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SLU LAW ALUMNI EMBODY THE JESUIT SPIRIT.


M E SSAG E F RO M THE

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TIMES CHANGE. THE MISSION DOES NOT. When the local newspaper did a story recently reviewing our progress since moving downtown (page 1, top of the fold for you older readers), its stltoday.com headline read: “SLU law school redefines itself.” Redefines? That is a challenging choice of words for a school whose mission has remained a constant, even though we together – faculty, staff, alumni and students – have faced and conquered the daunting challenge of moving downtown, right-sizing our law school to the needs and wants of the market, and in the past three years:

moved up 20 places in the U.S. News and World Report rankings;

regained and remain the No. 1 health law program in the nation (12 of the past 13 years);

won two national awards for our clinical education program; and

helped place nearly 90 percent of our graduates in J.D.-required and J.D.-preferred jobs following graduation.

As to the latter, alumni and other friends in the profession who hire our grads tell me that two attributes stand out and distinguish them from their peers from other schools. Besides being smart and well prepared, which many schools can claim, our graduates know how to work – many have had real jobs with real bosses and real pressures – and they know how to write. Ten years or more ago, when I was serving on the Supreme Court in Jefferson City, I was surprised to learn that our school – and indeed most

other law schools in our region and the nation – had gotten big. Big, as in nearly 900 students at our peak. Big, as in twice the size of our recently graduated class. Too big, to be blunt. The demand for legal education far exceeded, in my view, the job market available for them. (The ABA accreditation process was not helping, as it was accrediting dozens of new law schools, but fortunately none were in our region.) Five years ago or so, the bubble started to burst. Nationwide, and in this region, the number of LSAT test-takers is down approximately 40 percent or more in the past five years. In our first year downtown, we responded to the market – not by lowering our standards but by accepting fewer students. After taking the hit in 2013, our enrollment has edged up each year, and we are now comfortably fit to the market with about 500 students. Our teaching faculty and staff have been reduced, but the student reviews remain high – the professors rate more than 4.5 on a 5-point scale for effectiveness. If I have learned anything in this job, and in some previous undertakings, it is this: when challenges come, pivot to your values. Confront challenges forthrightly. You will make mistakes, but above all, remember the mission. Sidney Watson, the Jane and Bruce Robert Professor of Law, was part of the team that developed the law school’s budget plan that guides us and makes us poised for growth. The newspaper summed up her comments: Finding the right balance of students, and then offering them enough financial support to finish, is a noble strategy, she said. “It’s what the Jesuits would do.” Our mission has been around for a long time. It needs no redefining: “The mission of Saint Louis University School of Law is to advance the understanding and development of law and prepare students to achieve professional success and personal satisfaction through leadership and service to others. The School of Law is guided by the Jesuit tradition of academic excellence, freedom of inquiry and respect for individual differences.” At least twice in the past few years, I have been pressured – once from the left, once from the right – to cancel speakers who were invited by students. Both times I refused. While I respect individual differences including differences in opinions and beliefs, our institution is strong enough, and our community of scholars, teachers and students is strong enough, to tolerate the expression of views that some may find offensive. Our society, sadly, has become polarized to an extent not seen in decades. We in the academy and in our profession must guard free speech and free inquiry especially when the larger society may seem to prefer otherwise. Remember, pivot to your values. There is a search in progress for a new dean, and I intend to serve until he or she is named. The law school is strong and enduring, thanks to our highly supportive community of students, staff, faculty and alumni who have been part of the “redefining” moments in our transition to the law school’s great new home in the heart of the St. Louis legal community. Stay tuned. The best is yet to come.

MICHAEL A. WOLFF Dean and Professor


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O N T H E COV E R MOTI VAT E D BY M ISS IO N

DEA N MI C H A E L A . WO L F F DIREC TO R OF CO MMU NI CAT I ONS JE SS I C A C ICCO N E ASS ISTA NT D I R EC TO R O F CO M M U N I CAT I ONS L AURE N B R U C K E R GRA P H I C D E S I G N E R JOS H B O OT H P H OTO G RA P H Y A A RON B A N KS (’ 1 4 ), JOS H B O OT H , STE V E D O L A N , JAY F R A M , KE V I N LOW D E R S P EC IA L T H A NKS JO HN A M M A N N (’ 8 4 ), F R. PAT CO N R OY (’ 79 ), C A I TL I N FAG A N ( AN TI C IPAT E D ’ 1 8 ), S H E RI DA N H AY N E S , SA M JO R DA N , COL L E EN K E A N E Y (’ 07) , MA RK K E A N E Y (’ 1 2 ), MI KE KO L N IK (’ 9 4 ), A L E X LIN D L E Y ( AN TI C IPAT E D ’ 1 8 ), S U E Mc G R AU G H , AS HL E Y M O O R E (’ 1 6 ), TI N O O C H OA (’ 1 0 ), E MI LY R OS E N F E L D (’ 1 5) , E RI C KA S IM P SO N CO NNER ( AN TI C IPAT E D ’ 1 7 ), E L I ZA B E T H STO O K E Y, MA RK T IM M E R M A N ( AN TI C IPAT E D ’ 1 7 ), COL L E EN Z E R N (’ 1 3 )

VO LU M E 1 7 I SSU E 2 CO PY R I G H T © 2 01 6 SA IN T LO U I S U N I V E R SI TY S C H O O L O F L AW A LL RIG H TS R E SE RV E D. SAI NT LO U IS BR IEF I S PU BLIS H E D T W IC E A N N UA L LY BY SA I NT LO U IS U N IV E R SITY S C H OO L O F L AW. TH E OFF IC E O F COM MU N IC AT IO N S IS LOC ATE D IN SCOT T H A LL, 1 0 0 N O RT H T U C K E R BO UL E VA R D, S U IT E 872 , SA I NT LO U IS , M ISS O U R I 631 01 -1 93 0 EM A IL: BRIEF @ L AW. SLU. E D U

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J O H N A M M ANN (’8 4), M c DO N N E L L P R O F E SS O R O F JUST ICE I N A ME R I CAN SO CIET Y

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FO CU S O N GIVING BACK


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L AW NEWS AND NOTES HEALTH LAW TOPS LIST AGAIN The Center for Health Law Studies was once again recognized as the top health law program in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. Since No. the magazine began ranking the category, the Center has ranked 2017, 2016, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, first for 12 out 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005 of 13 years.

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Congratulations also go out to the part-time program (up to No. 25) and the Legal Clinics, ranked for the first time at No. 30. The School of Law as a whole has risen 20 spots in three years, currently tied at No. 82.

DEAN’S SEARCH In January, Dean Michael A . Wolff announced he would step down as dean of the School of Law. A search committee has since formed to find his successor. Chaired by Dr. Mark Higgins, dean of the John Cook School of Business, the committee is represented by the following faculty, staff, student and alumni representatives: Erika Cohn, J.D., director of the Vincent C . Immel Law Library; Denise Economon, associate dean of administration in the School of Law; Chad Flanders, associate professor in the Center for International and Comparative Law; Rob Gatter, co-director of the Center for Health Law Studies; Thomas Greene, superior of the Bellarmine House of Studies; Michael Korybut, professor of law; Sheila Manion, vice president for development; Robert May, law alumnus and University trustee; Kelly Mulholland, assistant professor of law; Brendan Roediger, associate professor in the Legal Clinics; Ericka Simpson Conner, second-year law student; and Aaron Taylor, associate professor of law. Dean Wolff will remain at the helm until a replacement is named.

FROM MONDALE TO BIDEN Vincent C . Immel Professor of Law Joel Goldstein, the nation’s foremost expert on the vice presidency, wrote a

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BRIEFS new book, “The White House Vice Presidency: The Path to Significance, Mondale to Biden.” Goldstein is once again being sought out for his expertise and opinion this presidential election season by media outlets worldwide. A full list can be found on his faculty profile at law.slu.edu/ people/joel-k-goldstein.

LEGAL CLINICS RECEIVE $100K HUD GRANT The School of Law Legal Clinics has partnered with St. Louis Housing Authority (SLHA) for a $100,000 grant to create a youth re-entry program in St. Louis. The grant, from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Justice, is part of a $1.75 million effort for public housing authorities and nonprofit legal services across the country to provide needed pro bono legal services aimed at youth. The Legal Clinics will work with SLHA to focus on sealing and correcting criminal records for target youth, removing records by participation in diversion programs and reinstating revoked or suspended drivers licenses. The program will also provide information about collateral consequences of criminal involvement and connect target youth with existing supportive service partners to assist with a variety of needs including employment, housing and health.

WELCOME TO SLU LAW! In April, the Office of Admissions welcomed Aly Ricci (’15) and Elizabeth Clote Lillis (’14) as new assistant directors, joining Michael Kolnik (’94), dean


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of admissions. Our alumni are often the best advocates in recruiting students to come to SLU LAW. If you know of any prospective law students, our admissions team is here and eager to help.

CONFERENCES, SYMPOSIA AND EVENTS LEGAL SERVICES PRESIDENT VISITS SLU LAW On Tuesday, March 1, Jim Sandman, president of the Legal Services Corporation, brought messages of the urgent need for equal justice to SLU LAW students, faculty and staff gathered in the John K . Pruellage Courtroom. The lecture, titled “An American Paradox: How the Civil Legal System Really Functions Today in a Nation that Espouses Justice for All,” concerned the lack of federal money for legal aid programs that is leading the United States to no longer live up to one of its founding principles.

BRIEFS

machines be available for all polling places for all elections, including purely municipal elections.

THE LAW AND BUSINESS OF PEOPLE ANALYTICS On Feb. 19 the William C . Wefel Center for Employment Law, the Saint Louis University Law Journal and the John Cook School of Business co-hosted a conference exploring the work being done in the field of People Analytics, the use of data analytics in human resources. Participants’ focus was on the employment law and business ethics implications of these new technologies and practices, with an eye toward developing guidelines for good practices in the workplace. Videos of the conference are available at law.slu.edu/ event/law-and-business-people-analytics.

PUBLIC LAW REVIEW SYMPOSIUM The Saint Louis University Public Law Review spent Feb. 26 focused on the various challenges and workplace inequalities facing women and the change needed to move beyond them at its annual symposium, Shattering the Glass Ceiling: The Status of Women in the Workplace and the Change Needed for Equality. Speakers addressed wage gap, sexual harassment, discrimination in hiring, profession-specific challenges (including the medical, legal, and academic professions), and how roles within the home impact professional growth. Videos of the symposium are available at law.slu.edu/PLR2016.

28TH ANNUAL HEALTH LAW SYMPOSIUM

MISSOURI COUNCIL OF THE BLIND PRESS CONFERENCE On March 14, the SLU LAW Legal Clinics, in conjunction with the Missouri Council of the Blind, hosted a press conference with officials from the St. Louis County Board of Election Commissioners and the St. Louis City Board of Election Commissioners to encourage all persons with disabilities, including the blind and visually impaired, to participate in Missouri’s presidential primary election. In addition to the press conference’s demonstration of the audio voting machine and encouraging participation, the Legal Clinics, including second-year law student Thomas Mihalczo, called on the Missouri legislature to adopt bills requiring that the audio ballot-enabled

The SLU LAW Center for Health Law Studies and the Saint Louis University Journal of Health Law & Policy held the 28th Annual Health Law Symposium, Dying Fast and Slow: Improving Quality of Dying and Preventing Untimely Deaths, on April 1. The conference engaged ongoing ethical and legal questions about policies and practices that hinder effective communication about dying, impact utilization and quality of services that improve dying—such as palliative care and hospice—and lead to conflict and engagement of the legal system at the end of life. Conference participants also addressed untimely death—such as accidental overdoses, suicides, and pediatric mortality—and offered policy suggestions to decrease premature death and improve quality of dying. Videos of the symposium are available at law.slu.edu/HLsymposium2016.

