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shareholder S P R I N G 2014

JOHN COOK SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ALUMNI MAGAZINE / SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSIT Y

THE POWER OF

CONNECTIONS H O W R E L AT I O N S H I P S B U I L D B U S I N E S S

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A 3 0 -Y E A R BOND

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GLOBAL SHIPPERS

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A PURPOSEFUL CONNECTION

F U E L I N G E N T R E P R E N EU R S H I P I N S AU D I A R A B I A


{From the dean}

M O R E T H A N 3 0 Y E A R S AG O, O N T H E F O U R T H F LO O R O F C L E M E N S H A L L , T H R E E F R E S H M A N BUSINESS MAJORS PLANTED THE SEEDS OF A T H R I V I N G G LO B A L C O M PA N Y.

Their budding friendship led to casual conversations about how they might combine their complementary skills into a successful business venture. Today, Chuck Casagrande, Andy Schwarzbauer and Tom Yeager form the management team of Strata-Tac, a manufacturer of pressure-sensitive self-adhesive products and top-coated films. Their story exemplifies the power of connections, the theme of this issue of Shareholder. After recent graduate Dan Farmer took the initiative to reach out to fellow alumnus Bob Ciapciak, a partner at Edward Jones, at the 2013 John Cook School of Business Excellence Awards reception, the two men have formed an ongoing business mentoring relationship. To further shed light on this topic, the Director of our Career Resources Center, Barbara Gradala, provides valuable insights on mentoring. Sometimes, individuals separated by thousands of miles can unite around a common interest. Three SLU professors recently traveled to Saudi Arabia to share their entrepreneurial expertise and insights with business leaders, faculty and students from an international research university. Bridging language and cultural barriers, these SLU ambassadors exported entrepreneurship to a country eager to reshape its economy.

We also feature Wes Clayton and Brian Nottingham, the co-CEOs of ShipWorks, one of St. Louis’ hottest technology companies. Since meeting as SLU undergraduate students, they have pooled their expertise into a dynamic business that simplifies the shipment of billions of dollars worth of products ordered online each year. And in a poignant Reflections piece, senior international business student Tejaswi Paladugu explains how networking has enriched her SLU experience and led to valuable relationships that have helped guide her career goals and aspirations. I’m sure there are countless other examples of meaningful connections that have been formed both on campus and around the world over the years. All of us are grateful for your ongoing involvement and support as we continue our mission to equip students to make a positive difference in our interconnected world. Please stay in touch and continue to nourish the connections you developed while at SLU. And I hope you will even make some new connections by visiting Cook School, participating in SLU alumni events and following us online!

Scott R. Safranski, Ph.D.


{Table of contents} SHAREHOLDER

16

is published twice yearly for alumni and friends by Saint Louis University’s John Cook School of Business.

EDITOR Camilla Ferrario Hall

CONTRIBUTORS Barbara Gradala Jeanette Grider Tim Hayden Kate Flatley Jerry Katz, Ph.D. Annelise Piven Scott Safranski, Ph.D.

WRITER Mike Plotnick

DESIGN AND ART DIRECTION Nicole Cook

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PHOTO CREDITS Dale Allen Nate Cowen Brett DeLaria Alise O’Brien

PRINTING The Printing Source

PLEASE ADDRESS ALL MAIL TO: John Cook School of Business Shareholder Saint Louis University 3674 Lindell Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63108 Email: ferrario@slu.edu Past issues of Shareholder can be found at slu.edu/x16732.xml

© 2014 Saint Louis University All rights reserved.

News and Notes

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Awards, accomplishments, news and upcoming events at the John Cook School of Business at Saint Louis University.

Fueling Entrepreneurship in Saudi Arabia

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SLU faculty members visit a Saudi Arabian university to shed light on how entrepreneurship can transform their economy.

A 30-Year Bond

16

From college roommates to successful business partners, three SLU alumni share how they’ve stayed connected.

Global Shippers

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With a rising tech company in the heart of downtown St. Louis, ShipWorks founders reflect on their journey and future.

A Purposeful Connection

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Bob Ciapciak (MBA ’07) and Dan Farmer (BSBA ’13) share insights on the power of a professional mentoring relationship.

Alumni Events

Annual Easter Egg Hunt, ONCE at the Fox Theater, Join the JCSB Alumni Board.

25 Reflection

Thoughts on the value of networking and the Cook School experience by senior Tejaswi Paladugu.

Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.

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Notes NEWS AND

REAL ELEVATOR PITCH WINNER EMILY MUHOBERAC, A JUNIOR IN THE JOHN COOK SCHOOL OF BUSINES S

B U SI NES S ST U D E N TS TAKE PART I N ‘ RE A L’ ELEVATO R PI TC H COM PET I T I O N

SLU MBA STUDENTS GATHER OUTSIDE OF THE FEDERAL CORRECTION INSTITUTE IN GREENVILLE , ILL ., AS PART OF A NEW ETHIC S COURSE FOCUSING ON WHITE COLLAR OFFENDERS.

NEW G RA DUATE BUSIN ES S P ROG RA M L EARN S F ROM P RI S ONERS

Having a strong elevator pitch is a concept often discussed at the John Cook School of Business, especially for SLU entrepreneurship students. On Sunday, Dec. 15, the Center for Entrepreneurship took the elevator pitch to a new level with the Real Elevator Pitch competition. Beginning in November, all SLU students were encouraged to submit a video pitch of their business idea for a chance to be selected as one of 24 finalists based on popular vote. Finalists were invited to visit One Metropolitan Square, the tallest building in Missouri, on Sunday, Dec. 15 to pitch their ideas while riding on 13 elevators with 36 judges.

The John Cook School of Business at Saint Louis University is offering a new experiential course, Reclaiming the Human Spirit: Prison Experience & Learning from White Collar Offenders, where MBA students will study corporate fraud issues while increasing their ethical awareness.

The competition winner was Emily Muhoberac, a junior business student, with her Anti-Theft Bike Lock + App concept. The judges cited that they loved Muhoberac’s passion and intelligence. She currently works as a genius at an Apple store. In addition to having an opportunity to network with area influencers, Muhuberac won a $2,500 prize.

Through hands-on experiences such as meeting white-collar offenders and their victims, attending U.S. Court proceedings, visits to prison and halfway houses, and interacting with probation office staff, students will have the opportunity to understand corporate fraud from a variety of perspectives.

There was a tie for second place, with Ben Albers, a SLU senior in business, who pitched the Case Coolie, and Madeline Sciortino, a SLU senior in business, who pitched the Personal Allergen Tester. Both Albers and Sciortino won a $2,000 prize.

The program is led by Nitish Singh, Ph.D., associate professor of international business, and facilitated by Tom Bussen. The course is offered in partnership with the U.S. District Court (Eastern District of Missouri) and the Saint Louis University Prison Program, directed by Kenneth Parker, Ph.D., associate professor of theological studies.

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“Although I thoroughly enjoyed holding a giant check, I believe the opportunity created by this competition is phenomenal for all the students that competed,” Muhoberac said. “We had the privilege of networking and pitching to some of the most influential people in St. Louis. Competitions like these are what make the SLU Center for Entrepreneurship stand out. I’m so thankful to be part of that.”


CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP CREATES GLOBAL HIGH SCHOOL EXPERIENCE

TIM HAYDEN AND GREG DAVENPORT OF THE CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP JOIN STUDENTS FROM EIGHT ST. LOUIS HIGH SCHOOLS WHO TOOK PART IN THE CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP GLOBAL PITCH EVENT.

