2022 Saint Louis University Research Institute Impact Report

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Nationwide Impact, Beyond City Limits

Since the launch of the Saint Louis University Research Institute in 2018, SLU has been on a journey to become a preeminent Jesuit research university with unique strengths that address the needs of communities around the world. SLU researchers have developed new partnerships with industry leaders and academic institutions in a variety of areas, including geospatial science, an important and interdisciplinary field that can have a transformative impact on agriculture, public health, national security, and more. The launch of the Taylor Geospatial Institute brings together eight outstanding Midwest research institutions to advance new innovations in this field. Made possible by a legacy gift from Mr. Andrew Taylor and housed at SLU, the Taylor Geospatial Institute aims to become the nation’s leader in geospatial science research and accelerate the St. Louis region’s development into a global geospatial center of excellence.

Explore the full Missouri as Art presentation:

https://missouriview.github.io/#art

On the Cover
A bird’s-eye view of St. Louis, pulled from the Taylor Geospatial Institute’s “Missouri as Art” presentation.

This book covers research from September 2021 – September 2022.

The SLU Research Institute Annual Impact Report is published annually for Saint Louis University, its alumni, friends, and benefactors.

CONTACT US

1 North Grand Blvd. DuBourg Hall 450 St. Louis, MO 63103

314-977-7742

research@slu.edu slu.edu/researchinstitute

OTHER UNIVERSITY PHONE NUMBERS

Office of the President

314-977-7777

Office of the Provost

314-977-2193

Undergraduate and Graduate Admissions

314-977-2500

Alumni Engagement

314-977-2250

EDITORIAL TEAM

Kevin Lynch Editor

Fernando Monserrate

Lexie Broemmer

SPECIAL THANKS

SLU Marketing and Communications

Paradigm

Design + Content Strategy

PHOTO CONTRIBUTORS

Mayur Khanna

Neha Hanumathiah

Owais Qureini

Henning Lohse-Busch, Ph.D.

Steven Dolan

Douglas Garfield

SPLYCEHOUSE LLC

Katie Long Photography

SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY

Fred P. Pestello, Ph.D. President

Joseph Conran (’67, ’70) Chair of the Board of Trustees

Michael Lewis, Ph.D. Provost

Sheila Manion Vice President, Development

SLU RESEARCH

Kenneth A. Olliff Vice President for Research and Partnerships

Director, SLU Research Institute

Matthew Christian Deputy Vice President for Research

Jasmin Patel

Associate Vice President for Research and Chief of Staff

Amy Breuer Manager, Programs and Partnerships

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Areas of Focus

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Big Ideas 46

Table of Contents

OPENING LETTERS

SLU RESEARCH INSTITUTE

RESEARCH LEADERS

DISTINGUISHED FELLOWS

AREAS OF FOCUS

SINQUEFIELD CENTER FOR APPLIED ECONOMIC RESEARCH

THE TAYLOR GEOSPATIAL INSTITUTE

CENTER FOR VACCINE

SLU/YOUGOV POLL

FOR TRANSLATIONAL NEUROSCIENCE

CENTER FOR RESEARCH ON GLOBAL CATHOLICISM

THE PRIME CENTER

3 TABLE OF CONTENTS
INSTITUTE AHEAD INSTITUTE THE INSTITUTE FOR HEALING JUSTICE & EQUITY INSTITUTE FOR
AND BIOTHERAPEUTIC INNOVATION
FOR ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING
HORIZON
DEVELOPMENT WATER
DRUG
CENTER
PEOPLE AND TECHNOLOGY
INSTITUTE
RESEARCH INSTITUTE FELLOWS PUBLISHED EXCELLENCE ANNOUNCEMENTS RESEARCHERS SUPPORTED BY THE RESEARCH INSTITUTE SUPPORT US 04 06 16 24 28 36 46 56 66 76 86 96 106 116 126 136 146 156 166 206 214 228 234 Support Us 234

FROM THE PRESIDENT

In1818, Saint Louis University became the first university west of the Mississippi River. SLU has had many historic “firsts” in our more than two centuries of operation: The first law school and the first medical school in the west, the first federally accredited flight school, and the first organization to conduct a heart transplant in Missouri. Inspired by this legacy of innovation, our researchers continue to seek the “firsts” that will define our third century.

With the launch of the SLU Research Institute in 2018, we made it our mission to grow and amplify the impact of SLU’s scholarship and research. The work of our exceptional student and faculty researchers has expanded over the last five years — and with it, our capacity to alleviate human suffering and advance solutions to some of the world’s most urgent challenges.

Over the past year, our researchers have remained on the front lines of our most persistent public health challenges, such as COVID-19. As the devastating effects of climate change continue to materialize, our researchers have worked together to mitigate the harm and map a safer future. Our faculty have launched exciting new initiatives in the fields of translational neuroscience and the study of global Catholicism.

In the spring, we celebrated the launch of the Taylor Geospatial Institute (TGI), a first-of-its-kind collaboration that brings together eight leading research institutions to advance research in geospatial technology. Made possible by a landmark investment from Mr. Andrew Taylor and housed at SLU, TGI places St. Louis at the heart of the geospatial future and empowers researchers to make strides in critical areas such as food security, public health, and national security.

While we’re proud of these accomplishments, we are looking toward the future. The past few years have been filled with challenges for our world. These moments call the SLU community to come together in service of the greater good. Time and time again, our researchers remind us that a better, healthier, and more just world is possible.

The 2022 SLU Research Impact Report will give you a glimpse of all that our researchers have achieved in the past year and offer a look at the exciting path before us. Together, I am confident that we will continue to forge a promising and equitable future. We invite you to join us in advancing this vision.

Sincerely,

FROM THE DIRECTOR

Forthe second time in five years, the extraordinary generosity of St. Louis families has made it possible for Saint Louis University to build something that truly matters. In 2018, Dr. Jeanne and Mr. Rex Sinquefield launched the SLU Research Institute through a $50 million gift that set us on a path to becoming a great research university. The result of their generosity will be an institution that powerfully lives out our Jesuit mission, delivering talent and knowledge to tackle some of the world’s most profound challenges.

As President Pestello notes in his letter, Andrew Taylor’s legacy gift in 2022 to found the Taylor Geospatial Institute requires SLU and our partners to again create something that truly matters. The mission of the Taylor Geospatial Institute is to be the nation’s leader in geospatial science and to accelerate the St. Louis region’s development as a global geospatial center of excellence. Geospatial science is an emerging set of technologies with deep implications for human life and our planet in the 21st century. Feeding a growing global population, keeping our nation safe, making our communities healthier — these are just a few of the areas where geospatial science is making an impact. Thanks to Mr. Taylor’s extraordinary generosity, we have the responsibility to build a world-class institute that will shape the future of our region and beyond.

It is a tremendous privilege to be part of undertakings that are so far-reaching and consequential. Being entrusted by these individuals to bring our shared aspirations to life is humbling. SLU Research is contributing to something that is bigger than any of us — and if we do our jobs well, our community and our world will be better for it.

Building on the successes of the first five years of SLU’s research growth aspirations, in fall 2022, we launched our next five-year plan. By 2027, we aspire to be a 21st-century Carnegie

Research 1 university grounded in SLU’s Jesuit mission; a leading anchor institution in St. Louis, generating research, innovation, and talent to fuel the region’s knowledge economy; with distinctive research strengths that address the needs of our city, nation, and world; together with innovative partnerships and a heightened profile that enhances our impact.

While there is much work yet to do, we are making tremendous progress. As you will see in these pages, our SLU Research community is becoming more intense, more vibrant, more collaborative, and more ambitious. We invite you to join us.

In gratitude,

SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022
Mr. Rex and Dr. Jeanne Sinquefield, whose gift of $50 million to the University led to the establishment of the SLU Research Institute in 2018.

A Gift for THE GREATER GOOD

In 2018, the Saint Louis University Research Institute began with an extraordinary display of generosity: a $50 million gift from Dr. Jeanne and Mr. Rex Sinquefield. This gift allowed the University to cement its reputation as an eminent hub for research and teaching, based on its Catholic, Jesuit values. Moreover, it inspired a Universitywide desire to expand possibilities and discover innovations.

In the years since, the Research Institute has expanded its research capacity and impact. In the past year, SLU researchers have brought in nearly $58 million in research expenditures — a 7% compound annual growth rate from 2016 to present. The generosity of the Sinquefields has enabled groundbreaking discoveries, innovative adaptations, and a research culture centered on the betterment of humankind.

EXPLORE THE RESEARCH INSTITUTE slu.edu/researchinstitute

THE RESEARCH INSTITUTE HAS FIVE PRIMARY GOALS:

1 2 3 4 5

Achieving and sustaining annual research expenditure growth

Establishing eminence in strategic, University-wide research priority areas

Raising the profile and reputation of SLU in the St. Louis area and around the world

Recruiting, retaining, and investing in world-class research leaders

Leveraging the initial Sinquefield gift to increase federal, industry, and philanthropic funding for research within SLU

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A SPECIALTY IN Solutions

The Research Institute invests in solutions for humanity’s most pervasive challenges and enhances life for all. To achieve this, the University supports initiatives examining issues in a wide array of areas, from human-oriented technology to digital humanities, from geospatial science to health disparities. Since its launch, the Research Institute has supported faculty in launching new, interdisciplinary research initiatives, including:

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Geospatial @ SLU The Institute for Healing Justice & Equity (IHJE) The Center for Research on Global Catholicism (CRGC) People and Technology Horizon (PATH) The Water Access, Technology, Environment and Resources (WATER) Institute The Advanced HEAlth Data (AHEAD) Research Institute The SLU Center for Additive Manufacturing (SLU CAM) The Institute for Drug and Biotherapeutic Innovation (SLU-IDBI) The Institute for Translational Neuroscience (ITN)

OUR YEAR in Review

The past year at Saint Louis University’s Research Institute has been filled with momentous achievements. The Institute has enhanced capabilities, expanded regional partnerships, and furthered research excellence. A few achievements of note include:

The Launch of the Taylor Geospatial Institute

• Launched in April 2022, the Taylor Geospatial Institute is a firstof-its-kind consortium that brings together eight leading research institutes to collaborate on research in geospatial technology. The Institute will position St. Louis as a global geospatial center within the next decade.

The New School of Science and Engineering

• Formed in 2022, the new college unites select departments from the College of Arts and Sciences — chemistry, computer science, earth and atmospheric sciences, and physics — with the Parks College for Engineering, Aviation and Technology.

The Appointment of the Inaugural Cohort of Research Institute Fellows

• SLU researchers are named fellows in recognition of scholarly accomplishments at the highest level of their respective fields — in September 2022, the University appointed 70 fellows.

The Launch of Two New Big Ideas

• The Big Ideas competition is a multiyear process to identify and invest in collaborative projects. This competition resulted in the launch of two new ventures: The Institute for Translational Neuroscience (ITN) and The Center for Research on Global Catholicism (CRGC).

A Collaboration With the St. Louis Regional Advanced Manufacturing Innovation Center

• In fall 2022, AMICSTL announced Saint Louis University and the University of Missouri–St. Louis as co-leads for research and development. Researchers from multiple institutions will collaborate at a physical location adjacent to the campus of Ranken Technical College.

The Rollout of a New Five-Year Plan

• In 2022, SLU rolled out its next five-year research growth plan. The plan outlines strategies and priorities that will aid in achieving our vision of becoming a preeminent Jesuit research university in St. Louis.

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THE Five-Year PLAN

In 2017, Saint Louis University launched a five-year plan to grow the scale and eminence of the University’s research enterprise. Since then, the University’s research community has undergone a significant cultural shift. Enhanced research support has led to new innovations and steady growth in research expenditures.

THE FIRST FIVE YEARS

The University has made a number of significant accomplishments toward realizing the vision laid out in the first five-year plan. These include:

Building a Culture of Research Excellence

In the past five years, the University has enhanced research support by expanding its capacity for strategy, grants, research computing, and innovation. The University has also offered new opportunities for seed funding and established four research councils to support work in scholarship, health, science and engineering, and medicine.

The Establishment of the Research Institute

The SLU Research Institute was established in 2018 following a $50 million gift from Dr. Jeanne and Mr. Rex Sinquefield. The goals of the Research Institute built upon the University’s existing research growth ambitions, allowing transformative investments in faculty, research staff, and infrastructure across all disciplines. Funding from the Research Institute also assists departments in hiring and retaining exceptional researchers. In 2022, the Research Institute appointed the initial cohort of Research Institute Fellows.

Big Ideas and Centers

SLU researchers have established eight University-wide, collaborative institutes to tackle some of the greatest scientific and social challenges of the day, from access to clean water to health disparities across the United States. The University has also strengthened existing centers, such as the Center for Vaccine Development, and faculty have formed new college-level centers. SLU researchers have established themselves as national leaders in crucial areas including vaccine development and geospatial science.

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A researcher calibrates a drone in preparation to take photos of St. Francis Xavier College Church for a digitizing project.

Launch of the Taylor Geospatial Institute

In spring 2022, leaders from St. Louis’ business, civic, academic, and governmental communities came together to celebrate the launch of the Taylor Geospatial Institute, a first-ofits-kind institute that brings together eight leading research institutions to collaborate on research into geospatial technology.

Heightening Public Perception of SLU as a Growing Research University

SLU has improved the ways we recognize and communicate our researchers’ accomplishments. As part of this work, the Research Institute launched its first annual Impact Report in January 2021 and relaunched its website in fall 2021.

Growth in Research Funding, Scholarly and Scientific Impact

In the years since, the Research Institute has expanded its research capacity and impact. In the past year, SLU researchers have brought in nearly $58 million in research expenditures — a 7% compound annual growth rate from 2016 to present.

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Guangyong Peng, M.D., Ph.D, works with researcher Feiya Ma, MS, Ph.D. student, in the Center for Vaccine Development.
The next five-year plan builds on these accomplishments.
Leslie Hinyard, Ph.D., MSW, leads AHEAD Institute researchers in designing a new study.

A FIVE-YEAR PLAN FOR RESEARCH GROWTH

In fall 2022, the University rolled out the next five-year plan for research growth. This plan envisions that, by 2027, the experience of being a researcher at SLU will be characterized by:

A Vibrant Research Environment

SLU will be home to an interdisciplinary and diverse intellectual community made up of mission-driven, collaborative and ambitious faculty, staff, and students. Research will be supported by excellent research infrastructure and skilled support staff. High expectations and recognition for research excellence will be balanced with appropriate teaching loads for highly productive researchers.

Outstanding Research Support

SLU will offer enhanced support for exploring new ideas, finding collaborators, growing research programs, managing grants, and navigating compliance. Research staff will offer expertise in finding diverse federal, philanthropic, and industry funding; building innovative collaborations with external entities; and generating impact through publication and commercialization.

A Heightened Research Profile and Reputation

Regionally and nationally, SLU will be known as one of the leading Catholic research universities. SLU will be recognized for its distinctive top-ranked research strengths and its preeminent scholars and scientists.

STRATEGIES ENABLING ELEMENTS

• Accelerate Hiring and Retaining Research Intensive Faculty

• Grow Research Strengths and the Centers of Excellence

• Establish Research Growth as a SLU-wide Priority

• Solidify SLU’s Role as a Leading St. Louis Research University

• Increase Faculty Research Support

• Enhance Research Philanthropy

• Aggressively Market SLU Research

• Pursue SLU Innovation

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The following strategies and elements in the five-year plan will guide researchers, students, collaborators, and partners as we build together.

INVESTMENTS IN INNOVATION

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15 THE RESEARCH INSTITUTE
From left, Bryan MacGavin demonstrates a haptic wearable device for U.S. Director of National Intelligence Avril Haines and SLU President Fred Pestello, Ph.D., alongside CHROME Lab Director Jenna Gorlewicz, Ph.D.

Highlighting RESEARCH LEADERS

The Saint Louis University Research Institute works closely with faculty research leaders from a variety of disciplines to ensure the support it offers to the University community aligns with researchers’ needs and ambitions.

The following three research leaders represent different aspects of SLU’s research enterprise — science and engineering, scholarship and the humanities, and the medical sciences, respectively — and they each have appointments with the Research Institute, enabling them to facilitate research growth that aligns with both the strengths and capabilities of the colleges and the University’s larger research ambitions. Under their leadership, research growing across the University is interdisciplinary and impactful, bringing together experts from across fields to tackle the greatest challenges of our time.

Jenna Gorlewicz, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering; Director of the People and Technology Horizon (PATH) at SLU; Associate Dean of Research and Innovation in SLU’s School of Science and Engineering (SSE)

Claire Gilbert, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of History, Interim Director of the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies; Director of Scholarly Research Initiatives in the Office of the Vice President for Research

Adriana Montaño, Ph.D.

Professor of Pediatrics, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Vice Dean for Research - School of Medicine

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JENNA GORLEWICZ, Ph.D.

Jenna Gorlewicz, Ph.D, is associate professor of mechanical engineering, director of the People and Technology Horizon (PATH) at SLU, and associate dean of research and innovation in SLU’s School of Science and Engineering (SSE). She works alongside SSE faculty and students, the dean, and the vice president for research and partnerships to enable research growth across SSE, forge new interdisciplinary research collaborations, and foster a research environment compatible with SLU’s research growth agenda.

What are you most excited for and what do you hope to accomplish as associate dean of research and innovation for the School of Science and Engineering?

I am most excited about our interdisciplinary research portfolio and where we are going! We have outstanding faculty, staff, and students in the School of Science and Engineering, and I am excited to be working with them as we shape and innovate the new school. As associate dean of research and innovation, I hope to bring visibility to the impactful research happening within our school; grow our research capacity and ambitions by supporting our faculty, staff, and students; and secure partnerships that enhance our research and innovation initiatives.

Relatedly, SLU recently established a School of Science and Engineering. What role will this new school play in SLU’s research enterprise? What research is being done in this new school that most excites you?

The School of Science and Engineering will be instrumental in SLU’s research enterprise and in meeting our research ambition of becoming a Carnegie R1 institution. Through scholarly publications, externally funded research, and interdisciplinary collaborations, our faculty are addressing today’s greatest challenges in areas including geospatial science, artificial intelligence, space systems, water research, additive manufacturing, humancentered design, drug discovery, and more. What excites me most is that we are doing this together — with one another, with our students, with industry partners, and with our community.

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“What excites me most is that we are doing this together — with one another, with our students, with industry partners, and with our community.

There are a lot of exciting things happening in St. Louis right now. What role is SLU playing, and what impact do you hope SLU can have in the region?

SLU and the School of Science and Engineering are already having an impact in the region, and our growing partnerships and involvement in regional initiatives are setting the stage for this impact to be amplified. Our Center for Additive Manufacturing (SLU CAM) and our Open Source Software Center bring external projects into the hands of our students. Our Water Access, Technology, Environment and Resources (WATER) Institute partnerships result in stream bank restoration projects, groundwater monitoring wells, and numerous other initiatives that enhance our regional area and propel water research to the next level. Our Taylor Geospatial Institute is building the nation’s leading geospatial research collaborative rooted right here in St. Louis. This is just the beginning. Our faculty, staff, and students are at the core of this impact, and I am excited for what they will do next.

One exciting development in St. Louis is the launch of the Taylor Geospatial Institute, of which SLU is a lead organization. What does this mean for research in the School of Science and Engineering?

The Taylor Geospatial Institute represents a legacy investment in SLU that will advance core geospatial science and adjacent fields, many of which reside in SSE. The network of eight institutions that comprise TGI brings new opportunities for collaboration, partnership, and impact across existing and yetto-be-uncovered research areas which will positively shape the research portfolio of SSE moving forward. I’m excited about the catalytic momentum that TGI brings to SSE and SLU!

Faculty at SLU have launched a number of institutes in the past few years that leverage SLU’s science and engineering expertise, such as the WATER Institute and SLU CAM. What role do you hope these institutes can play in SLU’s research ambitions?

SSE faculty play pivotal roles in numerous Big Idea institutes across campus, including the WATER Institute, SLU CAM, Institute for Drug and Biotherapeutic Innovation (IDBI), Artificial Intelligence at SLU, Open Source With SLU, PATH, and others. These institutes capture the collaborative spirit at SLU and are tangible examples of “the sum being bigger than its parts.” SLU research shines in these collective initiatives and in our outstanding individual researchers who continue to push the bounds of possibility.

How are SLU researchers working with partners in industry, and what is the importance of these partnerships?

SLU researchers engage across the spectrum of research, from discovery through translation. Partnerships are an evolving and growing area for SLU Research and SSE. At an individual level, our faculty engage in industry-sponsored research that spans across many of our departments. At a larger scale, partnerships are being cultivated at the school, University, and institute levels to spark innovation in our teaching and our research and to establish mutually beneficial, sustainable relationships with industry. These partnerships illustrate the relevance and importance of the research being done at SLU, expand faculty and student networks and their reach, provide both direct and indirect resources to enable addressing today’s biggest challenges, and pave a pathway for impact beyond our walls.

What impact do you hope researchers in the School of Science and Engineering can have in addressing the challenges of today?

SSE researchers are already having an impact in addressing the challenges of today. From launching satellites into space to uncovering subcellular communication channels, our researchers are leaving a footprint on the world for good. This is not a hope — this is a reality. My hope is that as SSE grows and evolves, our impact is magnified, shared, and embedded in all we do.

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CLAIRE GILBERT, Ph.D.

Claire Gilbert, Ph.D., is associate professor of history and interim director of the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. In 2022, Gilbert was named director of scholarly research initiatives in the Office of the Vice President for Research. In this position, Gilbert works alongside the vice president for research and partnerships and faculty across the University to facilitate excellence in scholarship as the University pursues a rigorous research growth agenda.

As you step into your new role as director of scholarly research initiatives, what are you most excited for and what do you hope to accomplish?

I’m thrilled about the opportunity to work with so many talented colleagues across the University who engage with scholarly and creative endeavors as part of their research activities. Going forward, I hope to work collaboratively with my colleagues to foster increased connections across schools and colleges. SLU faculty across the University engage with diverse humanistic and social science methods in their research and creative expression. After the distancing of COVID-19 over the past few years, we now have a unique opportunity to reach out to one another around common interests to build an evermore robust culture of intellectual engagement at our University.

What work is being done in scholarly and creative endeavors at SLU right now that most excites you?

I’m tremendously excited about the interdisciplinary work being done through our scholarly centers across the University, from the Richard A. Chaifetz School of Business to the School of Social Work. Several of these centers are reaching important milestones in 2022-2023. In the College of Arts and Sciences, our brand-new Center for Research on Global Catholicism launched in 2022 as SLU’s first humanities Big Idea, while the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies celebrates 30 years of internationally recognized excellence in 2023. At the School of Law’s Center for Health Law Studies, 2022 marks 40 years of rigorous legal training and community engagement. For 16 of the past 17 years, SLU’s Health Law program has been top-ranked in the nation.

These SLU centers, among many others, are vital hubs for bringing our cutting-edge scholarly research to our broader community, while attracting world-renowned scholars to SLU to interact with our faculty and students.

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“I’m tremendously excited about the interdisciplinary work being done through our scholarly centers across the university...”

They serve as a platform for showcasing SLU expertise and projects for diverse public audiences. At the University, scholarly centers of excellence bridge departments and other units by creating intellectual communities that reach across disciplinary boundaries. These intellectual communities at SLU are the incubators of innovative research among our faculty and graduate students — the next generation of scholarly leaders — with broad benefit for scholarly and creative disciplines and public communities beyond SLU.

How does scholarly research at SLU impact the larger St. Louis region?

Scholarly research at SLU engages with our local community in a variety of ways, including through our scholarly centers of excellence. Individual faculty and students also pursue scholarly and creative endeavors with partners at major regional institutions like the Missouri Historical Society, the Missouri Botanical Garden, Kranzberg Art Foundation, among many others. Beyond the St. Louis region, SLU scholars work with colleagues at major research institutions around the world, from Mexico to New Zealand.

Humanities are one major component of scholarship at SLU. What is the role of the humanities at a Jesuit research university like SLU?

Humanities, as the name suggests, refers to the constellation of academic disciplines and approaches to the study of human cultures, societies, and experiences — past, present, and future. At SLU, our humanists are carrying out cutting-edge research and scholarship from literary methods to anthropology, from thorny theological and philosophical questions to cutting-edge techniques in digital humanities software and analysis.

As a preeminent Jesuit University, the humanities at SLU embrace our mission to pursue truth for the greater glory of God and for the service of humanity. SLU’s Jesuit identity is one of its most significant assets for many reasons, among which is the intrinsic value of the humanities to a Jesuit education. There are few better-prepared humanists than those members of the Jesuit order, whose training requires years of intensive study in theology and other humanistic disciplines to prepare for their varied callings and occupations within and beyond the University. The excellence of SLU humanities is thus rooted in its Jesuit tradition and is inextricably linked to the future success of this University.

I am proud to say that the quality of SLU humanists has been recognized in 2022 by an unprecedented level of funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities. SLU investigators received, collectively, over $700,000 to fund

individual and collaborative projects in digital humanities, foreign language acquisition, fieldwork and archival research, and world history pedagogy. In addition to these impressive achievements, a team of SLU investigators received nearly $500,000 from the Henry Luce Foundation for the public and digital humanities project, Lived Religion in a Digital Age.

Why are the humanities so important in this moment we are living in? How can the humanities help us address and understand the challenges of today?

Humanities scholarship has a venerable tradition in U.S. higher education and remains the heart of the modern university. Throughout the 20th century, the technological advancements of the industrial age facilitated the incorporation of new disciplines into the modern university for the broad benefit of humanity. The fact that we now have more paths toward advancing knowledge and improving human lives for the greatest number is only for our collective benefit. It does not mean, however, that the humanities are any less relevant for modern students and modern research. At SLU, students learn independent and collaborative modes of advanced critical thinking, research and analysis, and written and spoken communication through their humanistic training and experiences in the new University Core and in humanities majors and minors. Our SLU humanists connect their research to the classroom for the benefit of our students and our communities. Student experiences with the investigative, critical, and rhetorical skills of humanities research become a major asset they take with them from SLU as global citizens. These same skills underpin the pursuit of advanced research in the humanities itself, which is being conducted at the highest level by SLU faculty.

Where do you see scholarship and the humanities at SLU five years from now?

SLU scholarship is on a strong upward trajectory. I believe that five years from now, we will find our scholars still engaging with some of the most vital questions about human cultures and societies, past, present, and future, and producing some of the most meaningful scholarly and creative expression in their fields. I expect that our track record of excellence and impact in publications and external funding will only increase as our profile is raised through the major awards that we have received this year and the milestones of our scholarly centers. Scholarship has a major role to play in SLU’s journey to R1 status as a generator of research reputation and graduate training as well as through the impact of our scholarly centers and individual faculty publications, presentations, performances, and exhibits.

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ADRIANA MONTAÑO, Ph.D.

Adriana M. Montaño, Ph.D., is professor of pediatrics, biochemistry and molecular biology, and the vice dean for research in SLU’s School of Medicine. In this position, Montaño works with the dean of the School of Medicine and the vice president for research and partnerships to enhance SLU’s biomedical research.

What are you most excited for and what do you hope to accomplish as the vice dean for research in the School of Medicine?

I am most excited to be part of the engine that marks the beginning of a transformational change in basic, clinical, and translational research at the School of Medicine. We have outstanding scientists devoted to performing impactful research that benefits our communities and are part of the mission of Saint Louis University.

The Office of Research at the School of Medicine is committed to supporting our investigators and to providing the resources needed to help them be successful in their career path. Basic and translational scientists work collaboratively to provide fundamental knowledge that will advance treatments, change paradigms to improve current approaches, and develop innovative perspectives into life-changing medications.

What is unique about the medical research happening at SLU? What is the advantage of working in the medical sciences at a Jesuit research university like SLU?

We have a unique array of centers and institutes that provide new opportunities for collaboration with our investigators at the School of Medicine. The Institute for Drug and Biotherapeutic Innovation (IDBI) is a great example of it. Scientists from different disciplines across SLU work together on cutting-edge strategies to develop innovative treatments for a wide array of diseases including chronic pain, rare genetic disorders, tuberculosis, and hepatitis B, among others.

At the School of Medicine, our scientists are creating new approaches to narrow the gap between basic and translational research. Development of new techniques and approaches is fundamental to the advancement of medical sciences.

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“With the recent integration of SLU and SSM Health, we foresee new opportunities and resources that will enhance clinical research to continue to achieve medical breakthroughs. Collaboration between both organizations is crucial for a bright and innovative future where we can address the needs of the St. Louis community.”

In addition, personalized medicine is becoming more and more important in the medical setting. Thus, the development of state-of-the-art technologies to improve drug discovery is instrumental. Our scientists at the School of Medicine are using structural biology, transcriptomics, metabolomics, precise genomic technologies, advanced analytics, and proteomics to establish novel approaches to uncover attractive therapeutic targets for pharmacotherapy as well as getting new insights into toxicity and drug resistance.

At SLU, we are taking advantage of our multidisciplinary teams to change the traditional approach of drug development to one that focuses on improved processes that will result in the development of effective medications that can augment wellness in our community.

Service to humanity and community engagement are critical parts of SLU’s Jesuit mission. How do these values inform research in the medical sciences at SLU?

A Jesuit education emphasizes the view that each person is a unique creation of God. Cura personalis (meaning “care for the whole self” in Latin) is demonstrated by personal attention in the classroom, a deep respect for diversity and difference, and an emphasis on holistic care for the mind, body, and spirit.

Our researchers are motivated by a concern for the most vulnerable members of our society. We strive to be a responsible partner and an ambitious leader in our local St. Louis community, and we believe that the research done at SLU can transform our world into a healthier and more just one for all.

Our work at the Saint Louis University School of Medicine goes beyond training physicians to be scholars of the human body. We graduate doctors who appreciate humanistic medicine, concern themselves with the sanctity of human life, and commit to dignity and respect for all patients. All SLU research reflects our University’s Jesuit values and our desire to care for the most vulnerable members of our society.

What impact do you hope SLU’s medical researchers can have in St. Louis?

We want to be the preferred destination for patients and scientists in St. Louis and the surrounding areas. Our strong research programs attract and retain a healthy workforce in St. Louis and provide a source of job creation, contributing to the economic outputs. Our workforce and research, which has a strong community focus, can help to progress community health and equity in access to health care. We want to enhance our already strong relations with the St. Louis community

providing world-class service in primary care, elder care, and the care of medically underserved and the most vulnerable populations. This is one of the pillars of our mission as a Jesuit research university. SLU’s medical researchers and students investigate and develop new techniques, technologies, and treatments. We want to make sure that these are available to members of the St. Louis community and address the priority health concerns of our community.

Industry partnerships are an important part of SLU’s medical research. What are the advantages and services that SLU can bring to the table?

We believe that a working relationship between SLU researchers and the industry (commercial enterprises) will improve health outcomes and their delivery to patients and the community. We recognize the critical role of industry for innovative research. We also recognize that many opportunities exist to establish working and mutually beneficial partnerships between SLU’s School of Medicine and industry that will help to improve patient and community health. SLU is providing the talent, passion, and breakthrough research accomplishments of our researchers. Industry partners will not only have access to our innovative and world-class research but will also play a role in contributing to our research efforts. SLU researchers have many scientific results and endpoint products that would benefit from a partnership with industry. At SLU, we have a diverse portfolio of technologies that provide a strong foundation for investors. Process scalability and excellent operational know-how that will be provided by industry partners may swiftly move these research outcomes to the next level, making them accessible for patients locally and globally.

Our world has faced a variety of public health crises in the past few years, including the COVID-19 pandemic. How is SLU and its medical experts and researchers positioned to help?

SLU is home to one of the 10 Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units (VTEUs) in the United States and has been recognized as such for the past 33 years. During the COVID-19 pandemic, our team at SLU actively participated in phases I to III COVID-19 clinical trials. Additionally, SLU is aspiring to be a critical player in the development of novel vaccines to improve global health outcomes. Making the case for health, social, and economic benefits of vaccines and contributing to the increased awareness about these benefits in our community is crucial for SLU. SLU is aware of its critical role in developing vaccines and effective therapeutic strategies for public health crises and wants to be part of the conversation with its experience and globally recognized experts and researchers.

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Recognizing

DISTINGUISHED FELLOWS

Saint Louis University has fostered connections with leaders with exceptional capabilities. Eminent scientists, scholars, and executives are drawn to work with the University and support its mission of service to humanity. In recognition of their efforts, the SLU Research Institute created the Distinguished Fellows Program in 2020.

Distinguished Fellows are selected for their outstanding accomplishments in their respective fields. Their fellowship position empowers them to advise the Research Institute on emerging research trends, key external partnerships, and other strategic priorities.

Robert Cardillo

Former Director, National GeospatialIntelligence Agency (NGA)

Dennis Muilenburg

Former President and CEO, The Boeing Company; Currently Chairman, CEO, and Co-Founder of New Vista Capital, and Owner and CEO of DAM CyFly Consulting, LLC

Art McCoy, Ph.D.

Superintendent Emeritus, Jennings School District

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A view of the St. Louis campus.
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ROBERT CARDILLO

What work being done at SLU right now most excites you as a Distinguished Fellow?

I am so proud of everything that SLU has accomplished via its leadership in growing the regional geospatial ecosystem. And I am evermore excited about what lies ahead as we begin to leverage new talent and innovative technologies to create more diverse and inclusive regional economic development. This dedication to creating broader benefits in our society will rebound in future generations and result in a more equitable and inclusive ecosystem.

This year saw the launch of the Taylor Geospatial Institute (TGI). What does this launch mean for Saint Louis University and the larger geospatial ecosystem here in St. Louis? What role do you think SLU can play in the continual growth of the St. Louis geospatial ecosystem?

The Taylor Geospatial Institute is, quite simply, a game-changer. In addition to growing our talent base and advancing core science, TGI is catalyzing complementary efforts to accelerate the region’s path to becoming a national leader in harnessing geospatial science to solve society’s grand challenges. From a more fair distribution of health care to a more sustainable environment, TGI will be at the forefront of creating a better world.

Distinguished Fellow, Saint Louis University Research Institute

Former Director, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA)

Robert Cardillo is the president of The Cardillo Group (TCG). TCG delivers strategic and operational expertise to create an enhanced awareness of our planet to enable improved decision-making. TCG’s portfolio includes academic, nonprofit, and national securityrelated clients.

Before TCG, Cardillo held leadership positions with the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Defense Intelligence Agency, and Office of the Director of National Intelligence. Until 2019, Cardillo was the sixth director of the NGA. He transformed the Agency’s future value proposition through innovative partnerships with the growing commercial geospatial marketplace.

25 DISTINGUISHED FELLOWS

Distinguished Fellow, Saint Louis University Research Institute

Former President and CEO, The Boeing Company; Currently Chairman, CEO, and Co-Founder of New Vista Capital, and Owner and CEO of DAM CyFly Consulting, LLC

Dennis Muilenburg is chairman, CEO, and co-founder of New Vista Capital, launched in 2021, and owner, president, and CEO of DAM CyFly Consulting, LLC, launched in 2020. Previously, Muilenburg joined The Boeing Company in 1985 as an engineering intern. He quickly rose through the company, serving as president from 2013 to 2019, as chief executive officer from 2015 to 2019, and as chairman of the board from March 2016 to October 2019. Until July 2015, Muilenburg served as vice chairman, president, and chief operating officer of Boeing, where he supported the company’s aerospace business operations and focused on specific growth enablers, including important global relationships, leadership initiatives, and development program performance.

DENNIS MUILENBURG

What work being done at SLU right now most excites you as a Distinguished Fellow?

I’ve experienced an extraordinary span of exciting leading-edge research work being done at SLU, ranging from geospatial science to collaborative haptics and robotics, water safety and innovation, autonomous systems, microsatellites, advanced additive manufacturing, and more. It’s doubly exciting to see collaboration across these various research areas, with a culture of sharing and creating new solutions that benefit humanity. Innovation momentum is also being scaled with recently announced regional projects such as the Taylor Geospatial Institute and the Advanced Manufacturing Innovation Center STL. And across all of these efforts, it’s been a privilege to meet so many extraordinary people with a purpose-filled passion for what they do at SLU. It’s clear that the investment we make in people is the most important and meaningful investment we can make — that’s what excites me the most about joining SLU in my Distinguished Fellow role.

In fall 2022, SLU rolled out its next five-year plan for research, which will place the University on the path to becoming an R1 research university. What would this achievement for SLU mean for the region’s industry and innovation ecosystem?

Becoming an R1 research university would be an extraordinary accomplishment, and I love the boldness of the objective and the sense of energy it generates. This achievement would benefit the region’s industry and innovation ecosystem in multiple important dimensions. First and foremost, it would further brand and strengthen our region as a leading innovation epicenter — nationally and globally — accelerating talent growth and creating diverse career opportunities. It will also attract meaningful resources and investment in the region, expanding industries, scaling large enterprises, and creating a wealth of new startups in the ecosystem. It will generate broader economic prosperity and societal benefits for the community — the clear ripple benefit of a robust innovation flywheel. Bottom line, SLU achieving R1 research university status will be an exciting game-changer for our region.

IMPACT REPORT 2022
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ART McCOY, Ph.D.

What work being done at SLU right now most excites you as a Distinguished Fellow?

The Career and Postsecondary Exposure and Support Mentorship Program started this year in St. Louis Public Schools impacting over 100 students and adults. This SLU, Regional Business Council, and SLPS partnership has been so successful that over $50,000 of private donations have come to SLU for this purpose — multiple schools in the St. Louis area have requested to join this program. SLU faculty and staff provide college prep sessions and mental health and humanflourishing lessons weekly, creating individual flourishing plans with high schoolers for success in college, careers, and the community as empowered citizens.

Working with the Taylor Geospatial Institute to develop a series of four week-long geospatial data science camps has been wonderful. The curriculum focuses on GIS principles, machine learning, AI, and applied research to engage and enlighten hundreds of underserved middle and high schoolers and educators across the region.

Lastly, it was a thrill to spearhead a collaboration with industry leaders and include SLU’s School of Education in a $5 million Missouri Department of Economic Development Workforce Training Grant. This grant aims to expand geospatial, advanced manufacturing, energy, and education workforce development and Power Skills training, as I have coined it, for youth and adults over the next four years.

How can SLU make a positive impact in the St. Louis area?

SLU has the power and passion for bringing constituents, consortiums, and leaders together for a collective impact that addresses the needs of education, industry, and beyond. We can drive more workforce innovations and renovations in partnership with industry and then backward design current and emerging positions (experience) and skillsets to create professional certifications and courses (exposure) and create specialized K-12 curricula offerings for schools (for early awareness). This stellar university can also impact education at national, state, and regional levels by helping K-12 schools update school curricula faster and with better insights.

While industry insights and innovations are wonderful, we know the most important way to make a positive impact is through relationships that transform lives. As a leading higher education institution, SLU’s actions influence other leading organizations to serve in more extraordinary ways and for the greater good. As such, SLU must continue to champion collaborations and investments in the mind, heart, body, and spirit of individuals and institutions, transforming the St. Louis community and the broader society at the speed of the need.

Distinguished Fellow, Saint Louis University Research Institute

Superintendent Emeritus, Jennings School District

After graduating magna cum laude with a bachelor’s degree at age 19, Art McCoy, Ph.D., began his career as a trailblazing mathematics teacher in the Rockwood School District, making him the youngest certified teacher in Missouri. By age 33, McCoy had received his master’s degree and Ph.D. and was named the youngest and first African American superintendent of the Ferguson-Florissant School District. Under his leadership, Jennings School District achieved multiple years of 100% graduation, college, and career placement through innovative programming and professional mentorship. In the last 15 years, McCoy has raised over $20 million to create innovative programs in STEAM, workforce development, diversityinclusion-equity, mental health, and wellness to sever attainment gaps existing in society (SAGES).

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NEW GRANTS FROM THE National Endowment for the Humanities BUILDS ON A TRADITION OF SCHOLARLY EXCELLENCE

In an increasingly STEM-focused world, Saint Louis University researchers continue to highlight the importance and ongoing relevance of the humanities.

Claire Gilbert, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of History, plans to underscore the need for the humanities — and exactly what the area of study is — in her new role with the Office of the Vice President of Research as the director for Scholarly Research Initiatives.

“By the humanities, I mean scholarship that explores the meaning of human experience across different places and times and through a wide variety of disciplinary approaches from literary methods to anthropology, from thorny ideological and philosophical questions to cutting-edge techniques in digital humanities software and analysis,” Gilbert said.

The humanities, Gilbert further explained, are a venerable tradition and remain at the heart of the modern university both in scholarship and education. Faculty in the humanities guide their students through their humanistic training by mirroring skills used in their own research — engaging them in modes of advanced critical thinking, research, and analysis.

“These same skills underpin the pursuit of advanced research in the humanities itself, which is being conducted at the highest level by Saint Louis University faculty,” Gilbert said.

That, in 2022 alone, the University’s researchers have been awarded nearly $630,500 by the National Endowment for the Humanities highlights the relevance of the humanities as well as the expertise of faculty belonging to this field of study.

Gilbert noted the significance of the NEH awards that faculty received this year.

“SLU is punching well above its weight in its success with the National Endowment for the Humanities,” she said. “These are among the largest available awards in the humanities, equivalent to multimillion-dollar grants from funding agencies in the sciences.”

A Renowned Legacy

Although the funds have been awarded to researchers across the humanities, it is notable that a significant amount has been designated for programs specific to research in the Medieval and Renaissance periods. The University’s Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies (CMRS) is celebrating its 30th anniversary as well as the 10th anniversary of its Annual Summer Symposium.

The CMRS’s 30 years of success are rooted in the support for the humanities at SLU, especially the support that comes from the Vatican Film Library, which itself will mark the 70th anniversary of its opening this year. The library, established in 1953 with funding from the Knights of Columbus, contains over 40,000 manuscripts, ranging from the fourth to 17th centuries. The library’s METAscripta project is particularly important to humanistic research at the University, especially research that is rooted in the Medieval and Renaissance periods. It serves as an international hub for digital manuscript research online as it holds 37,000 pre-modern manuscripts originally microfilmed in the 1950s.

Moreover, SLU’s Rare Book Division of Special Collections and the Jesuit Archives aid in the successes of various centers and researchers at SLU. The Rare Books Division contains more than 30,000 volumes written by or about members of the Society of Jesus. The volumes cover such fields as theology, philosophy, and church history. The Jesuit Archives, on the other hand, contain publications, ledgers, journals, and more related to the University’s history. The collected documents cover over 180 years of history.

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Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Gilbert, along with fellow College of Arts and Sciences faculty members Atria Larson, Ph.D., Charles H. Parker, Ph.D., and Fabien Montcher, Ph.D., recently received awards for their work in Medieval and Renaissance studies.

Making Manuscripts Accessible

Larson, associate professor of Medieval Christianity in the Department of Theological Studies, director of the Center for Religious and Legal History, and associate director of the CMRS, is leading a digital humanities project called “Gallery of Glosses”. She was

awarded $149,835 to complete the project. The goal of “Gallery of Glosses” is to produce an accessible, open digital platform where users can work together to identify and transcribe annotations in medieval manuscripts. Of particular interest in this project is authoritative texts in medieval education and society.

Institute for Higher Education Faculty

Gilbert; Parker, professor in the Department of History; and Montcher, assistant professor in the Department of History, are working together to develop an educational institute for higher education faculty. They were awarded $219,641 for the institute, called “Global

Geographies of Knowledge: Creating, Representing, and Commodifying Ideas Across Early Modern Places, 1400-1800.” The institute is meant to enrich scholarship that is rooted in the first age of globalization by exploring the interconnections between humans, objects, ideologies, and the environment during this time period. Gilbert, Parker, and Montcher plan to invite 30 higher education faculty for the four-week institute on Saint Louis University’s campus. By the end of “Global Geographies,” it is the hope of its directors that faculty will have begun to produce a research project related to the program’s themes and that they will walk away with ideas for new courses, projects for students, and more.

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History department faculty members from left, Fabien Montcher, Ph.D., Charles H. Parker, Ph.D., and Claire Gilbert, Ph.D., have received an NEH grant for a summer institute at SLU. Atria Larson, Ph.D, associate professor of Medieval Christianity, has received an NEH grant to create a web platform for sharing digitized Medieval manuscripts that allows users to identify and transcribe the annotations and marginalia.

Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Two faculty in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, Dan Nickolai, Ph.D., and Amy Wright, Ph.D., also received NEH awards.

Developing a Language Learning Tool

Nickolai, associate professor of French, director of the Language Resource Center, and president-elect of the International Association for Language Learning Technology, was awarded a grant in the amount of $275,000 for the continued development and distribution of an application called iSpraak. Nickolai originally created the application, which aids in the instruction, assessment, and research for second language pronunciation, in 2014 for internal use at Saint Louis University. However, students and instructors across the globe now also use it. As such, one of the main goals of this project is to ensure the application is a free and open-source platform.

Serialization and Storytelling in Mexico

Wright, associate professor of Hispanic studies, received a fellowship from the NEH, which lasted from June through November 2022. She used her NEH award, which amounted to $30,000, to finish her upcoming book, “Serial Storytelling in Mexico from Nationhood to Now, 1821-2021.” In this work, she provides an in-depth look at serialization, as it has been an important narrative feature of Mexican storytelling since the origins of the nation. The book will be released through Vanderbilt University Press in June 2023.

Theological Studies

Religion and the Hôpital-Général in Canada

Mary Dunn, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Theological Studies and director for the Center for Research on Global Catholicism, was awarded a $6,000 summer stipend to aid in the writing of a chapter of her upcoming book, “Disorder and Disease: The Hôpital-Général of Quebec, 16931799.” In this book, she aims to write a history of the hôpital-général, which was founded in 1692 to be a refuge for the poor. She is specifically interested in focusing on the role of religion within the hospital and the society from which it was borne.

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SLU RESEARCHERS Confront and Adapt to Changes TO OUR COMMON HOME

Saint Louis University is rooted in compassion and service — and that care extends to the world around us. As our ecosystems change, SLU researchers are contributing to a robust understanding of climate change. Over the years, they have worked to study the impact of change and address it for the sake of our common home.

Examining Climate Change

Addressing climate change requires researchers to see the overall state of our world and how variable conditions impact the resources at our disposal. Notably, the Taylor Geospatial Institute connects researchers from Saint Louis University and seven other organizations to advance geospatial science through interdisciplinary collaborations. Together, these organizations identify innovative, realworld solutions to grand challenges.

The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) and Saint Louis University (SLU) co-sponsor the annual Geo-Resolution conference in St. Louis. The 2022 topic was “Geospatial Perspectives on Climate Change: Predicting and Mitigating Effects.” Geospatial researchers came together to examine how geospatial tools may help stakeholders make science-based decisions in legislative policies and aid decision-makers in managing our overall resources.

Event panels included:

• Water Tension and Conflict. This conversation examined how geospatial tools may be useful in resolving conflict around water resources and enabling data-informed decisions on water policies.

• Migration Due to Climate Change. This panel considered how changes in the environment and human mobility create conditions that may upend communities through dissolution, assimilation, and reimagination.

• Impacts on Energy and Food Systems. This panel discussed how research may help pave the way for innovations in mitigating the impacts of climate change on energy and food systems.

• Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Climate Change and Health. This panel discussed how climate change and resulting catastrophes require multimodal, interdisciplinary approaches to address the loss of biodiversity, the emergence of infectious diseases, and overall access to health resources.

Protecting Water Resources

As world temperatures rise and precipitation patterns change, one of society’s most critical resources hangs in the balance. The state of water is becoming more precarious — the United States is the perfect example, facing an increase in the frequency of both droughts and floods in almost all regions. Saint Louis University’s Water Access, Technology, Environment and Resources (WATER) Institute is stepping up to research and identify solutions for persistent water-related challenges.

Researchers within the WATER Institute monitor water resources and infrastructure in the Midwest and beyond. Through careful modeling, they project the behavior of bodies of water in the future — for example, climate change disturbs the natural equilibrium of river systems, creating the risk of flooding or shrinking river flows. Through the data collected, the WATER Institute hopes to inform policy and infrastructure design suitable for our changing world.

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The WATER Institute also hosts events to share research, encourage institutional collaboration, and bring awareness to water supply issues. The topic of the SLU Summit for Water was “Water Resources in a Changing Climate.” The event spanned two days in March 2022 and covered topics including environmental justice, how climate change may multiply health threats such as COVID-19, the use of artificial intelligence in managing water resources, and the impact of climate change on the Mississippi River.

Restoring Natural and Agricultural Ecosystems

Nearly 75% of the planet’s land has been impacted by human activity, contributing to the loss of approximately 50% of the planet’s topsoil in the last 150 years. The New Roots for Restoration and Biology Integration Institute (NRR-BII) aims to restore degraded lands by discovering and integrating knowledge about roots, soil, and microbiome communities.

The NRR-BII was established at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center in 2021 following a $12.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation. Scientists with the Institute are working together to restore both natural and agricultural ecosystems. These ecosystems are resilient, diverse, and high-functioning, and can provide a sustainable and equitable food supply for humanity while delivering critical ecosystem functions for the planet.

“Our vision is to revolutionize the way in which we approach land restoration,” said Allison Miller, Ph.D., professor of biology at SLU and director of the NRR-BII.

The NRR-BII brings together 26 scientists and educators from nine member organizations, including SLU. Abby Stylianou, Ph.D., assistant professor of computer science at SLU, is developing new technologies, such as an iPhone-based app for in-field plant phenotyping, that will solve practical challenges and offer new innovations for plant research.

In addition to scientific advancement, the NRR-BII is fostering a culture that broadens participation by removing historical barriers to success in the scientific field; a major focus of the Institute is to recruit, train, and retain the next, diverse generation of scientists who will lead an integrated approach to the restoration of degraded lands.

“The mission of the Institute is to build the scientific foundation and diverse workforce required to advance longlived, resilient systems in nature and agriculture,” said Miller.

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Amanda Cox, Ph.D., P.E., using an acoustic doppler current profiler (ADCP) instrument to measure flow velocity distribution within the Meramec River.

SLU RESEARCHERS Work Toward Health Equity ACROSS LOCAL AND

GLOBAL COMMUNITIES

As a Jesuit institution, Saint Louis University is dedicated to addressing human needs within communities around the world. Health equity is one of the primary interests shared by SLU researchers, and many projects seek to understand health disparities and identify solutions.