REMEMBERING JUSTICE SCALIA In the wake of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia’s death, SLU LAW gathered a panel discussion reflecting on his life and jurisprudence. The Hon. Raymond W. Gruender, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit, D. John Sauer, founder and principal at James Otis Law Group and a law clerk for Justice Scalia, and John D. Inazu, associate professor of law and political science at Washington University in St. Louis joined SLU LAW professors Joel Goldstein, Douglas Williams, Molly Walker Wilson, Chad Flanders and Justin Hansford as participants.

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HONORS AND DISTINCTIONS

POLISH JURIST VISITS The Center for International and Comparative Law welcomed Judge Lech Garlicki as a Distinguished Visiting International Jurist from March 21-April 1. Garlicki gave a public lecture on March 29 on constitutional rights in regards to same-sex marriage. He is an impressive Polish jurist who has served on both the Constitutional Court of Poland and the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg. His primary teaching and research interests focus on constitutional law, judicial review, European law, comparative law, human rights, and comparative government. Garlicki will teach a two-credit course on human rights for SLU LAW during the second half of Spring 2017. For more, visit law.slu.edu/sidebar.

WOMEN’S JUSTICE AWARDS The 18th annual 2016 Women’s Justice Awards, presented by Missouri Lawyers Weekly on April 14, honored 10 women of the SLU LAW community. Associate Professor Jacqueline Kutnik-Bauder received the Legal Scholar Award and third-year law student Mari Katherine Webb was selected as a Leader of Tomorrow. Public Official Awards went to Lisa Van Amburg (’75) and Annette Slack (’98). Sara Stock (’02) received the Business Practitioner Award. Litigation Practitioner Awards went to Irene Marusic (’00) and Donna Harper (’79). Enterprise Awards were bestowed on Julie Immer (’94) and Jenny Schwendemann (’90). Rising Star Awards were received by Mara Lahnar (’10) and AnneMarie Brockland (’07).

WLSA JUDICIAL RECEPTION The Women Law Students Association celebrated the following individuals at its annual judicial reception on April 5: the Hon. Lisa Page (’97), the Hon. Margaret Neill (’81) and the Hon. Jennifer Ascher (’03). Professor Susan FitzGibbon (’84) received the Eileen Searls Service Award.

BLSA JUDICIAL RECEPTION The Black Law Students Association held its annual judicial reception on April 20. They celebrated the Hon. Kathy A . Surratt-States with the Judge Theodore McMillian Award and honored both Courtney Logan (’12) and Annette Slack (’98) with the Ronda F. Williams Service Award.

2016 PILG AUCTION The annual Public Interest Law Group (PILG) Auction, held at SLU’s Center for Global Citizenship on April 16, brought together the SLU LAW community to raise money for the Irvin and Maggie Dagen Fellowship Fund. This year’s fund will provide stipends to more than 64 students working in unpaid public interest and public service positions this summer. Second-year law students Ashley Shula, Kaitlyn Parker and Rachel Jag co-chaired the recordbreaking event, which also honored St. Louis area attorneys, law firms and nonprofit organizations that have shown a commitment to servicing the needs of those within the St. Louis community. The Excellence in Pro Bono and Public Service Award recipients were Phillips Black and Saint Martha’s Hall. Judge Booker Shaw received the Lifetime Excellence in Pro Bono and Public Service Award.

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FACULTY MEMBERS OF THE YEAR The 2016 graduating class selected Associate Professor Chad Flanders as Faculty Member of the Year. Professor of Practice Gary Rutledge was chosen as Adjunct Faculty Member of the year.

INNOVATION STATION Associate Professor Patricia H. Lee, director of the Legal Clinics, was selected as a recipient of the St. Louis Business Journal ’s Innovation Award.


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STUDENT SPOTLIGHT THURGOOD MARSHALL MOCK TRIAL Congratulations to the Thurgood Marshall Mock Trial team, made up of second-year students Caslyn Brandes and Aigner Carr and third-year students Sheree Davis and Kyra Short. The team placed fifth in the national competition. They were coached by Courtney Logan (’12).

MOOT COURT 2016 The Robert G. Dowd Sr. Appellate Advocacy Award was won by John Hackett, Grant Ford and Katherine Ricks. Taking second place was the team of Patrick McPhail, Kaitlyn Parker and Robert Mahon, who was awarded best oralist.

STUDENT EXCELLENCE AWARDS The Excellence Awards Ceremony was held on April 15, honoring student achievements during the past year. Among those highlighted for their work beyond the classroom: Mark Timmerman, Jaime Ramirez Student of the Year and the Award for Diversity and Cultural Competency; Sheree Davis, Award for Leadership; Jack Waldron, Award for Pro Bono Legal Service; and Mary Simon, Award for Community Service.

DAVID GRANT AWARDS On May 12 SLU LAW gathered to recognize the inspiring work of students in the Legal Clinics with the David Grant and CLEA Awards. Finalists for the David Grant Award were Lilla Buru, Kevin Healy, Elizabeth Larsen, Robert Maher, Michael Oldweiler and Taylor Sander, with Ashley Moore selected as the winner. The CLEA Award, given on behalf of the Clinical Legal Education Association, is given to one student who excelled in both the field work and classroom components of the clinic. This year’s honoree was Lauren Rouse.

Social Scene HERE’S WHAT TWITTER’S BEEN SAYING ABOUT SLU LAW: @seth_crompton @SLULAW Congrats to Ctr for Health Law Studies - again the nation’s top health law program. I need to get that certificate framed. @AKarSTL Had a great afternoon sharing @BryanCaveLLP pro bono experiences with @SLULAW & @WashULaw BLSA students. Both schools have great students @MOattorney @SLULAWCAREERS @SLULAW Thanks for hosting us and letting us educate law students about collaborative divorce. We’ll definitely be back! @SLULAWAdmits So so very proud of the @SLULAW Alums who passed the Missouri Bar yesterday! #Partytime #HardWorkPaysOff @ACSstudents Congrats to our chapter @SLULAW on being Student Chapter of the Week! @slulawlibrary Checked in, but won’t be for long: Ferguson’s Fault Lines. Chapters from #SLULAW Profs @RoedigerBrendan & @cwflander @fsnole1 Excited to chat w/The Criminal Law Society @SLULAW today about work in biosocial criminology! @mobarnews Missouri Bar VP Nancy Mogab welcomes #MiniLawSTL attendees at @SLULAW #YourMOLaw @mcinnismp Professor Goldstein: Constitution contemplates a collaborative process in selecting a new Justice to the Supreme Court. #Scalia @SLULAW Get in on the conversation and follow SLU LAW on Twitter and Instagram for announcements, photos, live tweeting of events and more! @SLULAW

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SIX LONGTIME MEMBERS OF THE SLU LAW COMMUNITY CELEBRATED THEIR RETIREMENT AT THE END OF THE 2015-16 ACADEMIC YEAR. WE THANK THEM FOR THEIR COMMITMENT TO THE SCHOOL OF LAW AND WISH THEM A FOND FAREWELL!

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PAM SCHOLL

JOYCE HERLETH

ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER

DIRECTOR OF ACADEMIC SUPPORT J.D., SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW, 1979

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YEARS OF SERVICE

YEARS OF SERVICE

FACULTY

ADMINISTRATION

1985-2016: ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT, FINANCIAL COORDINATOR AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER, OFFICE OF THE DEAN 1969-1978: ASSOCIATED WITH THE SCHOOL OF LAW BOTH FULL-TIME AND PART-TIME

1990-1997: INSTRUCTOR LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING 1998-1999: INTERIM DIRECTOR OF ACADEMIC ADVISING 1999-2016: DIRECTOR OF ACADEMIC SUPPORT

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SUSAN A. FITZGIBBON

JOANNE VOGEL

SR. ADVISOR, WILLIAM C. WEFEL CENTER FOR EMPLOYMENT LAW

HEAD OF ACCESS SERVICES, VINCENT C. IMMEL LAW LIBRARY

J.D., SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW, 1984

29 YEARS OF SERVICE

FACULTY

1987-2016: PROFESSOR OF LAW (ASSISTANT: ‘87-’91, ASSOCIATE: ‘91-’94)

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AWARDS

2011: LEGAL SCHOLAR AWARD, MISSOURI LAWYERS WEEKLY WOMEN’S JUSTICE AWARD

YEARS OF SERVICE

2016: EILEEN SEARLS SERVICE AWARD ADMINISTRATION

FACULTY

ADMINISTRATION

1987-2015: DIRECTOR, CENTER FOR EMPLOYMENT LAW (ASSISTANT: ‘87-’94, DIRECTOR: ‘94-’15, SENIOR ADVISOR: ’15-’16) 2001-2012: FACULTY SENATE (EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: ‘10-’12)

2007-2016: HEAD OF ACCESS SERVICES; ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LEGAL RESEARCH

1970-1975: SERIALS AND CATALOGING DEPARTMENTS, SLU PIUS XII LIBRARY 1975-1979: ACQUISITIONS ASSISTANT 1979-1986: GOVERNMENT DOCUMENTS COORDINATOR 1986-2001: ARCHIVIST/SPECIAL COLLECTIONS 2001-2007: SR. LIBRARY ASSOCIATE, ACCESS SERVICES/SPECIAL COLLECTIONS

STEVEN THAMAN

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JESSE A. GOLDNER

PROFESSOR

JOHN D. VALENTINE PROFESSOR OF LAW

J.D., UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA-BERKELEY, 1975; DR. IUR., UNIVERSITY OF FREIBURG (GERMANY), 1992

J.D., HARVARD LAW SCHOOL, 1973

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1998, 2002, 2010: THOMPSON COBURN AWARD FOR FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP

ADMINISTRATION FACULTY

1995-2016: PROFESSOR OF LAW

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1995-2001: SUPERVISOR, CRIMINAL CLINIC 2001-2013: CO-DIRECTOR, CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW 2001-2013: DIRECTOR, SUMMER LAW PROGRAM IN MADRID

YEARS OF SERVICE

AWARDS

1997, 2001: THOMPSON COBURN AWARD FOR FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP 2004: DISTINGUISHED HEALTH LAW TEACHER OF THE YEAR AWARD, AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LAW, MEDICINE & ETHICS

FACULTY

1973-2016: PROFESSOR OF LAW (ASSISTANT & ASSOCIATE: ’73-’79) 1974-2016: PROFESSOR OF PSYCHIATRY* (ASSISTANT & ASSOCIATE: ’74-’88) 1989-2016: PROFESSOR OF HEALTH ADMINISTRATION* 2006-2016: ADJUNCT PROFESSOR OF HEALTH CARE ETHICS

ADMINISTRATION

1985-1988, 1991-2000: DIRECTOR, CENTER FOR HEALTH LAW STUDIES 1988-1991: ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS, SCHOOL OF LAW *SECONDARY APPOINTMENT

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Saint Louis University School of Law was founded in 1843 when there were fewer than 20 law schools in the nation. For nearly 175 years since, SLU LAW has graduated highly capable lawyers who serve as leaders of the legal profession. To commemorate this tradition of excellence, the School of Law established the 1843 SCHOLARS PROGRAM, awarding FULL-TUITION SCHOLARSHIPS to a distinguished group of exemplary applicants for their outstanding academic achievements, demonstrated leadership abilities and commitment to service.

“We’re not simply awarding these tremendous scholarships to students with amazing undergraduate records and strong LSAT scores,” said Michael Kolnik (’94), assistant dean of admissions. “We want to know who they are, what drives them and what they’re passionate about. We’re selecting people who we think will be student leaders and will fit in well in the SLU LAW community. The interview component of the application process has always allowed us to go beyond what we learn in their applications and get to the heart of who the students are and hope to become.”

Since the inaugural group (members of the Fall 2000 incoming class), more than 150 SLU LAW students have received the distinction of being an 1843 Scholar. Having the ability to award this high honor to students allows the admissions team to remain competitive in bringing in strong candidates that share in the Jesuit mission. Sixteen years later, the impact these scholarships have on students remains profound. “The 1843 Scholarship has no doubt changed my future for the better,” said first-year law student Caitlin Fagan. “Deciding to go to law school was a huge decision, primarily because of the financial burden. The scholarship gave me the opportunity to receive a great legal education with much less stress.”

