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A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 017/18 S U R F L I F E S AV I N G Q U E E N S L A N D


SLSQ SNAPSHOT

2,865

RESCUES

32,291 VOLUNTEER PATROL HOURS

35,257

MEMBERS INCLUDING NIPPERS

FIRST AID

TRAINED IN

TREATMENTS

FIRST AID & CPR

701,973 TOTAL MEMBERS

224,068

PREVENTATIVE ACTIONS

ENGAGED VIA COMMUNITY

AWARENESS PROGRAMS


CONTENTS OUR COMMITMENT TO SAVING LIVES PATRON’S AND PREMIER’S MESSAGE BOARD BIOGRAPHY

2 3   4 

Surf Life Saving Clubs

Operations Support

North Queensland Branch

Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service

Port Douglas Ellis Beach Cairns Etty Bay Mission Beach North Barrier Branch

PATRONS AND HONOURS PRESIDENT’S REPORT CEO’S REPORT STRATEGIC PLAN

5 6 8 10

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

12

HUMAN RESOURCES

13

LIFESAVING SERVICES

15

AUSTRALIAN LIFEGUARD SERVICE QUEENSLAND WESTPAC LIFESAVER RESCUE HELICOPTER SERVICE

23 37 

COMMUNITY AWARENESS

31

MEMBERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

35

SURF SPORTS

39

EDUCATION

45

FUNDRAISING, MEDIA AND MARKETING

49

OUR PARTNERS

55

SLSQ COMMITTEES AND PANELS

56

SLSQ LIFE MEMBERS

57

AWARD WINNERS

58

STATISTICS, SPORTING RESULTS AND FINANCIALS

63

Forrest Beach Arcadian Townsville Picnic Bay Ayr Bowen Eimeo Mackay Sarina Wide Bay Capricorn Branch Yeppoon Emu Park Tannum Sands Agnes Water Moore Park Bundaberg Elliott Heads Hervey Bay Sunshine Coast Branch

Rescue Water Craft service SurfCom communications centres State Operations and Communications Centre Duty Officer program Coastalwatch cameras Brisbane Lifesaving Service Remote coastal beacons Emergency Response Groups Gold Coast Dawn and Dusk Patrols Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

Australian Lifeguard Service Servicing: Bundaberg Regional Council Burdekin Shire Council Cassowary Coast Regional Council Cairns Regional Council Council of the City of Gold Coast Fraser Coast Regional Council Gladstone Regional Council Gympie Regional Council

Rainbow Beach Noosa Heads Sunshine Beach Coolum Beach Marcoola Mudjimba Maroochydore Alexandra Headland Mooloolaba Kawana Waters Dicky Beach Metropolitan Caloundra Bribie Island Redcliffe Peninsula

Hinchinbrook Shire Council

South Coast Branch

“Surf Rescue House” 18 Manning Street, South Brisbane, Queensland 4101

Point Lookout Coochiemudlo Island Southport Surfers Paradise Northcliffe Broadbeach Kurrawa Mermaid Beach Nobbys Beach Miami Beach North Burleigh Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park Point Danger Branch Tallebudgera Pacific Palm Beach Currumbin Tugun Bilinga North Kirra Kirra Coolangatta Tweed Heads & Coolangatta Rainbow Bay

Livingstone Shire Council Mackay Regional Council Moreton Bay Regional Council Redland City Council South Bank Corporation Sunshine Coast Council Townsville City Council Whitsunday Regional Council

Registered office of SLSQ –

Notice of SLSQ Annual General Meeting The 2017/18 Annual Report will be presented at the 88th Annual General Meeting of Surf Life Saving Queensland, to be held at Surf Rescue House in South Brisbane on Friday, 24 August 2018 at 6pm.

Surf Life Saving Queensland 18 Manning Street, South Brisbane QLD 4101  P: 07 3846 8000  F: 07 3846 8008 E: slsq@lifesaving.com.au  W: lifesaving.com.au

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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OUR COMMITMENT TO SAVING LIVES

Who we are Surf Life Saving Queensland (SLSQ) is the state’s leading authority on aquatic safety and surf rescue, and one of the largest volunteer-based community service organisations in Australia. From humble beginnings, when the first official rescue was recorded on a Queensland beach in 1909, SLSQ has developed into a groundbreaking and highly innovative organisation encompassing 58 clubs and more than 30,000 men, women and children across the state. Since its inception, SLSQ’s volunteer surf lifesavers and lifeguards have directly saved the lives of more than 130,000 people through in-water rescues, and educated in excess of 10 million people about surf and aquatic safety through targeted and grassroots community awareness programs. SLSQ is directly affiliated with, and is part of, Surf Life Saving Australia (SLSA) and the International Life Saving Federation (ILS). As a not-for-profit organisation, SLSQ relies heavily on community support and donations to continue our vital work both on and off Queensland’s beaches. It is the generous support of Queenslanders that enables us to help keep beachgoers safe.

Why we exist SLSQ is built on a fundamental principle: to save lives. Our organisation encompasses several diverse arms – lifesaving and lifeguarding services, community education, membership services, surf sports, fundraising, commercial training and member training – all supporting one overarching purpose. Queensland’s mainland coastline is extensive, stretching more than 6,000 kilometres from the Gulf of Carpentaria in the west and Cape York in the north to Point Danger in the southeast. With more than 700 accessible beaches along this expanse, the state boasts some of the world’s most popular sandy stretches, attracting approximately 30 million visitors to our beaches every year.

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SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND

Unfortunately, despite significant advances in technology, techniques and knowledge, people still drown on Queensland beaches. SLSQ aims to set the benchmark in lifesaving service provision, rescue practices, emergency care and training and education as we strive to make our stunning coastline safer for everyone who uses it. A commitment to continuous improvement across all areas of our operation ensures we are highly regarded across Australia and around the world. We are leaders in our industry, and are committed to maintaining this stance to ensure we are equipped for the future.

Our vision Zero preventable deaths in Queensland public waters.

Our mission SLSQ will operate as a proactive and effective peak body, leading the way in lifesaving service provision, education, sport, beach safety advocacy and community leadership.

Our strategic imperatives Committed To Our Community: To advocate water safety management and continue to enhance the reputation of SLSQ as the peak body. Connected To Our People: To recruit and retain the best people through support and development of their skills and knowledge. Effective In Our Business: To plan and execute our day-to-day operations to an outstanding level of efficiency, with continuous improvement always in mind. Sustainable For Our Future: To ensure SLSQ is equipped for the future through continuous growth, strong financial management and sound governance.


PATRON’S MESSAGE

Surf lifesavers and lifeguards are synonymous with our beautiful Queensland beaches - undoubtedly some of the finest in the world. As Governor and Patron of Surf Life Saving Queensland (SLSQ), I am proud to congratulate the board, partners, staff and volunteers who all contributed to a landmark year in and out of the water. From Port Douglas to Rainbow Bay, the state’s lifesavers and lifeguards watched over tens of millions of beachgoers, many of them international and domestic visitors to Queensland. This was certainly the case during the highly successful 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games, when SLSQ provided unprecedented levels of coastal coverage. Importantly, these efforts helped to ensure there were no drownings and minimal beach-related incidents during the Games.

SLSQ was just as busy on dry land, as community awareness campaigns visited hundreds of schools, universities and festivals to promote water safety messages and directly engage with more than 200,000 people. To the men and women of SLSQ, thank you for your dedication and commitment to keeping Queensland beaches safe. Your actions continue to benefit millions of people all over the world, and you are wonderful ambassadors for our state and our country.

His Excellency the Honourable Paul de Jersey AC Governor of Queensland

Similarly, no drownings were recorded between the iconic red and yellow flags – a remarkable achievement for the organisation and the entire state of Queensland.

PREMIER’S MESSAGE

No living Queenslander can remember a time without Surf Life Saving Queensland − which this year marks its 110th anniversary in our state. Since our first practising surf lifesavers ran onto the sands of Greenmount Beach all those years ago, Surf Life Saving Queensland has become part of our everyday lives, a vital stitch in the fabric of Queensland. Surf Life Saving Queensland has grown up alongside us and has evolved to meet new challenges, trialling drone technology in patrol and rescue operations, and extending patrol hours to achieve its vision of ‘zero preventable deaths in Queensland public waters’. In the past season, an army of surf lifesavers watched over tens of millions of Queensland beachgoers and rescued 3,000 swimmers, with their efforts guaranteeing there were no recorded drownings between the red and yellow flags. Off the beach, Surf Life Saving Queensland continues to educate Queenslanders of all ages about the importance of surf safety, visiting hundreds of schools, community groups and universities, and

upskilling thousands of migrants, refugees and people from culturally and linguistically−diverse backgrounds through the On The Same Wave program. And at the 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games earlier this year, we were proud to see our surf lifesavers playing a crucial role both on and off the screen − keeping the influx of domestic and international visitors safe on our beaches, and singing and dancing before the eyes of the world at the spectacular Opening Ceremony. I extend my heartfelt thanks to everyone involved in Surf Life Saving Queensland, who each day keep watch along our coast, ensuring our beaches remain safe and welcoming places for all.

Annastacia Palaszczuk MP Premier of Queensland Minister for Trade

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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BOARD BIOGRAPHY Mark Fife OAM

Amanda Lawson

President

Director

Since joining Surf Life Saving in 1975, Mark has become the epitome of the iconic Aussie surf lifesaver. Mark is a former Club and Branch President, was the Australian Director of Life Saving for five years, and is the only person to have been recognised as both the Australian Surf Lifesaver of the Year and Australian Volunteer of the Year. He is a Life Member of Broadbeach SLSC, South Coast Branch, SLSQ, and SLSA. In 2013 he received an OAM for his contributions to surf lifesaving and was inducted into SLSA’s National Hall of Fame in 2015.

Amanda joined Point Lookout SLSC in 2010 as a Junior Activities parent and has since served her club in various finance and fundraising roles, as well as sitting on the SLSQ Audit, Finance and Compliance Committee since 2016. She is a chartered accountant running her own consulting company, having previously served on numerous not-for-profit boards as a former financial services executive. With over 25 years experience, Amanda holds a Bachelor of Commerce (University of Queensland) and postgraduate qualifications in professional services and assurance. She is a Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia & New Zealand, a Member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors, and a Fellow of the Financial Services Institute of Australasia.

Michael White Deputy President Michael has been involved in the surf lifesaving movement for more than 20 years. He is a former Director and Secretary of Alexandra Headland SLSC, and a former member of SLSQ’s Judiciary. He has been a patrol captain for 10 years and a helicopter rescue crewman for six years. An accomplished athlete, Michael has competed at the international level and has won 24 medals on the national stage. He is a barrister at the Sunshine Coast Barristers Chambers, and has also acted as an Independent Director to a number of community association boards.

Darrin Bragg

Laurie Murphy Director Laurie joined the movement as a nipper in 1971 before completing his Bronze Medallion at Mooloolaba in 1974. While most of his seasons have been spent at Maroochydore SLSC, he has been a member of a numerous clubs in Queensland and New South Wales, holding a variety of positions including Secretary, Captain and Boat Captain. Professionally, Laurie is the CEO of BGW Group, a large Australian-owned business operating through multiple locations in Australia and South East Asia. He also holds a number of directorships on boards of private companies.

Director of Finance Darrin joined the surf lifesaving movement in 1974 as a nipper at Mackay SLSC. He is currently president of Townsville Picnic Bay SLSC. Darrin chairs SLSQ’s Audit, Finance and Compliance Committee, and is President of the Cairns SLSC Supporters Club. He is a Life Member of North Barrier Branch and SLSQ and is principal of his own accounting and taxation practice.

Kaitlyn Akers Director Kaitlyn is a Life Member of Mudjimba SLSC and has held several operational and senior leadership roles at club, branch and state level. She is an active patrolling lifesaver, surf sports competitor, trainer and is active in leadership and member development. In 2010/11 she was named the Queensland Surf Lifesaver of the Year. Off the beach, Kaitlyn leads people and strategy as head of operations for a commercial health services company, focusing on sustainable change and start-up business units, privately consulting to not-forprofit organisations to optimise their impact. She holds an Executive MBA, is a Fellow of AIM, and an AICD member, and has completed a postgraduate certificate in Strategic Talent Management from Stanford University along with Strategic Innovation and Sustainability Reporting at Harvard Business School.

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SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND

Tanya O’Shea Director Tanya has been a member of Bundaberg SLSC since 2005, initially joining as a nipper parent before being elected as the Junior Activities Chair. As the CEO of IMPACT Community Services, she balances a strong academic and practical background in business management and mental health, applying sound business principles to the governance and strategic vision of an organisation that delivers a diverse and innovative suite of programs to some of the most vulnerable within the community. Tanya is passionate about improving life opportunities, and is continually looking for ways to grow, diversify, innovate, and improve the sustainability and financial viability of ‘for purpose’ organisations.

Warwick Agnew Independent Director Warwick is currently the Director-General at the Queensland Department of Local Government, Racing and Multicultural Affairs. Warwick has senior executive and commercial experience in both public and private sectors. Over the past 20 years, his experience includes senior leadership positions in Queensland Treasury (including Queensland Treasury Corporation Board), Macquarie Capital, and Transfield Services. Warwick has a background in surf lifesaving and returned as a nipper parent at Metropolitan Caloundra SLSC in 2015.


PATRONS AND HONOURS Vale

Patron

SLSQ offers its deepest respect and sympathy to the friends and family of members who have passed away this year. In particular, condolences are extended to the friends and family of our Life Members who passed away during the 2017/18 season including Jack Dearlove MBE, Ron Harding OAM, Kevin Hoskins OAM, Alan Doig OAM, and Ken O’Connell.

His Excellency the Governor of Queensland, the Honourable Paul de Jersey AC.

Vice Patrons Hon Annastacia Palaszczuk MP

Condolences are also extended to the members of Surf Life Saving who have suffered bereavements in their families.

Hon Craig Crawford MP

Australian Honours

Hon Cameron Dick MP

Awarded Australia Day 2018: Ms Karen Deephouse OAM – Awarded a Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division for service to surf lifesaving through various roles at a state and club level. Queen’s Birthday Honours 2018: Mr John Neumann OAM – Awarded a Medal (OAM) of the Order of Australia in the General Division for service to the community of the Gold Coast. Mr Neumann OAM is a Life Member of Currumbin Vikings Surf Life Saving Club and a past president and co-founder of its nippers club.

Hon Mick de Brenni MP Hon Shannon Fentiman MP Hon Dr Steven Miles MP Hon Kate Jones MP Hon Mark Ryan MP Hon Curtis Pitt MP Hon Steven Ciobo MP Hon Peter Dutton MP Mrs Deb Frecklington MP Lord Mayor Graham Quirk Mr Michael Hart MP

Life Members 2017/18* Congratulations are extended to the following individuals, awarded Life Membership of SLSQ at the Annual General Meeting on 25 August 2017: Darrin Bragg

Mrs Brittany Lauga MP Mr Tim Nicholls MP Ms Fiona Simpson MP Hon George Brandis QC

Grahame Long

Dr Jim Chalmers MP

John Sunner

Cr Matt Burnett

Colin Neil OAM

Cr Mick Curran

Sue Neil OAM

Cr Jack Dempsey

Peter Whitty

Cr Jenny Hill

* A full list of SLSQ’s Life Members can be found on page 57.

Cr John Kremastos Cr Chris Loft Cr Bill Ludwig Cr Bob Manning OAM Cr Allan Sutherland Cr Andrew Willcox Cr Karen Williams Cr Greg Williamson Ms Katarina Carroll APM Mr Ian Stewart APM Mr Jim McGowan AM Mr Mick Power AM Mr Stephen Maitland OAM RFD Ms Julieanne Alroe Mr Daniel Gschwind Mr Bruce Watson

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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PRESIDENT’S REPORT

It has been a privilege to have served as President of Surf Life Saving Queensland (SLSQ) for another season. I would like to extend my personal thanks and appreciation to the SLSQ Board, Council, and all staff for their efforts and support over the past 12 months. We have some wonderful individuals involved in the surf lifesaving movement, and the dedication of our people working behind-the-scenes is second-to-none. I also wish to acknowledge the extraordinary work of our volunteers across the season. Our membership is broad and diverse, encompassing people of all shapes, sizes, ages, and backgrounds, but the one trait they all share is an unwavering commitment to our vision of saving lives. On behalf of SLSQ, thank you to each and every person who selflessly volunteered their time in 2017/18 to protect Queensland beaches; your vigilance and service can never be questioned. A total of 140,497 beachgoers have been rescued by our surf lifesavers and lifeguards across the state since SLSQ was formally established in 1930. This is a truly remarkable figure, and reflects the positive impact our movement continues to have on Queensland communities. However, it’s worth noting this figure only tells half the story. Off the beach our members are more active than ever, investing a considerable amount of their own time each year into fundraising activities, community engagement, surf club administration, emergency management, learning and development, and skills training. Importantly, these collective efforts ensure that Queensland beaches are amongst the safest in the world. In reflection, the 2017/18 season was historic to say the least, with a number of significant developments and achievements recorded across the year. From trialling drones and new technology, through to boosting safety at high-risk stretches of coastline, SLSQ continued to leave no stone unturned in pursuit of its lifesaving vision. The global spotlight shone brightly on Queensland in April when our state played host to the 2018 Commonwealth Games. On the beach, our surf lifesavers and lifeguards significantly boosted their services to cope with an increase in tourists. Meanwhile, off the beach, it was wonderful to see our volunteers honoured on the international stage, with more than 500 nippers and surf lifesavers invited to play a key role within the Opening Ceremony and Queen’s Baton Relay.

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SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND

More recently, I had the pleasure of attending the 2018 Summer Surf Girl Gala Dinner on the Gold Coast in June, which celebrated the efforts of this year’s 11 participants. What these young women were able to achieve over the past 12 months has been nothing short of inspiring. Collectively, they raised in excess of $500,000 for their respective surf clubs and, along the way, championed the lifesaving cause at every opportunity. Thank you to each participant for their efforts this season; you are all outstanding ambassadors for your clubs and the wider surf lifesaving movement. From the Board’s perspective, we remain committed to advancing and building upon the organisation for the benefit of all branches, clubs, and members across the state. With the support of the State Council, the Board has commenced a major governance review from top to bottom to ensure we are up-to-date, compliant, and aligned with bestpractice standards. Moving forward, members will be consulted on any changes resulting from this review. On a personal note, I would like to acknowledge the efforts of Darrin Bragg who is stepping down from the Board after a combined 12 years in the role. Darrin has also served as Director of Finance for six years during this time, and his guidance and expertise have been greatly appreciated by all. It is our responsibility as board members to leave the organisation in a better position than we found it, and Darrin has certainly done that. Thank you once again to all who supported SLSQ across the past season, and I look forward to working with you again in 2018/19 to pursue our vison of ‘Zero preventable deaths in Queensland public waters.’

Mark Fife OAM President Surf Life Saving Queensland


ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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CEO’S REPORT

On behalf of Surf Life Saving Queensland (SLSQ) I am proud to bring you our Annual Report for 2017/18. The past 12 months have been extraordinary, with millions of people flocking to Queensland beaches and entrusting our organisation to keep them safe in the water. On the front-line, we focused on delivering positive and proactive strategies in pursuit of our overarching vision of ‘Zero preventable deaths in Queensland public waters.’ Behind the scenes, we recorded strong growth and development across a range of areas to solidify our position as a peak body organisation. Importantly, our achievements across 2017/18 have been a collective effort. With that in mind, I wish to formally thank SLSQ president Mark Fife OAM, deputy president Michael White, and the Board of Directors for their contributions across the past 12 months. I would also like to acknowledge the tireless efforts of staff around the state, who regularly go above and beyond for our cause. Above all, I wish to sincerely thank our volunteer members for their dedication and the sacrifices they continue to make in the name of saving lives.

SLSQ’s overarching vision continues to be supported through four strategic imperatives, outlined below.

Committed to our community: Since its inception more than a century ago, the surf lifesaving movement has delivered a vital service to Queensland communities. Time and time again our members have shown themselves to be lifesavers in every sense of the word, with their training and dedication often proving the difference between a potential drowning and a positive outcome. This was again the case in 2017/18, with SLSQ’s surf lifesavers and lifeguards combining to perform 701,973 preventative actions, treat 35,257 first aid patients, and directly save the lives of 2,865 people via in-water rescues. Above all else, these efforts ensured there were zero drownings recorded between the red and yellow flags. This is an outstanding result for SLSQ and Queensland as a whole, and rightly reflects the commitment and bravery of our patrolling members. SLSQ was just as active off the beach, educating more than 200,000 members of the community about safe swimming practices, and upskilling 13,890 people with vital first aid and CPR skills.

Connected to our people: Our people are the heart and soul of SLSQ. With that in mind, we have continued to focus on the recruitment and retention of members and staff across all levels. These efforts have delivered outstanding results for the organisation. Across the past 12 months SLSQ’s overall membership recorded strong growth of 3.85 per cent, surpassing 32,000 for the first time since 2012. In addition, SLSQ recorded its highest ever number of active patrolling members, with 9,120 volunteers watching over Queensland beaches. This season also saw SLSQ launch its inaugural smartphone app, signalling a sizeable shift in the way we engage with our diverse membership base. The initial feedback has been positive, and we will continue to build upon this platform in the seasons to come. Once again we focused on developing and rolling out a wide variety of sporting events in 2017/18 to cater for lifesavers of all ages, disciplines, backgrounds, and abilities. Surf sport is one of the cornerstones of the lifesaving movement, and we remain committed to building on our competitive programs moving forward. From a personal perspective, it was wonderful to see the efforts of our volunteers highlighted so prominently during the 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games. From the Queen’s Baton Relay to the Opening Ceremony, our members were rightly honoured as an iconic and invaluable part of both Queensland and Australia.