Students from eight St. Louis high schools connected with students in Hawaii, Australia, India and Spain for the inaugural “Chasing the Sun” idea pitch event hosted by Saint Louis University’s Center for Entrepreneurship in November. The event kicked off on a Friday afternoon, with each site logging on to a Fuse Box video conference. Groups of students in each time zone were divided into three teams and presented

with a problem in their school community. All teams were asked to develop an entrepreneurial solution – an idea for a sustainable business that also addressed the problem or community pain. Each group’s first team developed a pitch for a product or service that created a more efficient high school student, while the second team focused on creating a more engaged school community and the third team emphasized creating a safer school environment.

At set time periods, the groups pitched their ideas to the next time zone and received peer-to-peer feedback. For example, St. Louis teams worked on their project from kick off until 8 p.m., when they pitched their ideas to Honolulu students and received feedback about the strengths and weaknesses of their presentations. Honolulu teams then had a few hours to modify their pitches before interacting with Perth, Australia. The process continued until Madrid finally pitched to and received feedback from St. Louis. The sites did not have to build on initial ideas, but rather benchmark their own thoughts to develop the best pitch possible. The final presentation was a five-minute video summarizing all components of the business. The program was well received by participants, parents and teachers, and planning is already underway for the next event.

NEW FO R M AT FO R T HE M A ST ER OF I N TER N AT I O N A L BU S IN E S S The Master of International Business (EMIB) is launching a new format beginning this fall 2014. The 21-month schedule with new, blended learning formats offers in-class meetings one Saturday each month with virtual coursework. Additionally, students can benefit from:

IN MEMORIAM

• Cohort group • Intensive weekend course each semester with team emphasis

• Extensive networking opportunities For more information about EMIB or to register for an upcoming Info Session or webinar, visit: emib.slu.edu.

Flavio Guerra, a retired faculty member from the department of accounting, died Nov. 22, 2013. He was 92. Guerra joined the School of Commerce and Finance (now the John Cook School of Business) in 1955. In 1960, he was named a full professor, and he taught accounting until his retirement in 1990.

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SUMMER ACADEMIE S This summer, John Cook School of Business will once again welcome high school students from around the country as part of our annual high school summer academies for sports business, entrepreneurship and international business. For more information and to register, visit business.slu.edu/summer. The Sports Business Summer Academy, will be held June 16-21, 2014. This special program is developed to introduce rising high school juniors and seniors to the business of sports. During the four-day program, students are introduced to basic business concepts related to sports through presentations by faculty and industry professionals, attending behind-the-scenes tours of sports facilities and working together on a group presentation.

The Allsup Entrepreneurship Academy attracts entrepreneurialminded high school students from across the country, with experiential learning through field trips to area businesses, handson group projects where students pitch their ideas to a panel of successful entrepreneurs and more. The Academy will take place July 28-Aug. 1. The International Business Summer Academy will be held June 25-27, 2014. The on-campus program introduces high school juniors and seniors to an international business curriculum and a practical understanding of local companies doing business internationally. Students will learn more about international business—and the benefits of a career in international business—through lectures, discussions, seminars, and culturally-focused social activities.

1 AND 2: IN 2013, THE BOEING INSTITUTE OF INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS HOSTED THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS SUMMER ACADEMY. 3: THE CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP WELCOMED MORE THAN 90 HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

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FROM ACROSS THE COUNTRY FOR THE NINTH ANNUAL ALLSUP SUMMER ENTREPRENEURSHIP ACADEMY. 4: IN ITS SECOND YEAR, THE SPORTS BUSINESS SUMMER ACADEMY, IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE ST. LOUIS CARDINALS, HOSTED HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS FROM ACROSS THE COUNTRY, PICTURED AT BUSCH STADIUM.

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SUMMER

AT SLU FIND OUT MORE ABOUT THESE CAMPS AND MORE AT SUMMER.SLU.EDU

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STUDY ABROAD JOURNAL COOK SCHOOL STUDENTS SHARE IN THEIR OWN WORDS HIGHLIGHTS OF RECENT S T U DY A B R O A D T R I P S T O H O N G K O N G , PA N A M A A N D H O N D U R A S .

HONDURAS

HONG KONG

“ T H R O U G H T H I S E X P E R I E N C E I H AV E B E E N A B L E T O F O R M A B O N D B E T W E E N M Y B U S I N E S S E D U C AT I O N A N D C AT H O L I C I D E A L S A S A S T U D E N T O F S A I N T L O U I S U N I V E R S I T Y T H AT W I L L F O R E V E R F O R M T H E B A S E O F MY F U T U R E CA R E E R . ”

- R AC H E L C A M P B E L L , S E N I O R

“ T H E G U E S T L E C T U R E R S W E R E R E M A R K A B LY I N S I G H T F U L A N D P R O V I D E D A N O U T S TA N D I N G A N D CA N D I D V I E W I N TO T H E P O L I T I CA L , S O C I A L AND BUSINESS ASPECTS OF LIFE IN ASIA—AND N E C E S S A R Y C O N S I D E R AT I O N S F O R D O I N G BUSINESS THERE.”

- M I K E F U R E Y, E V E N I N G M B A S T U D E N T

HONG KONG

PANAMA “ T H E R E I S ST I L L MU C H MO R E TO D I S C OV E R A N D E X P L O R E , A N D T H I S C L A S S G AV E M E T H E O P P O R T U N I T Y T O D O S O I N A WAY T H AT W O U L D B E B E N E F I C I A L T O M Y C A R E E R I N I N T E R N AT I O N A L B U S I N E S S . W I T H T H E K N OW L E D G E A N D G U I DA N C E F R O M O U R P R O F E S S O R , A M P Y KO L L M A N - M O O R E , O U R G U E S T L E C T U R E S A N D O U R S I G H T- S E E I N G , W E W E R E A B L E T O M O R E F U L LY C O M P R E H E N D T H E W E I G H T T H AT T H E E M E R G I N G M A R K E T S O F C E N T R A L A M E R I C A P L AY I N T H E R O L E O F G L O B A L B U S I N E S S C OM P E T I TO R S . ”

“ T H E G O A L O F O U R H O N G K O N G C L A S S WA S T O C R E AT E A B U S I N E S S P L A N T H AT W O U L D C O N N E C T S A I N T L O U I S U N I V E R S I T Y O R S T. L O U I S I N G E N E R A L W I T H H O N G KO N G A N D S U R R O U N D I N G A R E A S . W E W E R E O N E O F M A N Y T E A M S T H AT H A D T H E O P P O RT U N I T Y TO I N T E R AC T W I T H B U S I N E S S E S A R O U N D H O N G KO N G, A N D W E W I L L S U B S E Q U E N T LY R E T U R N T O F O R M B U S I N E S S P L A N S T H AT C O U L D B E U T I L I Z E D I N T H E R E A L W O R L D . ”

- M I T C H L O U C H , O N E -Y E A R M B A S T U D E N T

- STEPHANIE SHEEHAN, SENIOR

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CEN T EN NI AL C I RC L E D ED I CAT I ON The Centennial Circle in the John Cook School of Business has been dedicated to Brett and Norma Rufkahr for their long-standing support of the Cook School and the University. Rufkahr is a Cook School alumnus (BSBA ’86, MBA ’92) and serves on the school’s Executive Advisory Board.

BRET T RUFKAHR (B. S.B. A ’86, MBA ’92) OF U. S. TRUST; AND INTERIM VICE PRESIDENT OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS ELLEN HARSHM AN, PH.D., J.D.