Implementation Science in Practice

Juliet Iwelunmor, Ph.D., professor of behavioral science and health education, is a global health researcher and implementation scientist with an interest in sustainable solutions that improve health outcomes in resource-limited settings. Her research uses participatory, culture-centered approaches to implement and sustain evidence-based interventions in low-tomiddle-income countries. Iwelunmor has published over 100 research articles, and she has received substantial support from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to work alongside communities around the world

One such project is I-TEST — that is, “Innovative Tools to Expand HIVSelf Testing.” Iwelunmor and her colleagues work hand-in-hand with at-risk Nigerian youth and their local communities to define, implement, and evaluate participatory interventions focused on HIV prevention. This project, which is entering its fifth year, is supported by $6.4 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), and has

informed national health guidelines in Nigeria.

The I-TEST project showed that crowdsourcing methods could be used to identify adolescents and young adults capable of becoming junior leaders in promoting HIV self-testing in Nigeria. Building on this, in 2022, Iwelunmor and her colleagues are organizing the Stimulating Training and Access to HIV Research Experiences (STAR) Institute. Funded by the NIH, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), STAR identifies young adults and adolescents from diverse minority backgrounds in the U.S. interested in HIV implementation research and connects them with opportunities for training and mentorship from multiple academic institutions across the country.

Also, in 2022, Iwelunmor received funding from the NIH/National Cancer Institute (NCI) to enhance HPV prevention. Cervical cancer caused by HPV is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in African countries. To eliminate cervical cancer as part of the World Health Organization, 90-70-90 strategy in Nigeria, Iwelunmor is using crowdsourcing methods to promote

HPV prevention among mothers and daughters. The project will identify locally relevant prevention messaging for HPV vaccination for girls and HPV screening for women and as designed by mothers and daughters as a dynamic team. They will also work with the mother/daughter team to lead the implementation and evaluation of the campaigns in Nigeria. Their ultimate vision is a world where cervical cancer is eliminated with girls and women themselves, empowered to lead the way.

Studies for Security and Well-Being

Ellen K. Barnidge, Ph.D., M.P.H., associate professor of behavioral science and health education, was appointed as interim dean of the College for Public Health and Social Justice in February 2022. Currently, she and Heather Bednarek, Ph.D., associate professor of economics, are working with funding from the Missouri Foundation for Health to understand the impact of Missouri Medicaid expansion and household food security.

Barnidge and Bednarek have previously noted the positive impact of states expanding health care eligibility

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requirements. Missouri expanded Medicaid on October 1, 2021, opening the door for as many as 275,000 people to enroll. Increased access to health care coverage is an essential step toward greater well-being for Missourians. At the same time, nearly 695,830 Missourians face hunger, an essential building block for health, signaling a need to continue exploring environments around basic health needs.

Barnidge also served alongside Eric Anderson, interim assistant vice president for student well-being, as cochair for SLU’s Student Well-Being Task Force. The task force was formed in September 2021 and comprised nearly 30 students, faculty, and staff who brought diverse viewpoints, experiences, and expertise to the effort. Final task force recommendations focused on creating inclusive community spaces, prioritizing student well-being in strategic plans, regularly assessing the state of SLU, and using data to inform best practices.

Spatial Contributions to Health Equity

The journey toward health equity involves looking at the world around us and analyzing the steps required to improve conditions. Enbal Shacham, Ph.D., professor of public health and acting associate director of the Taylor Geospatial Institute (TGI), explores how the environment influences health and utilizes partnerships to create actionable interventions.

The College for Public Health and Social Justice and the Taylor Geospatial Institute both strive to make our lived experiences better. The institutions explore how air quality, water, pollutants, the quality of schools, economic opportunities, and health care accessibility impact health outcomes. The Taylor Geospatial Institute has solidified extensive working relationships with external universities. Colleagues work across institutions to solve pervasive health problems, with new people plugging in their unique expertise to provide new insights.

Shacham and her colleagues’ research often revolves around high-risk communities and improving access

to resources. During the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic, the College’s focus was informing at-risk populations of the dangers of the virus and analyzing policy efficiency. The data collected from these efforts informed leaders and elected officials as they enacted updated policies. The College also collaborated with the Richard A. Chaifetz School of Business to optimize vaccine allocation. Through this, researchers were able to prioritize areas of high morbidity and ensure vaccine availability.

As they divert away from a COVID-19 focus, the College for Public Health and Social Justice pursues three ongoing research areas:

• Mental health challenges. The research focuses on communities at high risk for mental health challenges and concludes where departments should place their mental health resources.

• Childhood asthma and the environment. Patient populations with childhood asthma have a higher risk for triggers and morbidity — the University is working on a health plan to allocate health care resources and housing remediation.

• Climate change and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS). MERS is a respiratory condition present in Egypt and Saudi Arabia. The College is working alongside the International Livestock Research Institute to analyze the risk of physical environmental changes to food insecurity and infection prevention.

Enbal Shacham, Ph.D., explains the role of location during a public health crisis.
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STIMULATING ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

A Conversation With Michael Podgursky,

Director of the Sinquefield Center for Applied Economic Research

Amid an expansive world economy, policymakers and economists in the St. Louis metro area are constantly searching for new avenues for growth and long-term prosperity. They hope to secure a greater influence on the U.S. market through manufacturing, health care services, research centers, and beyond. To aid their efforts, Saint Louis University researchers collect and analyze economic data that will inform the best steps forward. The Sinquefield Center for Applied Economic Research studies urban economic development in the hopes of reversing any downward trends and improving the overall quality of life in St. Louis.

“Hopefully, the kind of research we’re doing will help stimulate economic development in such a way that it trickles down to low-income families and communities,” Michael Podgursky, Ph.D., director of the Center, said.

The Center utilizes a variety of data sources, including geospatial data, surveys, and governmental records to understand behavior patterns and the impact of public policy decisions. Podgursky stated that the Center develops rich databases on schools, neighborhoods, employment records, and workforce development for the

state and city. These resources form the foundation for applied economic research, touching on topics such as taxation, education, health regulation, entrepreneurship, and technology.

Podgursky emphasized the Center is particularly unique in its ability to connect researchers with insightful data and expand the reach of their work in meaningful ways. While the economic researchers conduct individual studies, they also offer resource support for the rest of the University. The Sinquefield Center’s cross-departmental nature allows for endless opportunities for future collaboration.

“We branch out to everyone in all of SLU’s colleges. It’s turned out to be quite advantageous,” Podgursky said.

Podgursky believes that the Sinquefield Center provides the raw materials necessary for conducting cutting-edge public policy research. Rather than putting the weight of data collection on researchers, the Center empowers them to jump straight into analysis related to their areas of interest.

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“If you want to play in the big data game, you need data, computational resources, and assistance — we provide all three,” Podgursky said.
WATER INSTITUTE
Postdoctoral fellow Guangli Zhang presents econometric findings to colleagues.

Research AREAS

The Sinquefield Center for Applied Economic Research utilizes diverse data sets to guide decision-making and encourage growth. The Center delves into the local community that Saint Louis University calls home and reveals new insights related to the factors involved in economic development.

Academic Trajectories

Education is a crucial starting point for long-term economic success, often guiding students toward valuable careers in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) — a core tenet of growth. Podgursky shared that the Sinquefield Center hopes to encourage an uptick of STEM interest in new generations and create positive economic trends as a result.

“We have a particular interest in STEM science, technology, engineering, and math training, and getting more kids into STEM fields and degree programs because there’s a lot of opportunity there,” Podgursky said.

One project, Project Lead the Way, provides transformative learning experiences for PreK-12 students and teachers in many schools in the St. Louis and Kansas City metro areas. The program allows for hands-on, classroom engagement with computer science, engineering, and biomedical sciences in the hopes of inspiring students to solve real-world challenges in the future.

The Center is working closely with a team of researchers at the University of Missouri–Kansas City to track kids through the program to determine if their involvement increased the likelihood of graduates pursuing STEM majors or degrees. As hubs of innovation grow in St. Louis, such as the new headquarters for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), Podgursky believes these programs could push students to pursue geospatial science and encourage them to stay in the area as young professionals.

“We want to see to what extent Missouri kids are moving into programs that get kids ready for careers that could apply to the NGA location science field,” Podgursky.

However, Podgursky emphasized that their research is not limited to examining and encouraging STEM participation. The Sinquefield Center strives to see the highs and lows of

various education policies — the hope is that by alleviating any bottlenecks, these educational and community resources will positively impact diverse racial and socioeconomic groups throughout the city.

“We have a particular interest in inclusive growth — not only stimulating growth in the city but making sure we’re monitoring the extent to which it trickles down and see what barriers are present,” Podgursky said.

Education System Outcomes

Podgursky stated the Center took a leadership role in developing a P-20W system for state officials. A P-20W is a state longitudinal data system that includes information from preschool, K-12, postsecondary, workforce, and social services data sources. The end goal is to ensure that schools have an accountability system that determines

38 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022
Data analyst Darrin DeChane at the Sinquefield Center for Applied Economic Research.

the path of most benefit for students, teachers, and the larger community.

“They create report cards for school districts, and we’re going to analyze how well those metrics they use to grade schools predict the future performance of students,” Podgursky said.

Along with this development, Podgursky shared that the Sinquefield Center submitted a joint proposal alongside the State Department of Education to the U.S. Department of Education. They plan to leverage the longitudinal data system to determine how efficient the metrics used on school performance are. The end goal is to ensure the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education has the ability to reliably showcase what policies succeed in creating more successful postsecondary outcomes.

“Those metrics they use to grade schools predict the future performance of students. We ask if these schools that

have a higher measure on this particular metric produce kids that have more successful postsecondary outcomes.”

Patterns of Mobility

In recent years, St. Louis has experienced an explosion of development with new businesses, community resources, and research centers popping up frequently. Notably, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) broke ground on the new North St. Louis headquarters in November 2022. The move has increased employment opportunities in the area and is expected to benefit surrounding neighborhoods and businesses.

“We’re looking for indicators of prosperity in terms of residential and commercial housing prices near the new location,” Podgursky said. “We’ll also be examining the effects of the shutdown of the old location in the south part of the city.”

As the development continues, the Sinquefield Center has the capacity to analyze how consumer behavior changes. Researchers use cell phone location data to examine where people are going and why — revealing which areas of St. Louis are thriving and others that may need further support.

“We can look at the extent to which people are going to businesses and commercial and retail businesses in different parts of the city,” Podgursky said.

Podgursky shared that Sinquefield Center projects may create frameworks to be replicated for different interests. During the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Sinquefield Center sponsored a study conducted by the Richard A. Chaifetz School of Business and the College for Public Health and Social Justice about metro area vaccination sites. The data SCAER

provided allowed researchers to see where people traveled from and where they received a vaccination, showcasing what sites received the most traffic and thus required a higher supply of vaccines.

While this study focused on health access and resource allocation, a similar human mobility study emerged. Podgursky stated the Center is currently studying how baseball games alter the economic performance of surrounding restaurants, bars, and hotels.

“We’re looking at the activity before, during, and after home baseball games around Busch Stadium to see the extent to which there’s spillover economic activity.”

The beauty of this research, Podgursky said, is that it measures economic activity on a granular level. Sinquefield Center researchers can analyze individuals in particular neighborhoods, blocks, and establishments. This level of detail allows researchers to answer fundamental questions in economic activity, such as where St. Louis is succeeding and expanding upon the discoveries.

“We have a particular interest in inclusive growth — not only stimulating growth in the city but making sure we’re monitoring the extent to which it trickles down and see what barriers are present,” Podgursky said.
39 THE SINQUEFIELD CENTER FOR APPLIED ECONOMIC RESEARCH

INCREASING Impact

In 2022, researchers within the Sinquefield Center for Applied Economic Research focused on sharing meaningful connections between data and the economy. The following working papers from this year showcase the breadth of expertise underneath the Sinquefield Center umbrella.

AUTHOR:

Jonathan Presler

Postdoctoral fellow at Saint Louis University

AUTHORS:

Dillon Fuchsman, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral fellow at the Sinquefield Center for Applied Economic Research, Saint Louis University

Gema Zamarro, Ph.D.

Professor of education reform and economics at the University of Arkansas

Andrew Camp

AUTHORS:

Darrin DeChane

Data analyst at the Sinquefield Center for Applied Economic Research

Takako Nomi, Ph.D.

Associate professor of educational studies at Saint Louis University

Michael Podgursky, Ph.D.

Director of the Sinquefield Center for Applied Economic Research at Saint Louis University

Distinguished Doctoral Fellow and graduate assistant in the Department of Education Reform at the University of Arkansas

Josh B. McGee, Ph.D.

Research assistant professor at the University of Arkansas

40 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022
“Who’s Affecting Whom? Obesity Peer Effects in NYC Public Schools”
“High School Preparation and PostSecondary Educational Attainment: An Analysis of Race and Gender Differences for a Cohort of Missouri Public High School Students”
“Understanding How COVID-19 Has Changed Teachers’ Chances of Remaining in the Classroom”
Members of the Sinquefield Center for Applied Economic Research. Back row, left to right: Darrin DeChane, Jonathan Presler. Front row, left to right: Michelle Wickman, Dillon Fuchsman, Michael Podgursky.

LOOKING TO the Future

As Podgursky considers the years ahead, he shared that he strives to deepen the Sinquefield Center’s connections in multiple departments. The Center’s capacity to collect, supply, and analyze economic data draws in researchers from disparate fields, leaving the door open for boundless impactful collaborations.

Applied economic research aligns with the mission of the Richard A. Chaifetz School of Business, so Podgursky expressed a desire to increase their collaborations over the next few years. Notably, the Sinquefield Center plans to work with Carlos Esparza, S.J., Ph.D., assistant professor of economics, to increase data acquisition around Catholic schools in the St. Louis region.

Podgursky aims to reach across disciplinary lines to establish new, innovative partnerships as well. Podgursky mentioned working alongside J.S. Onésimo Sándoval, Ph.D., acting associate director for diversity, equity, and training at the Taylor Geospatial

Institute as well as associate professor of sociology at SLU, on census block and locational data. Future projects are likely to include analyzing population sizes and how people are migrating to different areas in St. Louis. Finally, he expressed an interest in actively working alongside the Policy Research in Missouri Education (PRiME) Center to continue analyzing school performance and policy impact.

“Even though we have economics in our title, we’ve always been truly interdisciplinary,” Podgursky said.

Now that the Sinquefield Center firmly established itself within the University community, Podgursky envisions seeing returns on their investment in the coming years. With multiple grant proposals in the works, he remains hopeful the Center will only expand its research resumé.

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“It’s like planting a fruit tree — it takes a couple of seasons to get fruit,” Podgursky said. “We’re growing. Within the next year, we’ll get a significant yield on investments made here.”

THE BEAUTY OF THE SINQUEFIELD CENTER IS THAT IT MEASURES ECONOMIC ACTIVITY ON A GRANULAR LEVEL TO IMPROVE THE OVERALL QUALITY OF LIFE IN ST. LOUIS.

Dillon Fuchsman describes his econometric model to colleagues. Predoctoral fellow Michelle Wickman working at the Sinquefield Center for Applied Economic Research.

Experts IN THE FIELD

Michael Podgursky is the director of the Sinquefield Center for Applied Economic Research at Saint Louis University, a position he has held since 2019. Prior to that, he was a professor of economics at the University of Missouri–Columbia, on whose faculty he served on for 25 years. His research focuses on labor economics and the economics of education. He serves on the board of editors of several academic journals, including Education Finance and Policy and Education Next, and is an affiliated scholar with the Center for Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research (CALDER) at the American Institutes for Research and CESifo in Germany. He was born and raised in St. Louis.

Takako Nomi is the associate director of the Sinquefield Center for Applied Economic Research and associate professor in education policy and equity. Prior to joining SLU, she was a senior research analyst at the University of Chicago Consortium on school research. Nomi’s research has focused on issues related to college readiness, transitions from high school to postsecondary education and the workforce, and policies and programs that are aimed at improving postsecondary student success and reducing educational attainment disparities. She currently co-leads several projects using Missouri student longitudinal data. They include the evaluation of Project Lead the Way, a career technical education program, implemented widely in Missouri and around the country; the investigation of postsecondary degree attainment trajectories by race and gender overall and in STEM; and the evaluation of Missouri Core 42, which standardized division courses across public postsecondary institutions to reduce credit loss upon transferring.

Nomi’s research has been supported by the Institute of Education Sciences, the Spencer Foundation, and the American Educational Research Association. Her publications have appeared in the Proceedings of National Academy of Science, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, American Educational Research Journal, Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness, and Journal of Human Resources. She currently serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness.

45 THE SINQUEFIELD CENTER FOR APPLIED ECONOMIC RESEARCH

LEADING THE WAY IN GEOSPATIAL SCIENCE

A Conversation With Vasit Sagan, Ph.D., Acting Director, Taylor Geospatial Institute

University of Illinois Urbana–Champaign, University of Missouri–Columbia, University of Missouri–St. Louis, and Washington University in St. Louis.

St. Louis has a rich history of mapping the world. In 1804, the Lewis and Clark Expedition began in the region, creating the first map of the North American West. Decades later, the U.S. Air Force started the production of charts at the Aeronautical Chart Plant in St. Louis. With this distinguished history on St. Louis’ side, it has become a hotbed for geospatial research.

For this reason, the National GeospatialIntelligence Agency fostered a lasting presence in the region, electing in 2016 to build a new campus in North St. Louis for its western headquarters. This catalytic decision created a new wave of economic opportunity and inspired geospatial experts to forge new collaborations in the region. Saint Louis University was at the forefront of this momentum, launching the Geospatial Institute in fall 2019 as part of the Research Institute’s Big Ideas competition.

The Geospatial Institute catalyzed geospatial research in the region, leading to the creation of the Taylor Geospatial Institute (TGI) in April 2022. Led by SLU, TGI is a consortium of eight research institutions including the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, Harris-Stowe State University, Missouri University of Science and Technology,

Vasit Sagan, Ph.D., associate professor of earth and atmospheric sciences at SLU, was selected as the acting director of this unique institute, which brings together an unprecedented number of faculty and students from across the region to advance geospatial research and collaboration.

“We realized the need to create a consortium to address issues like climate change, wildfires, food security, and the COVID-19 pandemic,” Sagan said. “All of those global challenges require a lot of resources and partnership — SLU cannot pull that off alone.”

Sagan emphasized that TGI creates partnerships with industry leaders, government agencies, and research entities not only to develop geospatial science, but also to grow talent in the region. Through collaboration, TGI is harnessing the power of partnership to address some of the world’s greatest challenges.

The Institute integrates ethical considerations into its approach to geospatial science and supports research that addresses global challenges like food security and public health. Researchers across the TGI are advancing research that helps humanity answer some of its most pressing questions for the future.

“We make sure the data we collect is of good quality, make sure data is used for good, and establish geospatial ethics guidelines that are founded on or enhanced by SLU’s Jesuit mission,” Sagan said.

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“Our goal is to create new knowledge, new tools, and make new discoveries that advance human flourishing and specifically improve quality of life,” Sagan said.
SLU President Fred Pestello, Ph.D., and Vasit Sagan, Ph.D., at the launch of the Taylor Geospatial Institute in April 2022. THE TAYLOR GEOSPATIAL INSTITUTE

Research AREAS

TGI advances research in geospatial science through supporting multi-institutional, interdisciplinary collaborations across the consortium. As the consortium’s lead institution, SLU is advancing an ambitious research agenda and extending the Jesuit mission of care to a broader community.

Core Geospatial Science

Sagan explained that one of the central focuses of TGI is core geospatial science. This focus area utilizes location data for global positioning systems (GPS), navigation, geographic information systems (GIS), and beyond. Researchers in these areas build new tools to measure the Earth and advance our understanding of geospatial science. They use the information these tools gather to develop technology such as sensors, drones, robots, and satellites to uncover ways to address grand societal challenges.

One of TGI’s goals is to apply this core geospatial research to a broad range of disciplines. Sagan believes that this is part of the beauty of the Institute and what makes it unique.

“If we look around the country, there is no institute addressing or investing in as many areas,” Sagan said.

Food Systems

As the environment continually changes, the concern for agricultural output heightens. Sagan shared that we may need to increase our resources to accommodate our growing population worldwide — leaving the question of how we can produce more with less at our disposal.

“We have to produce 70% more food in the next several decades to feed the growing population and do that with limited and variable land and water resources, which are shrinking because of climate change,” Sagan said. “That is a big challenge.”

The Institute is currently using drones, artificial intelligence, satellite imagery, and other resources to analyze and improve agricultural systems at the heart of food production. Researchers are building on the strong legacy of agricultural research in the Midwest. Notably, collaboration with the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center allows TGI researchers to find crop adaptations suitable for changing climates in Missouri and throughout the rest of the country.

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Public health students work with the Taylor Geospatial Institute to track the correlation between location and health care.

Geospatial Health

Sagan explained that geospatial health research measures and analyzes complex building blocks of health across the world. Air quality, water access, and the spread of disease intimately impact the locations where we live, work, and play. Through data collection and careful analysis, TGI examines how location impacts availability of resources and access to health care.

TGI researchers have also combined public health and health care data from disparate sources to provide real-time COVID-19 risk assessments. By synchronizing data streams from anonymized smartphone data,

geolocated social media mentions, satellite imagery analysis, and geolocated search terms, these researchers have created digital models that provide critical insights into community-level COVID-19 risks.

National Security

The Institute’s research portfolio includes developing tools to address emerging national security threats such as food, water, and climate insecurity, supply chain disruptions, energy needs, disruptions to GPS and navigation systems, and cyberattacks. All these challenges can and have led to geopolitical conflict and humanitarian crises around the globe.

These emerging threats are global challenges as well, which any one institution cannot tackle alone. Sagan believes that people working together can solve the hardest problems, and radical collaboration is needed. As a collaborative research consortium backed by a data-centric research infrastructure, TGI provides real-world solutions to these global challenges.

“As scientists, we believe in the power of data to understand our world,” Sagan said. “Our entire Earth is being imaged every day by an awe-inspiring constellation of satellites. TGI scientists are training artificial intelligence algorithms to help us better and more quickly understand this huge amount of data.”

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“We have to look holistically at the environment, the climate, shifting hydrological regimes, and other factors to understand the disease impacts so we can stay ahead of the curve,” Sagan said.
THE TAYLOR GEOSPATIAL INSTITUTE

EXTERNAL Funding

The Taylor Geospatial Institute bolsters the efforts of faculty and researchers across the consortium to collaborate on external grants. In the Institute’s first nine months, TGI collaborations have led to nearly $50 million of external grant funding. TGI is also leading a regional effort to bring a National Science Foundation Regional Innovation Engine award of $160 million to St. Louis.

Among those, Sagan listed a $1 million grant as an example. The three-year grant from the National Science Foundation was awarded to Sagan and his TGI colleagues at the University of Illinois Urbana–Champaign:

William TC Kramer, Ph.D., professor of computer science, and Shaowen Wang, Ph.D., professor of geography and geographic information science. Together, they will establish the Taylor Geospatial Institute Regional AI Learning System (TGI RAILS).

“TGI RAILS is a significant NSF grant that will establish cutting-edge

computing analytics capabilities and services to our members,” Sagan said.

This grant will improve TGI’s data analytics infrastructure by creating a high-performance computing system dedicated to geospatial research. The platform will incorporate artificial intelligence, analytics technologies, and training on advanced computational methods. Sagan hopes that this and other cutting-edge tools will shorten data analysis and processing time, giving researchers additional time to interpret the results and meaning of the analysis.

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“We are expanding our research infrastructure to advance science and to train next-generation talent,” Sagan said. “It’s a great example of a collaborative win for TGI.”
From left, Shaowen Wang, Ph.D., professor of geography and geographic information science, University of Illinois; William TC Kramer, Ph.D., research professor of computer science and executive director of the New Frontiers Initiative, University of Illinois; and Vasit Sagan, Ph.D., associate professor of earth and atmospheric sciences at Saint Louis University and acting director of TGI.

THE Geo-Resolution Conference

The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency and Saint Louis University co-hosted the Geo-Resolution conference in St. Louis for the fourth year in 2022. The event featured collaborative discussions on climate change and highlighted the St. Louis region and its vibrant ecosystem as a global geospatial center of excellence.

“By all metrics, our 2022 Geo-Resolution conference was a real success,” Sagan said. “It was so energizing to witness so many passionate conversations between national geospatial leaders and students from across the region.”

This year’s event was titled “Geospatial Perspectives on Climate Change: Predicting and Mitigating Effects.” Keynote speeches, panels, and research presentations focused on how geospatial scientists study climate change and

its impact on agriculture, water resources, sustainable energy, and human migration. Experts explored how geospatial technologies and methodologies are used to track and predict climate change more effectively with the intent to mitigate its effects and avoid geopolitical tensions in our global relations.

“Through Geo-Resolution, we forged many new connections between academic, industry, and government

experts in a wide range of fields,” Sagan said.

Government agencies, academic institutions, nonprofits, and startups all participated in the event. Students also took on an active role in the event — nearly 150 students attended, 100 students participated in a mentoring lunch with industry leaders, and 40 posters were presented in the poster session. Sagan said that high student engagement will remain a long-term goal across the consortium.

Top-performing students from TGI institutions received awards for their poster presentations:

LAURA GRAY

University of Illinois Urbana – Champaign

“Impacts of Global Climate Change on Total Runoff”

PENGFEI MA

Missouri University of Science and Technology

“Pipeline Leakage Detection by Mapping Vegetation Stress Indices from Hyperspectral Imaging”

JENNI NUGENT

University of Illinois Urbana – Champaign

“Monthly Virtual Blue and Grey Water Transfers on the U.S. Electric Grid”

1st 2nd 3rd

51 THE TAYLOR GEOSPATIAL INSTITUTE
“Training the next generation to become the geospatial leaders of the future is very important,” Sagan said. “It aligns well with SLU’s mission of training the whole person.”

NAVIGATING THE Years Ahead

Sagan outlined extensive long-term goals befitting a growing institute. In its first year, he wants TGI to energize the geospatial community through funding support, fellowship designations, analytics expertise, and building a research infrastructure. He ultimately hopes to continue the momentum established through the creation of the Institute by building connections and supporting research that propels TGI and the region to a national stage.

“As we build genuine research connections throughout the consortium and plant seeds for future collaboration, we also gain a deep understanding of the great expertise available and a more accurate picture of the existing gaps,” Sagan said. “Understanding these gaps in the consortium allows us to better shape investments.”

Within five years, Sagan aims to cement TGI as a self-sustaining institute with 20 full-time staff members operating to provide data analytics, research proposal development, and management expertise. He also hopes to bolster their workforce with 50 new faculty members across the eight institutions. Apart from growing their membership, Sagan hopes to further advance geospatial science by establishing a long-term government funding stream, creating

a geospatial research journal for TGI, and encouraging a research agenda that impacts nationwide priorities.

In the decades ahead, Sagan emphasized his confidence in the research capabilities of the Taylor Geospatial Institute. TGI unites institutions and individual researchers to achieve a dual vision of becoming the national leader in geospatial research and making the St. Louis region a global geospatial center of excellence.

52 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022
“People around the consortium have been working and engaging with us in many ways,” Sagan said. “I see the momentum and excitement about TGI, from humanities to computer science to STEM.”

TGI UNITES INSTITUTIONS AND INDIVIDUAL RESEARCHERS TO ACHIEVE A DUAL VISION OF BECOMING THE NATIONAL LEADER IN GEOSPATIAL RESEARCH AND MAKING THE ST. LOUIS REGION A GLOBAL GEOSPATIAL CENTER OF EXCELLENCE.

Enbal Shacham, Ph.D., discusses location and public health to a classroom of students. THE TAYLOR GEOSPATIAL INSTITUTE

Experts IN THE FIELD

Ph.D.

TGI Acting Director; Associate Professor, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, SLU School of Science and Engineering

Vasit Sagan is acting director of the Taylor Geospatial Institute, associate professor in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, and director of Saint Louis University’s Remote Sensing Lab. Sagan leads TGI’s efforts to harness the power of partnership with industry, government, and academia to develop geospatial research, addressing some of the world’s greatest challenges. Previously, he served as the founding director of SLU’s Geospatial Institute (GeoSLU) and directed campuswide geospatial research and training programs. Under his leadership, GeoSLU secured over $10M in external grants and contracts and played an important role in the creation of the TGI. Sagan’s research focuses on stateof-the-art computer vision technologies, AI/ machine learning, and sensor/information fusion algorithms for studying food and water security, ecosystems, and social instability from local to global scales. He currently serves as a member of the National Geospatial Advisory Committee under the U.S. Department of the Interior.

Ph.D.

TGI Acting Associate Director for Diversity, Education, and Training; Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, SLU College of Arts and Sciences

J.S. Onésimo Sándoval is a professor of demography and sociology at Saint Louis University. He has been conducting research at the intersection of demography and computational spatial science. His research focuses on geospatial data science methodologies to study socioeconomic demographic patterns in American cities. He recently founded two geospatial applied community projects: Demography 4 Democracy and Coding for Spatial Justice. Both projects are designed to empower community members to envision the future they want for their neighborhoods and acquire the resources to make their visions happen. Sándoval is acting associate director for diversity, education, and training at the Taylor Geospatial Institute, co-director of the Ph.D. in Public and Social Policy Program, and the director of the M.S. Sociology Program.

Ph.D., M.Ed.

TGI Acting Associate Director for Strategic Initiatives; Professor and Associate Dean for Research, SLU College for Public Health and Social Justice

Enbal Shacham is a professor and associate dean for research at the College for Public Health and Social Justice and the acting associate director of the Taylor Geospatial Institute at Saint Louis University. She has been intersecting public health and geospatial research throughout her career. Her research has explored social and physical environmental factors that impact infectious and chronic diseases by leveraging technological advancements and data to improve health equity. The research she conducts is committed to growing insightful methods to better know and provide real-time data, analyses, and interventions for improving health in communities and clinic settings both domestically and internationally. She focuses on growing research collaborations to address these grand challenges of our society by leveraging geospatial technology to predict and prevent poor health outcomes.

Vasit Sagan Enbal Shacham J.S. Onésimo (Ness) Sándoval
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Abby Stylianou received her B.A. in environmental studies at Washington University in St. Louis in 2012 before joining the Media and Machines Lab as a research associate. There, she found a passion for building computer vision tools to benefit the world and decided to pursue an M.S. and a Ph.D. in computer science, with research focusing on building global-scale image search tools to combat human trafficking by recognizing the hotels where victims of human trafficking are photographed. As an assistant professor of computer science at Saint Louis University, she has continued this important work in collaboration with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children and with funding from the National Institute of Justice. She is also interested in how machine learning and computer vision approaches can be used in agriculture and plant breeding to develop more sustainable, more resilient, and healthier crops, and has been funded by the Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, and Google to work on these problems.

Director, Midwest-Intelligence Community Center for Academic Excellence (MW-IC CAE); Director and Assistant Professor, Security and Strategic Intelligence Program, School for Professional Studies

Joe Lyons is an assistant professor and director of the Strategic Intelligence Program, and principal investigator/director for the Midwest-Intelligence Community Center for Academic Excellence (MW-IC CAE). The MW-IC CAE is one of only 11 elite centers in the country funded by the Director of National Intelligence. Lyons leads a consortium of universities and colleges to recruit and educate talented, diverse students interested in careers in the intelligence and national security fields. Geospatial skills are critical to many of these career pathways and the MW-IC CAE will help fulfill one of TGI’s goals of preparing the next generation of students for successful careers in the geospatial ecosystem. Lyons’ research interests include policy, education, and big data. In earlier years, Lyons served multiple overseas tours as an intelligence officer before leaving the U.S. Intelligence Community to pursue a university posting. He is a retired naval officer with 27 years of military service, serving in both the U.S. Army and U.S. Navy.

TGI Acting Chief of Staff

Henning Lohse-Busch provides strategic advice, central coordination, and hands-on execution to enable the Taylor Geospatial Institute and the research consortium members to accomplish the mission to advance geospatial research and make progress toward the vision of making the St. Louis region a national leader in geospatial science. In addition to being a passionate STEM advocate, he is a strategic thinker and technical leader with over 20 years of experience in transportation, energy efficiency, and renewable energy research. Prior to joining Saint Louis University, he led and managed a research group at Argonne National Laboratory as an established and published scientist. He also spent time working on assignments at the U.S. Department of Energy in Washington, D.C., and co-developed and taught a powertrain course at the Illinois Institute of Technology.

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Abby Stylianou Ph.D. Henning Lohse-Busch Ph.D. Joe Lyons Ph.D. TGI Fellow; Assistant Professor, Department of Computer Science, School of Science and Engineering
THE TAYLOR GEOSPATIAL INSTITUTE

INSTRUCTING OUR IMMUNE SYSTEMS

A Conversation With Daniel Hoft, M.D., Ph.D., Director, Center for Vaccine Development

Pandemics rise like waves throughout history, and each time, scientists rise to the occasion to stem the spread of disease and develop new ways of inducing immune systems to protect against future outbreaks. Researchers within the Saint Louis University Center for Vaccine Development (CVD) have often found themselves at the center of these efforts. In developing vaccines for protection against bioweapons, pandemic flu, and COVID-19, these researchers have been central to global efforts to stem ongoing crises and prepare our world for future strains yet to emerge.

“We’re a research group at SLU focused on doing preclinical and clinical vaccinology research,” Daniel Hoft, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Center for Vaccine Development, said. “What I mean by that is we conduct discovery research, identify new antigens for new vaccines, and test new vaccines in animals and people.”

Hoft explained the Center has an incredible wealth of experience in multiple layers of vaccine research. Center for Vaccine Development researchers conduct clinical trials,

including phase one human studies, phase two studies on rare safety issues as well as immunogenicity, and phase three trials to examine rare side effects and vaccine efficacy. The Center boasts a broad range of capabilities, from experimental biological studies to trials in which researchers challenge healthy humans with different infectious pathogens.

“The research at the Center for Vaccine Development involves diverse clinical trials of new vaccines for different pathogens,” Hoft said.

The Center currently has 10 faculty members conducting hands-on research. Most of the vaccine development team focuses on immunology or vaccine development for different diseases such as influenza, COVID-19, or tuberculosis. However, some investigators look to explore the broader applications of vaccines that extend to conditions such as cancer and autoimmune disorders.

The Center for Vaccine Development is one of only 10, elite National Institutes of Health-funded Vaccine Treatment and Evaluation Units (VTEUs) scattered across the U.S. The network strives to develop new and improved vaccine therapies, sharing expertise and clinical trial results across institutional boundaries to positively impact global health. The Center’s cumulative research ultimately creates the foundation for pharmaceutical companies to further develop effective vaccines.

56 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022
“You can develop vaccines that can decrease the chances that someone would develop an autoimmune response that could attack that person’s own body,” Hoft said. “There are many potential applications of vaccines outside of infectious disease that some of our investigators are getting involved in.”

The Center for Vaccine Development

Daniel Hoft, M.D., Ph.D., principal investigator conducting a clinical trial patient checkup.

Research AREAS

Over the decades, Saint Louis University has focused research efforts on the world’s most pressing infectious diseases. Hoft described the ebb and flow of research as a near-constant reprioritization for the sake of public health and safety.

He characterized multiple periods of research he witnessed throughout his time at the Center for Vaccine Development. After 9/11, the Center’s focus was on diseases that could become bioweapons, such as smallpox, anthrax, and tularemia. In 2009, various strains of influenza such as the swine flu and the bird flu took the forefront. In 2015, they dedicated their manpower to outbreaks of the Zika virus throughout the U.S.

Now, many eyes are trained on development in our latest pandemics. Ultimately, researchers enact SLU’s Jesuit mission each day by identifying new areas of protection and preparation.

COVID-19 Trials

The Center for Vaccine Development began work on COVID-19 months before the public understood the gravity of the virus. Within three months of meeting with Anthony Fauci in D.C., Hoft and his team were deeply ingrained in foundational research. The beauty of the VTEU network is that all 10 sites join together to serve a pandemic preparedness function. Their work heavily contributed to the eventual licensure of the Moderna vaccine in January 2022. However, the work conducted at the Center for Vaccine

Development is not limited to one outcome.

“We’ve been heavily engaged in testing at least three coronavirus vaccines — Moderna, Janssen’s adenovirus vaccine, and other second-generation vaccines that we’re still testing,” Hoft said.

As the protocol chair, Hoft has been exploring second-generation COVID-19 vaccines. These investigational vaccines may provide unique advantages over boosters. Hoft explained that they are designed to elicit an immune response to multiple SARS-CoV-2 proteins in addition to the spike protein targeted

by the first-generation vaccines from Moderna, Pfizer, and Johnson & Johnson. Put simply, most COVID-19 variants, such as omicron, share similar T-cell sequences — by targeting them with a new vaccine, researchers create a new layer of immunity for the public.

“T-cell targeting is a way to have a backup that would still protect in the face of a variant of concern that escaped the susceptibility to any neutralizing antibodies induced by past infections or vaccinations,” Hoft said.

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CVD Lab personnel determine how well experimental vaccines induce protective responses.

Reflecting on their work throughout the pandemic, Hoft took a moment to commend the over 45 individuals who put themselves in the line of fire. Without their early dedication and care, the Center for Vaccine Development would not have received the vital information necessary to get them to the final stages of vaccine development. Hoft emphasized that it was a huge challenge to tackle for the sake of the greater public.

Mpox

Mpox, formerly known as monkeypox, is a viral zoonosis, or a disease transferred from animals to humans, that presents similarly to smallpox. While many members of the public have only heard of this disease in the U.S. recently, it has been active around the world since the 1970s. Luckily, vaccines previously used in the smallpox eradication campaign are also effective against mpox.

However, as smallpox was eradicated in nature, pharmaceutical companies are no longer producing sufficient vaccines — in the event of an epidemic, the vaccine supply may not be able to meet the demand. Researchers at the Center for Vaccine Development are researching solutions for supply chain issues by examining the Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vaccine. Hoft explained that Sharon Frey, M.D., clinical director for the Center for Vaccine Development and professor of infectious diseases, allergy and immunology, is exploring how to safely stretch our supply of smallpox vaccines.

“She’s doing an additional study looking more carefully at diluting the MVA vaccine and making sure that it can induce an immunological response with lower volumes of the vaccine,” Hoft said.

Hoft shared that their efforts against mpox extend to health care preparation and examinations of overall immune uptake. Infectious disease clinical faculty members such as Nongnooch Poowanawittayakom, M.D., and JoAnn Jose, M.D., are working to instill response protocols and get approved drugs into the SSM Health system. Hoft stated that other faculty members are looking at the immune responses induced by low-dose vaccinations. As the studies are ongoing, he shared multiple questions these faculty members endeavor to answer in their research.

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“Our team was putting themselves in danger before we had any drugs or vaccines,” Hoft said. “Seeing people with infections and risking getting it themselves made it possible for us to make these contributions.”

“With the lower doses given, we wonder how fast protective immunity develops,” Hoft said. “Can you vaccinate after somebody is exposed and expect antibodies to be there within a certain time frame that can protect before the infection totally manifests?”

The Center for Vaccine Development will continue aiding health care systems by monitoring the immune responses in exposed individuals and examining the overall safety of administered vaccines. The hope is that ongoing research will ultimately set health care structures up to prevent outbreaks rather than levying epidemic-level responses.

Influenza

Each year, there is a new flu shot on the market tailored to the most dominant strain. Researchers at the Center for Vaccine Development have investigated extensive vaccines for new strains of influenza in the hopes of finding commonalities to utilize in a universal influenza vaccine.

Hoft shared that their facilities allow them to study influenza in a fully contained environment, eliminating the possibility of an outbreak. The Extended Stay Research Unit is a former hotel in the Salus Center that was converted into a 23-room research suite to house volunteers intentionally exposed to influenza. Hoft shared that researchers expose volunteers to specific strains of influenza, enabling the research team to study the ensuing immune response and the efficacy of investigational vaccines.

“We’ve actually challenged people in contained areas,” Hoft said. “We looked for the immune responses preexisting in the 80 volunteers we enrolled that could reduce symptoms or prevent the individuals from getting infected with the deliberate challenge.”

These challenges enable researchers to hone in on promising studies early on and witness efficacy firsthand. Their work attracts pharmaceutical companies who further fund and research successful treatments and therapies.

“It’s a way to de-risk the process,” Hoft said. “Focus on the most promising vaccines very early in the clinical pipeline so you don’t waste money and time and you, theoretically, will get to your endpoint much faster.”

Looking ahead, Hoft explained that additional studies may look at initially challenging people with H1N1 (swine flu), followed by challenging that same group with the H3N2 (influenza A) challenge strain months later. The efforts will help researchers understand what immune responses one type of influenza may produce that will offer partial immunity to another strain.

“Challenge studies can help us better understand human immunity to influenza and other pathogens,” Hoft said. “They can reveal responses that we should target with the future universal influenza and coronavirus vaccine.”

“It’s a way to de-risk the process,” Hoft said. “Focus on the most promising vaccines very early in the clinical pipeline so you don’t waste money and time and you, theoretically, will get to your endpoint much faster.”
Retrieving human samples from liquid nitrogen storage for use in immune assays.

BACKED BY Investments

Hoft shared that a variety of mechanisms fund the Center for Vaccine Development. The NIH awards faculty members large grants, such as R01 and R21 grants, to fund mature research projects as well as early-stage exploratory research. Typically, the Center would receive a total of $5 million to $8 million in NIH grants annually. Hoft explained that since the onset of the pandemic, the Center has grown to nearly $10 million to $15 million in awards each year.

“NIH awards are the badge of success for an independent scientist in an academic job,” Hoft said. “We’ve been very successful at that.”

However, as part of the VTEU network, the Center also receives extensive funding from the NIH. Hoft shared that this VTEU cycle was supposed to allocate $27 million to Saint Louis University over seven years — with multiple pressing infectious diseases to address, the Center has spent $29 million in just three years.

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“We’re going to greatly exceed the total dollar amount that we were supposed to receive in this seven-year cycle because of the outbreaks of COVID-19 and then mpox — who knows what the next one will be,” Hoft said.
Work being done under Biosafety Level 3 conditions using a full body protective suit and PAPR.

LOOKING TO the Future

In the years ahead, Hoft shared that his main goal is to grow the Center’s membership and ensure continuity for years to come. The University has provided funding to recruit and support new researchers in this vital field. Hoft emphasized this funding will empower young vaccinologists as they are getting started.

“Young faculty don’t have to scrounge for dollars in the early years of their position,” Hoft said. “We can provide funding for them early so they can hit the ground running and start doing research, build their labs, build their clinical trial expertise, and not have to worry about where the money is coming from for their training during the first three years.”

Hoft hopes to continually grow the capabilities and expertise present within the Center for Vaccine Development from the ground up. He aims to attract experts in computational biology, vaccinology, and data analytics over a period of five to 10 years with the end goal of creating an irresistible place to build a career.

“They wouldn’t want to go anywhere else,” Hoft said. “They have to come to Saint Louis University because it’s built up, in the best way, for what they want and need to succeed.”

In the meantime, the researchers within the Center will continue to promote global health through disease prevention. Hoft expressed pride in the Center’s collaborations, including doctors in behavioral medicine, pharmacists, lab technicians, senior scientists, and beyond.

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“I can’t say anything more than we’re blessed by having people dedicated to the work, who want to continue with us and make it possible for us to do everything we’re doing,” Hoft said.

HOFT AIMS TO ATTRACT EXPERTS IN COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY, VACCINOLOGY, AND DATA ANALYTICS OVER A PERIOD OF FIVE TO 10 YEARS WITH THE END GOAL OF CREATING AN IRRESISTIBLE PLACE TO BUILD A CAREER.

Ph.D. bench scientists and M.D. clinical scientists work together closely to conduct CVD research.

Experts IN THE FIELD

M.D., Ph.D.

Director and Professor, Division of Infectious Diseases, Allergy and Immunology; Director, Center for Vaccine Development; Director, Stephen C. Peiper and Zi-Xuan Wang Institute for Vaccine Science and Policy; Adorjan Endowed Chair of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, SLU School of Medicine

Daniel Hoft is director of the Center for Vaccine Development and principal investigator for the SLU Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Unit, one of only 10 elite NIH-funded units in the country. In these roles, Hoft has championed communitycentered vaccine research, and in April 2020, a generous donation from Stephen C. Peiper, M.D., (Med ’77) and Zi-Xuan Wang, Ph.D., established a new center of excellence under Hoft’s leadership: the Stephen C. Peiper and Zi-Xuan Wang Institute for Vaccine Science and Policy.

Hoft has earned national recognition for his research, including his study of whether mucosal and booster vaccinations enhance immunity induced by conventional vaccination, and for being the first to demonstrate that human γ9δ2 T cells develop protective memory responses after vaccination, enabling an important new approach for tuberculosis vaccine development. His additional contributions include vaccine development for Chagas disease and pandemic influenza and leading multiple phase 1-3 COVID-19 vaccine trials.

M.D.

Clinical Director, Center for Vaccine Development; Kinsella Endowed Chair in Internal Medicine; Professor, Associate Director of Clinical Research, Division of Infectious Diseases, Allergy and Immunology, School of Medicine

Sharon Frey is the clinical director for the Center for Vaccine Development, the co-principal investigator for SLU’s NIHsponsored Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Unit (VTEU), and the co-director for clinical research in the Division of Infectious Diseases, Allergy and Immunology. She is also a current member of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP).

Frey is a clinical trials expert and has conducted two of the first three prophylactic HCV trials in humans. Her research emphasis has been in the evaluation of vaccines against influenza, including chimeric and pandemic influenza strains, vaccines to counter bioterrorism/biowarfare, and emerging infections such as smallpox and plague.

Frey was the principal investigator for the Moderna and Comirnaty (Pfizer/BioNTech) phase 3 COVID-19 vaccine trials at SLU, evaluating the effectiveness, safety, and immune response generated by the vaccines in a diverse population. Both vaccines have now received full FDA approval.

Sarah George is an associate professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases, Allergy and Immunology at SLU and a staff physician at the John Cochran VA Medical Center. The George Lab has extensive expertise on mosquito-borne diseases — in particular, Zika, dengue, and yellow fever. These emerging viral pathogens have caused pandemics or outbreaks in recent years. At the CVD, George has conducted numerous flavivirus vaccine trials and has helped demonstrate that live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccination induces a cross-serotype, specific, durable T cell response that recognizes discrete viral proteins. In the coming year, she will conduct clinical trials of several novel vaccines, including vaccines against yellow fever, West Nile, and chikungunya.

In addition, George is principal investigator for the Adaptive COVID-19 Treatment Trial (ACTT) for hospitalized patients at SSM Health Saint Louis University Hospital. This clinical trial, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, is evaluating novel therapies for SARS-CoV-2, including remdesivir.

Daniel Hoft Sharon Frey Sarah George
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Getahun Abate

M.D., Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Infectious Diseases, Allergy and Immunology, School of Medicine

Getahun Abate is an associate professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases, Allergy and Immunology at SLU, chief of the Clinical Section of Infectious Diseases, and program director of the Infectious Diseases Fellowship Program. His research focuses on development of diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines for mycobacterial diseases, including tuberculosis (TB) and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM).

On the vaccine development front, Abate studies the importance of inducing mycobacterial immunity through vaccination and directing immune cells to the lungs using harmless adenoviruses that make proteins to attract immune cells. This strategy is important as the lungs are primarily affected by mycobacterial infections and enhancing lung immunity protects against mycobacterial disease. In this project supported by the Department of Defense, Abate uses animal models to study the strategies of recruiting immune cells to the lungs to protect from subsequent mycobacterial infections and the importance of recruiting immune cells in resolution of established mycobacterial infection or disease.

Brett Jagger

M.D., Ph.D.

Infectious Disease Specialist

Zacharoula Oikonomopoulou

M.D.

Pediatric Infectious Disease Specialist

Ranjit Ray

Ph.D.

Professor of Internal Medicine

Jianguo Liu

Ph.D.

Professor of Immunobiology and Internal Medicine

Tammy Grant

MBA

Business Manager, Division of Infectious Diseases, Allergy and Immunology Center for Vaccine Development

Karla Mosby

RN, CCRC

Clinical Nurse Manager

Carol Duane

Ph.D., RN

Regulatory Affairs and Quality Manager

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S U P P O R T I N G S T A F F

THE FLOW OF WATER RESEARCH

A Conversation With Amanda Cox, Ph.D., P.E., Director, WATER Institute

W“We have the ability to do collaborative research that can make positive impacts on our communities and our environment,” Cox said.

ater is perhaps our most vital resource, yet it is also our most dynamic. In 2022 alone, natural disasters devastated the United States and widespread infrastructure failures robbed thousands of their access to clean water. Recent data from various government agencies outline threats to drinking water quantity and quality. These are just a few of the daunting water-related challenges facing our nation and world. As the effects of climate change continue to materialize, many of these issues are exacerbated.

“Water touches everything — every aspect of our environment, our health, and our communities,” said Amanda Cox, Ph.D., P.E., associate professor of civil engineering and director of the Water Access, Technology, Environment and Resources (WATER) Institute at Saint Louis University.

The WATER Institute is a one-of-akind research institute in the Midwest that attracts researchers across the academic spectrum, including fields such as engineering, natural sciences, social sciences, and law. Through the Institute, they partner with regional organizations to study our world’s emerging and persistent water challenges.

There are three key areas to the WATER Institute’s research: studying water in the built environment, protecting aquatic ecosystems, and addressing social justice issues related to water. The Institute understands these three areas are interconnected, requiring its researchers to take a holistic interdisciplinary approach.

Cox believes the Institute’s unique location in St. Louis, Missouri, places researchers in a position of impact. St. Louis sits in an ideal location for water research, providing quick proximity to natural, urban, and agricultural water systems.

“Large rivers, small rivers, groundwater, cave systems, forested areas, agricultural areas, urban areas — it all comes together here,” Cox said.

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SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022
“The more we can understand, predict, model, quantify, and study water, the better we can inform policies, infrastructure design, and the future,” Cox said. “The choices we’re making now can improve our lives in the future.”
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Amanda Cox, Ph.D., P.E., and Elizabeth Hasenmueller, Ph.D., use an acoustic doppler current profiler (ADCP) instrument to measure flow velocity distribution within the Meramec River.