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SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND


Effective in our business: As an organisation, we have continued to focus on developing and delivering innovative strategies to protect swimmers and reduce drowning deaths across Queensland. In the past 12 months SLSQ conducted extensive trials of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), with lifeguards testing their efficiency and durability in a range of patrol, search, and rescue scenarios. Trials were also conducted to review the technology’s effectiveness when it comes to identifying and monitoring crocodile activity in North Queensland. In addition, SLSQ rolled out a number of mobile cameras and emergency response beacons at identified blackspots on the Sunshine Coast. This Australian-first technology will significantly improve safety at remote and unpatrolled stretches of coastline, and has the capacity to be implemented in other regions across Queensland next season. The Commonwealth Games saw SLSQ embark on one of the biggest operations in organisational history to help safeguard the influx of tourists arriving on the Gold Coast. This included a significant increase in manpower, patrol hours, and services at tourist hotspots and highrisk locations. Importantly, there were no drownings and minimal incidents recorded leading into, and during, the Games, which was an outstanding result.

In the past 12 months, we continued to work towards a number of target achievements outlined in SLSQ’s 2020 Strategic Plan, which provides us with a strong foundation for sustained growth in the years to come. SLSQ remains more committed than ever to delivering proactive programs in a bid to achieve our overarching vision of ‘Zero preventable deaths in Queensland public waters.’ However, it is important to note our lifesaving efforts would not be possible without a committed and equally-passionate group of corporate, community, and government partners behind the scenes. SLSQ is grateful for the ongoing support of our sponsors and partners, whose contributions directly help us to deliver safer beaches and waterways. Looking ahead, in 2018/19 SLSQ will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of our iconic Nippers program in Queensland. This is a wonderful milestone and an opportunity to reflect on the past halfcentury, while paying tribute to some of the men and women who have helped shape our organisation into what it is today. Thank you again for your support across the past 12 months, and I look forward to working with you next season to help save lives and improve aquatic safety across Queensland.

Sustainable for our future: The surf lifesaving movement in Queensland is steeped in history, dating all the way back to 1909 when the state’s first rescue was recorded at Greenmount Beach. Since then, SLSQ has developed into a highly-innovative organisation, and one of the world’s leading authorities on coastal and aquatic safety.

John Brennan OAM Chief Executive Officer Surf Life Saving Queensland

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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STRATEGIC PLAN SLSQ aims to set the benchmark in lifesaving service provision, rescue practices, emergency care, training and education, as we strive to make our public waterways safer for everyone. A commitment to continuous improvement across all areas of our operation ensures we are highly regarded both in Australia and around the world. In 2017/18 SLSQ worked towards the following target achievements: KEY STRATEGIES

WHAT WE ACHIEVED 2017-18

Committed to our community Reduce drowning and aquatic deaths by implementing a regional lifesaving plan that coordinates the efforts of lifesavers and lifeguards at blackspots and popular waterways.

• •

Top five blackspots identified and managed over 2017/18 season. An extensive lifesaving plan was developed and implemented for the 2018 Commonwealth Games, and extended services were maintained at a level required to manage the anticipated influx of tourists. Importantly, zero drownings were recorded on Gold Coast beaches during the Games period.

Reduce drowning and aquatic deaths by providing targeted education and aquatic safety advice to Queensland communities and tourism industries.

SLSQ’s 2017 Coast Safe Report was published with an increased focus on drownings at inland and public waterways. The report was circulated to all key stakeholders, including Government, and achieved considerable media coverage. Many recommendations outlined within the Coast Safe Report were adopted by State and Local Governments. The Water Safe project was developed and implemented. Continued advocacy with all forms of media. Ongoing liaison with key Government stakeholders. Digital media campaigns developed and delivered SLSQ actively participated in the Queensland Government Water Safety Roundtable.

• • • • • • Grow and retain members by strengthening club management practices through the Club Development Project.

• • • • •

SLS Club Development Project provided clubs with the necessary resources, tools, and education platforms to develop, adapt, and maintain good governance. The SLSQ Club app was produced and launched. CYRMS resources were updated and released. Peer Support Officer refresher training was launched via the SLSQ app. Inclusion of child protection/Blue Card reference to all club vacancy advertisements Addition of Member Protection Policy to all existing and new club staff for acknowledgement.

Increase participation in SLSQ clubs and programs through a school integration program for students from preschool to grade 12.

Strategy developed with the aim of converting one per cent of school participants into members of SLS clubs.

Increase participation in SLSQ clubs and programs by providing opportunities for all community members to participate in SLS activities.

SLSQ Workplace Volunteer numbers increased, with volunteers assisting with several projects and fundraising activities

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KEY STRATEGIES

WHAT WE ACHIEVED 2017-18

Effective in our business Develop, deliver and continuously evaluate the provision of sports programs to enable and ensure that all SLSQ members to be engaged.

• • • • • • •

The consistency of sports safety practices were reviewed and shallow water rescue kits were rolled out to clubs. Carnival Safety Officer Familiarisation Package developed and delivery of courses commenced. Five athlete development programs were conducted across the state in various regions. Thirty-five new Level 2 officials were accredited. Members were surveyed to identify the top five key issues affecting participation in sport. An IRB racing investigative review was completed and new guidelines implemented. An extensive Surf Sports Review commenced.

Sustainable for our future Expand SLSQ’s commercial service offering.

• • • • • • •

Conduct state-wide fundraising programs to benefit the surf lifesaving movement in Queensland.

• • • •

Cairns Supporters Club stage two was completed. The Queensland Police Service Pol Air contract was maintained. A business case was developed for the expansion of lifeguard services. Sponsorship income increased through new partnerships. New sponsorship opportunities have resulted from SLSQ’s involvement in the Commonwealth Games. SLSQ received additional Government funding to provide increased lifesaving services during Commonwealth Games SLSQ delivered contracted water safety services during the Commonwealth Games SLSQ annual fundraising appeal was rebranded as ‘SOS Week’, with 50 clubs participating. The annual Appeal income increased by $24k from the previous year. New ‘Tap & Go’ payment systems were launched for fundraising events. Fundraising events increased across the state.

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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CORPORATE GOVERNANCE With a membership base of more than 32,000, SLSQ is one of the largest volunteer-based community organisations in Queensland. Control of SLSQ is vested in the Board of Directors which is accountable to the State Council which, in turn, represents the members.

The role of the State Council The State Council comprises the SLSQ President and the six Branch Presidents. As the voting members of SLSQ, its duties include electing the Board and Life Members, and approving changes to the constitution. Representing the interests of the six branches, and ultimately the clubs, the Council met on three occasions throughout the year.

Attendance NAME

POSITION

MEETING ATTENDANCES

Mark Fife OAM

President

11/11

Michael White

Deputy President

8/11

Darrin Bragg

Director of Finance

11/11

Laurie Murphy

Director

10/11

Kaitlyn Akers

Director

11/11

Tanya O’Shea

Director

10/11

Amanda Lawson

Director

5/6

Warwick Agnew

Independent Director

11/11

The role of the Board and Committees

Code of conduct

SLSQ’s Board and Committee structure is critical to ensuring volunteer representation in key decisions and strategic planning. The various committees outlined on page 56 were established by the Board to assist SLSQ in the operational management of the volunteer members. Where necessary, the Board can establish special purpose committees and panels to oversee the management of projects, programs or other initiatives.

Nominees for Director positions are required to agree to SLSQ’s ‘Code of Conduct’ for Directors. Candidates must sign their acceptance to comply with this code on their nomination form. The Code of Conduct is contained within the Directors’ Handbook, which is provided to all Directors upon their election at the Annual General Meeting.

The primary function of the Board is to govern and provide leadership to SLSQ, members, affiliated branches and clubs in accordance with the aims and strategic objectives of SLSQ, its constitution, and the law. The Board is responsible for acting on all issues in accordance with SLSQ’s objectives. It operates for the benefit of SLSQ, its members and the wider Queensland community.

At the commencement of each Board meeting, the Chair asks for Directors to declare conflicts of interest in any agenda items.

The role of Directors and management SLSQ’s CEO is tasked with managing the day-to-day business requirements of SLSQ, under the direction of the Board. The President is the nominated head of SLSQ and the SLSQ Board is responsible for the appointment of a CEO to manage and administer the organisation. The CEO is accountable to the Board and reports to the Board at each meeting. The CEO ensures the resolutions of the Board are properly and efficiently carried out, and transacts all business of SLSQ between Board meetings and general meetings of the Council.

Independence

The Council may elect up to two Independent Directors each year. Nominees for these positions shall be endorsed and recommended to the Council by the Board.

Independent advice SLSQ’s Board and management are assisted in aspects of its operations with external advice. Our auditors, BDO, conduct an annual audit, providing the Board with independent assurance and advice on financial management matters. Other consultants engaged by SLSQ in 2017/18 include: • AccessEAP (employee welfare and support) • Capital Talent (IT personnel providers) • CCIQ (HR and corporate advocacy and advice)

Board composition

• Clubs Queensland (licensed club operations)

SLSQ’s Board comprises the President, the Deputy President, the Director of Finance, four Directors, one Independent Director and the CEO, who is a non-voting member. A Director must be a member of SLSQ, and Independent Directors may or may not be individual members of SLSQ.

• Community Sports Management (government liaison)

Board meetings and access to management

• Ian Fullagar (legal services)

The Board meets as often as is deemed necessary in every calendar year for the dispatch of business. At any time, five Directors may ask the CEO to convene a meeting of the Board and, subject to SLSQ’s Constitution, questions at any meeting are decided by a majority of votes by the Board of Directors.

12 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND

• David D’Arcy Pty Ltd (Industrial Relations Advocate) • GPP Consulting (strategic planning and advisory services) • The Grants Guru (grant applications) • Hall Computing (IT services) • Jardine Lloyd Thompson Australia Pty Ltd (insurance advice and services) • Sports Marketing Australia (sporting guidance) • Surety IT (IT consultants) • WattsNext (human resources services)


HUMAN RESOURCES The past season proved to be another milestone year for Human Resources (HR) at SLSQ, with a number of positive programs and initiatives rolled out around the state. The department continues to work closely with key staff in all regions to support SLSQ and its broader vision of saving lives. Key achievements across the past 12 months include: • The 2017-2020 Human Resources Support Plan was drafted and finalised, providing an overarching framework for sustained departmental growth and development in the years to come; • More than 50 per cent of all HR policies were reviewed, signedoff, released, and reaffirmed with staff; • The Employee Performance Review tool, and supporting materials, were reviewed, updated, and implemented across the organisation; • A Whistleblower Policy and Procedure was developed and implemented; • A concerted effort was made to significantly reduce paperwork across the hiring process, ensuring that costs, time, and wastage are minimised. This saw an increase in the use of SLSQ’s website for access to new starter and induction documents, an increase in the use of electronic contracts, and a greater focus on e-communication over traditional mailing methods; • The majority of SLSQ employees, including management, completed further Policy Awareness and Behaviour training; • SLSQ’s first online pre-start induction program was developed, and is scheduled for piloting in August 2018; • The Employee Assistance Program continued to provide vital support to all staff members following a successful transition from a manager-referral process to self-referrals; • The second Succession Planning Workshop was conducted; • On-boarding processes were reviewed and refined further to streamline and continually improve effectiveness for new starters; • Work commenced to expand the use of SLSQ’s Human Resource Information System (ROCKFAST) and Employee Kiosk (known as ESKi), with leave processing and recruitment management modules to be activated in 2018; • Position descriptions continued to be reviewed and updated across the organisation, improving role clarity and accountability; • The health and wellbeing of staff remained a priority, with a number of programs and initiatives facilitated across the year; and • SLSQ worked closely with new and expecting parents to develop flexible and supportive workplace solutions for both parties, where possible. In addition, the ‘Surf Babies’ booklet was developed to engage with staff set to embark on parental leave.

Staff snapshot In 2017/18, SLSQ encompassed 554 staff members including permanent, part-time, and contract positions. In total, 30.5 per cent of employees this season were female, compared with 69.5 per cent male.

Recruitment and retention The recruitment and retention of staff at all levels remains a key focus area for SLSQ, with a number of new roles developed and appointed across the past 12 months. This saw the HR team work in consultation with departmental heads and front-line managers to identify, engage, and induct employees with a diversified set of skills and qualifications. In 2017/18 SLSQ successfully hired 88 new employees, excluding lifeguards. As part of this process, the HR department managed a total of 1,052 candidates and conducted 199 interviews and telephone screenings. On average, it took eight days from advertising a new position to offering a role, and approximately 21 days for a new hire to commence employment. In addition, the retention of staff across SLSQ remains relatively high, with approximately 3.4 per cent turnover in permanent employees recorded this year, and a further 8.7 per cent turnover in casual staff.

Workplace Volunteer Program SLSQ’s Workplace Volunteer Program (WVP) grew from strength to strength this season, providing members of the public with unique opportunities to directly contribute to our cause by donating their time, experience, and/or expertise. At its core, the WVP focuses on matching the skills and interests of volunteers from outside of the surf lifesaving movement with relevant and appropriate projects within SLSQ. A total of 589 volunteers were registered and/or donated their time across the past season, ranging from interns and work experience students through to corporate professionals. Collectively, they donated 2140 hours of their time, working across a variety of projects and events including the annual Heli Ball, SOS Week Appeal, SLSQ’s Awards of Excellence, Christmas gift wrapping, and the Westpac Helicopter Race Day Fundraiser, amongst others. This year the program was supported by a targeted marketing plan, developed and rolled out to engage with semi-retired, corporate, and student volunteers. This saw a strong increase in participation numbers across these core demographics and it is hoped this continues into 2018/19. Since its launch three years ago, the program has seen a total of 863 volunteers collectively donate more than 4,728 hours to assist SLSQ, at a value of approximately $214,237

The HR internship at Surf Life Saving Queensland has provided me with an array of opportunities, which have allowed me to enhance my skills and abilities. As a HR intern working in a large non-profit organisation, I have been provided with a range of experience, valuable professional development and an excellent foundation for my future career. Throughout the duration of my internship, I provided assistance with various tasks, including: conducting interviews, database management, corresponding with volunteers and creating job advertisements. These tasks have been very beneficial to broaden my understanding and knowledge about the HR processes within Surf Life Saving Queensland. I would highly recommend this internship to anyone who is seeking an opportunity to gain valuable skills and experience in Human Resource Management, whilst supporting the values of the organisation. MOLLY KEYES SLSQ intern

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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LIFESAVING SERVICES 389,012 Volunteer Patrol Hours

11,275 First Aid Treatments by Volunteer Surf Lifesavers

1,178 Rescues by Volunteer Surf Lifesavers


LIFESAVING OPERATIONS The past season proved to be another busy year for SLSQ and its members, with more than 21 million people flocking to Queensland beaches. Collectively, the ‘red and yellow army’ of volunteer surf lifesavers and professional lifeguards combined to perform 701,973 preventative actions, treat 35,257 first aid patients, and directly save the lives of 2,865 people through in-water rescues. These efforts ensured that Queensland recorded one of the safest summer holiday periods in its history, with zero beachrelated drownings recorded between 1 December 2017 and the recommencement of school on 23 January 2018. There were also zero drownings between SLSQ’s red and yellow flags in 2017/18, reinforcing the crucial service that surf lifesavers and lifeguards continue to deliver across the state. In addition to record crowds, there were a number of other challenges across the season, with surf lifesavers and lifeguards forced to contend with periods of heavy swell, dangerous conditions, and significant water movement. When coupled with semi-regular sightings of sharks, crocodiles, and marine stingers, it prompted a significant number of beach closures across the season. In total, beaches were closed for a total of 9,159 hours in 2017/18, up from 7,331 hours the year before, highlighting the importance of effective beach management, proactive patrolling, and preventative actions to keep people safe in and around the water. The 2018 Commonwealth Games also created a number of flow-on challenges for SLSQ, as thousands of international and domestic tourists descended on the Gold Coast. A wide range of new and extended services were rolled out ahead of the Games, ensuring there were zero drownings and minimal incidents recorded. From an organisational perspective, the past season saw SLSQ continue to build upon its blackspot program and increase aquatic safety at identified high-risk areas across the state. A number of key initiatives were introduced and/or expanded upon as SLSQ continued to work towards its overarching vision of ‘Zero preventable deaths in Queensland public waters.’

16 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND

BLACKSPOT INITIATIVES Each year SLSQ strives to expand its reach along Queensland’s coastline and implement positive programs to reduce drowning deaths. As part of this process, the organisation collects and analyses data on a range of aquatic incidents to help identify any particular ‘high-risk’ locations. In September 2017, SLSQ identified five stretches of coastline that warranted a more targeted approach to safety. These blackspots are outlined below, in order of priority, along with the strategic initiatives introduced in 2017/18.

North Queensland – Green Island • SLSQ worked closely with Cairns Regional Council, Queensland Parks and Wildlife, and other key stakeholders to install a permanent lifeguard tower on Green Island; • Regular services were boosted across 2018, with lifeguards integrating trials of unmanned aerial vehicles (drones) into daily operations to assist with patrols and beach management; • SLSQ continued to build on the success of its multilingual Surf Speak booklet, and began development of an interactive Surf Speak app; • SLSQ continued its welcoming service at Cairns Airport during peak periods to greet inbound passengers and provide them with water safety information; and • Development commenced on a multilingual water safety video to be rolled out next season on the ferry to Green Island.

Gold Coast – Surfers Paradise (Tower 33-35) • The launch of SLSQ’s Harbour Town Surf Crew program in December 2017 significantly increased coastal safety at Surfers Paradise and surrounding beaches; • Dusk patrols at Surfers Paradise were expanded during peak periods, with surf lifesavers stationed on-site until 10:30pm on weekends and public holidays; • Jet ski services were boosted during peak times; • Free surf safety ‘pop up’ clinics were delivered across summer, providing an avenue for lifesavers to directly engage with thousands of beachgoers; • Surf safety information was provided to nearby hotels, accommodation providers, and tourism agencies; and


• Surf safety posters and coasters were supplied to pubs, clubs, and restaurants to educate local residents and tourists about the dangers of swimming while intoxicated.

Sunshine Coast – Noosa River to Double Island Point Headland • SLSQ’s existing services were reviewed and modified to ensure that Waverunner 19 roving jet ski patrols were adequately covering the southern end of the blackspot; • A permanent storage facility was secured at Rainbow Beach to house vital patrol and rescue equipment; • A surf safety flyer was developed in consultation with Queensland Parks and Wildlife Services for distribution with all camping and beach-access permits; • An emergency response beacon and coastal camera trailer was developed for rollout in 2018/19; and • SLSQ reviewed and upgraded signage on the emergency beacon near Noosa North Shore to make it easier to identify and understand.

Sunshine Coast – Peregian to Sunshine Beach • Roving jet ski patrols were expanded during peak periods and school holidays; and • SLSQ’s existing services were reviewed and modified to ensure that Waverunner 18 roving jet ski patrols were adequately covering the stretch of coastline from Peregian to Noosa Main Beach.

Gold Coast – Marina Mirage to South Stradbroke Island • All jet skis operating within the area were equipped with first aid kits; • SLSQ boosted its roving jet ski services to effectively manage an influx of beachgoers during the Christmas school holidays and Commonwealth Games; • Remote and proactive surveillance was conducted via SLSQ’s coastal cameras; and • A number of static surf safety displays were set up at resorts within the area.

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

17


OPERATIONAL INITIATIVES SLSQ continues to solidify its reputation as the state’s peak authority on coastal and aquatic safety, building upon services at all levels in a bid to increase protection for all Queensland beachgoers and swimmers. In 2017/18 SLSQ delivered a number of key initiatives, technology, and campaigns on and off the beach in line with its overarching vision of ‘Zero preventable deaths in Queensland public waters’.

2018 Commonwealth Games A range of new and expanded initiatives were delivered on the Gold Coast this season to help safeguard the expected influx of tourists arriving for the Commonwealth Games. The operation was one of the largest in SLSQ’s history, and the culmination of extensive planning behind the scenes. Importantly, these efforts ensured there were zero drownings and minimal incidents recorded during the Games. Key services included: • Patrol hours were extended at all beaches from Southport to Burleigh, and from Kirra to Rainbow Bay. Clubs raised the red and yellow flags from 6:00am to 6:00pm, providing unprecedented coverage during this time; • SLSQ’s dawn and dusk services were expanded, with surf lifesavers stationed at Surfers Paradise until 11:00pm on peak days, while two patrol crews roved between Southport and Miami beaches from 4:00am each day; • Duty Officers and SLSQ’s State Operations and Communications Centre operated from 6:00am to 6:00pm each day; • The Australian Lifeguard Service increased its manpower at Tallebudgera Creek and Southport Broadwater; • SLSQ’s 24/7 emergency response groups were placed on standby for the entire duration of the Games to ensure that lifesavers were in a position to respond immediately to any after-hour emergencies;

distributing surf safety information and teaching international guests how to protect themselves in the water; • An extensive marketing and communications campaign was undertaken to strategically spread surf safety messaging; • SLSQ worked closely with Gold Coast City Council lifeguards to integrate services where possible; and • Surf lifesavers worked with a number of international teams and athletes upon their arrival to equip them with aquatic safety knowledge and skills.

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles From the beach to the sky, SLSQ continues to embrace new technology to boost coastal safety across the state. During the past season, SLSQ conducted extensive trials of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to test their effectiveness and durability across patrol, search, and rescue scenarios. In the state’s far north, UAV trials were also conducted to review their ability to identify and monitor crocodile activity. To date, six SLSQ pilots have completed certification through the Civil Aviation Safety Authority to fly sub-25kg UAVs, while a further six pilots have completed non-accredited training to fly smaller UAVs in North Queensland.

Mobile beacons In 2018 SLSQ developed and rolled out two mobile emergency response beacons and coastal cameras on the Sunshine Coast. The innovative, Australian-first technology was specifically designed to boost safety at unpatrolled and/or high-risk beaches. The cameras allow provide SLSQ with an opportunity to monitor blackspots around-the-clock, while the beacons can be activated by members of the public if a beachgoer is in immediate danger. SLSQ will continue to build upon this technology moving forward, with the aim of expanding it into to other regions across the state.