A N N O U N C IN G T H E 2 014 EXC E L LE N C E AWA R DS The John Cook School of Business 2014 Excellence Awards recognize alumni, faculty and corporate partners who have excelled in their fields as well as in the community. DIST IN GUIS H E D CO R P O RATE PA RTNE R AWA R D : A LLSUP I N C . FR. JOSEPH E . B O LA ND O U TSTA ND ING A LUM N I AWA R D : L ARRY COL L ET T FR. JOSEP H L . DAV IS A LUM NI M E R IT AWA R D : RI C HARD T HORNB ERRY F R. T HOM AS M. K NA P P D ISTINGU IS H E D FAC U LT Y AWA R D : D EB B I E P I KE DISTIN G U IS H E D YO U NG A LUM NI AWAR D : CAROL I NE ST EGM AN J OHN BASL ER OUTSTA ND ING A LUM NI BOA R D S E RV I C E AWA R D : KRI ST EN D ONOVAN

SMUR FI T-STO N E E N T R E P R E NEU RI AL A LUM N I H A L L O F FA ME Since 2007, the Hall of Fame has recognized prestigious alumni for their distinguished careers and personification of the Center for Entrepreneurship’s motto “Do Good, Do Well.”

C HAK RABART Y NA MED EDWAR D JONES EN D OW ED P ROF E S SOR OF F I NANC E Bidisha, Chakrabarty, Ph.D., associate professor in the department of finance, has been appointed as the holder of the Edward Jones Endowed Professorship in Finance. Recognized for her significant service to the University as well as for her teaching and research, Chakrabarty has earned significant recognition, including the Outstanding Faculty Award presented by the John Cook School of Business Alumni Board, the Kwak Research Award for the best research productive faculty, the ICRIER policy paper grant and the National Stock Exchange of India Research Initiative Grant. Edward Jones created this endowed professorship in 2007 to position a visionary expert in the field of finance who provides academic leadership in the finance department, focusing their efforts on teaching, research and service. Chakrabarty was recognized at an investiture ceremony on October 24, 2013.

SM AL L IND E P E ND E NT E NTR E P R E NEU R SHI P: PE TE S PANOS , C EO, V ET TA S P ORT S L ARGE IND E P E ND E NT E NTR E P R E NEU R SHI P: CH RIS SOMMERS , FOU ND ER AND OW NER, P I P I ZZ E R I A PSHED O RATE E NTR E PER E NEUNRER S HAWARD: IP: DISTCOR I N G UI CORP ORAT PART STEVE F RANK, VIACL E C PHAI RM L SU INC . AN, P LA N CO R P F R . J OS E P HSOC E . BOL OUETP STAND I NG IA LAND E NTR R E NEU R SALUM H IP: NI AWARD: RRYRM COAN, L L E TATR CH A N G E L S GIL B IC KEL , LCAHAI F R . J OS EP H L . DAVI S ALUM NI M ERI T AWARD: RI C H A RD TH O RNBE RRY 6 | BUSINESS.SLU.EDU

FR . T HOM A S M . K N A PP D I ST I NGU I SHED FAC U LT Y AWARD: DEB B IE PIKE

FROM LEF T: DR. SCOT T SAFRANSKI, INTERIM DEAN JOHN COOK SCHOOL OF BUSINES S; DR. BIDISHA CHAKRABART Y; ROBERT J. CIAPCIAK (GRAD COOK ’82) OF EDWARD JONES; AND INTERIM SLU PRESIDENT WILLIA M KAUFFM AN.


JOHN COOK SCHOOL OF BUSINESS SPRING 2014 CALENDAR FO R UP DAT E S O N EV E N T S TAK I NG P L AC E AT TH E J O H N CO O K S C H OOL OF BU SI N ES S, PL EA S E V I S I T: BUS I N E S S . S LU. E D U/EV E NTS

FRIDAY, APRIL 11

FRIDAY, MAY 16

6: 3 0 P.M . - S P O RTS BUS I N E S S T R I V I A NI G HT

WEDNE SDAY, APRIL 2

A-B AU D I TOR I UM

4:4 5 - 6 :0 0 P. M . - JO H N CO O K S CH O O L O F BUS IN E SS P R ECOM M E N CE M E N T R ECE PTIO N

4 P. M. - ATLAS WE EK: C U LT U RE AL I VE! A- B AUDITORIUM

This annual event during ATLAS Week is an interactive student program demonstrating how cultural issues impact business interactions. Contact Karen Carpentier for more information, schneikl@slu.edu.

THURSDAY, APRIL 3 1 1 : 3 0 A .M. - ATLAS WEEK: CEL EBRATING INTERN AT I ONAL ST UDE NT-ATH LETE S A- B AUDITORIUM

Anastasios Kaburakis, Ph.D., assistant professor of management and sports business, will moderate a lively discussion featuring current and former international student athletes as part of ATLAS week. Contact kaburakis@slu.edu for more information.

SATURDAY, APRIL 5 - SUNDAY, APRIL 6 GAT EWAY ENTREP RE NEU RS HI P R E S EA RCH CONF ERE NC E A- B AUDITORIUM

“Mindfulness, Trust & the Education of Courageous Entrepreneurs: Lessons from Engineering Education Reform,” presented by David Goldberg, Ph.D., President of ThreeJoy Associates and co-founder of the Big Beacon Movement. Contact ecenter@slu.edu for more information.

The annual event will benefit the SLU Sports Business Association and the Disabled Athletes Sports Association. Tickets are $20/person, with tables costing $200 for a group of 10. For questions or to donate an item for the auction, contact: slusba@slu.edu.

TUE SDAY, APRIL 15 6: 3 0 P.M . - S P O RTS BUS I N E S S SYM P OSI UM A-B AU D I TOR I UM

“When Worlds Collide: The Impact of Social Media on Sports”

WEDNE SDAY, APRIL 23 6 P.M . - SMU R F I T- STO N E ENT REPR E N EU R I A L A LUM N I H A L L O F FAM E I N DU CT I O N CE R E MO N Y A-B AU D I TOR I UM

This annual event will celebrate the newest class of inductees as well as up-and-coming students. Contact ecenter@slu.edu for ticket information.

TUE SDAY, APRIL 29 7: 3 0 A .M . - DE A N ’ S B R E A K FAST

Featuring Dana Abraham, president of Private Wealth Management at UMB

6 : 3 0 P.M. - TH E SH OW-M E I NST I T U T E ECO NOMIC P OLICY SP EAKER S ERI E S A- B AUDITORIUM

Featuring Casey Mulligan, Ph.D., of the University of Chicago Economics Department

6 :3 0 P. M . - JO H N CO O K SCH O O L O F BUS I N E S S P R ECOM M E N CE ME N T CE R E MO N Y C HA I F E TZ A R E N A

SATURDAY, MAY 17 9 A . M . - SA I N T LO U I S U N IVE RSIT Y 2 01 4 COMME N CE ME N T CE RE MO N Y C HA I F E TZ A R E N A

SATURDAY, MAY 31 - SUNDAY, JUNE 1 SYMP OS I UM O N R E S E A R CH IN SYST E MS A N A LYS I S A N D DE SIG N J OHN COOK S C HOOL O F B USIN E S S

The annual Symposium on Research in Systems Analysis and Design has the objective of promoting and developing high-quality research on all issues related to systems analysis and design. The roots of the Symposium lie in the observation that, although systems analysis and design lie at the core of the Information Systems discipline, there is a notable shortage of research on these topics in the leading research journals in Information Systems. For more information, visit: business.slu.edu/sigsand2014.

SATUR DAY, MAY 3 6: 3 0 P.M . - 2 01 4 E XCE L L E N CE AWA R DS S H A NA HA N AT R I UM , COOK HA L L

THURSDAY, APRIL 10

B U S C H ST U D E N T C E N T E R - HARLE N E & M A RV I N WO OL BA L L R OOM

The John Cook School of Business 2014 Excellence Awards recognize alumni, faculty and corporate partners who have excelled in their fields as well as in the community. Alumni and friends are invited to congratulate and celebrate with the winners. Cocktails will be served at 6:30 p.m., with dinner and the awards program to follow at 7:15 p.m. The cost is $60 per person. To register for the event, visit alumni.slu.edu/ excellenceawards14.