Research AREAS

The WATER Institute brings together exceptional researchers to study unique and wide-ranging water-related problems in the St. Louis region, enabling impactful and actionable research. The researchers shape our understanding of water systems by making data accessible, protecting our infrastructure, monitoring our water resources, and forecasting future conditions.

Making Data Accessible

Cox has several projects focused on rivers and sedimentation. Since 2012, Cox has been working in collaboration with colleagues at Purdue University, the University of Iowa, and the University of Colorado to build a first-of-its-kind online portal for river morphology data. The portal provides researchers around the world with access to river geometry survey and sediment composition data.

“This is an innovative new portal for different types of data — one that ultimately leads to other researchers and stakeholders getting more access to data that could help them with their studies and research activities,” Cox said.

Some of those activities include enabling modeling of flood areas, changes in river channel form, and erosion and sedimentation processes. Development of the web-based platform officially began in August 2020, and is expected to run through July 2023. This project was made possible by large-scale, multi-university funding from the National Science Foundation — the grant allocated $90,724 to SLU’s efforts.

Analyzing Water Infrastructure

The WATER Institute completed work on a new project with the Army Corps of Engineers to examine the capacity of America’s reservoirs and how they slowly fill with sediment from the river systems that feed them. The actionable value of this research, Cox said, varies by the needs of the region.

“Reservoirs fill with sediment over time, and they begin to lose their functionality and associated societal benefits,” Cox said. “In the eastern part of the United States, that is usually flood control, and in the western part of the United States, that is typically water supply.”

Cox and her colleagues utilized data from the Reservoir Sedimentation Information (RSI) system to examine trends in sedimentation and volume capacity in 184 U.S. reservoirs. To supplement this data, they computed several additional watershed characteristic parameters. The composite dataset was then used to

develop machine-learning methods to estimate reservoir sedimentation rates. Cox noted that most reservoirs in the U.S. are not monitored as often as they should be. This novel research will improve the nation’s ability to estimate reservoir storage change over time and maintain reservoir benefits for our communities.

Cox’s research team analyzed five sites across Missouri for bridge scour (i.e., the erosion of soil and sediment surrounding a bridge foundation) as part of an ongoing project with the Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT). Bridges are vital elements of our infrastructure, but they rely on abutments and piers below the water’s surface to support them.

“Those piers only go down so far — if the scour gets below the piers, the bridge could fail. Bridge scour is actually the leading cause of bridge failure in the United States,” Cox said.

Cox’s research team strives to estimate how much scour may occur around these structural supports so that engineers

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Amanda Cox, Ph.D., P.E., works with students to study river flow processes and engineering techniques for channel stability.

may ensure long-term structural integrity. The MoDOT grant allocated $199,996 to the project in April 2020 — the project comes to a close in June 2023.

Protecting Our Aquatic Ecosystems

This year, the WATER Institute joined a collaborative effort led by three regional organizations working with environmental restoration: The Nature Conservancy in Missouri, the Land Learning Foundation, and the Midwest Waters Initiative. The project is part of the Shoal Creek Watershed Conservation and Restoration Initiative.

“This is a new project for us, but it’s really exciting,” Cox said. “We’re working in the southwestern Missouri area, using our expertise to improve regional stream environments and help local communities.”

During the summer of 2022, Institute researchers collected data around channel geometry as well as channel

bed and bank material composition data, near the confluence of the Hickory and Shoal creeks. They are currently developing stream restoration engineering designs to address the existing channel bank instabilities that are contributing to ecosystem degradation. The potential solutions include the use of woody debris, bank slope reductions, bank revegetation, and/or stone protection to stabilize bank erosion and revitalize the aquatic ecosystem.

Monitoring the Quality of Our Water

Throughout the year, the WATER Institute analyzes critical issues impacting our region. Cox noted that many researchers analyze the quality of water. Elizabeth Hasenmueller, Ph.D., associate director of the WATER Institute, focuses her research on understanding how pollutants move through water resources. According to Cox, Hasenmueller’s work investigates excess nutrients which can lead to harmful algal blooms with serious risks for our communities.

Excess nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus are common in our water supply and can allow algae to flourish. Hasenmueller also studies microplastic contamination, an emerging concern in our communities. Her research will provide insight into pollutant exposure and tactics to minimize harm to our communities and the surrounding environment.

Predicting the Effects of Climate Change

According to Cox, in addition to current water quality and quantity challenges, WATER Institute investigators are also studying future conditions. Jason Knouft, Ph.D., professor of biology, looks at the impact of climate change

on our river systems. He works within the WATER Institute to forecast how stream flows and temperature will change through 2029. High stream temperatures may accelerate natural chemical reactions, release excess nutrients into the water, and harm wildlife. With accurate forecasts, researchers like Knouft may predict the impending impact of climate change on our ecosystems and identify ways to mediate harm.

“He’s looking at how climate change is potentially going to impact our river systems and the habitat and ecology of those systems to support various species,” Cox said.

Cox places a strong emphasis on how decisions determine outcomes — ultimately, it is up to the researchers of today to inform decision-makers, educate the researchers of tomorrow, and encourage our communities to take action to care for our water resources.

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“We have the ability to do collaborative research that can make a positive impact on our communities, but also on the environment we share,” Cox said. “We can protect and restore our water resources and associated ecosystems for generations to come.”

WORKING FOR AND WITH the Region

Over the years, the WATER Institute has expanded its network of researchers and regional partners. Terracon, a national engineering consulting firm that specializes in environmental services like the Deer Creek Watershed Rehabilitation Project, partnered with SLU. Terracon installed four groundwater monitoring wells on behalf of the Institute in June 2022. These wells will allow graduate students and researchers to monitor regional contaminants and survey how they may be detrimental to human and ecological health.

“Over the last few years, we’ve continued to grow our regional partnerships and engagement activities,” Cox said. “The installation of monitoring wells is a great example of these successful efforts.”

In the research community, the Institute aims to increase visibility for water access issues and highlight the progress made for social, ecological, and other water uses. The annual SLU Summit for Water brings together leaders and experts from academia, industry, and government to share ideas, learn the latest research advances, and tackle challenges. The 2022 summit focused on water resources in a changing climate, touching on topics such as machine learning, artificial intelligence, toxins, environmental justice, and the social value of water. Cox stated that while this was only the third event of its kind, the event has grown substantially since its inception.

“We have been increasing our participation and numbers almost twofold with each year of the summit,” Cox said. “We’re definitely growing in engagement with the regional community.”
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A student deploys a water quality monitoring device in a spring.

Notably, the WATER Institute participated in the 2022 Geo-Resolution conference. Knouft spoke on a panel titled “Water Tension and Conflict,” examining how geospatial tools may be used to help stakeholders make sciencebased decisions on water policy and management. Cox expects collaboration with the Taylor Geospatial Institute to be fruitful in the coming years.

“As the Taylor Geospatial Institute grows, it will provide resources and expertise that advance our mission as well,” Cox said. “Water is an important part of the geospatial environment and geospatial instruments and analysis tools are critical for the WATER Institute’s research efforts.”

ADVOCATING FOR Clean Water

The WATER Institute also has a hand in water improvements across the state. The Institute is unified by the belief that issues surrounding the supply and quality of our water impact us all, and we must advocate for enacting positive change.

“Many of the challenges we have as a community are connected to water such as getting reliable water supplies or natural disasters related to water,” Cox said. “Through our research and outreach efforts, we can make a positive impact in our communities.”

This year, the WATER Institute served on the Missouri Filter First Coalition

steering committee, a committee that unified community organizations to raise awareness of elevated lead levels in school drinking water. Through their advocacy, a bill that requires schools to test and filter their water was passed through the state legislature and signed into law by Governor Parson in June 2022.

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“Many of the challenges we have as a community are connected to water such as getting reliable water supplies or natural disasters related to water,” Cox said. “Through our research and outreach efforts, we can make a positive impact in our communities.”
A student picks up a pH solution to calibrate field water quality instrumentation.

PROVIDING Student Opportunities

Cox believes that the WATER Institute provides an outlet for students to learn and leave an impact on the world. Students have the opportunity to engage with active research projects and make a mark before they enter the workforce.

“Throughout the Institute, we have various undergraduate students working on research projects that address real-world problems,” Cox said. “On the MoDOT project, we had seven undergraduate research assistants working together over a couple of years.”

Students who participate in field research and lab analysis gain knowledge that will give them an advantage in their career pursuits. Cox described students digging into research to learn relevant computer programs, modern data collection methods, and other advanced skills.

The WATER Institute encourages students to take initiative to address societal water challenges. Billikens for Clean Water, a student organization dedicated to addressing water injustice, traveled to Belize in August 2022. Students, alumni, staff, and faculty members worked alongside individuals and local organizations in the Toledo District to examine the efficacy of the household drinking water filters implemented with community leaders in 2018 and 2019.

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“Having research opportunities for undergraduate students makes a big impact,” Cox said. “You’re taking things from the in-class environment and doing real-world applications, seeing how their learning can be applied to some of the challenges we are working to address.”

THESE EFFORTS, ALONG WITH ADVOCACY AND RESEARCH ENDEAVORS, DEMONSTRATE THE WATER INSTITUTE’S DEDICATION TO SLU’S JESUIT MISSION, BETTERING THE STATE OF HUMANITY THROUGH RESOURCE ASSURANCE AND UNDERSTANDING.

Students working with the WATER Institute travel upstream on the Meramec River.

Experts IN THE FIELD

Ph.D., P.E.

Director, WATER Institute; Associate Professor, Civil Engineering, School of Science and Engineering

Amanda Cox’s research activities cover a wide range of topics related to water movement. She has conducted studies on river engineering, sediment transport, urban drainage, stream restoration, bridge pier scour, hydraulic structures, and erosion control. Cox uses a variety of research methods including numerical simulations, physical modeling, direct field measurements, and remote sensing. Through her research, she applies advanced technologies in novel ways to observe and model water and sediment flow behavior.

Ph.D.

Associate Director, WATER Institute; Associate Professor, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, School of Science and Engineering

Elizabeth Hasenmueller’s overarching research goal is to improve our understanding of how disturbances, especially urbanization and climate change, affect water quality and quantity. Her research focuses on the interaction of water, soil, and rock in both natural and altered systems. She is particularly interested in the origin and transport of contaminants in surface waters and groundwaters. To examine hydrologic and geochemical processes over multiple scales in space and time, Hasenmueller’s research incorporates a variety of methods such as field sampling, laboratory experiments, analytical techniques, and theoretical modeling.

Amanda Cox Elizabeth Hasenmueller
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As director of business and outreach, Rachel Rimmerman leads the WATER Institute’s marketing, communications, and development processes. This includes identifying strategic partnerships with internal and external stakeholders, as well as facilitating outreach activities for community impact. Her collaboration with colleagues across the University builds the awareness and engagement needed to grow the WATER Institute into a leading center for watercentric research.

Primary Investigator, WATER Institute; Oliver L. Parks Endowed Chair, Professor of Civil Engineering, School of Science and Engineering

Craig D. Adams’ research in SLU’s Water Quality and Treatment Laboratory is focused on both drinking water quality issues and evaluating and implementing appropriate water sanitation and hygiene (WASH) technologies for developing nations. His recent work analyzing the cause and control of both cyanotoxins/cyanobacteria and novel taste-and-odor compounds directly translates into actionable guidance for utilities in the United States and beyond. Adams is also involved in the validation and testing of a wide range of filtration and disinfection technologies used in developing nations.

Laboratory Technician, WATER Institute, School of Science and Engineering

Sofie (Xuewei) Liang joined the WATER Institute in January 2021 and has been working with the directors and primary investigators on instrumentation and devices in the WATER Institute labs. In her role, Liang is responsible for managing the setup, maintenance, and operation of advanced research and teaching instruments, as well as training students and supervising lab safety. She earned her master’s degree from Iowa State University, where her research focused on the biodegradation of cyanotoxins in drinking water and recreational water. Among her many discoveries is a bacterial species that is able to degrade microcystins (the most common group of cyanotoxins) from water samples and produce harmless byproducts.

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Rachel Rimmerman MBA Sofie (Xuewei) Liang M.Sc.Eng. Craig D. Adams

FINDING DIRECTION IN DATA

A Conversation With Leslie Hinyard, Ph.D., MSW, Executive Director, AHEAD Institute

Every research project stems from questions of “how” or “why” — the Advanced HEAlth Data (AHEAD) Research Institute at Saint Louis University serves as the nexus between research questions and data. The Institute utilizes and develops resources that will improve patient and population health, advance the quality of care, and decrease health care costs.

Leslie Hinyard, Ph.D., executive director of the AHEAD Institute and associate professor in the Department of Health and Clinical Outcomes Research, positions AHEAD as the foundation for data-informed research and decision-making.

“Our role as an institute is to ensure that the faculty and trainees who are coming out of SLU are prepared to ask questions,” Hinyard said. “We want them to look at the environment critically and analyze it strategically to inform clinical care.”

Hinyard condensed AHEAD’s core offerings into three services: research support, research-related training, and data warehousing. Essentially, the Institute assists investigators in defining their research question, then does everything possible to get their projects off the ground.

“We provide start-to-finish research

support services,” Hinyard said. “We assist investigators who have a general idea or aim with refining their research question into an answerable question. We also support identifying appropriate sources of data, analysis, and reporting of results.”

AHEAD has several in-house databases that are useful for investigators, the largest being the virtual data warehouse (VDW). The VDW holds de-identified patient data from more than 5 million SSM Health and SLUCare patients. The VDW provides invaluable health care data for SLU and SSM Health investigators. Hinyard believes access to this information allows consideration for the larger picture and promotes a patient-focused mission.

As a part of the Health Care Systems Research Network (HCSRN) and an SSM Health collaborator, Hinyard believes AHEAD provides a snapshot of real-world conditions. While clinical trials help demonstrate the efficacy of treatment, real-world evidence allows us to understand how interventions operate in practice, including how care may vary geographically or have differences in outcomes between different populations.

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“Health data research allows us to look at how services are provided and how interventions are effective in groups of people,” Hinyard said. “We can understand how and where services are being provided and link information to social determinants of health.”
AHEAD INSTITUTE
Researchers led by Leslie Hinyard, Ph.D., MSW, examine new health data collected by the AHEAD Institute during a meeting in the Academic Technology Commons in the Pius XII Memorial Library.

DATA Activation

Investigators across the University tackle major challenges in health care and AHEAD provides support for their efforts. The allure of the VDW data draws more and more investigators each year. Over 125 requests have been made over the past year for data and research support from AHEAD, and nearly 213 to date.

Each researcher is looking to better lives and outcomes in health care settings. They grasp the opportunity to observe and analyze data through their own unique lens, whether that be by examining elements related to psychology, biology, nutrition, chemistry, and many other disciplines.

“The AHEAD Institute helps to bridge the gap between patient- and population-level research,” Hinyard said. “We work with clinicians to answer the questions that they have about their own practices and their own populations in a way that’s rigorous, reproducible, and valid.”

Analyzing Opioid Use

Data may be used to analyze facets of pervasive community health problems and identify a solution. As an example, Hinyard pointed out that Jeffrey Scherrer, Ph.D., professor of family and community medicine, utilizes VDW data extensively to analyze one of the most pressing issues of the 21st century.

“Dr. Jeffrey Scherrer, who is the senior director for research, has several projects that are using the VDW to look at opioid use and the opioid epidemic,” Hinyard said.

Scherrer and Joanne Salas, M.P.H., AHEAD’s director of biostatistics, are investigating issues around the opioid epidemic, including the frequency

of long-term prescription opioid use and the rates of new-onset depression occurring in the same individuals. Their work suggests a distinct link between daily opioid prescriptions and mental health. Through his research, Scherrer hopes to understand the relationship between chronic opioid use and mental and physical health.

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Director of biostatistics, Joanne Salas, consults with Clinical Research Scholar Megan Ferber, Ph.D., on opioid study results.

Assessing Annual Well Visits

Hinyard emphasized how administrative health data is being used to understand the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Salas is actively utilizing VDW data to study trends in annual checkups for infant, pediatric, and adult patients before and during the pandemic. Salas analyzed multiple years of primary care well visits to understand how COVID-19

impacted routine health care utilization. Study results indicated most age groups saw a decrease in well visits in the early years of the pandemic, with the exception of well-baby visits for infants up to age 1. However, there was a rapid return to pre-pandemic rates for all ages by July 2020.

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“The ability to utilize large data sources that capture realworld practice allows researchers to investigate trends that would be difficult to evaluate in smaller, prospective studies,” Hinyard said.

GROWING THE Next Generation

While AHEAD supports the work of individual research projects, the Institute is also focusing on the training and development of the next generation of clinical researchers. One mechanism for supporting faculty development for research is the Clinical Research Scholars Program. Through the program, investigators are paired with a biostatistician and a research mentor to develop their early research portfolio and move toward careers as independent investigators.

Meanwhile, AHEAD’s impact on the health care industry has allowed strong collaborations between providers and academic leaders. The Institute piloted a program to support research training for pharmacy fellows at St. Clare Hospital. In the program, the fellows receive educational training sessions on study design and biostatistics and then receive one-on-one support in the development, analysis, and reporting of their research study. The program has since expanded

to support similar programs at Cardinal Glennon and St. Mary’s hospitals.

“We are working with a lot more faculty across the School of Medicine and the University,” Hinyard said. “Our reach has grown quite a bit from just supporting one or two departments to working in very formal research support arrangements with departments across the School of Medicine.”

Leslie Hinyard, Ph.D., MSW, leads AHEAD Institute researchers in designing a new study.

THE BIG DATA Research Symposium

Hinyard expressed that support for research starts by making the inherent value of data warehouses evident on a larger stage. In September 2022, the AHEAD Institute co-hosted the Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences (ICTS) Big Data Research Symposium alongside Washington University in St. Louis’ Center for Administrative Data Research. Hinyard said this event was attended by over 90 faculty members from SLU, Washington University, and the University of Missouri and highlighted the types of research accomplished with big data this past year.

“Many large data resources are generated for purposes other than research, for example, billing or tracking clinical care,” Hinyard said. “However, the information in these databases remains a valuable asset for research.”

Events like the symposium bring researchers from local institutions together to network, present their findings, and develop future project ideas. Using big data resources, researchers presented work investigating topics as diverse as prostate cancer in veterans, opioid use and depression,

and anxiety treatment and dementia. Additionally, SSM Health presented how they utilize big administrative data to improve processes in patient care delivery. The event creates a fertile ground for meaningful research between universities.

“We’re really looking to start trying to build those bridges between WashU and SLU investigators in a meaningful way,” Hinyard said.

As an incentive to increase collaboration in big data research, SLU announced

“These big data resources can be a challenge to use if you don’t know what you’re doing,” Hinyard said. “But they can be very valuable in understanding how care takes place.”

a new funding opportunity sponsored by AHEAD and the Center for Administrative Data Research (CADR) at Washington University in St. Louis. This $20,000 pilot award will be granted to an investigative team that includes a principal investigator from both institutions and utilizes data resources from AHEAD and CADR. Hinyard hopes future events will continue to bring institutions together and give community members a greater understanding of the value of data.

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AHEAD INSTITUTE
Faculty members from SLU, Washington University in St. Louis, and University of Missouri attend the 2022 Big Data Research Symposium.

AHEAD provides opportunities for students to engage in clinical and health outcomes research. This includes the chance for students to take a hands-on approach to translational research.

AHEAD facilitates student involvement in research projects by establishing clear guidelines for effective studentfaculty mentor relationships that ensure a meaningful research experience for students. By facilitating student-mentor research relationships, AHEAD supports the education and development of students to meet their research goals.

PROVIDING Student Opportunities THE YEARS Ahead

Hinyard expressed that AHEAD has grown substantially over the past year. With the launch of the VDW and its continued support for University researchers, AHEAD welcomed multiple new team members who will only bolster its expertise.

Hinyard’s hope is that AHEAD will continue expanding its team and its capabilities as well. However, looking further ahead, Hinyard aims to create a more extensive data warehousing operation and further develop research support and training services.

By setting ambitious goals, Hinyard believes they can expand their training collaborations within SLU and the SSM Health system. AHEAD strives to make data-driven research open, attainable, and actionable for researchers at all stages of their careers.

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“We’ve developed this pipeline where we engage students to work with clinical and research faculty to help move research forward while students develop their research and collaboration skills,” Hinyard said.
“We want to expand and grow so investigators have the support they need and everyone interested in this line of work feels welcome to join,” Hinyard said.
a protocol for an upcoming AHEAD Institute study. AHEAD INSTITUTE
AHEAD STRIVES TO MAKE DATA-DRIVEN RESEARCH OPEN, ATTAINABLE, AND ACTIONABLE FOR RESEARCHERS AT ALL STAGES OF THEIR CAREERS.
Alex Zhang, M.P.H., develops

Experts IN THE FIELD

Leslie Hinyard, Ph.D., MSW, is an associate professor of Health Outcomes Research, the director of the Saint Louis University Center for Health Outcomes Research (SLUCOR), and the founding director of the Advanced HEAlth Data (AHEAD) Institute at Saint Louis University. Hinyard has expertise in secondary data analysis including national survey research, large administrative claims databases, and research involving electronic medical records as well as analysis of prospective and observational studies. Her research focuses on health disparities and health equity, health-related quality of life, and psychosocial needs of cancer patients. Additionally, she works with an interdisciplinary group of researchers to improve training for interprofessional health care clinicians for improvements in advance care planning and palliative care.

Hinyard earned her Master of Social Work from Washington University in Saint Louis and her Ph.D. in Public Health Studies from Saint Louis University.

Senior Director for Research, AHEAD Institute; Professor, Family and Community Medicine, School of Medicine

Jeffery Scherrer started his career in 1990 as a research assistant in animal models of memory. He sought out a research coordinator position in epidemiology while completing his doctoral degree in Health Services Research. In 2004, he was appointed as an assistant professor in the Washington University Department of Psychiatry. Scherrer eventually joined the Department of Family and Community Medicine at Saint Louis University School of Medicine in 2013. Family medicine empowered him to pursue his research interest in the interplay of mental and physical health.

Scherrer’s current research grants focus on three areas:

1. Health outcomes of PTSD and depression, and the potential to reduce poor outcomes by reducing severity of these conditions.

2. Chronic prescription opioid use and risk for depression and related conditions.

3. Novel protective factors for dementia. His methodological expertise is in retrospective cohort designs using medical records and claims data and prospective cohort studies.

Director of Operations & Outreach, AHEAD Institute

Katie Sniffen is the director of Operations & Outreach for Saint Louis University’s AHEAD Institute. In this role, she leads teams in facilitating logistical and administrative support to faculty, staff, and primary investigators using the AHEAD Institute’s data and research support services.

Katie is an athletic trainer with six years of clinical experience providing quality, affordable, and accessible health care to collegiate student-athletes at the University of Oregon and Pepperdine University. She obtained a master’s degree from the University of Oregon’s Post-Professional Athletic Training Master’s Program and is currently seeking a Ph.D. in Public Health Studies: Health Outcomes Research. Katie is also a faculty member in the Department of Athletic Training and Physical Therapy with additional teaching experience in interprofessional education. Katie’s research interests include demonstrating the value of athletic training services on the health of populations through the application of health outcomes research.

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Leslie Hinyard Ph.D., MSW Katie Sniffen M.S., ATC Jeffrey Scherrer Ph.D.

Paula Buchanan

Ph.D.

Director for Consulting Services, AHEAD Institute; Associate Professor, Health and Clinical Outcomes Research

Richard Grucza

Ph.D., M.P.E.

Professor, Family and Community Medicine; Professor, Health and Clinical Outcomes Research

Divya Subramaniam

Ph.D., M.P.H.

Assistant Professor and Program Director, Health and Clinical Outcomes Research

Deepika Gopukumar

Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Health and Clinical Outcomes Research

Sarah Gebauer

M.D., MSPH

Assistant Professor, Family and Community Medicine

Matthew Breeden

M.D.

Family and Community Medicine

Joanne Salas

M.P.H.

Director of Biostatistics

Paul Hitz

MSHI

Director of Data Management and Health Informatics

Irene Ryan

Data Manager

Noor Al-Hammadi

Ph.D.

Director for Prospective & Clinical Trial Analytics, Senior Biostatistician

Timothy Chrusciel

M.P.H.

Senior Biostatistician

Roxann Kirkwood

MHI, BSRT(T)

Data Manager

Krithika Narayana Kumana

Biostatistician

Matthew Simpson

M.P.H.

Biostatistician

Alex Zhang

M.P.H.

Biostatistician

Linda Waller

MBA

Business Manager

A D D I T I O N A L F A C U L T Y S U P P O R T I N G S T A F F
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“The AHEAD Institute inspires positive outcomes and opportunities — none of which would be possible without its many talented faculty and staff members.”

VISIONARY JUSTICE AND EQUITY COME TO LIFE

The events of history continue to impact our present and challenge communities across the U.S. However, with the required resources and support, communities can acknowledge history to move toward creating an equitable and just society where people can flourish. One institute at Saint Louis University believes that ethical community engagement, humanized equity, and healing justice have the ability to heal a divided nation, dismantle harmful systems, and devise solutions informed by both history and community.

The Institute for Healing Justice & Equity (IHJE) is a multidisciplinary group of faculty, staff, collaborators, and partners working together to eliminate disparities caused by systemic oppression through mechanism changes and deep community partnerships. Amber Johnson, Ph.D., professor of communication and social justice, cofounder and executive director of IHJE, believes progress begins with an honest acknowledgment of history and present community conditions.

“We have to tell the truth about our country’s history, our nation’s reality, and where we are,” Johnson said. “It’s too easy to be dismissive and write off history as if it never happened.”

Adopting a three-pronged approach, IHJE uses historical events to inform

its efforts to create a better future. The first prong of their research involves interrogating how existing efforts to create equity are informed by inequities in process and power, which results in continued oppression. As a second prong, IHJE advocates for the multimodal resources necessary for healing from trauma, such as play therapy, art therapy, and somatic healing. Finally, Johnson stated that IHJE strives to build community capacity to ideate and problem-solve independently — essentially leveraging their platform and resources to leave communities with the right tools in their toolbox.

As they push forward in their mission, Johnson shared that IHJE researchers aim to build off the success they have experienced since 2019. Through resources such as community art efforts and insightful research that informs public policy, IHJE has promoted healing and equity in the St. Louis community and beyond.

“Our first three years in service were spent building up our equity and policy work,” Johnson said. “We are really starting to see the fruits of that labor come to fruition.”

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“The idea is communities don’t need us to fix them,” Johnson said. “They are experts of their experience — they know their problems, they know what they need, and they have ideas and solutions. Our role is to actively listen and leverage our resources to scale their work.”
WATER INSTITUTE
Amber Johnson, Ph.D., executive director, Institute for Healing Justice & Equity, and professor of communication and social justice in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Research AREAS

IHJE utilizes research, transformative education, community engagement, capacity building, and public policy development to foster healing from social injustice, trauma, and oppression. Members and collaborators work together to activate their research findings, with the end goal of building equitable communities.

Healing Communities

Johnson shared that IHJE creates and shares resources, reaching out to communities to ensure these can be leveraged to promote healing in the face of societal challenges. They noted that Kira Banks, Ph.D., professor of psychology and co-founder of IHJE, took quick action to promote healing after tragedy rocked a south St. Louis high school.

On October 24, 2022, a shooting at Central Visual and Performing Arts High School and Collegiate School of Medicine and Bioscience left two dead and seven others wounded. The event shook the community to its core, leaving faculty, staff, students, and their families trying to cope with the trauma. Banks connected with the Black Healers Collective, a local organization that spreads healing resources for Black communities, to develop a strategy to reach out to students on the ground.

Days after the tragedy, the group hosted a healing circle at Tower Grove Park. They provided boxing gloves for the attendees to physically express

their anger, grief, and frustration. Alternatively, healing professionals were available to counsel those who preferred to discuss their internal struggles after the event. Active community engagement, Johnson said, remains a core tenant of IHJE’s mission.

“That’s what our community engagement looks like,” Johnson said. “It looks like being responsive. It looks like showing up.”

Addressing Disparity

Johnson explained that IHJE researchers dedicate their lives to studying and addressing inequities and systematic injustice, with faculty members often pursuing their individual areas of interest.

Keon L. Gilbert, Ph.D., associate professor of behavioral science and health education and co-founder of

IHJE, is completing a fellowship at the Brookings Institution. His research focuses on policy interventions to enhance social mobility for Black males, developing strategies of anti-racism to rebuild the public health infrastructure, and addressing persistent inequalities in health exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Johnson emphasized that researchers within IHJE utilize their platforms and resources to mirror SLU’s Jesuit mission.

“Our mission is to leverage our resources to alleviate ills in society, whether it’s hunger, poverty, or a lack of access to health care and medicine,” Johnson said.

Rather than only engaging academia, IHJE takes action to make lasting changes. Ruqaiijah Yearby, J.D., M.P.H., former professor of law at Saint Louis University, co-founder and former executive director of IHJE, formed the basis for IHJE’s legal advocacy for access

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Kira Banks, Ph.D., professor of psychology and co-founder of IHJE.

to quality health care and fair wages through seminars, journal articles, opeds, and community outreach. Yearby’s work with the Institute demonstrated how decades of policies regarding employment, housing, and health care continue to impact our communities and may inform policy moving forward.

Amplifying Critical Futures

While research is impactful, curious minds may find themselves barred from exploring journal articles. Johnson shared that the articles themselves may be packed with difficult-to-understand jargon and the platforms that host them feature expensive paywalls. As a result, the exclusivity of research publications ultimately limits the reach of their findings to academic circles rather than the general public.

“We have all these brilliant folks who do all this beautiful research and have all these great ideas about the future of our world, but it is highly inaccessible,” Johnson said.

They believe that the problem lies primarily in the platform — for IHJE’s research to disseminate, it needs a more engaging medium. As part of a $715,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), IHJE formed an

Anti-Racism Consortium composed of experts, community advocates, and organizations working to develop antiracist health policy and address racism in the health care system. In Phase II of this grant, Johnson and their colleagues created a podcast called “Critical Futures.” Available on all streaming platforms, the podcast is led by a consortium of experts in health, equity, and anti-racist health policy.

“It’ll begin with disseminating the work of the consortium and then eventually start talking about other kinds of future building and future world-making,” Johnson said.

The podcast will ultimately have three separate components. The initial series will be a rotating conversation centered around ongoing work from the consortium members, hosted by Gilbert, Banks, and Johnson. The second series will involve interviews with researchers who work in future studies such as planning, in addition to Afrofuturism, Indigenous Futures, and liberation theologies. Finally, the third component may incorporate fiction storytellers to provide improvisational views of how policy work may play out in the future.

“They’ll have a conversation where the researcher builds a rubric for the future while the storyteller tells it in a way that an 8-year-old can understand and get excited about,” Johnson said. “For me, that’s the future of academic publishing.”

As they continue their second year of funding, Johnson hopes that the accessibility the project allows will help IHJE maintain relevance in the public eye. The revitalized platform may reach and inspire younger generations, who have a different view on life plans compared to previous generations.

“That’s what our community engagement looks like,” Johnson said. “It looks like being responsive. It looks like showing up.”
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A collection of works from the Justice Fleet™ initiative fostering community healing through art, dialogue, and play.

CONTINUED Outreach

The Justice FleetTM is an ongoing project for IHJE created by Johnson. The project began in 2015 when Johnson’s students suggested that the art, narratives, and healing frameworks Johnson presented in the classroom could transform communities beyond campus lines. Since then, Johnson has created a network of mobile museum experiences that foster healing through art, play, and dialogue. They shared that the pop-up gallery currently has three complete exhibits: Radical Forgiveness, Radical Imagination, and Transfuturism.

“We have been traveling a lot throughout the nation, talking about radical forgiveness and imagination and helping people reimagine what it looks like to heal and foster new futures,” Johnson said.

Sometimes, the Justice FleetTM responds to tragic events that make headlines. In November 2022, a mass shooting occurred at Club Q, an LGBTQ+ nightclub in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The event left five dead, 17 injured, and an entire community traumatized. In an effort to aid their

healing, the Justice FleetTM provided the community with access to their Radical Forgiveness exhibit. This mobile art gallery proposed that we do not have to live in fear after trauma — rather, we can engage in the active process of forgiveness to begin healing ourselves while actively holding systems and people that cause harm accountable.

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“If we aren’t actively helping people heal from the trauma caused by inequities, then our policies, our frameworks, and all this beautiful work that we’re doing will not finish the job,” Johnson said.
LEARN MORE AT: www.thejusticefleet.com/home

LOOKING TO the Future

This year was a transitional period for IHJE as Johnson was appointed as the new executive director of the Institute. Under their leadership, IHJE looks to mimic the success of their equity and policy work in their healing justice and community engagement efforts.

“Hopefully, in the next two years, our healing justice and community engagement efforts will be as applauded and as popular as our equity and policy work,” Johnson said. The future is packed with visions of expansion — Johnson shared that they aim to continue adding to their expertise. They hired two new team members, onboarded new faculty affiliates, and plan to hire an award specialist to help members navigate grants. Johnson also hopes to transition from primarily virtual spheres to a brick-and-mortar location for researchers, collaborators, and community members alike.

Johnson shared that while they continue to build IHJE’s legacy, the Institute remains open to new collaborations with community partners and other academic institutions. Moving forward, the Institute will continue to share the reality of disparate communities and build a better world for the next generation.

“When you tell the truth about these experiences, you create the capacity to fix them,” Johnson said.

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“I want us to have a space that people can come to for healing, research, learning, and community building,” Johnson said. “We continue to expand, so the goal is to continue building out the Institute.”

MOVING FORWARD, THE INSTITUTE WILL CONTINUE TO SHARE THE REALITY OF DISPARATE COMMUNITIES AND BUILD A BETTER WORLD FOR THE NEXT GENERATION.

Amber Johnson, Ph.D., is interviewed as part of the Smithsonian’s “Our Shared Future: Reckoning with our Racial Past.” The documentary highlighted the work of IHJE and the Justice Fleet™; it also included an interview with Institute Co-Founder Kira Banks, Ph.D.

Experts IN THE FIELD

As a scholar/artist/activist, Johnson’s research and activism focus on narratives of identity, protest, healing, and social justice in digital media, popular media, and everyday lived experiences. As a polymath, their mixed-media artistry involves working with metals, recycled and reclaimed goods, photography, poetry, percussion, and paint to interrogate systems of oppression and create capacity for different, critical futures. Amber Johnson is an award-winning professor of communication and social justice at Saint Louis University. As executive director and co-founder of the Institute for Healing Justice & Equity, Johnson specializes in humanizing equity and exploring the relationship between healing justice and equity. Humanizing equity is the process of making organizational equity work radically inclusive in action. Johnson is also the founding director of the Justice FleetTM , a mobile social justice museum that fosters healing through art, dialogue, pleasure, and play. Johnson created the Justice FleetTM to experiment with methodologies that reimagine community engagement, healing justice, humanized equity, and critical futures.

Co-Founder

Ruqaiijah Yearby, J.D., M.P.H., is the inaugural Kara J. Trott Professor in Law at the Moritz College of Law and a faculty affiliate of the Kirwan Institute at The Ohio State University. She is also co-founder and a faculty affiliate of the Institute for Healing Justice & Equity.

Recently, Yearby received over $5 million in grant funding from the National Institutes of Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to study structural racism and discrimination in vaccine allocation as well as the equitable enforcement of housing laws and structural racism in the health care system. Her work has been published in the American Journal of Bioethics, Health Affairs, and the Oxford Journal of Law and the Biosciences and used in law, medical school, and social science classes at schools such as Harvard, NYU, Fordham, and the University of California Berkeley.

She earned her B.S. in honors biology from the University of Michigan, her M.P.H. from Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, and her J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. She worked at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services as an assistant regional counsel and served as a law clerk for the Honorable Ann Claire Williams of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit.

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Amber Johnson Ph.D. Ruqaiijah Yearby J.D., M.P.H

Co-Founder, Institute for Healing Justice & Equity; Associate Professor, Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences

Kira Banks is a professor of psychology at Saint Louis University where she researches how discrimination affects mental health, and she is a co-founder of the Institute for Healing Justice & Equity. She has been working to support individuals and groups to understand themselves, others and systems of oppression for over 20 years. Banks has done so across Hollywood, Broadway, corporations, nonprofits, K-12 schools, colleges, and communities. She has been described as making complex and controversial topics accessible and intergroup interactions more understandable. Banks has published over 20 articles in journals such as American Psychologist, Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, and Journal of Diversity in Higher Education. She has also contributed to The Harvard Business Review and popular media outlets like The Atlantic and The Guardian. Banks received her BA from Mount Holyoke College, where she graduated Phi Beta Kappa, and her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.

Co-Founder and Director of Equity and Policy, Institute for Healing Justice & Equity; Associate Professor, Behavioral Science and Health Education College for Public Health and Social Justice

Keon L. Gilbert, DrPH, M.A., MPA, is an associate professor in the Department of Behavioral Science and Health Education at Saint Louis University’s College for Public Health and Social Justice and codirects the Institute for Healing Justice & Equity. He is also a David M. Rubenstein Fellow at the Brookings Institution (Washington, D.C.). The goal of his work is to build collaborations to eliminate emerging and systemic inequities in health to achieve health equity. He utilizes CBPR skills to develop and evaluate community-based projects focused on health inequities in urban and rural settings. Examples of his collaborations includes mixed methods approaches to answer questions regarding the intersections of racism, class, and gender; identifying social and structural determinants of Black male health; working with community organizations and nurses to bring health care screenings to Black barbershops and beauty salons; developing strategies to undo the influence of racism on social and health care policies; examining how racial equity tools influence policy change; and most recently, identifying how vulnerable populations in Missouri have been affected by COVID-19. He is co-editor of “Racism: Science and Tools for the Public Health Professional.”

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Kira Banks Ph.D. Keon Gilbert DrPH

LAYING THE GROUNDWORK

A Conversation With John E. Tavis, Ph.D., Director, Institute for Drug and Biotherapeutic Innovation

Too many diseases cannot be treated adequately, and some diseases that could be previously treated are becoming unmanageable as drug resistance increases to antibiotics and antiviral drugs. The Saint Louis University Institute for Drug and Biotherapeutic Innovation (SLU-IDBI) seeks to address these problems by connecting researchers with diverse expertise into interdisciplinary collaboration throughout the process of drug discovery.

“The goal of SLU-IDBI is to improve drug discovery research at Saint Louis University in order to bring new cures to patients worldwide, with an emphasis on diseases disproportionately affecting the underserved,” Director John E. Tavis, Ph.D., professor of molecular microbiology and immunology, said.

Tavis believes the wide range of expertise from SLU-IDBI researchers and their broad understanding of drug enzymes involved in diseases, crucial cellular functions, and disease symptoms places SLU-IDBI in an outstanding position to reduce the burden of disease on people. In the face of COVID-19, mpox, and a growing number of antibiotic-resistant superbugs, it is evident that lesser-known diseases may evolve into worldwide threats. With

researchers of diverse expertise on hand, SLU-IDBI takes on the challenge of adapting in the fight against new and evolving health challenges.

“That’s what having a robust drug discovery institute allows you to do — you’re ready to pivot,” Tavis said. “There are certain activities common to all drug discovery projects or aspects you need to know about the biology of the target. That domain knowledge and ability to pivot to attack a new target are critical.”

Tavis explained that every treatment and therapy on the market is backed by years of research and funding. With the total cost of a drug from the first experiment to public release reaching well over $1-2 billion, pharmaceutical companies hesitate to take on the risk of foundational research. Instead, they turn to academic institutions such as SLU-IDBI to lay the groundwork and de-risk treatment ideas that would otherwise go unpursued.

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“We are not motivated by profit, allowing us to move toward cures for diseases that big companies can’t afford to research because there’s going to be an inadequate level of return,” Tavis said. “At SLU-IDBI, we can de-risk these types of drugs and further SLU’s Jesuit mission of care for humanity.”
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John Tavis, Ph.D., director, Institute for Drug and Biotherapeutic Innovation, and professor of molecular microbiology and immunology in the School of Medicine.

Research AREAS

SLU-IDBI provides a wealth of opportunities to internal and external partners, researchers, and students interested in drug and biotherapeutic discovery and development processes. By leveraging its members’ expertise in medicine, biology, engineering, computational chemistry, and applied chemistry, they facilitate collaboration across disciplines with a common goal of improving the quality of care worldwide.

Interdisciplinary Collaboration

SLU-IDBI takes an interdisciplinary approach to drug and biotherapeutic development, with a leadership group of six guiding more than 90 additional researchers and many student trainees. The Institute provides support, knowledge, and training to push drug discovery projects closer to a breakthrough. SLU-IDBI offers its members crucial discovery services, advanced equipment, and guidance from experienced members of the leadership team and senior members.

“This year, we have substantially upgraded our capacity and increased the number of people in the University who are capable of leveraging our powerful programs,” Tavis said.

A vital area of support is the Innovation Seed Grant — a flexible funding opportunity to rapidly promote projects that expand SLU-IDBI collaborations and improve competitiveness for

external funding. This year, the Institute received 10 applications and funded six grants for a total of $50,142. Projects included neuropathic pain, targeted drug screening, therapeutic strategies for obesity, the relationship between metabolites and neonatal-opioid withdrawal syndrome, the development and characterization of human monoclonal antibodies, and the purchase of new instrumentation. Tavis believes the support the Institute provides proves vital in the pursuit of future funding.

“Drug discovery is inherently a very

multidisciplinary procedure,” Tavis said. “By providing networking opportunities and sharing information and education, we leverage the ideas of our members and expand the funding they get to support their projects.”

COVID-19 Response

Tavis noted SLU-IDBI’s knowledge has proven crucial throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. For example, Tavis facilitated an early collaboration between chemists in China and

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An IDBI trainee prepares tissue samples for analysis.

researchers within SLU-IDBI to study the COVID-19 antiviral therapy, remdesivir. Ann Tollefson, Ph.D., and Karoly Toth, D.V.M., both research professors in the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, conducted early biological screenings while Tavis’ lab conducted cytotoxicity assays to ensure the virus was the primary target of the treatment.

“I do the compound archiving and preparation, and we also measure key parameters of the compounds called their cytotoxicity, which is how toxic they are to cells,” Tavis said. “It is a critical component that you need to know in order to be able to interpret efficacy — Tollefson and Toth test the new compounds to see how well the experimental compounds work.”

Remdesivir became the first COVID-19 treatment with an emergency use authorization. Though eventually surpassed by more effective treatments, the research continues with new collaborative studies focused on making novel inhibitors of COVID main protease.

Yet, this program is a microcosm of the true breadth of research performed within SLU-IDBI. Assistant professors in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, James D. Brien, Ph.D., and Amelia K. Pinto, Ph.D., are screening compounds against COVID-19, where they pivoted rapidly from the classes of viruses they typically work with. Their versatility in screening methods allowed them to collaborate with different companies and develop antibody-based drugs.

“There are multiple examples you can use of COVID where SLU-IDBI is poised and is active to try and launch early-stage discoveries,” Tavis said. “But, that same argument can be held for multiple other microbial and non-microbial diseases.”

Combating Antibiotic Resistance

Tavis noted the focus of each research lab varies, encompassing areas such as genetic disease, neuropathic pain, and organ system conditions. Tavis pointed to John Walker, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, as a prime example of SLUIDBI’s work. As a medicinal chemist, Walker and his research team work alongside external academic institutions such as the University of Oklahoma to combat the rapidly growing problem of antibiotic resistance.

“Walker’s research program is focused around improving antibiotics and improving the efficacy of existing antibiotics,” Tavis said. “It is very collaborative work.”

Through their work, they develop molecules that can penetrate the membrane of bacteria and inhibit efflux pumps that often cause resistance to antibiotics, and also develop novel antibiotic classes. With the support of SLU-IDBI’s Innovation Seed Grant, Walker and his team will be able to expand their collaborative efforts and seek additional external funding in the near future.

Tavis also pointed out that their research efforts may also target specific communities. Feng Cao, Ph.D., adjunct professor, works within the St. Louis Veterans Administration (VA) Medical Center to develop screening assays for drug-resistant bacteria found in VA patients.

“Cao routinely screens new compound libraries against a panel of diverse, highly pathogenic human bacteria,” Tavis said. “As a result, her work contributes directly to the development of improved antibiotics that will work against bugs resistant to existing drugs.”

“There are multiple examples you can use of COVID where SLU-IDBI is poised and is active to try and launch early stage discoveries,” Tavis said. “But, that same argument can be held for multiple other different viruses and microbes around the world.”
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EQUIPPING FOR Change

SLU-IDBI saw the wet-bench core take strides forward this year with the acquisition of new equipment. The Institute ramped up its capacity to study disease by supporting the purchase of a Fast Protein Liquid Chromatography (FPLC) system for SLU-IDBI members in an effort led by Daniel Hawiger, M.D., Ph.D, associate professor in the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology. This machine permits fast and reliable analysis or purification of proteins and peptides without contaminants.

“We now have the means to purify both bacterially derived components and non-bacterially derived components without any risk whatsoever in cross-contamination with pyrogenic components that are almost impossible to get out of something that is purified from a bacterial source,” Tavis said.

In addition, the Institute acquired a new liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry system (LC/ MS) to support SLU-IDBI’s ability to perform in vitro and in vivo ADME (Absorption Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion)/PK (pharmacokinetics) tests. The mass spectrometry system allows investigators to quickly and precisely measure the levels of an experimental compound to learn how it gets into cells and the body, where it goes once there, and how long it lasts.

This is critical knowledge during early drug discovery. The new equipment was installed in the SLU-IDBI laboratory space located in the Edward A. Doisy Research Center in July 2022. This stateof-the-art system was funded through a $250,000 National Institutes of Health (NIH) S10 grant written by David Griggs, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology. Ultimately, the advancement bolsters SLU-IDBI’s understanding throughout all stages of discovery, preclinical development, and clinical development.

Tavis expects that both the FPLC and LC/MS will greatly improve SLU-IDBI’s ability to support those who research biotherapeutic development — this is an advanced area of drug discovery, as the complexities of the molecules require

high-level machines.

“A biotherapeutic is not a traditional small molecule drug,” Tavis said. “Small molecules are like what you see in chemistry diagrams where there are a bunch of lines and hexagons sticking out all over the place. Rather, biotherapeutics are much larger molecules, like the antibody treatments for COVID-19.”

These advancements will allow investigators to support grant research and further safe yet effective treatments for evolving diseases and conditions. Though the Institute has fallen into the swing of discovery and development, Tavis said they aim to amplify their ability to provide medicinal chemistry support to the faculty in the coming year.

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“Getting key information early in a drug discovery project can greatly improve the likelihood of funding from a grant,” Tavis said. “That would improve the ability of an investigator to massively upshift the rate of development of a compound.”
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IDBI Research Scientist Abdul Mottaleb, Ph.D., performs analysis on the newly acquired LC/MS system.

TRANSLATING Expertise

As the Institute has expanded, so have its opportunities. Notably, SLU-IDBI hosted its inaugural Research Symposium on September 23, 2022. About 115 researchers attended the event to discuss their findings and listen to oral presentations. Shaun Stauffer, Ph.D., director of the Cleveland Clinic Center for Therapeutics Discovery, kicked off the symposium with a keynote speech on small molecule discovery in drug research. Topics throughout the event ranged from molecular components such as ribosomal complexes to specific conditions, including cancer and hepatitis B.

Additionally, undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral students presented 24 posters at the symposium — and at the end, four students received awards for their work:

Graduate Awards

• Monica Goodland: “A₃ adenosine receptor agonists: novel therapeutics to prevent traumatic brain injury induced cognitive impaired in rodents”

• Allyson McCune: “Natural killer cell-derived extracellular vesicles have a potent anti-leukemic effect and selectively target the cancer stem cell subpopulation”

Undergraduate Awards

• Laura Hopkins: “Characterization and pharmacokinetic study of biodegradable hydrogels for sustained release of N-acetylgalactosaminesulfate sulfatase (GALNS) into mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) affected mice”

• Kirti Madhu: “Anti-proliferative effects of curcumin, silibinin, and combination of curcumin plus silibinin on gastric cancer”

Tavis believes that the strength of these events lies in the connections created between faculty members, students, and researchers from external institutions.

“We make those connections, and we build those connections both organically and through the member networking activities through the direct link of our members,” Tavis said.

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IDBI members discuss their scientific advances at the IDBI symposium.

SLU-IDBI has grown significantly in its ability to support student research over the last year. Blythe Janowiak, Ph.D., associate professor of biology and member of the SLU-IDBI leadership team, brings her passion for training the future generation by offering additional lab opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students.

Janowiak worked with the University to incorporate the inaugural Scholarly Undergraduate Research Grants and Experiences (SURGE) program into ongoing SLU-IDBI research programs in the summer of 2022. The SURGE program places students in labs to gain research experience, access mentorship from SLU-IDBI members, and build a lasting student community. In 2022, SLU-IDBI laboratories hosted nine undergraduate summer researchers funded by the SURGE program. Three of these students entered as designated SLU-IDBI SURGE Fellows.

PROVIDING Student Opportunities LOOKING Ahead

“The SURGE program funding allowed us to expand our reach and foster a cohesive summer undergraduate researcher cohort, including opportunities for academic and social interactions with each other,” Tavis said.

The culmination of the summer research program was celebrated by inviting all SLU-IDBI trainees to present research posters at the inaugural IDBI Research Symposium in fall 2022. At the symposium, eight IDBI undergraduate researchers presented their work and two shared the honor of best poster.

As he looks toward the future, Tavis hopes to increase the number of people across the University applying their expertise to drug discovery. Tavis believes that their power will always lie in collective expertise rather than singular effort — chemists, biologists, pharmacologists, and other disciplines all touch different processes in drug development.

“Drug discovery is inherently very multidisciplinary,” Tavis said. “No one person can take something and run with it all the way.”

To this end, SLU-IDBI strives to prepare students, researchers, and residents to continue its therapeutic development work. The Institute inspires the next

generation of researchers by bringing them into the lab early through the Institute’s undergraduate research fellows program. Training the next generation of researchers is critical because their fresh eyes and enthusiasm is where future advances in disease treatment will originate.

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“Every time we have a new success, it inspires a feeling of glowing pride in our members,” Tavis said. “That reinvigorates our efforts to accelerate the development of new therapies for people suffering from diseases that cannot currently be treated.”
Janowiak is working to expand the research program based on successes and feedback from this summer.

