsides, and the women of Honduras Threads can leave their houses to take it to rural El Cruce outside Tegucigalpa where they will set it up.

BILL BANCROFT, Honduras Threads

ago when the Honduran government started a program to revive it. Perhaps a dozen men and women in rural areas high up in the Department of Intibuca about four hours west of Tegucigalpa via dusty, dirt roads took the government up on training. They acquired primitive looms and both cotton and wool thread. They turned out fabric perfect for shawls and at a reasonable price. Intibuca (pronounced in-tee-book-a) weavers,

Back in Dallas, Threads contacted the Dallas Handweavers and Spinners Guild. Two of their leaders, Christine Miller and Cate Buchanan, jumped in to help acquire the used loom, repair it, test thread and patterns on it, dress it and get it ready for shipping. Cate would join the April mission trip to Honduras to deliver three days of training.

The “it” is a loom. A used handweaver’s loom Honduras Threads acquired so its Honduran artisan members can weave fabric to turn into embroidered shawls. Like those that sold like hotcakes a year and a half ago until fabric the women were using was all gone. It would seem to be easy to acquire fabric to make Honduras Threads shawls. But bear with me for a minute. A couple of years ago, Honduras Threads leader M’Lou Bancroft decided to augment the Threads product line with the shawls and went in search of fabric made in Honduras. The indigenous Lenca, like the Maya, had a tradition of handweaving. That tradition died out until some years

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Repeated pleading with the weavers did no help. And Threads needed more shawls to sell. So over dinner on the Threads mission trip last fall in a Tegucigalpa restaurant, the crazy idea was born that Threads artisan members could weave the fabric themselves. As it turns out the largest group of Lenca in Central America, more than 100,000, are Hondurans. Several Honduras Threads embroiderers are Lenca. And to a person, they were enthusiastic about learning how to weave.

however, were “discovered” by the Honduran First Lady Ana Garcia de Hernandez. So the weavers, knowing a good thing when they saw it, quadrupled their prices and held on to their finished goods for Sra. Ana.

And then COVID-19 hit. And the loom, still in its crate, is now a significant piece of décor in Reva. Patty’s house. The plan is to pick up where we left off with a mission trip in the early Fall of 2020. It is also to continue Continued pg. 27


DID YOU KNOW?

LEARNING MORE ABOUT THE LITURGY

THE PRINCIPAL KINDS OF PRAYER The principal kinds of prayer include adoration, praise, thanksgiving, penitence, oblation, intercession, and petition. (see BCP, pp. 856-857, and individual entries for each of the principal kinds of prayer).

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make those 4th of july pies!

KENTUCKY DERBY PIE PEGGY CARR

9� pie shell, unbaked 6 oz. pkg. semi-sweet chocolate chips 2 eggs 1 c. pecans, chopped 1 c. sugar 1 t. vanilla 1/2 c. flour 1/2 c butter, melted

22

-Beat eggs -add sugar, flour and melted butter -Stir until blended -Add chips, nuts and vanilla -Pour into unbaked pie shell -Bake @350 degree oven, 45 minutes -Prepare at least 6 hours before serving; may be prepared the day before but do not refrigerate before serving. THE ARCHANGEL | SUMMER 2020


FRENCH APPLE PIE NANCY WILBUR

1-9 inch unbaked pie shell 1 pound sliced apples (4-5 cups) 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg ½ cup granulated sugar ¼ cup seedless raisins 1 cup brown sugar 2 tablespoons flour ¼ stick butter ½ cup pecans, chopped ¼ cup milk -Put sliced apples in pie shell -Sprinkle with lemon juice, nutmeg and cinnamon -Spread evenly with white sugar then raisins -Mix the brown sugar and flour and cut in the butter with a pastry cutter -Spread mixture over the apples in the pie shell and sprinkle with pecans -Add milk -Cover with the top crust, pricking well with a fork (or you can cut designs in the top of the pie shell to allow steam to escape) -Brush the top lightly with milk -Bake at 450 degrees for 10 minutes then reduce the temperature to 350 degree -bake another 30 minutes until light browned and bubbly -Serve with hard sauce or ice cream THE HARD SAUCE 1/2 cup butter 1-1/2 cups powdered sugar 1 tsp. brandy or rum -Cream butter until light. -Beat in the sugar and add 1 tablespoon boiling water -Beat in the brandy or rum. -Spread on individual slices of warm pie before serving. THE ARCHANGEL | SUMMER 2020

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BREAKFAST SAUSAGE APPLE PIE Pat Moore 1 1 5 1 4 ½

(Serves 6)

lb. sausage piecrust (9-11 in.) to 6 oz. of piecrust mix can (1 lb. 4 oz.) apple pie filling oz. shredded cheddar cheese cup firmly packed light brown sugar

-Cook sausage until well browned. -Drain well. -Prick pie crust well with fork and -bake at 375 degrees for 10 min. -Remove crust from oven and spoon pie filling in crust. -Spoon sausage on top of pie filling. -Sprinkle with cheese. -Combine piecrust mix and sugar in a small bowl, sprinkle on top of pie. -Return to oven. -375 degrees 25 additional min. or until golden brown. -Serve warm -Serves 6 CRUST: You can either use half of a prepared crust for the pie crust mix or make half of the dry ingredients of a regular pie crust recipe or buy pie crust mix.