• Additional helicopter and jet ski patrols were rolled out during the Games;

Fraser Island

• SLSQ’s community awareness teams provided a strong presence on the beach and within the Athletes’ Village,

SLSQ continued to focus on proactively increasing safety at Fraser Island this season, following a number of potential Irukandji stings

My family and I moved to the Sunshine Coast from Sydney, and I had just left my Army career of 22 years. After moving closer to the coast, we wanted to get our kids involved in surf safety and there was no better way than to join our local surf club at Sunshine Beach. Along with getting my children into Nippers, I also decided to volunteer by gaining my Bronze Medallion. This became an ongoing commitment, and I gained all the qualifications I could to eventually become the Club Captain after three years of patrolling. I felt I had served my country for so long, how could I best serve my local community? Lifesaving was the answer for me. Recognition of my award at a national level was truly an honour and a great way to further my message to the community about surf and water safety. Being involved in the SLSA Board Committee also gave me a better understanding of the policies and processes of SLSA and the involvement in the state organisations. SCOTT SUMMERS – SUNSHINE BEACH SLSC 2016/17 Queensland and Australian Surf Lifesaver of the Year

18 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND


in recent years. From 27 December 2017 to 28 January 2018, SLSQ conducted multiple stinger drags on the western side of the island, from Moon Point to Wathumba. SLSQ also engaged with campers, boaters, swimmers, and other beachgoers, providing them with vital information on marine stingers and beach safety. SLSQ is appreciative of Hervey Bay VMR for its assistance with transporting lifeguards to and from Fraser Island.

Other key initiatives In addition to its targeted blackspot initiatives, SLSQ also delivered a number of other services across the season to increase safety at all public waterways. These included: • SLSQ’s third annual Coast Safe Report was released in September 2017 to highlight drowning and aquatic safety trends on Queensland beaches and all inland public waterways; • Designated patrol hours were extended across the state during peak holiday periods to cater for an increased number of beachgoers; • SLSQ representatives attended various Queensland Government-led forums, including roundtable discussions on crocodile management and school-based water safety programs; • Etty Bay SLSC transitioned across to digital radios, ensuring that all clubs are now operating under the same radio network and linked in with SLSQ’s State Operations and Communications Centre; • Aerial patrols via the Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service were increased both during and immediately after extropical cyclone Linda; • SLSQ maintained its network of coastal cameras, now totalling 47, at selected beaches and high-risk areas across the state; • Night operations training was regularly conducted on the Gold and Sunshine Coasts in conjunction with the Queensland Water Police; • Dawn patrol services on the Gold Coast continued to operate 365 days a year, as did SLSQ’s State Operations and Communications Centre; • SLSQ’s recommendations from the Reef Safety Roundtable were implemented into Queensland’s dive industry standards; • Lifeguard services continued at Tallebudgera Creek, Southport Broadwater, and Paradise Point during peak holiday periods; • SLSQ continue to work with both local and state governments via its seat on the Local Disaster Management Group and State Disaster Coordination Group, with the organisation placed on standby to assist during ex-tropical cyclone Linda; and • SLSQ continued to operate a dedicated phone number, available 24/7, for emergency service agencies to request urgent assistance.

BRISBANE LIFESAVING SERVICE SLSQ’s Brisbane Lifesaving Service continues to provide a vital service to Queensland communities while, at the same time, supporting a number of surf clubs across the state with additional patrolling members. In 2017/18, the service’s 60 members combined to perform more than 1,381 patrol hours at various beaches including Rainbow Bay and Bilinga.

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

19


COASTAL RISK MANAGEMENT As the state’s peak advisory body on coastal safety, SLSQ continues to work with councils and land managers to conduct public safety risk assessments on beaches and inland waterways across Queensland. A number of aquatic audits were conducted in 2017/18 with positive outcomes. This included audits at the following locations: • Fraser Island (western side); • Platypus Beach (Pioneer River); and • North Stradbroke Island (Frenchman’s Beach, Deadman’s Beach, and surrounding headland areas).

DANGEROUS MARINE CREATURES SLSQ continues to play a leading and proactive role in the management of dangerous marine creatures including sharks, crocodiles, and marine stingers. This sees SLSQ work closely with a range of key stakeholders each year including surf life saving clubs, local governments and councils, tourism operators, and the general public to educate and protect Queensland beachgoers. SLSQ leads the Marine Stinger Prevention and Awareness Strategies on behalf of the Queensland Government. In addition, SLSQ plays a key role in estuarine crocodile management, working closely with the Department of Environment and Heritage Protection, and sits on the North Queensland Community Advisory Group for Crocodile Management. Meanwhile, SLSQ representatives work with the Queensland Government to help protect swimmers from sharks, with the organisation an active member of the Shark Marine Advisory Group on the Gold Coast.

LIFESAVING ASSISTANCE FUNDS Queensland Fire and Emergency Services (QFES) Vital funding from QFES continues to ensure that SLSQ has the resources and equipment to save lives along Queensland’s coastline. This season QFES provided funding across several key areas: • Lifesaving Services Development Fund: QFES Sustainability and More Beaches Under Guard Grants. These enable SLSCs and branches to make an application for lifesaving equipment to sustain and expand beach patrols; • Volunteer Marine Rescue Support Package: This includes funding for all clubs and branches to maintain current services across Queensland; • Regional Development Fund: Funding is provided to improve beach safety services for Queensland communities north of the Sunshine Coast; and • Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service: This funding helps SLSQ provide a dedicated search and rescue helicopter service in SEQ.

Federal Government Blackspot Funding In 2017/18, a number of SLSQ projects were successful in receiving Federal Government blackspot funding. These included: • Mobile emergency response beacons and coastal cameras were developed and rolled out at high-risk locations on the Sunshine Coast; • The production of an instructional video showing surfers how to perform aquatic rescues;

20 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND

• The Harbour Town Surf Crew program was launched on the Gold Coast to engage with, and educate, beachgoers about surf safety; • SLSQ boosted services and significantly increased its lifesaving presence across the Gold Coast leading into, and during, the 2018 Commonwealth Games; and • Surf safety was boosted on Green Island in North Queensland following the installation of a permanent lifeguard tower, and the continued development of SLSQ’s multilingual Surf Speak booklet.

Other funds SLSQ is also grateful for support received through grants from other organisations across the year, which have allowed the organisation to increase and expand upon its service delivery around the state. These include: • Cory Charitable Foundation; • Flannery Family Foundation; • John Villiers Trust; and • Surf Life Saving Foundation, Grant Seeking Unit.

FUTURE PRIORITIES Each year SLSQ reviews its existing services to determine the best strategies for saving lives and eliminating drowning deaths moving forward. As a result of this review, the following priorities have been identified for 2018/19: • Expand upon existing UAV trials and operations, with a particular focus on high-risk and/or unpatrolled areas; • Increase organisational focus on, and investment in, public safety at inland aquatic waterways via SLSQ’s blackspot program; • Sustain focus on blackspot identification and mitigation strategies along Queensland’s coastline; • Proactively focus on the research and development of innovative lifesaving technologies; and • Build upon SLSQ’s coastal and aquatic safety auditing program.

SLSQ LIFESAVING SERVICES QUALITY ASSURANCE SLSQ has been certified under the Australian Quality Management Standard 9001:2015 for the provision of professional lifeguard services, operations support (including, but not limited to, rescue water craft, rescue boats and communication centres), helicopter surveillance and rescue services (for SLSQ and police operations), the support of club patrol services, community awareness programs and coastal risk assessments. This provides the communities in which we operate with the assurance that services meet current and future requirements, while ensuring that lifesaving services remain a clear leader in aquatic safety and rescue services. (Certification Number – QEC22945).


ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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AUSTRALIAN LIFEGUARD SERVICE QUEENSLAND 23,982

First aid treatments performed by ALSQ lifeguards

623,903 Preventative actions performed by ALSQ lifeguards

1,687 Rescues by ALSQ lifeguards


The Australian Lifeguard Service Queensland (ALSQ) is the professional lifeguard arm of SLSQ, providing vital aquatic safety services to a variety of governments, councils, and land managers across the state.

• ALSQ worked with Cairns Regional Council and other key stakeholders to install a permanent lifeguard tower on Green Island, significantly increasing safety at the identified blackspot;

In 2017/18 ALSQ was comprised of 369 lifeguards, including 37 permanent staff and nine supervisors. Collectively, the team boasts 1,529 years of experience between them, and more than 1.52 million career patrol hours.

• Lifeguards continued to trial UAV technology for use with patrols and crocodile management;

As the largest provider of professional lifeguard services in Queensland, ALSQ operates at 80 locations across the state including beaches, lagoons, and creeks. Many of these sites are actively patrolled 365 days of the year, supporting SLSQ’s overarching commitment to saving lives and reducing drowning deaths. On and off the beach, ALSQ continues to set an international benchmark in the provision of lifeguard services through nationally-accredited training, highly-skilled and experienced staff, and continued best practice operations. Each year lifeguards are required to undertake regular fitness testing and professional development to ensure they maintain and enhance their patrol and beach management capabilities. This season ALSQ lifeguards combined to perform 623,903 preventative actions, treat 23,982 first aid patients, and rescue 1,687 swimmers in distress.

Key achievements and developments Across the past season, ALSQ continued to build upon its existing services, trial new lifesaving equipment, and roll out new initiatives in a bid to increase safety along Queensland’s coastline. Some of the key achievements and developments from 2017/18 include: • Queensland lifeguards continue to set a national benchmark when it comes to aquatic safety. This was evident when Sunshine Coast senior lifeguard Max Pettigrove was recognised with the industry’s top individual honour, named SLSA’s Australian Lifeguard of the Year in 2017;

24 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND

• Nine ALSQ lifeguards were trained and accredited across the year as UAV pilots, including three in South East Queensland and six in North Queensland; • Services were boosted at Tallebudgera Creek and Southport Broadwater during the Commonwealth Games to cope with an expected influx of beachgoers; • A lifeguard service is now operational at Discovery Beach 365 days of the year; • ALSQ celebrated 25 years of partnership with Gympie Regional Council and Redland City Council; • Roving patrols continued to operate at Double Island Point, Moreton Island, and Noosa North Shore during peak periods; • Lifeguards provided water safety for the individual and team triathlon events at the Commonwealth Games; • ALSQ extended its lifeguard service contracts with the Noosa Shire and Sunshine Coast Councils for a further five years, and its contract with Mackay Regional Council for a further three years; • Lifeguards provided first aid and water safety services at the 2018 Queensland Surf Life Saving Championships on the Sunshine Coast; • ALSQ continued to integrate its patrols with the Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service, with six lifeguards now qualified as crewmembers; and • Lifeguards continued to provide a Safety Ambassador Service at South Bank Parklands to proactively engage with parents, and encourage them to supervise their children.


COUNCIL/CORPORATION

YEARS OF SERVICE

YEAR COMMENCED

BEACHES/AREAS PATROLLED

FAR NORTH QUEENSLAND REGION LIFEGUARD SERVICES Douglas Shire Council

29 years

1989

Four Mile Beach

Cairns Regional Council

29 years

1989

Holloways Beach, Yorkeys Knob Beach, Ellis Beach, Palm Cove, Trinity Beach, Clifton Beach, Bramston Beach, Kewarra Beach, Esplanade Lagoon

Cassowary Coast Regional Council

23 years

1995

Etty Bay, North Mission, Mission Beach

Queensland Parks and Wildlife

3 years (previously with Cairns Regional Council)

2015

Green Island

23 years

1995

Forrest Beach

28 years

1990

The Strand Net 1, The Strand Net 2, The Strand Water Park, Alma Bay, Picnic Bay, Horseshoe Bay

15 years

2003

Balgal Beach, Riverway Lagoon, The Strand Rock Pool

7 years

2011

Pallarenda

Burdekin Shire Council

26 years

1992

Alva Beach

Whitsunday Regional Council

10 years

2008

Horseshoe Bay (Bowen)

27 years

1991

Harbour Beach, Lamberts Beach, Eimeo Beach

25 years

1993

Sarina Beach

26 years

1992

Emu Park Beach, Yeppoon Beach

23 years

1995

Agnes Water Beach

26 years

1992

Tannum Sands Beach

Bundaberg Regional Council

26 years

1992

Moore Park Beach, Oaks Beach, Kelly’s Beach, Elliott Heads Beach, Nielsen Park Beach

Fraser Coast Regional Council

26 years

1992

Torquay Beach

NORTH QUEENSLAND REGION LIFEGUARD SERVICES Hinchinbrook Shire Council

Townsville City Council

Mackay Regional Council

WIDE BAY CAPRICORN REGION LIFEGUARD SERVICES Livingstone Shire Council Gladstone Regional Council

SOUTH EAST QUEENSLAND REGION LIFEGUARD SERVICES Noosa Shire Council

6 years

2012

Noosa West, Noosa, Sunshine, Sunrise, Peregian, North Peregian, Noosa North Shore (roving)

Sunshine Coast Council

6 years

2012

Coolum North, Coolum Beach, Yaroomba, Boardwalk, Marcoola, Discovery Beach, Mudjimba, Twin Waters, Maroochydore, Alexandra Headland, Mooloolaba, Mooloolaba Spit, Buddina, Wurtulla, Currimundi, Dicky Beach, Kings Beach, Bulcock Beach, Golden Beach, Kings Pool

Gympie Regional Council

25 years

1993

Rainbow Beach

Moreton Bay Regional Council

23 years

1995

Woorim Beach

City Parkland Services (South Bank)

26 years

1992

Streets Beach Lagoon

Redland City Council

25 years

1993

Cylinder Beach, Main Beach, Adder Rock, Wellington Point

Council of the City of Gold Coast

5 years

2013

Paradise Point, Southport Broadwater, Tallebudgera Creek

10 years

2008

Double Island Point

3 years

2015

Noosa North Shore

9 years

2009

Moreton Island

Non Local Government Areas

I first started lifeguarding around 1985. I was in the surf club and was helping the lifeguards one day with a few recues at Noosa, and they suggested that I should consider giving it a go a bit further down the track. I only had my Bronze Medallion and First Aid qualifications at that point, but I ended up working towards it. You have to start at the bottom to begin with but I eventually worked my way up, got more days on the beach, gained more experience, and it’s gone on from there. I was stoked to be recognised as the Lifeguard of the Year, but we all work together as a team and it’s hard to single anyone out. We’re always helping each other, and always supporting each other. MAX PETTIGROVE – ALSQ SENIOR LIFEGUARD 2016/17 Queensland and Australian Lifeguard of the Year

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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WESTPAC LIFESAVER RESCUE HELICOPTER SERVICE 431

Helicopter surf patrols

54

Preventative actions

20

Lives saved


Since its inception in 1976, the Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service (WLRHS) has developed into one of SLSQ’s core assets when it comes to saving lives and reducing drowning deaths across South East Queensland. The service has performed some 10,000 missions over the past 42 years and directly saved the lives of more than 850 swimmers in distress. Today, the WLRHS is a full-time service, operating 365 days of the year and providing coastal surveillance and aerial support to surf lifesavers, lifeguards, and other emergency service agencies as required. In 2017/18, the WLRHS was comprised of 20 professional staff including five full-time air crew, six lifeguards, eight pilots, and one administration assistant. The service also encompassed a further 20 highly-trained volunteer surf lifesavers, including six air crew and 14 rescue crew. The service continues to support SLSQ’s overarching vision of ‘Zero preventable deaths in Queensland public waters’, and rolled out extended patrol services during peak holidays and periods of dangerous surf over the past 12 months. The training, bravery, and efforts of pilots and crew have seen the WLRHS build upon its reputation as one of the world’s leading aerial search and rescue services.

Key achievements and developments: • The WLRHS continued to work with the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA), surf life saving clubs, media outlets, Sunshine Coast Council, the Council of the City of Gold Coast, and industry bodies to advocate for increased safety around drones;

• A concerted focus on skills maintenance and development saw staff and volunteer crew successfully complete a wide range of courses including fitness and helicopter underwater escape training. In addition, a number of pilots attended Safety Investigation Courses; • A new full-time air crewman was appointed on the Gold Coast; • David O’Brien was approved by CASA to fulfil the roles of Deputy Chief Pilot and Head of Training and Checking, while pilot James Orrom was appointed as Safety Officer; and • The WLRHS worked with QPS to name SLSQ-owned Polair 2 as ‘Brett A Forte’. ACTIVITY

LS45

LS46

TOTAL

Preventative actions

28

26

54

Rescue support

14

9

23

Searches

28

43

71

Rescue incidences

5

7

12

Patients rescued

10

10

20

18,686

17,223

35,909

Beach surveillance

LIFESAVING EXCELLENCE AWARDS The professionalism, training, and bravery of pilots and crew continued to be recognised across the season, with a number of Lifesaving Excellence Awards presented in 2017/18. Awards were presented for:

• Increased aerial patrols were conducted on the Gold Coast leading into, and during, the 2018 Commonwealth Games to significantly boost coastal safety and effectively manage an expected influx of beachgoers;

• The outstanding rescue and recovery of a female near Hells Gates at Noosa on 4 November 2017;

• The WLRHS continued to work closely with the Queensland Fire and Emergency Services, the Queensland Police Service (QPS), and the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) to provide search and rescue services during times of need;

• The successful night-time rescue of a father and his three children near Sovereign Island on 25 November 2017;

• Extended aerial patrols were conducted across south east Queensland during peak holiday periods to support the onbeach efforts of surf lifesavers and lifeguards; • The service continues to benefit from increased integration with the Australian Lifeguard Service, with six SLSQ lifeguards now fully-qualified as rescue crew; • All southern Gold Coast patrols were expanded this season to include Fingal Head and Dreamtime beaches in northern New South Wales, following a number of incidents and drownings in recent years; • The inaugural High Flyers Club was launched in 2017 to provide additional opportunities for corporate partners and members of the public to support the lifesaving work of the WLRHS; • A Memorandum of Understanding was signed with the Queensland Water Police regarding WLRHS involvement in search and rescue operations moving forward; • A new contract was signed with AMSA, covering WLRHS taskings; • The WLRHS received approval from CASA as a Training and Checking Organisation; • Six new volunteer crewmen were recruited to commence training as Rescue Crew;

28 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND

• The successful rescue of two males at South Stradbroke Island on 5 November 2017;

• The successful rescue of two female hikers at Mount Cougal National Park on 26 November 2017; • The outstanding rescue of a young female from a dangerous rip between Mudjimba and Marcoola on 17 December 2017; and • Assistance rendered in the relocation of an injured female at Granite Bay near Noosa on 22 January 2018.

POLAIR For the past six years, the WLRHS has successfully operated two Polair helicopters on behalf of the Queensland Police Service (QPS). This relationship helps SLSQ build safer communities across Queensland, and broadens the organisation’s experience and expertise within the aviation industry.


ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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COMMUNITY AWARENESS 224,068 People reached via community awareness initiatives

31,262

Multicultural participants in SLSQ’s On The Same Wave program

32,728

People reached through SLSQ’s Harbour Town Surf Crew Program


Each year SLSQ introduces new and extended services along Queensland’s coastline to protect swimmers and reduce drowning deaths. Importantly, these front-line initiatives are supported by a concerted effort behind-the-scenes to save lives through education and prevention. In 2017/18 SLSQ broadened its educational focus to include messaging around all public waterways. In addition to promoting beach safety, SLSQ delivered programs on dam, river, creek, waterfall, and snorkelling safety. In total, SLSQ directly engaged with 224,068 men, women, and children about aquatic safety, equipping them with potentially life-saving skills and awareness.

Achievements Some of the key achievements from 2017/18 include: • In December 2017 SLSQ launched its inaugural Water Safe Week, with surf lifesavers travelling to lakes, dams, rivers, lagoons, and waterfalls across South East Queensland to educate members of the public about aquatic safety; • An extensive community awareness campaign was developed leading into the Commonwealth Games to educate tourists and athletes about beach safety; • The Harbour Town Surf Crew program was launched on the Gold Coast, providing vital opportunities for surf lifesavers to engage with beachgoers about water safety; • SLSQ worked with the British Consulate leading into The Ashes to educate members of the ‘Barmy Army’ about aquatic safety; • SLSQ increased its involvement in the Federal Government’s ‘Sporting Schools’ program to include additional coaches and school-based activities; • The Community Awareness team attended a number of key events across the year to spread surf safety messaging including the Gold Coast 600, festivals, and school fetes; • The award-winning Little Lifesavers program was expanded to include an additional program at Orion Lagoon in Springfield. The success of this trial has resulted in three programs planned for 2018/19; • SLSQ worked with the Clontarf Foundation in Cairns to train 14 young Indigenous students to Bronze Medallion standard, with thanks to funding from the John Villiers Trust; • SLSQ partnered with Preston Hire Racing to help spread the surf safety message; and

32 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND

• SLSQ worked with the Mantra Group to display beach safety information within the foyer of various hotels, and deliver safety presentations at Mantra conferences.

COMMONWEALTH GAMES In 2018 SLSQ delivered a range of targeted community awareness initiatives during the Commonwealth Games to educate tourists and athletes about beach safety. This included: • Surf lifesavers were stationed at the Gold Coast airport during peak times to provide tourists with surf safety information upon arrival; • ‘Don’t Drink and Swim’ collateral was developed and distributed to venues within the various Games’ precincts, with similar safety messaging featured on taxis; • SLSQ engaged with thousands of tourists via its Harbour Town Surf Crew program; • Surf lifesavers were positioned within the Athletes’ Village to engage with competitors about beach safety; and • An educational surf safety video was produced and shown to a number of international teams and their supporters.

KEY EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS Water Safe Week In December 2017, SLSQ launched its inaugural Water Safe Week to highlight the potential dangers associated with swimming at publicly-accessible and unpatrolled rivers, dams, creeks, waterfalls, and lagoons. As part of the initiative, surf lifesavers travelled to various waterways across South East Queensland and directly engaged with 1,096 people about aquatic safety. These efforts were underpinned by an awareness campaign, WATERSAFE: Know the Dangers, encompassing an engaging video series and extensive online information.