TRAINING THE NEXT GENERATION OF RESEARCHERS IS CRITICAL BECAUSE THEIR FRESH EYES AND ENTHUSIASM IS WHERE FUTURE ADVANCES IN DISEASE TREATMENT WILL ORIGINATE.

An IDBI
cell
for analysis. INSTITUTE FOR DRUG AND BIOTHERAPEUTIC INNOVATION
trainee prepares
cultures

Experts IN THE FIELD

Director, SLU-IDBI; Professor, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine

John Tavis, Ph.D., is a professor of molecular virology at Saint Louis University School of Medicine, director of the Saint Louis University Institute for Drug and Biotherapeutic Innovation, and a fellow of the Saint Louis University Research Institute. He received his Ph.D. from Penn State University in 1990 and completed postdoctoral studies at the University of California San Francisco. He is the chairman of the Scientific Advisory Council for the annual International HBV Meeting, the incoming chair of the International Coalition to Eliminate HBV (ICE-HBV), and a member of the Scientific and Medical Advisory Board member for the Hepatitis B Foundation. He received the Mission Hero Award from the American Cancer Society in 2018 for his efforts to combat virally induced cancer. He studies HBV replication and enzymology, currently focusing on the biochemistry of the HBV ribonuclease H and developing drugs to suppress HBV replication that target this enzyme.

Co-Director, SLU-IDBI; Associate Professor, Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences

Blythe Janowiak, Ph.D., is an associate professor of biology and directs a research lab studying host-pathogen interactions using the opportunistic pathogen Group B streptococcus (GBS). With the help of graduate and undergraduate researchers, Janowiak studies the interaction between GBS, the microbiome, and the healthy or altered immune system, and the regulation of glutathione synthesis and metabolism as a means to reveal novel, specific, and selective treatments for GBS. Janowiak also collaborates throughout the University, providing expert guidance on tools and strategies for studying the microbiome, oxidative stress, and antioxidants in multiple systems. Finally, Janowiak has a strong passion for training the future generation of biomedical scientists, as evidenced by her mentoring five to 10 undergrads and one to three grad students in biochemical and microbiological research per semester.

Co-Director, SLU-IDBI; Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering, School of Science and Engineering

Silviya Zustiak, Ph.D., has a diverse educational background with a bachelor’s and master’s in bioelectrical engineering, a doctoral degree in biochemical engineering, and postdoctoral training in biophysics from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Zustiak’s primary research interests are in hydrogel biomaterials and tissue engineering, with an emphasis on developing novel biomaterials as cell scaffolds, drug screening platforms, and drug delivery devices. Her research is highly multidisciplinary, merging the fields of engineering, material science, and biology. Zustiak has received several research awards such as the NIH Fellows Award for Research Excellence in 2011 and the Saint Louis University Scholarly Works Award for a Junior Faculty in 2017. Her work has resulted in over 55 peerreviewed publications, over 200 conference presentations, and multiple patent applications.

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John Tavis Ph.D. Silviya Petrova Zustiak Ph.D. Blythe Janowiak Ph.D.

Co-Director, SLU-IDBI; Associate Professor, Chemistry, School of Science and Engineering Director, Chemical Biology Program

Marvin Meyers, Ph.D., is an experienced medicinal chemist and drug discovery scientist. Upon completion of his Ph.D. in chemistry at the University of Illinois Urbana–Champaign, he spent a decade at Pharmacia and Pfizer working on new drug discovery for a variety of diseases resulting in two novel compounds entering human clinical trials. Since joining Saint Louis University in 2010, his research focus shifted to the identification of novel drug candidates for rare and infectious diseases including cryptosporidiosis, malaria, tuberculosis, hepatitis B virus, herpes simplex virus, cryptococcal meningitis, and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. This work is highly collaborative, where Meyers partners with leading disease experts to form complementary interdisciplinary teams with the goal of identifying drug candidates for clinical trials. In addition to support from the SLU Research Institute, research in the Meyers Lab is currently supported by five grants from the National Institutes of Health. His work has resulted in 53 peer-reviewed publications, 31 patent applications, and seven issued U.S. patents. In 2021, he was elected as a senior member of the National Academy of Inventors.

Co-Director, SLU-IDBI; Associate Professor, Edward A. Doisy Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine

Fran Sverdrup, Ph.D., is an experienced researcher focused on drug discovery in human genetics and infectious diseases. His lab performs target identification and validation, drug screening, and preclinical evaluation of drug candidates. His primary project targets facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), one of the most common forms of muscular dystrophy for which there is no treatment. His lab has identified druggable pathways that modulate the expression of the toxic DUX4 gene responsible for FSHD and is translating those findings into potential therapies — his lab is currently advancing three exciting classes of drugs that turn off DUX4 expression. Sverdrup’s project is steadily moving through animal model testing and will eventually advance to human trials. Sverdrup is also interested in anti-infective research with recent programs targeting malaria, lymphatic filariasis, and African sleeping sickness. Sverdrup maintains a network of collaborations with disease experts, medicinal chemists, and pharmaceutical/biotech companies and foundations. Sverdrup is also the director of the IDBI Discovery Services Core, including ADME/PK and LC/MS services.

Director of Business Development, SLU-IDBI; Office of the Vice President for Research (ex officio)

Jaffre Athman, Ph.D., has experience with research in both academia and the biotechnology industry. He performed graduate research on Mycobacterium tuberculosis, studying the role of bacterial vesicles in immune response and evasion at Case Western Reserve University. His postgraduate work focused on oncolytic viruses. Athman’s interest lies in the development and translation of basic research into drug discovery and preclinical development. Relying on his scientific training and scientific and research communication experience, Athman seeks out opportunities for SLU faculty and IDBI researchers to collaborate with industry partners.

Marvin Meyers Ph.D. Jaffre Athman Ph.D. Fran Sverdrup Ph.D.
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PURPOSE IN EVERY PRINT

Sell wanted to create an accessible way for additive manufacturing to connect students, researchers, and community members across disciplines.

In 2015, Andrew F. Hall, D.Sc., associate professor of biomedical engineering, was conducting research in medical imagery and robotics and needed test objects produced cheaply and quickly. Hall was attempting to optimize CT imaging protocols for a research project involving interventional radiology at Saint Louis University. At the same time, two fellow faculty members were searching for a common solution — Scott Martin, Ph.D., professor of chemistry, was working on creating small microfluidic devices for cell cultures and analysis while Scott Sell, Ph.D., professor of biomedical engineering, was developing complexly engineered tissue structures that could mimic native tissues. While each of their projects was vastly different, all utilized 3D printing — Hall, Martin, and Sell collaboratively decided there was a pressing need to advance SLU’s additive manufacturing production capabilities.

“Over time, it became an invaluable resource and several other people were doing the same thing,” Hall said. “We had the idea that if it benefits us, why wouldn’t it benefit everyone?”

The Saint Louis University Center for Additive Manufacturing (SLU CAM) was born from this collaborative idea and has kept the spirit of service firmly at its core. Founders Hall, Martin, and

Now, SLU CAM prints solutions for everything from day-to-day frustrations to large-scale issues, with the end goal of making lives a little simpler. Whether an individual is part of the University, working with an external organization, or simply looking to explore the capabilities of additive manufacturing, the Center empowers them to realize new concepts through 3D printing.

“People may have some idea or dream about something they want to build,’’ Hall said. “It could be engineeringrelated, it could be art, or it could be any category. With the Center, you don’t have to know or do anything. All you need is your idea.”

Hall believes that SLU CAM stands apart from other 3D printing entities because it provides access to people rather than just machines. The Center offers a direct line of communication with students and faculty members proficient in all facets of computer-aided design and additive manufacturing. Rather than simply handing them a

design, SLU CAM will work with each visitor to design, print, and adjust ideas as needed. Currently, anyone from the public is welcome to visit the Center, learn from those who work there, and bring their ideas to life — no extensive expertise is required.

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“Our mission is to bring the benefits of additive manufacturing to everybody that needs it,” Hall said. “That’s why we’re really focused on the research community, but also open to the public.”
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Andy Hall, D.Sc., works with a student to build a model using a medical robotic arm in the School of Science and Engineering’s Robotics Lab.

PROJECT Spotlights

A primary goal of SLU CAM is lowering the threshold of additive manufacturing and empowering people of all experience levels to explore their creative vision. The Center opens the door for numerous rewarding interactions between SLU researchers and the general public.

Restoring a Piece of History

Brittney Hearn, owner of Britt Design and SLU alumna, specializes in historic renovations — yet she could not find a business to replace the corbels on the exterior of her 100-year-old home. Corbels, or decorative pieces of plaster, are often costly to repair and may require highly specialized workers. Hearn needed an affordable, long-lasting, and aesthetically pleasing solution for this unique home repair.

John Hearn, M.D., a SLU alumnus, directed his wife to SLU CAM after hearing about additive manufacturing capabilities at the University. Hall said that workers at SLU CAM optically scanned the pieces of plaster, created a 3D model, and printed nearly 20 parts to attach to the exterior cornices of the home.

Hall pointed out that this example shows how external individuals can bring an idea to the Center and explore how to make it a reality. By using additive manufacturing as an alternative to repair, they restored the outward appearance of the couple’s house for only a fraction of the anticipated cost.

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“They were able to take those and paint them and put them back in,” Hall said. “From 20 feet or 40 feet away, when you’re looking at the roof of the house, they look like the originals.”
A minimally damaged corbel (left) was 3D scanned and digitally repaired using computer-aided design tools to produce a digital replica, from which 18 copies were printed (right).

Supporting Startups

Hall noted an uptick in the number of startups working with SLU CAM. One such company is Mochtech, a disabled veteran-owned health care startup based in St. Louis. Mochtech worked with SLU CAM representatives to design and build parts for their Multi-Insertion Training System, a device enabling nurses and military personnel to practice how to insert an IV and learn lifesaving techniques.

Robb Mourton, the founder of Mochtech, shared that working with the Center was simple. Mourton expressed that they wanted to remain cost-conscious as a small startup, but still wanted to create the best product possible. Wesley Mourton, Robb’s son and the COO of Mochtech, directed the company toward SLU CAM because of its flexibility as well as its budgetfriendly nature. Robb Mourton was quickly impressed by the experts he interacted with.

“They wanted to make sure my vision became a physical representation,” Mourton said. “They use engineering minds while I’m a creative mind.”

Though Mochtech was unfamiliar with additive manufacturing in the beginning, Hall and his team created a collaborative environment during each stage of development. They held frequent face-to-face meetings with Mourton to brainstorm, review the designs, and set goals to strive toward.

“It’s a very easy relationship, but it’s also professional,” Mourton said. “They have the ability to engage in conversation and work past unknowns.”

Hall and other members of SLU CAM helped Mourton identify the best materials to use and craft multiple iterations so they left with a fleshedout product that fit their needs. Hall expressed that participating in the development process before commercialization was rewarding for the SLU CAM team.

Aiding Medical Practice

On the SLU side of its service, the Center fosters interdisciplinary collaboration. In one such project, SLU CAM helped vascular surgeons explore a new 3D-printed tool that would be invisible to X-ray, and therefore, not block the surgeon’s view of the patient during surgery. The surgeons came in with the original idea, then SLU CAM’s students and lead engineers later produced design concepts.

“They didn’t come to us with a design that was ready to print,” Hall said. “They came to us with an idea.”

Together, they have gone through multiple prototypes for the tool, which they expect to reach clinical evaluation in 2023. Hall believes the back-andforth interaction adds to the beauty of the Center — ideas become realized by personally working with experts in 3D printing.

“If you need to see a couple of iterations, want to talk to someone about optimizing a design, or don’t know how to make a design and just know what you want — these are one of the many instances where you can come to see us,” Hall said.

SLU CAM also worked with surgeons to utilize scans of patient-specific aortas and print replicas to help train surgeons before entering the operating room. With both of these projects, SLU CAM team members worked with the surgeons to learn the requirements of the project, then walked the medical professionals through the additive manufacturing process and brought their ideas to life.

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“We started with very early prototypes and took them all the way into early production,” Hall said. “To take a company from an idea to early commercialization is something we’re pretty proud of.”

EQUIPMENT AND Expertise

SLU CAM currently houses two state-of-the-art industrial 3D printers — an FDM printer capable of printing a wide variety of materials and a PolyJet printer capable of printing different colors and durometers within the same object. Hall believes the inherent value of SLU CAM is that it provides access to expensive machines without personal investment.

However, SLU CAM also provides access to experts — the Center is staffed with a full-time engineer and a team of student workers. Together, they promote an open-door policy so that students, researchers, and community members can come in and chat about their ideas at any time. Hall emphasized that this adds to the value of the Center — the machines at the Center are full of nuances an expert can help you navigate.

“These are pretty serious machines that are very reliable, but they require somebody to run them that has a lot of education and training,” Hall said.

“You don’t have to invest in a machine — you don’t have to learn a bunch of stuff about a machine,” Hall said.
“All you have to do is show up with your idea and we can work with you to demonstrate the value of 3D printing for your organization, lab project, or students.”
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Michael Borovik, SLU CAM lead engineer, and Vicky Karamouzi, SLU CAM engineering student employee, discuss the construction of a 3D printer.

BUILDING Student Opportunities

Over the past year, SLU CAM has progressed in both expertise and proficiency. The Center has established a predictable cost structure for all those who use its service.

“The students work and collaborate with our customers,” Hall said. “They also get involved in talking to the customer, trying to understand what they want, working through iterations of the prototype, and even trying to understand the billing.”

As they move forward, Hall said that there is a hope to continue expanding educational opportunities with additive manufacturing. One such effort is the Saint Louis University 3D Printing Summer Camp. While there was only one session for students in the summer of 2022, the Center previously hosted a teacher camp in 2021.

“This is the second summer that we’ve done workshops,” Hall said. “Last summer we did a teacher workshop and this summer we hosted a student workshop.”

Participants had the opportunity to learn the basics of 3D printing, navigate how to use the machinery, and build a functioning 3D printer to take home. The hope was to instill a lifelong interest in additive manufacturing early on and encourage educators to implement 3D printing lessons in their classrooms.

“I think our educational programs are one of the things that we’re particularly proud of,” Hall said.

Hall believes that working with these machines provides a unique educational opportunity for students of all ages

The Center takes pride in actively creating students with a competitive edge, one that he would compare to speaking another language or having a superpower. Speaking on the growth of his own students, Hall expressed that he is proud of how far they have come.

Andy Hall, D.Sc., works with a student to build a biomedical model in the School of Science and Engineering’s Robotics Lab.
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“Through our student employees, we’ve made several 3D printing experts,” Hall said. “We’re now up to half a dozen — these are people who have spent a year becoming better at computer design and learning the details of 3D printing.

THE Bigger Picture

Over the next few years, Hall hopes to diversify the capacity of SLU CAM. The printers currently only produce plastic parts — while they are useful in prototyping, he hopes the Center will soon begin incorporating additional materials into their printing processes.

“Everything we do now is printing various types of plastics and polymers,” Hall said. “Our technology goal is to grow into metal printing.”

With added funding from the University and continued donor support, Hall believes that SLU CAM has the capacity to establish long-term partnerships with manufacturing entities around St. Louis. Notably, the St. Louis Regional Advanced Manufacturing Innovation Center (AMICSTL), an organization created to establish an advanced manufacturing sector in the region, tapped Saint Louis University to co-lead research and development — opening the door for SLU CAM’s involvement in the near future.

As SLU CAM broadens its horizons for future industry involvement and community outreach, Hall hopes to ultimately dispel the idea that 3D printing is an exclusive endeavor. Rather than buying your own printer, SLU CAM provides access to expensive resources without the commitment.

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“A lot of people think the threshold to start using 3D printing is very high,” Hall said. “While it does take time and money, partnering with SLU CAM can help you understand before you commit.”

AS SLU CAM BROADENS ITS HORIZONS FOR FUTURE INDUSTRY INVOLVEMENT AND COMMUNITY OUTREACH, HALL HOPES TO ULTIMATELY DISPEL THE IDEA THAT 3D PRINTING IS AN EXCLUSIVE ENDEAVOR.

Scott Martin, Ph.D., works on the fine details of a printed model with a PolyJet printer.
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Experts IN THE FIELD

D.Sc.

Co-Founder and Director, SLU CAM; Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering Adjunct Associate Professor, Radiology, School of Science and Engineering

Andrew F. Hall, D.Sc., is an associate professor of biomedical engineering in the School of Science and Engineering and the director of SLU CAM. He has been at Saint Louis University since 2014. Prior to joining SLU, Hall held R&D management positions at Siemens Medical Solutions and Stereotaxis, a local startup. His research interests include 3D printing in medicine, medical imaging for vascular and interventional radiology applications, and image-guided robotic spine surgery. Hall teaches courses in signal processing, medical imaging, medical robotics, and engineering entrepreneurship. He has been a MEDLaunch adviser (SLU medical entrepreneurship program) since 2015. Hall is a native, life-long resident of the St. Louis area.

Co-Founder, SLU CAM; Professor, Biomedical Engineering, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education, School of Science and Engineering

Scott A. Sell, Ph.D., is currently a professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering and the associate dean for undergraduate education in the School of Science and Engineering. Sell’s Tissue Engineering Scaffold Fabrication Lab focuses on the fabrication and evaluation of tissue engineering scaffolds capable of replicating both the form and function of the native extracellular matrix (ECM). His principal interests include the fabrication of scaffolds capable of promoting wound healing and the filling of large tissue defects, as well as orthopedic applications such as bone and intervertebral disc repair. Sell has over 90 peer-reviewed publications, with over 6,000 citations of his work, and has submitted 10 patents and invention disclosures.

Co-Founder, SLU CAM; Professor, Chemistry

R. Scott Martin is a professor of chemistry in the School of Science and Engineering at SLU. He was promoted to full professor in 2012 and served as the College of Arts and Sciences Endowed Chair in Chemistry (20112015) and Department Chair (2015-2021). He was also named recipient of the Mid-Career Award from the American Electrophoresis Society (2017) and the Graduate Mentor Award from the Saint Louis University Graduate Student Association (2011 and 2022). He has been actively involved with the journal Analytical Methods, serving as an associate editor (2013-2017) and editor-inchief (2017-present). Martin and his research group are well-established in the area of developing microchip-based cell culture models with integrated analytical schemes, with the goal of better understanding cellto-cell communication processes. He is an active researcher in the area of using 3D printing to fabricate microfluidic devices. His group is pushing the envelope by developing techniques to further decrease the feature size that can be achieved by 3D printing.

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Andrew F. Hall Scott Sell Ph.D. Scott Martin Ph.D.

TECHNOLOGY ROOTED IN HUMAN INTUITION

A Conversation With Jenna Gorlewicz, Ph.D., Director, People and Technology Horizon

Technology should be built to grow with us — yet there are sensory limitations to many modern-day technologies, including popular communication devices, educational tools, and recreational interfaces. Modern-day devices have untapped capacity to augment our senses and expand our abilities to reach beyond what we know. Jenna Gorlewicz, Ph.D., director of Saint Louis University’s People and Technology Horizon (PATH), believes we must engage in deeply integrated collaborations at the intersection of design and human interaction to capture the untapped potential of technology.

“While technology has opened up a host of new opportunities, we still feel limited or forced into awkward, unintuitive interactions,” Gorlewicz said. “PATH is about rethinking common approaches to technology design, with a specific focus on the recognition that technology is a part of a complex human ecosystem.”

PATH is an ongoing collaboration between multiple labs and institutions, established in 2020 through the Research Institutes’ Big Ideas competition. PATH researchers study human language, interaction, and (remote) communication to drive

the design and translation of nextgeneration technologies that capture, facilitate, and augment human potential. The established structure of our modern world is difficult to disconnect from, so Gorlewicz and her team work to rethink established technological structures.

“PATH’s collaborations with diverse communities, particularly those that are marginalized, are critical to reframing how we think about technologies, and the affordances and limitations they produce, in addition to rethinking new designs rooted in diverse experiences,” Gorlewicz said.

In addition to Gorlewicz, PATH’s leadership team includes Flavio Esposito, Ph.D., associate professor of computer science at Saint Louis University, and Terra Edwards, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology at the University of Chicago. Gorlewicz helms the engineering aspect of PATH while Esposito focuses on integration with computer science and Edwards focuses on the intersections with human language and interaction. Together, they utilize the intersections of their expertise to imagine new technologies rooted in human intuition that will better suit our collective needs.

“The whole idea behind PATH is that you can no longer think about technology design and human communication and interaction independently,’’ Gorlewicz said. “Technology has become embedded into our interaction fabric and multiple channels now exist with which humans can communicate with one another. We can no longer silo technology design from the underpinnings of human interaction — they are too intertwined to do so.”

Gorlewicz believes PATH’s work is deeply entrenched in SLU’s Jesuit mission. PATH’s research and outcomes benefit the greater good, reimagining technological design rooted in diverse, sensory experiences. Gorlewicz stated that PATH designs with, and not for, communities often left out of technology design. These community collaborations are critical to breaking down silos, alleviating roadblocks, and reimagining the possibilities of technology to redefine technology’s role in and impact on the human experience. She believes that, through cumulative effort, PATH innovates outdated practices and redefines them with ease of use and human connection in mind.

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“PATH moves beyond human-centered design — it’s deeper than that,” Gorlewicz said. “It’s about convergence of multiple disciplines and multiple channels of communication to capture human intuition and human capacity in technology design.”
PEOPLE AND TECHNOLOGY HORIZON
Jenna Gorlewicz, Ph.D., director of People and Technology Horizon (PATH) at SLU.

Research AREAS

PATH is characterized by research that breaks the mold of standard technological advancement. These researchers aim to alleviate frustration and limitations involved with technology to create inclusive devices that promote ease of use for all.

Wearable Haptics

Gorlewicz’s research delves into multimodal forms of information transfer, with a focus on haptic (touch) technologies as a primary mode of interaction. Gorlewicz believes many forms of modern technology neglect our sense of touch, leaving room to expand into this channel as a primary means of communication.

“Touch is another tenant of PATH that is unique,” Gorlewicz said. “We believe in multisensory, multimodal, communication — most of our technology designs today have heavily relied on visual and audio interfaces in very prescriptive ways.”

This interest has led PATH to work alongside experts in touch communication. The DeafBlind community has created a purely touchbased language, protactile. Protactile consists of taps, squeezes, and complex touch interactions as a form of communication. Gorlewicz and Edwards realized that protactile is the perfect motivation and framing for touch-based technology — PATH taps into nonverbal intuition and learns from it to shift the paradigm of design.

“What’s the design shift from an engineering perspective? It’s a shift from

designing interfaces to operate on a symbolic level, where specific feedback maps to a specific meaning, to designing interfaces to operate on a semiotic level, where the sequences of touch maps to core functions of communication,” Gorlewicz said.

With support from the National Science Foundation, PATH researchers embraced this shift to design a wearable haptic sleeve to bring touch into remote communications. The sleeve is capable of relaying the core functions of communication through taps, presses, and squeezes. The three-year project received nearly $200,000 in funding since its launch in 2020 — it has since inspired several other long-lasting

collaborations related to touch-based communication technologies.

“Terra Edwards, one of PATH’s founding members, has studied the evolution of this protactile language for over a decade,” Gorlewicz said. “Her deep expertise, rooted in linguistic anthropology, along with Dr. Esposito’s expertise in networking was pivotal to our success.”

In addition to this grant, Esposito received another two-year NSF grant in 2021. The grant allotted $500,000 to experiment how next-generation wireless networks can support remote telecommunication of wearable and other devices within the internet of things.

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U.S. Director of National Intelligence Avril Haines, center, watches a demonstration of a haptic wearable device with Bryan MacGavin, left, and CHROME Lab director Jenna Gorlewicz, right, during a tour of the ISE Building in connection with a recently announced grant SLU received from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence.

Recreational Capabilities

Technology goes beyond pure communication — it may also be used for recreation. In Gorlewicz’s lab, Seyoon Choi, a SLU undergraduate student researcher with a degenerative retinal condition, is working alongside SLU graduate student Colton Doherty to develop an adapted hockey puck for the blind. The current hockey puck for blind ice hockey is about double the size of the standard hockey puck and contains eight ball bearings, which rattle upon movement. This auditory feedback enables blind ice hockey players to play the same fast-paced game but through sound instead of sight. Gorlewicz and

her team partnered with the Lighthouse for the Blind St. Louis and the St. Louis Blues Blind Hockey Club to increase the durability of the current puck without sacrificing the auditory quality of the output.

“A lot of that project directly arose out of my lab, but really embodies PATH as a collaboration among many labs,” Gorlewicz said.

As a member of both the club and PATH, Choi provides firsthand feedback to further research on the acoustics of the puck. Doherty presented their cumulative findings at the 2022 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) International Workshop on Sport, Technology, and Research (STAR) in Cavalese, Italy. Reflecting on this project as well as many others, Gorlewicz emphasized that hands-on student involvement is paramount in all PATH initiatives.

Areas of Exploration

PATH’s design approach has the potential to expand to numerous other applications from “reading the room” in videoconferencing applications to supporting nonvisual navigation interfaces. Many of the devices we use daily, including phones and computers, could be augmented to move past archaic experiences and convey information through the incorporation of a broader set of senses.

“Raising our ability to route core functions of communication through touch has a tremendous opportunity to move the needle on how we think about touch-based technologies in the future,” Gorlewicz said. “It doesn’t have to stop there — this is the power of deep, integrated collaboration.”

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“One of our goals is to train students as engineers and scientists that can think and innovate in a community context — being able to engage and embed themselves within communities and across disciplinary bounds,” Gorlewicz said.
PEOPLE AND TECHNOLOGY HORIZON

STUDENT Engagement

“It’s students from varying backgrounds working together on broad, complex societal challenges,” Gorlewicz said. “The students imagine and create with community collaborators, delving into rapid design cycles while also developing deep research questions around innovations.”

PATH’s home is in the Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Building, where engineering and computer science students, along with students from psychology, regularly work together with collaborators on and off campus to reimagine technology. They engage in projects that will produce technology in inclusive learning settings, remote communication settings, medical settings, and beyond.

PATH also aims to expand student opportunities in the form of hands-on community experiences. Gorlewicz recalled accompanying a graduate student to stay in a DeafBlind house for a weekend. They were not allowed to use their phones or speak — instead, they immersed themselves in protactile communication, which informed their future research efforts firsthand. Gorlewicz said she hopes to share similar experiences with future students in the years ahead.

“The experience really shaped that particular grad student’s motivation and view of their research,” Gorlewicz said. “It’s as much about the technical training as it is about the community context.”

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At PATH, students are provided with the opportunity to embed themselves in research. Gorlewicz expressed pride in attracting students from all levels, including students in undergraduate programs, graduate programs, high school, and occasionally, middle school.
“It’s students from varying backgrounds working together on broad, complex societal challenges,” Gorlewicz said. “The students imagine and create with community collaborators, delving into rapid design cycles while also developing deep research questions around innovations.”
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A student works in the CHROME Lab in the School of Science and Engineering.

FORGING Forward

Gorlewicz reflected upon the growth PATH has experienced now that it has established its footing with formal branding and strategic planning. According to her, the goal moving forward is to build the core PATH team, secure externally funded research projects, and expand PATH’s network of partners.

“Our tangible goal for the next year is to grow PATH and our team,” Gorlewicz said. “That growth internally will also be paralleled with growth externally.”

Their first step is creating a multiinstitutional network for PATH. This effort will begin with an external workshop within the next year — PATH plans to welcome 10-15 researchers to present their findings, share ideas, and establish collaborations in an in-person group setting.

“The goal of this workshop will be to bring together researchers in engineering, computer science, and anthropology to build out PATH’s collaborative network and deeply integrated partnerships,” Gorlewicz said.

With continued support, PATH hopes to launch a fellows program that will promote more foundational experiences alongside traditional forms of education. The hope is that PATH will inspire the next generation of researchers through embedded community experiences intertwined with a technical, research training curriculum. Through firsthand understanding, students and researchers will uncover new approaches to technology design to augment human capabilities.

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“Our tangible goal for the next year is to grow PATH and our team,” Gorlewicz said. “That growth internally will also be paralleled with growth externally.”

THE HOPE IS THAT PATH AT SLU WILL INSPIRE THE NEXT GENERATION OF RESEARCHERS THROUGH EMBEDDED COMMUNITY EXPERIENCES INTERTWINED WITH A TECHNICAL, RESEARCH TRAINING CURRICULUM.

PEOPLE AND TECHNOLOGY HORIZON
Flavio Esposito, Ph.D., assists students in the PATH Lab.
A student works in the CHROME Lab in the School of Science and Engineering.

Experts IN THE FIELD

Director, PATH; Associate Dean of Research and Innovation, School of Science and Engineering

Jenna Gorlewicz directs the Collaborative Haptics, Robotics, and Mechatronics (CHROME) Lab at Saint Louis University. Her research interests are in human-centered design, haptic and multimodal interfaces, robotics, medical devices, engineering education, and entrepreneurship. Her current research projects include a protactileinspired wearable haptic sleeve; multimodal digital graphics for accessibility; smart, tangible learning manipulatives; social connectedness in telerobotics; wearable medical devices; and a hockey puck for the blind. She is co-leading a new initiative at SLU centered around people and technology, synergizing engineering, computer science, and anthropology to rethink technology design. Gorlewicz received the National Science Foundation CAREER award in 2019 and was named a Saint Louis University Research Institute Fellow in 2022. She is also co-founder of an educational technology company, Vital, focused on bridging the digital graphics accessibility gap in STEM education. Her passion for research and innovation has led her into administrative roles as associate dean in the School of Science and Engineering and special assistant to the vice president for research at SLU, which she began in 2022.

Co-Founder, PATH; Associate Professor, Computer Science, School of Science and Engineering

Flavio Esposito’s research centers on the intersection of networked systems and artificial intelligence. His recently funded research projects include edge computing, machine learning for (wireless) network management, web technologies for interdisciplinary applications, computer security, and big data management. He is the recipient of several National Science Foundation awards and the Comcast Innovation Award in 2021.

Co-Founder, PATH; Assistant Professor, Comparative Human Development, University of Chicago Division of the Social Sciences

Terra Edwards’ research is concerned with the many ways that language reflects and is shaped by our experiences in the world. For the past 10 years, she has been pursuing this interest in DeafBlind communities in the United States, which has developed a new tactile-based communication system. She has published articles on language emergence, rechanneling language, sign-creation, and intention-attribution. Edwards is currently writing a book about language and life in DeafBlind communities, titled “Going Tactile: Life at the Limits of Language.”

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Jenna Gorlewicz Ph.D. Terra Edwards Ph.D. Flavio Esposito Ph.D.

THE NUANCES OF PUBLIC OPINION

A Conversation With Steven Rogers, Ph.D., Director of SLU/YouGov Poll

said. “Additionally, we ask how they feel the economy is going, what they think of schools, and what they think of different issues.”

The United States is an ever-changing landscape of voter opinions. Priorities differ by state, locality, and even time — it takes continual analysis to determine what constituents want. When data is unavailable, politicians may fail to enact decisions that reflect the region they represent. Steven Rogers, Ph.D., director of the SLU/ YouGov Poll and associate professor of political science at Saint Louis University, shared that a failure of policy to mirror community needs creates new opportunities for political analysis.

“Policymakers are not always doing necessarily what voters want them to do,” Rogers said. “Not that the voters are always right, but the gap between policy and opinion does create questions.”

The SLU/YouGov Poll is a nonpartisan poll that explores the divide between policy and points of view. The academic institution provides Missouri voters and policymakers with an assessment of statewide public opinion. Researchers create polls with differing focuses to provide broad insight into the political issues facing the state of Missouri. The SLU/YouGov Poll typically consists of two polls in election years and one poll in non-election years.

“We ask a standard battery of questions on each poll, such as what do people think of a governor, their senators, Congress, and the president,” Rogers

The organization establishes a foundation of analysis, gauging everything from opinions on specific legislators, hot-button issues, and overarching priorities. The polls empower researchers to track changes in perception over time, whether looking at yearly changes or analyzing trends. Notably, the SLU/YouGov Poll has already discovered a shift in statewide priorities.

Those who conduct the SLU/YouGov Poll take pride in being accessible to all Missourians. The poll results are published online shortly after SLU faculty members receive them from their pollster platform, YouGov, and make them available in three different formats. Rogers stated that the SLU/ YouGov Poll stands apart from other statewide polls as they place transparency at the forefront of all they do rather than profit or publicity.

“Some polls are going to be behind paywall subscriptions or they are only releasing one top-line result or their methodology is really opaque,” Rogers said. “With our methodology, we release all that we’re doing and seeing.”

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“In 2020, people were saying health care was a top priority, but now people are saying the economy,” Rogers said. “I was able to make that comparison just in a two-to-three year window.”
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Steven Rogers, Ph.D., speaks at the 2020 election watch parties hosted by SLU’s Department of Political Science.

Research AREAS

The SLU/YouGov Poll methodically creates polls that apply to pertinent issues in the state of Missouri. These polls are planned months in advance and distributed to hundreds of Missourians through the YouGov platform. Over the past year, the SLU/YouGov Poll conducted two separate surveys — one in August 2022 and another in February 2023. Some topics covered included perceptions on the 2022 U.S. Senate Election, Missouri political actors, abortion policy, and other issues important to Missouri voters.

The Political Landscape

Rogers expressed that the poll results provide a view of Missourian approvals and disapproval rates for various political figures over time. The August 2022 SLU/YouGov Poll interviewed Missouri voters on Missouri’s 2022 U.S. Senate race and other pressing political issues throughout the state. Recent polls have included questions on President Joe Biden, Governor Mike Parson, Senator Roy Blunt, Senator Josh Hawley, the U.S. Supreme Court, U.S. Congress, and the Missouri State Legislature.

The in-depth, full results show opinions often vary with intersections of demographics such as gender, race, education level, and socioeconomic status. The SLU/YouGov Poll team translates key findings such as

comparative preferences of men and women into charts and other graphics to make them easy to digest. Rogers said that each poll’s clarity falls in line with SLU’s overarching Jesuit mission.

“Part of the Jesuit mission is just kind of seeking knowledge or providing truth,” Rogers said. “Here, what the SLU/ YouGov Poll does is provide our best estimates of the truth.”

After surveying the public, SLU researchers also create estimates of what will occur in an election. For example, the August 2022 poll identified a public preference for Eric Schmitt in Missouri’s U.S. Senate race two months before election day. In an in-depth analysis of the U.S. Senate race, Kenneth Warren, Ph.D., associate director of the SLU/ YouGov Poll and professor of political

science, examined overall voting intent for the general election candidates. Rogers believes that the results shone a positive spotlight on the SLU/YouGov Poll and its researchers for its timely analysis of the race.

“We were the first ones to give an estimate on the U.S. Senate race between Eric Schmitt and Trudy Busch Valentine,” Rogers said. “We were the first ones out on that, so we helped shape the conversation there.”

Details in Divisive Issues

Missouri has been considered a fairly conservative state throughout history, but public opinion is not always black and white. The SLU/YouGov Poll reveals the nuances involved in hotbutton topics and policies each year.

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For example, after the Supreme Court repealed Roe v. Wade on June 24, 2022, Missouri was the first state to place a total ban on abortion with no exceptions for rape, incest, or health complications. In response, the SLU/YouGov Poll coordinators surveyed the Missouri population on the decision. The results displayed that a majority of Missourians disagree with the severity of the law — many constituents want exceptions to be incorporated.

The August 2022 poll waged questions regarding abortion in multiple contexts and aggregated the approval rates for different scenarios. Rogers expressed that even the small details of public opinion are worth considering in policy decisions if a politician hopes to reflect the group.

Education Policies

The SLU/YouGov Poll bolsters its work by collaborating with other entities across the University. Rogers shared that the SLU/YouGov Poll builds off a strong partnership with the School of Education, particularly the Policy Research in Missouri Education (PRiME) Center. Teams associated with the PRiME Center and the SLU/ YouGov Poll coordinate research resources, enabling them to grow past the initial funding provided by the SLU Research Institute.

“They’ve added us to one of their main grants in terms of renewals,” Rogers said. “Now we have funding for polls for most of the next three years.”

The collaboration empowers researchers to identify nonpartisan questions that delve into the needs of citizens and the consequences of state legislation. Notably, the PRiME Center helped the SLU/YouGov Poll identify teacher salaries as a leading area of concern among constituents. Missouri law previously provided a one-time grant to boost starting teacher salaries up to $38,000. However, this grant raised the expectations for teacher salaries in Missouri while failing to address longterm implications.

“The school districts are on the hook for a salary later after that, which creates complications,” Rogers said.

Through one of their polls, researchers found that the majority of Missouri voters want the starting teacher salary to be permanently increased. This discovery makes it clear that there is a need to create financial security for new teachers and fill the gap left by previous legislation. Researchers hope that by making this information publicly available, they may guide policymakers to focus on addressing these primary issues before moving on to other areas of concern in legislative sessions.

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A student prepares for Election Day at a SLU voter registration table.
“Seventy-five percent of Missourians believe that abortion should be allowed in cases of rape, incest, or the life of the mother being endangered,” Rogers said. “This provides some insights into the nuances in these different policy issues.”
SLU/YOUGOV POLL

ENGAGING WITH the Region

Rogers shared that community media outlets turned to the SLU/YouGov Poll as a reliable resource for real-time data and survey results. The SLU/YouGov Poll results on abortion laws led to front-page headlines in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the Kansas City Star, and the Springfield News-Leader. With each passing year, the SLU/YouGov Poll solidifies relationships with prominent news resources through press releases, interviews, and pre-release data access.

“Media-wise, we release all the results and everyone does write-ups online alongside multiple press releases — education and political press releases are spread throughout the media cycle,” Rogers said.

He explained that the coordinators of the SLU/YouGov Poll make agreements

with some publications before the release of the poll results. Rogers himself interviews with reporters to condense the results into a readable format, keeping University research visible while simultaneously ensuring Missourians are aware of the resource at their disposal.

“Media-wise, we release all the results and everyone does writeups online alongside multiple press releases — education and political press releases are spread throughout the media cycle,” Rogers said.
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SLU students promote voter registration prior to the 2020 election.

Enhancing EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES

Rogers also sees the importance of drawing attention to data on a smaller scale. In his research methods course, Rogers brings some SLU/YouGov Poll data into the classroom so students can attach numbers to the real world. The hope is that the overlap will engage students in data analysis and pique their interest in policy research.

Rogers noted the Research Institute provided the SLU/YouGov Poll team with a research assistant via the Scholarly Undergraduate Research Grants and Experiences (SURGE) program. The program creates a path to connect students with faculty pursuing research, creative endeavors, or other scholarly projects at SLU. Kaitlin Klasen, a junior at Saint Louis University, was

selected as their public opinion research assistant in June 2022. She has since worked with Rogers to proofread the polls, identify high-impact questions, and write condensed content.

“She’s additionally written multiple policy memos very well. I’ve been very impressed,” Rogers said.

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“We’re still teaching them the same lessons, but ‘here, let’s analyze this data that may be a little bit more relevant to you, or you may have a little bit more of a connection to than just something that came out of a textbook’,” Rogers said.
SLU/YOUGOV POLL
Students check election results at the 2020 election watch party.

LOOKING TO the Future

Rogers established multiple goals for the SLU/YouGov Poll team moving forward. It strives to inform the public and policymakers about what voters think about key Missouri issues. Particularly, researchers stay up to date with different bills expected to be addressed and release timely results to inform that decision. He hopes that one day the SLU/YouGov Poll coordinators may consistently communicate with legislators and ease some of the discourse in our political landscape.

“It’s a very tumultuous political time — there are many big issues being addressed by our government and leaders,” Rogers said.

Researchers aim to establish the SLU/ YouGov Poll as a trusted source for impartial political opinions. They plan to expand the breadth of topics they touch on. Rogers shared they ran a few preliminary questions around critical race theory — the results shed some light on the negative connotation around the phrase and the general misunderstanding of it.

“We ran a little survey experiment where we gauged voters’ opinions about critical race theory as classified as critical race theory, but then also asked using an explanation of what critical race theory is,” Rogers said. “We found voters to be a lot more supportive of it once that polarizing phrase was removed.”

Rogers said that future polls may dive into issues like gun control and sports betting so that legislators make more informed decisions. He believes the SLU/YouGov Poll provides value by analyzing public opinion in anticipation of legislative action, rather than simply as a reaction to legislation.

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“I think what the SLU/YouGov Poll does is bring a little bit more nuanced attention to certain issues, whether it be abortion or teacher pay or guns,” Rogers said.

ROGERS BELIEVES THE SLU/YOUGOV POLL PROVIDES VALUE BY ANALYZING PUBLIC OPINION IN ANTICIPATION OF LEGISLATIVE ACTION, RATHER THAN SIMPLY AS A REACTION TO LEGISLATION.

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Steven Rogers, Ph.D., speaks on predicting presidential primary outcomes.

Experts IN THE FIELD

Ph.D.

Director, SLU/YouGov Poll; Associate Professor, Political Science, SLU College of Arts and Sciences

Steven Rogers, Ph.D., associate professor of political science, is the director of the SLU/ YouGov Poll. Rogers received his Ph.D. in politics from Princeton University. Rogers’ research focuses on elections, particularly at the state level. His in-progress book manuscript addresses the question, “Do elections hold state legislators accountable for their own performance?” Rogers’ research has appeared in top disciplinary journals such as the American Political Science Review and the American Journal of Political Science. Prior to joining Saint Louis University, Rogers was a postdoctoral fellow at Vanderbilt University, where he contributed to the Vanderbilt Poll.

Ph.D.

Associate Director, SLU/YouGov Poll; Professor, Political Science, College of Arts and Sciences

Kenneth Warren has his Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts Amherst and has over 30 years of professional polling experience as the president of The Warren Poll. Warren is the author of several publications in the area of electoral behavior and public opinion research, including “In Defense of Public Opinion Polling” (Westview, 2001), “Public Opinion Polls” (Wiley StatRef, 2014), “Public Policy Planners Be Aware: Public Opinion Poll Data Are Very Valuable for Public Policy Planners, but Data Can Prove Counterproductive if Polling Data Are Not Representative of the Opinions Sought” (Esade, 2020), and general editor and contributor of “Encyclopedia of U.S. Campaigns, Elections, and Electoral Behavior,” Vols 1 and 2 (Sage, 2008), among others.

SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022
Steven Rogers Kenneth Warren

Evan Rhinesmith earned his Ph.D. from the University of Arkansas and uses survey findings in his research to shape and inform education policy. His research focuses on educational policies intended to improve access and opportunities for students and community-engaged research. His current research focuses on postsecondary access, career and technical education, testing policies, and meta-analysis. His published works include chapters in several books, technical reports, and peer-reviewed articles. He also regularly writes policy briefs and blog posts on education policy and practice in Missouri for the PRiME Center.

Gary W. Ritter, Ph.D., is a professor and dean of the School of Education at Saint Louis University. Since taking the role as dean in 2018, Ritter has focused on growing programs that are evidence-based, academically rigorous, and of direct service to the St. Louis region. Ritter was a faculty member in education policy at the University of Arkansas from 2000 to 2018. He has published over 100 articles, books, book chapters, and working papers on topics related to teacher quality, teacher evaluation, postsecondary access for low-income students, and the implementation and evaluation of programs aimed at improving educational outcomes for low-income students.

Evan Rhinesmith Ph.D. Gary W. Ritter Ph.D. Associate Director, SLU/YouGov Poll; Director of Research and Evaluation, SLU PRiME Center
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Executive Sponsor, SLU/YouGov Poll; Professor and Dean, School of Education

TRANSFORMING TRANSLATIONAL NEUROSCIENCE

A Conversation With Daniela Salvemini, Ph.D., Director, Institute for Translational Neuroscience

Every field of science hopes to foster a fertile ground for collaboration, and the Institute for Translational Neuroscience (ITN) at Saint Louis University has made this its reality. With over 100 members across 23 departments, ITN delves into every facet of the human nervous system and how it impacts our lived experiences.

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Ultimately, the mission of the Institute is to connect all stages of research and encourage collaboration across SLU’s many other institutes. Salvemini explained the members of ITN learn from one another’s expertise, with the end goal of unlocking the mysteries of normal and abnormal nervous system function. The hope is that cumulative research will lead to translational discovery and the invention of approaches to treat nervous system disorders for all.

“The beauty is that while a lot of collaborations are internal, we add in collaborators from other institutions,” Salvemini said. “Our philosophy is that you start strong at home and build with external collaborations and external equipment.”

Pharmacology and Physiology and director of the Institute, expressed that the field of translational neuroscience is unique in its capacity to cross disciplines and encourage innovation.

Researchers within the Institute study the molecular aspects of neuroscience, create next-generation technology for drug discovery, and find new tactics for addressing neurological conditions. Salvemini believes that the Institute’s united purpose mirrors SLU’s Jesuit mission of serving humanity by bridging expertise and addressing pervasive health issues.

“We host many expertise areas under one umbrella, with researchers from each area studying problems that are common to the entire Institute,” Salvemini said.

Together, Salvemini said ITN researchers solve fundamental problems in neuroscience. Scientists and clinicians join together to develop non-opioid pain treatments, mitigate detriments to cognitive health, identify influential behavioral markers, address psychological health related to trauma and addiction, and translate basic research discoveries into clinical practice.

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“Translational neuroscience brings together people that have a common interest around the nervous system, in multiple areas ranging from biochemistry to pathology to drug discovery to new technologies, public health, law outreach, advocacy, and so forth,” Salvemini said.
WATER INSTITUTE
Daniela Salvemini, Ph.D., speaks during the fourth annual Neuroday on November 2, 2022.

Research AREAS

The nervous system is filled with mysteries, but ITN divides and conquers various pain states and neurological conditions. Each lab’s pursuits delve into unique considerations for neuroscience and open opportunities for discovery.

Understanding Neuropathic Pain

Salvemini emphasized that ITN shines through its multidisciplinary efforts across multiple labs. The Salvemini Lab pioneers research on alternative painkillers in the hopes of diverting the medical community away from the prescriptions contributing to a nationwide epidemic. Many health care circles see opioids as a “quick fix” for pain states, yet even short prescriptions often lead to addiction and even overdoses.

“My research interest is understanding the molecular mechanisms that lead to the chronicity of neuropathic pain,” Salvemini said. “My laboratory wants to understand at the molecular level, what drives the development of neuropathic pain.”

Her research interests also expand into the driving components of chronic pain, such as the use of chemotherapy and traumatic nerve injury. Though a necessary treatment for cancer patients, chemotherapy can exacerbate pain levels and cause chronic pain conditions. Salvemini and the graduate students in her lab focus on how to navigate

the effects of these treatments. These efforts are backed by immense funding — in September 2022, Salvemini and Susan Farr, Ph.D., professor in the SLU School of Medicine, received a five-year grant for $2,334,549 from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study the link between chemotherapy and cognitive impairment

“Neuropathic pain is associated with chemotherapy, which is a major problem,” Salvemini said. “It’s a major neurotoxicity — we have several projects in this area.”

This year, Salvemini joined forces with Christopher Arnatt, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, to receive a $2.8 million grant from the NIH to further her research on neuropathic pain. They will conduct a five-year study on the role of oxysterol, a derivative of cholesterol. Researchers will study this chemical compound’s role in the central nervous system, including its contribution to neuropathic pain and how to utilize it to develop non-opioid

drugs. Salvemini said research into the molecular mechanisms of pain uncovers potential tactics to ease the side effects.

“We’re also branching out now to expand and look more into the molecular mechanisms associated with the development of neuropathic pain, as well as the comorbidities associated with it, such as cognitive impairments, anxiety, and depression,” Salvemini said.

Identifying Immune Solutions

The lab of Daniel Hawiger, Ph.D., M.D., professor of molecular microbiology and immunology, focuses on the cellular mechanisms involved with the immune response and autoimmune disorders. Hawiger actively focuses on identifying a treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS) that will restore cell function and stop further tissue damage in the hopes of bettering the quality of life of MS patients. His efforts were selected for funding by the National MS Society in December 2021.

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Daniel Hawiger, M.D, Ph.D, of the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology.

Improving Neurological Therapies

The lab led by Yuna Ayala, Ph.D., associate professor of biochemistry and molecular biology, and the lab led by Andrew Nguyen, Ph.D., work in conjunction to develop RNA-based therapies that may one day improve the life expectancy of those with various neurodegenerative diseases. Salvemini believes that the work being conducted by the Ayala and Nguyen labs will leave a lasting mark on diverse health conditions.

Developing and Regenerating Biomaterials

Silviya Zustiak, Ph.D., associate professor of biomedical engineering, and her lab members focus on tissue engineering, with emphasis on developing novel biomaterials as well as new drug-screening models. Currently, the Zustiak Lab is focusing on creating new models for drug screening that closely mirror the behavior of real cell tissue, allowing researchers to explore drug interactions without testing on humans or animals.

Notably, Zustiak and fellow ITN member, Koyal Garg, Ph.D., associate professor of biomedical engineering, received a renewal grant for $403,951 from the NIH in September 2022. This twoyear grant will enable them to develop regenerative therapies for muscle loss. With the accomplishments of previously mentioned labs as only a snapshot of the Institute’s capability, Salvemini believes that ITN is a firm hub of excellence for translational neuroscience.

“As for the work done in the Institute, we have an amazing group of people doing amazing work that is increasing

our knowledge in neuroscience,” Salvemini said. “This has and will make a difference in neuroscience and our understanding of the nervous systems and its diseases.”

An Examination of Type 1 Diabetes

Gina Yosten, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, was awarded a $1,982,000 grant by the Helmsley Charitable Trust as part of a Type 1 diabetes program initiative to prevent hypoglycemia. In previous studies, Yosten determined that delta cells in the pancreas produce neuronostatin, a hormone previously discovered by Yosten and her colleague, Willis Samson, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Physiology. Neuronostatin acts locally within the pancreas to stimulate the secretion of glucagon — this suggests that neuronostatin could be a useful therapeutic target for the prevention of hypoglycemia. Yosten will continue these efforts by determining how Type 1 diabetes, and the insulin analogs used as treatment, affect the production and function of neuronostatin in isolated human islets and in human subjects.