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MORE THAN

150 STUDENTS HAVE RECEIVED THE DISTINCTION OF BEING AN 1843 SCHOLAR

Of course there is more that draws students to SLU LAW than simply finances. As Fagan says, “The ultimate connection is with SLU LAW itself and the student body. SLU LAW is truly a great environment for law students, from the friendly and knowledgeable faculty and staff to the multitude of opportunities that the school works so hard to provide for us. This environment, that is academic, collaborative, and fun

Through semiannual gatherings in the fall and spring, current Scholars and Scholar alumni develop a connection with each other, in addition to a collective sense of gratitude for the tremendous financial gift they’ve been awarded. Incoming students have the opportunity to ask questions and have early networking access to current students, alumni and professors.

all at once, is what makes the 1843 Scholarship so special and such an incredible honor and opportunity.” To learn more about how you can support the 1843 Scholars Program, please contact the Office of Development and Alumni Relations:

“First and foremost, being an 1843 Scholar means that I am part of an ongoing community at SLU LAW,” said Michael Brockland (’08). “And as a member of that community it is my obligation to help in any way I can to contribute to the ongoing success of the school and its students.”

SHERIDAN HAYNES (314) 977-3303 hayness@slu.edu SCHOOL OF LAW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 100 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 (314) 977-3300 alumni@law.slu.edu

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ALUMNI PROFILE

a MINISTER to the CAPITAL FR. PAT CONROY, S.J. (’79)

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ow does one prepare to take on the role of chaplain, a position of peace and counsel, to a divisive and contentious 435-member U.S. House of Representatives? Thirteen years working in retreat programs for college freshmen and eight years teaching high school freshmen wouldn’t necessarily be first on a list of qualifications. But for Fr. Patrick J. Conroy, S.J. (’79), that experience was the perfect training ground. “When I arrived, there were 87 ‘freshmen’ in Congress! I was prepared for that! Freshmen are those who were the biggest thing where they came from; a nothing where they are now.” Conroy is no stranger himself to being the new guy on campus. While the idea of being a lawyer entered his mind as early as 4th grade (having an attorney father helped in that regard), Conroy felt a call to the priesthood as well. A native of Everett, Washington, he joined the Jesuits after a year of study at Gonzaga Law School. Continuing his legal studies at Saint Louis University allowed him, as a Jesuit Scholastic, to complete his law degree while living in the formation community at Fusz Hall, which he did and graduated a semester early. As his classmates finished their final semester, Conroy studied and sat for the Washington bar exam. Knowing in just over a year he’d head off to study theology on the path toward ordination – not an ideal position for a job-seeker – 10

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Conroy took a temporary job with the Colville Confederated Tribes in Washington defending Tribal members in state courts. To keep his skills sharp in his second year of theology studies at Santa Clara University, he walked into the Catholic Conference’s Immigration Clinic in San Francisco offering his services. “Most of the workers were paralegals, so having a real, live attorney inquire about helping out in the office was a good day at the office.” He was able to use his experience within the U.S. immigration system to draw parallels to his classes. “Representing Salvadoran asylumseekers was an excellent focus for a Jesuit seminarian, given the Church’s – and JudeoChristian – mandate that we be mindful of the alien in our midst, akin to the Exodus and the Holy Family’s flight to Egypt,” he said. Following his ordination in 1983, Conroy was pastor to four villages on the Colville and Spokane Indian reservations. He also helped develop the case for the Colville Tribes’ treaty fishing rights. A year at the National Office of Jesuit Social Ministries in Washington, D.C., led into his chaplaincy work at the college and high school level, unknowingly tutoring him for his eventual swearing in as the 60th Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives on May 25, 2011. This position gives Conroy a front seat to history.

“It is interesting to me that though I am quite rusty on the content I absorbed while at SLU, and aware that the law has certainly evolved over the decades, that many legal and constitutional principles are still ‘in here,’” he said. “I also studied political science at Claremont McKenna, so educationally, if you will, I was entering the ‘candy store’ as I entered my 60s.” However, that legal background does not necessarily give him an added advantage when building connections with his congregation. “I have one of the few jobs in the U.S. where I am required to abstain from participation in the political process. Thus, no matter my superior knowledge about all things around here given my excellent educational background, including SLU, I am not able to bring it to the relationships I am forming with members of Congress.” This ministry has come at a good time in Conroy’s life. The bulk of his duties require him to simply be present and available to members of Congress for consultations, conversation and the like. With little sense of “getting something done,” restlessness could easily set in for someone early in their career. Conroy makes it clear his role is not to pastor, growing the denominational faith in House members. As a chaplain, he is prepared to attend to any spiritual, personal situation that might arise while representatives are in D.C.


ALUMNI PRO FILE

“I think the ‘icon’ of a religious figure – having somebody on the floor of the House who is a reminder that all of this is about something much bigger than any of the members, is significant. I get to be that icon, but it’s not about me." Furthermore, it’s the image of the chaplain’s office that carries the biggest weight. “I think the ‘icon’ of a religious figure – having somebody on the floor of the House who is a reminder that all of this is about something much bigger than any of the members, is significant. I get to be that icon, but it’s not about me. I also think there is considerable benefit to having someone on the floor with whom members can be human, as opposed to political. When any member visits with me they know that our conversation will not show up somewhere else, nor have to be incorporated in some legislative issue or another. In this polarized pressure-cooker, the humanizing effect of having a chaplain is, like Mastercard, priceless. I get to be that guy.” Being ‘that guy’ has its perks and pinch me moments: escorting the Dalai Lama to his waiting car, chatting with Roger Daltrey of The Who. And then there was the time he greeted Pope Francis during his historic visit and speech to Congress in September 2015. Conroy, like Pope Francis is the first Jesuit to serve in his role, knew he had only about 20 seconds with the pontiff as he entered the Capitol. “What do you do with 20 seconds?” recalled Conroy. “Well, I decided I’d ask him if I could give him a blessing – he’s always asking people to pray for him. The fact that we were both Jesuits actually made that a pretty comfortable experience for me.” VO LU M E 1 7 I SS U E 2

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motivatEd by

missioN

Integrated among the law books, the briefs and the oral arguments is SLU LAW’s commitment to social justice. It is a cornerstone principle of a SLU LAW education that reflects our students’ and faculty’s focus on community, academic excellence and public service all embodied in the Jesuit mission. Throughout their education, SLU LAW provides tangible opportunities for students to see the law – and the power of what the law can do – by placing them in positions to help real people in real situations. For many School of Law alumni, that willingness to be men and women for others continues as they chart the path of their careers. For some, it is by directly working in public interest work or volunteering their pro bono services. Others volunteer their time to charitable organizations.

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ana Roberts (’90) and Craig Knapp (’90) focus their Phoenix personal injury firm on being the voice for and protecting society’s most vulnerable. For them, that means focusing on the elder care industry (nursing homes, group homes, rehab facilities, assisted living facilities and in-home care services) that often, as Roberts says, puts profits over patients. Through their cases they have made changes in the industry by requiring facilities to make changes in their policies and procedures to provide better care. Like any battle to make a difference, this area of practice is not without its challenges. “The most challenging is dealing with the legislative changes that make it harder to protect the vulnerable in favor of the facilities all in the name of cutting out frivolous lawsuits,” said Roberts. “I do not consider a case where a vulnerable person has been abused or neglected as frivolous. All these legislative changes did was close the courthouse door for victims. Sadly, the facilities know the threat of a lawsuit has been significantly reduced which in turn affects the care that is given. The threat of a lawsuit was the watch dog. When the watch dog is taken away it is the patients that suffer.” The couple has found helping the special needs community to be the most rewarding of their professional and personal lives. As the parents of a now 17-year-old son with autism, their involvement in the community showed them

just how people with special needs are mistreated through abuse and neglect. “Their families are often exhausted just taking care of their loved ones on a daily basis and do not know what to do,” she said.

“Other than volunteering at special needs clinics and doing service hours, she did not have any outside work experience, mainly because she spent that time helping out with her brother. Fortunately, we could pay for her college, but

“When you have been given a lot, you have a duty to give a lot to others that aren’t as fortunate as you. Roberts and Knapp met on the first day of law school, and as fate would have it, were in the same 1L section. They always wanted to have their own firm, and so to help develop the business side of practice Knapp followed up his law degree with an MBA. In 1992, Knapp & Roberts was formed. Twenty-one years of marriage and two kids later, the SLU LAW ideals of giving back remain an integral part of their lives. “The Jesuit mission is a part of us. We think, ‘For the grace of God, go I,’ Roberts explained. “In a different situation we could be the ones that needed help. We would like to think someone would be there for us. We have been lucky to have professional success, so we wanted to help others as a way of recognizing how lucky we have been compared to others.” The couple, through their firm, recently established two scholarships for college students. While their now 19-year-old daughter was filling out college applications, they came to a striking realization.

what about the kids that help with their special needs siblings whose parents cannot afford to pay for their college yet they are not able to work outside of the home? What do those kids do? How do they afford to go to college? So, we thought a scholarship for a worthy sibling of a special needs child was needed.” The second scholarship rewards a student who is pursuing a special education degree, a vocation in which they’ve witnessed a shortage. With all the gifts they’ve been given, Roberts believes it is their duty to give back. “When you have been given a lot, you have a duty to give a lot to others that aren’t as fortunate as you,” she said. “Sometimes, helping someone even a little can help get them back on track. I think when you start helping out others in small ways and see the impact, it makes you want to help out in bigger ways. It’s such a good feeling.”

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mily Rosenfeld (’15) is early in her career, but is already experiencing how her dual J.D./Masters of Public Health degree can help promote social justice on a global scale. The combination of SLU programs helped Rosenfeld satisfy two passions. As a child, she dreamed of becoming a doctor, but midway through her time at Connecticut College in New London, Connecticut, she discovered it wasn’t going to be the right fit. During college as a volunteer at the New London Homeless Hospitality Center, she witnessed clients dealing not only with the daily challenge of homelessness, but also the heavy burdens of systemic challenges. This experience, among others, shaped her desire to help promote social justice by working to reform many of the policies that challenge society’s most vulnerable. An internship between her 3L and 4L year sent her to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) where she fell in love with the agency’s scientific focus on public policy, among other attributes, and applied for the ASPPH/Allan Rosenfield Global Health Fellowship. Since September 2015 she has worked as an ASPPH/CDC Global Health Fellow as part of the policy team in the Office of the Director for the Center for Global Health. Her particular team provides management, oversight and technical assistance on the Global Health Security Public Health Law Project. “We are in the process of mapping the presence or absence of laws in 25 countries either coping with the aftermath of Ebola, or those that are at a high-risk for future similarly destructive disease threats,” she said. The global aspect of her job gives the St. Louis native plenty of stamps in her passport. “It is a great opportunity to get to see how the practice of public health as well as public health law touches the lives of individuals all around the world.” In her first eight months in the position, she has traveled to Vietnam, Liberia and South Africa providing on-site assistance and training. The core on-the-ground team consists of Rosenfeld and two colleagues, with assistance from across various divisions in the Center for 14

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Global Health. The team returned in May from their second two-week visit to Liberia, where they were invited by the Liberian Ministry of Health and the CDC Liberia country office to provide technical assistance as the country seeks to revise its public health laws. “Our team provides tailored training on the use of law as a public health tool, country-specific analysis to answer questions surrounding the role of law in promoting public health, and identification of legal and policy barriers that exists for implementation of CDC programmatic activities.” They travel the country meeting with key stakeholders who will ultimately be responsible for devising various components of the revised laws. It is also an opportunity to experience public health interventions in action. While approaching a border between two counties, Rosenfeld and her team were stopped at an Ebola checkpoint. Before entering the next county, they had to exit the vehicle, wash their hands and have their temperatures checked. If someone is discovered to be sick or have a fever, they are not permitted to continue onward. Regardless of where she is globetrotting now or where she will head in the future, Rosenfeld often finds herself drawing on knowledge she gained from her SLU LAW health law courses. Lobbying for Medicaid expansion in Jefferson City through Professor Sidney Watson’s grassroots advocacy course taught her that “affecting change is not always pretty and persistence and perseverance is necessary,” she recalls. “Change rarely occurs overnight, but nevertheless it is important to continue making steps towards a goal.” Moreover, she utilizes the actionable public health law skills she learned in Professor Rob Gatter’s public health law course every day in her work at the CDC, routinely referring back to lessons learned when completing various projects. “Having both the J.D. and the MPH helps me navigate through two very different spheres, the scientific and the legal,” she said. “I often find myself wearing two hats, and having the dual degree has really helped me navigate both spheres successfully.”