EVENING AND ONE YEAR MBA INFO SE SSIONS Learn more about our Evening and One Year MBA during an upcoming info session. You’ll have the opportunity to hear from alumni and faculty while meeting peers. For more information and to register, visit gradbiz.slu.edu 5 :3 0 P. M . - S HA N A HA N AT RIUM , CO OK HA L L

TUE SDAY, APRIL 1 WEDNE SDAY, MAY 7 TUE SDAY, JUNE 10

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{Shareholder}

FUELING ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN

SAU D I A RA B I A T H R E E F A C U LT Y M E M B E R S S H A R E T H E I R E X P E R T I S E W I T H A N AT I O N E A G E R T O B E T R A N S F O R M E D T H R O U G H E N T R E P R E N E U R S H I P.

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S

aint Louis University is playing an active role in helping Saudi Arabia transition from an oil-based economy to one that is fueled by entrepreneurship.

This past fall, three SLU faculty members hopped a flight to the Middle East on a diplomatic mission to share their entrepreneurial expertise and insights with Saudi Arabia dignitaries, business leaders, academic leaders and students. As one of the leading U.S. entrepreneurship programs, SLU earned an invitation to participate in the inaugural Entrepreneurship Forum hosted by King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals (KFUPM), a public sector university in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, renowned for its science and engineering programs.

1. FROM LEFT: JERRY KATZ, PH.D., TIM HAYDEN, WAIL MOUSA, PH.D., SRIDHAR CONDOOR, PH.D. AND TREY GOEDE AT THE KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM AND MINERALS. 2. FROM LEFT: HAYDEN, KATZ AND CONDOOR OUTSIDE OF KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM AND MINERALS.

“They invited a bunch of Americans over to help them launch Saudi Arabia 2.0,” said Tim Hayden, director of the Center for Entrepreneurship at the John Cook School of Business. “They want to build it with an entrepreneurial mindset, leveraging their expertise in oil and energy, but doing it in such a way that can sustain the country long-term.” Joining Hayden for the visit was Jerry Katz, Ph.D., Coleman Foundation Professor in Entrepreneurship at the Cook School, and Sridhar Condoor, Ph.D., interim chair of the department of aerospace and mechanical engineering at Parks College of Engineering, Aviation and Technology. Surrounded by a who’s-who of academic leaders representing other topranked university entrepreneurship programs, the three SLU ambassadors shared their collaborative, experiential approach to teaching that has contributed to earning a top 25 national ranking for 21 consecutive years. “We were the only tag team teaching group at the event,” Katz said. “The three of us together, we feed off each other. We know each other’s stories and how we teach the topics, and we work together to make sure a group understands them.” They joined other presenters in addressing challenging issues raised by participants, including the validity of entrepreneurship as an academic discipline as well as the importance of women entrepreneurs.

“WE’VE BEEN ON THE LEADING EDGE — SOMETIMES BLEEDING EDGE — OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP E D U C AT I O N F O R 4 0 YEARS.” - J E R R Y K AT Z , P H . D .

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“We are in a great position to go in and talk about the value of entrepreneurship,” Katz said. “These are not new questions. Every university is trying to promote entrepreneurship as a discipline.” The SLU team introduced participants to material presented in Entrepreneurial Small Business, the textbook co-authored by Katz and one of the leading academic texts on the subject. Currently in its fourth edition, the textbook is used by more than 10 percent of American colleges and was recently adopted by the Korean government for the country’s newly formed entrepreneurship program launched in 61 colleges. “We’ve been on the leading edge — sometimes bleeding edge — of entrepreneurship education for 40 years,” Katz said. “We also have one of the oldest centers for entrepreneurship in the world.”

G LO BA L CO N N ECT IO NS Helping to facilitate the St. Louis-Saudi connection was Trey Goede, a St. Louis entrepreneur and former SLU adjunct professor who is employed by Saudi Aramco, the national oil and energy company that sponsored the Entrepreneurship Forum. Goede helps to manage the venture capital fund within Saudi Aramco’s newly formed Center for Entrepreneurship, Wa’ed (Arabic for “promising”). He also has taught business planning courses at KFUPM and is working on a number of other initiatives within the university’s entrepreneurship department. Since relocating to Saudi on New Year’s Eve 2012, Goede and his wife, Shannon, live in a self-contained camp that is part of one of the world’s largest expatriate communities. About 12,000 people live in the camp,

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which includes all the amenities of a major city: a hospital system, pharmacy, two grocery stores, an equestrian center, pools and a yacht club. Working in Saudi Arabia definitely wasn’t a career aspiration for Goede, whose St. Louisbased wind energy development company — Affinity Wind — previously earned investment from the entrepreneurship program’s Billiken Angels Network. “I wasn’t looking to leave St. Louis,” Goede said. “But the more I learned about Saudi Aramco, the more impressed and intrigued I became. It’s a remarkable company.” Having never ventured beyond Europe, however, Goede wasn’t quite sure what to expect when he arrived in his new home. “It was definitely something new, and my wife and I treated it as an adventure,” he said. “We came over with modest expectations, and it has exceeded almost every expectation, both professionally and socially.” As the Entrepreneurship Forum began taking shape in early 2013, Goede couldn’t resist talking up the SLU entrepreneurship program and his former faculty colleagues. “I know these guys are great because I worked for them as an adjunct professor for eight years,” he said. His efforts convinced Wail Mousa, Ph.D., director of business incubators at KFUPM, to extend invitations to all three SLU professors. SLU was the only university to send three representatives to the event. “Jerry, Tim and Sridhar did what they always do, and they kind of stole the show,” Goede said. “They have a lot of knowledge and

experience, and they’re great with students. It almost felt like I was back at SLU, with a bit of a language barrier.”

PUT TIN G ST. LOU I S O N TH E M AP No doubt, Goede’s high-profile role in Saudi Arabia is helping to build awareness both for the University and for the city of St. Louis at large. “It’s amazing that a guy who is helping to lead entrepreneurship efforts for all of Saudi Arabia is an American from St. Louis,” Hayden said. “It brings a lot of notoriety about what we’re doing in St. Louis from an entrepreneurial perspective.” And the SLU faculty team helped further boost awareness about the University’s entrepreneurship program. “When we initially asked the students if anyone had heard of St. Louis, not one person raised their hand,” Hayden said. “But by the end of our time there, everybody knew about St. Louis and our entrepreneurial efforts, which is tremendous.” Participants also were struck by SLU’s unique curriculum and teaching style. “When we finished our presentation, there was a surge of people who came down to learn more,” Katz said. “They were full of questions about how they could apply the principles and start a business.” The SLU ambassadors even managed to turn some heads among their U.S. peers, who were intrigued by the University’s unique, non-mainstream approach to entrepreneurship education. “We are just different across the board — from the way all of our classes are co-taught,


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to our Center for Entrepreneurship, to the Billiken Angels Network,” Hayden said. KFUPM was drawn to many of the creative programs hosted by SLU, such as the annual elevator pitch competition, which takes place in an actual elevator at the tallest building in Missouri rather than in a classroom or on a stage.

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“The cornerstone of all entrepreneurs is the same: somebody who has identified a problem and can figure out a solution that people will pay for,” Hayden said. “That equation is no different anywhere in the world. The difference is in how you go about it.”

1. JERRY KATZ, PH.D. AND

Similarly, Hayden realized that students are students no matter where they reside.

BABSON COLLEGE, CALIFORNIA

TIM HAYDEN PRESENT A TOKEN OF APPRECIATION FROM THE SLU CENTER FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP TO DR. WAIL MOUSA. 2 AND 3. REPRESENTATIVES FROM INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY,

“They are real pitches on real elevators with real investors,” Hayden said. “The university loved the idea so much they’ve already identified the tallest building in Saudi Arabia where they can hold the competition.”