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“Neurological diseases are going to be highly impacted by the work we are doing here at SLU,” Salvemini said.
“People need to know that.”
Members of the Zustiak Lab. From left to right: Emily Luc, Andrew Schab, Hamidreza Moheimani, Samuel Stealey, Silviya Zustiak, Ph.D., Shabnam Nejat, Rebekah Boos, Eya Ferchichi

AMPLIFYING the Institute

As director of the Institute, Salvemini aims to provide ample educational opportunities for health care providers, educators, research fellows, undergraduates, and graduate students. Events throughout the year provide channels of growth and platforms for collaborations. For students, Neuroday provides an opportunity to showcase research through oral presentations and posters, learn from prominent speakers, and receive recognition for exceptional work. This year’s student-organized event was the first to take place in person since 2019, and participation was high.

“We had 36 posters, one keynote speaker, and three lightning-talk presenters. Nearly 140 people attended from different institutions — both in St. Louis as well as in other areas of the Midwest,” Salvemini said. “It was very, very exciting to see.”

On the opposite side of the spectrum, the Annual Henry and Amelia Nasrallah Center for Neuroscience Research Symposium provides an opportunity for both students and researchers to share their ideas and expand their network. The in-person event took place on November 2, 2022, and welcomed Stuart Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Neurodegeneration New Medicines Center, Scripps Research, as the keynote speaker. His speech covered the hidden networks of specific proteins and how they contribute to synaptic damage in neurological disease. The overarching topic was chronic neuropathic pain, a condition impacting 5-20 million people in the United States. Salvemini emphasized events like these are the first step to increasing ITN’s presence within the SLU community and around the world.

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“I think the minisymposium is one area that we thought would also be very good for advocacy and outreach purposes,” Salvemini said. “We want to reach out to the foundations and the patient advocacy groups to attend those meetings so they can get the latest information.”
RESEARC H
Posters are presented during the fourth annual Neuroday on November 2, 2022.

Student INVOLVEMENT

There are about 300 undergraduate students throughout the University focusing on neuroscience. ITN provides wet-bench training opportunities for all students. ITN offers students multiple outlets to pursue fieldwork and lab experiences. Through existing collaboration with the biology and psychology departments, ITN provides students with the opportunity to learn alongside experienced researchers and engage with nervous system discovery before they leave campus.

As they pursue their research endeavors, ITN’s connections throughout the Research Institute open the door to larger platforms for networking and research discussion. Many neuroscience students participated in the inaugural Institute for Drug and Biotherapeutic Innovation (IDBI) Research Symposium.

Silvia Squillace, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow and member of the Salvemini Lab, was recognized as one of the top abstracts and presented her work.

Monica Goodland, M.D., a Ph.D. candidate in the Farr Lab, received a first-place award for the best poster in her category. Cass Dedert, a Ph.D. candidate in the Xu Lab, and Fatima Mufti, a Ph.D. candidate in the Salvemini Lab, both showcased posters at the event as well. Salvemini believes that their outstanding work is a culmination of support from the Research Institute.

“They have the ability to get hands-on experience in terms of research,” Salvemini said. “They get their ability to understand more about various aspects of the nervous system in different ways.”

“ITN has a very strong education mission that features outstanding mentoring for undergraduates, graduate and medical students, residents, and fellows,’’ Salvemini said. “It also has a number of leadership opportunities for the basic and clinical researchers.”

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Posters are presented during the fourth annual Neuroday on November 2, 2022.

THINKING Long Term

Salvemini believes that while there is no cure-all for neurological conditions, it is crucial to invest time in multiple avenues of research and discovery. ITN supports teams specializing in specific areas within neuroscience such as chronic pain, cognition, technological development, and drug discovery. Salvemini also sees publications and external funding as a strength of the Institute.

Salvemini hopes to increase advocacy and outreach efforts so neuroscience has a tangible community impact while research continues. Outreach may soon come in different forms, whether that be in inviting patient advocacy groups to ITN’s annual symposium or increasing awareness of the advancement made for certain neurological conditions.

“A long-term goal is to increase our outreach and advocacy mission by bringing in people that are involved in foundations and patient-focused groups to make them more aware about the center and what we do,” Salvemini said.

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“We want to continue submitting successful grants so we can increase our level of visibility to the outside world as a true center of excellence populated by great people, both in basic and clinical work,” Salvemini said.

AS THE OPIOID EPIDEMIC CONTINUES, OUR POPULATION GROWS OLDER, AND THE MEDICAL COMMUNITY STILL LACKS ADEQUATE TREATMENTS FOR NEUROPATHIC PAIN STATES — INVESTIGATORS WITHIN ITN WILL HAVE THEIR HANDS FULL AIDING THOSE WHO NEED IT.

Posters are presented during the fourth annual Neuroday on November 2, 2022. 143

Experts IN THE FIELD

Ph.D., FASPET

William Beaumont Professor and Chair

Director, Institute for Translational Neuroscience,

Department of Pharmacology and Physiology;

Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience;

Saint Louis University School of Medicine

Fellow, Saint Louis Academy of Science

Fellow, National Academy of Inventors

Daniela Salvemini is William Beaumont Professor and chair of the Department of Pharmacology and Physiology at Saint Louis University School of Medicine, professor of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience, and director of SLU’s Institute for Translational Neuroscience. Salvemini received her BSc in pharmacology from Kings College in London and her Ph.D. in pharmacology from the University of London under the mentorship of the late Nobel Prize winner Professor Sir John Vane. She pursued postdoctoral studies at the William Harvey Research Institute in London and the Department of Discovery Pharmacology at Monsanto in St. Louis. Before joining SLU in 2005, Salvemini spent 15 years in the private sector where she led drug discovery efforts on novel anti-inflammatory agents and analgesics. Salvemini’s research interests are understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning neuropathic pain and developing therapeutics to target these mechanisms. Her highly

translational approaches combine behavioral pharmacology, biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics, toxicology, and drug discovery. Her work led to several seminal discoveries that resulted in the development of novel therapies that entered clinical trials. She has published over 270 peer-reviewed articles and holds many U.S. patents.

Salvemini is the founder of BioIntervene Inc., which is developing first-in-class selective A3AR agonists for the treatment of chronic pain and neuroinflammatory diseases, and the founding director of the Henry and Amelia Nasrallah Center for Neuroscience at SLU. She is a board member of the United States Association for the Study of Pain. Salvemini has been honored with several awards for her basic science and translational research in pain and inflammation, including the Novartis Award in Pharmacology, the Outstanding Scientist Award from the Saint Louis Academy of Science, and the Pharmacia-ASPET Award in Experimental Therapeutics. Salvemini is a fellow of the St. Louis Academy of Science, a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, and a fellow of the American Society of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. Her research has been funded consistently by the NIH, foundations, and the private sector.

Ph.D., D.Sc., FAPS, FAHA

Executive Leadership, Institute for Translational Neuroscience; Professor and Vice Chair in Pharmacology and Physiology, School of Medicine

Rick Samson studied chemistry at Duke University through 1968, then served for four years in the U.S. Army. He returned to academia in 1974, completing his Ph.D. in physiology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School. After several years on the faculty at UTSWMC, Samson moved to the Department of Neuroscience and Anatomy at the University of Missouri as a professor. In 1992, he became the chair of physiology at the University of North Dakota Medical School. He accepted a position at SLU in 1999, where he maintains an active, federally funded laboratory focused on the discovery of novel approaches for treatment of common diseases. Samson’s goal is to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that may be targeted by novel therapeutics to either reverse the disease or lessen the severity of its comorbidities. In particular, his group seeks new approaches for the treatment of pain, Type 2 diabetes, infertility, hypertension during pregnancy, and several eating disorders. With his longtime colleague, Gina Yosten, Ph.D., Samson has discovered two novel neuropeptides and identified the receptors for five peptide hormones that are either produced in and/or act in the central and peripheral nervous system. Alongside Daniela Salvemini, Ph.D., Yosten and Samson are developing targeting approaches for the treatment of chronic pain states.

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Daniela Salvemini Willis Kendrick “Rick” Samson

Ph.D.

Executive Leadership, Institute for Translational Neuroscience; Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, School of Science and Engineering; Associate Professor of Pharmacology and Physiology, School of Medicine

Silviya Zustiak is a co-director for the Institute of Drug and Biotherapeutic Innovation and on the executive leadership committee for the Institute for Translational Neuroscience. Prior to joining SLU, she spent three years at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland. Zustiak joined the Department of Biomedical Engineering at SLU in January 2013. Zustiak’s current research merges the fields of engineering, materials science, biophysics, and biology. She focuses on hydrogel biomaterials and tissue engineering, with an emphasis on developing novel biomaterials as drug screening platforms and delivery devices for biologics, elucidating matrix structure-property relationships as well as cell-matrix interactions. Her work has yielded over 50 peer-reviewed publications, 200 presentations, and multiple patent applications.

Other accomplishments include:

• NIH Fellows Award for Research Excellence (2011)

• The Outstanding Parks Graduate Faculty Award (2015)

• The SLU Scholarly Works Award for a Junior Faculty (2017)

M.D.

Executive Leadership, Institute for Translational Neuroscience; Psychiatry, School of Medicine

George T. Grossberg is the Samuel W. Fordyce professor and director of Geriatric Psychiatry at the Saint Louis University School of Medicine. Grossberg is a leader in developing mental health programs and in treatment and research in geriatrics. Notably, he started the first geriatric psychiatry program in Missouri and the first Alzheimer’s Disease Community Brain Bank. He is a consultant in protocol development for central nervous system disorders in older patients. Grossberg is involved in basic as well as clinical research projects regarding dementing disorders, particularly behavioral disturbances in Alzheimer’s disease. His work has been featured in numerous national publications, including USA Today and The New York Times.

Other accomplishments include:

• Former president of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry as well as the International Psychogeriatric Association (IPA)

• Author and editor of 15 books and 500+ published works

• Recipient of the Missouri Adult Day Care Association Outstanding Physician Award and the FleishmanHillard Award

Executive Leadership, Institute for Translational Neuroscience; Professor of Biology, Director of Neuroscience Program, College of Arts and Sciences

Judith Mosinger Ogilvie serves on the executive leadership committee for the Institute for Translational Neuroscience and is co-director of the interdisciplinary neuroscience program. After receiving her Ph.D. from Harvard University, she continued her research at Washington University in St. Louis and the Central Institute for the Deaf before joining the Department of Biology at Saint Louis University in 2004. The Ogilvie Lab takes a multidisciplinary approach to better understand the structure, development, and degeneration of the vertebrate retina with two major areas of focus. Investigations of primate retinal circuitry address fundamental questions of how the neurons in the retina enable us to interpret the complex visual world around us. Additional research efforts focus on understanding the molecular cascade of events required for the development and differentiation of healthy retinal neurons and unraveling how defects in this cascade can lead to blindness. Her vision research has produced over 50 peer-reviewed publications and 70 presentations. Ogilvie also has a long-standing interest in science education, having mentored nearly 50 graduate and undergraduate students in her research lab and publishing more than a dozen articles on science pedagogy.

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Silviya Zustiak Judith Mosinger Ogilvie Ph.D. George Grossberg
INSTITUTE FOR TRANSLATIONAL NEUROSCIENCE

RELIGION AT THE NEXUS OF CULTURE

A Conversation With Mary Dunn, Ph.D., Director, Center for Research on Global Catholicism

With over 2 billion adherents, Christianity is presently the world’s most populous religion. Despite its overarching popularity, each sect of Christianity is in a state of perpetual change as it adapts to the surrounding world and the people who adopt it. However, research often fails to consider the complex interactions between religion and culture and the ways in which beliefs and practices change, adapt and respond to context. Belief structures change within the environment and interact with culture to inspire creation.

Mary Dunn, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of Theological Studies and director of the new Center for Research on Global Catholicism (CRGC) at Saint Louis University, emphasized the importance of examining religion from a different lens. While countless research centers study Christianity, the CRGC is a one-of-akind consortium of scholars dedicated to probing the intersections of Catholicism and culture in a global context.

The CRGC aims to stimulate and support scholarship that examines Catholicism in particular. Dunn shared that the CRGC is invested in challenging the idea that Catholicism spread from its origin in Rome and Catholicism worldwide is simply the reception of the Roman model. The CRGC takes a “decentered” approach to questions of global Catholicism, looking at how beliefs and practices shape and are shaped by cultural complexities in discrete times and places.

“We are interested particularly in the surprising reroutings, encounters, and creative diffusions of Catholicism that unsettled the narrative we’ve worked with for so long,” Dunn said.

At its core, the Center supports research on Catholicism at the nexus of global cultures. Art, history, medicine, culture, and many other facets impact established belief structures and inform our understanding of religion. Dunn emphasized that their primary method of impact is active discussion — the Center crosses disciplines to engage scholars with events and coursework revolving around global Catholicism.

“As we conceive it, research on global Catholicism means bringing together historians, theologians, art historians, scholars of religion, and other humanists — even colleagues in the social sciences and professions schools — to build a more complex picture of religion on the ground,” Dunn said.

Although only in its inaugural year of operation, the CRGC has already created multiple avenues for academic inquiry. The Center hopes to engage the SLU community and beyond in rigorous academic inquiry for years to come.

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“Our focus is global Catholicism at the nexus of culture,” Dunn said. “We’re interested in the ways and means by which Catholicism has migrated across the globe to become a worldwide religion.”
Mary Dunn, Ph.D., director, Center for Research on Global Catholicism, associate professor of theological studies, College of Arts and Sciences.

A YEAR OF Building

Over the past two years, the Center for Research on Global Catholicism has built a strong intellectual community at SLU, bringing together scholars for research and collaboration. With its official launch in the 2022 fall semester, the Center has moved forward with a robust slate of lectures, talks, and book discussions.

The Annual Lecture

While the CRGC leadership team has sponsored events since 2020, the Center officially began hosting events under the CRGC umbrella in 2022. Dunn shared that the Center hosted its first annual lecture on September 29, 2022. The event was titled “Refugee Trauma and the Ambiguities of Miracles: A Historical Case Study of the Flying House of Loreto.” Karin Vélez, Ph.D., associate professor in the history department at Macalester College and author of “The Miraculous Flying House of Loreto: Spreading Catholicism in the Early Modern World,” delivered the lecture, which was followed by a lively discussion afterward.

Vélez spoke about the history behind the House of Loreto — the house where Mary, the mother of Jesus, is believed to have resided. Many Catholics believe the house was flown from Nazareth to Italy in the 1290s by angels — as a result, modern individuals travel hundreds of miles to visit the holy house that remains preserved in a basilica. The lecture considered how the lived experience of refugees fleeing war zones is central to the history of devotion

around the House of Loreto and its diffusion throughout the 18th century. Dunn expressed excitement about the event and its implications for the Center’s future.

“It couldn’t have gone any better,” Dunn said. “I think it was a great way of officially launching the Center and showing to people that this is what we do.”

Dunn stated that this initial event was open to students, scholars, faculty members, and even members of the public. The lecture ultimately provided insight that may inform a general understanding of coming events. Refugee crises continue to shape the modern world — the interpretations of the flying house may reveal how groups, cultures, and generations process the survival of disaster through religious outlets.

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Karin Vélez delivering the annual lecture at SLU’s Pere Marquette Gallery.

The Inaugural Book Symposium

Dunn noted that the Center hosted its inaugural book symposium on October 21, 2022. The event revolved around “The Church of the Dead: The Epidemic of 1576 and the Birth of Christianity in the Americas” by Jennifer Scheper Hughes,

of California, Riverside. CRGC’s executive committee collectively read the book earlier in the year and came to a group consensus that the content was valuable to the greater community.

Hughes’ book describes a counter-history of Christian origins in the Americas. Through accounts of the work of Spanish missionaries and the conditions arising from the 1576 pandemic, Hughes explains how Indigenous survivors rebuilt Catholic structures and reframed their belief systems amid tragedy.

The symposium featured a keynote speech from the author, as well as commentary from respondents Paul Ramirez, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of History at Northwestern University, and Nathan Millett, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of History at Saint Louis University. Faculty members, SLU students, and members of the public all attended the event. Dunn expressed pride in their ability to create spaces for academic conversation around Catholicism.

The next book symposium will occur in the 2023 spring semester. The second event will invite John McGreevy, Ph.D., Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame, to discuss his book “Catholicism: A Global History from the French Revolution to Pope Francis.”

professor in the Department of History at the University

“This book was a great illustration of the nexus of Catholicism and culture,” Dunn said. “It’s a book that focuses on the missions to New Spain, but then looks at the influence of disease on the landscape and the Indigenous people.”

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“The author is so generous and scholarly, and the book itself is pretty fantastic,” Dunn said. “Being able to bring scholarship like this to SLU is very rewarding.”

Leadership and Coursework

In addition to Dunn, three SLU faculty members make up CRGC’s executive board — Cathleen Fleck, Ph.D., associate professor of art history; Kate Moran, Ph.D., associate professor in the Department of American Studies; and Charles H. Parker, Ph.D., professor in the Department of History. Dunn shared that they also acquired a new administrative assistant to further streamline events in the coming years.

“That was really an open, missing piece for us,” Dunn said. “There’s a lot of behind-the-scenes work in terms of applying for grants, securing spaces, paying stipends to the visiting scholars, and arranging the itinerary.”

The Center is currently developing two courses for Saint Louis University students: an undergraduate Ignite Seminar and an interdisciplinary graduate seminar on global Catholicism. Dunn hopes that, through these efforts, CRGC members will encourage students to explore and examine the complexities of Catholicism in the world.

“We are looking forward to continuing the programming we did this year in future years, but also building our pedagogical imprint,” Dunn said.

Dunn emphasized the Center is a scholarly entity. The ambitions of the CRGC are to stimulate and support intellectual engagement with the broad topic of global Catholicism. The CRGC is committed to creative, unfettered scholarly inquiry that will make Saint Louis University a destination for research on global Catholicism.

Published Perspectives

Dunn noted that many faculty members involved with the CRGC released publications within the last year. Dunn herself published a book titled “Where Paralytics Walk and the Blind See: Stories of Sickness and Disability at the Juncture of Worlds.” This account explores the case of early modern Catholic Canada under French rule. Through careful examinations of the primary sources, Dunn reveals it to be a period rich with alternative understandings of infirmity, disease, and death — ultimately, she provides a counter-narrative to our modern assumptions on the meanings of sickness and disability.

“My book engages the encounters between the Indigenous people of northeastern North America and the Jesuit missionaries, as well as female religious orders,” Dunn said.

Fleck also published a book this year titled “Reimagining Jerusalem’s Architectural Identities in the Later Middle Ages.” In this book, Fleck examines how architecture came to be an outlet for religious expression. European Catholic crusaders, Eastern Christian sects, and diverse Muslim factions all used architecture in one way or another to showcase their interpretations of the holy city’s sanctity and influence. Dunn expressed that Fleck’s work demonstrates how Catholicism may be examined through multiple, even non-textual perspectives.

“Her book is a great example of global Catholicism from the perspective of an art historian,” Dunn said.

Faculty members have also engaged questions of global religion from different angles. Parker published a book titled “Global Calvinism: Conversion and Commerce in the Dutch Empire, 1600-1800.” This publication examines Calvinism during the 17th and 18th

centuries and the connection between Calvinist missions and Dutch imperial expansion.

These artifacts are called “billets” and would have been attached to foundlings abandoned at the Hôtel-Dieu in Quebec in the early 18th century. These are material objects that Mary Dunn has been working with in connection to her monograph project.

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“That was really an open, missing piece for us,” Dunn said. “There’s a lot of behind-the-scenes work in terms of applying for grants, securing spaces, paying stipends to the visiting scholars, and arranging the itinerary.”

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LOOKING TO the Future

As she looks past the Center’s first year, Dunn has her eyes set on building partnerships across disciplines and entities. Externally, the Charles and Margaret Hall Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism at the University of Notre Dame and the John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics at Washington University in St. Louis provide inspiring models for research, outreach, and collaboration.

“Both of those have been great conversation partners and great to learn from,” Dunn said.

Dunn also hopes to expand the reach and impact of the CRGC within Saint Louis University. She envisions collaborations emerging with researchers and scholars in Asian and Middle Eastern studies, science, digital humanities, and law. Another goal of the Center is to eventually create two postdoctoral positions and research awards for incorporated faculty members.

As they continue their programming, Dunn hopes community members will engage with the work of the CRGC and help fill out the picture of what scholarship on global Catholicism might look like in the 21st century. The CRGC furthers the ethos of the Jesuit mission by emphasizing the encounter between Catholicism and culture that has been so vital to the order’s history.

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“People are continuing to think in creative ways about Catholicism — there are an infinitude of ways to narrate the story of Catholicism’s worldwide diffusion,” Dunn said.

THE CRGC FURTHERS THE ETHOS OF THE JESUIT MISSION BY EMPHASIZING THE ENCOUNTER BETWEEN CATHOLICISM AND CULTURE THAT HAS BEEN SO VITAL TO THE ORDER’S HISTORY.

Cathleen Fleck, Ph.D., examines a facsimile copy of the ninth century Book of Kells in the Knights of Columbus Vatican Film Library of the Pius XII Memorial Library.

Experts IN THE FIELD

Ph.D.

Director, Center for Research on Global Catholicism; Associate Professor, Theological Studies, College of Arts and Sciences

Mary Dunn is the director of the Center for Research on Global Catholicism and an associate professor in the Department of Theological Studies at Saint Louis University. A historian of religion, Dunn works in the area of early modern Catholicism. She has published extensively on both Catholicism in 17th- and 18th-century colonial New France and theory and method in the study of religion, and is the author of several books, including “From Mother to Son: The Selected Letters of Marie de l’Incarnation to Claude Martin” (Oxford, 2015), “The Cruelest of All Mothers: Marie de l’Incarnation, Motherhood, and Christian Tradition” (Fordham, 2016), “Religious Intimacies: Intersubjectivity in the Modern Christian West” (Indiana, 2020), and most recently, “Where Paralytics Walk and the Blind See: Narratives of Sickness and Disability at the Juncture of Worlds” (Princeton, 2022). She is currently at work on a new book project focusing on the history of Quebec’s 19thcentury foundlings and the Augustinian nuns of the Hôtel-Dieu who cared for them.

Ph.D.

Leadership Team, Center for Research on Global Catholicism; Associate Professor, Art History, College of Arts and Sciences

Cathleen A. Fleck, Ph.D., is an associate professor of art history and chair in the Department of Fine and Performing Arts at Saint Louis University. She received her Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. Her first book, “The Clement Bible at the Medieval Courts of Naples and Avignon: A Story of Papal Power, Royal Prestige, and Patronage” (Ashgate Press, 2010) is a “biography” of the 14thcentury illustrated Bible of Clement VII, an opposition pope in Avignon from 1378–94 that traces the Bible’s production in Naples (c. 1330) through its changing ownership and meaning in Avignon (c. 1340–1405) to its presentation as a gift to Alfonso, King of Aragon (c. 1424). She has also published over two dozen articles on the medieval art of Avignon, Naples, Cairo, and Jerusalem. Her newest book is titled “Jerusalem’s Architectural Identities in the Later Middle Ages” (Brill, 2022), which considers Islamic and Christian representations of Jerusalem in sculpture, painting, manuscripts, and glassware. Fleck teaches courses in medieval European and Islamic art as well as topics related to the history of anatomical art.

SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022
Mary Dunn Cathleen A. Fleck

Leadership Team, Center for Research on Global Catholicism; Professor, Department of History, College of Arts and Sciences

Charles H. Parker is professor in the Department of History at Saint Louis University. His research interests focus on the religious and cultural history of early modern Europe and cross-cultural interactions in world history. His most recent publications include “Global Calvinism: Conversion and Commerce in the Dutch Empire, 1600-1800” (Yale University Press, 2022) and (co-edited with Nathaniel Millett) “Jesuits and Race: A Global History of Continuity and Change, 1530-2020” (University of New Mexico Press, 2022).

Leadership Team, Center for Research on Global Catholicism; Associate Professor, Department of American Studies, College of Arts and Sciences

Katherine D. Moran is an associate professor in the Department of American Studies at Saint Louis University, where she teaches classes and advises graduate students on religion and American culture and transnational American studies. She holds a Ph.D. in United States history from Johns Hopkins University. Her book “The Imperial Church: Catholic Founding Fathers and United States Empire” (Cornell University Press, 2020) examines cross-confessional commemorations of Catholic history as part of the rhetoric of the U.S. empire. Her second book project “California Magdalens: Women, Religion, and the Carceral State, 1850-1940,” is a globally situated history of the San Francisco Magdalen Asylum. She was chosen as a member of the Lilly Endowmentfunded Young Scholars in American Religion program and has received numerous grants and fellowships, including from the Huntington Library, the Newberry Library, the Louisville Institute, and the U.S. Fulbright Program.

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Charles H. Parker Ph.D. Kate Moran Ph.D.

INVESTED IN STUDENT GROWTH

Conversation With

education policy and practice for the state,” Rhinesmith said.

Afew years ago, Saint Louis University researchers noticed that education conversations in Missouri often focus on the state’s cities and urbanized areas rather than embracing a statewide perspective. As a result, the overarching view of education was disjointed — the state needed someone to paint a more comprehensive picture of the conditions, opportunities, and benchmarks within Missouri school systems.

The Policy Research in Missouri Education (PRiME) Center at Saint Louis University looks to fill this vital space within state education research. Since its inception in spring 2019, the PRiME Center has aimed to serve as a resource for state policymakers, educators, administrators, and additional education leaders who make critical policy decisions in K-12 education in Missouri.

By easing access to education data, Evan Rhinesmith, Ph.D., executive director, believes PRiME Center research may encourage improvements in policies, educational outcomes, and opportunities for all Missouri students.

“We’re a nonpartisan research center focused on describing and providing data, evidence, and research on

PRiME Center researchers provide policy reports, education profiles, and education reports with the goal of providing evidence to inform decisions. These resources cover a wide berth of topics, including explorations of new policies, in-depth descriptions of data analysis, and comparisons of district performances. Rhinesmith believes the PRiME Center’s work plays a role in changing the conversation and focus in Missouri, diverting focus away from meeting minimum benchmarks in favor of encouraging long-term group improvement.

The shift toward academic growth is made possible by mutually beneficial relationships. Rhinesmith noted the PRiME Center’s advisory board is made up of a diverse group of superintendents, executive directors, experienced educators, and influential leaders in Missouri education. They offer insights and feedback for the PRiME Center on their research directions and provide perspective through sharing their individual experiences in service to the education community. In return, advisory board members receive

resources to help them make smarter decisions around program funding and institutional practices over time.

“We focus on anything that is educationrelated for the state, be that helping with program evaluation in partnership with school districts at charter schools, different groups across the state, or providing useful data sets for others to access and find information on their own,” Rhinesmith said.

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“A lot of what we focus on is trying to shift the conversation from academic proficiency to academic growth,” Rhinesmith said. “We think that’s a really big issue that’s not discussed nearly as well in the state of Missouri at this point.”
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Evan Rhinesmith, Ph.D., Executive Director, PRiME Center, presents on scholarship programs.

Research AREAS

The PRiME Center focuses its research efforts on analyzing and interpreting data that will lead to comprehensive education policies and ultimately improve schools in Missouri.

students were most adversely impacted by the COVID-19 shutdown. The resulting policy brief added local context to an ongoing national conversation regarding which students were more adversely impacted by the shutdown. Over the next few years, researchers will need to follow student recovery and document programs and policies contributing to their growth after returning to in-person schooling.

Closing the Legislative Gap

The Impact of COVID-19

When the COVID-19 pandemic interrupted in-person student learning, the PRiME Center committed to prioritizing investigations and research on the impact of the pandemic on student resources, school reopening plans, and the needs of vulnerable student populations. For example, Rhinesmith pointed to the changes in student development during this period of time. The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) LongTerm Trend (LTT) results revealed dramatic drops in fourth grade student achievement across the country.

“We are really trying to shift the conversation to focus so heavily on how we help kids recover and grow as much as they can moving forward,” Rhinesmith said. “The growth reports that we created got a lot of attention.”

Rhinesmith and Richard Hall, Ph.D., Saint Louis University Research Fellow, wrote a policy brief contextualizing the much-publicized declines for American fourth grade students highlighted by recent NAEP LTT results. They included a description of declines in Missouri’s most recent state standardized test scores, with a specific focus on which

Rhinesmith noted many researchers in the realm of education policy focus heavily on Missouri’s major cities, including Kansas City and St. Louis. While countless underserved schools exist in these districts, it is difficult for the many rural districts in the state to take results from these settings and apply them to their own context. The PRiME Center hopes to increase its partnerships beyond the state’s urban centers to improve the conversation on education for all students in Missouri.

“We don’t really focus on any individual districts,” Rhinesmith said. “We definitely partner with some districts more than others. We’re open to working with just about anybody who has education questions.”

He emphasized that many rural schools struggle as well, and to achieve true equity in education, they also deserve legislative focus. The PRiME Center analyzes and describes data regarding the 561 traditional and charter public school districts in Missouri for legislators to consider in the hopes they equitably allocate resources and support the growth of the next generation of Missourians. This is especially important as education and education policy begins to garner more attention among the state’s legislative bodies.

Analyzing Postsecondary Access and Success

The PRiME Center released two reports in 2022 on Missouri students’ postsecondary access and success, comparing trends locally and nationally. While their research is ongoing, the reports noted that while university student retention is higher than the national average, immediate college enrollment among Missouri high school students has declined. They also noted that about half of Missouri public school graduates who enroll in college remain as first-time, full-time students at Missouri public institutions of higher education and have

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steadily improved their early college academic performance.

These results generally vary by location, providing more evidence of the influence of high school education on postsecondary performance. The PRiME Center team is optimistic these reports may soon encourage a push toward more targeted education resources to support students in their journey toward and through their college and career.

“Just within the School of Education and in talking with some other folks in the community, there does seem to be a lot more conversation around how we can get the evidence into more people’s hands,” Rhinesmith said.

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THE PRIME CENTER
“We are really trying to shift the conversation to focus so heavily on how we help kids recover and grow as much as they can moving forward,” Rhinesmith said. “The growth reports that we created got a lot of attention.”
School of Education faculty meet in Fitzgerald Hall.

Finding Evidence-Based Strategies

Along with research that trends toward quantitative data, the PRiME Center has also sought to pull together existing evidence to inform policy and decisions. In late 2021, the PRiME Center conducted an in-depth review of existing research on transitions out of state-appointed school boards back to locally elected governance. This work came as state officials were considering transitioning two St. Louis metropolitan districts from state-appointed governance to locally elected boards. The idea behind this shift is to provide the close oversight and understanding needed to address problems within a school district. The Center’s report covered both a review of the national literature and a review of an empirical study investigating perspectives from key stakeholders on their experiences and some of the exit strategies for state-appointed governance in Missouri school districts.

In general, the evidence demonstrated no clear guidelines on successfully exiting state governance in favor of a local approach. However, the report outlined a need for setting expectations for exit conditions, targeted and ongoing training of school board members, early outreach in communities, and cultivating a culture of high-quality candidates for school boards.

In general, the evidence demonstrated no clear guidelines on successfully exiting state governance in favor of a local approach. However, the report outlined a need for setting expectations for exit conditions, targeted and ongoing training of school board members, early outreach in communities, and cultivating a culture of high-quality candidates for school boards.

Starting a Conversation Around Education

The PRiME Center builds relationships in the education system and opens the door to conversations around data, not limited to legislative discussions. Internally, there are ongoing collaborative efforts with the School of Education and the University’s political science department. Rhinesmith noted that the Center is a contributing partner for the SLU/YouGov Poll, an organization that conducts political polls in Missouri to provide researchers and policymakers with a scientific assessment of Missouri public opinion. Meanwhile, the Center collaborates with many other educational institutions across the state to discuss and learn about issues in education policy, faculty

and staff labor issues, and student behavior to provide rigorous and reliable evidence. Along with their colleagues at SLU, the PRiME Center currently collaborates with the University of Missouri–Kansas City (UMKC), the University of Missouri–Columbia (MU), the University of Missouri–St. Louis (UMSL), and Washington University in St. Louis.

Rhinesmith pointed to an ongoing collaboration between partners at SLU and UMSL as an example. In an effort stemming from UMSL, the two institutions have researched the use of the four-day school week (4DSW) to find that while the 4DSW is expanding in popularity across the country, the body of evidence on its effectiveness is far from clear and still in the early stages.

“It’s been a great opportunity for us to collaborate not just within the University but across the state,” Rhinesmith said. “We don’t want to gatekeep anything and we don’t want to compete — we all have a similar mindset. Our work needs to help more students.”
PRiME team members planning projects on Missouri education research.

STUDENT Involvement

The PRiME Center has steadily increased opportunities for junior researchers. Postdoctoral, graduate, or undergraduate research associates are not only able to gain experience conducting in-depth research studies in the education sphere, but they also help increase the number and depth of publications the PRiME Center delivers to inform education policy and practice conversations in Missouri.

Many of these team members take the helm on projects throughout the year. For example, Misti Jeffers, Ph.D., PRiME Center postdoctoral fellow, spearheaded and collaborated on multiple reports, including the Missouri Students’ Postsecondary Access and Success Report, the Missouri Statewide Student Growth Report, and The Beating the Odds Report. Rhinesmith

also expressed excitement for the continued opportunity to pursue new outreach opportunities and witness the advancement of the next generation of researchers in education policy.

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“Seeing the students and junior researchers on our team walk into a room and present research on Missouri education and do it with confidence and skill has been really satisfying,” Rhinesmith said.
PRiME graduate research assistant Andrew Diemer (foreground) and SLU School of Education graduate students.

REFLECTING ON the Year

Rhinesmith revealed that the PRiME Center is marked by continual success and hope for the future. The Center was officially renewed for three more years of funding through the Walton Family Foundation — a foundation created by Walmart founders Sam and Helen Walton that invests in K-12 education nationwide.

“Getting renewed is a big moment for us,” Rhinesmith said. “It’s sort of a stamp of approval that the effort we put in was well placed.”

The PRiME Center was initially established through a grant from the Walton Family Foundation, and the new $1.3 million grant will now support their efforts through 2025. With several valuable pieces coming out within the next year, some of which have been cited by school districts and state entities, the PRiME Center’s student growth series has previously received attention by highlighting schools that move Missouri students forward.

Kansas City Public Schools cited information from the PRiME Center after nine KCPS schools were featured in the series’ third report: “The Beating

the Odds Report.” The report published by the PRiME Center highlights schools that are “beating the odds” by exhibiting high rates of academic growth as they serve higher concentrations of lowincome students. By focusing on overall statewide student growth in English language arts (ELA) and mathematics, the report showcases the exceptional academic growth of schools in these subjects and provides a model for other schools to follow as they continue their development.

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“Education is a vital part of developing what a person can accomplish,” Rhinesmith said. “It’s a focus of ours to make our schools the best they can possibly be to better serve students.”

AS THEY ENTER A NEW YEAR OF RESEARCH, THE PRIME CENTER TEAM DEDICATES THEMSELVES TO PROVIDING RESEARCH AND EVIDENCE THAT HELPS TO CREATE EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR QUALITY EDUCATION.

A School of Education undergraduate student working in a local school. THE PRIME CENTER
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PRiME Associate Director of Operations Ashley Burle working in the School of Education.

Experts IN THE FIELD

Ph.D.

Executive Director, PRiME Center, School of Education

Evan Rhinesmith is a former third and fourth grade teacher at Sacred Heart School in the Columbia Heights neighborhood of Washington, D.C. He earned a master’s in education from the University of Notre Dame and a doctorate in education policy from the University of Arkansas.

Associate Director of Operations, PRiME Center, School of Education

Ashley Donaldson Burle is a doctoral candidate in higher education administration at Saint Louis University. Her research focuses on postsecondary access and success, Missouri education policy, and university student affairs.

Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Fellow, School of Education

Misti Jeffers is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Saint Louis University Policy Research in Missouri Education (PRiME) Center. She holds a Ph.D. in social policy from Brandeis University. Her research focuses on postsecondary access and success, education and career pathways, and student support services.

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Evan Rhinesmith Misti Jeffers Ashley Donaldson Burle Doctoral Candidate Juliet Iwelunmor, Ph.D., professor, behavioral science and health education, is recognized at the 2022 Fellows Induction Ceremony by the Provost and Chief Academic Officer, Michael Lewis, Ph.D.

Recognizing

RESEARCH INSTITUTE FELLOWS

In fall 2022, Saint Louis University appointed the first cohort of Research Institute Fellows. These exceptional individuals are prime examples of research changing the landscape of health care, technology, and scholarship. Research Institute Fellows are selected by comparing researchers’ scholarly output and impact to peers in their field at Carnegie R1 universities.

This program strives to both recognize and support excellence throughout the University. The Research Institute works with each Fellow to determine how to best support their research interests. This intellectual community also stimulates discussions and collaboration amongst Fellows through workshops, a lecture series, and special events throughout the year.

This initial cohort will serve three-year, renewable terms, with new Fellows being appointed annually. The following pages feature conversations with select Fellows as well as information on SLU faculty who earned this prestigious distinction.

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Jeffrey Teckman, M.D.

Patricia and James Monteleone Endowed Chair in Pediatric Gastroenterology Professor of Pediatrics, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine

Teckman is a part of numerous impactful research projects, drug trials, and laboratory studies. Notably, his 2022 paper in the New England Journal of Medicine, “Fazirsiran for Liver Disease Associated with Alpha1Antitrypsin Deficiency,” identified the first effective drug to treat a rare, genetic liver disease that could previously only be treated with a liver transplant. Working with longtime collaborator Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals, his research team at SLU’s School of Medicine utilized technology to allow physicians to shut down one gene in the human liver with almost no side effects.

RECENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS

“Fazirsiran for Liver Disease Associated with Alpha1-Antitrypsin Deficiency”

The New England Journal of Medicine, August 2022

“Perfusion Regulated Organ Therapeutics with Enhanced Controlled Testing”

Patent pending, January 11, 2022

Jeffrey Teckman studies liver disease, liver injury, and new therapeutic technologies for use against these conditions. In particular, Teckman is a leader studying the genetic disease, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, and also has special interest in treating patients with fatty liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, and hepatitis B and C.

Teckman carries out his research through two avenues: practicing medicine as the division director of gastroenterology/ hepatology at SSM Health Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital and conducting research as a professor at Saint Louis University. He shared that both institutions partner with pharmaceutical companies, bringing new treatments to patients that may one day stop and reverse the progression of disease.

“New genetic and biotech discoveries have led to new options for treatment development,” Teckman said. “With each discovery, we draw closer to mitigating the impact of disease and injury.”

Teckman expressed excitement for the possibilities that come with this discovery; his work brought forth new descriptions of the natural history of the rare genetic disease and identified effective therapies. He and his colleagues uncovered a way to better the lives of those impacted by rare diseases while expanding researchers’ understanding of this complex and important issue.

“This is the culmination of over a decade of work to cure this disease, and a significant part of the work was done [at SLU],” Teckman said. “We have patients with this disease come from around the country to see SLU’s expert faculty members at SSM Health Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital with this disease for care and to participate in our studies.”

In between moments of discovery, Teckman is also a mentor for students at SLU and residents at Cardinal Glennon. He takes a “curiosity-first” approach to education, encouraging students to ask questions and explore answers for positive patient outcomes.

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“Through new knowledge, we can change the outcome,” Teckman said.
Featured Fellow
“That’s the magic of collaboration, especially in medical fields.”

Eleonore Stump, Ph.D.

Department of Philosophy, College of Arts and Sciences

Her various books and articles have attempted to explain the Christian worldview in all its complexity — the view that at the ultimate foundation of all reality, there is love in powerful, welcoming personal relationships.

Stump has provided a powerful example to illustrate the understanding of suffering in Christian tradition. She points to an instance in which the Psalmist says to God, “In the presence of the angels, I will sing your praises.” (Psalm 138:1) “It is one thing for a human being to sing praises to God — it is another thing entirely for a human being to sing those praises in the presence of the angels,” Stump said. “How would the Psalmist dare? The answer lies in suffering love.”

RECENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS

“The Image of God: The Problem of Evil and the Problem of Mourning”

Eleonore Stump, Oxford University Press, October 2022

“The New Cambridge Companion to Aquinas”

Eleonore Stump (Editor), Thomas Joseph White (Editor)

Eleonore Stump’s research is centered around medieval philosophy, the philosophy of religion, and metaphysics. She hopes to be a link in the chain of Christian intellectual tradition — merging tradition, understanding of contemporary thought, and connections between the best of the past and the promise of the present.

“No culture divorced from its common past can flourish, because expertise is vested in a community which is extended across cultures, countries, and times,” Stump said. “Many of the most pressing problems of our age can be understood more insightfully by making use of this communal expertise, which my own research attempts to explain, develop, and share with others.”

Stump joined the philosophy department at Saint Louis University in 1992. Over the years, she has become a leader in her field, celebrated and recognized by peers around the world.

Although in medieval angelology the angels in heaven are metaphysically greater than human beings, they do not suffer. Thus, they do not mirror the love of God manifested in Christ’s passion in their love of God either. And so in the Christian tradition, when any sufferer sings the praises of God in the presence of the angels, the angels will want to listen because the song that is the life of the sufferer is more glorious than any song the angels sing.

Stump feels closely aligned with SLU’s Jesuit mission. She believes that, as a Jesuit institution, SLU attracts students and scholars driven by a love for something greater than themselves. She shares knowledge with students and researchers alike in the hopes of promoting erudition, intellectual deftness, soundness of judgment, and a fierce love for the beauty of the Jesuit mission.

“I believe that love can accomplish great things,” Stump said. “I have been blessed to live and work with many great and loving people who have been part of this great Jesuit University.”

Cambridge University Press, July 2022

2023 John Dewey Lecture — Central American Philosophical Association Honor

“Humility, Courage, Magnanimity: A Thomistic Account”

In “Scientia et Fides” Vol. 10 No. 2, 2022

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“No culture divorced from its common past can flourish, because expertise is vested in a community which is extended across cultures, countries, and times,” Stump said.
Featured Fellow

Alexei Demchenko, Ph.D.

Professor and Department Chair of Chemistry, School of Science and Engineering

where he was promoted to the rank of associate professor with tenure in 2007 and professor in 2011. In 2014, Demchenko was appointed Curators’ Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry. After retiring from UMSL in 2021, Demchenko joined the faculty at SLU as professor and department chair.

Demchenko said he was drawn to SLU because of the clear commitment to service shared by the University’s researchers. In the past year alone, Demchenko has invented new reactions, developed automated platforms for glycan synthesis, and conducted biomedical studies to create anti-septicemia therapeutics, vaccine adjuvants, and anti-Alzheimer’s drugs. As he enters his second year at SLU, he shared that he believes new facilities, support staff, and departmental capabilities have pushed the University toward becoming a top-ranking research institution.

Alexei Demchenko’s research is centered on glycoscience — the study of complex carbohydrates on the surface of proteins and lipids. His recent studies have focused on streamlining the synthesis of carbohydrate building blocks, novel glycosylation reactions, synthetic vaccines, glycopharmaceuticals, and solid phase and automated synthesis. This research is vital in numerous applications, including the development of therapeutics, pharmaceuticals, vaccines, and food additives.

Demchenko and his colleagues focus on developing accessible, automated technologies to further the study and understanding of carbohydrates. Demchenko hopes to continually improve synthesis methods and find cures for major diseases such as Alzheimer’s.

Before joining Saint Louis University, he worked at the Complex Carbohydrate Research Center at the University of Georgia as a research associate. In 2001, Demchenko joined the faculty at the University of Missouri–St. Louis as an assistant professor,

Throughout his career, he has co-authored more than 200 articles and has presented over 160 lectures and seminars in the U.S. and abroad. Demchenko has also received several professional recognitions and awards including a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation (2005), the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Research and Creativity (2013), the St. Louis Award by the American Chemical Society (2014), Fellows Award by the Academy of Science of St. Louis (2020), and the UMSL Co-Investigators of the Year Award (2020).

RECENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS

HPLC-Based Automated Synthesis of Glycans in Solution

Chemistry — A European Journal, May 5, 2022

Stereoselective Glycosylation via H-bondmediated Aglycone Delivery

National Science Foundation Grant, 20212022

Facile Fabrication of Hierarchical Nanoporous Gold Electrode for Biosensing Applications

Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry, November 2022

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Featured Fellow
“SLU is a great place to do research, not only because of the facilities on campus — but also because of the positive, supportive environment that proliferates each lab, classroom, and interaction,” Demchenko said.

Professor, School of Social Work Michael Vaughn, Ph.D.

empirical work and the concept of intellectual diversity among care professions.

After receiving his doctoral degree from the Brown School of Social Work at Washington University in St. Louis, Vaughn joined the faculty at the University of Pittsburgh. Taking the next step in his career, Vaughn joined the Saint Louis University School of Social Work in 2008. Thus far, he has written 500 peerreviewed articles and book chapters as well as eight books.

He believes that faculty members, collaborators, and students are all equally important parts of the research process. He looks to continually include students in all research endeavors in the hopes of nurturing the next generation of researchers and furthering the positive research environment present at the University.

RECENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS

“Exposure to ambient particulate matter and hyperuricemia: An eight-year prospective cohort study on male traffic officers in China”

Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, January 2023

“Police stops and youths’ educational expectations: Findings from the UK Millennium Cohort Study”

Children and Youth Services Review, December 2022

Michael Vaughn’s research examines the epidemiology of drug use, mental health, crime, and violence. He has ongoing research programs with students and faculty collaborators on antisocial and prosocial behavior throughout the course of human life and among special populations, including adolescents and adults in contact with the criminal legal system. Vaughn shared that he has a long-standing interest in asymmetry in juvenile delinquency and the measurement of school disengagement and dropout processes.

“Most of the phenomena I conduct research on is connected to major social issues,” Vaughn said. “I hope that my research has a positive influence on policymakers and practitioners.”

Vaughn is involved in research regarding the health outcomes of migrated populations as well as the health outcomes related to environmental contaminants. Vaughn also studies conceptual and theoretical concepts around the role of confirmation bias in

Vaughn was recognized by Research.com as one of the Top 1,000 Scientists for 2022, making him one of the most-cited researchers in the area of social sciences and humanities. He was ranked 92nd in the United States and 183rd in the world, placing him in the top 1% of his peers. Vaughn’s research has been previously covered by national news outlets including NBC, CBS, CNN, USA Today, the Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, National Geographic, Reuters, and National Public Radio (NPR).

“Trends and distinct profiles of persons who inject drugs in the United States, 2015–2019”

Preventive Medicine, October 2022

“Psychopathy and drug-related crime and violence”

Psychopathy and Criminal Behavior, January 2022

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“SLU is a terrific environment for research,” Vaughn said. “I have been able to pursue my research goals with positive support, maximum freedom, and minimal interference.”
Featured Fellow

Jintong Tang, Ph.D.

Mary Louise Murray Endowed Professor of Management Richard A. Chaifetz School of Business

Tang’s research seeks to provide new insight in ground-up entrepreneurship, business policy, and innovation. She hopes that through analysis and open discussion, her research can make a positive impact in the business world.

“Entrepreneurs search for the next gamechanging venture, while policymakers and global nongovernmental organizations seek to foster innovation-focused entrepreneurship,” Tang said. “Research has a positive impact on these stakeholders by moving them one step closer to positive change.”

RECENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS

“Are Female Entrepreneurs More Effective in Applying Effectual Logics?” 2022 Best Empirical Paper

The United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (USASBE)

Jintong Tang is a leading business researcher focused on new venture creation, innovation, and women’s entrepreneurship. She draws on multidisciplinary collaboration, solid theory, and sound methodologies to conduct fundamental, practice-led research.

The end goal of her research is to identify policy interventions that will promote the creation of innovative global ventures as well as women-led entrepreneurial ventures. Tang believes that her line of research improves business, policy, and society as a whole by shedding a light on the steps toward inclusive success.

Tang joined the Richard A. Chaifetz School of Business at Saint Louis University in 2007, and the impact of her research has only grown since then. This year alone, she has received multiple awards and honors related to her writing on entrepreneurism, including the 2022 Best Empirical Paper from the United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (USASBE) and the Best Paper on Entrepreneurial Cognition Award from the Managerial and Organizational Cognition (MOC) Division of Academy of Management and the Kauffman Foundation.

Now, as a member of the inaugural class of Research Fellows, Tang expressed gratitude for her position at the University.

“I am grateful to be recognized for my contributions to making SLU a top research institution,” Tang said.

2022 Best Paper in Entrepreneurial Cognition Academy of Management Managerial and Cognition Division

2022 Fr. Thomas M. Knapp, S.J., Distinguished Faculty Member Award Saint Louis University

2022 Dean’s Curriculum Innovation Grant Saint Louis University

2021-2022 Friday Research/Teaching Seminar Series

Richard A. Chaifetz School of Business, Saint Louis University

Senior Editor Appointment Asia Pacific Journal of Management (2022-2024)

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Featured Fellow
“Innovative new ventures can prove indispensable in helping countries deal with emerging threats and opportunities,” Tang said. “They remain one of the most important globally deployable tools to confront regional and global challenges.”

Elizabeth Pendo, J.D.

Law

Center for Health Law Studies, School of Law

“My research shows that the significant health inequities experienced by people with disabilities are rooted in policies, practices, and beliefs that reflect and reinforce longstanding stigma, unequal treatment, and discrimination,” Pendo said.

Pendo leverages federal disability and health care laws to address inequities in access to health care and other institutional factors of health. She believes that Saint Louis University is the perfect place for researchers to engage in interdisciplinary health law and policy research. SLU researchers engage in research, education, service, and advocacy simultaneously as they move toward the goal of health equity.

RECENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS

“Understanding the Impact of Medicaid Expansion on Health Equity in Missouri” Missouri Foundation for Health Grant, 2021-2023

“Health Law: Cases, Materials and Problems”

(9th ed., 2022 edition)

Elizabeth Pendo is an expert in disability law, bioethics, and health law and policy. She is a specialist on the Americans with Disabilities Act, disability health disparities, legal obligations of providers, institutions, and employers under anti-discrimination laws, and equity issues in private and public insurance.

Pendo uses a disability justice framework to study the impact of health care and antidiscrimination laws on the outcomes and experiences of people with disabilities. She hopes to promote equity and inclusion in health care systems, workplaces, and communities.