CHEAT SHEET As Zoom is playing such a significant role in our ability to connect, here are a few shortcuts to make it easier!

WINDOWS NAVIGATION -Switch Zoom windows: F6 -Go to meeting controls: Ctrl+Alt+Shift -Go to previous video in Gallery: Page Up -Go to next video in Gallery: Page Down -Go to Invite menu: Alt+I -Go to next tab (right): Ctrl+Tab -Go to previous tab (left): Ctrl+Shift+Tab -Go to previous chat: Ctrl+Up -Go to next chat: Ctrl+Down -Jump to chat: Ctrl+T -Close current chat: Ctrl+W INTERFACE -Toggle full screen On/Off: Alt+F -Toggle “Always Show Meeting Control -Toolbar” On/Off: Alt -Toggle In-Meeting chat panel: Alt+H -Toggle Participants panel: Alt+U

-Switch to Active Speaker view: Alt+F1 -Switch to Gallery video view: Alt+F2 -Close front window: Alt+F4 CONTROLS -Toggle video On/Off: Alt+V -Toggle audio On/Off: Alt+A -Toggle all audio On/Off except host: Alt+M -Toggle Screen Share On/Off: Alt+Shift+S (only works when the meeting control toolbar is onscreen). -Stop current Screen Share and launch a new one: Alt+S (control toolbar visible). -Pause/Resume Screen Share: Alt+T (control toolbar visible). -Switch camera: Alt+N -Toggle floating meeting controls: Ctrl+Alt+Shift+H -Raise/Lower hand: Alt+Y

-Start remote control: Alt+Shift+R -Stop remote control: Alt+Shift+G DOCUMENTATION -Start/Stop local recording: Alt+R -Start/Stop cloud recording: Alt+C -Pause/Resume recording: Alt+P -Take a screenshot: Alt+Shift+T -Search: Ctrl+F

MAC OS NAVIGATION -Join or schedule a meeting: Cmd+J -Start a meeting: Cmd+Ctrl+V -Screen Direct Share: Cmd+Ctrl+S -Toggle Active Speaker and Gallery views: -Cmd+Shift+W -Go to Invite menu: Cmd+I -Go to previous video in Gallery: Ctrl+P -Go to next video in Gallery: Ctrl+N


GAIDO'S FAMOUS SEAFOOD RESTAURANT

KEY LIME PIE

LYNNE CAMPBELL

(serves 10)

GRAHAM CRACKER CRUST 4 TBS Sugar 9 Whole Graham Crackers, crushed 4 TBS Butter -Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. -Combine the sugar and crumbs in a bowl and mix well -Melt the butter and add to crumb mixture and mix well -Spread the mixture over the bottom of a 9-inch springform pan. -Press down to compact the crust. -Bake for 5 minutes; let cool, then reduce the oven temperature to 300 degrees. KEY LIME FILLING ½ Cup Egg Yolks 8 Oz Cream Cheese, softened 2 ½ Cups Sweetened Condensed Milk ¾ Cup Key Lime Juice -Combine the egg yolks, cream cheese, condensed milk and Key Lime juice in a blender -Process until well blended -Pour into the crust and bake for 15 minutes; let cool MY NOTES: Be sure to use a “squeeze handle” juicer to extract the juice from the tiny Key Limes! The blender is also useful to pulverize the graham crackers. After cooling, best to refrigerate pie for several hours or overnight. Before serving I decorate with whipped cream dollops and finely grated “green” lime zest. Enjoy!

INTERFACE -Toggle Participants panel On/Off: Cmd+U -Toggle In-Meeting Chat On/Off: Cmd+Shift+H -Toggle full screen On/Off: Cmd+Shift+F -Toggle meeting controls On/Off: Ctrl+Opt+Cmd+H -Toggle “Always Show Meeting Control -Toolbar” On/Off: Ctrl+\ -Switch to minimized window: Cmd+Shift+M CONTROLS -Toggle audio On/Off: Cmd+Shift+A -Toggle video On/Off: Cmd+Shift+V -Toggle Portrait/Landscape views: Cmd+L -Toggle Screen Share On/Off: Cmd+Shift+S -Pause/Resume Screen Share: Cmd+Shift T