S

ince his arrival in St. Louis in 2001, Constantino “Tino” Ochoa Jr. (’10) has gone above and beyond to make a difference in his new home. When the Chicago

native first came to town with his wife, Zoila, he worked for the social services agency Family Resource Center which gives abused kids a chance for a better life by preventing and treating all forms of child abuse and neglect and by strengthening families through family-centered therapeutic, educational, and support services. When he decided to go back to school for his law degree, SLU LAW was a natural fit. “We knew we were going to stay in St. Louis for the long haul, and I knew that SLU LAW had a great reputation,” he said. “I also knew SLU overall was and is committed to the city. With both of those points, I chose to apply and be a part of the SLU LAW family and mission.” At SLU LAW Ochoa made lifelong friends and helped revive the Hispanic Law Student Association. He also was influenced by several professors, most notably Professor Pete Salsich, whose classes relating to urban development served as the insightful catalyst to his legal career. “He was very instrumental in developing my interest in community development and pushing the idea that all things development are not strictly legal, but interdisciplinary.” A two-time summer associate at Bryan Cave, Ochoa joined the firm after graduation where he has since developed skills as a real estate and finance attorney. The firm continues to support his efforts outside of work that tie into his practice area or into his previous life in social work. It is that past experience that made him a natural fit to assist, and now lead, Bryan Cave’s guardian ad litem (GAL) pro bono program with the Probate Division of the 22nd Judicial Circuit. “My favorite part is knowing that whatever we do as part of the GAL program, we still have an impact on the lives of these children and families, even if we are involved for only a moment of their lives,” Ochoa said. “With that being said,


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writing utensils, and other crucial school supplies.

I do not think I could have been able to approach problems the same way.”

A

we have a great responsibility to assist the families and the court the best we can.” His commitment to others extends beyond the walls of a courtroom. For years Ochoa has been active in the community-based revitalization efforts of Old North St. Louis, where he resides. He is a previous board president of the Old North St. Louis Restoration Group (ONSLRG), during which time the community completed the $35 million Crown Square redevelopment renovation of 27 vacant historic buildings and adjacent blocks into 80 mixed-income apartments and over 34,000 square feet of commercial and retail space. “I love this neighborhood and all of the neighbors. I grew up in a rough neighborhood on the south of Chicago and now feel it is my obligation to help a community – as part of the community – get past the obstacles it faces.” The Old North community is striving to grow and make the neighborhood a great place for families and to progress as, Ochoa hopes, “a true model of what urban revitalization could mean: inclusion.” ONSLRG has assisted with bringing neighbors together with a collective goal and fresh ideas that go beyond simply saving physical buildings through bringing in events like Shakespeare in the Streets. Others have taken notice of Ochoa’s dedication, and he has earned recognition for his efforts. In 2012 Missouri Lawyers Weekly honored him as an Up & Coming Lawyer and St. Louis Business Journal included him in the 40 Under 40 class for 2013. “I believe my law degree has provided me with opportunities in the community and the ability to work on complex projects that feed my interests, both personally and professionally. Without a law degree coupled with my interests,

fter finishing his two-year commitment with Teach for America in spring 2009, Mark Keaney (’12) was looking for an interesting and challenging activity to keep him occupied before beginning law school in the fall. Little did he know how a summer volunteer experience teaching abroad would turn into figuratively adopting an orphanage in a Ghanaian village. It took just a few weeks teaching at the Royal Seed Shelter in Ofaakor, Ghana, for Keaney to realize how a small amount of fundraising could dramatically provide profound, lasting change for the more than 130 children living and going to school at this orphanage. When he returned home for the summer, he went to work. His sister, Colleen Keaney (’07), then an associate attorney at Bryan Cave, was tasked with creating a 501(c)(3) organization to begin raising money. Thus, the Children of Africa Fund for Social Mobility (CAFSM) was born. And family and friends were quick to respond at the first fundraiser. “We were stunned and deeply humbled by the overwhelming support of the community, including the SLU LAW community, as we sought to transform the educational prospects of the kids living at the orphanage,” said Keaney.

Since that initial trip, Mark graduated law school and himself joined Bryan Cave. In the fall of 2015 he left St. Louis for Columbus, Ohio where he now works as an associate attorney in the litigation department of Calfee, Halter & Griswold LLP. Meanwhile, Colleen practiced for seven-plus years before switching gears and taking some time to focus on her growing family. They currently reside in Charleston, South Carolina. But the mission and efforts of the organization go on. Mark continues to make annual pilgrimages to Ghana. Guests have frequently joined him, from board members and volunteers to others simply interested in learning more about the orphanage and the Ghanaian culture. All expenses for the trips are paid for by the individual attending. “When I saw the finished classrooms and visited with students whose higher-level education tuition was being paid for by CAFSM, I felt an overwhelming sense of joy and deep appreciation for our supporters who made it all possible,” he said. “I also felt deeply heartened and moved by the sincere gratitude conveyed by children who otherwise would not have the opportunity to obtain a meaningful education if it were not for the generosity of our supporters.” CAFSM continues to fundraise to pay for the tuition of those children who have the academic qualifications to enter higher education, as well as the salaries of qualified teachers who are essential to the future progress of the school. Additionally,

“We were stunned and deeply humbled by the overwhelming support of the community, including the SLU LAW community, as we sought to transform the educational prospects of the kids living at the orphanage.

It certainly takes a village to transform one 5,800 miles away. Recognizing that fundraising to purchase food, drinkable water, and medical resources would only provide short-term solutions to the problems confronting the children at Royal Seed, CAFSM developed a plan to build a new school, train qualified and respected teachers, and provide basic educational resources like desks, textbooks, reading books, maps, notebooks,

money is also needed to ensure other basic life necessities are met such as adequate health care, potable water and at least one protein-based meal every day for every child. In a few months the first dormitory – equipped with electricity, running water and plumbing – is expected to be finished; an impressive result for a summer sabbatical killing time waiting for law school to begin. For more information on CAFSM, visit cafsm.org.

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ONES TO WATCH The job of a law student is a hectic one.

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While students come to law school to prepare for the practice of law, many students do not wait to have their

In between the reading and outlining,

diploma in hand before they use the

there’s OCI prep and brief drafting. And

skills and knowledge they learn along

oh yeah, carving out time for family,

the way to enact change. Whether

friends and a little fun here and there,

fighting injustice or seeking to stymie

too. But there are those students who find

stigmas, the following four individuals

a passion for something and aren’t going

are examples of how SLU LAW students

to let the demands of law school and

take the initiative to make a difference in

the confines of a 24-hour day stop them

the lives of others beyond the classroom

from pursuing something a little bigger.

– while not quitting their day job.

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ONES TO WATCH

ALEX LINDLEY Class of 2018 Hometown: St. Louis Undergrad: University of Missouri-Columbia; PSychology

What extracurricular activities are you involved in? I founded Project Wake Up in 2015. Wake Up has been the focus of my philanthropic/ extracurricular efforts since then.

Why is it important to you? In 2014, my best friend took his own life. He was the last person anyone would have guessed was secretly battling mental illness. Ryan was one of the most popular, respected and determined people I knew. He was very intelligent and had a bright future ahead of him; he easily could have been one of my SLU LAW classmates. I mention that because despite all of his talents and his bright future – he was fighting a hidden battle. Too many kids, even those who seemingly have everything going for them, can be suffering in silence. I attribute Ryan’s silence to the stigma surrounding mental illness. This stigma keeps so many from reaching out for the help they desperately need because they are afraid that reaching out will result in ridicule and alienation. They don’t want to feel crazy, or different or weird.

What is your "big idea"? If you could solve one problem, what would it be? Project Wake Up is currently raising money to create a documentary addressing mental illness on college/grad school campuses and aiming to start an open conversation about mental illness

that will hopefully eradicate that awful stigma. We received our 501(c)(3) nonprofit status and have raised over $70,000, hoping to raise the remaining $80,000 within the next year to produce the film. We plan to distribute it to colleges and universities across the nation for implementation into orientation programs/ mental health awareness weeks. We also plan to install “Wake Up Chapters” on campuses nationwide, based on a model we created at the University of Missouri in 2015: a studentrun organization with certified “Respond Training,” which equips members with the tools they need to facilitate a crisis situation should it arise in a peer.

How has your time at SLU LAW helped shape your focus to give back to the community? It was obvious from the beginning that SLU LAW holds its Jesuit values high and has a strong commitment to social justice. The seminars and summer reading challenge us to think critically and open a dialogue about current social justice issues. These discussions not only opened my eyes to more issues that deserve the spotlight and an open dialogue, but also motivated me even further to fight for those suffering silently from mental illness.

How do you envision your law degree and your role as a lawyer helping you continue your communityfocused passions? Throughout this process I have learned of the serious need for legislation in the area of mental health. I hope to use my J.D. to create legislation that will hopefully pass and change the way Missouri allocates resources to the mental health field. I also plan to provide pro bono legal service for mentally ill members of the community.

TOO MANY KIDS, EVEN THOSE WHO SEEMINGLY HAVE EVERYTHING GOING FOR THEM, CAN BE SUFFERING IN SILENCE.

ASHLEY MOORE Class of 2016 Hometown: St. Louis Undergrad: Pace University (New York); Political Science, Communication Studies

What extracurricular activities/pet projects are you involved in? I was a mentor for Top Teens of America and I am a board member for North County Community Development Corporation. Our organization is committed to helping at-risk individuals and families become self-sufficient and independent by providing essential supportive and educational services. I was a top teen when I was a young girl, so when I became an adult I wanted to give back to the organization and volunteered to be a mentor. In 2010, my mentor reached out to me and told me that she and her husband were creating a nonprofit and they wanted me to be on the board.

Why are these endeavors important to you? Ever since I was a child I always knew the importance of volunteering and giving back to your community. I have been very fortunate in my life and recognize that not everyone has the same opportunities. It’s also very important to me that everyone is treated with dignity, and I think servicing the community is a great opportunity to do that and remind people despite your circumstances you are still a human being and deserve to be treated as such.

What is your "big idea"? If you could solve one problem, what would it be? During my time in the Children and Youth Advocacy Clinic, I saw that, overall, children

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to the school providing me with various opportunities to do so within the legal community. It has also shown me that I can use my legal skills to give back to the community without giving out legal advice. As attorneys we have a duty to the community to give back to the community in some way, whether it is through mentorship or volunteering at a Know Your Rights presentation.

How do you envision your law degree and your role as a lawyer helping you continue your communityfocused passions? and families were not being treated fairly when it came to Individualized Educational Programs (IEP). In many instances, it appeared that families needed an attorney to not only stand by their side through the process so their children received the care they needed, but for any follow up meetings as well. However, this is not a process that attorneys are generally used for, as an IEP meeting is not a legal setting. From my experience, children’s rights were being violated by the school boards and by the time an attorney would get involved it would be too late. In addition, children often don't have legal representation at disciplinary hearings. Again, this is not a legal setting but it also leaves open the door for many students to be treated unfairly. By the time they realize this, the school year is over. I think in the future it would be beneficial to have volunteer attorneys familiar with educational law to attend IEP meetings and disciplinary hearings. I have observed that just the mere presence of attorneys in the room makes school districts follow all of the rules. Legal Services’ educational law department is often not involved until after the fact. Our children deserve some type of representation throughout the entire process to ensure they do not lose out on any needed services. While an attorney present would be nice, it doesn't have to be; it could be law students, social workers or a community volunteer that is very familiar with the school district, IEPs and disciplinary hearings or has some training on the topics.