Currently, 1 in 4 American adults lives with a disability — amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the general public has become keenly aware that anyone is at risk of acquiring a disability in their lifetime. Pendo believes that disability rights laws are more important than ever. With the right research guiding policy decisions, disability laws have tremendous potential to promote the health and wellbeing of our communities.

Pendo has published more than 50 law review articles, books, and other publications such as Health Affairs and the Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law, and Ethics. In 2020, she co-authored a report on using law and policy to promote health for people with disabilities for the Healthy People 2020 Law and Health Policy Project, a partnership between the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the CDC Foundation funded through a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. She is also a co-investigator on a project funded by the Greenwall Foundation identifying promising practices and legal resources needed by state medical boards.

“Engaging Disability Rights Law to Advance Racial and Disability Justice for People with Substance Use Disorder”

50(1) J. Law Med. & Ethics 38 (2022)

“U.S. Physicians Knowledge About the Americans with Disabilities Act and Accommodation of Patients with Disability”

41(1) Health Affairs 96 (2022)

“People with Disabilities” in Essentials of Health Justice: A Primer (2022)

“Protecting the Rights of People with Disabilities”

Healthy People 2020 Law and Health Policy Project

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“Access to quality, affordable, equitable health services is a fundamental challenge that speaks to SLU’s Jesuit mission, and draws on the strengths, values, and interests of faculty and students across campus,” Pendo said.
Featured Fellow

HONORING OUR Fellows

Saint Louis University was proud to recognize 70 Research Institute Fellows in 2022. Each Fellow is a crucial piece of SLU’s robust intellectual community.

Associate Professor, Department of Biology

Kasey Fowler-Finn is an evolutionary biologist leading a team of scientists fascinated by the natural world and dedicated to understanding how it is being altered by human activity. Research in her lab centers on how urbanization impacts important ecological and evolutionary processes in spiders and insects, and her group uses highly integrative approaches (collaborating with engineers, computer scientists, geospatial scientists and more) to tackle these complex problems. Kasey is particularly fascinated by vibrational acoustics and the ways in which arthropods use sound to navigate their world. She has shared her research with the public through several sound installations in museums and art galleries. The Fowler-Finn Lab participates in several activities geared toward increasing diversity in STEM in order to support the scientific excellence and discovery that happens only through diverse thinking and perspectives.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Recipient of the 2021 College of Arts and Sciences Donald G Brennan Award for Excellence in Graduate Mentoring

• Plenary talk at the European Congress of Arachnology in Greifswald, Germany, 2022

• 2020 SLUMA exhibit “Too hot to sing” (permanent online exhibit: www.toohottosing.com)

• Research is currently supported by the National Science Foundation

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Jason Knouft

Ph.D.

Ph.D.

Professor of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences

Jason Knouft was a Jefferson Science Fellow from 2021 to 2022 and served as a climate and water security analyst at the U.S. Department of State in the Bureau of Intelligence and Research in the Office of the Geographer and Global Issues. He has a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Illinois Urbana–Champaign, and a B.S. and M.S. in biology from Drexel University. Knouft’s research focuses on the impacts of human activities on freshwater resources with a focus on climate change, land use transformations, and climate adaptation strategies to address these issues. This work integrates hydrologic, water quality, and ecological models with global climate model projections and field-based research to address contemporary and future issues related to freshwater system sustainability.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Awarded a Jefferson Science Fellowship by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine for work at the U.S. Department of State as a climate and water security analyst

• Appointed to a joint position as a large river ecologist at the National Great Rivers Research and Education Center

• Served as deputy representative of the U.S. Bureau of Intelligence and Research to the Climate Security Advisory Council established by the Director of National Intelligence and the deputy ex officio representative to the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Climate Security Roundtable

Professor, Department of Biology, College of Arts and

Sciences, Member and Principal Investigator, Danforth Plant Science Center

Allison Miller serves as a professor of biology at Saint Louis University and is a member and principal investigator at the Danforth Plant Science Center. Her research program focuses on biology, diversity, and the evolution of long-lived (perennial) plants. The long-term goals of Miller’s research group are to adapt contemporary perennial crops for changing climates, to develop new perennial herbaceous crops for regenerative agricultural systems, and to advance the conservation and accessibility of perennial plant genetic resources. Originally from the Chicago area, Miller earned B.S. and M.S. degrees in botany from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, and Colorado State University, respectively, and has a Ph.D. in ecology, evolution, and population biology from Washington University in St. Louis. She completed postdoctoral training at the University of Colorado.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Miller is leading two federally funded projects:

• “New Roots for Restoration Biology Integration Institute: integrating plant traits, communities, and the soil ecosphere to advance restoration of natural and agricultural systems,” (2021–2026, National Science Foundation Biology Integration Institutes program, $12.5M total)

• “High dimensional phenomics and automation to transform cost and timeframe of early-stage domestication of new crops,” (2021–2026, Foundation for Food & Agriculture Research Seeding Solutions — Next Generation Crops, $1M from FFAR; $1.5M in matching funds)

• Miller and her colleagues have published two new publications on grapevine research in Plant Direct and Microorganisms. She also co-authored an opinion paper on crop domestication in Current Opinion in Plant Biology, Volume 65 102150.

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Amber Johnson

Ph.D.

Ruth Evans Ph.D.

Executive Director, Institute for Healing Justice & Equity

As a scholar/artist/activist, Amber Johnson’s research and activism focus on narratives of identity, protest, healing, and social justice in digital media, popular media, and everyday lived experiences. As a polymath, their mixed-media artistry involves working with metals, recycled and reclaimed goods, photography, poetry, percussion, and paint to interrogate systems of oppression and create capacity for different, critical futures. Johnson is an award-winning professor of communication. As executive director and co-founder of the Institute for Healing Justice & Equity, Johnson specializes in humanizing equity and exploring the relationship between healing justice and equity. Humanizing equity is the process of making organizational equity work radically inclusive in action. Johnson is also the founding director of The Justice FleetTM, a mobile social justice museum that fosters healing through art, dialogue, pleasure, and play. Johnson created The Justice FleetTM to experiment with methodologies that reimagine community engagement, healing justice, humanized equity, and critical futures.

Dorothy McBride Orthwein Professor of English, College of Arts and Sciences

Ruth Evans is Dorothy McBride Orthwein Professor of English in the Department of English at Saint Louis University and a former president and executive director of the New Chaucer Society. Before coming to SLU, she worked at the University of Stirling, Scotland, and Cardiff University, Wales. Her research interests are in medieval English literature and other European literature of the period 13001580, critical theory, gender and sexuality, and memory studies. She has published over 60 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, and nine edited collections on topics that include Geoffrey Chaucer, “The Book of Margery Kempe,” the idea of the vernacular in late medieval England, and translation theory and practice. She is currently working on a monograph, “Chaucer and the Representation of Memory.”

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• The Justice Fleet’sTM Transfuturism Exhibit at SLUMA, spring 2022

• Received two book awards for “Gender Futurity, Intersectional Autoethnography: Embodied Theorizing from the Margins” published by Routledge: The Outstanding Book in Performance Studies and Autoethnography from the Central States Communication Association and the Best Book Award from The GLBTQ Division of the National Communication Association

• Creator and series editor for a new podcast and book series called “Critical Futures”

• Named executive director of the Institute for Healing Justice & Equity

• Time as interim vice president of the Division of Diversity and Innovative Community Engagement (DICE) and the changes Johnson was able to set in motion

• Appointed executive director of an international scholarly society, the New Chaucer Society, a position held for six years (2012-2018)

• Elected president of the New Chaucer Society by the society’s members (2018-2020)

• Delivering the New Chaucer Society Presidential Lecture in 2021 (it was delayed because of COVID-19). The title of the lecture (which will be published this year, 2022, in the journal Studies in the Age of Chaucer) is “On Not Being Chaucer”

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Devin Johnston

Ph.D.

Professor of English, College of Arts and Sciences

Devin Johnston is the Eugene A. Hotfelder Professor in the Humanities and professor of English at Saint Louis University, where he has taught since 2001. He is the author of seven books of poetry, including “Dragons,” forthcoming from Farrar, Straus and Giroux in 2023. He has also published “Creaturely and Other Essays” (Turtle Point Press, 2009), meditations on the natural world; and “Precipitations: Contemporary American Poetry as Occult Practice” (Wesleyan UP, 2002). His poems and essays have appeared in the London Review of Books, The New Yorker, Parnassus, Poetry, and elsewhere. He serves as an editor of Flood Editions, an independent nonprofit publishing house, and he coordinates events for the Prison Education Program of Saint Louis University.

Walter J. Ong, S.J., Professor in the Humanities, Department of English, College of Arts and Sciences

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Since 2015, he has published two poetry collections. Another collection will be published in 2023.

• Dragons: poems (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2023)

• Mosses and Lichens: poems (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2019)

• Far-Fetched: poems (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2015)

Jonathan Sawday studied English at Queen Mary College (University of London) and University College London. A former Fulbright award holder, he has held visiting fellowships at the Huntington Library in California; The Russian State University for the Humanities in Moscow; Cambridge University in England; and (most recently) the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C. In the U.K., he is a fellow of the Royal Historical Society and of the Royal Society for the Arts, and (before moving to the U.S. in 2009) he was a frequent broadcaster on BBC radio on arts, culture, and historical topics. He has published over 100 singleauthored scholarly articles, essays, book chapters, and reviews. He is the author/editor of five books, including “The Body Emblazoned: Dissection and the Human Body in Renaissance Culture” (1995) and “Engines of the Imagination: Renaissance Culture and the Rise of the Machine” (2007). His new book, entitled “Blanks, Space, Print, and Void in Renaissance English Literature: An Archaeology of Absence” will be published by Oxford University Press this year.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• The completion of his latest book for Oxford University Press — a comprehensive account of British print culture in the 16th and 17th centuries centered around the unlikely history of gaps, vacancies, and emptinesses, hence the title: “An Archeology of Absence”.

• The discovery of the Bermudian “pamphlet wars” in 1650s London was associated with the establishment of the short-lived radical English republic of Eleuthera in the Bahamas, and the poetry of the major English poet and politician Andrew Marvell. This discovery was announced in The Times Literary Supplement (2017) and published in the scholarly journal English Literary Renaissance (2018).

• In 2018, his 1995 book on the Renaissance “culture of dissection” prompted the London-based theater director Anna Furse to create a digital artwork and a one-woman performance, staged in London and Dublin under the title “An Anatomy Act.” As Furse wrote: “My project began with reading Jonathan Sawday’s The Body Emblazoned. This book fascinated me, and I decided to create a work on anatomy theaters.”

177 RESEARCH INSTITUTE FELLOWS

Lorri Glover

Ph.D.

Professor of Philosophy, Professor of Theological Studies, Tenet Endowed Chair in Bioethics, College of Arts and Sciences

Jeffrey P. Bishop trained in medicine, philosophy, and theology. His work engages contemporary science and technology and explores the historical, political, and philosophical foundations of the theories and practices in science and technology, broadly, and medicine, specifically. His first book, “The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying” (Notre Dame Press, 2011), explores how the dead body of the anatomy lab shapes medical practice, especially the care of the dying, and the way that many concepts of death originate in social and political concerns, from brain death to organ transplantation to palliative care. His second book, “Biopolitics After Neuroscience: Morality and the Economy of Virtue,” (Bloomsbury 2022, coauthored with M. Therese Lysaught and Andrew A. Michel), explores the relationship of biological science to social science as it is found in the neuroscience of morality. His current project takes inspiration from the philosophy of biology and the metaphysics of life and explores the way culture shapes scientific and technological development.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Latest book won the Expanded Reason Award from the Joseph Ratzinger/Benedict XVI Vatican Foundation

• Completed a book prospectus for the next book on biology, life, and culture

• Tasked by the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences to create an interdisciplinary research center that brings scientists, engineers, philosophers, theologians, political scientists, and historians into conversations around recent scientific and engineering developments

Lorri Glover is the John Francis Bannon S.J. Endowed Chair in the Department of History at Saint Louis University. She is the author or editor of 10 books, including “Founders as Fathers: The Private Lives and Politics of the American Revolutionaries” (Yale University Press, 2014), “The Fate of the Revolution: Virginians Debate the Constitution” (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2016), and “Eliza Lucas Pinckney: An Independent Woman in the Age of Revolution” (Yale University Press, 2020). Glover often participates in the George Washington Teacher Institutes at Mount Vernon and is on the author team for McGraw-Hill’s high school and middle school U.S. history textbooks. She has served as president of the Southern Association for Women Historians and on the executive council of the Southern Historical Association.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Her most recent book, “Eliza Lucas Pinckney,” won 2021 book prizes from the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic and the South Carolina Historical Society.

• Awarded the 2020 Don Brennan Award for graduate mentoring at the College of Arts and Sciences

• Serves on the advisory board for the National Women’s History Museum

178 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022
John Francis Bannon S.J. Endowed Chair, Professor of History, College of Arts and Sciences

Thomas Madden

Ph.D.

Charles H. Parker

Ph.D.

Professor of History, College of Arts and Sciences

Thomas F. Madden is the author of numerous books and studies, including “Venice: A New History” and “Istanbul: City of Majesty at the Crossroads of the World.” His books have been translated into more than a dozen languages worldwide. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal, as well as numerous periodicals, including First Things and The New Criterion. Awards for his scholarship include The Charles Homer Haskins Medal (Medieval Academy of America) and the Otto Gründler Book Prize (The Medieval Institute). He is a fellow of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the Medieval Academy of America, and the American Council of Learned Societies.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• 2020: Awarded a research grant for Venetian studies by the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation

• 2019: Named a Public Scholar by the National Endowment for the Humanities

• 2018: Selected as an editor for “The Cambridge History of the Crusades”

Professor of History, College of Arts and Sciences

Charles H. Parker’s research interests focus on the religious and cultural history of early modern Europe and cross-cultural interactions in world history. In particular, he focuses on the complex ways that individuals and communities experienced and appropriated religious beliefs. His publications include “Global Calvinism: Conversion and Commerce in the Dutch Empire, 1600-1800” (Yale University Press, 2022), “Global Interactions in the Early Modern World, 1400-1800” (Cambridge University Press, 2010), “Faith on the Margins: Catholics and Catholicism in the Dutch Golden Age” (Harvard University Press, 2008), and “The Reformation of Community: Social Welfare and Calvinist Charity in Holland, 1572-1620” (Cambridge University, 1998). His current book project traces the interconnections between space, narrative, and praxis in early modern religious encounters.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Recipient as co-director (along with Profs. Claire Gilbert and Fabien Montcher) of National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute 2023 on “Global Geographies of Knowledge in the Early Modern Period”

• Author of “Global Calvinism: Conversion and Commerce in the Dutch Empire, 1600-1800” (Yale University Press, 2022)

• Felix M. Gilbert Member of the School for Historical Studies, Institute for Advanced Study, 2019-2020

179 RESEARCH INSTITUTE FELLOWS

Mark Edward Ruff

Ph.D.

Silvana R. Siddali

Ph.D.

Professor of History, College of Arts and Sciences

Mark Edward Ruff is a specialist in modern European history, modern German history, and religious history. He has published widely in both German and English on the history of 19th and 20th century Catholicism, the Catholic Church’s relationship to National Socialism, secularization, and culture wars. He is beginning work on a new book, “The Weaponization of Guilt and the Politics of Emotion in the Weimar Republic,” as well as a project on Christian Democracy in Europe after 1945.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Published five books since 2017, including “The Battle for the Catholic Past in Germany, 1945-1980” (Cambridge University Press, 2017), its German translation (Brill, 2022), and “Germany and the Confessional Divide: Religious Tensions and Political Culture,” 1871-1989 (Berghahn Books, 2022)

• Received an award from the Concordia Historical Institute for the most outstanding article in the history of North American Lutheranism, “The Martin Luther Film of 1953 and Confessional Tensions in the United States and Germany”

• Received the Nancy McNeir Ring award for outstanding teaching from the Jesuit Honor Society, Alpha Sigma Mu

Professor of History, College of Arts and Sciences

Silvana R. Siddali teaches courses in 19th-century American history at Saint Louis University. Her area of specialization includes the constitutional, legal, and political history of the United States, in particular, the role of human rights in the development of democratic and judicial institutions. Her current book, “Transatlantic Constitution-making: Struggles over Democracy and Civil Rights, America and Europe, 1815-1870,” is under contract at Johns Hopkins University Press. Previous works include “From Property to Person: Slavery and the Confiscation Acts, 1861-1862” (Louisiana State University Press, 2005), “Missouri’s War: The Civil War in Documents” (Ohio University Press, 2009), and “Frontier Democracy: Constitutional Conventions in the Old Northwest” (Cambridge University Press, 2016). She has an M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard University and a BFA from the Massachusetts College of Art.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Missouri Humanities Council, Distinguished Achievement in Literature Award

• “African Americans in the Nineteenth-Century West” Research Symposium and St. Louis City Public School Teacher Workshop, Saint Louis University

• Eugene A. Hotfelder Professor of Humanities, 2016–2022

180 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022

Damian Smith

Ph.D.

Warren Treadgold

Ph.D.

Professor of Medieval History, College of Arts and Sciences

Damian Smith was educated at the Universities of London and Birmingham in the U.K., with postdoctoral fellowships at the Council of Higher Learning and the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona. He has taught at Saint Louis University since 2006, also acting as an adviser to 25 graduate students. His main areas of study are the history of the Crown of Aragon, the medieval papacy, heresy and inquisition in the High Middle Ages, the Albigensian Crusade, and cross-cultural encounters in the Mediterranean world. As an author, editor, or translator, he has published eight books and 50 articles/chapters. His current works revolve around the Crown of Aragon and the Mediterranean world in the 13th century, with a side project on the life of Anthony of Padua.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Recent works include: an edited volume on Pope Gregory IX (1227-1241), a chapter on the Albigensian Crusade in the new Cambridge History of the Crusades, and a 70-page essay on the political relations between France and Catalonia before the Sicilian Vespers in a series on Catalan treaties and diplomacy published by the Institute of Catalan Studies in Barcelona

National Endowment for the Humanities Professor of Byzantine Studies and Professor of History, College of Arts and Sciences

Educated at Harvard (B.A. 1970, Ph.D. 1977), Warren Treadgold has also taught at UCLA, Stanford, UC Berkeley, Hillsdale College, and Florida International University. He has held research fellowships at the University of Munich, the Free University of Berlin, All Souls College at Oxford, and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C., along with other research fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities (twice), the Earhart Foundation (five times), and the Wilbur Foundation. He has published 11 books and 60-odd articles on Byzantine, medieval, and late ancient history and literature.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• “In my recent and ongoing research, I am happiest with my identification of material from several Byzantine histories previously thought to be lost. Perhaps most important is my identification in about a dozen Byzantine histories of Greek summaries of the lost books of the major fourth century Latin historian Ammianus Marcellinus. Besides its importance for understanding Ammianus as a historian, this material, which covers the years from AD 96 to 353, is a significant source for a poorly attested period of Roman history.”

• A separate discovery is the identification of about a half-dozen Byzantine texts of material from a lost world history by the 10th century historian Nicetas the Paphlagonian. Although biased and unreliable as a source for his own times, Nicetas’ history was an interesting and influential work that has misled many later Byzantine historians and even some modern historians.

181 RESEARCH INSTITUTE FELLOWS

Helen De Cruz

Ph.D. Dan Haybron

Ph.D.

Danforth Chair in the Humanities, College of Arts and Sciences

Helen De Cruz holds the Danforth Chair in the Humanities at Saint Louis University. She is the author of “Wonderstruck: How Awe and Wonder Shape the Way We Think” (Princeton University Press, forthcoming), “Religious Disagreement” (Cambridge University, 2019), and she has edited and illustrated “Philosophy Illustrated: Forty-Two Thought Experiments to Broaden Your Mind” (Oxford University Press, 2022). In addition to her Ph.D. in philosophy (2011, University of Groningen), she holds a Ph.D. in archaeology and art sciences (2007, Free University of Brussels).

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Grant: “Oneness, an experimental philosophical approach,” Funded by the John Templeton Foundation via Hillsdale College, start: fall 2022, total of 24 months. Principal investigator.

• De Cruz, H. (2022), “Philosophy illustrated. Forty-two thought experiments to broaden your minds,” Oxford University Press

• De Cruz, H. (2019), “Religious Disagreement,” Cambridge University Press

Theodore

R.

Vitali C.P. Professor of Philosophy, College of Arts and Sciences

Dan Haybron is the Theodore R. Vitali C.P. Professor of Philosophy at Saint Louis University. He received his Ph.D. in philosophy at Rutgers University. His research focuses on ethics, psychology, and political philosophy, particularly issues of well-being. He has published numerous articles in these areas. In 2015 he was awarded a $5.1 million grant for a three-year project, “Happiness and WellBeing: Integrating Research Across the Disciplines,” funded by the John Templeton Foundation and Saint Louis University. He is the author of “The Pursuit of Unhappiness: The Elusive Psychology of Well-Being” (Oxford University Press, 2008), and “Happiness: A Very Short Introduction” (Oxford University Press, 2013). A new monograph, “The Lives We Should Want,” is under contract with Oxford University Press.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Book: “The Lives We Should Want,” under contract with Oxford University Press

• Book: “Against Happiness,” in press with Columbia University Press, co-authored with Owen Flanagan, Joseph E. LeDoux, Bobby Bingle, Batja Mesquita, Michele Moody-Adams, Songyao Ren, Anna Sun, and Yolonda Y. Wilson. Responses from critics Jennifer A. Frey, Hazel Rose Markus, Jeffrey D. Sachs, and Jeanne L. Tsai

• David B. Yaden and Daniel M. Haybron (2022), “The emotional state assessment tool: A brief, philosophically informed, and cross-culturally sensitive measure,” The Journal of Positive Psychology, 17(2), 151–165, https://doi.org/10.1080/17439760.2021.201 6910

182 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022

Cort Rudolph

Ph.D.

Jeremiah Weinstock

Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Industrial-Organizational Psychology; Interim Director of the Industrial-Organizational Psychology Ph.D. Program; Interim Director of the Center for the Application of Behavioral Sciences (CABS), College of Arts and Sciences

Cort Rudolph received a B.A. from DePaul University and an M.A. and Ph.D. from Wayne State University. His research focuses on a variety of issues related to the aging workforce, including applications of lifespan development theories, well-being and work longevity, and ageism/generationalism. Rudolph has published over 120 peer-reviewed articles, books, and book chapters on these and related topics. He is a consulting editor for the journal Work, Aging and Retirement and an associate editor for Group & Organization Management and serves on the editorial review boards of the Journal of Managerial Psychology, the Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, Consulting Psychology Journal: Practice and Research, the Journal of Vocational Behavior, the Journal of Organizational Behavior, and Leadership Quarterly.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Elected fellow of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology

• Co-PI on a grant to fund a four-year longitudinal study (December 2019–December 2022) to investigate the long-term psychosocial impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on workers

• Several top-tier publications in the past three years (e.g., American Psychologist, Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior) and a new co-edited book, “Age and Work: Advances in Theory, Methods, and Practice”

• Two recent Ph.D. advisees received tenure track positions

Professor and Chair, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences

Jeremiah Weinstock is a licensed clinical psychologist and professor of psychology at SLU. His research centers on addressing the difficulties in helping individuals with addictions make lasting and meaningful changes in their lives. More specifically, he investigates the utility of exercise as an intervention for substance use disorders and examines the characterization and treatment of gambling disorder. Much of this research is translational, such as randomized clinical trials examining the efficacy of psychosocial interventions, such as motivational interviewing and contingency management. Other facets of this research are theoretical or focused on public policy. Over $2 million in research grants from the National Institutes of Health and the International Center for Responsible Gaming have supported his work.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Co-sponsor (mentor) on an NIH K-award for Jennifer Bello-Kottenstette, M.D. A K-award is a five-year career grant that supports the launch of a new investigator into becoming an independent investigator.

• “I have a line of research around contingency management, a behavioral intervention for substance use disorders. The federal government has recently prioritized disseminating this intervention across the nation to treat stimulant use disorders. I am involved in contingency management dissemination efforts in two states across the U.S. These dissemination efforts are an example of research being translated into practice.”

• Developing a new line of research with doctoral students on stigma within substance use disorders

183 RESEARCH INSTITUTE FELLOWS

J.S. Onésimo (Ness) Sándoval

Ph.D.

James Redfield

Ph.D.

Acting Associate Director for Diversity, Education, and Training, Taylor Geospatial Institute; Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, SLU College of Arts and Sciences

J.S. Onésimo Sándoval is a professor of sociology and demography at Saint Louis University. He has been conducting research at the intersection of demography and computational spatial science to study the spatial hierarchy of inequality in American cities. His research currently focuses on spatial inequality, Latino and immigration demographic patterns, and crime patterns in American cities. He recently founded two geospatial applied community projects: Demography 4 Democracy and Coding for Spatial Justice. Both projects are designed to empower community members to envision the future they want for their neighborhoods and acquire the resources to make their visions happen. Sándoval is the acting associate director of the Taylor Geospatial Institute, co-director of the Public and Social Policy Ph.D. Program, and the director of the M.S. Sociology Program.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Acting associate director of the Taylor Geospatial Institute

• Two new publications that include the development of historical demographic methods to study the Latino population trends in Nebraska and Missouri

• A new study with the Sacramento Police Department to implement new measures of spatial statistics to crime patterns

Assistant Professor of Biblical and Talmudic Literatures, College of Arts and Sciences

James Adam Redfield writes mainly on rabbinic literature, with a focus on rabbinic ethnography, travel narratives, and storytelling more broadly. Redfield is completing a monograph, “Adventures of Rabbah & Friends: The Talmud’s Strange Tales and their Afterlife” (under contract with Brown University Press), on the reception history of a cycle of enigmatic travel stories. For his next project, he plans to return to a monograph-in-progress that is loosely based on his 2017 dissertation about the ethnographic dimensions of early rabbinic law in Roman cultural context. James has published or accepted articles on those topics, as well as on ancient ethnography, phenomenology, and the work of 20th-century Jewish/German intellectuals Erich Auerbach, Isaak Heinemann, and Mikhah Yosef Berdichevsky.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• “From a Distant Relation,” Syracuse University Press, 2021. Edition and translation with a critical introduction, map, glossary, notes, and a foreword by Avner Holtzman, of the Yiddish writings of Ukrainian Jewish writer M.Y. Berdichevsky (1865-1921), 407 pp.

• Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship. Institut für jüdische Theologie, University of Potsdam, fall 2021 and 2022.

• Cornell University Society for the Humanities Fellowship, 2019-2020.

184 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022

Grant Kaplan

Ph.D.

Professor of Historical and Systematic Theology, College of Arts and Sciences

Grant Kaplan’s work centers on two areas: the mimetic theory of René Girard and its application to theology, and 19th century German theology. More broadly, he studies and researches modern Christian theology. Kaplan has authored works on such topics as the relationship between faith and reason, theologies of atheism, interpretations of the Second Vatican Council, theologies of tradition, the scientific nature of theology, historical theology, and the doctrine of revelation. He also translates and edits works of German theology into English. Kaplan is a board member of the Colloquium on Violence & Religion, and serves on the editorial board of two journals: Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture, and Neue Zeitschrift für Systematische Theologie und Religionsphilosophie.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Book: “Faith and Reason through Christian History: A Theological Essay” (Catholic University of America Press, 2022)

• Article: “Brothers or Enemies? Revisiting Academic Rivalry in the Möhler/Baur Debate,” forthcoming in Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 30 (Spring 2023)

• Grant: Humboldt Foundation, Renewed Research Stay (summer 2019)

Associate Professor of Medieval Christianity, Department of Theological Studies, College of Arts and Sciences; Director of the Center for Religious and Legal History; Associate Director of the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Atria A. Larson, B.A. (Covenant College), M.A., and Ph.D. (The Catholic University of America), is an interdisciplinary medievalist with expertise in medieval canon law, theology, biblical exegesis, the history of penance, and Latin manuscripts. Recently her teaching and research engages with the theology of law, legal philosophy, the fields of law and religion, and also digital humanities, primarily for preserving and understanding glosses or annotations to authoritative medieval texts. Her monograph, “Master of Penance: Gratian and the Development of Penitential Thought and Law in the Twelfth Century” (Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America Press, 2014), won a 2015 Manfred Lautenschlaeger Award for Theological Promise. It was followed by “Gratian’s Tractatus de penitentia: A New Latin Edition with English Translation” (2016).

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• “In August 2022, I received a Level II NEH Digital Humanities Advancement Grant for the project ‘Gallery of Glosses,’ in partnership with the Research Computing Group (Patrick Cuba, Bryan Haberberger, John McEwan).”

• “In July 2022, I co-hosted (with Steve Schoenig, S.J., Ph.D. [History]) a prestigious international quadrennial conference at SLU called the 16th International Congress of Medieval Canon Law.”

• “In fall 2020, the College of Arts and Sciences appointed me as the first director of the Center for Religious and Legal History, where my primary job is to steward an endowed gift meant to promote research in the history of canon law.”

185 RESEARCH INSTITUTE FELLOWS

Peter William Martens

Ph.D.

Edwin Antony Ph.D.

Professor of Early Christianity, Department of Theological Studies, College of Arts and Sciences

Peter Martens is a historian studying the lives and writings of late antique Christians (second to ninth centuries) with special attention to their scholarly practices, storytelling techniques, and teachings. His research focuses on how early Christians transformed their Bibles, Byzantine manuscripts, and editorial practices, as well as the historiography of his field. In his teaching, he regularly explores how we think about religion (then and now), and how we might reimagine the humanities (then and now). His current project is a book-length study provisionally called, “Habits of Attention: How Early Christians Encountered Scripture.” He will provide a new taxonomy that brings neglected facets of textual engagements to light and challenges how we narrate the history of the humanities.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Appointed senior fellow (2022-2023) at the Institute for Advanced Studies (Central European University) to write a new book

• Three books published by the Oxford University Press

• “Origen and Scripture,” also translated into Spanish

• “Adrian’s Introduction to the Divine Scriptures”

• “The Oxford Handbook of Early Christian Biblical Interpretation”

• Numerous invited lectures around the globe in recent years (U.K., Germany, Canada, Italy, Australia, Hungary)

Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology,

School of Medicine

Research in Edwin Antony’s laboratory focuses on understanding the fundamental mechanisms of action of multi-domain and multi-subunit enzyme complexes. His research group utilizes presteady-state kinetics, single-molecule fluorescence, biophysical, and structural tools to identify the mechanistic steps that drive enzymatic activity and functional specificity. Currently, there are four major areas of research emphasis in his lab. First is the identification and mechanistic exploration of proteins involved in DNA repair and recombination (supported by current R01 grants from NIGMSGM130746 and GM133967). The second investigates the mechanism of ATP-dependent electron transfer in oxidoreductases such as nitrogenase and nitrogenase-like enzymes (supported by a grant from the DOE, DE-0000256945). The third emphasis is on the origins of substrate-binding specificity within multi-domain RNAbinding proteins (supported by startup funds). Finally, his research group is focused extensively on method development using noncanonical amino acids to generate site-specifically labeled proteins for biophysical studies. Over the past 10 years as an independent investigator, his group has made significant discoveries on the mechanism of action of many enzymes.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Solved the mechanism of RPA regulation by a chaperone protein called Rtt105 (Kuppa et. al., Nature Communications, 2022)

• Sahiti Kuppa, a graduate student in the group, received the prestigious F99/K00 fellowship from the National Cancer Institute

• In collaboration with the Sofia Origanti group in the biology department, uncovered a novel signaling axis that controls chromosome segregation during mitosis (Rosham et. al., Under Review)

186 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022

Enrico Di Cera

M.D.

Alice A. Doisy Professor and Chair, School of Medicine

Enrico Di Cera is the Alice A. Doisy Professor and chair of the Edward A. Doisy Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Saint Louis University School of Medicine. He received his M.D. in 1985 from the Università Cattolica in Rome and did postdoctoral work at the University of Colorado Boulder. He joined the faculty at Washington University in St. Louis in 1990, where he eventually became the Roy and Diana Vagelos Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics and professor of internal medicine. He moved to his current position in 2010. Di Cera is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• First X-ray structure of prothrombin

• First cryo-EM structure of a coagulation factor

• First cryo-EM structure of a coagulation complex

James B. and Joan C. Peter Endowed Chair in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine

David Ford, Ph.D., is an expert in lipid metabolism and lipidomics. His research focuses on the intersection of lipids and cardiovascular disease. He discovered a group of lipids, chlorinated lipids, produced by white blood cells during infection. These lipids are produced during myocardial infarction, during the development of atherosclerosis, and during sepsis. As pioneers in the field of chlorinated lipids, the Ford Lab continues research on the role of chlorinated lipids in multiple human diseases including myocardial ischemia/reperfusion, heart failure, atherosclerosis, sepsis, and asthma. The chlorinated lipidome also has an application as a biomarker and mediator in accidental and chemical terror/warfare exposures to chlorine. Ford is an expert in mass spectrometry which, coupled with his background in biochemistry and physiology, provides unique opportunities to discover new molecules in the human body, and their roles in physiology and pathophysiology.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• New NIH R01 Award: Halolipid-Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Axis in Halogen Lung Injury

• Publication: Endothelial cell protein targeting by myeloperoxidase-derived 2-chlorofatty aldehyde (2022) Antioxidants 11:940, PMCID: PMC9138145

• Publication: Identification of novel neutrophil very long chain plasmalogen molecular species and their myeloperoxidase mediated oxidation products in human sepsis (2021) Redox Biology, 48:102208, PMCID: PMC8671113

187 RESEARCH INSTITUTE FELLOWS

Richard Grucza

Ph.D.

Professor, Family and Community Medicine, School of Medicine

Richard Grucza received his Ph.D. from the Division of Biology and Biomedical Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis and subsequently undertook postdoctoral training in biostatistics and epidemiology with a focus on mental health and addiction research. He was the recipient of the National Institute on Drug Abuse Mentored Research Scientist Development (K01) Award and joined the faculty in the Department of Psychiatry at Washington University School of Medicine. He has been the principal investigator on nine NIH or foundation grants related to substance misuse and has made significant contributions in the areas of alcohol, tobacco, and drug policy. His recent focus has been on opioid use disorder treatment and related policy issues, and he is currently pursuing projects related to patient-level barriers to medication treatment.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Invited op-ed on federal drug policy to appear in Scientific American print edition, November 2022

• Former mentee and current collaborator Andrew Plunk received an NCI MERIT award and COVID supplement to study smokefree public housing policies

• Publications of a paper on the safety of medication for opioid use disorder for high-risk patients in the American Journal of Psychiatry, JAMA Network Open, and Journal of Clinical Psychiatry

Professor, Family and Community Medicine, School of Medicine

Jeffrey Scherrer joined SLU’s Department of Family and Community Medicine in 2013. He has led the growth of NIH-funded research from zero dollars to ranking in the top 20 most NIH-funded departments of family and community medicine. His three areas of research focus on 1) health outcomes in mental illness, 2) mental health consequences of prescription opioid use, and 3) novel protective factors for dementia.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• “Our most recent research success was our ability to identify the type of opioid use most strongly associated with risk for new-onset depression. We had prior evidence that chronic opioid use increased the risk for depression but our most recent study indicated that among chronic prescription opioid users, the risk of depression was only present in daily and near-daily opioid users as compared to intermittent users.”

• “We have completed the enrollment of over 1,000 patients from SLUCare and Henry Ford Health into a prospective study of prescription opioid use and risk for adverse mental health outcomes, including risk for opioid use disorder.”

• “Last, growing research in family and community medicine has been a major career goal and we now have five funded investigators, two of whom (Drs. Gebauer and Bello) are new K23 awardees.”

188 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022

Mark Dykewicz

M.D.

Daniel Hoft

Raymond and Alberta Slavin Endowed Professor in Allergy and Immunology; Professor of Internal Medicine; Chief, Division of Infectious Diseases, Allergy and Immunology, School of Medicine

Mark Dykewicz, M.D., has authored more than 170 publications including research in rhinitis and asthma treatment, anaphylaxis, and drug allergy. A past chair of the FDA Pulmonary-Allergy Drugs Advisory Committee, he is an FDA advisor and has been chair of multiple Data and Safety Monitoring Boards and Safety Monitoring Committees for vaccine trials of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. He is a co-author of national and international clinical care guidelines on a range of diseases (including asthma, drug and food allergy, urticaria and anaphylaxis, sinusitis, and allergen immunotherapy), and most recently was chair of the Rhinitis

2020 Parameter of the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology and American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• “Systemic Allergic Reactions to SARS-CoV-2 Vaccination,” National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

Adorjan Endowed Chair of Infectious Diseases and Immunology; Director, Division of Infectious Diseases, Allergy and Immunology, SLU Medical Center; Director, Center for Vaccine Development; Principal Investigator, SLU Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Unit; Director, Stephen C. Peiper and Zi-Xuan Wang Institute for Vaccine Science and Policy

Daniel F. Hoft, M.D., Ph.D., is the director of the Division of Infectious Diseases, Allergy and Immunology at Saint Louis University School of Medicine. Since 1992, he has received continuous NIH funding, which has helped to pioneer the use of immunoinformatics to develop T cell-targeting “universal” vaccines for intracellular pathogens. In 2014 he became the principal investigator of SLU’s Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Unit (VTEU). He has earned national recognition for his contributions to science, which include the development of improved tuberculosis vaccines, the development of vaccines for Chagas disease, and conducting multiple phases 1-3 COVID-19 vaccine trials. Hoft was elected a fellow of the St. Louis Academy of Science in 2018, and in June 2020, elected to the National Vaccine Advisory Committee, which provides recommendations to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Clinical development of highly protective COVID-19 vaccines

• Identification of a tuberculosis (TB) antigen that induces protective gamma/delta T cells being tested in nonhuman primates

• Development of T cell-targeting influenza vaccines designed to provide more broadly protective (“universal”) immunity

• Discovery that a novel subset of CD4+ T cells that produce the cytokine IL-9 can protect against TB

189 RESEARCH INSTITUTE FELLOWS

Ranjit Ray Ph.D.

Professor with Tenure, Associate Division Director, Nephrology, School of Medicine; Medical Director of Living Donation, SSM-Saint Louis University Transplant Center

Krista Lentine, M.D., Ph.D., is professor of Medicine with tenure associate division director of nephrology, medical director of Living Donation, and Mid-America Transplant/Jane A. Beckman

Endowed Chair in Transplantation at SSM-Saint Louis University Transplant Center. Lentine actively participates in transplantrelated service, including as past chair of the OPTN/UNOS Living Donor Committee, current chair of the American Society of Transplantation (AST) Living Donor Community of Practice, cochair of the ‘Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Living Donor Guideline, Senior Staff of the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR), and a member of the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) Transplant Advisory Committee. She is a member of the ASN Policy and Advocacy Committee, and serves on multiple AST, AHA, NKF and KDIGO work groups related to transplant patient care. She publishes actively on topics related to organ donation, outcomes and health economics, and recently published a book on living donor care. Lentine is interested in professional social media and dissemination to support advocacy related to patient care and research initiatives. She chairs the Dissemination Workgroup of the NIH-funded APOLLO U01, and supports the local NKF in new initiatives such as the annual Fellows’ Renal Roundtable event.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• NKF Award of Excellence in Mentorship and Communication (November 2022, her 4th NKF award)

• Named director of the SRTR Living Donor Collective (January 2023)

• Reached 350th publication in Medline (January 2023)

• Selected for induction in the American Society of Clinical Investigation (April 2023) — Lentine will be the sixth SLU inductee, and the first in 20 years

Professor of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine

Ranjit Ray completed his M.S. and Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Calcutta, India, in 1983 and moved for postdoctoral research on virology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He joined Saint Louis University in 1993 as an associate professor at the Division of Infectious Diseases within the Department of Internal Medicine. He initiated research on various aspects of respiratory viruses and the potential use of viral envelope glycoproteins as a subunit vaccine. Subsequently, he initiated research on other viruses, including hepatitis C and E, Ebola, Zika, and SARS-CoV-2. For the last several years, he primarily emphasized diverse aspects of the hepatitis C virus (HCV). He contributed significantly to understanding the molecular mechanisms of HCV entry, pathogenesis, host defense, and vaccine development.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Ranjit Ray has modified HCV envelope glycoprotein antigens for induction of protective immune response and vaccine development using the mRNA-LNP platform in collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. The HCV mRNA-LNP vaccine is under consideration for evaluation in clinical trials. He also works on therapeutic potential against hepatocellular carcinoma, a common form of liver cancer.

• Initiated research on SARS-CoV-2 in understanding the molecular basis of pathogenesis and therapeutic modalities. He has made significant progress and reported the research findings in internationally reputed journals.

• He has published more than 150 research papers and is currently funded by two R01 research grants from NIH.

190 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022

Richard DiPaolo

Ph.D.

John Tavis

Ph.D.

Professor and Interim Chair, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine

Richard DiPaolo received a B.A. at the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. at Washington University in Saint Louis before completing a postdoctoral fellowship at the National Institutes of Health. He was recruited to SLU as an assistant professor in the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology in 2007. He was promoted to associate professor with tenure in 2013, full professor in 2018, and was appointed interim chair in 2021. He has received support for his research program from the American Cancer Society, the Arthritis National Research Foundation, the American Gastroenterological Association, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and several grants, including training grants from the National Institutes of Health.

DiPaolo has a strong track record for training scientists (Ph.D.s, M.D.s, and junior faculty) and collaborating with other scientists at SLU and other institutions.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• The DiPaolo Lab recently introduced a new technology to the SLU School of Medicine: single RNA sequencing. With this new technology, funded by a grant from the Research Institute, they have made several novel and important discoveries in immunology and cancer biology.

• They recently published important findings in top journals in the field that define genes expressed as individual cells in the stomach starting to transition into cancer. This discovery could allow doctors and researchers to identify precancerous cells before they develop into cancer, leading to better screening and prevention strategies. In addition, the lab recently described new immunotherapies that reversed cancer development in preclinical mouse models of gastric cancer.

• Finally, the lab is currently testing newly designed injectable biotherapeutics to treat/cure several autoimmune diseases that may also improve the success rate of transplanted tissue.

Professor of Virology, School of Medicine; Director of the Saint Louis University Institute for Drug and Biotherapeutic Innovation

John Tavis received his Ph.D. from Penn State University in 1990 and did postdoctoral studies at the University of California, San Francisco. He is the chairman of the Scientific Advisory Council for the annual International Hepatitis B Virus Meeting, the incoming chair of the International Coalition to Eliminate HBV (ICE-HBV), a member of the Scientific and Medical Advisory Board, and a member of the Hepatitis B Foundation. He received the Mission Hero Award from the American Cancer Society in 2018 for his efforts to combat virally induced cancer. He studies HBV replication and enzymology, currently focusing on the biochemistry of the HBV ribonuclease H and developing drugs to suppress HBV replication that target the ribonuclease H.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Prediction and validation of the HBV polymerase

3D structure

• Ongoing efforts to help control HBV-induced disease worldwide

• Leading development of the SLU Institute for Drug and Biotherapeutic Innovation

191 RESEARCH INSTITUTE FELLOWS

Ratna B. Ray

Ph.D.

Adriana M. Montaño

Ph.D.

Professor of Pathology, School of Medicine

Ratna Ray received her Ph.D. from the University of Calcutta, India, in 1985. She completed her postdoctoral training at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She joined Saint Louis University as an assistant professor in 1993. Ray’s group made a significant contribution to understanding the crosstalk between the hepatitis C virus and host cell factors in end-stage liver disease progression. Recently, her laboratory has been engaged with noncoding RNA and liver disease. She is interested in finding noninvasive biomarkers for early detection of liver cancer and additional therapeutic modalities against liver cancer. Ray’s laboratory is also engaged in cancer biology work. She showed that a natural product (bitter melon) has anticancer activity. Currently, she is investigating its role in the tumor microenvironment using oral and breast cancer model systems.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Ray’s group recently found Momordicine-I, a bioactive metabolite from a natural compound, which has anti-cancer activity. In a different study, they found that exosomes from severe COVID-19 patients enhance inflammasome activity in distant organs for augmentation of immunopathogenesis.

• In spring 2022, she received a new grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study “Developing new therapeutic strategies against head and neck cancer.”

• One of the postdoctoral fellows from her laboratory recently received a “Ramalingaswami Fellowship” in India [like K99/R00 in the USA] with a project in which he gained experience in her lab during his tenure.

Vice Dean for Research, Professor of Pediatrics and Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine

Adriana Montaño received her B.S. from the University of Los Andes (Bogotá, Colombia) and her Ph.D. from Gifu University (Japan). After completing the Ph.D. program, she received a postdoctoral fellowship from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) to study the molecular evolution of keratan sulfate and peptidoglycan recognition proteins at the Graduate University for Advanced Studies (Japan). She also served as a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Biochemistry at Kobe Pharmaceutical University (Japan) where she studied chondroitin sulfate metabolism and hyaluronidases. Montaño received an M.Sc. from Saint Louis University in health outcomes research and evaluation sciences with a concentration in clinical investigation. Montaño has over 25 years of research experience on lysosomal storage disorders. Her research has set the basis for the understanding of Morquio A disease (MPS IVA) and Sly disease (MPS VII) by providing insights into the natural history of patients showing their heterogeneity in phenotype and genotype.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Inducted as a senior member of the National Academy of Inventors

• Named as vice dean of research - SLU School of Medicine

• Working on reorganizing the research enterprise at the School of Medicine

192 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022

Ph.D.

William Beaumont Professor and Chair, School of Medicine

Daniela Salvemini received her B.Sc. in pharmacology from Kings College in London and her Ph.D. in pharmacology from the University of London under the mentorship of the late Nobel Prize winner Professor Sir John Vane. She pursued postdoctoral studies at the William Harvey Research Institute in London and Monsanto in St. Louis. Before joining Saint Louis University, Salvemini spent 15 years in the private sector where she led drug discovery efforts on novel anti-inflammatory agents and analgesics that contributed to the advancement of several therapeutics into clinical trials. Salvemini’s research interests are to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning neuropathic pain and develop therapeutics to target these mechanisms. Her work led to several seminal discoveries that resulted in the development of novel therapies that entered clinical trials. She has published over 250 peer-reviewed articles, holds many U.S. patents, and has been honored with several awards including the Pharmacia-ASPET Award in Experimental Therapeutics. She is a fellow of the Saint Louis Academy of Science and a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors.

Edward Jones Endowed Professor of Finance, Richard A. Chaifetz School of Business

Bidisha Chakrabarty has an active cross-disciplinary research portfolio and has been published in the top journals in finance, accounting, management, and decision sciences. Chakrabarty is also engaged in research with and for securities markets (SEC) and accounting (PCAOB) regulators. Her research has been recognized with national and international awards, grants from academic institutions, and stock exchanges. Chakrabarty has also received awards for her teaching from students and alumni, and for overall faculty excellence at the Richard A. Chaifetz School of Business. She is actively involved in community outreach efforts and has taught in a maximum-security federal prison and at a women’s halfway house, and was a pro bono consultant for Housing First, an organization that helps renters avoid illegal eviction.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Academy of Management Fellows Award, 2021

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• “In this last year, we secured about $5M in grants from the Department of Defense and NIH in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Baltimore to pursue studies on a non-opioid-based drug discovered in my lab for the treatment of migraines.”

• “In July 2022, our lab was awarded a five-year $2.7 million R01 grant from the National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke that will allow us to further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms engaged by oxysterols in the spinal cord in the development of central sensitization associated with chronic neuropathic pain states and the development of non-opioid-based therapies. This came from a collaboration with Chris Arnatt, Ph.D.”

• “In September 2022, our lab was awarded a five-year $2.3 million R01 grant from the National Cancer Institute to explore our discovery of a novel mechanism in the brain that drives the development of cognitive deficits associated with the use of chemotherapy. This work is anticipated to facilitate the repurposing of FDA-approved drugs to address this unmet medical need.”

• NYU-NSE Capital Markets Grant Award, 2021

• London Stock Exchange Best Paper Award, 2020

193 RESEARCH INSTITUTE FELLOWS

Marcus Painter

Ph.D.

Nitish Singh

Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Finance, Richard A. Chaifetz School of Business; Research Associate of the Taylor Geospatial Institute

Marcus Painter’s research uses novel sources of data such as satellite imagery and geospatial foot traffic to study open questions in financial markets, corporate finance, and political economy. Painter’s research has been published in well-regarded academic journals such as the Review of Financial Studies, the Journal of Financial Economics, and the Journal of Public Economics, and has been cited in numerous media outlets including The Wall Street Journal, The Economist, The New York Times, The Atlantic, Financial Times, and The Washington Post, among others. Prior to his academic career, Painter worked as a senior portfolio analyst at Landmark Bank in Columbia, Missouri. Painter earned his bachelor’s degree in finance from the University of Missouri and his Ph.D. in finance from the University of Kentucky.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• His paper “The value of differing points of view: Evidence from financial analysts’ geographic diversity” (with Will Gerken) was accepted for publication at the Review of Financial Studies in 2022.

• His paper “An inconvenient cost: The effects of climate change on municipal bonds” was published in the Journal of Financial Economics, 135 (2), 2020, 468-482.

• His paper “Firm statements, consumer political beliefs, and the limits of stakeholder capitalism” won the Best Paper in Corporate Finance Award at the Financial Management Association Meeting (2021).

David Orthwein Endowed Professor of International Business, Richard A. Chaifetz School of Business

Nitish Singh, David Orthwein Professor of International Business, received his Ph.D. from Saint Louis University in 2003. After teaching at California State University, Chico from 2003 to 2007, he returned to SLU, where he founded two certificate programs, one in corporate ethics and compliance management and the other in web globalization. Singh’s research examines global strategy, global e-business, localization, international marketing, ethics and compliance, corporate responsibility, and environmental sustainability. He has written over 80 scholarly articles and four books. His work has been cited 5,000 times. Additionally, he has given 86 conference presentations and developed Arabic web localization software. Furthermore, the U.S. Department of Education, Qatar Foundation, CSU, and various corporations have supported his educational efforts. He has also received research, teaching, and service awards.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Awarded Endowed Professorship: David Orthwein Professor of Int. Business

• Recently surpassed 20 publications in highly ranked academic journals

• Recipient of a highly competitive international grant from the Qatar National Research Foundation

194 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022

Ph.D.