“These kids reminded me of our students here in St. Louis,” he said. “They are all very intrigued, they question, they want to learn. They have a lot of ideas. It’s just a matter of giving them an opportunity to explore them.”

During their visit to Saudi Arabia, the SLU team also had the opportunity to teach a graduate and undergraduate class. They discussed the importance of failure and risk-taking, two challenging concepts within Saudi Arabian culture.

Ultimately, entrepreneurship has the ability to unite cultures and build valuable connections throughout the world.

CITY FOR SCIENCE AND

“The beauty of entrepreneurship is it intertwines with anything and everything,” Hayden said. “It crosses every industry and every border.”

(SCITECH)

“For them, the concept of failure comes with a stigma and a belief that they’ve shamed their family,” Hayden said. “But entrepreneurs have to embrace failure and understand how we learn from it and how we become better entrepreneurs because of it.” In fact, the principles of entrepreneurship are consistent throughout the world.

Mousa was so impressed by what he heard about St. Louis in Saudi Arabia that he visited the city this February to learn more about the University’s entrepreneurship program and St. Louis’ expanding community of entrepreneurs. Sh

UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG, UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA, VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY, KING FAHD UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM AND MINERALS, AND SULTAN BIN ABDUL AZIZ TECHNOLOGY AT THE SULTAN BIN ABDUL AZIZ CITY FOR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

“J E R R Y, T I M A N D S R I D H A R D I D W H AT T H E Y A LWAY S D O, A N D T H E Y K I N D O F S T O L E T H E S H O W. ” - TREY GOEDE

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{Shareholder}

A 30-YEAR

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A L U M N I T R I O C U LT I VAT E S T H E I R L O N G - S TA N D I N G F R I E N D S H I P I N T O A S U C C E S S F U L M A N U FAC T U R I N G B U S I N E S S .

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friendship that formed on the fourth floor of Clemens Hall more than three decades ago has developed into a thriving business partnership with global reach.

Cook School graduates Chuck Casagrande (BSBA ’87), Andy Schwarzbauer (BSBA ’87, MBA ’93) and Tom Yeager (BSBA ’87) form the management team of Strata-Tac, a manufacturer of pressure-sensitive self-adhesive products and top-coated films. Launched by Casagrande in 1995, the company now employs about 30 people at its 47,000-square-foot manufacturing plant in St. Charles, Ill., west of Chicago. Strata-Tac sells its label and film products to a diverse range of printer customers that convert them into a variety of materials, including ID cards, window decals, packing slip labels, posters, signs and magnets. “We are a specialty coater and tend to focus on the higher-end, more complicated value-added products,” Yeager said. “We have a very high-quality product and we provide good manufacturing jobs with low turnover. And we’re very proud to be made in the USA.” Given their backgrounds, one might assume these business partners were destined to work together. Not only did they live together at SLU, but all three met their wives on campus and each of them has four kids. But they’re hardly carbon copies of each other. Casagrande is the entrepreneur of the group. He lives in Bradenton, Fla., and is constantly dreaming up new business ideas. One of his other successful ventures — SeaSucker — is a producer of vacuum-mount systems for products ranging from bike racks to cup holders to iPads. “I come up with new ideas and companies, and I just have to pursue them,” he said. “It’s kind of the way I’m driven and built.” Schwarzbauer is the nuts-and-bolts guy, overseeing day-to-day operations of the manufacturing facility. He lives in the Chicago suburb of Batavia, Ill.

“I always say I’m the vice president of everything that Chuck and Tom don’t want to do,” he said. “That includes managing accounting, office management, operations, shipping and receiving.” And Yeager, who lives in the St. Louis suburb of Weldon Spring, Mo., is the consummate salesman. “Chuck has the ideas, Andy makes the stuff, and I have the easy job … I just sell it,” he said. Yeager’s efforts have brought Strata-Tac products to customers on six continents. He is the son of former Cook School Finance Professor Fred Yeager, Ph.D., who taught at the university for 41 years and died in 2011. The trio’s complementary skill sets have contributed to a productive business partnership with very little conflict. “It’s been an unbelievable partnership. I don’t think we’ve ever fought,” Casagrande said. “From the beginning, we’ve treated it as if everyone has an equal vote, and we’ve always stayed true to that.” He also attributes the harmonious business relationship to mutual respect for each other’s talents. “It’s a good mesh of personalities and what each person brings to the table,” he said. “I let them do what they’re good at, and they let me do what I’m good at. It works out well.”

SE E DS OF STRATA-TAC It didn’t take long for a strong bond to form among the men when they arrived on campus as incoming freshmen in fall 1983. Schwarzbauer recalls hearing a knock at his door shortly after his parents helped him move into his new home on the fourth floor of Clemens (4C). He opened the door and met Yeager and his twin brother, Tim Yeager (BSBA ’87), who introduced themselves as the freshman welcoming committee. So Schwarzbauer decided to join this self-appointed welcoming posse. “We started walking around the dorm introducing ourselves to people and making new friends,” he said. “It was a terrific beginning to our friendship.”

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The group of casual buddies eventually grew to 10 or 12 guys, earning the nickname ‘Boystown’ in recognition of their unique blend of friendship and good-natured trickery. “We were always having fun and joking around,” Schwarzbauer said. “4C kind of became the center of gravity for the group. We lived there for three years. And senior year, six of us moved to a house on Newstead.”

“ I T H I N K W H AT M A K E S T H I S A V E R Y S U C C E S S F U L PA R T N E R S H I P I S T H E F A C T T H AT W E W E R E F R I E N D S F I R S T A N D H AV E S O M U C H I N C O M M O N BESIDES BUSINESS.” - T O M Y E AG E R

One weekend during junior year, Casagrande decided to rent a video camera to document the group’s antics. “One of the scenes in the video is the whole group of us sitting around in my dorm room talking about what we were going to do when we graduated,” Schwarzbauer said. “Some guys had a little bit more clarity to their plans than others, but one of the common themes was that it would be a great opportunity if we could find a way to go into business together.” After graduation, however, all the ‘Boystown’ men went their separate ways, eventually building successful careers in medicine, law, education and business.

Schwarzbauer initially pursued a career in public accounting, working in the wholesale grocery industry. Yeager started as a management trainee with an insurance company. And Casagrande joined his stepfather’s label company: United Stencil & Affixing in Chicago. “When we wanted to create a satellite location, Tom was the first person I thought of as a manager who could really run a sales operation,” Casagrande said. So Yeager came onboard in 1989, opening a St. Louis location of the label business that he owned and operated in partnership with Casagrande for the next 10 years.

AN E N TRE PRE N EUR TAKE S FLI G H T When the introduction of a new piece of equipment pioneered a new method of creating cards and labels, it fanned the entrepreneurial flames within Casagrande. He decided to leave the family business to forge a new path as a supplier to the label industry, launching Strata-Tac in 1995. But it wasn’t long before Casagrande realized he couldn’t do it alone. Accounting, in particular, was not his forte, despite beginning his university experience as an accounting major. “I have a hard time even balancing my checkbook,” Casagrande said. “I’m all over the place, and I needed that financial help.” So he enlisted the accounting expertise of Schwarzbauer. “When I originally accepted this position, I thought I was just coming on as an accountant, which had been my entire career up until that point,” Schwarzbauer said. “I very rapidly found out that

ENDURING FRIENDSHIP

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1985

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just being an accountant in a small business is not going to get you all that far.” Yeager came onboard the next year to lead the sales effort, as Casagrande temporarily relocated overseas to build a distribution network in the United Kingdom. With the purchase of a slitter-rewinder machine in 2003 and two large coater machines in 2010, Strata-Tac began its transformation from a wholesale distributor to a full-fledged manufacturer. “We essentially hit the reset button and changed the whole company structure, becoming a manufacturer instead of primarily a distributor,” Casagrande said. Schwarzbauer’s role expanded to encompass the management of plant operations, drawing on the business insights he gleaned while working at large companies during the first decade of his career. “We’ve tried to stay small in terms of the feel of the company, but act big in the way we run it so it can become scalable and we can grow as we go,” he said. Through the years, the business has endured and overcome numerous challenges, including economic recessions, patent litigation and ongoing technology advancements. “Going through difficulties, you’ve got to stick with each other, trust each other and be loyal to each other,” Schwarzbauer said. “The friendships come first, and the friendships were very well established long before we started this business.”