Harbour Town Surf Crew In December 2017 SLSQ launched the Harbour Town Surf Crew program and car on the Gold Coast. Using a dedicated red and yellow surf vehicle, lifesavers are stationed at Surfers Paradise during peak periods to proactively engage with beachgoers and deliver free beach safety clinics.


The program directly reached 32,728 beachgoers in its inaugural year, and was made possible thanks to the generosity of Harbour Town and Federal Blackspot Funding.

On The Same Wave Each year SLSQ’s On The Same Wave program educates thousands of people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds about beach safety. In 2017/18 surf lifesavers visited a number of schools, community groups, and multicultural events where they distributed safety information in more than 25 languages. In total, the program engaged with 31,262 potential beachgoers this season. SLSQ thanks the Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships, the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services, and The University of Queensland for their support of this vital initiative.

Little Lifesavers The Little Lifesavers program has developed into one of SLSQ’s most popular water safety initiatives since its inception in 1993. A total of 657 children were taught vital skills and water safety awareness through the program in 2017/18. This year also saw the continued growth of SLSQ’s Little Lifesaving Legends, which is specifically tailored for children with physical, emotional, or social challenges. In total, 48 participants were involved in the program this season. SLSQ acknowledges the support of the South Bank Corporation, Brisbane City Council, Cairns Regional Council, Council of the City of Gold Coast, Ipswich City Council, Redland City Council, and Sunshine Coast Council.

Breaka Beach to Bush Each year Breaka Beach to Bush sees qualified surf lifesavers travel to remote and rural communities across Queensland to educate primary school students about water safety. The program equips its young participants with the skills and awareness to manage their own safety in and around the water. In 2017/18, the Beach to Bush initiative visited 64 schools and directly educated 5,939 students. SLSQ thanks Breaka for its ongoing support of the Beach to Bush initiative.

Queensland Health Beach Safe Schools Program The Beach Safe Schools Program was developed to educate primary and high school students about surf safety, dangerous marine creatures, and the importance of sun safety. This season the program visited 169 schools and directly educated 41,497 students. SLSQ thanks Queensland Health for its vital support of this initiative.

Airport welcoming services In 2017/18 surf lifesavers returned to the Sunshine Coast and Cairns airports at peak periods to greet arriving passengers and present them with multilingual safety messaging in 15 languages. Collectively, this program provided 20,992 domestic and international tourists with crucial surf safety information. SLSQ acknowledges the support of the Sunshine Coast Airport and Cairns Airport for their continued support of these important initiatives.

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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MEMBERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

3.85% Growth in Membership

10,797 Nippers

9,120 Active Patrolling Members


Behind the scenes, SLSQ continues to implement a range of diverse programs focusing on the recruitment, retention, and development of volunteer members across the state. This delivered positive results for the organisation in 2017/18, with SLSQ recording strong membership growth for the second consecutive year. This season, SLSQ’s membership across 58 clubs and six branches surged to 32,291 volunteers, reflecting an annual increase of 3.85 per cent when compared to 31,093 members in 2016/17. This continues a recent upwards trend, and represents the first time since 2012 that total membership has exceeded 32,000. The increase was underpinned by strong growth across a number of categories, including junior activities members (six per cent), award members (nine per cent), and associate members (six per cent). Most importantly, the past year also saw SLSQ record the highest number of active patrolling members in its history, with 9,120 volunteers keeping watch over Queensland beaches this season. Moving forward, the development of retention strategies remains a core focus area for the organisation. In 2017/18, for the second straight year, SLSQ collected and extensively analysed data on retention trends across the surf lifesaving movement. This information will be used to help shape SLSQ’s membership development strategies and programs in the years to come.

KEY PROGRAMS Junior Activities The past season saw 10,797 youngsters participate in SLSQ’s junior activities program across the state, representing a healthy six per cent increase when compared to 10,219 members in 2016/17. Junior members now account for 33.4 per cent of SLSQ’s total membership base, highlighting their importance to the long-term sustainability of the surf lifesaving movement in Queensland. With thanks to support from Breaka, SLSQ’s junior members across the state were again recognised at a grassroots level this season

36 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND

through ‘Breaka Nipper of the Week’ awards. These were presented in each branch across the season to young members displaying SLSQ’s core values. During the season, SLSQ’s regional development officers visited the majority of clubs across Queensland to provide on-the-ground support and assistance with the delivery of their junior activities programs. Importantly, SLSQ continues to focus on inclusivity and, in 2017/18, 15 clubs delivered specialised Nippers programs for children with physical, social, and emotional challenges. Looking ahead, in 2018/19 SLSQ will officially celebrate the 50th anniversary of its iconic Nippers program in Queensland. In addition to reflecting on the past half-century, the anniversary also provides SLSQ with a pertinent opportunity to review what structures and strategies are needed to ensure sustained growth and development in the years to come.

Pathways Project Now in its third year, SLSQ’s Pathways Project continues to highlight the diverse opportunities available to new and existing members within the surf lifesaving movement. The project supports the recruitment and retention of volunteers at all levels, and will be built upon in the seasons to come.

DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS The UQ SLSQ Leadership Excellence Program Once again SLSQ partnered with The University of Queensland (UQ) to deliver the Leadership Excellence Program on 24-26 November 2017. The annual initiative seeks to develop the communication, teamwork, and management skills of future leaders within the movement. In total, 39 participants converged on UQ’s St Lucia campus along with four leaders, two mentors, and four coordinators. SLSQ thanks UQ for its continued support of this membership initiative.


National Leadership College

SLSQ member app

A number of Queensland’s top young surf lifesavers attended the National Leadership College in Sydney from 4-10 February 2018. The annual program continues to provide personal and professional development opportunities for emerging leaders across SLSQ. The Queensland delegates were Andrew Mendes (Surfers Paradise), Ann-Sophie Sullivan (Point Lookout), Courtney Taylor (Currumbin), Fletcher Ericson (Elliott Heads), Harry Crosthwaite (Redcliffe), Joel Tomasoni (Mermaid Beach), and Natasha Wilkinson (Emu Park). In addition, Jamie Findlay (Bundaberg) and Will Hagan (Point Lookout) attended as facilitators, while Michael White (Alexandra Headland) returned as a mentor.

In 2017/18, SLSQ launched its inaugural smartphone app, marking a significant shift in the way the organisation engages with its broad and diverse membership base. Developed as part of the Membership Sustainability Project, the new app provides SLSQ with an avenue to communicate directly with members across all regions and clubs. Initial feedback has been extremely positive, and SLSQ will continue to build upon this platform in the years to come.

Awards of Excellence Almost 300 surf lifesavers, guests, and VIPs attended the annual Awards of Excellence Gala Ball at The Star on 26 August 2017. Overseen by SLSQ’s membership development team, the evening sought to recognise the efforts and achievements of Queensland’s surf lifesavers and lifeguards across the previous 12 months. A full list of award winners can be found on page 58.

Membership Sustainability Project SLSQ continued to work towards its Membership Sustainability Project in 2017/18, with a number of initiatives developed and implemented across the season: • SLSQ collected extensive data on volunteer retention trends, which will assist with building and developing member engagement strategies;

MEMBER WELFARE AND PROTECTION SLSQ continues to prioritise the welfare and protection of all members, regardless of their age, location, gender, ethnicity, and/ or sexuality. With that in mind, SLSQ regularly reviews its strategies, policies, and practices to ensure they align with government legislation and SLSA policies. Throughout the year SLSQ continued to advocate the Child Youth Risk Management Strategy within clubs and branches to operate in line with the Working with Children (Risk Management and Screening) Act 2000. The organisation also strictly adheres to SLSA’s Member Protection Policy, and works closely with the Public Safety Business Agency on ‘working with children’ checks (Blue Cards). Additionally, SLSQ’s Peer Support Program continues to provide support for members during times of distress. An additional 23 members completed peer support training in 2017/18, taking the total number of qualified officers up to 66.

• The Family Participation Program was rolled out again this year to help clubs engage with nipper parents and encourage them to step into volunteer roles on and off the beach; and • SLSQ continued to develop the Patrol Gap Calculator to assist with active member management across all regions.

I started surf lifesaving in 2009 and never looked back. I began as a little Green Cap, playing on the beach each Sunday morning and, as I worked my way up through the years, I found myself receiving my Surf Rescue Certificate and patrolling Eimeo Beach. I now plan to get my Bronze Medallion. There are many aspects of surf lifesaving that I love; I love learning new skills, helping people and, most importantly, having fun. My proudest moment in lifesaving, other than winning the Junior Surf Lifesaver of the Year for Queensland, was my first branch competition in Under-9s. I wasn’t as good as some of the other competitors, the sea was rough, and the swim was challenging. But I told myself I could do it and I came out in 9th place. I ran up to my dad and gave him a big high-five and a hug. Personally, the best part about winning the Junior Surf Lifesaver of the Year award is that it’s allowed me to have a leadership role in my surf club. It has allowed me to feel confident in myself and I try to use that to help make other kids feel confident. One of the best parts about helping someone, is having that feeling of accomplishment when you see them get over a fear. I love seeing the smiles of their faces when they accomplish a goal. BRIANNA BAKER – EIMEO SLSC Brianna was named SLSQ’s Breaka Under-14 Junior Surf Lifesaver of the Year for 2016/17

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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SURF SPORTS

4,814 Athletes at SLSQ championship events

1,582

Competitors at SLSQ’s Masters and Open Championships

1,625 Nippers at SLSQ’s Youth Championships


The past season saw SLSQ focus on developing and delivering a range of competitive sporting opportunities for members of all ages, abilities, backgrounds, and locations across Queensland. These efforts continued to pay dividends, with thousands of surf lifesavers diving in to compete across the year, from nippers and social competitors through to elite athletes and world champions. The benefits of a strong and vibrant sporting program are numerous and wide-reaching. Surf sport not only encourages a healthy and active lifestyle choice amongst members, it also supports the recruitment and retention of surf lifesavers across all levels of the movement. Additionally, unlike any other sporting code in the world, the underlying purpose of our competition is to improve and refine lifesaving skills and, ultimately, feed back into SLSQ’s vision of reducing drowning deaths. In 2017/18 there was a concerted focus on boosting regional competition and grassroots participation while, at the same time, solidifying SLSQ’s position as a leader in sports development.

Queensland Endurance Championships A total of 568 lifesavers dived into the Queensland Endurance Championships at Tweed Heads and Coolangatta SLSC on 23 September 2017. Noosa Heads and Alexandra Headland tied for first place on 166 points, ahead of Kurrawa (135 points) and Southport (131 points).

Laerdal Queensland Surf Rescue Championships The Laerdal Surf Rescue Championships saw 143 surf lifesavers line up across two days of competition at Bundaberg SLSC on 17-18 February 2018. Alexandra Headland (87 points) took out the event, with Northcliffe (63 points) and Maroochydore (45 points) rounding out the podium. SLSQ thanks Laerdal for its continued support.

Queensland Board Riding Championships

SLSQ thanks the Queensland Government (Sport and Recreation Services) for its valued support of our sporting programs, and its support of Queensland clubs via the ‘Get in the Game’ initiative.

Coolum Beach played host to 144 competitors at the Queensland Board Riding Championships from 12-14 January 2018. Sunshine Coast clubs made the most of the local conditions, with Alexandra Headland (118 points) taking the win ahead of Noosa Heads (80 points) and Kawana Waters (32 points).

QUEENSLAND CHAMPIONSHIP EVENTS

Queensland Youth Surf Life Saving Championships

Queensland IRB Championships The Queensland IRB Championships were held at Kawana Waters on 1-2 July 2017, attracting a field of 284 competitors. Kurrawa (68 points) took out the event ahead of Broadbeach (57 points) and North Burleigh (49 points).

Queensland Pool Rescue Championships The Queensland Pool Rescue Championships were held across two days, from 22-23 July 2017, at the Gold Coast Aquatic Centre. In total, 468 lifesavers lined up to compete, representing a 28 per cent jump when compared the previous year. Northcliffe (520 points) took the top honours ahead of Currumbin (466 points) and Maroochydore (294 points).

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A total of 1,625 young competitors lined up at the 2018 Youth Championships, held at Alexandra Headland over three days from 2-4 March. Gold Coast’s Currumbin ended a 20 year drought, finishing on 303 points to prevail ahead of Northcliffe (237 points) and Maroochydore (224 points).

Queensland Surf Life Saving Championships The state’s top athletes converged on Maroochydore and Mooloolaba across three days from 16-18 March to contest the 2018 Queensland Surf Life Saving Championships. Northcliffe ended the competition on 421 points to claim its 14th consecutive title at the event, with Alexandra Headland (381 points) and Currumbin (291 points) rounding out the podium. In the masters event, Alexandra Headland (427 points) prevailed ahead of Mooloolaba (341 points) and North Burleigh (331 points).


OTHER SPORTING EVENTS

SPORTS DEVELOPMENT

Fastest Man on Sand

In 2017/18 SLSQ continued to focus on building and enhancing development programs at all levels across the state. This included a number of key initiatives targeting athletes, coaches, and officials.

Queensland’s top beach sprinters lined up over three rounds this summer to contest SLSQ’s Fastest Man on Sand series. In total, 1,004 athletes competed across the series, with Alexandra Headland (723 points) taking the top honours ahead of Kurrawa (456 points) and Currumbin (258 points).

Interbranch Championships The Interbranch Championships were held across two days, from 24-25 November 2017, at Nobbys Beach and Miami Aquatic Centre. The Sunshine Coast Branch (1,043 points) claimed overall honours for a tenth straight year, with the South Coast Branch (893 points) and Point Danger Branch (711 points) completing the top three.

North Australian Championships More than 350 competitors lined up at Mackay from 3-5 November 2017 to contest the annual North Australian Championships. Cairns (1,067 points) won its eight consecutive title at the event, prevailing ahead of Tannum Sands (952 points) and Port Douglas (453 points).

The University of Queensland Secondary School Surf League The annual series saw hundreds athletes line up across six regional competitions during the season, culminating in the UQ Secondary School Surf League Championships at Mooloolaba on 11 May 2018. Gold Coast’s Palm Beach Currumbin High School (313 points) won this year’s title ahead of Sunshine Beach State High School (145 points) and Assisi Catholic College (116 points). SLSQ thanks The University of Queensland for its continued support.

Interstate Championships Each year the Interstate Championships provide Queensland athletes with an opportunity to represent their state in elite-level competition as part of the Cyclones team. In 2017 the Queensland Cyclones won the Interstate IRB and Pool Rescue Championships. When coupled with their previous results across the ocean and surf boat competition, it saw Queensland win the Alan B Whelpton AO Perpetual Shield as the best performing state in 2016/17. SLSQ kicked off its title defence in 2017/18 with a second place finishes at the Interstate Ocean and Surf Boat championships. Congratulations are extended to all athletes who were selected to represent Queensland across the season.

• A total of 12 athlete development clinics were rolled out at various locations across the state including Cairns, Townsville, Mackay, the Sunshine Coast, and the Gold Coast, attracting 486 participants; • SLSQ linked with some of Queensland’s elite athletes to deliver a series of clinics in Townsville and Mackay. This included an open ski clinic with Bonnie Hancock and Luke Cuff, a pool rescue clinic with Prue Davies and Matthew Davis, and a beach sprint clinic with Bree Masters; • SLSQ worked with other states to deliver the Youth Pathways Cup in NSW, a new event specifically designed to provide competitive and pathway opportunities for athletes aged under-14 and under-15; and • SLSQ filmed its second season of the Surf Sports TV web series to provide athletes, coaches, and officials with key information on a variety of topics including high performance preparation, anti-doping procedures, and social media management.

REVIEWS IRB racing investigative review In 2017, the SLSQ Board commissioned an internal review into IRB racing across Queensland following a number of competitor injuries in recent years. The review sought to examine, and subsequently recommend, any potential ergonomic, procedural, and/or other reforms to IRB racing that were not already covered under existing policies. A total of 21 recommendations were put forward for implementation over the coming seasons.

Surf sport review Moving forward into 2018/19, SLSQ has committed to conducting an extensive review into its sporting strategy and programs in a bid to increase participation and engagement across all key events. The review will involve considerable consultation with clubs, athletes, officials, and the wider surf lifesaving membership to help build SLSQ’s suite of sporting events and further develop its competitive program.

Ocean Roar IRB Series SLSQ’s Ocean Roar Series provides IRB crews across the state with additional competitive opportunities over the winter months. This year saw rounds held at Alexandra Headland, Coolangatta, Rainbow Beach, and Kirra. Kurrawa (335 points) took out this year’s series, successfully defending its title ahead of North Burleigh (317 points) and Broadbeach (229 points).

Surf boat competition Surf boat competition continues to gain momentum, with Queensland crews regularly lining up in the Navy Surf Boat and Queensland Cup series. A number of crews also ventured interstate to compete in the ASRL Open, Ocean Thunder, and other key carnivals.

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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QUEENSLAND CYCLONES TEAMS 2017 Queensland Cyclones IRB Team Andy Kelckkoven (North Burleigh) Spencer Moncrief (North Burleigh) Aiden Holloway (North Burleigh) Nathan Fife (Broadbeach) Darcy Abbott (Broadbeach) Matthew Gardner (North Burleigh) Tim Minnett (Alexandra Headland) Timothy Burgess (Broadbeach) Ben Domeraki (Kirra) Isaac Nation (Kirra) Belinda McAuliffe (Kirra) Brooke Ward (North Burleigh) Sarah Cartwright (North Burleigh) Mikaela Rawlings (North Burleigh) Rizu Sawaki (Broadbeach) Samantha Thornton (Alexandra Headland) Sonita Leng-Cole (Alexandra Headland) Alicia Baired (Alexandra Headland) Team Management: Manager – Bronwyn Champness (Alexandra Headland) Assistant Manager – Cathie Palmer (North Burleigh) Coach – Adam Barbour (North Burleigh) Assistant Coach – Andrew McAuliffe (Kirra)

2017 Queensland Cyclones Pool Rescue Team Under-14: Kai Watson (Northcliffe) Connor Peabody (Kurrawa) Madeline Allars (Northcliffe) Jessica Oates (Maroochydore) Under-15: Will Taylor (Northcliffe) Sebastian Younan (Northcliffe) Tahlia Dilkes (Northcliffe) Jaimie Cotter (Maroochydore) Under-17: Hayden Cotter (Maroochydore) Jacob Loughan (Currumbin) Summer Short (Maroochydore) Harmana Williams (Maroochydore) Under-19: Tom Montgomery (Currumbin) Toby Wilson (Northcliffe) Rachel Eddy (Currumbin) Maggie Dowker (Currumbin)

Open: Matt Davis (Currumbin) Sam Bell (Maroochydore) Liam Ryan (North Burleigh) Prue Davies (Currumbin) Mariah Jones (Tweed Heads and Coolangatta) Rebecca Pegg (Currumbin) Team management: Manager – Steven Fry (Northcliffe) Coach – Craig Holden (Elliott Heads) Assistant Coach – Danny Short (Maroochydore) Medical – Bonnie Hancock (Kurrawa)

2018 Queensland Cyclones Ocean Team Youth team: Bay Wildin-Snedden (Kurrawa) Brielle Cooper (Kurrawa) Electra Outram (Noosa Heads) Ruby Nolan (Sunshine Beach) Tiarnee Massie (Maroochydore) Taylor Stickler (Kurrawa) Jordan Sergis (Northcliffe) Jy Timperly (Currumbin) Jackson Collins (North Bondi)* Ky Kinsela (Currumbin) Mitch Coombes (Northcliffe) Bradley Hunt (Currumbin) Open team: Lana Rogers (Noosa Heads) Karlee Nurthen (Currumbin) Bonnie Hancock (Kurrawa) Lani Pallister (Alexandra Headlands) Amy Nurthen (Currumbin) Bree Masters (Kurrawa) Luke Cuff (Mermaid Beach) James Lacy (Mermaid Beach) Jackson Maynard (Currumbin) Jett Kenny (Alexandra Headlands) Rhys Burrows (Noosa Heads) Kieran Gordon (Currumbin) Team management: Manager – Bronwyn Champness (Alexandra Headland) Assistant Team Manager – Steven Fry (Northcliffe) Head Coach – Darren Mercer (Noosa Heads) Assistant Coach – Gavin Hill (Northcliffe) Beach Coach – Ryan Hoffman (Kurrawa) Physiotherapist - Nick Marshall (SurfLife Physio) *Selected under State of Origin rules.

2018 Queensland Cyclones Surf Boat Team Open Men – Tallebudgera Mojitos: Gary Williams (sweep) Sam McPhillips Sam Robinson Seth Philbrook Cain Hayward Open Women – Tallebudgera Kaylews: Gary Williams (sweep) Lisa Webber Kirsty Morrison Kelissa Brockett Nikki Wood Reserve Grade Men – Maroochydore Force: Michael Brooks (sweep) Troy Slade Johnny Naughton Corey Stone Chris Howell Reserve Grade Women – Coolum Chums: Patrick McGuire (sweep) Sophie Gruhl Erin Smith Phoebe Child Rachel Reiser Under-23 Men – Alexandra Headland H&H: Nick Hume (sweep) Bennett Hume Ned Archer Blake Primrose Ned Jenkinson Under-23 Women – Tallebudgera Two Strokes: Steve Purcell (sweep) Natasha Saunders Teagan McFarlane Melanie Walker Abbey Holyman Under-19 Men – Alexandra Headland H&H: Nick Hume (sweep) Hayden Tanis Mitchel Stewart Gus Archer Bailey Hume Under-19 Women – Dicky Beach Tooshies: Rob Flood (sweep) Kate Morcom Luca Sullivan Victoria Barbour Natalie Dean Team managers: Craig Williams (Tugun) Charles Melloy (North Burleigh)

42 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND


ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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EDUCATION

42,071 Units of competency delivered

13,890 People trained in First Aid and CPR


SLSQ remains focused on providing world-class training for its members and the broader community as a significant step towards saving lives through education, prevention, and awareness. The Australian Lifesaving Academy Queensland (ALAQ) is the trading name for SLSQ as a Registered Training Organisation (RTO 2804), set up to deliver lifesaving education to members and the broader community.