Edwards

Professor of Chemistry, School of Science and Engineering

James Edwards graduated from Saint Louis University in 1999 with his Bachelor of Arts in chemistry and his Master of Science in 2001. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Michigan and his postdoctoral research was conducted at the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Center for Diabetic Complications. Edwards started his academic career at the University of Maryland as an assistant professor before moving to SLU in 2012. The Edwards Lab investigates the changes in metabolism that occur in diabetic complications. To do this, new chemical analysis methods are needed to detect smaller amounts of materials with higher sensitivity. These methods are applied to single cells and single islets. The Edwards Lab has been funded by the American Heart Association, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Science Foundation.

Istvan Kiss

Ph.D.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Edwards’ team recently discovered four new small molecules (called metabolites) that exist in nature. These molecules appear to be involved in a process called oxidative stress, which is important to diabetes, cancer, and inflammation.

• Analyzing samples quickly to improve drug discovery and diagnostics is an important part of biotechnology. We’re now able to analyze 96 samples at the same time using a technique called mass spectrometry. This should allow us to get answers and form new hypotheses much faster than previous work.

• Green chemistry has become an important part of his lab and the industry. Analyzing samples requires the use of industrial solvents. His method has used carbon dioxide to replace these solvents to give a cleaner, better performance.

Professor of Chemistry, School of Science and Engineering

Istvan Kiss received his undergraduate and Ph.D. degrees at the University of Debrecen (Hungary) with a dissertation on machine learning of chaotic chemical reactions. After postdoctoral study at the University of Virginia, he joined the Department of Chemistry at Saint Louis University in 2007. The research in the Kiss group is on complex chemical systems with applications to network science, circadian rhythms, and morphogenic instabilities in corrosion. In addition to being a recipient of the National Science Foundation CAREER award, he also received funding from the National Institutes of Health and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Kiss has published 128 articles, many of them in highimpact journals such as Nature, Science, Nature Communications, and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Publication in a prestigious journal, Nature, on “Braess’s paradox and programmable behavior in microfluidic networks”

• DARPA grant on “Extending the Fatigue Life of Al-Mg and Mg-Al alloys through Physics Based Design and Control of Morphogenic Instabilities During Key Stages of Corrosion Damage Evolution”

• Invited Gordon Research Conference presentation on “Order by Disorder: Heterogeneity Induced Synchronization in Electrochemical Oscillator Networks”

195 RESEARCH INSTITUTE FELLOWS

Marvin J. Meyers

Ph.D.

Flavio Esposito Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Chemistry, School of Science and Engineering; Co-Director of the SLU Institute for Drug and Biotherapeutic Innovation; Chemistry Graduate Program Coordinator

Marvin Meyers is an experienced medicinal chemist and drug discovery scientist. Upon completion of his Ph.D. in chemistry at the University of Illinois Urbana–Champaign, he spent a decade at Pharmacia and Pfizer working on new drug discovery for a variety of diseases resulting in two novel compounds entering human clinical trials. Since joining Saint Louis University in 2010, his research focus has shifted to the identification of novel drug candidates for rare and infectious diseases including cryptosporidiosis, malaria, tuberculosis, hepatitis B virus, herpes simplex virus, cryptococcal meningitis, and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. This work is highly collaborative where Meyers partners with leading disease experts to form complementary interdisciplinary teams with the goal of identifying drug candidates for clinical trials.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Progress on projects toward new treatments for infectious diseases

• Students presenting their work at local and national meetings

• Contributions as a member of the External Scientific Advisory Committee for the Center for Therapeutics Discovery at the Cleveland Clinic

Associate Professor, School of Science and Engineering

Flavio Esposito is an associate professor of computer science. He obtained his B.S. and M.S. in telecommunication engineering from the University of Florence, Italy, and his Ph.D. in computer science from Boston University. His research centers on the intersection of networked systems and artificial intelligence. Before joining SLU, Esposito was a senior software engineer and worked in a few research laboratories in Europe and the U.S. He is a principal investigator on several research awards from the National Science Foundation. His funded projects include edge computing, machine learning for network management, next-generation wireless networks, distributed artificial intelligence, and computer security.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• NSF Grant-CNS Core: Small: Collaborative Research: HEECMA: A Hybrid Elastic Edge-Cloud Application Management Architecture (500K)

• NSF Grant-CC* Integration-Small: A Software-Defined Edge Infrastructure Testbed for Full-stack Data-Driven Wireless Network Applications (500K)

• NSF Grant-Collaborative Research: CPS: TTP Option: Medium: Sharing Farm Intelligence via Edge Computing (1.2M)

196 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022

Abby Stylianou Ph.D.

Fellow, Taylor Geospatial Institute; Assistant Professor, Department of Computer Science, School of Science and Engineering

Abby Stylianou’s research has focused on building very large data sets of images and their metadata, and the deep learning approaches to digest and understand those data sets for a variety of tasks. These tasks include performing hotel-specific image retrieval to locate victims of sex trafficking who have been photographed in hotels, making measurements of the natural environment in timelapse imagery to understand climate change, and observing how individuals interact with the world around them in outdoor webcam images to support better design of the built environment. She is additionally interested in how machine learning and computer vision approaches can be used in agriculture and plant breeding to develop more sustainable, more resilient, and healthier crops.

Banpu Chair in Sustainability, Professor of Atmospheric Sciences, School of Science and Engineering

Benjamin de Foy is an atmospheric scientist whose research focuses on data mining and computer modeling of air pollution. After recieving a Ph.D. in engineering from Cambridge University, de Foy worked with a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor, Mario Molina, on a project to improve the air quality in Mexico City. He now researches air pollution in places ranging from East St. Louis to Tibet and teaches classes on climate change. He works extensively with satellite remote sensing of air quality around the globe. His latest collaboration is on a project to deploy hundreds of air quality monitors to cities and rural areas in seven countries in South Asia: Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Nepal, Burma, Sri Lanka, and the Maldives.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Named to the 2022 Saint Louis Business Journal’s 40 Under 40

• Selected as a 2022 Google Research Scholar (one of fewer than 200 in the world)

• Received two separate best paper awards (tied) for “Classification and Visualization of Genotype × Phenotype Interactions in Biomass Sorghum” and “What Does TERRA-REF’s High Resolution, Multi Sensor Plant Sensing Public Domain Data Offer the Computer Vision Community?” at the IEEE/CVF CVPR Workshop on Computer Vision Problems in Plant Phenotyping and Agriculture, 2021

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• In progress: Higher-than-expected methane emissions in megacities around the world detected by the TROPOMI sensor on board the Sentinel 5-Precursor satellite

• High-resolution mapping of pollution sources in megacities in South Asia using retrievals from the TROPOMI sensor identifies missing sources in emission inventories

• Detailed data mining of air quality data identified the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown at the local level in Beijing

197 RESEARCH INSTITUTE FELLOWS

Vasit Sagan

Ph.D.

Lupei Zhu Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Geospatial Science; Acting Director of the Taylor Geospatial Institute; Member of the National Geospatial Advisory Committee

Vasit Sagan leads the Taylor Geospatial Institute’s efforts to harness the power of partnership with industry, government agencies, and research entities to develop geospatial research addressing some of the world’s greatest challenges. Previously, Sagan served as the founding director of Saint Louis University’s Geospatial Institute (GeoSLU) and directed SLU’s campuswide geospatial research and training programs across campus. Under his leadership, GeoSLU secured over $10M in external grants and contracts and played an important role in the creation of TGI. Sagan’s research focuses on developing state-of-the-art computer vision technologies, AI/ machine learning, and sensor/information fusion algorithms for studying food and water security, ecosystems, and social instability from local to global scales.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• The Launch of the Taylor Geospatial Institute, for which Sagan serves as acting director. “We have submitted over $75 million in external grant proposals since then.”

• “I have developed successful R&D partnerships with companies such as Bayer and SynMax, securing over $360K/year in funding.”

• Secured a $2.5M National Science Foundation (NSF) grant with other collaborators. One of the NSF grants is to establish the Taylor Geospatial Institute Regional AI Learning System (TGI RAILS) high-performance computing system dedicated to supporting faculty and researchers across the TGI consortium, elevating SLU’s capabilities in high-performance computing.

Professor of Geophysics, School of Science and Engineering

Lupei Zhu is currently a professor of geophysics at the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Saint Louis University. He received his B.S. from the University of Science and Technology of China in 1985 and his Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in 1998. He then did his postdoctoral research at the University of Southern California and Caltech before joining SLU as an assistant professor in 2001. He is a recipient of the F. Beach Leighton Fellowship in geophysics at Caltech in 1996, the Citation of the SLU President and Dean of the Graduate School for excellence in research in 2005, and was appointed a fellow of the SLU Research Institute in 2022.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Li, Z., 1. L. Zhu1., T. Officer, F. Shi, T. Yu, and Y. Wang. 2022, A machine-learning-based method of detecting and picking the first P-wave arrivals of acoustic emission events in laboratory experiments. 1. GJI1., 1. doi:10.1093/gji/ggac1481.

• Feng Shi, Yanbin Wang, Jianguo Wen, Tony Yu, 3. L. Zhu4., Taizi Huang, and Kelin Wang. 2022, Metamorphism-facilitated faulting in deforming orthopyroxene: implications for global intermediate-depth seismicity. 5. PNAS6., 119, e2112386119, 7. doi:10.1073/pnas.21123861198.

• Liu, Y., and 10. L. Zhu11. 2021, Joint Inversion for 1-D Crustal Seismic S- and P-wave Velocity Structures with Interfaces and Its Application to the Wabash Seismic Zone. 12. GJI13., 14. doi:10.1093/gji/ggab09215.

198 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022

Koyal Garg

Associate Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Science and Engineering

Koyal Garg completed her graduate work at Virginia Commonwealth University (Richmond, Virginia), followed by postdoctoral fellowships at the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research (San Antonio, Texas) and the University of Illinois Urbana–Champaign. Garg’s musculoskeletal tissue engineering lab at Saint Louis University is focused on the development of regenerative and rehabilitative therapies for the restoration of functional muscle tissue following traumatic musculoskeletal injuries. Her lab is funded by several awards and grants from external and internal sources including the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Defense. Garg’s research has resulted in three book chapters, 47 peer-reviewed journal articles, and 69 poster/podium presentations at various scientific conferences. A startup company (GenAssist, Inc.) has spun out of her lab for the commercialization and clinical translation of the scaffold technology developed by her team.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Renewal of R15 grant (NIGMS) titled “Proregenerative Immunotherapies for Volumetric Muscle Loss” by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS). Silviya Zustiak, Ph.D., and Richard DiPaolo, Ph.D., will serve as co-investigators on this three-year project which will combine regenerative biomaterials with immunomodulatory factors to boost muscle recovery following traumatic injury.

• Publication in Tissue Engineering: Part A (Impact Factor: 4.080): Garg and her research team published an article titled “Laminin-111 Enriched Fibrin Hydrogels Enhance Functional Muscle Regeneration Following Trauma.” This study, funded by a Department of Defense Grant, showed that an acellular scaffold composed of fibrin and laminin-111 extracellular matrix proteins can improve muscle regeneration and function in a rat model of volumetric muscle loss injury.

• Garg was awarded a Neuromodulation and Regenerative Rehabilitation Pilot Grant to carry out the proposal, “Combined Application of Regenerative and Rehabilitative Therapies to Enhance Muscle Mass and Function Following Volumetric Muscle Loss.” This proposal will integrate previously optimized regenerative and rehabilitative technologies to accelerate the functional recovery of muscle tissue following trauma, hopefully improving the quality of life for VML-injured patients.

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering; Associate Dean of Research and Innovation for the School of Science and Engineering; Director of the CHROME Lab; Special Assistant to the Vice President of Research and Partnerships for Innovation

Jenna Gorlewicz directs the Collaborative Haptics, Robotics, and Mechatronics (CHROME) Lab at Saint Louis University. Her research interests include human-centered design, haptic and multimodal interfaces, robotics, medical devices, engineering education, and entrepreneurship. Her current research projects include a protactile-inspired wearable haptic sleeve; multimodal digital graphics for accessibility; smart, tangible learning manipulatives; social connectedness in telerobotics; wearable medical devices; and a hockey puck for the blind, to name a few. Gorlewicz is invested in use-inspired research and translational initiatives, and has been awarded NSF I-Corps, SBIR, and Convergence Accelerator funding. Gorlewicz also received the National Science Foundation CAREER award in 2019. She is co-founder of an educational technology company, Vital, focused on bridging the digital graphics accessibility gap in STEM education. Her passion for research and innovation has led her into administrative roles as associate dean in the School of Science and Engineering and special assistant to the Vice President for Research at SLU, which she began in 2022.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• NSF Phase I Convergence Accelerator Grant in 2023

• Two Best Paper Awards in 2022 covering work on smart tangibles for STEM education

• A collaborative NIH Award investigating the role of tactile number expressions for multisensory vision and hearing loss using wearable haptics in 2022

• SLU Faculty Excellence Award in 2021

199 RESEARCH INSTITUTE FELLOWS
Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering; Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education, School of Science and Engineering

Scott Sell’s Tissue Engineering Scaffold Fabrication Lab focuses on the fabrication and evaluation of tissue engineering scaffolds capable of replicating both the form and function of the native extracellular matrix (ECM). Of principal interest is the fabrication of scaffolds capable of promoting wound healing and the filling of large tissue defects, as well as orthopedic applications such as bone and intervertebral disc repair. Sell is also heavily interested in STEM education. He has worked closely with both the Kern Entrepreneurial Engineering Network (KEEN) and the Coleman Foundation and was selected to participate in the National Academy of Engineering’s Frontiers of Engineering Education Symposium in 2016. Sell has over 90 peer-reviewed publications, over 200 conference abstracts, over 6,000 citations of his work, and has submitted 10 patents and invention disclosures.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• One of the founders and part of the leadership team for the SLU Center for Additive Manufacturing, which was launched in November 2019

• Recently became the associate dean for undergraduate education in the new School of Science and Engineering, which was officially launched in July 2022

• Katherine Hixon, who did her Ph.D. work in the Sell Lab, began a tenure-track faculty position in the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College in January 2022.

Assistant

Professor of Nutrition and Dietetics, Doisy College of Health Sciences

Yi Li obtained his Ph.D. in human nutrition at Case Western Reserve University, obtained his postdoc training for research at Yale University and Duke University, and completed his teaching training at Yale University. His research interest is in the areas of nutritional biochemistry and nutritional genomics. He has been working to address epigenetic modifications caused by nutrition and lifestyle factors involved in developing chronic diseases, such as obesity and Type 2 diabetes. He is an active professional member of the American Society for Nutrition, the American Diabetes Association, and the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. He has been serving on the editorial board of several biomedical research journals, including: the Journal of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Obesity Journal, and The Open Biochemistry Journal.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• JIT pilot funding program funds ($5,000, Washington University Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, 05/02/2022–05/01/2023)

• Li, Y. (2022) Transgenerational transmission of epigenetic modifications in development of obesity and other chronic diseases. American Journal of Biomedical Science and Research, 16, 468-471. DOI: 10.34297/AJBSR.2022.16.002257

• Li, Y. (2022) Epigenetic modifications in obesity and type 2 diabetes. The Open Biochemistry Journal, 16. DOI: 10.2174/874091X-v16-e2206271

200 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022
Yi Li Ph.D.

J. Cameron Anglum

Ph.D.

Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Education Policy and Equity, School of Education

J. Cameron Anglum is an assistant professor of education policy and equity in the School of Education at Saint Louis University. Anglum’s research and teaching concentrate on the economics of education policy with a focus on the intersection of education finance and teacher labor markets. In particular, Anglum focuses on the provision of educational resources and the relationship between public policy and socioeconomic, racial, and ethnic inequality. Anglum was the recipient of a National Academy of Education/ Spencer Foundation dissertation award and the Association for Education Finance and Policy new scholar award. He received his Ph.D. and M.S.Ed. in education policy and his B.A. in economics, all from the University of Pennsylvania.

Professor of Mathematics, Science, and STEM Education; Founder and Director of the Institute for STEM Collaboration, Outreach, Research, and Education (iSCORE)

Christa Jackson, professor of mathematics, science, and STEM education in the School of Education, holds a B.S. in elementary education from Evangel University, a M.S.Ed in natural science from Missouri State University, and a Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction with an emphasis in mathematics education from the University of Missouri–Columbia. She taught 11 years in the Springfield Public School District in Springfield, Missouri. Her research focuses on instructional practices teachers use to afford opportunities for students from diverse cultures, ethnicities, and socioeconomic backgrounds to learn mathematics and STEM while simultaneously fostering productive STEM identities. She examines the development, use, and implementation of integrated STEM curriculum as well as the influence of curricular materials and standards. Jackson has developed integrated STEM materials for NEWTON, DESCARTES, and EDISON.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Being awarded an NSF grant to study the STEM teacher workforce: Co-principal investigator: “Preparing for the Future of the STEM Teacher Workforce in the 21st Century: Leveraging Multi-contextual Evidence.” National Science Foundation. $491,943. With T. Nguyen. June 2022–May 2025.

• Publishing a paper examining preferences for private school choice, first authored by a student advisee: Shelton, A., Anglum, J. C., Rhinesmith, E., & Burrola, A. (2022). Who supports MO school choice? Evidence from likely voters in Missouri. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 30(81), 1-30. https://doi. org/10.14507/epaa.30.7159

• Publishing a paper examining the growth of the four-day school week in Missouri with a student advisee: Anglum, J. C., & Park, A. (2021). Keeping up with the Joneses: District adoption of the 4-day school week in rural Missouri. AERA Open, 7(1), 1-23. https://doi.org/10.1177/23328584211002842

Her research has been supported through grants from organizations such as the National Science Foundation, the Institute of Education Sciences, and the Department of Education. Her research has been published in refereed journals including International Journal of STEM Education, Teaching Equity and Excellence in Mathematics, School Science and Mathematics, Teacher Education and Practice, and Mathematics Teacher Education and Development. Currently, she is serving as the president of the School Science and Mathematics Association and is an associate editor for two journals: Mathematics Teacher: Learning and Teaching PK-12 and Investigations in Mathematics Learning.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Establishment of the Institute for STEM Collaboration, Outreach, Research, and Education (iSCORE) at SLU

• Conceptualization of the Equity-Oriented STEM Literacy Framework and the development of the Integrated STEM Practices

• Designing and researching the implementation of integrated STEM curriculum

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Nomi

Gary Ritter

Ph.D.

Associate Professor, School of Education; Associate Director of the Sinquefield Center for Applied Economic Research

Takako Nomi is an associate professor in education policy and equity and the associate director of the Sinquefield Center for Applied Economic Research. Prior to joining SLU, she was a senior researcher at the University of Chicago Consortium on school research. Nomi’s current research areas include issues related to college readiness, transitions from high school to postsecondary education and the workforce, and policies and programs supporting persistence and degree attainment overall and in STEM. Nomi’s research has been supported by the Institute of Education Sciences, the Spencer Foundation, and the American Educational Research Association. Her publications have appeared in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, American Educational Research Journal, and Journal of Human Resources. She serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Research on Educational Effectiveness.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• IES-funded projects

• PNAS publication

• Co-leading SCAER and increasing the research capacity through building collaborations with the University of Missouri–Kansas City, the University of Missouri–Columbia, and state education agencies. The current studies on STEM workforce development led state agencies to link K-12 student data to six years of postsecondary data to track students’ college completion for the first time in Missouri.

Professor and Dean, School of Education

Gary Ritter is a professor and dean of the School of Education at Saint Louis University. Since taking the role as dean in 2018, Ritter has focused on growing programs that are evidence-based, academically rigorous, and of direct service to the St. Louis region. His primary areas of interest are teacher quality, teacher evaluation, postsecondary access for low-income students, and the implementation and evaluation of programs aimed at improving educational outcomes for low-income students. Ritter’s work has been published in the Review of Educational Research, Education Finance and Policy, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, Educational Policy, Education Policy Analysis Archives, Education and Urban Society, Journal of Education Finance, Journal of School Choice, Education Next, and Phi Delta Kappan.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• In spring 2022, along with colleagues from Mathematica Policy Research, the School of Education was awarded a five-year contract from the U.S. Department of Education to manage the Missouri partnership within the U.S. Regional Education Lab - Central.

• The SLU PRiME Center, which Ritter developed with School of Education colleagues in 2019 to disseminate research evidence to policymakers, school leaders, and other interested constituents, was funded for another three-year grant cycle in 2022.

• In 2021, with colleagues and graduate students from Saint Louis University, Harvard University, and the University of Arkansas, Ritter published two primary studies evaluating college access programs in top journals from the American Educational Research Association.

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Denise Côté-Arsenault

Ph.D., R.N., CPCLC, FNAP, FAAN

Hendricks-Ferguson

Ph.D.

Denise Côté-Arsenault has a Bachelor of Science in nursing and a master’s in childbearing family nursing/nurse education from Syracuse University, a Ph.D. in nursing from the University of Rochester, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in women’s health research at the University of Washington, Seattle. She has a clinical background in childbearing family nursing with many years in childbirth education, labor, delivery, postpartum and neonatal areas, lactation consultation, and perinatal loss. Côté-Arsenault’s research over the past 25 years has focused on women’s experiences of pregnancy after prior perinatal loss, couples’ experiences of continuing pregnancy with a life-limiting fetal condition, and perinatal palliative care.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• She was a Fulbright Scholar in 2021 at Edinburgh Napier University and conducted an ethnographic study of perinatal bereavement care in Edinburgh, Scotland.

• Côté-Arsenault is co-editor, with her research colleague Erin Denney-Koelsch, M.D. The book, “Perinatal Palliative Care: A Clinical Guide,” published by Springer Nature in 2020.

• Côté-Arsenault was the principal investigator on the study “Looking for Answers: Parent Experiences with Perinatal Autopsy” with SLU pathologists Sherri Besmer, M.D., and Katie Hanson, M.D. Their manuscript is ‘in print’ in Death Studies.

Irene Riddle Endowed Chair and Professor, Trudy Busch Valentine School of Nursing

Verna Hendricks-Ferguson is the Irene Riddle Endowed Chair at the Trudy Busch Valentine School of Nursing at Saint Louis University. Her research has evaluated: (a) bereaved parent concerns about symptoms experienced by children during hospice care and preferences to receive early palliative care and end-of-life (PC/ EOL) information; (b) pediatric oncology nurses’ perspectives about engaging in PC/EOL discussions with patients and families; and (c) an MD/RN delivered early PC/EOL communication intervention to parents of children with a poor prognosis cancer. Her research has been funded by several funding organizations (i.e., Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation for Childhood Cancer, Oncology Nursing Society, Sigma Theta Tau Nursing Honor Society, SLU, National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Nursing Research, and National Cancer Institute).

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• 2022: St. Louis Magazine in Nursing Excellence, Research Award

• 2022: Trudy Busch Valentine School of Nursing, Research Award

• 2022: APHON: Distinguished Nurse Researcher Award

• Hendricks-Ferguson is PI of the NIH/NCI six-year funded R01 multisite grant titled: “Evaluation of the Communication Plan Early through End-of-Life (COMPLETE) Intervention” (R01 CA235632-01A1; from 2019-2025).

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Patricia and James R. Hemak Professor of Maternal Child Nursing, Trudy Busch Valentine School of Nursing Verna

Helen Lach

Professor, Associate Dean for Research, Interim Ph.D. Program Director, Trudy Busch Valentine School of Nursing

Helen Lach has specialized in clinical care, teaching, and research related to care of older adults for over 25 years. She received her Ph.D. from Saint Louis University and completed a Claire Fagin Postdoctoral Fellowship funded by the John A. Hartford Foundation. Her research has focused on injury prevention, mainly falls in older people, and the related issue of fear of falling, and how to empower older adults and caregivers to maintain their health and quality of life. She is a fellow in the Gerontological Society of America and the American Academy of Nursing.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Quoted in The Washington Post about regaining confidence after a fall: https://www.washingtonpost.com/wellness/2022/07/12/fallregaining-confidence-elderly/

• Research briefs editor for the Journal of Gerontological Nursing

• A recent publication explored the use of the Rapid Geriatric Assessment tool developed at SLU for identifying fall risks, with the Geriatric Workforce Enhancement Program: https://journals. sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/07334648221124912

Professor of Behavioral Science and Health Education, College for Public Health and Social Justice

Juliet Iwelunmor is a global health researcher and an implementation scientist passionate about implementing sustainable solutions that improve health outcomes in resource-limited settings. She is currently a professor of global health at Saint Louis University. Her research interests involve using participatory and culture-centered approaches to implement and sustain evidence-based interventions in low to middle income countries and resource-limited settings. Notable projects include NIAID STAR (Stimulating Training and Access to HIV Research Experiences) for Underrepresented Minority Students, the Actions for Collaborative Community-Engaged Strategies for HPV (ACCESS-HPV) grant, and Innovative Tools to Expand HIV Self-Testing (I-TEST).

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Iwelunmor is currently leading five federally funded grants from the National Institutes of Health, including:

• NIAID STAR (Stimulating Training and Access to HIV Research Experiences for Under-Represented Minority Students): the project will build capacity in implementation science, crowdsourcing and related participatory methods, leading to innovative strategies to scale up evidence-based HIV interventions for underrepresented minority students. The project began August 2022.

• ACCESS-HPV (Actions for Collaborative CommunityEngaged Strategies for HPV): a $2.6 million NIH/NCI funded grant focused on engaging young girls and their mothers to increase uptake of essential HPV prevention services in Nigeria. The project began September 2022.

• I-TEST (Innovative Tools to Expand HIV Self-Testing), now in its fifth and final year, seeks to increase the uptake of HIV self-testing among young people in Nigeria.

• In the past year, Iwelunmor published 11 papers, of which 6 were with her current and prior students.

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Enbal Shacham

Ph.D.

Enbal Shacham has been researching the intersection of health and location using geospatial science and application, epidemiology, and behavioral science throughout her career. Her research has explored social and physical environmental factors and their impact on infectious and chronic diseases by leveraging technological advancements and data to improve health equity. The research she conducts is committed to growing insightful methods to better know and provide real-time data, analyses, and interventions for improving health in communities and clinic settings both domestically and internationally.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Part of the team that grew the Geospatial Institute from dreams of GeoSLU to the current Taylor Geospatial Institute, where the focus is on growing collaborative geospatial science and application across eight institutions

• Recently named associate dean for research at the College for Public Health and Social Justice

• She has grown her research team of undergraduate, graduate and doctoral students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty to conduct collaborative projects across several domains, including business, environmental ecology, veterinary science, and remote sensing as evidenced by new and upcoming publications and proposals.

Professor of Social Work, School of Social Work

Jin Huang is interested in global social policies, with a particular focus on structural and institutional strategies to build financial capability and assets for all families to achieve financial inclusion and equity. Huang is one of the co-leads of the network to “Build financial capability and assets for all,” which is one of the 13 Grand Challenges for Social Work. He has published more than 100 articles in peer-reviewed journals, including JAMA Pediatrics, American Journal of Public Health, Social Science & Medicine, Social Science Research, and Social Service Review. Huang has collaborated with researchers on multiple international financial capabilities and assetbuilding and Child Development Account policy projects, including mainland China, Taiwan, Singapore, Israel, and others.

FEATURED ACCOMPLISHMENTS

• Delivered keynote address at the 2022 Financial Literacy Education Forum in mainland China, drawing an audience of over 2.65 million viewers

• In 2022, the Chinese government established a standard guideline for financial social work practice, which is based on Huang’s research and consultation services collaborated with Yingying Zhang, a SLU doctoral student.

• In July 2022, California launched the nation’s largest Child Development Account policy enrolling 3.4 million children. This is the seventh state to create a statewide CDA policy for children. The policy has been modeled in SEED OK research, a Child Development Account experimental research in Oklahoma, for which Huang has been one of the key research team leaders for more than 10 years.

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Professor, Associate Dean for Research, College for Public Health and Social Justice; Acting Associate Director of the Taylor Geospatial Institute

PUBLISHED EXCELLENCE

Researchers at Saint Louis University share their findings via the printed page. These publications delve into key topics regarding morality, philosophy, research frameworks, and the implications of specific health conditions. The following section highlights some of the many works published by SLU’s research community in 2022.

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A patron visits the SLU-Madrid library.

The purpose of this book is to explore how American policing can break free from the historical cycles of crisis and controversy in which it is mired. The book offers diverse perspectives on how policing can overcome its historical challenges, as well as the contemporary crises confronting the profession. To make improvements in policing, we have to rethink basic assumptions about the profession, how it is structured and operates, and how we can reform problematic aspects of the American policing system and its formal and informal elements. The book brings together the views of contributors with diverse backgrounds and expertise to illuminate key aspects of the discussion about how we can rethink and reform American policing.

Cort W. Rudolph, Ph.D.

Age and Work: Advances in Theory, Methods, and Practice. Routledge, 2022.

The edited volume of “Age and Work: Advances in Theory, Methods, and Practice” presents a systematic collection of key advances in theory, methods, and practice regarding age(ing) and work. This cutting-edge collection breaks new ground by developing novel and useful theory, explaining underutilized but important methodological approaches, and suggesting original practical applications of emerging research topics.

The book begins with a prologue by the World Health Organization’s unit head for aging and health, an introduction on the topic by the editors, and an overview of past, current, and future workforce age trends. Subsequently, the first main section outlines theoretical advances regarding alternative age constructs (e.g., subjective age), the intersectionality of age with gender and social class, paradoxical age-related actions, generational identity, and integration of lifespan theories. The second section presents methodological advances regarding behavioral assessment, age at the team and organizational levels, longitudinal and diary methods, experiments and interventions, qualitative methods, and the use of archival data. The third section covers practical advances regarding age and job crafting, knowledge exchange,

the work/nonwork interface, healthy aging, absenteeism and presenteeism, and organizational meta-strategies for younger and older workers. The book concludes with an epilogue by an eminent scholar in age and work.

Written in a scientific yet accessible manner, the book offers a valuable resource for undergraduate and graduate students, academics in the fields of psychology and business, as well as practitioners working in the areas of human resource management and organizational development.

From a Distant Relation. Syracuse University Press, December 2021.

“From a Distant Relation” introduces English readers to the Yiddish literary writings of a major figure in modern Jewish culture. Mikhah Yosef Berdichevsky (1865-1921) was also a prolific author and scholar in Hebrew and German. His role in Jewish culture today is mainly in Israel or among scholars, who focus on his importance for Hebrew letters or early Zionism. The Yiddish Berdichevsky holds many surprises. Two historical-critical studies in the volume fit this work into the author’s broader life and cultural context. Notes to each story, as well as a glossary, concordance, bibliographies, and map, open new paths for new

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A. Schafer, Ph.D., M.S. Rethinking and Reforming American Policing. Palgrave, 2022.

readers. This subtle collection of short pieces about daily Jewish life in small Ukrainian towns speaks to themes that are as relevant today as they were a century ago: intergenerational struggle; fate, will, desire; and deep ambivalence about the meaning of home.

Emily Dumler-Winckler, Ph.D.

Modern Virtue: Mary Wollstonecraft and a Tradition of Dissent. Oxford University Press, 2022.

Modern societies are plagued with conflicts about basic beliefs, values, and ideals. What some call virtue, others count as vice. This book argues that the cultivation of virtues as well as contestation about them are part and parcel of the goods that Christians and democratic societies share in common. Drawing on the work of Mary Wollstonecraft, Emily DumlerWinckler aims to dissolve the anxieties of both defenders and despisers of virtue ethics and so form a rapprochement. Influenced by religious dissenters in 18th-century England, Wollstonecraft revolutionized ancient traditions of the virtues in modern ways for feminist and abolitionist aims. By elaborating on the specifically theological aspects of Wollstonecraft’s account, this book demonstrates the important role religious traditions have played in feminism and radical sociopolitical movements in the modern era. By treating the relation between modern

rights and virtues such as justice and friendship, Dumler-Winckler illuminates their vital relation and roles in modern democratic societies. With good reason, both modernity and virtue have cultured despisers. “Modern Virtue” provides an account of the virtues in modernity and, even, the virtues of modernity.

Scott R. Harris, Ph.D.

How to Critique Journal Articles in the Social Sciences (2nd Ed.). Waveland Press, 2022. Research articles form the bedrock of social science, but they can be unfamiliar and intimidating. Scott Harris’ succinct text helps readers appreciate the rigor and pitfalls of research by comparing it to more ordinary ways of knowing. Each chapter focuses on a key aspect of articles — such as sampling, measurement, and ethics — demystifying the complexities. A new chapter on research design explores how scientists choose a broad approach to study a topic (such as survey, experimental, or observational research), which then impacts subsequent research decisions. Engaging exercises help readers practice the book’s suggestions. Comprehensive yet succinct and accessible, the second edition of “How to Critique Journal Articles in the Social Sciences” gives readers the confidence to understand and evaluate social research for use in their education, careers, and personal lives.

Ana M. Montero, Ph.D.

De la literatura amorosa a la ética política: la obra de don Pedro de Portugal (1429-1466). University Press, Seville, Spain, 2021.

Traditional courtly love stories involve a disdainful lady, a tormented lover, and the unrestrained exhibition of extreme melancholy. Why would a 15th-century writer inject, within such a conventional narrative, images of savagery, genocides, and exorbitant violence taken from the Roman past? This question led Ana Montero to delve into the political substrata in the works of Pedro, constable of Portugal (1429-1466), a Portuguese writer still not recognized as a beacon for many of the literary experiments that would anticipate Golden Age masterpieces.

Her book, “From Love Narratives to Political Ethics: The works by Don Pedro, Constable of Portugal (14291466),” identifies a more incisive way of understanding pre-Machiavellian literature, close to Leo Strauss’ betweenthe-lines method of reading, that unfolds how subjectivity, political propaganda, and emotions — features usually associated to the post-Enlightenment literary landscape — were utilized by a generation adept at the art of spinning entertaining stories and ethical principles. This publication also received support from the Instituto de Estudos Medievais at Nova University in Lisbon, Portugal.

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Biopolitics After Neuroscience: Morality and the Economy of Virtue. Bloomsbury, 2022.

This book offers a provocative analysis of the neuroscience of morality. Written by three leading scholars of science, medicine, and bioethics, it critiques contemporary neuroscientific claims about individual morality and notions of good and evil. Winner of a 2021 prize from the Expanded Reason Institute, it connects moral philosophy to neoliberal economics and successfully challenges the idea that we can locate morality in the brain.

Instead of discovering the source of morality in the brain as they claim to do, the popularizers of contemporary neuroscience are shown to participate in an understanding of human behavior that serves the vested interests of contemporary political economy. Providing evidence that the history of claims about morality and brain function reach back 400 years, the authors locate its genesis in the beginnings of modern philosophy, science, and economics. They further map this trajectory through the economic and moral theories of Francis Bacon, David Hume, Jeremy Bentham, John Stuart Mill, and the Chicago School of Economics to uncover a pervasive colonial anthropology at play in the neuroscience of morality today.

The book concludes with a call for a humbler and more constrained neuroscience, informed by a more robust human anthropology that embraces the nobility, beauty, frailties, and flaws in being human.

Where Paralytics Walk and the Blind See: Stories of Sickness and Disability at the Juncture of Worlds. Princeton University Press, 2022.

In our age of biomedicine, society often treats sickness and disability as problems in need of a solution. Phenomena of embodied difference, however, have not always been seen in terms of lack and loss. “Where Paralytics Walk and the Blind See” explores the case of early modern Catholic Canada under French rule and shows it to be a period rich with alternative understandings of infirmity, disease, and death. Counternarratives to our contemporary assumptions, these early modern stories invite us to creatively imagine ways of living meaningfully with embodied difference today. At the heart of this book are a range of historical sources: Jesuit stories of illness in New France, an account of Canada’s first hospital, the hagiographic vita of Catherine de Saint-Augustin, and tales of miraculous healings wrought by a dead Franciscan friar. In an early modern world that

subscribed to a Christian view of salvation, both sickness and disability held significance for more than the body, opening opportunities for virtue, charity, and even redemption. When these reflections collide with modern thinking, the effect is a certain kind of freedom to reimagine what sickness and disability might mean to us.

Eleonore Stump, Ph.D.

The Image of God: The Problem of Evil and the Problem of Mourning. Oxford University Press, 2022.

The problem of evil has generated varying attempts at theodicy. To show that suffering is defeated for a sufferer, a theodicy argues that there is an outweighing benefit that could not have been gotten without the suffering. Typically, this condition has the tacit presupposition given that this is a post-Fall world. Consequently, there is a sense in which human suffering would not be shown to be defeated even if there were a successful theodicy because a theodicy typically implies that the benefit in question could have been gotten without the suffering if there had not been a Fall. There is a part of the problem of evil that would remain, then, even if there were a successful theodicy. This is the problem of mourning. Even defeated suffering in the post-Fall world merits mourning. How is this warranted

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mourning compatible with the existence of an omniscient, omnipotent, perfectly good God? The traditional response to this problem is the felix culpa view, which maintains that the original sin was fortunate because there is an outweighing benefit to sufferers that could not be gotten in a world without suffering. The felix culpa view presupposes an object of evaluation, namely, the true self of a human being, and a standard of evaluation for human lives. This book explores these and a variety of other topics in philosophical theology in order to explain and evaluate the role of suffering in human lives.

theodicy, namely that of Thomas Aquinas, is embedded. It explicates Aquinas’ account of the good for human beings, including the nature of love and union among persons. Eleonore Stump also makes use of developments in neurobiology and developmental psychology to illuminate the nature of such union.

Stump then turns to an examination of narratives. In a methodological section focused on epistemological issues, the book uses recent research involving autism spectrum disorder to argue that some philosophical problems are best considered in the context of narratives. Using the methodology argued for, the book gives detailed, innovative exegeses of the stories of Job, Samson, Abraham and Isaac, and Mary of Bethany.

In the context of these stories and against the backdrop of Aquinas’ other views, Stump presents Aquinas’ own theodicy, and shows that Aquinas’ theodicy gives a powerful explanation for God allowing suffering. She concludes by arguing that this explanation constitutes a consistent and cogent defense for the problem of suffering.

of the philosophical thought of Aquinas and be successful in transmitting the worldview he inherited, developed, altered, and argued for, while at the same time revealing to contemporary philosophers the strong connections there are between Aquinas’ interests and views and their own.

Wandering in Darkness: Narrative and the Problem of Suffering. Oxford University Press, 2010.

—Translated into Polish by Mateusz Przanowski and published as Wędrówka w ciemnościach. Narracja a problem cierpienia. Edited by

Only the most naive or tendentious among us would deny the extent and intensity of suffering in the world. Can one hold, consistently with the common view of suffering in the world, that there is an omniscient, omnipotent, perfectly good God? This book argues that one can.

“Wandering in Darkness” first presents the moral psychology and value theory within which one typical traditional

The New Cambridge Companion to Aquinas. Editor with Thomas Joseph White. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2022.

This volume aims to manifest the power

De Cruz,

Philosophy Illustrated. Oxford University Press, 2021.

Thought experiments are tools philosophers and scientists use to investigate how things are, without actually having to go out and experiment in the real world. This book presents 42 philosophical thought experiments. Each thought experiment is illustrated by Helen De Cruz (who is an illustrator as well as a philosopher) and is summarized in one or two paragraphs, which is followed by a brief exploration of its significance. Each thought experiment also includes a longer (approximately two pages) reflection, written by a philosopher who is a specialist in the field. De Cruz’s unique illustrations serve as visual and accessible starting points for classroom discussions in Intro to Philosophy courses.

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Michael Barber, S.J., Ph.D.

The Anthem Companion to Alfred Schutz. Anthem Press, 2022.

The Anthem Press (New York, London, New Delhi) publishes a series — “Anthem Companions to Sociology” — that provides collections of essays on the work of great social thinkers. There are volumes on Max Weber, Karl Marx, Talcott Parsons, Georg Simmel, and others. Michael Barber edited this volume of 10 papers by distinguished sociologists and philosophers on Alfred Schuzt (1899-1959), a sociologist and philosopher who fled Austria after Hitler’s Anschluss and taught at the New School for Social Research. Barber contributes one paper, and the papers in the volume examine Schutz’s thought on social relationships and social theory. This is a truly international undertaking with authors representing Europe, Latin America, Japan, and the United States.

This volume of Schutzian Research, edited as an annual by Michael Barber, contains the keynote addresses given at the biennial conference of The International Alfred Schutz Circle for Phenomenology and Interpretive Social Science. It contains papers by distinguished philosopher of race, George Yancy, and by Schutz scholar, Thomas Eberle, and by some participants in the conference.

Barcelona, focusing on the historical evolution of the movement in its major European stronghold. Intertwining historical, cultural, political, and symbolic readings, the book explores the process through which working-class identities and spaces were constructed in the city, along with what the author labels the “proletarian public sphere.” This space, which consisted of unions, cooperatives, social clubs, schools, and publishing presses, clashed with elite urban models and reached the peak of its power during the transformations that accompanied the Spanish Civil War. In the words of Mike Davis, distinguished professor emeritus, University of California, Riverside, it is a “revelatory history of a city of slums.” The book has, to date, been published in four languages.

Ángeles Encinar, Ph.D.

Las cuatro esquinas, de Manuel Longares. Cátedra , 2022.

Chris Ealham, Ph.D.

La lluita per Barcelona: classe, cultura i conflicte (1898-1937). Virus Editorial, 2022.

“La lluita per Barcelona” (The Struggle for Barcelona) studies anarchism in

“Las cuatro esquinas” (The Four Corners) is a novel made up of four short novels by one of Spain’s most prestigious novelists, Manuel Longares. It recreates 70 years of Spanish history. These four independent works — along with their different characters, narrative perspectives, and historical eras — form a collage that offers the reader the equivalent of an individual’s life in contemporary Spain.

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Schutzian Research, Volume 13. Zeta Books, 2022.

A meticulously re-edited collection of stories, “Celama (un recuento)” [Celama (a retelling)] presents a rearrangement of stories by famed Spanish writer Luis Mateo Díez. The narratives explore the disappearance of rural cultures and the depths and mysteries of the human heart — passion, melancholy, joy. Díez’s lucid and, at times, poignantly humorous prose provides glimpses into adversity and the human condition.

In “Libye, Guerres et Convoitises” (Libya, Wars and Covetousness), Barah Mikaïl examines the country 10 years after the outbreak of its “spring.” The different phases Libya has undergone highlight the many logics of division — political, institutional, ideological, military, even economic — all against a backdrop of power rivalries. Libyan political representatives are not exempt from responsibility; their disagreements have opened the way to the projection of foreign ambitions on Libyan territory.

Verónica

Teatro y memoria: Cinco piezas del exilio republicano. Editorial Fundamentos, 2022.

“Teatro y memoria” (Theater and Memory) is a compilation of dramatic works by five playwrights who focus on the experiences of Spaniards silenced during and following the Spanish Civil War. The majority of the plays were written in exile and illustrate the important role drama played in preserving Spanish cultural identity in their host countries.

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Barah Mikaïl, Ph.D. Libye, Guerres et Convoitises. L’Harmattan , 2022. Azcue, Ph.D. Celama (un recuento), de Luis Mateo Díez. Alfaguara, 2022.
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Students work with Ángeles Encinar, Ph.D., in the library on the SLU-Madrid campus.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Abby Stylianou, Ph.D.

Abby Stylianou, Ph.D., assistant professor of computer science, was one of fewer than 200 early faculty researchers around the world named as a Google Research Scholar Program recipient for 2022. Her project, “Using Deep Learning to Uncover Unknown Genotype x Phenotype Relationships in Crops,” seeks to use artificial intelligence to improve crop breeding pipelines to develop more resilient, sustainable, and healthy crops.

Human Trafficking Research

This year, Stylianou and Annamaria Szakonyi, Ph.D., participated in the initial phase of a national engagement studying the role of information technology in the context of domestic sex trafficking. The multidisciplinary research team contains criminal justice professionals, academic researchers, and private sector professionals led by Baylor University. This study was funded by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 2039678. and will continue with various breakout teams to solve specific problems identified during this initial study.

Whitney Postman, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Whitney Postman, Ph.D., assistant professor of speech, language, and hearing in the Doisy College of Health Sciences, completed the first year of a grant from the National Institute on Aging. The federal grant, titled “The COEQUAL Registry: Creating Opportunities to Increase Health Equity and Equality for Persons at Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias,” allocates $85,598 over the next three years. Postman is Saint Louis University’s principal investigator alongside Joyce E. Balls-Berry, Ph.D., MPE, from the Knight Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Postman published several articles this year, including:

• Postman, W.A., Fischer, M., Dalton, K., *Leisure, K., *Thompson, S., *Sankey, L., and *Watkins, H. (2022). Coupling Hearing Health With Community-Based Group Therapy for Cognitive Health in Low-Income African American Elders. Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, SIG-8 on Public Health Audiology

7:387-399. https://pubs.asha.org/ doi/10.1044/2021_PERSP-21-00110

• Postman, W.A., Fischer, M., and *Leisure, K. (2022). Cognitive Group Tackles Racial Disparities in Dementia Prevention. The ASHA Leader, May-June issue, 6-8. https://leader. pubs.asha.org/do/10.1044/leader. AE.27052022.cognition-africanamerican.6/full

The 2022 American SpeechLanguage-Hearing Association (ASHA) Convention

In addition, a poster presentation by Postman, four SLU students, and collaborators from the University of Cincinnati and Syracuse University, was accepted by the 2022 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Convention. The presentation, “Ultrasound Intra-Oral Visual Feedback for an Adult Case of Stroke-Induced Apraxia of Speech,” will be the inaugural national-level presentation of work conducted for Postman’s Research Growth Fund study, “Real-Time Ultrasound Intra-Oral Visual Feedback for Adult Acquired or Degenerative Motor-Speech Disorders.” In summer 2022, a case of corticobasal degeneration has been recruited for ultrasound intraoral imaging of progressive apraxia of speech mixed with spastic dysarthria.

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Anthony Breitbach, Ph.D., ATC

Anthony Breitbach, Ph.D., ATC, professor and vice dean in Saint Louis University’s Doisy College of Health Sciences, was recognized by the Association of Schools Advancing Health Professions (ASAHP) with the 2022 Darrell C. Mase Presidential Citation for leadership and service to the ASAHP. Breitbach serves as the chair of both the Partnerships, Alliances and Advocacy Committee and the Interprofessional Task Force. He represents ASAHP on the prestigious Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) Core Competencies Revision Work Group. He has served as the National Athletic Trainers’ Association liaison to ASAHP since 2015. In 2018, Breitbach was named an ASAHP Fellow and received their Outstanding Member Award.

In addition, Breitbach co-authored an invited paper “Global leadership in IPECP research; an intro to co-creation of best practice guidelines” in the September 2021 issue of the Journal of Interprofessional Education & Practice with distinguished colleagues from the Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative (CIHC) and the American Interprofessional Health Collaborative (AIHC). The paper is based on a

workshop at the Collaborating Across Borders VII (CAB VII) conference in Indianapolis in October 2019, which looked to promote and advance theorydriven, methodologically rigorous Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice (IPECP) research. Facilitators of the workshop also served as co-authors of the paper: Hossein Khalili (Ph.D., University of WisconsinMadison), Gail Jensen (Ph.D., Creighton University), Sharla King (Ph.D., University of Alberta, Canada), Barbara Maxwell (University of Indiana), Devin Nickol (M.D., University of Nebraska Medical Center), Andrea Pfeifle (Ed.D., Ohio State University), and John Gilbert (Ph.D., University of British Columbia, Canada).

They also engaged with Swiss colleagues Claudio Nigg, Ph.D., and Daniel Erlacher, Ph.D., from the University of Bern, as well as Justin Carrard, Ph.D., from the University of Basel in a Swiss Society of Sport Science webinar “Is Healthcare a Team Sport? Widening Our Lens on Interprofessional Collaboration and Education in Sport Science and Exercise Medicine” from Zurich on November 8, 2021. The presenters followed up with a manuscript with the same title, which was published in BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine in fall 2022.

Developing a Valid Measure of Financial Access

Interprofessional Collaboration in International Sports and Exercise Medicine

Breitbach has also been collaborating with Gert Ulrich, Ph.D., of the Careum Foundation in Zurich, Switzerland, on research regarding interprofessional collaboration in international sports and exercise medicine. They also published “Interprofessional collaboration among sport science and sports medicine professionals: an international cross-sectional survey” in the Journal of Interprofessional Care in 2022.

Julie Birkenmaier, Ph.D., professor of social work; Jin Huang, Ph.D., professor of social work; and Steven E. Rigdon, Ph.D., professor of epidemiology and biostatistics, were awarded a $295,632 grant from the National Endowment for Financial Education (NEFE) for the project “Developing a Valid Measure of Financial Access: From Conceptualization to Empirical Testing.” Investigators will work to develop an individual, reliable financial access scale for use in practice, research, and policymaking. The team began research in September 2022 and will continue through 2025.

215 ANNOUNCEMENTS

Flavio Esposito, Ph.D.

Flavio Esposito, Ph.D., assistant professor of computer science, received a grant for $500,000 from the National Science Foundation titled: “IntegrationSmall: A Software-Defined Edge Infrastructure Testbed for Full-stack Data-Driven Wireless Network Applications.” Over the next two years, the grant will allow researchers to build a wireless virtual network testbed at Saint Louis University, in collaboration with Northeastern University. Investigators will evaluate network management solutions that integrate the use of machine learning and artificial intelligence with programmable radios and programmable network switches.

Esposito also received an additional NSF grant in 2022, “Collaborative Research: CPS: TTP Option: Medium: Sharing Farm Intelligence via Edge Computing.” This grant will award investigators $1,227,049 over three years. Investigators aim to find a solution for sharing lessons learned from agricultural data collection and processing. Their focus is intersecting expertise in plant science, networked systems, software engineering, and geospatial science to report findings on crops in Missouri, Illinois, and Tennessee.

Yan Gai, Ph.D.

Yan Gai, Ph.D., associate professor of biomedical engineering, School of Science and Engineering, has received a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant (Award Number (FAIN): 2217032) for $200K, titled “Collaborative Research: PPoSS: LARGE: Co-designing Hardware, Software, and Algorithms to Enable Extreme-Scale Machine Learning Systems.” This is a collaboration with the University of Virginia and the University of Pittsburgh on machine learning and

the internet of things. Over the next five years, this study will establish Saint Louis University as a future distribution terminal to test the enhancement of human hearing and vision using a largescale artificial intelligence network.