How has your time at SLU LAW helped shape your focus to give back to the community? My time at SLU LAW reaffirmed my focus to give back to the community, thanks

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My purpose for coming to law school was to be able to legally advocate on juveniles’ behalf. However, I think as an attorney there will be many ways I will be able to continue my community-focused passions.

understand the importance of service to others and respect for individual differences. It is not our goal that every student becomes a public interest lawyer but we would expect SLU LAWeducated lawyers to know an injustice when they see it and work to correct it.

What is your “big idea”? If you could solve one problem, what would it be? I think St. Louis City has a lot of potential and so much to offer. It would be great if we could build up our city’s abandoned buildings and improve our public school system. I think SLU LAW has some great resources (our students and faculty) that can help the community make this happen. By engaging with the community we can learn how our resources can best be used in already existing efforts to improve the city. I’ve had the pleasure of participating in some community engagement opportunities at SLU LAW like Street Law (a student organization that teaches area teens the basics of the law) led by 2L Jack Waldron, and the Legal Education Seminar at People’s Community Action Corporation organized by 2L Mary Simon.

How has your time at SLU LAW helped shape your focus to give back to the community?

ERICKA SIMPSON CONNER Class of 2017 Hometown: San Jose, California Undergrad: Morris Brown College (Atlanta); Political Science

What extracurricular activities are you involved in? How did you get started with them? I, along with fellow 2Ls Mark Timmerman and Ilana Friedman, are working to start a Social Justice Center at SLU LAW. This project began to ensure the Jesuit mission of SLU LAW which includes service to others, freedom of inquiry and respect for individual differences, permeates every aspect of SLU LAW students’ legal education.

Why is it important to you? It is our goal that ethical and social justiceminded lawyers are created by doing the work to

I’ve had some great professors who have challenged my thinking beyond what was in our textbooks to understand how the laws we are studying actually affect people on a micro-level. I have been granted access to so much information through our lunch or after school meetings, CLEs and ABA conferences. I feel much more knowledgeable about my community and the world at large. As a law student I have been given the opportunity to volunteer and share my education throughout the community.

How do you envision your law degree and your role as a lawyer helping you continue your communityfocused passions? As a lawyer I believe I have a duty to give back to the community. Working as a lawyer will allow my efforts to have a larger impact on individuals’ lives.

I THINK ST. LOUIS CITY HAS A LOT OF POTENTIAL AND SO MUCH TO OFFER.


ONES TO WATCH only tackling individual cases for low-income populations, but also in working towards solving some of the systemic issues in our region involving access to justice for poor and marginalized communities and the negative and racially disparate effects some of our region’s money-hungry municipal courts have on our poorest populations. I was involved with the creation of the BAMSL group through my work with the Ferguson Commission.

Why is it important to you?

MARK TIMMERMAN Class of 2017 Hometown: West Lafayette, Indiana Undergrad: Illinois Wesleyan University; Religion, Philosophy and Music Performance

What extracurricular activities are you involved in? I am involved with activist groups that do grassroots work in and around Ferguson related to issues of poverty, access to justice, implementation of the consent decree between Ferguson and the Department of Justice, municipal courts reform and voting participation. In April I gave testimony in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri regarding the potential effectiveness of the Consent Decree for Ferguson residents. Along with several other students, and with the help of a few SLU LAW professors, I participated in an educational seminar at a lowincome community center this past semester on legal topics such as navigating the municipal courts, applying for unemployment benefits, and knowing what constitutional rights a person has during encounters with the police. There was a great turn out for the event, and we look forward to getting more students involved in these student-led community outreach efforts. This year the Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis formed a task force dedicated to pro bono legal work efforts in the region. I was asked to provide recommendations to the group regarding how pro bono efforts could be better organized and effective in not

There are people my age all around the world who work harder, are smarter, are more gifted, are more generous, loving and kind than I am, and yet they live impoverished and tremendously unfair and difficult lives. I don’t know why I have been allowed to lead such a privileged life while others suffer, and I also don’t know why I have had tremendous access to opportunities while so many do not. But what I do know is I can choose to use my voice and some of my time and energy to try and help others who have it harder than I do, and that is important to me because I would want someone to advocate for me if I were the one who was without a voice in this world.

How has your time at SLU LAW helped shape your focus to give back to the community? I have exploding gratefulness for SLU LAW because of the tremendous legal education that it provides and for the opportunities I’ve been able to take advantage of through this school. The main reason for that gratefulness is because of the amazing people, including many SLU alumni, I have been able to connect with who so beautifully choose to use their power and influence in society to help those in need. Those people have taught me what it looks like to be a legal professional who is involved in the struggles of the community.

How do you envision your law degree and your role as a lawyer helping you continue your communityfocused passions? I see a law degree and the label of “lawyer” as tools of privilege and power that I can harness and use to further the work of marginalized communities as they work to become truly liberated and equal in the eyes of the law and society.

What is your "big idea"? If you could solve one problem, what would it be? It would be fantastic if humanity, all of us, could fully and completely (1) understand the complex ways in which we have created societies and communities that benefit some while marginalizing others and (2) commit to creating new societies and communities together where every person is treated equitably and has the opportunity to thrive.

For the first time, the opportunity to collaborate on an article in Saint Louis Brief was auctioned off at this year’s PILG Auction. Many thanks to Professor Sue McGraugh for her generous bid and help in curating this article. In keeping with the theme of the issue, it was her wish to highlight student-led initiatives that are making an impact in the community.

I CAN CHOOSE TO USE MY VOICE AND SOME OF MY TIME AND ENERGY TO TRY AND HELP OTHERS WHO HAVE IT HARDER THAN I DO...

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By John J. Ammann (’84)

We are told in Scripture, “The Lord hears the cry of the poor.” What I have learned is that very often He uses our ears to hear them. Being able to hear the poor and respond to their needs is a great privilege, and I am grateful that Saint Louis University supports our work in the Legal Clinics where we champion the mission of the University.

M

any of our students have embraced our role as a faith-based institution, where all faiths are welcomed but also challenge us to engage in the service of others. We place great trust in our students to lead in this work, with our supervision, and they never disappoint us. For they realize the great gifts they have been given. Not just the gifts of intelligence and caring, but the gift of the opportunity to serve others. The students learn quickly that those in need are God’s gift to us. They give our lives purpose and meaning. And we as faculty

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are personally privileged that these thoughtful, dedicated students are placed in our presence for a short time to guide them in the path of justice. Who are those closest to God’s heart? The poor, the homeless, the blind, the deaf, the sick, abused children, abused women, those who are out of work, and yes, those who are in prison. And for a few months at a time, God entrusts these souls to our students in the Clinic. These are our clients, and they are the best clients any lawyer could have.

We often find our greatest days are those spent not where we feel most at home, but where our clients are at home. One of our graduates, Anthony Laramore (’10), started his own practice right out of law school and has been very successful. He tells me one big reason for his success is that he meets people at their homes. Sitting on the front porch of a home in Winfield, Missouri, interviewing a man injured in a terrible accident that left him disabled, he connects with a client in ways not possible in an office.


FACULTY VIEW

Likewise, some of our best days in the Clinic are when we travel to the women’s prison in Chillicothe, Missouri to meet with our clients seeking clemency, or go to the Veterans’ Administration Hospital at Jefferson Barracks to interview disabled vets, or to the homeless shelters to volunteer our time. Addressing the needs of our community means study followed by action. We have had numerous discussions recently about inclusion and diversity at SLU LAW. To bring those discussions alive, we provide concrete opportunities to express the welcoming attitude of the JudeoChristian heritage by sponsoring Naturalization ceremonies here at Scott Hall. We have hosted ceremonies at which thousands of people from almost every country on earth become American citizens. We have also had meetings and conferences about incarceration rates and the school-to-prison pipeline. But it is a lot easier to understand the issue if you have been to a prison and met people sentenced to life without parole and see that they are not a threat to society. Likewise, the effort to reform municipal courts in the area has been successful on many fronts. But we make sure our students understand the problem firsthand by going to night court on a cold winter night to represent a client, and seeing hundreds of people in line outside, waiting to get in a too-small courtroom, and often having their lives turned upside down by minor traffic offenses. Our charge from our ancestors in faith is simple, as articulated by the prophet Micah, who poses a question, then gives the answer: “What does the Lord require of you? To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God.” But the first of these is to act justly. We have seen our students act justly, and bravely, in their work in the Clinic. Marie DeFer (’15) argued in the Missouri Supreme Court on behalf

of poor citizens whose rights were violated by a municipal court system geared more toward profit than public safety. Erica Mazzotti (’15) spoke to the Ferguson City Council shortly after the death of Michael Brown to ask for clemency for people who had been victims of that same system. Second-year student Thomas Milhaczo recently advocated for accessible voting machines for the blind and others with disabilities. Katherine Landfried, a 2L, argued before the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals for a fired minority worker in an employment discrimination case, while fourth-year part time student Michael Oldweiler argued on behalf of an unemployed worker who had been wrongly denied unemployment compensation benefits. Over and above our legal work, students also immerse themselves in the community in ways that all good lawyers do. Serving a meal to the homeless, hosting a party for sick kids at Children’s Hospital or eating lunch at a business trying to survive in Ferguson, all help the students learn how to work as a team and to address problems from many angles.

The University’s mission is stated, in part, as the “pursuit of truth for the greater glory of God.” It is humbling to know that we can reveal His love and grace to people who might not otherwise see it. Watching clients hug or fist bump their student attorney confirms that standing with the poor and oppressed is just as important as the outcome of their legal case. God wants us to hear the cries of the poor, but he doesn’t want us to wait until the tears turn into wailing. So through our work, we strive to help students listen more carefully and watch more intently, so that we see the injustice in the world before the rest of the world sees it, that we serve the oppressed before the oppression leads to despair. For students who are anxious about classes, the bar exam and finding employment, we give them this message: Who do you think brought you this far with His great love and protection? Surely God did not bring us to this point to abandon us. So do justice, wherever God sends you.

JOHN J. AMMANN is the McDonnell Professor of Justice in American Society at SLU LAW. He has been named Faculty Member of the Year four times and currently works as a supervisor in the Civil Litigation Clinic where students handle a variety of lawsuits in state and federal court, including class actions regarding government rights and benefits, and individual cases in the areas of consumer law (including bankruptcy), landlord-tenant, foreclosures, and municipal court matters. Prior to his current role, he served as the director of the Legal Clinics for 18 years. For 19 years, Ammann served as faculty advisor for the Public Interest Law Group, helping make it one of the largest student organizations at SLU LAW. As a lawyer and teacher, Ammann stresses the need to practice law with compassion and purpose.

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SCHOOL OF LAW

HOODING MAY 12, 2016 STEVE DOLAN

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SAINT LOUIS B RIEF


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FAC ULT Y

SCHOLARSHIP

FACU LT Y

SCHOLARSHIP SLU LAW faculty’s national and international excellence continues to develop through their extensive production of legal scholarship. The following is a collection of our faculty’s scholarship successes from 2015. *Scholarship citations are listed in accordance with Bluebook citation guidelines.

MATTHEW T. BODIE

Callis Family Professor of Law R estatement of E mployment L aw ch. 7: Employee Privacy and Autonomy (2015) (primary reporter). Foreword: The Restatement of Employment Law Project, 100 C ornell L. R ev . 1245 (2015) (with Samuel Estreicher, Michael C. Harper & Stewart J. Schwab). We Are What We Work, J otwell (June 5, 2015) (reviewing Orly Lobel, The New Cognitive Property: Human Capital Law and Reach of Intellectual Property, 93 T ex . L. R ev . 789 (2015)), http://worklaw.jotwell.com/ we-are-what-we-work/. Income Inequality and Corporate Structure, 45 S tetson L. R ev . 69 (2015).