PUBLIC EDUCATION The ALAQ continues to equip thousands of Queenslanders each year with potentially lifesaving skills through a variety of nationallyrecognised courses including first aid and CPR training. Its goal is to transfer a century of lifesaving experience from the beach into homes, schools, workplaces, and communities across the state. Each course is designed to provide participants with the skills, awareness, and knowledge to provide basic treatment and life support following an accident or emergency situation. At its core, the ALAQ exists to support and contribute to SLSQ’s vision of saving lives. Importantly, all trainers and assessors employed by ALAQ are qualified surf lifesavers in their own right, often bringing decades of hands-on and practical experience into the classroom. Additionally, all proceeds raised through ALAQ training are invested directly back into supporting beach safety services across Queensland. In addition to public courses, targeted and tailored training solutions are also delivered to a range of industries each year including education, sport and recreation, mining, government, emergency services, and medical.

46 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND

Key highlights and developments: • The ALAQ continued to enhance its reputation as an industry expert in emergency care training, recording an increase in the number of commercial clients across the year through word-of-mouth and customer referrals; • The ALAQ partnered with the Heart Foundation to deliver a marketing and networking breakfast for existing and potential clients; • Client feedback and retention remained at a high level across the state; • Key staff continued to provide representation within various industry bodies including the Australian Resuscitation Council (Queensland Branch); • The ALAQ was invited to present at the Queensland University of Technology and the Port of Brisbane during Queensland Safety Week; • A CPR demonstration was performed for the Prince of Wales and Duchess of Cornwall during their official Royal visit to the Gold Coast during the 2018 Commonwealth Games; • A partnership with Austrade and the Council of the City of Gold Coast saw ALAQ staff and senior lifeguards travel to Nha Trang, Vietnam, to deliver advanced aquatic training to 40 professional lifeguards and a number of hotel staff; • Extensive professional development was undertaken with ALAQ trainers and assessors in line with the Standards for Registered Training Organisations 2015; and • The ALAQ was recognised as a distributor of Laerdal defibrillators.


MEMBER EDUCATION In addition to offering a variety of nationally-recognised public courses and training options, the ALAQ is also responsible for delivering effective and world-class education to lifeguards and volunteer surf lifesavers across Queensland. These efforts ensure that SLSQ patrolling members are amongst the highest-trained around Australia and the world.

Key highlights and developments: • SLSQ was the only Surf Life Saving body in Australia to apply for, and have, TAE 40116-Certificate IV in Training and Assessment included within its scope. Moving forward, SLSQ has the capacity to work in partnership with other Surf Life Saving bodies across Australia to roll-out the training interstate; • Changes to AVETMISS and VET data reporting will now see all SLSQ members benefit from having their nationallyrecognised training banked against their Unique Student Identifier (USI) transcripts; • Planning is underway to upskill more than 300 Queensland assessors in line with regulatory standards; • There continued to be a focus on streamlining processes and reducing paperwork around training course reports. These efforts, coupled with a broader transition to pre-printed booklets, have received positive feedback from members;

• SLSQ sought to re-employ an Education Development Coordinator in Townsville from 1 July 2018 onwards, tasked with delivering training across the North Queensland and North Barrier Branches. This was also made possible through VetSurge funding; • A concerted focus on skills maintenance and professional development saw a total of 17 assessor workshops delivered across Queensland at the start of the 2017/18 season, drawing attendance of more than 300. These workshops included an updated CPR course for all assessors; • An updated marine stinger training course was rolled out across North Queensland, North Barrier and Wide Bay, supported by an educational video to upskill members about stinger drags and safety; • SLSQ was involved in national discussions regarding the content of Surf Life Saving’s Certificate II in Public Safety (Bronze Medallion); • SLSQ is currently investigating a learning management system for the roll-out of the TAE upgrade based on a ‘virtual classroom’, reducing the need for volunteers to attend face-toface classes; and • Moving forward, SLSQ’s skills maintenance online assessment will be integrated into the Members’ Portal, ensuring all relevant training can be completed via the one platform with a single log-in.

• Training Officer courses recommenced, with the first two successfully delivered in 2018 after SLSQ achieved TAE40116 on scope; • With thanks to Federal Government funding through the Vet Surge project, planning commenced on the first SLSQ conference for Chief Training Officers (CTO). The conference will be held in Brisbane during August 2018, with the CTO from each club invited to attend;

I joined lifesaving as an 8-year-old nipper at Mackay SLSC. I enjoyed all aspects of lifesaving, including CPR and first aid, and Emergency Care became a particular interest for me as this was something I knew would benefit many people and organisations with the focus on saving lives. Later on in life, after working out west, I moved back and joined Sarina SLSC with my youngest girl. In the first year I coached the juniors and gained all of my certificates from the Branch Trainer. I have been training and assessing for seven years now and ,an active member at Sarina SLSC for 11 years. I am also the Trainer & Assessor Coordinator for North Barrier Branch, and have assisted clubs including Eimeo, Mackay and Sarina to meet all of their training needs for members to continually stay on top of their proficiencies. It was an honour to be named Queensland Assessor of the Year by my peers. It means a great deal to me, my family, Branch and Club; although we do this for love, it is both rewarding and encouraging to be recognised for this prestigious award. Training and assessing young and old surf lifesavers means a lot to me, especially when you hear that a person you trained and assessed has performed a successful rescue, administered CPR, and saved a life. This gives me a great deal of satisfaction and belief that what I am doing is important not only in surf lifesaving, but life in general. DAVID YOUNG - SARINA SLSC Queensland Assessor of the Year 2017

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FUNDRAISING, MEDIA AND MARKETING

$320,146 Raised for clubs through the SOS Week Appeal

$504,849 Raised for clubs through Summer Surf Girl program

$40,000 Raised through the Heli Lunch


Each year SLSQ’s army of volunteers are directly responsible for saving thousands of lives up and down Queensland’s coastline. However, it is important to acknowledge these lifesaving efforts would not be possible without the continued generosity and financial support of the communities we serve.

SLSQ acknowledges this year’s supporting partner Zupps Mount Gravatt for its generous donation of a Holden Spark as the program’s major prize. SLSQ also thanks The Star, Engine, Kracka, Mantra Hotels, Sea World, Lorna Jane, Star Outdoor, Crockford Communications, Stefan, Etiquette and Manners Australia, and IPG for their support.

In 2017/18 SLSQ secured vital funds through a variety of programs and beneficiary events, with all proceeds raised invested directly back into saving lives and protecting swimmers on Queensland beaches.

Moving forward, SLSQ’s Summer Surf Girl will be renamed the Summer Surf Program to reflect the inspirational, dedicated, and highly-skilled lifesavers who participate each year.

KEY FUNDRAISING EVENTS ‘SOS Week’ Fundraising Appeal After 13 years, SLSQ’s Surf Safe Appeal was rebranded and renamed in 2017 to SOS Week. The week-long appeal, which ran from 23-29 October 2017, encouraged Queenslanders to ‘Support our Savers’ and recognise the lifesaving work of SLSQ’s volunteers. SOS Week saw hundreds of surf lifesavers hit the street to doorknock and rattle collection tins, with all funds raised invested straight back into beach safety equipment and services. For the first time, a number of collectors were also equipped with ‘tap and go’ facilities, allowing members of the public to make a quick donation via their credit or EFTPOS cards. The Queensland Premier generously donated $50,000 to kick start the SOS Week campaign, and this was followed by donations of money and equipment from various corporate partners including Transit Australia Group, JLT, Brisbane Airport Corporation, and The Star. In total, $320,146 was raised, and SLSQ is appreciative of all corporate partners and members of the community who generously donated to our cause.

Summer Surf Girl Since its launch in 1964, SLSQ’s Summer Surf Girl has developed into one of the most long-standing and enduring fundraising initiatives in Australia. More than $16.7 million has been raised by participants across the past 54 years, providing significant financial support for clubs and lifesaving services in Queensland.

Heli Lunch More than 350 guests attended the inaugural Heli Lunch at the RNA Showgrounds on 27 October 2017, raising vital funds and awareness for SLSQ’s Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service. In total, almost $40,000 was raised through ticket sales, auctions, and raffles on the day. SLSQ wishes to acknowledge the vital support of our long-term partner Westpac, in addition to the generosity of all suppliers and partners who supported the fundraiser through the donation of prizes and auction items.

BENEFICIARY EVENTS In addition to delivering its own suite of fundraising programs, SLSQ is proud to have been named as the official benefactor of various events across 2017/18, including: • SLSQ was named as the official charity partner of the Gold Coast 600 and the Townsville 400 Supercars events, raising much-needed funds and awareness for the movement; • Volunteers provided a gift wrapping service at Harbour Town over the Christmas period, with all funds raised invested back into beach safety services; • Long-term partner Westpac held a Race Day at Doomben, with proceeds donated to the Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service; and • A special fundraiser was organised by Zupps Mount Gravatt, with proceeds of sales made donated back to SLSQ.

This year’s program saw 11 fully-qualified female surf lifesavers embark on a nine month campaign, promoting SLSQ, spreading the surf safety messaging, and raising a combined total of $504,849.48 for their respective clubs.

THE SURF LIFE SAVING FOUNDATION

Congratulations are extended to Dicky Beach lifesaver Jessica Simpson who was officially announced the 2018 Summer Surf Girl at a gala dinner in May. Coochiemudlo Island’s Chloe McGrath was named runner-up, and was also recognised with the Innovation Award for her community engagement efforts. Meanwhile, Ashlee Keen received the Highest Fundraiser award after raising more than $110,000 for Townsville Picnic Bay.

SLSQ continues to receive vital fundraising support from the Surf Life Saving Foundation (SLSF). In particular, the SLSF oversees a number of key programs across Queensland including Guardians of the Surf, workplace giving, bequests, lotteries, and grant seeking. SLSQ is thankful for the SLSF’s continued support, which helps ensure that Queensland’s surf lifesavers are equipped with the vital equipment they need to protect beachgoers.

50 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND


I joined the Summer Surf Girl program to give back to my surf club and the organisation. Surf Life Saving is the greatest volunteer organisation I can think of that is continuously supporting other people, so I thought ‘Why not?’ After being Club Captain for a number of seasons, I quickly learnt how difficult it is to efficiently run a surf club, and how much manpower and money it takes to keep our beach open to the public; to be given the opportunity to assist even in the slightest way, I couldn’t say no. The whole journey was incredible and I couldn’t have asked for a better group of girls to experience it with. When we got to the end of judging week, the whole group had gelled so nicely and we were all very close. Standing on stage next to everyone, it didn’t matter to me what the outcome was – I was just so humbled by the support of my club and the fact that we had all made it so far. That was the best feeling. It is an absolute honor to be name the 2018 Summer Surf Girl and to represent an organisation I am so passionate about. It is a great feeling knowing that all the hard work myself and my entire club put into the last season was worth it. JESS SIMPSON – DICKY BEACH SLSC 2018 Summer Surf Girl

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MEDIA AND MARKETING The past season saw SLSQ’s media, marketing, sponsorship, and fundraising activities realigned into one overarching department, ensuring a more streamlined and strategic approach to organisational communication. The new Media and Marketing Department aims to increase brand awareness and proactively promote key surf safety messaging, while working to publicly position SLSQ as the state’s peak authority on coastal and aquatic safety.

Key achievements and developments: • Extensive work was undertaken with key stakeholders to rebrand and reposition the Surf Safe Appeal as SOS Week, with positive results recorded in its first year; • Significant and positive media coverage was achieved around key campaigns including the Queensland Surf Life Saving Championships, SOS Week, Summer Surf Girl, and the start and end of SLSQ’s 2017/18 volunteer patrol season; • A standalone website was developed and launched for the Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service, providing SLSQ with additional marketing and sponsorship opportunities moving forward; • A new partnership was launched with Sea World on the Gold Coast. Amongst other benefits, this will see an interactive marine stinger and beach safety display featured as part of a new ‘Sea Jellies’ exhibit opening at the park in 2018/19; • A more strategic focus on digital communication delivered strong growth in both followers and engagement across SLSQ’s online platforms, with a 12.4 per cent increase to almost 50,000 followers; • The media team continued to operate a seven-day roster during the patrol season, with a representative stationed alongside duty officers in south east Queensland on weekends. This continued to build stronger working relationships with key stakeholders, while maximising media coverage during peak periods; • There was an increased focus on public affairs to generate media discussion and debate around key aquatic safety issues; • SLSQ worked closely with the Sunshine Coast Regional Council to maximise media, marketing, and sponsorship opportunities leading into the 2018 Queensland Surf Life Saving Championships at Maroochydore and Alexandra Headland; • Significant media coverage was secured for the Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service, highlighting numerous rescues and operations across the season; • SLSQ worked directly with clubs across the North Queensland and North Barrier Branches to develop and deliver targeted membership recruitment campaigns; • The ‘High Flyers Club’ continued to grow, with SLSQ holding the first breakfast at the Carrara Hangar in May; • The iconic Summer Surf Girl initiative was rebranded and will be renamed the Summer Surf Program moving forward; • SLSQ’s long-standing partnership with Harbour Town was expanded to include the Harbour Town Surf Crew program; and • SLSQ renewed its partnership with Westpac for a further three years, and rolled out a new three-year national partnership with Holden.

52 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND

COMMONWEALTH GAMES The eyes of the world were on the Gold Coast in April when the city played host to thousands of international athletes and tourists for the 2018 Commonwealth Games. SLSQ worked directly with event organisers in the 18 months leading up to the Games to develop, secure, and roll out a number of unique opportunities to highlight the work of Queensland’s volunteer surf lifesavers. Collectively, the Commonwealth Games developed into one of the largest media, marketing and membership engagement initiatives in SLSQ’s history, with key highlights including: • More than 500 volunteer surf lifesavers and nippers from all regions across the state were recruited to play a key role within the Opening Ceremony, broadcast to a global audience exceeding 1 billion people; • SLSQ worked with organisers of the Queen’s Baton Relay to ensure volunteer surf lifesavers across the state were highlighted and recognised for their outstanding community service and contributions; • A flotilla of inflatable rescue boats (IRBs) from all Gold Coast clubs was organised on the final day of the Queen’s Baton Relay. The convoy of almost 50 surf lifesavers and 22 IRBs, led by ironman legend Trevor Hendy, safely guided the baton onto the shores of Surfers Paradise, attracting significant national and international media coverage; and • Surf lifesaving, nipper, and CPR demonstrations were organised for the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall as part of their Royal visit to the Gold Coast. These efforts served to highlight the vital work of Queensland’s surf lifesavers, generated significant international exposure for SLSQ, and encouraged athletes and tourists to always swim between the flags. In addition, SLSQ developed a targeted marketing and media campaign leading into, and during, the Games to encourage safe swimming behaviours. Key highlights included: • A multilingual surf safety video featuring ironwoman Courtney Hancock was developed in consultation with council lifeguards, and broadcast on various airlines and public transport, in major Gold Coast shopping centres, within local businesses, and on screens within the Games entertainment precincts; • Surf safety signage was developed and displayed on taxis and public bins to highlight the potential dangers of swimming after consuming alcohol; • The exterior fencing of SLSQ’s Carrara hangar was transformed into a sea of multilingual safety messaging, reaching millions of people travelling to and from the athletics arena; • A number of social media activities were developed and rolled out, including a surf safety video filmed with the Scottish beach volleyball team; • A safety display was erected at Mantra On View to educate guests about how to protect themselves on the beach; • Surf safety advertisements were placed within Gold Coast Tourist Magazine and Infomaps, and the GC2018 Official Program; and • Surf lifesavers were positioned at the Gold Coast Airport to welcome international arrivals and present them with multilingual surf safety information. These efforts were supported by beach safety billboards within the airport.


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OUR PARTNERS Principal

Premium

Government

Community

Media

Business

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SLSQ COMMITTEES AND PANELS SLSQ Council

Life Members and Civil Honours Panel

M. Fife OAM (President), G. Boothe (North Queensland), G. Morgan (North Barrier), L. Schuch (Wide Bay Capricorn), J. Thorpe (Sunshine Coast), P. McCue (South Coast Branch), K. Hunter (Point Danger)

M. Fife OAM (Chair), N. Kelk OAM, I. Young OAM, W. Massey, R. Bartlett, S. Crichton, R. Whitmore, N. Palmer (Sec) Lifeguard Advisory Panel

SLSQ Board M. Fife OAM (President), M. White, D. Bragg, K. Akers, L. Murphy, T. O’Shea, A. Lawson, W. Agnew, J. Brennan OAM (Sec)

G. Cahill (Chair), J. March, R. Blanchard, H. Ridland, J. Davis, J. Campton, A. King, R. Drury, T. Robinson, C. Lovitt, G. Wiley, G. Hill ESM, P. Lawlor, R. Barber (Sec)

State Lifesaving Committee

Education Panel

C. Swanton (Chair), D. McLean, M. Stevens, L. Johnson, L. Messer, K. Burke, E. Thomas, J. Clark, M. Fife, G. Hill, G. Cahill, P. Lawlor (Sec)

M. Fife (Chair), A. Grant, G. Gage, K. Glithero, R. Gibb, R. Morgan, B. Doman, M. Dwyer, C. Neumann, J. Campton, K. Clark

State Surf Sports Committee

State Operations Support Panel

C. Melloy (Chair), R. Wynberg, G. Miller, B. Cremer, S. Della Bianca, A. Walker, S. Dick, D. Mathison, G. Williams, W. McLennan, D. Collins, T. Smith, D. Abel, T. Carle, S. Hogben, R. Bennett, M. Palmer, M. Sanagan (Sec)

D. McLean (Chair), J. Crockatt, A McNeily (Proxy WLHRS), C. Swanton, G. Hill ESM, N. Fife, J. Thomson, R. Melton (industry expert) J. Argent (Sec) Lifesaving IRB Advisory Panel

Administration and IT Committee

G. Tanner (Chair), T. Carle, P. Hallett, P. Reid, T. Burgess, P. Lawlor

C. Williams (Chair), T. McCulloch, A. Fry, J. McDougall, T. Duncan, N. Banner, K. Barnes, B. Kelly, J. Sparkes, M. Gerry, M. Williams, SLSA representative, K. Degnian (Sec)

Meritorious Awards and Selection Panel

Audit, Finance and Compliance Committee

C. Swanton (Chair), C. Melloy, R. Campbell, K. Phillips, J. Palmer, S. Morgan, N. Palmer (Sec)

D. Bragg (Chair), D. Cahill, A. Lawson, I. Barfoot, E. Moffatt, J. Brennan OAM, R. Murphy (Sec)

R&R Competition Panel

State Membership Services Committee

Recue Water Craft Panel

R. Campbell (Chair), T. Sealy, W. Hagan, F. Grant, K. Phillips, B. Heaney, C. Chalkey, R. Fien, B. Lofthouse, T. Draman, N. Palmer (Sec)

G. Ferreira (Chair), I. Garofolo, B. Scoffell, J. Doyle, P. Rennex, W. Harrison, M. McDonald, C. Dreyer, K. Burnes, S. Urban, D. James, D. McLean, J. Argent, M. Thomson (Sec)

Officials and Assessors Finance Committee

Coaching Advisory Panel

C. Melloy (Chair), P. Lucas, D. Mathison, J. Hamrey, S. Della Bianca, R. Griffiths, A. Seeney, M. Buttrum, K. Bostock, D. Burchill OAM, J. Paskin, B. Henshaw, C. Williams (Non-voting), S. Crichton (Sec)

C. Melloy (Sec), D. Collins, M. Palmer

Communications Panel J. Crockatt (Chair), T. Wilson, C. Paschalis, A. Johnson, N. Banner, D. McLean, J. Argent (Sec) Helicopter Operations Panel G. Hill ESM (Chair), J. Brennan OAM, P. Gibson, D. O’Brien, T. Hughes, A. McNeilly, R. Murphy, D. McLean, A. Watt (Sec) IRB Competition Panel T. Carle (Chair), M. Stevens, C. Pashalis, J. Heaton, G. Tanner, T. Burgess, S. Stephenson, S. Urban, P. Hallett, P. Reid, G. Tanner, M. Palmer (Sec) State Judiciary Committee D. Boulton OAM, R. Whitmore OAM, R. Bartlett, I. Young OAM, S. Crichton, C. Melloy, S. Finch, C. Williams (Sec) Junior Activities Panel R. Fien (Chair), R. Campbell, T. Smith, A. Rogers, J. Molony, S. Milfull, A. Cordingley, D. Love, K. Schofield, N. Palmer (Sec)

56 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND

C. Melloy (Chair), B. Heyer

Officials Advisory Panel C. Melloy (Chair), D. Mathison, B. Walsh, R. Bartlett, A. Seeney, W. Massey, K. Bostok, B. Cremer, R. Griffiths Surf Boat Panel G. Williams (Chair), P. Grayson, G. Huegil, H. Baxter, M. Brooks Sport Selection Panel C. Melloy (Chair), N. Kelk OAM, C. Law, A. Moore, M. Palmer (Sec) Sports Meritorious Awards Selection Panel C. Melloy (Chair), T. Smith, R. Wynberg, S. Della Bianca, S. Dick, S. Hogben