BEYOND TH E WORKP LACE Although each man resides in a different city, business demands and opportunities bring them face-to-face every few weeks. They also make time for biannual reunion weekends of the full ‘Boystown’ clan. “When we get together, we just really enjoy each other’s company,” Schwarzbauer said. “There’s a bond that is special, unique and a tremendous blessing to all of us.”

“ T H E R E ’ S A B O N D T H AT I S S P E C I A L , UNIQUE AND A TREMENDOUS B L E S S I N G TO A L L O F U S . ” - A N DY S C H WA R Z B A U E R

The men attribute their enduring personal and business relationship to the values they shared and developed at SLU. “All three of us are good, solid family men with good Catholic values that provide a solid foundation for who we are and what we’re made of,” Schwarzbauer said. Yeager agrees. “We got along instantly, but the longer we’re friends, the tighter the friendship has gotten,” he said. “We share similar values, and we challenge each other to maintain those values and hold each other accountable. I think SLU just fosters those values.” Sh

1984 YEAGER AND SCHWARZBAUER AT SNOWBALL DANCE 1985 RESIDENCE HALL CAMPOUT 1985 CASAGRANDE AND HIS FUTURE WIFE JOYCE 1986 SPRING BREAK IN SOUTH PADRE ISLAND 2008 SCHWARZBAUER WITH THE FIRST COATER 2010 SCHWARZBAUER, CASAGRANDE AND YEAGER AT STRATA-TAC’S OPEN HOUSE 2013 CURRENT STRATA-TAC COATING LINE

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G LO BAL SHIP P E R S W E S C L AY T O N ( B S B A ’ 0 2 ) A N D B R I A N N OT T I N G H A M ( B A ’01 ) L E A D S H I P W O R K S , O N E O F S T. L O U I S ’ H O T T E S T T E C H N O L O GY C O M PA N I E S .

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hat began as casual brainstorming between two college buddies in the late ’90s has progressed into a thriving technology company that simplifies the shipment of billions of dollars worth of products ordered online each year. ShipWorks, founded in 2000 by SLU graduates Wes Clayton and Brian Nottingham, helps streamline shipping for thousands of online sellers throughout the United States. “We serve a very diverse range of customers — from someone who’s just starting a business out of their house to those who have grown their operations to multiple warehouse facilities located across the country,” Clayton said. Businesses can improve the efficiency of their shipping process by 30 to 50 percent by relying on ShipWorks software to print shipping

labels and packing slips, send email notifications and update tracking information in online stores. “We want to help drive our customers’ growth by making it possible for e-commerce sellers to focus on selling products and growing their business, not spending hours a day shipping packages,” Clayton said. The software integrates with more than 40 popular online marketplace and shopping cart platforms and provides direct support for all major shipping carriers. “We have these incredible relationships and have proven ourselves as a tool that helps businesses become more successful,” Clayton said. “By using ShipWorks, companies can ultimately grow their businesses faster than they would’ve been able to otherwise.” And speaking of growth … ShipWorks has averaged 40 percent

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CLOCKWISE FROM RIGHT: CLAYTON AND NOTTINGHAM IN THEIR NEW SHIPWORKS OFFICE; VIEWS OF THE NEWLY REMODELED SHIPWORKS OFFICE IN DOWNTOWN ST. LOUIS.

revenue growth each of the past four years and currently employs 21 people.

EN T R E P R E N EUR S U NITE Clayton’s entrepreneurial instincts began emerging in high school when he began developing websites for local businesses. That sideline business continued during college, where his budding friendship with Nottingham led to numerous conversations about potential opportunities to grow the operation. When one of Clayton’s clients asked him to help streamline the order and shipping management process on its website, Clayton enlisted his buddy’s coding expertise to help devise a solution. “Brian and I started working together on this particular project and hit it off really well and ultimately decided to create a partnership together to focus on developing software,” Clayton said. Like most startups, ShipWorks began modestly.

spaces, it just felt like home,” Nottingham said. The bright, colorful environment features abundant glass to take advantage of the 360-degree skyline perspective of downtown St. Louis, including stunning views of the Gateway Arch, Mississippi River and Busch Stadium. In 2013, the company publicly unveiled its presence to the city at large with the addition of a ShipWorks logo atop the building’s exterior.

“ W E WA N T T O H E L P D R I V E O U R C U STOM E R S’ G R OW T H BY MAKING IT POSSIBLE FOR E-COMMERCE SELLERS TO F O C U S O N S E L L I N G PRODUCTS AND GROWING T H E I R B U S I N E S S , N OT S P E N D I N G H O U R S A D AY S H I P P I N G PA C K A G E S . ”

“One of our early customers was a guy selling earthworms out of Connecticut,” Clayton said. Quietly building its reputation and customer base, the company maintained two separate office locations — one in St. Louis and one in Nottingham’s hometown of Springfield, Ill. “We saw the direction and the growth of the company and realized that if we really wanted to take things to the next level, we needed to have all our team members in one location,” Clayton said.

- W E S C L AY T O N

“We want people around the community to know who we are, what we’re doing, and hopefully to learn more about other companies that have started in St. Louis,” Nottingham said.

SH ARE D M ANAG EM ENT As co-CEOs, the founders share managerial duties. Clayton, who earned a management information systems degree, serves as chief operating officer, overseeing business relationships, finance, accounting and operations. And Nottingham, who graduated with a double major in math and computer science, leads software development efforts as chief technology officer.

“We’re very like-minded in the direction we want the company to go, from a big-picture perspective,” Nottingham said. “We know each other well and are able to come to decisions and conclusions without any major issues.”

In May 2012, ShipWorks moved into its new home on the 20th floor of the Gateway Tower building in the heart of downtown St. Louis’ burgeoning startup community.

With the e-commerce market projected to continue its exponential growth, the future is bright for ShipWorks. The company has customers in every U.S. state and recently added support for Canadian shippers as it explores opportunities in international markets.

“When we first walked in here after days of touring potential office

“Our focus has always been on creating the best product and best

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customer experience that we can and treating our partners in a way that we would want to be treated,” Nottingham said. “From the beginning, we knew it was going to take a long time, and we knew that it was going to take a lot of work, but we also knew that we’d eventually get there.” Future plans include enhancing the company’s mobile applications as well as expanding into more parts of the e-commerce workflow. But despite how successful ShipWorks becomes, its founders plan to keep their feet firmly planted in St. Louis. “St. Louis is home to us, and it’s important to us,” Nottingham said. “We plan on staying here and continuing to watch the technology boom downtown. We like to know that we’re part of something bigger and something good. It’s pretty exciting for us.” The success of ShipWorks doesn’t surprise Associate Professor of Management Laurel Pope Boone, J.D., who met Clayton when he was enrolled in her “Legal Environment in Business” class.