-Switch camera: Cmd+Shift+N -Switch tab: Ctrl+T -Mute all audio except host: Cmd+Ctrl+M -Unmute audio for all except host: Cmd+Ctrl+U -Push to talk: Space -Raise/lower hand: Opt+Y -Gain remote control: Ctrl+Shift+R -Stop remote control: Ctrl+Shift+G -End/Leave meeting or close current window: Cmd+W DOCUMENTATION -Take screenshot: Cmd+T -Start local recording: Cmd+Shift+R -Start cloud recording: Cmd+Shift+C -Pause/resume recording: Cmd+Shift+P

IPAD -Toggle audio On/Off: Command+Shift+A -Toggle video On/Off: Command+Shift+V -Toggle chat On/Off: Command+Shift+H -Toggle Manage Participants panel: Command+U -Minimize meeting: Command+Shift+M -Close front window: Command+W -Unfortunately, you can’t edit Zoom keyboard shortcuts on iPad. credit: howtogeek.com

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GRANT THEM ETERNAL REST May the souls of these faithful departed rest in peace. Grace Baruch Townley April 2 Estelle Victoria Mueller April 3, Nancy Young (daughter), Earl (son-in-law), Grant and Megan Young (grandchildren) Richard "Kevin" Hardage April 3, Tania Hardage (wife), Margaret, Will, and Jack (children) Mary Alice Shepherd April 11, Debby Robinson (daughter) and Robin (son-in-law) Kline Daniel "Dan" Busbee April 13, Pam Busbee (wife) Phebe Houghton April 14, Dr. Elizabeth Lang (daughter), Dr. John Lang (son-in-law), Phebe Bearden (granddaughter), Caleb and James (great-grandsons) Sarah "Sally" Rodgers April 15, Colleen O'Hara (niece) Diane Burgher "Donnie" Enholm April 16, Joan McGraw (daughter), Forres (son-in-law), Ian and Michael (grandsons) Joan Guderian April 18, Lydia Addy (daughter) and Bill (son-in-law) Louis "Lou" Rodgers April 20, Colleen O'Hara (niece) Richard Lee "Dick" Gannett April 20 Charles Lee Hall April 23, Steve Haal (son), Lainey (daughter-in-law), and Charlie (grandson) Marguerite Aepli "Betty" Whitelock April 23, Sam Mauldin (daughter), Don (son-in-law), Tish Visinsky (granddaughter), Matthew (grandson-in-law), Madison and Harper (great-granddaughters) Lawrence Brooks "Larry" Hawkins April 26, Kris Hawkins (wife) Robert Earle "Bob" Wilbur May 4, Nancy Wilbur (wife) and Paige Wilbur (daughter)

BIRTHS

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Mary "Polly" Lucille Hairston Tuesday, April 7, Walker and Hannah Hairston


Their decision: Three of them would share the top position, deciding on issues together as they arose. That, they said, would create the necessary trust needed to lead the entire group of 40 Honduran artisan members scattered across five production centers in different locations outside Tegucigalpa. In February, they rolled out their management structure at an all-hands meeting to great acclaim.

Honduras, con't.

building the artisan members’ business chops. On the January mission trip, missioners David Boyett and Bill Bancroft worked with the Honduran artisan leadership team to do some serious grappling with how to structure the management of the Honduran operation. Management versus board topped the list. Understanding, for example, that the position of board treasurer is not the same as the CFO in the management structure. That the responsibilities are different. A simple way to lay out the management structure, we from Saint Michael and All Angels thought, would be hierarchy. There would be a top spot filled by one person called the general

manager and three additional spots which would report up to the GM. Someone would be appointed to keep the books, another to oversee production and a third person to deal with sales and marketing in Honduras on Roatan and in Copan. The GM would report to the board and appoint people to other management roles although the reality might be that some filling positions in management would also hold positions on the board. After several hours of discussion, the Honduran leaders politely told us from SMAA that we were wrong. The Honduran members wouldn’t trust one person to lead the group. Fortunately, we had the night to sleep on what to suggest next. The next morning, we showed the Honduran leaders a chart with five different types of teams from hierarchy to holacracy and three hybrids in between. We provided explanations and then left the room so the Hondurans could decide which one of the five they believed would work best. After 45 minutes, they called us back.

Next steps on the business side, more work and counseling on processes, metrics and, especially, communication. Writing down processes, keeping metrics and achieving top-notch communication in organizations here at home isn’t easy. It’s even harder in Honduras where education levels are lower, keeping precise records is difficult and Internet connections are sketchy or non-existent. And the culture is to accomplish important business verbally in face-to-face meetings. Progress and challenges. It’s amazing with Honduras Threads. And fun to be a part of. If you’d like to see for yourself, come with us to Honduras. Honduras Threads is something you’ve got to see to believe. We’re planning the next trip now for September. Knowing that it might have to be postponed until later. Meanwhile, we’re figuring how to continue providing advice and instruction virtually. Yes, challenges. Which we’re thankful we’re called to do.

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