SLSQ LIFE MEMBERS G.B. Andrews OAM*, E.C. Avery*, J.R. Barlow*, R. Bartlett, P.J. Berigan OAM*, J.J. Betts*, K.C. Bird OAM, D. Bird*, R. Blackman*, K.F. Bostock, D.J. Boulton OAM, D. Bragg, W.J. Broadhurst*, D.W. Brockhurst*, R.A. Brumley, N.F. Bullpitt MBE*, D.S. Burchill OAM, F.E. Burke, R.A. Burrell*, R.J. Butler OAM, M.C. Buttrum, S.M. Byrnes OAM, J. Church*, M.J. Claybourn OAM*, M.A. Clyde, K.J. Collins*, P.J. Connell, B.F. Coomber*, L. Coomber, S. Costa*, T.R. Cramond AO OBE*, D. Crevola, S.L. Crichton, B.J. Crichton OAM, W.J. Daley*, W. Darwen*, R.J. Davidson OAM*, J.B. Dearlove MBE*, R.P. Devlin AM QC, V.A. Doig OAM*, A.R. Donaldson*, K.C. Dunn, T. Eldridge, C.G. Englert*, P.J. Fenner AM, M. Fife, M.A. Fife OAM, R. Findlater*, D.C. Foreman*, A.B. Frizzell OBE OAM*, J.C. Galea, R.J. Gear AM*, J.L. Gordon*, I.J. Grant OAM, J.E. Gray*, F.J. Grell, A.G. Griffiths, R.F. Griffiths, B.J. Guilfoyle, R. Halpin*, R.J. Harding OAM*, C.A. Hargrave*, W.J. Harris, K. Hart, J. Hayes, N.J. Heywood OBE, R. Holden*, C. Honey*, K.F. Hoskins OAM*, N. Howland*, D. Howlett*, D.P. Hoyland OAM, T.J. Imrie OAM, A.J. Inwood, D. Irvine*, H. Irvine, C.J. Jeanneret OAM, J.M. Jones OAM*, D.L. Johnson*, S.A. Johnson MBE*, N.T. Kelk OAM, A. Kennedy OAM*, M.J. Klingner*, D.J. Lennox, G.R. Long, P. Lucas, P.J. Madden*, M.M. Mahon, W.J. Massey, D.J. Mathison, J.G. McCarthy*, H.F. McGrath*, G.D. McKenzie OAM*, D.M. McLean ESM, W. McLennan, J.W. McMaster AM DFC*, A. McNeilly, M. McNeilly MBE, R.A. McPherson*, J.A. Menico OAM, G.S. Merry AM, M.E. Mulcahy*, J. Mullins*, C.D. Neil OAM, S.M. Neil OAM, A. Nicholson OAM*, G.F. Nicklin*, H.J. Nix*, A.G. Nixon*, W.H. Nixon OAM*, K.L. O’Connell*, S. O’Connor OAM, J.D. Ogilvie OAM, A.B. Parkyn OAM*, J. Paskin, J.C. Paterson, F.C. Payne, R. Pollard, C.D. Pratt*, G.D. Radel*, R.E. Rankin AM, C.F. Richards*, P. Roubin*, J.R. Sellars*, H. Silman*, C.G. Smith, E.J. Smith AM*, C. Sparkes, M.D. Stevens, J.H. Spencer*, J.R. Spender OBE*, J.J. Stewart*, J.B. Sunner, R.C. Tallon OAM*, C.E. Taylor*, C.J. Taylor OAM*, J.C. Taylor OAM, M.R. Taylor*, G.J. Terrell*, R.J. Thomas, B.R. Thorne, F.O. Venning*, B.L. Walsh, M.A. Webb OAM*, H.J. Weimer*, P.J. White, R.T. Whitmore OAM, P.J. Whitty, S.T. Wilcox OAM*, B.F. Wilkes*, A. Williams*, C.M. Williams, B.D. Williamson OAM, J.A. Williamson AM, J.R. Winders OBE*, S.W. Winders MBE*, N.S. Woodroffe*, R. Wyeth, I.J. Young OAM, R. Zillman* *denotes deceased

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AWARD WINNERS 2017/18 AWARD WINNERS

• 2018 Queensland Youth Surf Life Saving Championships – Curumbin

Clive Hammond OAM Silver Medal

• 2018 Queensland Surf Life Saving Championships – Northcliffe

• North Queensland – Graeme Boothe (Ellis Beach) • North Barrier – Dennis Di Bartolo (Townsville Picnic Bay)

• 2007 Queensland Masters Surf Life Saving Championships – Alexandra Headland

• Wide Bay Capricorn – Gail Williams (Tannum Sands) • Sunshine Coast – Santo Della Bianca (Alexandra Headland)

2018 Summer Surf Girl

• South Coast – Philip Chipman (Mermaid Beach AEME)

• Summer Surf Girl – Jessica Simpson (Dicky Beach)

• Point Danger – Jared Clark (Pacific)

• Runner-Up – Chloe McGrath (Coochiemudlo Island) • Innovation Award – Chloe McGrath (Coochiemudlo Island)

Operations Support Awards

• Highest Fundraiser – Ashlee Keen (Townsville Picnic Bay)

Gold Coast: • Operations Support Person of the Year – Scott Burgess • Duty Officer of the Year – Brent Imrie • SurfCom Operator of the Year – Rob Snart • Rescue Water Craft 1 – Chris Damic • Rescue Water Craft 3 – Scott Burgess • Rescue Water Craft 4 – Stephen James • Rescue Water Craft 5 – Sonya Karlsson • Rescue Water Craft 6 – Kelvin Richdale • Rescue Water Craft 7 – Nicolas Offroy • Rescue Water Craft 8 – Keith Weinert Sunshine Coast: • Operations Support Person of the Year – David James

2016/17 AWARD WINNERS* • U14 Junior Lifesaver of the Year – Brianna Baker (Eimeo) • U18 Junior Surf Lifesaver of the Year – Harriet Grant (Cairns) • U18-25 Young Surf Lifesaver of the Year – Hayley Bowers (Pacific) • Surf Lifesaver of the Year – Scott Summers (Sunshine Beach) • Volunteer of the Year – John Hamrey (Bilinga) • Clive Hammond OAM Gold Medal – Scott Summers (Sunshine Beach) • Lifeguard of the Year – Max Pettigrove • Club of the Year – Ellis Beach

• Duty Officer of the Year – David James

• Andy Frizzell OAM, OBE Award for Services to Junior Activities – Jenny Jones (Etty Bay)

• SurfCom Operator of the Year – Allan Davidson

• Operations Support Person of the Year – Scott Summers

• Rescue Water Craft 12 – Michael Broadbent

• Assessor of the Year – David Young (Sarina)

• Rescue Water Craft 14 – Don Fuller

• Trainer of the Year – Courtney Taylor (Currumbin)

• Rescue Water Craft 15 – Mark Pickering

• Youth Development Club of the Year – Mermaid Beach AEME

• Rescue Water Craft 16 – Oliver Charkow

• Junior Athlete of the Year – Lucas Miller (Northcliffe)

• Rescue Water Craft 17 – Alastair McGregor

• 15-18 Youth Athlete of the Year – Toby Wilson (Northcliffe)

• Rescue Water Craft 18 – Doug Gould

• Athlete of the Year – Harriet Brown (Northcliffe)

• Rescue Water Craft 19 – Steven Crisp Wide Bay Capricorn: • Operations Support Member of the Year – Wayne Ahrens • Rescue Water Craft 30 – Wayne Ahrens

• Masters Athlete of the Year – Alison Pegg (Noosa Heads) and Lee Vrolyks (Northcliffe) • Rookie Coach of the Year – Vincent Jason (Alexandra Headland) • Coach of the Year – Craig Holden (Elliott Heads)

Sports Club Champions

• Rookie Official of the Year – Peter Keen (Townsville Picnic Bay)

• 2017 Queensland IRB Championships – Kurrawa

• Official of the Year – John Braddick (Townsville Picnic Bay)

• 2017 North Australian Championships – Cairns

• Team Manager of the Year – Craig Law (Sunshine Beach)

• 2017 Queensland Pool Rescue Championships – Northcliffe

• Team of the Year – Open Patrol Competition Team (Alexandra Headland)

• 2017 Queensland Endurance Championships – Noosa Heads and Alexandra Headland • 2018 Laerdal Queensland Surf Rescue Championships – Alexandra Headland • 2018 Queensland Board Riding Championships – Alexandra Headland

58 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND

• President’s Cup – Alexandra Headland • Community Education Program of the Year – Seahorse Nippers, Bundaberg region * These awards were announced at SLSQ’s 2017 Awards of Excellence Gala Dinner, after the 2016/17 Annual Report was produced and tabled.


Peter Whitty, Col Neil OAM, Sue Neil OAM, Grahame Long, and Darrin Bragg

Hayley Bowers, 2016/17 Young Surf Lifesaver of the Year

Harriet Brown, 2016/17 Athlete of the Year

Sam Archer and Greg Craven

Courtney Taylor, 2016/17 Trainer of the Year

Michael Hart, Charlie Schwerkolt, Clint Swanton

Ian Stewart, Scott Summers, Mark Fife OAM

Jayke Menefy, Lifesaving Excellence Award recipient

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59


LIFESAVING EXCELLENCE AWARDS • Logan Specht, Joseph Addison, and Bronte Hartland for the successful rescue of two male swimmers at Point Lookout on 1 July 2017; • Anthony Gibson for the successful resuscitation of a female beachgoer at Seventeen Mile Rocks on 1 September 2017; • Anna Black for the outstanding rescue of a male swimmer at Grasstree Inlet, Sarina, on 4 September 2017; • Jamie Findlay and Riley McGregor for after-hours emergency assistance at Elliott Heads River on 20 September 2017; • Jack McNeil, Carter De Wild, and Tim Marchintor for the lifesaving resuscitation of a 65-year-old male who collapsed near Tallebudgera Creek on 4 October 2017; • Senior Sargent Kyle Bates, Senior Constable Murray Lyons, and Senior Constable Luke Watkins for their assistance with the retrieval of a deceased female in treacherous conditions at Hell’s Gate, Noosa, on 4 November 2017; • Tim Mandeville, Trevor King, James O’Connor, Shane Baird, James Orrom, Richard McHugh, Jacob Thomson, David McLean ESM, Damian Hopkins, David Gleeson, Sue Della Bianca, Allan Davidson, James Orrom, Richard McHugh, and Shane Baird for their outstanding assistance with the retrieval of a deceased female in treacherous conditions at Hell’s Gate, Noosa, on 4 November 2017; • Shannon Kurz, Paul Brennan, and Jared Clark for the successful rescue of two males from a rip off the coast of South Stradbroke Island on 5 November 2017; • Olivia Emanuel, Josh Jones, and Isaac Smith for the rescue and resuscitation of a 23-year-old female in treacherous seas 600 metres north of Sunshine Beach on 5 November 2017; • Luke O’More, Paul Brennan, and Scott Andrews for the successful night-time rescue of a father and his three children who had become stranded on their jet ski north of Sovereign Island on 25 November 2017; • Kristian Clarkson, Paul Brennan, and Kathryn McKenzie for their efforts in rescuing two female hikers missing in Mount Cougal National Park on 26 November 2017; • Zac Orchard, Michaela Henderson, Nathan Gray, Stewart Duffy, Brie Huxley, Kai Burness, and Jackson Donovan for the successful mass rescue and first aid treatment of up to 30 people at Surfers Paradise on 26 November 2017; • Sam Groom, Telissa Hansford, Caitlyn Pape, Kiraly Groom, Tony Groom, Robyn Groom, Cassandra Hansford, and Lynne Messer for their involvement in the search and rescue of a 20-year-old female approximately 550 metres south of Moore Park on 3 December 2017; • Emma Finnis for the successful rescue of a 66-year-old male swept out to sea at Kellys Beach on 9 December 2017;

• Lachlan Lansdown, John Reeves, David James, Brad Corby, Allison Johnstone, and Steven Boyd for the outstanding rescue and resuscitation of four swimmers in treacherous seas at an unpatrolled stretch of coast at Alexandria Bay on 24 December 2017; • Ashley Carriage for his bravery in rescuing three men in distress at Fraser Island in December 2017; • Darren Everard and Joanne D’Emilio for the successful rescue of four people at Hervey Bay on 4 January 2018; • John McGregor and Riley McGregor for the outstanding after-hours rescue of four Taiwanese tourists who were caught a rip near Kellys Beach on 15 January 2018; • James Orrom, Brett Dorrington, and Corey Jones for assistance with the removal and relocation of a female from Granite Bay to the Queensland Ambulance Service on 22 January 2018; • Levi Jubb, Craig Angel, Emma Angel, and BJ Fretwell for the successful rescue and resuscitation of a Papua New Guinean male found face down in the water at Mooloolaba on 26 January 2018; • Nirvana Le Roux, Cherise Kern, and Piper Dunne for the outstanding after-hours rescue of a male surfer from dangerous conditions at Coolum Beach on 10 February 2018; • Will Abbot for his involvement in the rescue of two swimmers near Palm Beach on 17 February 2018; • James Cervi for bravery and heroism demonstrated in the successful rescue of three swimmers in treacherous conditions near Granite Bay at Noosa Heads on 18 February 2018. As an off-duty lifeguard, James put himself in harm’s way to keep a female beachgoer afloat and above water for more than 20 minutes before assisting her onto nearby rocks. • Bruce Stewart and Robert McIntosh for the successful off-duty rescue of two female beachgoers struggling in the surf roughly 50 metres offshore at Kurrawa Beach on 11 February 2018; • Jack Mohr and Aurelia Donger for the outstanding rescue of a female beachgoer caught in a strong rip and challenging conditions at Peregian Beach on 18 February 2018; • Jack Moore, Cooper Miskell, Liam Albertson, Chris Maynard, and Bailey Williams for the outstanding rescue of four Chinese tourists during the Queensland Surf Life Saving Championships at Maroochydore Beach on 17 March 2018; • Damien McLuskie, Belinda Connolly, Dee Pascoe, Lucy Boyd, Mark Leon, Tracey King, and Kirsty Glithero for the rescue and treatment of two young beachgoers at Yeppoon Main Beach on 30 March 2018; • David Westby and Oliver Meyer for the successful rescue of two teenagers who were swept 100 metres out to sea in a strong rip at Frenchman’s Beach on North Stradbroke Island on 7 April 2018;

• Scott Bird, Marc Kuypers, and Dicky Beach SLSC Patrol Group 9 for their efforts in rescuing four distressed female swimmers south of Moffat Beach on 9 December 2017;

• Peter Hopley, Mark Quinlivan, James McManis, Madelin Gallagher, Carol Lockwood, Janina Cook, Ian Florence, Jay Sanderson, Josh Cunnington, Evie Nocher, Gordon Lockyer, and Caleb Thomas for their outstanding vigilance and service in dealing with three major incidents at Coolum Beach on 8 April 2018;

• Troy Muller, Tim Piper, Sam Hoppe, and Thomas Martin for the outstanding rescue of an elderly gentleman and his granddaughter swept out to sea by a strong rip outside of the flags at Miami Beach on 10 December 2017;

• Kaitlyn Akers, Jake Fallis, Robert O’Neal, Ryan Veitch, Dominic Russo, Aaron Larson, Ian Warburton, and David James for the successful mass rescue of a group of ocean swimmers from difficult conditions at Mudjimba on 22 April 2018;

• James Orrom, George Levett, and Andrew Mills for the successful rescue of a young swimmer caught in a rip between Mudjimba and Marcoola on 17 December 2017;

• Susan Ahmelman (Surf Life Saving Foundation) for going above and beyond to support SLSQ and its clubs with applications for project and equipment funding; and

• Gabe Sobczyk and Dylan Chapman for the successful rescue of a 15-year-old female and her mother after they were swept out beyond the break at Miami Beach on 17 December 2017;

• Surf Life Saving Foundation’s Grant Seeking Unit for its outstanding efforts and involvement in assisting SLSQ and its clubs obtain the vital funding required to protect Queensland beaches.

60 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND


ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

61


STATISTICS, RESULTS AND FINANCIALS


WIDE BAY CAPRICORN BRANCH

Yeppoon Emu Park Tannum Sands Agnes Water Moore Park Bundaberg Elliott Heads Hervey Bay

M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F

TOTAL Rainbow Beach Noosa Heads Sunshine Beach

SUNSHINE COAST BRANCH

Coolum Beach Marcoola Mudjimba Maroochydore Alexandra Headland Mooloolaba Kawana Waters Dicky Beach Metropolitan Caloundra Bribie Island Redcliffe Peninsula TOTAL

M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F

35 33 30 30 50 60 11 22 12 11 294

3 2 5 4 7 7 2 4 3 2 39

6 2 8 8 22 13 4 6 3 3 75

12 12 33 16 54 28 18 14 11 7 205

20 30 14 18 26 40 10 13 1 172

6 3 4 6 3 7 2 7 2 40

-

-

-

4 2 13 6 12 2 11 3 1 2 56

1 7 8

1 1

1 1

8 10 4 1 1 3 10 9 46

1 4 2 3 10

95 95 115 92 185 160 58 70 40 37

11 11 61 63 43 42 19 17 64 42 22 10 34 23 462

2 4 6 14 6 12 1 4 5 6 2 4 3 11 80

1 1 8 5 7 7 3 3 2 5 6 7 1 6 62

16 13 37 22 13 16 32 18 17 10 18 14 5 7 238

1 10 29 33 37 38 8 15 30 57 12 19 16 23 328

1 2 1 1 2 7

1 1

6 6 4 1 2 1 1 1 22

1 1 1 3

8 5 15 3 17 2 11 3 1 5 3 18 2 14 8 115

5 2 12 1 1 21

-

1 3 7 11

5 4 3 5 10 3 1 5 1 3 40

1 1 1 1 4

39 44 174 141 130 121 79 70 7 4 130 125 95 72 77 86

66 80 47 49 58 66 18 9 21 17 64 68 50 44 66 76 799

9 8 3 4 8 8 4 14 13 8 4 2 7 92

5 8 10 7 9 2 4 15 9 4 5 10 15 103

36 29 28 14 28 16 6 2 7 5 37 29 13 6 38 20 314

20 30 35 50 16 26 8 13 9 15 47 69 22 39 4 6 409

8 7 3 2 2 4 6 2 5 1 3 10 6 59

24 25 1 1 51

5 3 1 1 3 13

1 2 1 4

11 2 15 1 7 1 9 3 17 2 8 3 6 2 87

1 3 2 1 2 2 1 12

-

1 1 1 1 4

14 9 4 2 18 29 15 6 1 2 100

1 3 1 1 1 7

194 199 149 130 150 151 52 33 54 50 200 201 111 109 137 134

38 33 314 305 89 86 113 85 67 57 119 109 140 148 323 273 173 167 100 123 228 195 184 135 78 96 104 84 3,966

8 5 41 29 18 20 12 19 6 2 14 14 29 34 44 43 12 25 15 11 11 19 10 12 13 13 5 4 488

13 11 38 25 14 16 13 8 15 7 14 13 23 20 52 40 25 27 17 13 31 24 19 21 17 12 4 11 543

26 17 151 71 79 31 95 54 46 16 72 40 104 66 209 136 185 97 75 48 123 56 63 26 47 27 30 16 2,006

24 45 255 316 70 88 86 102 63 73 52 86 84 113 267 319 129 194 75 103 156 211 100 140 68 78 52 75 3,424

6 5 28 33 10 6 9 26 14 11 3 19 28 13 33 40 46 20 11 6 16 13 3 4 8 1 412

33 32 1 1 1 1 69

2 3 3 1 79 40 4 23 40 1 1 2 199

1 1 1 1 1 4 2 1 1 2 2 1 1 19

13 18 1 14 3 27 1 19 4 5 4 57 4 43 4 28 3 16 1 14 2 25 2 31 2 2 1 344

2 1 84 23 16 4 36 5 2 1 1 79 18 71 31 97 24 13 4 19 7 14 6 3 1 3 1 566

3 3 2 2 1 11

42 14 1 2 1 1 17 2 2 6 2 90

4 3 13 8 1 17 5 8 2 16 13 1 91

4 2 1 3 1 1 1 5 1 8 1 2 2 32

131 120 973 844 310 254 451 324 240 173 281 286 627 457 1052 894 763 606 336 315 617 542 424 346 262 237 202 193

64 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND

Total Membership

Total per Club

TOTAL

Reserve Active

Sarina

Probationary

Mackay

Past Active

Eimeo

Non-Member

Bowen

Long Service

Ayr

Life Member

Picnic Bay

Leave/ Restricted

Arcadian

M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F

Honorary

NORTH BARRIER BRANCH

Forrest Beach

General

TOTAL

Award

Mission Beach

Associate

Etty Bay

Active Senior (18+ yrs)

Cairns

Active Junior (15-18 yrs)

Ellis Beach

M F M F M F M F M F

Active Cadet (13-15 yrs)

Port Douglas

Jnr Activities (5-13 yrs)

NORTH QLD BRANCH

MEMBERSHIP 190 207 345 128 77 947 83 315 251 149 11 255 167 163 1,394 393 279 301 85 104 401 220 271 2,054 251 1817 564 775 413 567 1084 1946 1369 651 1159 770 499 395 12,260


Non-Member

Past Active

Probationary

Reserve Active

Total per Club

115 107 33 21 194 149 96 76 193 111 73 72 172 208 167 175 128 126 155 130 224 178 228 207 3,338

11 14 4 5 6 12 11 5 29 22 10 6 11 5 19 22 8 10 9 9 11 10 10 14 273

21 15 5 2 26 24 12 11 31 35 11 11 27 26 20 16 20 8 16 16 8 14 29 22 426

35 16 9 9 119 43 74 32 122 62 65 36 128 53 122 63 102 48 43 26 111 58 114 71 1,561

115 136 5 9 161 195 67 75 95 90 64 78 174 212 165 195 99 117 79 92 127 143 214 233 2,940

34 26 2 3 20 23 3 4 3 14 5 21 28 4 20 2 17 14 10 5 1 3 262

2 1 1 1 5

5 5 12 9 7 7 1 1 3 1 6 1 2 2 1 8 21 92

1 1 1 1 6 6 1 2 3 1 2 25

13 4 5 1 26 3 22 2 17 4 16 3 15 1 28 14 3 26 19 2 17 241

21 6 1 42 2 33 1 55 18 8 4 101 26 13 8 3 21 4 71 17 48 11 514

3 1 1 5

8 5 1 8 2 4 1 6 1 23 11 70

2 2 5 9 3 1 1 2 47 17 8 9 13 7 4 3 1 2 7 5 148

2 4 1 3 5 1 4 8 2 1 4 35

382 336 71 60 622 465 330 215 596 367 277 226 685 574 551 505 379 316 366 292 591 437 697 595