Assistant Professor of Health Law & Ethics

Legal & Ethical Issues in Critical Care, L inda D. U rden , K athleen M. S tacy & M ary E. L ough , P riorities in C ritical C are N ursing (7th ed.) (2015).

MONICA EPPINGER

Associate Professor

Property and Political Community: Democracy, Oligarchy, and the Case of Ukraine, 47 G eo . W ash . I nt ’ l L. R ev . 825 (2015). Politicized Justice in Emerging Democracies: A Study of Courts in Russia and Ukraine (Popova), 33 A nthropology E. E ur . R ev . 93 (2015) (book review).

MIRIAM A. CHERRY

The Projection Room, B ooks & I deas , (Nov. 19, 2015), http:// www.booksandideas.net/The-Projection-Room.html.

The Law and Economics of Catalyzing Fans, 6 H arv . J. S ports & E nt . L. 209 (2015).

L’Idée de Russie, L a V ie des I dées (Nov. 17, 2015) (Emilie L’Hôte, trans.), http://www.laviedesidees.fr/L-idee-deRussie.html.

Professor

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KELLY DINEEN

SAINT LOUIS B RIEF


FAC U LTY

SCHOLARSHIP

CHAD W. FLANDERS

SANDRA H. JOHNSON

The Supreme Court and the Rehabilitative Ideal, 49 G a . L. R ev . 383 (2015).

A Buyer’s Market? Fixing the Price for Human Ova for Assisted Reproduction, H astings C enter R ep ., Nov.–Dec. 2015, at 9.

Associate Professor

Claudio López-Guerra, Democracy and Disenfranchisement, N otre D ame P hil . R ev . (July 20, 2015) (book review), https://ndpr. nd.edu/news/59383-democracy-and-disenfranchisementthe-morality-of-electoral-exclusions/.

Professor Emerita

Structure of Governmental Oversight of Quality in Healthcare, in O xford H andbook of U.S. H ealthcare L aw (I. Glenn Cohen, Allison K. Hoffman & William M. Sage eds., 2015).

Teaching “Ferguson,” 65 J. L egal E d . 312 (2015).

SAMUEL P. JORDAN ROBERT GATTER Professor

Ebola, Quarantine, and Failed CDC Policy, 23 U. M iami B us . L. R ev . 375 (2015).

Professor

Federalism, Democracy, and the Challenge of Ferguson, 59 S t . L ouis U. L.J. 1103 (2015).

PATRICIA H. LEE

Associate Professor

JESSE GOLDNER

John D. Valentine Professor of Law Emeritus T he E thics and R egulation of R esearch with H uman S ubjects (2d ed., 2015) (with Carl H. Coleman, Jerry A. Menikoff & Efthimios Parasidis).

JOEL K. GOLDSTEIN

Vincent C. Immel Professor of Law Edmund S. Muskie: The Environmental Leader and Champion, 67 M e . L. R ev . 226 (2015). Harold H. Bruff’s Untrodden Ground: How Presidents Interpret the Constitution, 42 C ong . & P residency 372 (2015) (book review). Michael J. Gerhardt’s The Forgotten Presidents: Their Untold Constitutional Legacy, 77 H istorian 122 (2015) (book review). The White House Vice Presidency: The Path to Significance, Mondale to Biden, (University Press of Kansas, 2016)

B ond of F riendship : L egacy of G rand C hancellor , S ir W illiam H. “T illmon ” J ones and T he K nights of P ythias N orth A merica , S outh A merica , E urope , A sia , A frica and A ustralia (Patricia H. Lee, ed. 2015) (e-book), https://www.amazon.com/ BOND-FRIENDSHIP-Chancellor-William-Australia-ebook/ dp/B017QH2GA6.

YVETTE JOY LIEBESMAN Professor

When Does Copyright Law Require Technology Blindness? Aiken Meets Aereo, 30 B erkeley T ech . L.J. 1383 (2015).

MARCIA L. MCCORMICK

Professor

Let’s Pretend that Federal Courts Aren’t Hostile to Discrimination Claims, 76 O hio S t . L.J. F urthermore 22 (2015).

THOMAS A. GREANEY

JOHN O’BRIEN & THOMAS L. STEWART

Chester A. Myers Professor of Law Medicare Advantage, Accountable Care Organizations, and Payment Reform: Synchronization or Collision?, 15 Y ale J. H ealth P ol ’ y , L. & E thics 37 (2015). Competition Policy After Health Reform: Mending Holes in Antitrust Law’s Protective Net, 40 J. H ealth P ol ., P ol ’ y & L. 895 (2015)

Associate Professor

2015 S upplement to M issouri E videntiary F oundations (2012) (with Edward J. Immwinkelried).

HENRY M. ORDOWER Professor

JUSTIN HANSFORD

Associate Professor

F erguson from the F rontlines : T he W hole S ystem is G uilty as H ell , 21 H arv . J. A fr . A m . P ub . P ol ’ y 13 (2015). Ferguson to Geneva: Using the Human Rights Framework to Push Forward a Vision for Racial Justice in the United States After Ferguson,” 12 H astings R ace & P overty L.J. 121 (2015).

Global Regulatory and Ethical Framework, in P rivate E quity : O pportunities and R isks (H. Kent Baker, Greg Filbeck & Halil Kiymaz eds., 2015). Income Imputation: Toward Equal Treatment of Renters and Owners, in C ontroversies in T ax L aw : A M atter of P erspective (Anthony C. Infanti ed., 2015). continued on next page

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FAC ULT Y

SCHOLARSHIP ELIZABETH PENDO

Joseph J. Simeone Professor of Law What Patients with Disabilities Teach Us about the Everyday Ethics of Healthcare, 50 W ake F orest L. R ev . 287 (2015).

KAREN PETROSKI Professor

Legal Fictions and the Limits of Legal Language, 9 I nt ’ l J. L. C ontext 485 (2013) (republished in L egal F ictions in T heory and P ractice 131 (Maksymilian Del Mar & William Twining eds., 2015)).

JEFF A. REDDING

STEPHEN C. THAMAN

Professor Scheinbare Freisprüche: Die Unschuldsvermutung und die Aufhebung von Freisprüchen wegen Begründungsmängeln (Apparent Acquittals: the Presumption of Innocence and the Reversal of Acquittals Based on Inadequate Judgment Reasons), in S cripta A micitiae : F reundschaftsgabe für A lbin E ser zum 80. G eburtstag A m 26. J anuar 2015 p. 77 (Björn Burkhardt et al. eds., 2015).

CONSTANCE Z. WAGNER

Associate Professor Training the Transactional Business Lawyer: Using the Business Associations Course as a Platform to Teach Practical Skills, 59 S t . L ouis U. L.J. 745 (2015).

Associate Professor Islamic Law in South Asia: A Testament to Diversity, in O xford H andbook of I slamic L aw (Anver M. Emon & Rumee Ahmed eds., 2015) (invited submission). From ‘She-males’ to ‘Unix’: Transgender Rights and the Productive Paradoxes of Pakistani Policing, in R egimes of L egality : E thnography of C riminal C ases in S outh A sia 258 (Daniela Berti & Devika Bordia eds., 2015). Khwaja Siras and State (Dis)Belief, T anqeed (Mar. 2015), http://www.tanqeed.org/2015/03/suspect-genderskhwaja-siras-and-state-disbelief-tq-salon/.

KERRY A. RYAN

Associate Professor Merger is Indirect Gift in Cavallaro, 146 T ax N otes 139 (2015). Law on the Books Meets Law in Action, J otwell (Apr. 7, 2015) (reviewing David Horton, Wills Law on the Ground: Empirically Assessing Probate Reform, 62 UCLA L. R ev . 1094 (2015)), http://trustest.jotwell.com/law-on-thebooks-meets-law-in-action/.

ANN M. SCARLETT Professor

The Benefits of Integrating Entrepreneurship into Business Associations, 59 S t . L ouis U. L.J. 711 (2015).

AARON TAYLOR

Associate Professor L aw S chool S urvey of S tudent E ngagement , L ooking A head : A ssessment in L egal E ducation : A nnual R esults 2014, (2015) (with C. Christensen and L. Rocconi), http://lssse.indiana.edu/wp-content/ uploads/2016/01/LSSSE_2014_ AnnualReport.pdf. Diversity as a Law School Survival Strategy, 59 S t . L ouis U. L.J. 321 (2015). Ending the Higher Education Sucker Sale: Toward an Expanded Theory of Tort Liability for Recruitment Deception, 2015 U tah L. R ev . 425. Making State Merit Scholarship Programs More Efficient and Less Vulnerable, 37 U. H aw . L. R ev . 155 (2015).

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SAINT LOUIS B RIEF

ANDERS WALKER

Lillie Myers Professor of Law A Lawyer Looks at Civil Disobedience: Why Lewis F. Powell, Jr. Divorced Diversity from Affirmative Action, 86 U. C olo . L. R ev . 1229 (2015).

SIDNEY D. WATSON

Jane and Bruce Robert Professor of Law Out of the Black Box and Into the Light: Using Section 1115 Medicaid Waivers to Implement the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid Expansion, 15 Y ale J. H ealth P ol ’ y , L. & E thics 213 (2015).

ALAN M. WEINBERGER

Professor

Tools of Ignorance: An Appraisal of Deficiency Judgments, 72 W ash . & L ee L. R ev . 829 (2015). Cases in Brief: Recent Court Decisions, Appraisal J. (quarterly since Volume 75, 2007).

DOUGLAS R. WILLIAMS

Professor Mary Christine Wood, Nature’s Trust: Environmental Law for a New Ecological Age, 64 J. L egal E duc . 715 (2015) (book review).

ABA, S ection of E nvironment , E nergy , and R esources , Y ear in R eview 2014 (2015), http://www.americanbar.org/publications/ year_in_review_home/year_in_review_2014.html.

MOLLY J. WALKER WILSON

Professor Legal and Psychological Considerations in Adolescents’ End-of-Life Choices, 110 N w . U. L. R ev . O nline 33 (2015). The Rhetoric of Fear and Partisan Entrenchment, 39 L aw & P sychol . R ev . 117 (2015).


HAVE

YOU

HEARD

?

SLU LAW LAUNCHES NEW PODCAST SERIES,

SLU LAW SUMMATIONS

SLU L AW

SUMMATIONS

IN FEBRUARY 2016, SLU LAW LAUNCHED A BIWEEKLY PODCAST TO PROVIDE A PLATFORM FOR LEGAL DISCUSSIONS ON TIMELY TOPICS AND ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THE LAW SCHOOL . EACH EPISODE OF SLU LAW SUMMATIONS IS 15-20 MINUTES IN LENGTH AND AIMS TO REACH A BROAD GENERAL AUDIENCE. The podcast is hosted by Corie Dugas, Head of Outreach and Access Services at the Vincent C. Immel Law Library. Corie offers a fresh perspective on the often complex issues and has a great ability to navigate legal topics with interest and ease. The podcast showcases the depth of faculty expertise at SLU LAW. To date Professors Marcia McCormick, Matt Bodie, Kelly Dineen, Joel Goldstein, Roger Goldman, Chad Flanders, Justin Hansford, Sidney Watson and Dana Malkus have offered their perspectives on everything from the wage gap and health insurance to decertification of police and religious freedom legislation. Each episode is scheduled to be released on the second and fourth Thursday of each month. They are available on the SLU LAW website (law.slu.edu/podcast), Soundcloud and iTunes. They will also be announced on the SLU LAW Facebook and Twitter. Listen, enjoy and share!