Cort W. Rudolph, Ph.D.

Cort W. Rudolph, Ph.D., professor of psychology in the College of Arts and Sciences, was awarded a fellowship of APA Division 14, the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, in 2022.

Rudolph has also published nearly 33 peer-reviewed articles since 2021, including:

• “Short-Term Effects of Short-Term Work: Dynamics in Work Fatigue Across Two National Lockdowns” in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

• “Disentangling Between-Person and Reciprocal Within-Person Relations Among Perceived Leadership and Employee Well-being” in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology

Nori Katagiri, Ph.D.

Nori Katagiri, Ph.D., associate professor of political science, College of Arts and Sciences, published four works this year in various publications, including:

• “Explaining Cyberspace Dynamics in the COVID Era” in Global Studies Quarterly, Vo. 2, No. 3

• “Two explanations for the paucity of cyber-military, cross-domain operations” in the Journal of Cybersecurity, Vol. 8, No. 1

• “Assessing Japan’s cybersecurity policy: Change and continuity from 2017 to 2020,” in the Journal of Cyber Policy

• “The promise and challenge of launching cyber-military strikes: Japan’s ‘cross-domain’ operational concepts,” in International Relations of the Asia-Pacific

Katagiri encompasses a wide scope in his work, touching on international relations, security, and East Asia. As a result, he presents his research at conferences worldwide, including the following events:

• “Impact of offensive cyber operations on digital economy: vulnerable industries and changing currencies” at the European Political Science Association (EPSA)

• “Hackers of critical infrastructure: Expectations and limits of the principle of target distinction” at the International Studies Association (ISA), the Vienna Working Group on Digital Europe, the University of Vienna (April 2022), the University of Southern Denmark (January 2022), and the Offensive Cyber Working Group in the UK (September 2021)

On June 29, 2022, Jin Huang, Ph.D., professor of social work, was invited to deliver a keynote address at the 2022 China Financial Literacy Education Forum. Broadcast by multiple state news agencies and internet platforms, the event drew an audience of over 2.65 million viewers. Huang has been focusing on the development of financial social work through education, research, policy, and practice in China and advocates equipping social workers with the financial capability to promote financial well-being and financial health for clients.

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Emily Lutenski, Ph.D.

Emily Lutenski, Ph.D., associate professor of American studies, College of Arts and Sciences, was published in the book “African American Literature in Transition, 1930-1940.” Her article titled “Arna Bontemps and Black Literary Archives” makes up the second chapter of the book, where she discusses the work of African American poet Arna Bontemps as well as the overall broader shifts in African American literature during the decade.

Candice L. Thomas, Ph.D.

Candice L. Thomas, Ph.D., associate professor of psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, was published in the Journal of Business and Psychology. The study, titled “Incivility Begets Incivility: Understanding the Relationship Between Experienced and Enacted Incivility with Customers Over Time,” examines negative emotions and compassion fatigue as mechanisms that explain experienced and enacted incivility between nurses in a high-stake hospital setting and their patients.

Additional authors include:

• Lars U. Johnson, Ph.D., assistant professor of management at the University of Texas at Arlington

• Andrea M. Cornelius, Ph.D. candidate at Saint Louis University

• Haley R. Cobb, Ph.D. candidate at Saint Louis University

• Lauren D. Murphy, Ph.D. candidate at Saint Louis University

• Dulce Vega, Ph.D. candidate at Saint Louis University

Silviya P. Zustiak, Ph.D.

Silviya P. Zustiak, Ph.D., associate professor of biomedical engineering, School of Science and Engineering, was invited for publication by Acta Biomaterialia, an international peerreviewed journal that publishes peerreviewed original research reports, review papers, and communications in the broadly defined field of biomaterials science.

The following article was invited for a special issue on “Biomaterials for Personalized Disease Models”:

• #L. Hill, #J. Bruns, *S. P. Zustiak, “Hydrogel matrix presence and composition influences drug responses of encapsulated glioblastoma spheroids,” Acta Biomaterialia, 2021, 132, 437-447 (IF: 10.633)

The following article was invited for a special issue on “Mechanics of Cells and Fibers”:

• #J. Bruns, T. Egan, P. Mercier, *S. P. Zustiak, “Glioblastoma spheroid growth and chemotherapeutic responses in single and dual-stiffness hydrogels,” at Acta Biomaterialia, 2022, In Press (IF: 10.633)

Annamaria Szakonyi, Ph.D.

Annamaria Szakonyi, Ph.D., adjunct faculty member, concluded the initial phase of a national engagement led by Baylor University and funded by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 2039678. The multidisciplinary research team is composed of criminal justice professionals, academic researchers, and private sector professionals examining the role of information technology in the context of domestic sex trafficking.

The collaboration will continue with various breakout teams to solve specific problems identified during this initial study.

Mike Swartwout, Ph.D.

Mike Swartwout, Ph.D., associate professor of aerospace and mechanical engineering, was invited to speak with the Aerospace Corporation’s Engineering and Technology Group on August 23, 2022. His talk, titled “A Small Census of Small Satellites: History, Trends and a Vain Attempt to Make Sense of It All,” was part of their Acquisition Analysis and Planning Division’s Power Hour.

Swartwout’s students were finalists in the 10th University Nanosat Program, a nationwide competition where students design and develop their own space mission. They were also selected to participate in the 11th University Nanosat Program — for which, only 10 schools were selected. As part of this program, students are building a small spacecraft that they intend to complete in late 2022 and seek a sponsored (NASA) launch in 2023.

217 ANNOUNCEMENTS

Reza Tourani, Ph.D.

Reza Tourani, Ph.D., assistant professor of computer science, was named co-investigator on a three-year, $1 million grant from the National Science Foundation. The project, titled “RINGS: Resilient Edge Ecosystem for Collaborative and Trustworthy Disaster Response (REsCue),” addresses networking and security challenges in next-generation public safety and disaster response networks, where mission-critical emergency operations (e.g., search and rescue) need to be performed with limited surviving infrastructure.

This project is a collaboration with investigators at New Mexico State University, including:

• Satyajayant Misra (Principal Investigator)

• Roopa Vishwanathan (Co-Principal Investigator)

• David Mitchell (Co-Principal Investigator)

• Abderrahmen Mtibaa (Co-Principal Investigator)

Tourani’s lab also received a research grant from Intel Labs to study the security aspects of pervasive edge computing ecosystems.

Marvin Meyers, Ph.D.

Marvin Meyers, Ph.D., associate professor of chemistry and director of the chemical biology program, focuses on the discovery of new therapies to treat infectious diseases without safe and inexpensive treatment options. Ongoing, NIH-funded collaborative work in his lab includes drug discovery for parasitic, fungal, viral, and bacterial infections that primarily impact impoverished people around the world.

His lab is working on identifying a drug to treat cryptosporidiosis, a diarrheal disease caused by the parasite Cryptosporidium. Two current grants from the NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) support project collaborations between the Meyers and Sverdrup Labs at SLU as well as the Huston Lab at the University of Vermont to develop three potential new classes of drugs (R01 AI143951 and R33 AI141184). The Meyers and Huston Labs have been working toward the identification of an entirely new class of drugs to treat cryptosporidiosis since 2015.

Through an iterative process, the team has identified lead compounds in three distinct chemical series that possess more than tenfold greater potency than the current treatment as well as efficacy in animal infection models. The team has published their initial work for one of the series (Oboh et al., “Optimization of the Urea Linker of Triazolopyridine MMV665917 Results in a New Anticryptosporidial Lead with Improved Potency and Predicted hERG Safety Margin,” Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, 2021, 64, 11729-11745) and filed a patent application (WO 2021/252505, published December 16, 2021). Meyers has presented this work at international conferences such as the Third Symposium on Innovative Therapeutics for Cryptosporidium in 2021 and the Medicinal and Bioorganic Chemistry Foundation’s 15th Winter Conference in 2022.

Current efforts by the team are focused on further potency and safety improvements while simultaneously developing the other two lead series to meet their long-term objective.

Judith M. Ogilvie, Ph.D.

Judith M. Ogilvie, Ph.D., professor of biology, performed two research presentations at a 2022 national conference:

• Platform presentation: Marshak, DM, A. Bordt, S.S. Patterson, J. Kuchenbecker, J. Neitz, J. Yearick, E. Yang, J. Ogilvie. “Synaptic inputs to macaque intrinsically-photosensitive ganglion cells.” Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology Annual Conference. Denver, Colorado, May 1, 2022

• Poster presentation: Teal, WL, Ogilvie, JM. “Temporal and Spatial Expression of G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor 1 in Developing Mouse Retina.” Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology Annual Conference. Denver, Colorado. May 2, 2022

Ogilvie received two notable publications this year, including:

• AS Bordt, SS Patterson, JA Kuchenbecker, MA Mazzaferri, JN Yearick, ER Yang, JM Ogilvie, J Neitz, DW Marshak. “Synaptic inputs to displaced intrinsically-photosensitive ganglion cells in macaque retina.” Scientific Reports. 12, 15160 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-02219324-z

• Frenzel KE, Grisham W, Ogilvie JM, Harrington IA. “Project DiViNe: Diverse Voices in Neuroscience Profiles of Rita Levi-Montalcini, Ricardo Miledi, Simon LeVay, Erich Jarvis, and Steve Ramirez.” Journal of Undergraduate Neuroscience Education (JUNE), Winter 2022, 20(2):A206-A213

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Dana Baum, Ph.D.

A 2022 publication from Dana Baum, Ph.D., associate professor of chemistry, and environmental consultant John Samuelian, Ph.D., revealed the first reported DNA aptamers for benzodiazepines, a common class of medications with high potential for abuse and dependence. DNA aptamers are a highly stable technology on which to build small molecule detection platforms. When testing for the presence of benzodiazepines, accurate and selective detection in bodily fluids is vital.

NASA ICAR

Baum’s lab is a part of a NASA Interdisciplinary Consortia for Astrobiology Research (ICAR) titled “Bringing RNA to Life: Emergence of Biological Catalysis.” The consortium is led by researchers at the University of Missouri–Columbia. Baum’s lab collaborates with researchers at seven other institutions to explore RNA catalysis, with a particular focus on reactions at the heart of modern metabolic pathways. The Baum Lab is interested in the ability of RNA to participate in redox reactions, which are key reactions in modern metabolism.

Together, these researchers have demonstrated for the first time that an RNA aptamer can bind to an important biological cofactor, flavin, and shift its reduction potential. NMR structural analysis on this aptamer shows that RNA utilizes the same types of interactions employed by flavoproteins to cause these shifts. A manuscript presenting these findings has been published in Nature Chemical Biology. The publications results provide the foundation for exciting new studies harnessing these abilities in different types of applications.

Piotr Mak, Ph.D.

Piotr Mak, Ph.D., assistant professor of chemistry, received an NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award from the Chemistry of Life Processes (CLP) Program in the Division of Chemistry (CHE). His 2022 proposal focused on elucidation of the mechanism of heme degradation reactions by experimental characterization of critical intermediates encountered in enzymatic cycles of various heme oxygenases using a unique combination of powerful spectroscopic and biophysical techniques.

Istvan Z. Kiss, Ph.D.

Istvan Z. Kiss, Ph.D., professor of chemistry, made important breakthroughs on how diversity in the properties of chemical reaction properties can contribute to forming more synchronized action in complex systems. His research challenged the common assumption that nearly identical agents are required to generate organized behavior.

For example, when batteries are built for electric cars, extreme engineering goes into creating a battery pack from thousands of identical cells down to millivolts. With current designs, this makes recycling car batteries very difficult. Kiss reported in the prestigious journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, that a network of electrochemical reactions can be built in which different units with random mismatches, at an optimized level, are best for smooth uniform operation.

The results suggest that, rather than being eliminated, intrinsic diversity in chemical reaction properties can help to maintain behavioral homogeneity in network dynamics. The results can have important practical applications,

for example, in designing highpowered second-life (recycled) batteries that are made up of used (and thus heterogeneous) parts or in biology where cell diversity could contribute to more robust pacemakers.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) of the U.S. Department of Defense funded a grant in which Kiss develops computational models that predict how a new generation of engineered magnesium alloys, morphogenic materials, could stop corrosion by strategic placements of wavebreakers and other surface modifications. These predictions are then tested for corrosion and fatigue life with colleagues at the University of Virginia.

Devita T. Stallings, Ph.D., RN

Devita Stallings, Ph.D., RN, associate professor at the Trudy Busch Valentine School of Nursing, was recognized with the Emerging Leader Award in the 2022 St. Louis Excellence in Nursing Awards.

Stallings was also awarded the Clinical and Translational Science Grant Award from the Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences (ICTS) at Washington University in St. Louis. This grant provided $50,000 in funding to conduct a pilot study titled, “Engaging African American Communities in the Development of a Hypertension SelfManagement App (Pressure Points).”

219 ANNOUNCEMENTS

Anne Sebert Kuhlmann, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Anne Sebert Kuhlmann, Ph.D., M.P.H., associate professor of public health and social justice, has been cited in several legislative debates around period poverty and hygiene needs, especially among students. Notably, her work was cited in Missouri as the state legislature moved to include $1 million in funding for the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) to support period products in schools.

Her most recent research, “State Standards for Menstrual Hygiene Education in U.S. Schools,” was published on February 3, 2022, in the Journal of School Health.

Oluwatoyosi Owoeye, Ph.D., M.S., BPT

Oluwatoyosi Owoeye, Ph.D., assistant professor of physical therapy and athletic training in the Doisy College of Health Sciences, was appointed a deputy editor of injury prevention and implementation science for the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

Throughout 2022, he published six peer-reviewed papers, including:

• “Moving the Needle: A Call to Action for Sports Injury and Illness Prevention Researchers to Embrace Knowledge Translation Principles.” British Journal of Sports Medicine, 2022; 0:1–2. doi:10.1136/ bjsports-2022-106008 [Epub ahead of print]

• “Absence of Injury is Not Absence of Pain: Prevalence of Preseason Musculoskeletal Pain and Associated Factors in Collegiate Soccer and Basketball Student-Athletes.” Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(15), 9128

• “Breaking Research Barriers in Africa: Insights from Sports and Exercise Medicine and Sports Physical Therapy Research in Zambia and Call to Action.” British Journal of Sports Medicine, 2022; 0:1–2. doi:10.1136/ bjsports-2022-105817 [Epub ahead of print]

• “‘SHRed Injuries Basketball’ Nueromuscular Training Warmup Program Reduces Ankle and Knee Injury Rates by 36% in Youth Basketball.” Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, 2022; 52(1):40-48. doi: 10.2519/ jospt.2022.10959

• “Health-Related Outcomes 3-15 Years Following Ankle Sprain Injury in Youth Sport: What Does the Future Hold?” Foot and Ankle International, 2022; 43(1):21-31. doi: 10.1177/10711007211033543

• “Location of anterior knee pain affects load tolerance in isometric single leg knee extension.” Journal of Science in Medicine and Sport, 2022

Notably, his paper, “Reducing Injuries in Soccer (Football): an Umbrella Review of Best Evidence Across the Epidemiological Framework for Prevention,” was one of this year’s most downloaded contemporary articles on the SpringerLink platform in the Sports Medicine – Open Journal.

Thomas Finan, Ph.D., FSA, archaeologist and associate professor of history in the College of Arts and Sciences, continues to guide excavations on the Rock of Lough Key, one of the most important archaeological projects in Ireland today. This project examines the medieval settlement of the MacDermots of the Kingdom of Moylurg in the 13th century. Excavations on the Rock, an island castle now known to have origins in the very early medieval period, have turned up extensive evidence of feasting

220 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022
13th century dice. Excavations on the Rock of Lough Key in progress. Aerial view of the Rock of Lough Key.

(over 30,000 butchered animal bones), production of high-status and highquality jewelry such as bronze and silver dress pins, and worked antler used to create gaming pieces and harp pins.

Lucy Cashion, MFA

Lucy Cashion, MFA, professor in SLU’s theatre program in the College of Arts and Sciences, directed the play “HagSeed” by Stacie Lents, adapted from Margaret Atwood’s novel by the same name, for Prison Performing Arts at the Northeast Correctional Center. The production ran from May 17 to May 19, 2022, and was performed by men incarcerated at the correctional center, except for women’s roles, which were performed by professional actresses. The incarcerated men ran most aspects of the production, holding integral positions such as stage manager, assistant stage manager, and sound and video operator. Rehearsals for the play began at the facility in November 2021.

Pascale Perraudin, Ph.D.

Pascale Perraudin, Ph.D., associate professor of French in the College of Arts and Sciences, engaged in a project sponsored by the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program. As part of the project, Perraudin published the following article in Image [&] Narrative, a peer-reviewed e-journal on visual narratology and word and image studies.

• « La carte postale disparue: brouillons d’une histoire singulière. » in Perspectives post-coloniales et intermédiales sur la carte postale. Image and Narrative N0 23.1 (January 2022), http://www. imageandnarrative.be/

Perraudin also worked alongside Dawn M. Cornelio, Ph.D., professor of French studies at the University of Guelph Canada, to co-edit the following special edition of the Crossways Journal, the peer-reviewed, scholarly publication of The Crossways in Cultural Narratives Consortium.

• Transmission, conservation et médiation des savoirs: la curation à l’œuvre / Transmitting, Conserving, and Mediating Knowledge: Curation at Work. Eds. Dawn Cornelio and Pascale Perraudin. Special issue of Crossways Journal No 4.1 (2021), https://crossways.lib.uoguelph.ca/ index.php/crossways

This 2021 edition published Perraudin’s article, titled “Essai sur la curation et ses singularités.” This article attempted to examine curation in the field of contemporary literary and critical research.

Michael McClymond, Ph.D.

Michael McClymond, Ph.D., professor of modern Christianity, College of Arts and Sciences, was published in the “Encyclopedia of Violence, Peace and Conflict.” The full citation of his work is as follows:

• Michael McClymond, “Religious Traditions, Violence, and Nonviolence.” In Lester R. Kurtz, Jennifer E. Turpin, eds., Encyclopedia of Violence, Peace and Conflict: Volume 3, Po – Z. 3rd Edition. San Diego: Academic Press, 2022

Peter Martens, Ph.D.

Peter Martens, Ph.D., professor of early Christianity, was named a Senior Core Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study at Central European University

for 2022-23. He will spend the year in Budapest, Hungary, working on his new book project, “Habits of Attention: How Early Christians Encountered Their Scriptures.”

Cass Dedert, Ph.D.

Candidate

Cass Dedert, a Ph.D. candidate at Saint Louis University, conducted original research showing that a growth factor in the brain (progranulin) appears to protect against brain cell damage due to diabetic stress. Dedert studies in the lab of Fenglian Xu, Ph.D., associate professor of biology in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Kelsey Mesmer, Ph.D.

Kelsey Mesmer, Ph.D., assistant professor of journalism in the College of Arts and Sciences, published a monograph, “An intersectional analysis of U.S. journalists’ experiences with hostile sources” in Journalism & Communication Monographs, and a journal article, “An assumption of bad faith: Using fake news rhetoric to create journalistic teaching moments” in Journalism Practice. The manuscripts both stemmed from her dissertation project, which received an honorable mention for the Nafziger-WhiteSalwen Dissertation Award, the field’s most prominent dissertation award in the field of journalism and mass communication. The project also led to in-progress research that began in fall 2021, resulting in a top paper award at the 2022 Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Convention held in Detroit, Michigan.

221 ANNOUNCEMENTS

Robert L. Hughes Jr., Ph.D.

Robert L. Hughes Jr., Ph.D., professor of music in the College of Arts and Sciences, performed professionally as an orchestra musician for musical theater productions at the Fox Theatre and the Muny in St. Louis.

Amerigo Barzaghi, Ph.D.

Amerigo Barzaghi, Ph.D., Division of Humanities at SLU-Madrid, virtually presented at the Fifth Annual Meeting of the Society for Italian Philosophy, which ran from June 9 to June 11, 2022. He presented his paper, “Argumentum Non Apparentium: Emanuele Severino and Christian Theology.”

The presentation examined the ideas of Emanuele Severino, an essential 20thcentury Italian philosopher. Particularly, Barzaghi analyzed Severino’s thesis of the eternity of every being as well as the reasons why the philosopher believed that Christianity should be considered a great error. Barzaghi provided an analysis of his critique of faith and added understanding by considering three contemporary Christian philosophers from Italy with similar “neoclassical” academic backgrounds.

Laura Muro, Ph.D.

Laura Muro, Ph.D., professor of accounting at SLU-Madrid, received an Honorary Fellowship at the Hanken Centre for Accounting, Finance and Governance, Finland.

Paolo Saona, Ph.D.

Paolo Saona, Ph.D., professor of finance, and Laura Muro, Ph.D., professor of accounting, SLU-Madrid, were awarded as finalists in the Business Ethics Research Awards by Bankinter Consumer Finance, Madrid, Spain (June 2022). They took part in the contest with their co-authored paper titled “An Integrated Corporate Governance Index for Spain: From Construction to Construct Validity.” The award intends to reward the research which studies the implementation of ethical principles in the structures that deal with the core business of private companies, business associations, and industrial sectors.

Saona is also a co-principal investigator in a two-year research project collaboration with the Universidad Pontificia Comillas. The title of the project is “Answer of the Financial Information to the Social Demands for Innovation, Change, Responsible Management, and Education in Values (Respuesta de la Información Financiera a las Demandas Sociales de Innovación, Cambio, Gestión Responsable y Educación en Valores)” and received almost $14,000 in funding.

Jennifer Bello-Kottenstette, M.D.

Jennifer Bello-Kottenstette, M.D., family medicine physician at the Saint Louis University School of Medicine, was awarded a five-year K23 career development award from the National Institute on Drug Abuse in March 2022. Using award funds, Bello-Kottenstette will adapt and pilot test a pre-pregnancy intervention called CHOICES. The goal of the adapted intervention, CHOICESPLEAS (Pregnancy Liberated from Exposure to Alcohol and Substances) is to help incarcerated women with illicit polysubstance use lower their chance of having a substance-exposed pregnancy.

CHOICES-PLEAS will use motivational interviewing techniques to help women who are participating in a 90-day court-mandated substance use disorder (SUD) treatment program at the St. Louis County Jail to identify their goals for behavior change which can include changing substance use, risky sexual behaviors, or both. The findings from this pilot study will inform the development of subsequent interventions that will be delivered to women with SUD at the places where they present for care, including SUD treatment programs, syringe access programs, primary care, and other correctional settings.

Melissa K. Ochoa, Ph.D.

Melissa K. Ochoa, Ph.D., assistant professor of women’s and gender studies in the College of Arts and Sciences, received the American Association of University Women (AAUW) Research Fellowship Award for $6,000. This award will support more publications on women’s everyday experiences with sexism. This year, Ochoa also:

• Published an article titled “Stop Using Latinx If You Really Want to Be Inclusive” in both English and Spanish with The Conversation, resulting in a request to reprint in The Boston Globe (September 9, 2022) https://theconversation.com/ stop-using-latinx-if-you-reallywant-to-beinclusive-189358

• Interviewed with “The Morning Beat”

• Interviewed with the “Leading Consciously” podcast in November 2022

• Published an article titled “Life Course and Emerging Adulthood: Protestant Women’s Views on Intimate Partner Violence and Divorce” in the Social Sciences journal https://theconversation. com/deja-de-usar-latinx-si-realmente-

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quieres-ser-inclusivo-196111

Ochoa has a forthcoming book chapter publication titled “Colorism in the Latina Community: The Internalization of Racialized Sexism.” The article will be a part of “Feminists Talk Whiteness,” a collection of 12-18 articles for undergraduate readers, published by Taylor and Francis Publishing.

Enbal Shacham, Ph.D., M.Ed.

Enbal Shacham, Ph.D., professor of behavioral science and health education at Saint Louis University, and Stephen Scroggins, Ph.D., postdoctoral researcher at the Taylor Geospatial Institute, released a report titled “Geospatial Insights into Childhood Asthma” in March 2022. This report completed a contract between the Inland Empire Health Plan and the Geospatial Institute at SLU.

Their research tested the growing opportunities for geospatial science and technology on health outcomes. Shacham and Scroggins used medical claims data, air quality measures, proximity to locations high in pollutants, demographic characteristics, and mobility measures to determine who was at the highest risk for poorer childhood asthma management.

Through this contract, they were able to prioritize their health plan members among those with childhood asthma for housing remediation programming. This research provides actionable results for health care systems, public health systems, and policymakers moving forward. An abstract of the results was presented at the Annual Public Health Association Meeting in 2022.

Lisa Jaegers, Ph.D., OTR/L, FAOTA

Now in its second year of progress, the National Institute of Corrections funded a cooperative agreement between Lisa Jaegers, Ph.D., associate professor of occupational science and occupational therapy at the SLU Doisy College of Health Sciences, and the University of Massachusetts Lowell (UMass Lowell). The research project addresses the mental health needs among correctional workers across the U.S. working in jails and prisons. The NIC project brings together jail and prison workplace stakeholders and researchers across the U.S. in the National Corrections Collaborative (NCC). Jaegers and Mazen El Ghaziri, Ph.D., RN, associate professor at the Solomont School of Nursing and the Zuckerberg College of Health Sciences at UMass Lowell, have co-directed the NCC since 2014.

The study outputs include a completed scoping review and a national survey of organizational stressors and trauma-related resources to reduce the risk of chronic health issues among correctional workers. A full report and evidence-based webinars developed by Jaegers and colleagues from the project will be shared via the NIC website for consumer use.

Jaegers presented research findings from the project at the World Federation of Occupational Therapy Congress in Paris, France, in August 2022. The project was part of a concurrent session on correctional workplace health at the National Institutes of Health, Total Worker Health Symposium in October 2022. Project funding completed in January 2023.

Jaegers also directs the Occupational Therapy Transition and Integration Services (OTTIS) program under the Transformative Justice Initiative at SLU. This program was awarded two

grants for ongoing research projects in which Jaegers is a principal investigator, including:

• 3/22–2/23: Lutheran Foundation of St. Louis, Saint Louis University Occupational Therapy Transition and Integration Services, “Addressing a Gap in Reentry Services: Cognitive Disabilities,” $35,000

• 12/21–11/22: Raskob Foundation for Catholic Activities, Inc., Saint Louis University Transformative Justice Initiative, “Preparing those sentenced as juveniles to life without the option of parole (JLWOPs) for their transition to the community,” $40,000

Carolina Aznar, Ph.D.

Carolina Aznar, professor of theology at SLU-Madrid, was awarded a Beaumont Fellowship from Saint Louis University in March 2022. The fellowship will enable her to publish findings from excavations she co-directed at the Tel Regev site in Israel in 2010-2014 and 2018. This research aims to improve public understanding of the coastalinland relations among the Canaanites in the Late Bronze Age and of the relations between the Phoenicians and the Israelites in the Iron Age.

In June 2022, she began using the fellowship funds to pay for a two-week stay in Israel to resume the publication work with her excavation colleagues. In spring 2023, she will use about half of the funds from the fellowship to pay for a course release that will allow her to devote time to the publication work. The excavation funds will also be used to pay for the drawing of a large group of pottery shards from the excavation.

223 ANNOUNCEMENTS

Naresh Bansal, Ph.D.

Naresh Bansal, Ph.D., chair and professor in the Department of Finance, Richard A. Chaifetz School of Business, had two articles published in reputed finance journals in 2022.

• Bansal, Naresh and Stivers, Chris. “Bond risk’s role in the equity riskreturn tradeoff” (2022). Journal of Financial Markets, Volume 60

• Bansal, Naresh, Connolly, Robert A. and Stivers, Chris T. “Beta and Size Equity Premia following a High-VIX Threshold” (May 18, 2022). Journal of Futures Markets

Applied Portfolio Management (APM)

Applied Portfolio Management (APM) is a flagship, experiential learning program in the Department of Finance at Saint Louis University’s Richard A. Chaifetz School of Business. Through this program, students manage a portion of the University’s endowment while consulting with industry mentors and learning about the stock market and equity research.

This program has generated significant attention — winning the business school’s 2022 curriculum innovation grant and receiving high accolades from industry partners. Notably, the program will be featured in the forthcoming issue of Universitas magazine.

Mario Bermejo Castro, Ph.D.

Mario Bermejo Castro, Ph.D., researcher and assistant professor in the Department of Engineering at SLU-Madrid, co-authored a paper titled “Crushing effects on the durability of

rocky aggregates used on road surfaces subjected to winter maintenance and extreme climate conditions.”

O’Neill, Ph.D.

Bruce O’Neill, Ph.D., professor of sociology and anthropology in the College of Arts and Sciences, published the articles “Up, Down, and Away: The Place of Privilege in Bucharest,” in the Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute (28:1); and “Stuck Here: Boredom, Migration, and the PostSocialist Imaginary in Bucharest, Romania,” in the journal Urban Geography, 42(9).

O’Neill also organized a widely attended roundtable discussion on the social life of Metro and Subway systems at the Annual Meetings of the American Anthropological Association. These publications and presentation are part of a larger book project on underground urbanism that is currently under review with the University of Pennsylvania Press’ book series: “Cities of the Twenty-First Century.”

Carlos A. Segovia, Ph.D.

Carlos A. Segovia, Ph.D., associate professor of philosophy at SLU-Madrid, authored and contributed to several published works. Segovia acted as author and editor for the following book chapters and academic articles in 2022:

Book Chapters

• “Eἶδος�Utupë – On Dissymmetric Reciprocity of the Real and the Symbolic.” Forthcoming in Interpretation, Representation, Language: Cross-Cultural, Transhistorical and Interdisciplinary Perspectives, ed. Fionn Bennett. Reims: Éditions et Presses Universitaires de Reims, 2022

• “Ontologies and Ecologies of the Otherwise: Notes on Postdevelopment Practices in Malawi.” Forthcoming in Communicative Justice in the Pluriverse: A Dialogue towards the Planetarization of Experiences, ed. Joan Pedro-Caraña, Eliana Herrera-Huérfano, and Juana Ochoa Almanza. London and New York: Routledge, 2022

Academic Articles

• “Guattari�Heidegger: On Quaternities, Deterritorialisation, and Worlding.” Forthcoming in Deleuze and Guattari Studies (Edinburgh University Press), vol. 16, no. 4 (2022): 508–28

• “Rethinking Dionysus and Apollo – Redrawing Today’s Philosophical Board.” In Open Philosophy (De Gruyter), vol. 5 (2022): 360–80

• “Φύσις Penultimate Blink: On Heidegger’s Phrase ‘Only a God Can Save Us.’” [In Spanish.] Perspectiva filosofica, vol. 49, no. 3 (2022): 63–79

• “Rethinking Death’s Sacredness: From Heraclitus’s frag. DK B62 to Robert Gardner’s Dead Birds.” In Open Theology (De Gruyter), vol. 8 (2022): 64–78. IV

Edited Journal Articles

• “Conceptual Personae in Ontology,” ed. Carlos A. Segovia. Open Philosophy (De Gruyter), vol. 5, 2022

224 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022

Tim R. Randolph, Ph.D., MT(ASCP)

The research of Tim Randolph, Ph.D., MT(ASCP), professor of clinical health sciences, has a close connection to Randolph World Ministries, Inc. (RWM), an NGO he founded in 2000. RWM is a faith-based medical mission ministry operating in Haiti since 2000. Its primary mission is to partner with existing medical clinics in Haiti and raise the community standard of care through education, training, and material donation. Over the past decade, RWM has been focusing energy on developing a sickle cell diagnosis and treatment program in Haiti. This summer, RWM broke ground on the construction of the first Sickle Cell Center in Haiti.

Randolph’s university research over the past 20 years has been gradually aligning with the vision of developing a sickle cell program in Haiti. Thus far, we have developed and patented two low-cost methods to diagnose sickle cell disease (Sickle Confirm) and monitor treatment (HbF Assay) designed for underdeveloped countries. Randolph’s lab is in the final stages of the development of three additional diagnostic tests that can be used in a sickle cell program in underdeveloped countries. The mortality rate for sickle cell disease is very high in underdeveloped countries due largely to the lack of low-cost diagnostics. The methods Randolph and his colleagues develop are all low-cost and fairly easy to perform. In conjunction, these diagnostic tests can be used by small clinics in Haiti or in other underdeveloped countries where sickle cell is prevalent and modern diagnostics are absent. Once children born with sickle cell disease are identified through diagnostic testing, treatment can be initiated and mortality rates reduced.

Mary Maxfield, Ph.D.

Mary Maxfield, Ph.D., is a new postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies (WGS) and a SLU alum. She received a 20212022 Dissertation Fellowship and earned her Ph.D. in American studies from SLU in July 2022. Maxfield’s research ties to both SLU’s social justice mission and the larger St. Louis community. More specifically, her dissertation, “Networkin’ It: LGBTQIA+ Connections in St. Louis,” uses interviews and grassroots archival work to showcase how LGBTQIA+ people use arts and media to form connections in our city. The dissertation profiles four St. Louis organizations: CHARIS, the St. Louis Women’s Chorus; That Uppity Theatre Company; Left Bank Books; and local archival initiatives such as Gateway to Pride — in which Maxfield is embedded — that interrogates the links between research and community formation, scholarship, and social justice.

Amanda Gray Rendón, Ph.D.

Amanda Gray Rendón, Ph.D., is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies and has published several notable articles and presentations.

In September 2022, she released a project in the AMA Journal of Ethics, titled “A Case for Federal Labor Legislation to Protect Underpaid Home Care Workers.” The objective of the project was to explain unfamiliar viewpoints on ethical conduct, evaluate the usefulness of information for health care practices, and decide the merit of applying this information to health care systems.

She received awards for her work in medical humanities, Latina/o studies, and women’s and gender studies. Gray Rendón received the 2021-2022 George

E. Burch Postdoctoral Fellowship in Theoretical Medicine and Affiliated Theoretical Science from the Division of Medicine and Science in the National Museum of American History.

Her notable publications and appearances include:

• “A Case for Federal Labor Legislation to Protect Underpaid Home Care Workers.” AMA Journal of Ethics 24, no. 9 (September 1, 2022): E860-E866

• Author Interview: “A Case for Federal Labor Legislation to Protect Underpaid Home Care Workers,” (July 1, 2022)

Her external engagements include:

Conference panels

• “Redefining Care: Oral Storytelling with Young Adult Women Impacted by Cancer,” (Panelist), International Health Humanities Consortium, Virtual, March 27, 2022

• “Domésticas Unite: A New Labor Movement Born en Route,” National Women’s Studies Association Annual Conference, Virtual, November 19, 2022

Research collaborations

• Community Researcher, Patient Advocacy and Outreach, LIVESTRONG Cancer Institutes

225 ANNOUNCEMENTS

J. Chris Carroll, Ph.D., PE

Structural engineering courses are rigorous — the concepts are difficult for many undergraduate students to grasp and the traditional models for educating structural engineers are obsolete. The time for a change in structural engineering education is long overdue. Chris Carroll, Ph.D., associate professor of civil engineering, led a team of faculty members at SLU and Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. Together, they work to establish structural engineering laboratories and design and implement 12 full-scale, experiential learning modules (ELMs) in four structural engineering-related courses within the civil engineering programs at both institutions between fall 2017 and spring 2022.

This project was funded with $599,821, provided through the National Science Foundation’s Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE) Program. The project team included Drs. Matthew Lovell, Kyle Kershaw, Ronaldo Luna, John Aidoo, and Jim Hanson. Students at both institutions now have the opportunity to experience fullscale engineering failures as part of their undergraduate curriculum and have the research infrastructure to conduct structural engineering-related research. The preliminary results of the associated study show that students who experienced the modules have a deeper understanding of structural behavior. To date, the team has published five conference papers and presented three additional conference posters.

The project has also resulted in several industry collaborations and allowed several engineering students at both schools to work in the labs. This led some to pursue graduate degrees and prepare for careers as structural engineers.

226 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022
227 ANNOUNCEMENTS
A view of the quad on the St. Louis campus centered around a statue of St. Ignatius of Loyola.

Researchers Supported by the Research Institute

Ankit Agrawal, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Computer Science, School of Science and Engineering

SangNam Ahn, Ph.D., MPSA Associate Professor, Health Management and Policy, College for Public Health and Social Justice

Tae-Hyuk (Ted) Ahn, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Computer Science

J. Cameron Anglum, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Educational Policy and Equity, School of Education; Affiliated Researcher, SLU Policy Research in Missouri Education (PRiME) Center

Edwin Antony, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine

Heidi Ardizzone, Ph.D. Associate Professor, American Studies

Kira Hudson Banks, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Psychology; Co-Founder, Institute for Healing Justice & Equity

Michael Barber, S.J., Ph.D. Professor, Philosophy

Ellen Barnidge, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Associate Professor, Behavioral Science and Health Education, Interim Dean, College for Public Health and Social Justice

Lori Baron, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Theological Studies

Heather Bednarek, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Economics

Toby Benis, Ph.D. Professor and Chair, English

Jeffrey Bishop, M.D., Ph.D. Professor of Philosophy, Professor of Theological Studies, Tenet Endowed Chair in Bioethics, College of Arts and Sciences

Paul Bracher, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Chemistry

Mitzi Brammer, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Program, Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences

Matthew Breeden, M.D.

Assistant Professor, Family and Community Medicine; Core Faculty, AHEAD Institute

James Brien, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine

Paula Buchanan, Ph.D.

Associate Director for Consulting, AHEAD Institute

Richard Bucholz, M.D.

Professor, Neurological Surgery

Andrew Butler, Ph.D.

Professor, Pharmacology and Physiology, School of Medicine

Tarrell Campbell, Ph.D. Adjunct Professor, Department of African American Studies

Chris Carroll, Ph.D., P.E.

Associate Professor and Program Coordinator, Civil Engineering

Stephen Casmier, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, English

Bidisha Chakrabarty, Ph.D.

Edward Jones Endowed Professor of Finance, Richard A. Chaifetz School of Business

Niraj Chavan, M.D.

Associate Professor, Program Director, Maternal Fetal Medicine Fellowship Program, Medical Director, WISH Clinic

Vincenza Cifarelli, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, School of Medicine

Denise Côté-Arsenault, Ph.D.

Hemak Endowed Professor of Maternal Child Nursing, Trudy Busch Valentine School of Nursing

Amanda Cox, Ph.D., P.E. Director, WATER Institute; Associate Professor, Civil Engineering

Dannielle Joy Davis, Ph.D. Professor, School of Education

Helen De Cruz, Ph.D.

Danforth Chair in the Humanities, College of Arts and Sciences

Benjamin de Foy, Ph.D.

Banpu Chair in Sustainability and Professor of Atmospheric Sciences, School of Science and Engineering

228 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022

Alexei Demchenko, Ph.D. Professor and Department Chair of Chemistry, School of Science and Engineering

Enrico Di Cera, M.D. Alice A. Doisy Professor and Chair, School of Medicine

Richard DiPaolo, Ph.D. Professor and Interim Chair, Molecular Microbiology and Immunology

Emily Dumler-Winckler, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Constructive Theology, Theological Studies

Mary Dunn, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Theological Studies

Mark Dykewicz, M.D.

Raymond and Alberta Slavin Endowed Professor in Allergy and Immunology; Professor of Internal Medicine; and Chief, Division of Infectious Diseases, Allergy and Immunology, School of Medicine

James L. Edwards, Ph.D. Professor, Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences

Terra Edwards, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Sociology and Anthropology

Flavio Esposito, Ph.D. Associate Professor, School of Science and Engineering

Ruth Evans, Ph.D.

Dorothy McBride Orthwein Professor of English, College of Arts and Sciences

Thomas Finan, Ph.D., FSA Chair and Associate Professor, History

Cathleen Fleck, Ph.D.

Department Chair, Fine and Performing Arts; Associate Professor, Art History

David A. Ford, Ph.D.

James B. and Joan C. Peter Endowed Chair in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine

Kasey Fowler-Finn, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Department of Biology

Koyal Garg, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering

Robert Gatter, Ph.D. Professor, Center for Health Law Studies, Professor of Health Management and Policy

Sarah Gebauer, M.D., MSPH Assistant Professor, Family and Community Medicine; Core Faculty, AHEAD Institute

Sarah George, M.D. Associate Professor, Infectious Diseases, Allergy, and Immunology

Claire Gilbert, Ph.D. Associate Professor, History

Keon L. Gilbert, DrPH

Co-Founder and Director of Equity and Policy, Institute for Healing Justice & Equity; Associate Professor, Behavioral Science and Health Education

Lorri Glover, Ph.D.

John Francis Bannon S.J. Endowed Chair, Professor of History, College of Arts and Sciences

Jenna Gorlewicz, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering; Associate Dean Research and Innovation

David Griggs, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Molecular Microbiology and Immunology

Richard Grucza, Ph.D., MPE

Professor, Family and Community Medicine, School of Medicine; Professor, Health Outcomes Research, School of Medicine

Andrew F. Hall, D.Sc. Director, Center for Additive Manufacturing; Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering

Elizabeth Hasenmueller, Ph.D.

Associate Director, WATER Institute; Associate Professor, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

Dan Haybron, Ph.D.

Theodore R. Vitali C.P. Professor of Philosophy, College of Arts and Sciences

Verna Hendricks-Ferguson, Ph.D.

Irene Riddle Endowed Chair and Professor, Trudy Busch Valentine School of Nursing

Leslie Hinyard, Ph.D., MSW

Chair and Associate Professor, Health and Clinical Outcomes Research; Executive Director, AHEAD Institute

229 RESEARCHERS SUPPORTED BY THE RESEARCH INSTITUTE

Researchers Supported by the Research Institute (continued)

Daniel Hoft, M.D., Ph.D. Director and Professor, Division of Infectious Diseases, Allergy and Immunology; Director, Center for Vaccine Development; Director, Stephen C. Peiper and Zi-Xuan Wang Institute for Vaccine Science and Policy; Adorjan Endowed Chair of Infectious Diseases and Immunology

Kate Holdener, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Computer Science, School of Science and Engineering

Jin Huang, Ph.D., MSW Professor of Social Work, School of Social Work

Juliet Iwelunmor, Ph.D. Professor of Behavioral Science and Health Education

Kenton J. Johnston, Ph.D., M.P.H. Associate Professor, Health Management and Policy; Core Faculty, AHEAD Institute

Christa Jackson, Ph.D. Professor of Mathematics, Science, and STEM Education; Founder and Director of the Institute for STEM Collaboration, Outreach, Research, and Education (iSCORE)

Amber Johnson, Ph.D.

Co-Founder, Institute for Healing Justice & Equity; Professor, Communication and Social Justice

Devin Johnston, Ph.D.

Professor of English, College of Arts and Sciences

Malkanthi Karunananda, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Chemistry, School of Science and Engineering

Ajith Karunarathne, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Chemistry, School of Science and Engineering

Grant Kaplan, Ph.D. Professor of Historical and Systematic Theology, College of Arts and Sciences

Nori Katagiri, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Political Science

John Kennell, Ph.D. Professor, Biology

Brenda Kirchhoff, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Psychology

Istvan Kiss, Ph.D. Professor of Chemistry, School of Science and Engineering

Jason Knouft, Ph.D. Professor of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences

Sergey Korolev, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine

Helen Lach, Ph.D., RN, CNL, FGAS, FAAN

Associate Dean for Research, Trudy Busch Valentine School of Nursing; Ph.D. Program Director

Atria Larson, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Medieval Christianity, Department of Theological Studies, College of Arts and Sciences; Director of the Center for Religious and Legal History; and Associate Director of the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Krista Lentine, M.D., Ph.D. Professor with Tenure; Associate Division Director, Nephrology, School of Medicine; and Medical Director of Living Donation, SSM-Saint Louis University Transplant Center

Yi Li, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Nutrition and Dietetics, Doisy College of Health Sciences

Xuewei (Sofie) Liang, M.Sc.Eng. Laboratory Technician, WATER Institute

Henning Lohse-Busch, Ph.D.

Acting Chief of Staff, Taylor Geospatial Institute

Katherine Luking, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences

Thomas Madden, Ph.D.

Professor of History, College of Arts and Sciences, and Director of the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies

Peter William Martens, Ph.D.

Professor of Early Christianity, Department of Theological Studies, College of Arts and Sciences

R. Scott Martin, Ph.D. Professor, Chemistry

Mike May, S.J., Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Mathematics and Statistics

Marvin Meyers, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Chemistry

230 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022

Allison Miller, Ph.D. Professor of Biology; Principal Investigator and Leader of the New Roots for Restoration Biology Integration Institute at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

Adriana Montaño, Ph.D. Professor, Pediatrics

Kate Moran, Ph.D. Leadership Team, Center for Research on Global Catholicism; Associate Professor, American Studies

Aubin Moutal, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, School of Medicine

Laura Muro, Ph.D. Business and Economics, Accounting

Matthew Nanes, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Political Science

Dan Nickolai, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of French; Director of the Language Resource Center, Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, College of Arts and Sciences

Takako Nomi, Ph.D. Associate Professor, School of Education and Associate Director of the Sinquefield Center for Applied Economic Research

Marcus Painter, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Finance, Richard A. Chaifetz School of Business, and Research Associate of the Taylor Geospatial Institute

Charles H. Parker, Ph.D. Leadership Team, Center for Research on Global Catholicism; Professor, Department of History, College of Arts and Sciences

Elizabeth Pendo, Ph.D.

Joseph J. Simeone Professor of Law, Center for Health Law Studies, School of Law

Michael Podgursky, Ph.D. Director, Sinquefield Center for Applied Economic Research

Cristy Portales-Reyes, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Biology, College of Arts and Sciences

Whitney Postman, Ph.D., CCC-SLP Assistant Professor, Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences

Chris Prener, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Sociology; Core Faculty, AHEAD Institute

Ranjit Ray, Ph.D. Professor of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine

Ratna B. Ray, Ph.D. Professor of Pathology, School of Medicine

James Adam Redfield, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Biblical and Talmudic Literatures

Evan Rhinesmith, Ph.D. Director of Research and Evaluation, SLU PRiME Center; Associate Director, SLU/YouGov Poll

Rachel Rimmerman, MBA Director of Business and Outreach, WATER Institute

Gary Ritter, Ph.D.

Dean and Professor, School of Education

Steven Rogers, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Political Science, College of Arts and Sciences; Director, SLU/YouGov Poll

Maria Romo-Palafox, Ph.D., RD Assistant Professor, Nutrition and Dietetics

Fred Rottnek, M.D.

MAHCM Director, Community Medicine

Cort W. Rudolph, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, IndustrialOrganizational Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences, Interim Director of the Industrial-Organizational Psychology Ph.D. Program, and Interim Director of the Center for the Application of Behavioral Sciences (CABS)

Mark Edward Ruff, Ph.D. Professor, History

Vasit Sagan, Ph.D.

Acting Director, Taylor Geospatial Institute; Associate Professor, Geospatial Science

Daniela Salvemini, Ph.D.

Director, Institute for Translational Neuroscience; William Beaumont Professor and Chair of the Department of Pharmacology and Physiology

231 RESEARCHERS SUPPORTED BY THE RESEARCH INSTITUTE

Researchers Supported by the Research Institute (continued)

J.S. Onésimo (Ness) Sándoval, Ph.D. Acting Associate Director, Taylor Geospatial Institute; Professor, Sociology

Paola Saona, Ph.D. Business and Economics, Finance

Jonathan Sawday, Ph.D.

Professor, Walter J. Ong, S.J., Chair in the Humanities, English

Jeffrey Scherrer, Ph.D.

Professor, Family and Community Medicine; Senior Director for Research, AHEAD Institute

Scott A. Sell, Ph.D.

Associate Professor; Program Coordinator, Biomedical Engineering

Enbal Shacham, Ph.D., M.Ed.

Acting Associate Director, Taylor Geospatial Institute; Professor, Public Health

Silvana R. Siddali, Ph.D.

Professor of History, College of Arts and Sciences

Nitish Singh, Ph.D.

David Orthwein Endowed Professor of International Business, Richard A. Chaifetz School of Business

Annie Smart, Ph.D.

Professor, French

Damian Smith, Ph.D.

Professor of Medieval History, College of Arts and Sciences

Elena Bray Speth, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Biology

Madeline Stenersen, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences

Eleonore Stump, Ph.D. Robert J. Henle, S.J., Professor of Philosophy, Department of Philosophy, College of Arts and Sciences

Abby Stylianou, Ph.D. Fellow, Taylor Geospatial Institute; Assistant Professor, Department of Computer Science, School of Science and Engineering

Divya S. Subramaniam, Ph.D., M.P.H. Assistant Professor, Health and Clinical Outcomes Research; Program Director, M.S. in Health Data Science; Core Faculty, AHEAD Institute

Maya Tabet, Ph.D., M.S. Adjunct Assistant Professor, Epidemiology, College for Public Health and Social Justice

Jintong Tang, Ph.D. Mary Louise Murray Endowed Professor of Management, Richard A. Chaifetz School of Business

John Tavis, Ph.D.

Professor, Molecular Microbiology and Immunology; Director, Institute for Drug and Biotherapeutic Innovation

Jeffrey Teckman, M.D.

Patricia and James Monteleone Endowed Chair in Pediatric Gastroenterology; Professor of Pediatrics, Biochemistry; and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine

Clarice Thomas, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, African American Studies

Warren Treadgold, Ph.D. National Endowment for the Humanities Professor of Byzantine Studies and Professor of History, College of Arts and Sciences

Joya Uraizee, Ph.D. Professor, Associate Chair, English

Michael Vaughn, Ph.D. Professor, School of Social Work

Kenneth Warren, Ph.D.

Professor, Political Science; Associate Director, SLU/YouGov Poll

Sidney D. Watson, J.D.

Jane and Bruce Robert Professor; Director, Center for Health Law Studies

Jeremiah Weinstock, Ph.D.

Professor and Chair, Department of Psychology, College of Arts and Sciences

Jason Werner, M.D. Associate Professor, Pediatrics

Jinsong Zhang, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Pharmacology and Physiology, School of Medicine

Lupei Zhu, Ph.D. Professor of Geophysics, School of Science and Engineering

Silviya Zustiak, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering; Associate Professor, Pharmacology and Physiology

232 SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY RESEARCH INSTITUTE IMPACT REPORT 2022
233 RESEARCHERS SUPPORTED BY THE RESEARCH INSTITUTE

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