143 113 81 61 161 157 158 120 101 81 46 51 49 32 53 59 33 57 143 125 52 62 1,938

6 8 12 6 8 10 14 7 10 5 4 4 5 4 6 6 11 8 5 5 144

16 15 12 15 27 8 32 28 10 8 8 3 5 15 24 25 18 22 18 12 9 5 335

84 50 49 25 80 49 124 60 82 43 15 5 39 12 48 20 69 44 85 45 30 9 5 5 1,077

67 92 26 45 95 133 66 59 56 67 49 38 25 46 51 49 35 42 97 102 42 63 1 1,346

1 3 5 27 28 2 1 4 12 12 9 11 3 1 1 3 1 1 125

-

3 1 8 12 4 1 3 3 13 2 1 51

2 1 1 1 1 1 7

13 1 9 2 35 17 20 7 27 32 15 19 1 9 3 210

24 5 4 1 7 89 10 54 4 7 1 15 2 23 3 21 4 5 3 1 283

1 1 2

1 1 2 17 7 1 4 31 2 1 67

2 3 6 3 2 3 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 4 1 4 1 39

1 1 1 5 5 4 1 1 19

361 291 203 164 416 362 559 338 340 209 132 105 157 110 240 171 213 193 447 303 159 1499 13 8

M F

2798 2478 5,276

22 197 417

405 356 761

1754 884 2,635

1975 2311 4,286

185 202 387

4 1 5

78 65 143

18 14 32

424 27 451

669 128 797

7 7

99 38 137

114 73 187

44 10 54

M F

-

3 3 6

2 1 3

20 15 35

3 3 6

2 1 3

-

-

1 1

-

-

-

2 2

2 2

-

35 23 58

M F

5,650 5,147

554 568

826 721

3,538 1,898

3,823 4,802

447 461

64 62

206 171

34 25

939 114

1,146 258

7 12

175 70

269 197

84 23

17,762 14,529

10,797

1,122

1,547

5,436

8,625

908

126

377

59

1,053

1,404

19

245

466

107

32,291

M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F

TOTAL Tallebudgera Pacific Palm Beach (QLD)

POINT DANGER BRANCH

Currumbin Tugun Bilinga North Kirra Kirra Coolangatta Tweed Heads Coolangatta Rainbow Bay Point Danger Branch

M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F

TOTAL

Gold Coast TOTAL

Brisbane Lifesaving Service TOTAL State Total Surf Life Saving Queensland

Total Membership

Long Service

North Burleigh Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park

Life Member

Miami Beach

Leave/ Restricted

Nobbys Beach

Honorary

Mermaid Beach

General

Kurrawa

Award

Broadbeach

Associate

Northcliffe

Active Senior (18+ yrs)

SOUTH COAST BRANCH

Surfers Paradise

Active Junior (15-18 yrs)

Southport

Active Cadet (13-15 yrs)

Coochiemudlo Island

Jnr Activities (5-13 yrs) Point Lookout

718 131 1087 545 963 503 1259 1056 695 658 1028 1292 9,935 652 367 778 897 549 237 267 411 406 750 308 21 5,643

8787 12,578 6791 12,578 58

32,291

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

65


LIFESAVING PATROL ACTIVITY Seabob

Rescue Board

IRB

RWC

Other

Total Rescues

Prevent Actions

Crocodiles

Sharks

Missing Persons

Spinal Injuries

Fractures

Defib Cases

Oxygen Therapy

Resus (CPR)

Minor

Major

Minor

FIRST AID TREATMENTS

Rescue Tube

CLOSURE DANGEROUS MARINE CREATURES

Without Gear

RESCUES

Port Douglas

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

776

7:20

0:00

1

-

-

-

-

-

33

-

43

Ellis Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

470

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

13

-

22

-

35

Cairns

2

-

-

-

2

-

1

5

511

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

1

-

12

-

31

1

45

Etty Bay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

657

9:16

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

38

-

41

2

81

Mission Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,175

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

-

2

BRANCH TOTAL

2

-

-

-

2

-

1

5

3,589

16:36

0:00

1

-

-

-

1

-

104

-

139

3

247

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

520

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

23

-

8

1

32

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

436

0:00

0:00

1

-

-

-

-

-

29

-

-

29

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total First Aid

First Aid

Major

Marine Stings

North Queensland 76

10

North Barrier Forrest Beach Arcadian (Alma Bay/The Strand Net 2) Picnic Bay (Magnetic Island/The Strand Net 1) Ayr

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

400

0:00

0:00

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

102

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

Bowen

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

Eimeo

-

5

-

-

-

-

-

5

743

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

Mackay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

228

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

Sarina

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

405

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

BRANCH TOTAL

1

5

-

-

-

-

-

6

2,834

0:00

0:00

1

-

-

Yeppoon

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1,818

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

Emu Park

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

155

0:00

0:00

1

-

-

-

1

-

Tannum Sands

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

3

199

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

Agnes Water

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

Moore Park

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

2

667

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

Bundaberg

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

3,856

0:00

0:55

-

-

-

Elliott Heads

1

-

-

-

1

-

-

2

2,328

0:00

0:00

1

-

-

Hervey Bay

-

-

-

12

1

1

-

14

153

0:00

0:00

2

-

BRANCH TOTAL

2

-

-

18

2

1

-

23

9,176

0:00

0:55

4

-

Rainbow Beach

1

13

-

1

1

-

-

16

453

0:00

0:31

Noosa Heads

5

12

-

24

15

2

-

58

1,330

0:00

0:00

5

Sunshine Beach

4

13

-

5

-

-

2

24

754

0:00

0:00

Peregian Beach

1

-

-

2

-

4

-

7

437

0:00

0:00

-

Coolum Beach

1

2

-

4

8

-

-

15

1,538

0:00

0:00

1

Mudjimba

1

1

-

-

10

-

-

12

1,181

0:00

1:39

Marcoola

3

1

-

6

1

-

-

11

317

0:00

0:18

Maroochydore

1

8

-

5

15

-

1

30

551

0:00

0:00

Alexandra Headland

3

11

-

5

12

-

-

31

1,109

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

52

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

1

61

53

-

59

-

13

-

66

11

1

22

72

1

16

-

-

39

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

84

-

18

3

106

-

-

-

141

-

66

1

208

-

-

12

-

22

2

-

36

-

1

-

8

1

33

-

43

-

-

3

-

379

2

179

7

570

-

-

-

2

-

38

-

18

5

63

5

3

-

13

-

292

-

195

36

544

-

2

-

2

-

284

-

93

13

394

-

-

-

-

-

83

1

25

2

111

3

-

-

2

-

303

1

60

9

378

-

-

-

-

-

245

-

27

16

288 52

Wide Bay Capricorn

Sunshine Coast

1

-

1

-

1

-

33

1

12

4

4

3

-

3

-

18

1

20

12

61

1

-

-

4

-

74

2

41

16

138

Mooloolaba

4

46

2

14

26

6

-

98

3,092

0:00

0:00

1

9

5

-

8

-

176

1

124

40

363

Kawana Waters

1

1

-

3

4

-

2

11

501

0:00

0:00

2

2

2

-

1

-

151

-

11

11

178

Dicky Beach

-

5

-

7

7

-

-

19

1,013

0:00

0:00

1

-

-

-

3

-

60

-

33

3

99

Metropolitan Caloundra

3

23

-

8

16

-

-

50

1,272

0:00

0:00

3

2

1

-

4

-

223

-

105

15

350

Bribie Island

-

2

-

-

1

-

-

3

1,039

0:00

0:00

1

2

-

-

-

753

1

61

11

829

Redcliffe Peninsula

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

1

760

0:00

0:00

1

-

-

-

1

-

97

-

45

3

146

28

138

2

84

117

12

5

386

15,347

0:00

2:28

15

27

19

-

44

-

2,830

8

870

196

3,994

Point Lookout (Main Beach)

1

5

-

11

9

1

-

27

4,706

0:00

0:00

-

1

1

1

-

89

-

171

10

273

Point Lookout (Cylinder Beach)

-

1

-

3

3

-

-

7

6,244

0:00

0:10

-

-

-

-

3

-

448

-

65

6

522

Coochiemudlo Island

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

3

185

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

11

-

27

4

42

Southport

1

13

-

6

10

-

-

30

2,303

0:00

0:31

1

1

-

-

1

-

235

-

57

7

301 402

BRANCH TOTAL

South Coast

Surfers Paradise

3

48

-

34

6

8

99

10,498

0:00

0:00

2

1

1

-

7

-

293

5

68

27

Northcliffe

1

1

-

5

3

-

-

10

712

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

2

-

90

-

23

3

118

Broadbeach

3

5

-

5

2

-

-

15

482

0:00

0:42

1

-

-

-

-

-

190

-

24

2

216

Kurrawa

4

6

-

12

4

-

-

26

1,186

0:00

0:00

1

1

2

-

-

-

269

1

60

4

337

Mermaid Beach AEME

-

5

-

1

-

-

-

6

513

0:00

0:00

-

1

1

-

2

-

92

1

28

5

130

Nobbys Beach

1

14

-

5

1

-

21

1,647

0:00

0:57

-

-

-

-

3

-

105

1

39

7

155

Miami Beach

-

3

-

6

3

-

-

12

561

0:00

0:00

1

1

-

-

2

-

105

1

66

9

184

North Burleigh

-

16

-

9

4

-

1

30

1,394

0:00

0:00

2

2

1

-

-

-

347

-

43

7

400

Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park

1

3

-

16

16

-

-

36

2,145

0:00

0:02

4

3

-

-

7

-

267

2

71

19

369

BRANCH TOTAL

15

120

-

113

64

9

1

322

32,576

0:00

2:22

12

11

6

-

28

-

2,541

11

742

110

3,449

66 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND


Prevent Actions

Crocodiles

Sharks

Missing Persons

Spinal Injuries

Fractures

Defib Cases

Oxygen Therapy

Resus (CPR)

Minor

Major

Minor

Major

0:00

0:12

4

-

-

-

5

-

73

1

19

9

107

690

0:00

2:48

-

-

-

-

2

-

80

1

19

2

104

-

8

732

0:00

0:31

1

-

-

1

-

94

-

24

2

122

-

7

560

0:00

0:30

2

1

-

-

2

-

97

2

15

5

122

-

-

6

246

0:00

0:01

-

-

-

-

-

-

71

1

21

2

95

-

-

-

1

151

0:00

0:16

2

-

-

-

-

-

70

-

7

-

77

4

3

-

-

7

587

0:00

0:00

1

1

-

-

1

-

122

-

5

2

131

-

6

6

-

-

17

631

0:00

0:55

3

-

-

-

1

-

211

-

26

7

245

-

1

1

-

1

6

814

0:00

0:10

2

-

-

-

2

-

210

-

10

3

225

-

-

2

3

-

1

8

1,009

0:00

0:00

3

-

1

1

3

1

657

-

110

8

781

4

-

-

1

5

-

1

11

768

0:00

0:00

3

-

-

1

3

1

731

1

193

9

939

15

12

-

38

31

-

3

99

6,611

0:00

5:25

20

3

1

2

20

2

2,416

6

449

49

2,948

GOLD COAST TOTAL

30

132

-

151

95

9

4

421

39,187

0:00

7:48

32

14

7

2

48

2

4,957

17

1,191

159

6,397

CLUB TOTAL

63

275

2

253

216

22

10

841

70,133

16:36

11:12

53

41

26

2

96

2

8,322

27

2,387

366

11,269

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0:00

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

2

RWC 1

-

-

-

-

-

26

-

26

538

0:00

0:00

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

RWC 3

-

-

-

-

-

23

-

23

304

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

RWC 4

-

-

-

-

-

21

-

21

241

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

RWC 5

-

-

-

-

-

11

-

11

881

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

RWC 6

-

-

-

-

-

11

-

11

657

0:00

0:00

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

RWC 7

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

6

189

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

RWC 8

-

-

-

-

-

20

-

20

2,269

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

RWC 12

-

-

-

-

-

29

-

29

646

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

RWC 14

-

-

-

-

-

35

-

35

496

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

RWC 15

-

-

-

-

-

51

-

51

109

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

RWC 16

-

-

-

-

-

7

-

7

573

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

RWC 17

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

66

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

RWC 18

-

-

-

-

-

15

-

15

244

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

RWC 19

-

-

-

-

-

62

-

62

632

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

RWC 33

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

2

68

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Dawn GC

-

-

-

-

-

7

-

7

-

0:00

0:00

3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

25

Dusk GC

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0:00

0:00

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

6M ORB Rigid Hull

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

LS 45

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

7

17

0:00

0:00

26

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

2

4

LS 46

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

4

7

0:00

0:00

17

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

1

2

337

Tallebudgera

-

3

-

12

7

Pacific

-

3

-

1

2

Palm Beach

4

-

-

4

-

Currumbin

1

2

-

4

-

Tugun

-

-

-

2

4

Bilinga

-

-

-

1

North Kirra

-

-

-

Kirra

3

2

Coolangatta

1

2

Tweed Heads & Coolangatta

2

Rainbow Bay BRANCH TOTAL

Marine Stings

First Aid

Total First Aid

IRB

423

6

Rescue Board

22

-

Seabob

-

Rescue Tube

-

Without Gear

Total Rescues

FIRST AID TREATMENTS

Other

CLOSURE DANGEROUS MARINE CREATURES

RWC

RESCUES

Point Danger

Brisbane Lifesaving Service

-

Rescue Water Craft Services

Aerial Rescue Services

-

-

-

-

-

326

11

7,937

0:00

0:00

49

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

-

3

6

VOLUNTARY SERVICES

63

275

2

253

216

348

21

1,178 78,070

16:36

11:12

102

41

26

2

99

2

8,322

27

2,387

369

11,275

AUSTRALIAN LIFEGUARD SERVICES

114

72

1

637

-

862

1

1,687 623,903

71:27

28:04

28

47

55

1

73

6

8,985

27

14,447

341

23,982

GRAND TOTAL

177

347

3

890

216

1,210

22

2,865 701,973

88:03

39:16

130

88

81

3

172

8

17,307

54

16,834

710

74,370

LOS TOTAL

127:20

Total lives saved 2,865

Total first aid treatments 35,257

Total preventative actions (voluntary service) 701,973

Total preventative actions 701,973

Total lives saved (voluntary service) 2,865

Total patrol hours (voluntary service) 389,012

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

67


LIFEGUARD ACTIVITY FIRST AID TREATMENTS

Total First Aid

Major

First Aid

Minor

Major

Minor

Resus (CPR)

Oxygen Therapy

Defib Cases

Fractures

Marine Stings

Spinal Injuries

Missing Persons

Sharks

CLOSURE DANGEROUS MARINE CREATURES Crocodiles

Prevent Actions

Total Rescues

Other

RWC

Seabob

Rescue Board

Rescue Tube

Without Gear

RESCUES

Douglas Shire Council Four Mile Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5601

5:53

1:14

-

-

-

-

-

-

139

1

235

1

376

TOTAL

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5601

5:53

1:14

-

-

-

-

-

-

139

1

235

1

376

Cairns Regional Council Holloways Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4808

17:48

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

1

25

1

30

Yorkeys Knob Beach

-

1

4

-

-

-

5

3201

7:29

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

1

17

1

28

Ellis Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1236

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

-

14

-

21

Palm Cove

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

4965

8:35

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

63

1

55

1

120

Trinity Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4498

6:23

0:00

-

-

1

-

1

-

31

-

59

2

94

Clifton Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1167

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

11

-

2

-

13

Bramston Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

156

4:10

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

-

2

Kewarra Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1750

6:08

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

11

-

6

-

17

Esplanade Lagoon

27

9

-

-

-

-

36

12159

0:00

0:00

1

-

1

-

1

-

-

-

267

5

274

TOTAL

27

10

4

-

1

-

42

33940

50:33

0:00

1

-

2

-

2

-

136

3

446

10

599

Department of National Parks, Sport and Racing Green Island

9

-

50

1

1

-

61

15577

0:00

0:00

1

-

-

-

2

2

330

1

478

5

818

TOTAL

9

-

50

1

1

-

61

15577

0:00

0:00

1

-

-

-

2

2

330

1

478

5

818

Cassowary Coast Regional Council Etty Bay

-

1

-

-

-

-

1

190

0:00

0:00

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

8

1

10

North Mission

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

553

5:53

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

14

-

17

Mission Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

316

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

11

-

17

TOTAL

-

1

-

-

-

-

1

1059

5:53

0:00

-

-

1

-

-

-

9

-

33

1

44

Hinchinbrook Shire Council Forrest Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

48

0:00

0:00

1

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

1

-

3

TOTAL

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

48

0:00

0:00

1

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

1

-

3 61

Townsville City Council The Strand Net 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

865

0:48

0:58

1

-

1

-

2

-

6

1

44

7

The Strand Net 2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

840

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

-

21

-

30

The Strand Water Park

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11699

0:00

0:00

-

1

-

-

5

-

-

3

463

8

480

Alma Bay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

927

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

177

-

149

-

326

Horseshoe Bay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1579

0:00

0:53

-

-

-

-

1

-

45

3

130

6

185

Balgal Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

209

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

24

-

6

-

30

14

2

-

-

-

-

16

8984

0:00

0:00

2

-

-

-

4

1

-

-

362

8

375

The Strand Rock Pool

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

895

0:00

0:00

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

145

1

146

Pallarenda

1

-

-

-

1

-

2

312

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

TOTAL

15

2

-

-

1

-

18

26310

0:48

1:51

4

1

1

-

12

1

262

7

1320

30

1634

Riverway Lagoon

Burdekin Shire Council Alva Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

1

-

5

TOTAL

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

1

-

5

Whitsunday Regional Council Horseshoe Bay - Bowen

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

463

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

94

2

36

2

134

TOTAL

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

463

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

94

2

36

2

134

Mackay Regional Council Blue Water Lagoon

-

-

2

-

-

-

2

3308

8:20

1:13

-

-

1

-

-

-

7

1

2

3

14

Harbour Beach

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

1833

0:00

1:17

-

-

1

-

-

-

27

1

13

2

44

Lamberts Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

751

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

2

Eimeo Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

623

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

2

1

4

Sarina Beach

-

-

3

-

-

-

3

6515

8:20

2:30

-

-

2

-

-

-

35

2

19

6

64

75

2

1

-

-

-

78

72,181

-

1:14:52

1

-

-

-

-

-

115

9

1,112

85

1,321 20

TOTAL

Livingstone Shire Council Emu Park Beach

2

-

1

-

-

-

3

52

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

19

-

1

-

Yeppoon Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

268

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

13

-

-

1

14

TOTAL

2

-

1

-

-

-

3

320

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

32

-

1

1

34

Agnes Water Beach

2

-

28

-

-

-

30

5489

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

1

-

148

-

238

5

392

Tannum Sands Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

321

0:00

1:17

-

-

-

-

-

-

48

-

20

-

68

TOTAL

2

-

28

-

-

-

30

5810

0:00

1:17

-

-

-

-

1

-

196

-

258

5

460

Gladstone Regional Council

Bundaberg Regional Council Moore Park Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

518

0:00

6:04

1

-

-

-

-

-

7

-

3

-

10

Oaks Beach

1

3

1

-

-

-

5

1013

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

45

-

12

-

57

Kelly’s Beach

1

3

1

-

-

-

5

5804

0:00

4:01

-

-

-

-

-

-

153

-

58

1

212

Elliott Heads Beach

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

1733

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

70

-

6

-

76

Nielsen Park Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1805

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

48

-

14

-

62

TOTAL

3

6

2

-

-

-

11

10873

0:00

10:05

1

-

-

-

-

-

323

-

93

1

417

68 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND


FIRST AID TREATMENTS

Total First Aid

Major

First Aid

Minor

Major

Minor

Resus (CPR)

Oxygen Therapy

Defib Cases

Fractures

Marine Stings

Spinal Injuries

Missing Persons

Sharks

CLOSURE DANGEROUS MARINE CREATURES Crocodiles

Prevent Actions

Total Rescues

Other

RWC

Seabob

Rescue Board

Rescue Tube

Without Gear

RESCUES

Fraser Coast Regional Council Torquay Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