EPISODE 1 SHATTERING THE GLASS CEILING

PROF. MARCIA McCORMICK

EPISODE 2 THE INTERNET WANTS YOU TO LOSE YOUR JOB PROF. MATT BODIE

EPISODE 3 CHOOSING THE NEXT VICE PRESIDENT PROF. JOEL GOLDSTEIN

EPISODE 4 DYING WITH DIGNITY: THE ETHICS AND LEGALITY PROF. KELLY DINEEN

EPISODE 5 POLICING THE POLICE PROF. ROGER GOLDMAN

EPISODE 7 UNDERSTANDING THE FERGUSON CONSENT DECREE PROF. JUSTIN HANSFORD

EPISODE 8 HEALTHCARE LEGISLATION IN MISSOURI PROF. SIDNEY WATSON

EPISODE 6 RELIGIOUS FREEDOM AND THE FIRST AMENDMENT PROF. CHAD FLANDERS

EPISODE 9 THE FIGHT OVER PUBLIC EDUCATION DEAN MICHAEL WOLFF VO LU M E 1 7 I SS U E 2

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NOTES

C L ASS 1973

HON. KEVIN O'MALLEY, U.S. Ambassador to Ireland, was Saint Louis University’s 2016 commencement speaker and was awarded an honorary doctorate of medical sciences.

1975

HON. CHARLES SMITH was appointed a Circuit Court Judge by the Illinois Supreme Court for the 19 th Judicial Circuit of Kae County, Illinois.

1978

THOMAS WEAVER was appointed assistant general counsel at Armstrong Teasdale. He is a member of the firm's litigation practice group, serves as lead trial and appellate counsel in commercial, insurance and eminent domain litigation matters in both state and federal courts.

1980

JO ANN GRAVEMAN BROWN TROGDON is the author of “The Unknown Travels and Dubious Pursuits of William Clark,” published by the University of Missouri Press.

1981

HON. JIMMIE EDWARDS was awarded the Legal Legend Award by the Mound City Bar Association. He was also inducted into the Missouri Public Affairs Hall of Fame. HON. MARGARET NEILL was honored by the SLU LAW Women Law Students Association at their 2016 Judicial Reception. TIMOTHY TRYNIECKI, of Armstrong Teasdale, was featured in the 2015 edition of Chambers USA in the area of real estate and received Band 1 status.

28

SAINT LOUIS B RIEF

1982

GEORGE M. VON STAMWITZ, of Armstrong Teasdale, was featured in the 2015 edition of Chambers USA in the area of environment and received Band 1 status.

1984

COLLEEN DOLAN was appointed to the Missouri Court of Appeals, Eastern District by Gov. Jay Nixon. KEVIN EVANS, of Armstrong Teasdale, was featured in the 2015 edition of Chambers USA in the area of litigation: general commercial and received Band 1 status.

1987

JOSEPH GREEN was appointed Associate Circuit Judge for the 21 st Judicial Circuit by Gov. Jay Nixon. JOHN O'GARA was named Associate Judge in the 20 th Judicial Circuit.

1988

JOHN BEULICK, of Armstrong Teasdale, was elected managing partner and featured in the 2015 edition of Chambers USA in the area of intellectual property. VANESSA ROBINSON KEITH, an officer at Greensfelder, Hemker & Gale, P.C., was named general counsel to the Mathews-Dickey Boys & Girls Club. The club serves thousands of youths throughout the St. Louis area. JULIE O’KEEFE, of Armstrong Teasdale, will be featured in the 2015 edition of Chambers USA in the area of environment. STEPHEN M. STRUM, partner with Sandberg Phoenix & von Gontard, joined the mediation panel at United States Arbitration & Mediation in St.

NOTES

Louis. He focuses his practice in the defense of product manufacturers and nursing homes. Strum is trained and certified in dispute resolution, arbitration and mediation.

1990

JAMES MELLO, of Armstrong Teasdale, was featured in the 2015 edition of Chambers USA for Business in the area of real estate. JENNY SCHWENDEMANN, Husch Blackwell’s director of risk management and pro bono services, received the Enterprise Award from Missouri Lawyers Weekly at its Women’s Justice Awards.

1991

MARY ANN MURRAY joined Quarles & Brady in the firm's Chicago office as a partner in its real estate practice group. She focuses her practice on complex commercial and financial transactions, including secured and unsecured lending, asset-based and construction financings, and the acquisition and development of commercial and residential real estate. LAURA O’SULLIVAN joined the Kansas City office of the Missouri State Public Defender. GENTRY SAYAD, of Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton, was named Legal Advisor to the Board of Governors for 2016 of the American Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai (AmCham).


CLASS

1992

JANE DUEKER was appointed to the statewide executive committee for the Missouri State NAACP.

1994

DANA TUCKER REDWING joined Fox Galvin as partner. RICHARD ROUSTIO was named public defender in St. Clair County, Illinois.

1995

1998

MATTHEW REH was selected to lead the litigation practice group at Armstrong Teasdale.

RICHARD BRIDGE, of Armstrong Teasdale, will be featured in the 2015 edition of Chambers USA in the area of intellectual property.

ANNETTE SLACK received the Ronda F. Williams Service award by the SLU LAW Black Law Students Association during their 2016 ceremony.

CHRISTOPHER GOFF, of Armstrong Teasdale, was featured in the 2015 edition of Chambers USA in the area of intellectual property and received Band 1 status for the state of Missouri.

1999

TERRAL SMITH was included in The Best Lawyers in America.

1996

EDMOND ALIZADEH was named to the board of directors of Habitat for Humanity Saint Louis. RASHDA BUTTAR was named to the board of directors of Habitat for Humanity Saint Louis.

1997

LAURE ERGIN has been named Vice President and General Counsel at the University of Delaware. HON. LISA PAGE was appointed to the Missouri Court of Appeals, Eastern District by Governor Jay Nixon. She was also honored by the SLU LAW Women Law Students Association at their 2016 Judicial Reception.

directors. Gunn is president of the Gunn Law Firm where he focuses on estate planning, probate administration and litigation.

THOMAS LECH was named partner with Goldenberg Heller Antognoli & Rowland, P.C. He heads the firm's personal injury department, which focuses on medical malpractice, products liability, personal injury and pharmaceutical litigation. LISA G. MOORE, of Paule, Camazine & Blumenthal, was named as a 2016 Law Firm Leader by Missouri Lawyers Weekly.

MARTY CLAY was named chief financial officer of SLUCare Physician Group. MICHELLE A. LAWLESS, an attorney at Schiller DuCanto & Fleck, the nation’s largest family law firm, was named a 2016 Leading Lawyer in Illinois. JESSICA L . LISS, managing principal and litigation manager at Jackson Lewis P.C.’s St. Louis office, was named a Law Firm Leader by Missouri Lawyers Weekly. RICHARD SCHUTH, of Armstrong Teasdale, was featured in the 2015 edition of Chambers USA in the area of intellectual property.

2000

JOHN M. ALLEN joined Goldberg Segalla as partner in the firm's St. Louis office. He focuses his practice in the areas of workers' compensation, general liability and commercial practice groups. JOHN GUNN was elected chairman of the board of The Bar Plan Surety and Fidelity Company’s board of

Moved recently? Changed your email address? Have a new job?

}

NOTES

2001

JOSEPH BLANNER was named one of the St. Louis Business Journal’s 2016 40 Under 40 Class. He was also selected for the Client Choice Awards by Lexology. Only 16 lawyers in Missouri have received the Client Choice Award, which is an international award for excellent client care and quality of legal service, since its establishment in 2005. PETER DRISCOLL was appointed chief risk and strategy officer for the newly created Office of Risk and Strategy within the Securities and Exchange Commission’s Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations. DAVID P. NIEMEIER, an officer in the litigation practice group at Greensfelder, Hemker & Gale, P.C was selected as a member of the 2016 Leadership Council on Legal Diversity (LCLD) Fellows Program. CHRISTOPHER PICKETT was named the new chief diversity officer for Greensfelder, Hemker & Gale, PC. In this role, he leads the firm’s efforts to foster an increasingly diverse and inclusive workplace and to recruit and retain diverse talent.

2002

DOUGLAS HICKEL was awarded the Warren H. Solomon Civic Virtue Award, recognized for outstanding

SEND US AN UPDATE!

Go to LAW.SLU.EDU/ALUMNI and click on “UPDATE MY INFORMATION.” You can also email your class notes to BRIEF@LAW.SLU.EDU. Submitted photos will be included as space allows. VO LU M E 1 7 I SS U E 2

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NOTES

contributions to civic education by the Missouri Bar Association. JASON KELLY joined Edward Jones as associate general counsel. He provides strategic guidance on the firm's compliance with applicable laws and rules related to individual retirement accounts. AMY SHOLAR partnered with Kelly Stephan in practice. The Law Offices of Amy Sholar & Kelly Stephan handles cases involving divorce, child related issues, criminal and traffic matters, probate issues and other general litigation. JILL SUNDBERG has been named partner at HeplerBroom LLC.

2003

HON. JENNIFER ASCHER was elected an associate judge by the 7th Judicial Circuit in Illinois. She was also honored by the SLU LAW Women Law Students Association at their 2016 Judicial Reception.

2004

RACHEL JEEP was named partner at Copeland Thompson Farris PC. She focuses her practice on business litigation, federal civil litigation, business law, corporate law, health law, physician contracts, and commercial landlord and tenant law. MINDI JOHNSON was elected shareholder in the firm Foster Swift. She focuses her practice on employee benefits law, health care reform and health care law. She chairs the firm's employee benefits practice group in the Grand Rapids, Michigan office.

JACQUELINE F. REDMOND, a partner at Herzog Crebs, LLC, was named president of the Young Friends of Legal Services of Eastern Missouri (LSEM) board for 2016. JASON SENGHEISER was appointed by Gov. Nixon as an associate circuit judge for the 22 nd Judicial Circuit, which covers St. Louis City. He was also named vice president of the Young Friends of Legal Services of Eastern Missouri (LSEM) Board for 2016. NIK VAN DEVEN was named shareholder at Sandberg Phoenix & von Gontard.

THOMAS ADDIS was named a shareholder with Sandberg, Phoenix, von Gontard focusing on business law and litigation.

TODD SIVIA, managing partner of Sivia Business & Legal Services, P.C., was named a Rising Star in the 2016 Illinois Super Lawyers.

2005

DANIEL P. FINNEY III, of the Finney Law Office, was inducted into both the Million Dollar Advocates Forum and the Multi-Million as a life-long member. STEPHANIE JONES partnered with Sophy Raza to form Raza & Jones, LLC, a new family law practice in St. Louis. Their practice areas include divorce, pre- and postnuptial agreements, paternity, custody, child support, adoption, same sex relationships, mediation, collaborative Law, and modifications and enforcement of custody and support orders.

SANDER C. SOWERS, of Lear Werts LLP, received the Boone County Bar Association Outstanding Service Award. This award is given to a member of the Boone County Bar who has made significant contributions to the benefit of the legal profession, the justice system and the community. He also received the Warren H. Solomon Civic Virtue Award, recognized for outstanding contributions to civic education by the Missouri Bar Association.

2006

MICHAEL A . K ARR was elected member at Evans & Dixon, LLC. He concentrates his practice on the defense of employers against claims for workers’ compensation benefits.

CAROLYN HUSMANN was named Partner at HeplerBroom LLC.

MATTHEW NOCE was named partner at HeplerBroom LLC.

JAYNE GLASER was named partner at Keefe & Brodie. DONALD D. McBRIDE was elected officer at Greensfelder, Hemker & Gale, P.C. McBride serves the firm’s securities & financial services industry group and the litigation and trusts & estates practice groups. KEVIN McMANUS joined the law firm of Williams Dirks Dameron, LLC located in Kansas City, Missouri. He focuses his practice on business and commercial litigation, as well as personal injury litigation. In addition to his legal work, McManus is a member of the City Council in Kansas City. Previously, he served five years in the Missouri House of Representatives. MATT MELTON was appointed to serve as drug court commissioner for the 22 nd Judicial Circuit. Prior to his appointment, he served in the St. Louis City Public Defender's Office.