“Wes was very professional, mature and focused,” she said. ShipWorks continues to consult with Boone, who also practices law, on trademark issues. “I remember one time in particular when Wes could’ve cut corners, and he said, ‘I don’t do business like that.’ He took the high road, and I was absolutely delighted,” Boone said. “When there’s so much cynicism out there, to see a couple of guys who play by the rules and are also successful is great. They are role models who prove that success really is possible.” Both Clayton and Nottingham shared their entrepreneurial insights as guest speakers at the Dean’s Breakfast Series on Feb. 11. “SLU was definitely a springboard for growing my original web development company into something that was much, much greater,” Clayton said. “Had it not been for SLU, Brian and I may not have had the opportunity to meet, brainstorm and talk about the future and what we might be able to do together.” Sh

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{Shareholder}

A PURPOSEFUL CONNECTION

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TWO COOK SCHOOL ALUMNI D E V E LO P A N O N G O I N G B U S I N E S S M E N TO R I N G R E L AT I O N S H I P.


1. ROBERT CIAPCIAK (MBA ’07), PARTNER AT EDWARD JONES 2. DAN FARMER (BSBA ’ 13) 3. CIAPCIAK; INTERIM VICE PRESIDENT OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS ELLEN HARSHMAN, PH.D., J.D.; AND FARMER AT A RECENT ALUMNI NETWORKING EVENT AT EDWARD JONES.

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he night of the 2013 Cook School Excellence Awards reception that he helped coordinate, Dan Farmer (BSBA ‘13) had his eyes peeled for one particular honoree.

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Ciapciak said. “It’s something I would do for anybody, but since Dan sought me out, I’ve created time in my schedule to meet with him. And, from my perspective, he’s off to a good start.”

Ciapciak knows a thing or two about launching and sustaining a career at Edward Jones. Hired as the company’s sole intern in 1982, he accepted a full-time position as director of academic training after completing his internship. “ W H AT D R E W M E T O Subsequent roles have involved E D WA R D J O N E S I N T H E helping to provide consistent F I R S T P L A C E WA S I T S performance metrics for each E M P H A S I S O N T H E VA L U E S of the company’s divisions and A N D C U LT U R E O F T H E serving as director of marketing C O M PA N Y. I T A L I G N S W E L L research. W I T H T H E VA L U E S AT S L U In 1996, the firm’s managing — WHETHER IT’S SERVING partner at the time asked CLIENTS OR SERVING THE Ciapciak to take on an COMMUNITIES IN WHICH 18-month assignment within his T H E F I R M O P E R AT E S . ” office. The position evolved into - DA N FA R M E R a long-term role he continues to this day.

Farmer, who had recently accepted a position at Edward Jones, knew he had an ideal opportunity to meet Bob Ciapciak (BSBA ’79, MBA ‘81), a partner at the financial services firm. “I made sure to arrive early for the event to try to meet him,” Farmer said. “In the midst of setting up, I was able to approach Mr. and Mrs. Ciapciak. They welcomed me to the firm and he graciously offered to meet with me as soon as I was settled in.” Farmer had planned to propose meeting for coffee, but Ciapciak beat him to the punch.

“He gave me his business card and invited me to meet him for coffee sometime,” Farmer said. “He was willing to give his time, and I didn’t even have to ask for it.”

Farmer took Ciapciak up on his offer, reaching out to him shortly after beginning his new position. The men have met together several times so far, usually in the company cafeteria or a conference room. “My motivation is to make sure we’re creating an experience for Dan that tests his abilities, provides satisfaction and gives him the opportunity to advance in his career,”

“As I tell people, I still haven’t worked my way out of a job,” he said. Ciapciak functions as a chief of staff to the managing principal, as well as helping to guide the strategic development and day-to-day operations of the firm. One of the region’s most sought-after employers, Edward Jones is consistently ranked among the nation’s best – and best managed – companies. The firm recently ranked No. 4 on FORTUNE magazine’s “Best Companies to Work For” list in 2014.

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“We don’t manage the organization in order to appear on a list,” Ciapciak said. “We manage the organization by taking into consideration the needs and aspirations of each individual. We want every individual to have the opportunity to reach their full potential.”

“What drew me to Edward Jones in the first place was its emphasis on the values and culture of the company,” Farmer said. “It aligns well with the values at SLU – whether it’s serving clients or serving the communities in which the firm operates.”

Structured as a private partnership organization, Edward Jones has more flexibility than a public company does to make long-term But the accolades provide a measurable boost to recruiting. management decisions that focus on the retention of its people. “Within a few weeks after the FORTUNE ranking, more than 20 new financial adviser trainees “We think that if we can provide signed contracts with us citing the a long-term career opportunity article as the reason they became for people, it helps them grow as interested in our organization,” “ M Y M O T I VAT I O N I S individuals and reach their full Ciapciak said. “So the impact is TO M A K E S U R E W E ’ R E potential,” Ciapciak said. “But it also immediate.” C R E AT I N G A N E X P E R I E N C E benefits our organization because F O R D A N T H AT T E S T S we build institutional knowledge D I S COV E R ING HIS H I S A B I L I T I E S , P R OV I D E S within our people. By keeping them N IC H E S AT I S F A C T I O N A N D G I V E S here and by cross training them in Farmer signed on with Edward H I M T H E O P P O RT U N I T Y TO different functions and capacities, we Jones as part of the firm’s Rotational A D VA N C E I N H I S C A R E E R . ” don’t have to continuously train new Development Professional program, people to do the same work.” - BOB CIAPCIAK a year-long, cross-functional training Of course, according to Ciapciak, program for recent graduates. it’s absolutely essential for the firm “Our main responsibility is to rotate to identify high-potential candidates through several departments, gaining such as Farmer to join the organization. an understanding of the entire division and firm from multiple “I think Dan represents the type of individual the University angles,” Farmer said. “At the end of the program, we are given can be proud of,” Ciapciak said. “He’s been well-prepared by the a final placement, which is based on a combination of business education that he received. He has his eye on the ball because he needs and our own preferences. It is a rare and wonderful wants to establish a career. But he’s also concerned with making a opportunity to rapidly develop.” contribution to society at large and to the St. Louis community.” He appreciates the opportunity to benefit from the wisdom of Farmer’s initiative recently led him to help organize a successful his mentor. corporate connections networking event for SLU alumni at “Mr. Ciapciak has many years of experience, not only Edward Jones. with Edward Jones, but also within the St. Louis business “This is not something for which he’s going to be officially community,” Farmer said. “I have been able to reach out to him recognized, but it’s the type of thing that he’s doing because of with questions regarding our firm as well as topics like SLU and the values that he learned at the University,” Ciapciak said. “And community volunteering.” I’m sure that’s one of the reasons that attracted us to him in the Both men have discovered they share some mutual interests, first place.” including that Ciapciak chaired the Board of Directors of the So far, the Edward Jones experience has exceeded Farmer’s St. Louis Sports Commission, where Farmer completed an expectations. internship. “In the same way that the business school was my family for four “We were able to share our experiences, and I am sure that he will years, the same thing is starting to happen at Edward Jones,” he be a resource as I continue my involvement with the commission said. “It’s a great culture to be a part of. I am so appreciative of through their young professionals group,” Farmer said. everything Mr. Ciapciak and Edward Jones have been able to The values of Edward Jones remind Farmer of those he learned at give me. It is a blessing.” Sh the Cook School.

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TIPS FOR SUCCESSFUL MENTORING INSIGHTS FROM BARBARA GRADALA, DIRECTOR OF THE CAREER RESOURCES CENTER

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roductive mentoring relationships can take many forms and occur at all stages of a person’s life and career.

• Advancing in a profession. • Identifying career path possibilities.

“Individuals may have multiple mentors in their lives who will provide views from a variety of perspectives,” said Barb Gradala, director of the Valerie A. Davisson Career Resources Center at the John Cook School of Business. “I think mentoring relationships can work with a lot of different structures, but there are some key elements that maximize successful outcomes.” Seek compatibility. Connecting around a shared interest or area of expertise helps to build a mutual trust and respect that benefits both individuals.