JOIN US SEPTEMBER 16, 2016

ORDER OF THE FLEUR DE LIS HALL OF FAME CEREMONY INTRODUCING THE CLASS OF 2016: THE HON. HENRY E . AUTREY ('77) CLYDE S. CAHILL* ('51) THE HON. MICHAEL B. CALVIN* ('75) DENNIS C. DONNELLY ('66) SUSAN A . "TONIE" FITZGIBBON ('84) DAVID J. HENSLER ('67) F. WILLIAM HUMAN JR.* ('50) THE HON. MARY K AY HOFF ('78)

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SAINT LOUIS B RIEF

JOSEPH L . LERITZ ('52) HENRY F. LUEPKE JR. ('60) MARIAN V. "BO" MEHAN ('82) ROBERT F. SCOULAR ('64) THE HON. JOSEPH J. SIMEONE*, PROFESSOR EMERITUS

JOHN G. SIMON ('86) ARLENE ZAREMBK A ('74 )

*indicates deceased

MISSOURI ATHLETIC CLUB, ST. LOUIS, MO


CLASS

MARTIN C. WALSH JR. was named partner at Armstrong Teasdale. He is a member of the firm's corporate services practice group and counsels buyers and sellers through complex mergers and acquisitions, management buyouts stock and asset purchases and dispositions, consolidations, spin-offs and related transactions.

2007

GREGORY BULGRIN was named member at Lewis Rice. He focuses his practice in the area of labor and employment law. ELIZABETH CULHANE was named shareholder and partner at Fraser Stryker in Omaha, Nebraska. She focuses her practice on federal litigation, class action litigation, insurance defense litigation, and commercial trucking litigation. STEVEN FORISTAL was named partner at Armstrong Teasdale. He is a member of the firm's corporate services practice group and focuses on mergers and acquisitions, commercial transactions, antitrust and distribution business services, private capital and emerging companies, technology and licensing agreements and general business law, including corporate governance. NICOLE BURLISON KNEPPER joined the litigation firm Padberg, Corrigan & Appelbaum and focuses her practice on personal injury plaintiff’s work. CHRISSIE SCELSI joined Wargaming America, Inc., as U.S. general counsel. Wargaming is an award-winning online game developer and publisher and one of the leaders in the free-toplay MMO market across PC, console and mobile devices. BRIAN R. SHANK was elected member at Evans & Dixon, LLC. He focuses his practice on civil litigation and business services. MARIEL TAYLOR joined the St. Louis law firm Kamykowski, Gavin & Smith, P.C. as its senior litigation counsel. She focuses on defending medical negligence claims against physicians, hospitals and nursing homes.

ROSS TITZER was named partner at Williams Venker & Sanders, LLC.

2008

CHRISTOPHER K. DURSO was elected as member at Evans & Dixon, LLC. He focuses his practice in the area of collection and subrogation. JENNIFER GUSTAFSON was named member at Lewis Rice. She focuses her practice area in the area of commercial litigation and intellectual property law. R. TAYLOR MATTHEWS III was named Member at Lewis Rice. He focuses his practice in the area of complex commercial litigation. SARAH MULLEN was named member at Lewis Rice. She focuses her practice in the area of employment litigation. COREY SCHAECHER was named member at Lewis Rice. He focuses his practice on product liability and environmental, chemical and toxic torts. OLIVER THOMAS was named member at Lewis Rice. He focuses his practice on complex commercial litigation and banking litigation. JONATHAN TODD joined Benesch Freidlander's Cleveland office as of counsel in its national transportation and logistics practice group. DAVID A. WEDER was named member at Lewis Rice. He focuses his practice on product and premises liability, as well as transactional and corporate law. AMY J. WHITE, an attorney with Jackson Lewis PC, was elected to Presbyterian Children’s Homes & Services’ board of directors. ANDREW WOLKIEWICZ joined Greensfelder, Hemke & Gale, P.C. as an associate. He focuses his practice in estate planning.

2009

MICHAEL W. CHASE was named partner at Baird Holm LLP in Omaha, Nebraska. He assists clients with issues including compliance with Federal health care program fraud and abuse laws, reimbursement, clinical research and institutional review board compliance, and governance. EUGENE TUCKER joined HOK as a staff attorney in St. Louis. He gives

NOTES

legal counsel and advice to business unit management in legal matters affecting HOK by reviewing, negotiating and drafting contracts and subcontracts while helping to manage legal, regulatory and compliance risks.

2010

JEFFREY A . HERMAN joined Greensfelder, Hemker & Gale, P.C. as an associate. He serves the employee benefits practice group. AMY REBECCA JOHNSON joined Paule, Camazine & Blumenthal, P.C. as an associate. Her areas of practice include divorce, custody, child support, paternity, adoption, guardianship, and orders of protection. In addition, she has been a volunteer with Volunteer Lawyer and Accountants for the Arts since 2006. CASSIDY PEARSON was hired by Beal Law Firm, PLLC in Southlake, Texas, as a senior associate attorney. She focuses her practice area on family law. THOMAS SANFILIPPO was honored as a 2015 Best Lawyer by the Riverfront Times. SHANNON STARR joined Gutwein Law in the firms's Lafayette, Indiana office. He focuses his practice in the area of commercial litigation with an emphasis on real estate and securities. BENJAMIN WILSON, associate in HeplerBroom’s St. Louis office, was appointed to the Eighth Circuit Bar Association’s board of directors. He started a three-year term in January 2016.

2011

HAYLEY B. COLLINS, of family law firm GoransonBain in Plano, Texas, was named a 2016 Rising Star by Texas Super Lawyers. LINDSEY RENDLEN LATZKE joined McCarthy, Leonard and Kaemmerer, L.C. She focuses her practice on labor and

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C L ASS

NOTES

employment law and civil litigation. CAROL MENA QUICK, of Debra K. Schuster & Associates, was named a 2015 Rising Star by Kansas/ Missouri Super Lawyers in the area of elder law.

2012

JOSEPH HARVATH, of The JMH Law Firm, LLC, was selected as a Top 40 Under 40 Trial Lawyers by the National Trial Lawyers. CHRISTOPHER JONES was hired as an associate at Neuzil, Sanderson & Sigafoose, P.C. in Iowa City, Iowa. CLAIRE KALTENBACH received the Young Lawyers Division Award of Merit by the Bar Association of Metropolitan St. Louis. She was recognized for going above and beyond membership requirements during the last bar year, including as her role as chair of Read Across America. COURTNEY LOGAN was named city

IN

manager of East St. Louis, IL. He was also awarded the Ronda F. Williams Service Award by the SLU LAW Black Law Students Association during their 2016 ceremony.

2013

BENJAMIN GRIFFITH joined the St. Louis office of Greensfelder, Hemker & Gale, P.C. as associate. He is a member of the health care industry group. ROBERT SAMUELSON was hired as an associate at Becker, Hoerner, Thompson, & Ysursa, P.C. DEREK STEGELMEIER joined Jenner & Block in New York City as a staff attorney.

2014

JOEL HALVORSEN joined Paule, Camazine & Blumenthal, P.C. as an associate with a focus in family law and civil litigation. LESLIE A . NASH joined Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP in Nashville, Tennessee as an associate. She assists privately held and publicly traded companies with

MOHSEN PASHA, of Sandberg Phoenix, accepted a clerkship with The Hon. Duane Benton on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit, beginning August 2017. BENJAMIN TILLER joined the St. Louis office of Greensfelder, Hemker & Gale, P.C. as associate. He is a member of the litigation practice group. ASHLEY E . YEAGER joined Brinker & Doyen, L.L.P. as an associate. She focuses her practice in the areas of medical malpractice defense and personal injury defense.

2015

JONATHON FORBES joined Gori Julian & Associates, P.C. as an associate. He focuses his practice on asbestos litigation, benzene litigation and personal injury. JACQUELINE GEBHARDT joined Baker Sterchi Cowden & Rice as an associate. She focuses her practice on civil defense litigation.

MEMORIAM THE HON. WILLIAM STIEHL SR., 1949

MR. WALTER SHAW, 1968

MR. BENJAMIN FRANCKA, 1951

MR. FREDERICK BAEHR JR., 1968

MR. JOHN WALSH, 1953

MR. PETER PALUMBO, 1969

MR. JEAN SOUDERS JR., 1957

MR. JOSEPH WESTHUS, 1972

THE HON. DONALD STOHR, 1958

MR. ROBERT HEINRITZ JR., 1975

MR. RICHARD SCHWARTZ, 1961

MS. LEAH HAUB, 1982

MR. PETER HERZOG JR., 1961

MR. CHARLES BARBOUR, 1983

MR. ROBERT HARTENBERGER, 1962

MS. RENEE SCHOOLEY-BINKLEY, 1984

THE HON. EMMETT O'BRIEN, 1962

MR. DANIEL WRIGLEY, 1995

THE HON. JOSEPH MCGUIRE SR., 1963

MRS. CATHERINE VOGEDING OTT, 2009

MR. JERRY MURPHY, 1968

32

employee benefit and executive compensation matters.

SAINT LOUIS B RIEF


The Office of Development and Alumni Relations highlights why alumni give to the School of Law and the different avenues available to support future legal education at Saint Louis University. In this installment, we take a look at an 1843 Scholar alumnae who strives to pass on the generosity of others.

COLLEEN ZERN ('13)

ASSOCIATE, HAAR & WOODS, LLP

BEING AN 1843 SCHOLAR MEANS...

Being an 1843 Scholar is an honor that changed my life in many positive ways. The scholarship allowed me to focus on my education rather than on the stress of managing a large debt load. It truly provided me the freedom to pursue both my personal and professional goals, for which I am forever grateful.

I GIVE BACK BECAUSE...

I recognize that my opportunity to study at SLU LAW was made possible through the generosity of others. By donating my time and money, I can help make SLU LAW a better place. My contribution improves the school’s ability to attract the best and brightest students and professors.

I SUPPORT THE LOYAL TO LAW ANNUAL FUND BECAUSE...

The Loyal to Law Annual Fund makes an immediate impact on students’ lives through financial aid and funds for extracurricular activities. My experiences with the Public Law Review, trial advocacy program and the Health Law Association were influential to my professional development. I support this fund because I know my donations will directly enhance the SLU LAW experience for current and future students.

I ENCOURAGE OTHERS TO GIVE TO SLU LAW BECAUSE...

I encourage all alumni to give back to SLU LAW to show our appreciation for the impact the school has had on our careers. The investment that we make in the next generation of SLU LAW alumni will continue to strengthen our alumni network and improve the future of our profession.

To learn more about how you can continue the legacy and support the School of Law, please contact the Office of Development and Alumni Relations: SHERIDAN HAYNES (314) 977-3303 hayness@slu.edu SCHOOL OF LAW DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 100 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 (314) 977-3300 alumni@law.slu.edu law.slu.edu/alumni/giftform

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100 N. TUCKER BLVD. ST. LOUIS, MO 63101-1930

FOLLOW SLU LAW SLU LAW @SLULAW #SLULAW SLULAW

C ALENDA R O F

EVENTS JUL

26

& 27

AUG

25

FA L L 201 6

Lunch for the Missouri Bar Exam Takers Jefferson City

SEP

16

Order of the Fleur de Lis Hall of Fame Ceremony Missouri Athletic Club, St. Louis

Barristers Club Kick-Off Reception at SLU LAW 5:30-7:30

SEP

BLSA Casino Night

17

More information can be found at law.slu.edu

IV

SAINT LOUIS B RIEF

SEP

23

Alumni Lunch as part of the Missouri Bar Annual Meeting Lodge of Four Seasons, Lake Ozark, MO

Saint Louis Brief v17i2 Alumni Magazine  

This issue of the Saint Louis Brief focuses on the Jesuit mission of SLU LAW. Alums Dana Roberts ('90), Craig Knapp ('90), Emily Rosenfeld (...

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