Establish parameters. What are the frequency, duration and location of mentor-mentee interactions? Will the meetings include a specific activity, such as a job shadowing tour, introduction to another person or some type of homework? “The most successful relationships typically are mentee-driven,” Gradala said. “Because the mentor typically has more commitments, the mentee should drive it and be accountable for staying in touch.” Set realistic expectations. It’s important for both individuals to understand that the relationship provides one aspect of support for a person’s professional development.

Identify a shared goal or purpose. Both parties should articulate what they seek from the relationship and identify how the mentor’s expertise can help serve the mentee’s aspirations. A goal or purpose might include: • Adapting to a new professional environment. • Overcoming challenges in a professional environment.

• Developing a new skill.

“I think sometimes we make the mistake of putting all our eggs in one basket and expecting to learn everything we need to know from one person,” Gradala said. Learn from past mentoring experiences. Tap the knowledge of people who have had successful mentoring experiences. Identify what

worked for you and them, and use that insight in creating and sustaining a relationship. Seek diverse perspectives. “It’s so important to seek perspectives from other genders, ethnic backgrounds, experience levels and skill sets,” Gradala said. “Those different viewpoints contribute to more wellrounded professional growth.” Access valuable resources. Gradala recommends that both mentors and mentees read the book Building Career Equity by Jan Torrisi-Mokwa, available at congruence-inc.com. “It’s a really accessible and practical resource written by one of our executive advisory board members,” she said. “Chapter three provides a great reference for building meaningful mentor-mentee relationships.” Let the relationship evolve. Healthy mentoring relationships evolve and change, with new goals and parameters emerging. “Like any organic entity, relationships ebb and flow throughout your lifetime,” Gradala said. “Sometimes a mentor can become more of a peer or colleague over time.”

I F YO U ’ R E I N T E R EST ED I N L EAR N I NG MOR E ABOUT MENTORING OPPORTUNITIES OR OFFERING YOUR EXPERTISE AS A P OT E N T IA L M EN TOR, P L EASE CONTACT BARB GRADALA AT 314-9 7 7- 36 06 OR B GRADALA@SLU.EDU. YOU’ RE ALSO IN V ITE D TO J O IN “ S LU COOK SC HOOL OF BU SI N ES S CONNECTIONS,” A LINKEDIN GROUP OF ALUMNI, FACULT Y AND STUDEN TS .

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Events ALUMNI

SAVE TH E DATE : H OM ECOM I NG SE PTE M BE R 25-28, 2 01 4 Join the SLU community in celebrating 2014 Homecoming weekend. Come back to campus to enjoy all of the traditional fun – a concert, campus tours, the golf cart parade, soccer and fireworks. For more information, please visit alumni.slu.edu/homecoming2014

ONC E AT THE FOX

E ASTE R EG G H UNT

THU R SDAY, A PR I L 1 0, 2 01 4

SATURDAY, APRIL 1 9, 2 01 4

Winner of 8 Tony Awards, including Best Musical, Once is a truly original Broadway experience. Once tells the enchanting tale of a Dublin street musician who’s about to give up on his dream when a beautiful young woman takes a sudden interest in his haunting love songs.

Join the Billiken, the Easter Bunny and the Saint Louis University community for the annual Easter Egg hunt on Saturday, April 19. Bring your family back to campus to take part in this special tradition.

Cost: $75-85

For more information and to register: alumni.slu.edu/ easter14

Time: 6 p.m. preshow dinner reception; 8 p.m. curtain Get your tickets today: alumni.slu.edu/once14

J O I N T H E J C S B A LUMNI B OA R D ! The John Cook School of Business is recruiting new alumni board members. Candidates should have experience in leadership roles and embody the mission of the board in working with faculty, current and prospective business students, alumni, and the community to enhance and promote the image of Saint Louis University and the John Cook School of Business. Board members are expected to: • Attend bi-monthly meetings and events supported by the board throughout the year.

• Serve on at least one sub-committee.

• Serve terms of three years or more.

If interested, please forward a copy of your resume to Kate Flatley, assistant director of alumni relations, at kflatle1@slu.edu or 314-977-2348.

24 | BUSINESS.SLU.EDU

TRIVIA NIGH T RECAP On Saturday, Jan. 25, more than 300 alumni, students and friends of the business school gathered for the Annual Trivia Night, sponsored by the John Cook School of Business’ alumni board. The trivia night raised more than $18,000 for the scholarship fund. Thank you to our sponsors: Acropolis Investment Management, LLC Edward Jones Kräftig Noboleis Vineyards Pickleman’s Gourmet Cafe


{Reflection}

THE VALUE OF NETWORKING By Tejaswi Paladugu

MAY 2014, INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS AND MARKETING

STEPHEN FREIN, DIRECTOR OF PEOPLE AT ANHEUSERBUSCH INBEV PRESENTS TEJASWI PALADUGU WITH THE ANHEUSER-BUSCH GLOBAL BUSINESS SCHOLARSHIP DURING THE 2013 BOEING INSTITUTE OF INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS AWARDS CEREMONY AT THE COOK SCHOOL.

W

e have all heard the famous saying, “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know.” And in the business world, it is truer than anywhere else. Whether it is a student in your class or a CEO at a large corporation, people can become one of your greatest assets. Since day one of freshman year, I kept hearing how important networking is. It was like the mantra of the business school. I soon realized that if I wanted to learn beyond the classroom, I had to make connections. I have seized every opportunity that has come my way since. The first step I took to be more involved within the business school was becoming part of the Service Leadership Program. Through the program, I learned about all the exciting things my peers were doing and about the different ways they were living SLU’s Jesuit mission of becoming men and women for others. Not only did I hear about their fun service stories, but I also learned how service affected them in a positive way. Another component that makes service leadership so unique is the way it connects students to the business leaders in the community. The mentorship program helped me connect with experienced leaders in the business world who gave me a glimpse of the “real” world. They gave me insights on how to answer interview questions, helped make my résumé look more professional and taught me about professionalism and business etiquette. My efforts to grow my network did not stop there. I joined the Regional Business Council my senior year and got paired with

an amazing individual who was passionate about everything she did. She had an open-door policy and helped me with anything and everything. Knowing I was near graduation, she understood how important it was for me to meet other business leaders in the community in order to make the job search process easier. With the help of her amazing network and this rising program, I was able to meet people whom I would never have met otherwise. I always knew that I wanted to capitalize on my international background, but never knew how until I came to SLU and discovered my love for international business. The international business professors really showed me the true value and opportunities in this field. The research that I did with Dr. Mamoun Benmamoun and the simulation of managing a multi-million dollar firm that I completed in Dr. Hadi Alhorr’s class further reinforced my love for the field. With the help and support of the international business department, I applied for a prestigious scholarship sponsored by local multinational corporations. I was fortunate to be awarded the Anheuser-Busch Global Scholarship, which gave me an opportunity to showcase my academic excellence and meet with executives of various corporations at business school events. I am really proud of how much I was able to accomplish, and I know I could not have done it without the support of all the people I met through these different events and activities. They truly made a difference in my life and helped me grow into a strong individual with a better sense of where my life and my career will take me. sh

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Non Profit Organization U.S. Postage P A I D St. Louis, MO Permit #134

1 N. Grand Blvd., DS 200 St. Louis, MO 63103

FIND US AT: SLU COOK BUSINESS 800.SLU.FOR.U business.slu.edu

She is our future. We are her present. Invest in our future with a gift of scholarship. We’ll match it dollar for dollar. Together, we’ll go further.

your gift. our match.

giving.slu.edu/gofurther

G RAC E JO H NS O N • H OME TOW N : ST. LO U I S JO H N CO O K S C H O O L O F B U SI N E S S • C LAS S O F 2 01 4

Shareholder (Spring 2014)  

The Spring 2014 edition of Shareholder, the magazine for SLU Alumni. In this issue, and interview with the founders of Shipworks, Entreprene...