56

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

9

-

10

TOTAL

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

56

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

9

-

10

Gympie Regional Council Rainbow Beach

1

2

16

-

-

-

19

18128

0:00

0:00

1

1

4

-

2

-

404

1

497

14

923

TOTAL

1

2

16

-

-

-

19

18128

0:00

0:00

1

1

4

-

2

-

404

1

497

14

923

Noosa Shire Council Noosa West

2

-

19

-

-

-

21

26,750

0:00

0:00

1

-

4

-

2

-

66

2

1,036

11

1,121

Noosa

11

3

104

-

100

-

218

64,620

0:00

0:00

5

4

4

-

4

1

818

-

2,156

39

3,026 1,677

Sunshine

-

1

37

-

2

-

40

20,162

0:00

0:00

-

4

1

-

4

-

964

-

690

14

Sunrise

1

-

3

-

-

-

4

3,640

0:00

0:00

1

-

-

1

1

1

219

-

98

1

321

North Peregian

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

1,551

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

99

-

45

1

145

Peregian TOTAL

-

-

5

-

3

-

8

6,967

0:00

1:09

2

2

-

-

-

-

293

-

163

4

462

14

4

169

-

105

-

292

123,690

0:00

1:09

9

10

9

1

11

2

2,459

2

4,188

70

6,752

Sunshine Coast Council Coolum North

-

-

18

-

-

-

18

9,434

0:00

1:10

-

2

-

-

1

-

232

-

441

3

679

Coolum

-

-

28

-

4

-

32

14,803

0:00

4:27

2

2

-

-

4

-

436

-

320

6

768

Yaroomba

-

-

4

-

-

-

4

10,258

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

22

-

-

-

22

Boardwalk

-

-

6

-

-

-

6

4732

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

47

-

41

-

88

Marcoola

-

-

2

-

-

-

2

3931

0:00

0:00

-

-

1

-

-

-

13

-

2

1

17

Discovery Beach

1

2

4

-

-

-

7

7607

0:00

0:43

-

-

-

-

-

-

101

-

15

-

116

Mudjimba

1

-

6

-

-

-

7

8281

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

1

-

92

-

46

1

140

Twin Waters

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

8514

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

1

-

52

-

17

1

71

Maroochydore

8

-

39

-

22

-

69

10040

0:00

1:16

1

1

2

-

1

-

360

-

571

9

944

Alexandra Headland

-

1

20

-

1

-

22

16362

0:00

0:00

-

1

1

-

2

-

439

1

320

7

771

Mooloolaba

-

6

47

-

30

-

83

7763

0:00

0:00

-

7

2

-

4

-

320

-

400

26

759

Mooloolaba Spit

-

1

23

-

4

-

28

7597

0:00

0:00

2

8

4

-

2

-

185

1

427

17

644

Buddina

-

1

5

-

1

-

7

2635

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

109

-

211

1

321

Wurtulla

2

-

7

-

-

-

9

1549

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

1

-

136

-

330

3

470

Currimundi

2

3

14

-

-

-

19

4452

0:00

0:55

-

-

-

-

2

-

56

-

19

3

80

Dicky Beach

1

1

10

-

2

-

14

10890

0:00

0:00

-

1

5

-

1

-

66

-

57

7

137 305

Kings Beach Pool

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2661

0:00

0:00

1

-

1

-

2

-

-

-

299

3

Kings Beach

2

3

28

-

16

-

49

7342

0:00

1:05

-

2

1

-

7

-

66

-

137

16

229

Bulcock Beach

-

-

4

-

5

-

9

1806

0:00

0:00

-

1

-

-

1

-

14

2

283

2

303

Golden Beach TOTAL

-

-

3

-

-

-

3

987

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

44

-

47

17

18

269

-

85

-

389

141,644

0:00

9:36

6

25

17

-

30

-

2,749

4

3,980

106

6,911

Moreton Bay Regional Council Woorim Beach

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

16489

0:00

0:00

-

2

2

-

-

-

287

1

10

8

310

TOTAL

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

16489

0:00

0:00

-

2

2

-

-

-

287

1

10

8

310

-

-

259

47

332

-

8

-

-

-

259

47

332

Southbank Corporation Streets Beach Lagoon

24

24

6

-

-

-

54

91349

0:00

0:00

-

5

13

TOTAL

24

24

6

-

-

-

54

91349

0:00

0:00

-

5

13

8

Redland City Council Cylinder Beach

-

4

6

-

2

-

12

28852

0:00

0:00

-

-

2

-

1

-

544

-

153

3

703

Main Beach

-

1

13

-

2

1

17

18114

0:00

0:22

1

-

1

-

-

-

49

-

85

9

144 161

Adder Rock

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

6845

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

122

-

37

2

Wellington Point

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6208

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

64

-

70

TOTAL

-

5

19

-

5

1

30

60019

0:00

0:22

1

-

3

-

1

-

721

-

339

14

1078

Gold Coast City Council Southport Broadwater

-

-

26

-

-

-

26

4415

0:00

0:00

1

-

1

-

1

-

16

-

491

4

513

Tallabudgera Creek

-

-

31

-

74

-

105

8783

0:00

0:00

2

3

-

-

2

1

255

3

793

15

1072

Paradise Point

1

-

9

-

-

-

10

2150

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

17

-

133

-

150

TOTAL

-

-

57

-

74

-

131

15348

0:00

0:00

3

3

1

-

3

1

288

3

1417

19

1735

Non Local Government Areas Double Island Point

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

13781

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

504

-

451

-

955

Noosa North Shore

-

-

2

-

-

-

2

2943

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

1

-

8

-

160

1

170

Morton Island North Point

-

-

-

-

3

-

3

1780

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

9

-

11

Moreton Isl. Tangalooma

-

-

8

-

587

-

595

32151

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

207

-

207

TOTAL

-

-

11

-

590

-

601

50655

0:00

0:00

-

-

-

-

1

-

514

-

827

1

1343

71:27

28:04

28

47

55

1

73

6

8,985

27

14,447

341

23,982

GRAND TOTAL

114

72

637

1

862

1

1,687

623,903

62:59:00

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

69


TOTAL

5,131

ALAQ Surfguard

1,124

SLSQ

435

2 82 96 1 42 37 2 14 2 30 34 17 95 100 80 106 75 99 94 49 62 2 2

9 2 1 183 555 3 1 3 182 119 59 46 14 68 61 2 6 3 223 101 56 528 471 278 371 350 422 382 323 303 1 1 1

Lifeguards

491

TOTAL

1

PDB

72 11 23 4 2 2 13 1 35 45 27 38 30 41 35 30 26 -

SCB

1 9 71 38 14 10 32 5 5 8 7 31 37 18 32 27 40 34 37 34 1 1

SSCB

NBB

*Advanced Resuscitation Techniques [AID] Assessor Advanced Resuscitation Techniques [AID] Assessor Bronze Medallion Assessor Helicopter Assessor IRB Assessor Radio Assessor Rescue Water Craft (RWC) Assessor Silver Medallion Beach Management Assessor Surf Rescue ATV Operator Induction Bronze Medallion Facilitator Advanced Resuscitation Techniques [AID] Facilitator Bronze Medallion Facilitator First Aid [AID] Facilitator IRB Facilitator Rescue Water Craft Facilitator Silver Medallion Beach Management *First Aid [AID] Gold Medallion (Advanced Lifesaving) Helicopter Air Crewperson`s Certificate Helicopter Crew Certificate IRB Buoy Laying Induction IRB Buoy Laying Induction Presenter IRB Crew Certificate Junior Activities Age Manager - Online Theory Junior Activities Age Manager Course Marine Stinger Management ORB Crew Certificate ORB Driver Certificate *Pain Management Certificate Peer Support Officer QLD 4WD Induction QLD Assessor Bronze Medallion Workshop 17/18 Season Qld Club Safety Advisor Training QLD IRB Water Safety and Duty Boat Course QLD Junior Activities Accreditation Officer QLD Observers QLD Phase 1 Search and Rescue Training Course QLD RWC Crew Induction QLD TAF IRB Workshop 17/18 Season QLD Tractor Induction QLD Training Officer 4WD Induction QLD Training Officer ATV Induction QLD Training Officer Marine Stinger QLD Training Officer Tractor Induction Radio Operator Certificate Rescue Water Craft Operator Certificate *Resuscitation [AID] Silver Medallion Aquatic Rescue Silver Medallion Beach Management Silver Medallion IRB Driver Surf Aware One Surf Aware Two Surf Play One Surf Play Two Surf Rescue Certificate (CPR Endorsed) Surf Safe One Surf Safe Two Surf Smart One Surf Smart Two TAF Induction Training Officer IRB Training Officer Radio Training Officer RWC Training Officer Silver Medallion Beach Management Training Officer Surf Rescue Training Officer IRB

WBCB

Award

NQB

LIFESAVING AWARDS 4 2 91 368 1 6 153 55 49 34 10 27 76 5 2 59 60 83 437 374 403 447 212 335 277 236 201 4 4

3 3 6 1 2 118 213 2 87 73 72 21 24 11 50 101 3 9 6 204 40 12 263 224 211 272 128 196 187 162 146 3 1 2 -

59 11 3 2 48 15 2 44 29 2 7 61 3 2 46 45 24 34 3 -

9 1 6 5 6 1 5 1 1 48 6 3 22 15 5 2 3 3 24 7 206 7 2 1 10 167 1 2 35 36 4 8 37 6 -

747 3 1 1161 1 41 1316 -

815 11 21 1 9 7 8 1 2 536 1396 4 3 6 1 1 8 1253 31 6 3 28 15 518 326 196 53 3 3 41 24 169 206 7 24 42 177 1 10 167 238 9 22 7 11 488 81 1399 24 290 180 1389 1251 1017 1266 830 1133 1009 837 772 37 8 4 9 1 2 8

4,016

2,861

448

696

3,270

18,472

Based off award origination organisation *denotes award is delivered to club members by the Academy under the Emergency Care Training Model

Commercial awards issued by ALAQ below are not aligned to Nationally Recognised Training and only issued fee for service

70

Certificate II in Public Safety Update

31

Surf Survival

55

Certificate of Attendance - Resuscitation

5

Surf Rescue Certificate (Community)

73

Certificate of Attendance - Basic First Aid Training

42

Surf Rescue Certificate (Community) Update

Defib Awareness

7

SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND

74 Total

287


Award

Award code

NQB

NBB

WBC

SSCB

SCB

PDB

Lifeguards

SLSQ

ALAQ Surfguard

ALAQ Vetrak

TOTAL

NATIONALLY-RECOGNISED AWARDS Certificate II in Public Safety (Aquatic Rescue)

PUA21012

80

80

103

608

399

249

21

36

-

96

1672

Certificate III in Public Safety (Aquatic Search and Rescue)

PUA31312

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

2

Undertake aircraft underwater escape and survival

AVIF2014

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

44

44

Utilise emergency breathing system

AVIF2015

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

23

-

11

34

Utilise emergency breathing system

AVIF2015A

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

4

8

Make a presentation

BSBCMM401

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

28

-

-

28

Make a presentation

BSBCMM401A

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

1

Contribute to team effectiveness

BSBFLM312C

8

13

36

102

62

40

36

-

-

-

297

Provide cardiopulmonary resuscitation [CPR]

HLTAID001

-

14

-

-

-

-

399

-

2482

10995

13890

Provide first aid

HLTAID003

-

-

-

-

-

-

190

-

1376

5072

6638

Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting

HLTAID004

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1455

1455

Provide advanced first aid

HLTAID006

-

-

-

-

-

-

31

-

5

6

42

Provide advanced resuscitation

HLTAID007

-

-

-

-

-

-

205

-

837

499

1541

Provide basic emergency life support

HLTFA211A

80

80

103

608

399

249

21

36

-

96

1672

Apply first aid

HLTFA311A

-

-

-

-

-

-

42

-

-

-

42

Undertake helicopter safety and escape

PMAWHS214

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

27

1

11

39

Communicate in the workplace

PUACOM001C

77

79

101

588

391

241

18

8

-

96

1599

Provide emergency care

PUAEME001B

-

-

-

-

-

-

69

-

-

-

69

Administer oxygen in an emergency situation

PUAEME003C

-

-

-

-

-

-

69

-

-

-

69

Provide pain management

PUAEME005A

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

83

18

103

Prepare maintain and test response equipment

PUAEQU001B

9

3

20

84

85

17

53

52

-

-

323

Follow defined occupational health and safety policies and procedures

PUAOHS001C

77

79

101

588

391

241

18

8

-

96

1599

Maintain safety at an incident scene

PUAOHS002B

-

-

-

-

-

-

24

-

-

-

24

Operate communications systems and equipment

PUAOPE013A

77

79

103

591

388

244

18

8

-

96

1604

Undertake beach safety management activities

PUAOPE027A

8

13

36

102

62

40

35

-

-

-

296

Search as a member of an aquatic search team

PUASAR011C

-

-

-

-

-

-

24

-

-

-

24

Apply surf awareness and self-rescue skills

PUASAR012C

80

80

103

608

399

249

21

36

-

96

1672

Participate in an aquatic rescue operation

PUASAR013A

80

80

103

608

399

249

21

36

-

96

1672

Operate and maintain a small powercraft and motor for rescue operations

PUASAR014A

8

3

19

83

85

17

-

18

-

7

240

Crew small powercraft in a rescue operation

PUASAR015A

39

18

46

190

157

89

-

7

-

7

553

Operate and maintain a personal water craft for rescue operations

PUASAR016A

-

-

-

-

-

-

51

36

-

-

87

Work in a team

PUATEA001B

77

79

101

562

391

241

18

8

-

96

1573

Work autonomously

PUATEA002B

8

13

36

102

62

40

35

-

-

-

296

Work effectively in a public safety organisation

PUATEA004D

77

79

103

592

396

245

18

8

-

96

1614

Perform basic water rescues

SISCAQU002

-

-

-

-

-

-

69

-

-

-

69

Supervise clients in aquatic locations

SISCAQU006

-

-

-

-

-

-

69

-

-

-

69

Perform advanced water rescues

SISCAQU007

-

-

-

-

-

-

69

-

-

-

69

Provide work skill instruction

TAEDEL301

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

28

-

-

28

Provide work skill instruction

TAEDEL301A

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

1

Perform rescue from a live LV panel

UETTDRRF06B

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1013

1013

785

792

1,114

6,016

4,066

2,451

1,646

411

4,784

20,006

42,071

TOTAL

*SLSQ - includes Brisbane Lifesaving, Operations Support and RPL Assessment only applications *ALAQ - Surfguard relates to courses delivered to club members under DCS/QFES Funding *ALAQ - Vettrak relates to courses delivered to paying clients/members of the public fee for service

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

71


RESULTS 2018 Queensland Surf Life Saving Championships Open Female 2km Beach Run 1 Greta Petersen (Tallebudgera) 2 Courtney Innes (Northcliffe) 3 Brooke Eacott (Surfers Paradise) Open Female Beach Flags 1 Elizabeth Forsyth (Currumbin) 2 Brittanny Brymer (Currumbin) 3 Bree Masters (Kurrawa) Open Female Beach Relay 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A Open Female Beach Sprint 1 Bree Masters (Kurrawa) 2 Nicole Kay (Kurrawa) 3 Elizabeth Forsyth (Currumbin) Open Female Double Ski 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Northcliffe Team D 3 Maroochydore Team A Open Female Ironwoman 1 Courtney Hancock (Northcliffe) 2 Lana Rogers (Noosa Heads) 3 Maddy Dunn (Northcliffe) Open Female Rescue Tube Rescue 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A Open Female Surf Belt 1 Lana Rogers (Noosa Heads) 2 Mariah Jones (TH&C) 3 Rachel Eddy (Currumbin) Open Female Surf Board 1 Harriet Brown (Northcliffe) 2 Karlee Nurthen (Currumbin) 3 Jayde Hardstaff (Currumbin) Open Female Surf Board Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A Open Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Surfers Paradise Team A Open Female Surf Boat 1 Northcliffe 2 Currumbin 3 Tallebudgera Open Female Surf Race 1 Lani Pallister (Alexandra Headland) 2 Courtney Hancock (Northcliffe) 3 Prue Davies (Currumbin) Open Female Surf Ski 1 Bonnie Hancock (Kurrawa) 2 Alyce Burnett (Maroochydore) 3 Brianna Massie (Maroochydore)

72

Open Male 2km Beach Run 1 Jack Adams (Nobbys Beach) 2 Jack Lund (Tallebudgera) 3 Patrick Hagan (Point Lookout) Open Male 5 Person R&R 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A Open Male Beach Flags 1 Jason Gough (Kurrawa) 2 Kieran Gordon (Currumbin) 3 Saxon Beale (Anglesea) Open Male Beach Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Kurrawa Team B 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

Open Mixed 6 Person R&R 1 Alexandra Headland Team A Open Mixed Double Ski 1 Maroochydore Team B 2 Northcliffe Team D 3 Alexandra Headland Team B Reserve Grade Female Surf Boat 1 Palm Beach 2 Mermaid Beach 3 Coolum Beach Reserve Grade Male Surf Boat 1 Palm Beach 2 Maroochydore 3 Coolum Beach

U17 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Samuel McAuliffe (Tallebudgera) 2 Ryan McCure (Mermaid Beach) 3 Harley Adams (Nobbys Beach) U17 Male Beach Flags 1 Lachlan Alleyne (Bribie Island) 2 Thomas Baker (Alexandra Headland) 3 Samuel Dalton (Kurrawa) U17 Male Beach Relay 1 Bundaberg Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A U17 Male Beach Sprint 1 Bradley Hunt (Currumbin) 2 Lachlan Alleyne (Bribie Island) 3 Rick Cuthel (Kurrawa)

Open Male Beach Sprint 1 Milera Sanderson Tjimarri (Currumbin) 2 Jordan Caldow (Currumbin) 3 Conor Loughnan (Kurrawa)

Restricted Surf Race 1 Nathan Gray (Surfers Paradise) 2 Tanyn Lyndon (BHMP) 3 Lucas Allan (Northcliffe)

U17 Male Ironman 1 Bode Schulz (Northcliffe) 2 Hayden Cotter (Maroochydore) 3 Ruben Zikarsky (Maroochydore)

Open Male Double Ski 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 Mermaid Beach Team A

U17 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Brodee Trinca (Southport) 2 Drew Younger (Rainbow Bay) 3 Charlotte McKinley (Sunshine Beach)

U17 Male Surf Belt 1 Jacob Spark (Emu Park) 2 Ruben Zikarsky (Maroochydore) 3 Jordan Sergis (Northcliffe)

Open Male Ironman 1 Alastair Day (Surfers Paradise) 2 Matt Poole (Kurrawa) 3 Caine Eckstein (Northcliffe)

U17 Female Beach Flags 1 Mia McWilliam (Alexandra Headland) 2 Beth Underwood (Alexandra Headland) 3 Katie Gleeson (Alexandra Headland)

U17 Male Surf Board 1 Texas Dixon (Noosa Heads) 2 Adam Palmer (Maroochydore) 3 Bode Schulz (Northcliffe)

Open Male Rescue Tube Rescue 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Mermaid Beach Team A

U17 Female Beach Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A

U17 Male Surf Board Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Noosa Heads Team A

Open Male Surf Belt 1 Matthew Davis (Currumbin) 2 Jett Kenny (Alexandra Headland) 3 Stefaan Demopoulos (Northcliffe) Open Male Surf Board 1 Rhys Burrows (Noosa Heads) 2 Corey Fletcher (Currumbin) 3 Matt Poole (Kurrawa) Open Male Surf Board Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Mermaid Beach Team A Open Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A Open Male Surf Boat 1 Tallebudgera 2 Currumbin 3 Mermaid Beach Open Male Surf Race 1 Shannon Eckstein (Northcliffe) 2 Alastair Day (Surfers Paradise) 3 Nathan Gray (Surfers Paradise) Open Male Surf Ski 1 Cory Hill (Northcliffe) 2 Ben Carberry (BHMP) 3 James Porter (Alexandra Headland) Open Male Surf Ski Relay 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 BHMP Team A

U17 Female Beach Sprint 1 Katie Gleeson (Alexandra Headland) 2 Lily Peck (Kurrawa) 3 Lucia Fildes (Northcliffe) U17 Female Ironwoman 1 Lani Pallister (Alexandra Headland) 2 Tamarind Wildin-Snedden (Maroochydore) 3 Ruby Nolan (Sunshine Beach) U17 Female Surf Belt 1 Charlotte Connor -Rose (Kurrawa) 2 Chloe Silva (Alexandra Headland) 3 Madison Bravery (Northcliffe) U17 Female Surf Board 1 Ruby Nolan (Sunshine Beach) 2 Olivia Emanuel (Sunshine Beach) 3 Tiarnee Massie (Maroochydore) U17 Female Surf Board Relay 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Sunshine Beach Team A U17 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team B 3 Northcliffe Team A U17 Female Surf Race 1 Lani Pallister (Alexandra Headland) 2 Tiarnee Massie (Maroochydore) 3 Ruby Nolan (Sunshine Beach) U17 Female Surf Ski 1 Jenaya Massie (Maroochydore) 2 Olivia Emanuel (Sunshine Beach) 3 Hamarna Williams (Maroochydore)

U17 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Maroochydore Team C 3 Maroochydore Team A U17 Male Surf Race 1 Sam Frost (Currumbin) 2 Kaan Karadag (Kurrawa) 3 Zachary Bromage (Sunshine Beach) U17 Male Surf Ski 1 William Jones (Byron Bay) 2 Ben Regan (Mooloolaba) 3 Carter Brodhurst-Hill (Currumbin) U17 Male Surf Ski Relay 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Currumbin Team A U17 Male Surf Team 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Sunshine Beach Team A U17 Male Taplin 3 person 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A U19 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Erin Blanch (BHMP) 2 Erin Trinca (Southport) 3 Tahlia Kollen (Northcliffe) U19 Female Beach Flags 1 Ella Cummings (Currumbin) 2 Chelsea Lane (Currumbin) 3 Paisley Mullins (Kurrawa)

Open Female Surf Ski Relay 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 BHMP

Open Male Surf Team 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Surfers Paradise Team A 3 Northcliffe Team B

U17 Female Surf Ski Relay 1 Sunshine Beach Team A 2 Maroochydore Team B 3 Maroochydore Team A

U19 Female Beach Relay 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Currumbin Team A

Open Female Surf Team 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Currumbin Team A

Open Male Taplin 6 person 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Mermaid Beach Team A 3 BHMP Team A

U17 Female Surf Team 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

U19 Female Beach Sprint 1 Taylor Stickler (Kurrawa) 2 Ella Cummings (Currumbin) 3 Steffi Miller (Hervey Bay)

Open Female Taplin 3 person 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Kurrawa Team A

Open Mixed 5 Person R&R 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team B 3 Northcliffe Team A

U17 Female Taplin 3 person 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

U19 Female Double Ski 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A

SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND


U19 Female Ironwoman 1 Bay Wildin-Snedden (Kurrawa) 2 Brielle Cooper (Kurrawa) 3 Lucinda Kelly (Alexandra Headland)

U19 Male Rescue Tube Rescue 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Maroochydore Team C

U19 Female Rescue Tube Rescue 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Kurrawa Team A

U19 Male Surf Belt 1 Callum Lowe-Griffiths (Kurrawa) 2 Mason Hebbard (Emu Park) 3 Mitchell Coombes (Northcliffe)

U19 Female Surf Belt 1 Morgan Bellero (Alexandra Headland) 2 Tahlia Kollen (Northcliffe) 3 Jazmin Lewsam (Southport) U19 Female Surf Board 1 Alexandra Clarke (Maroochydore) 2 Bay Wildin-Snedden (Kurrawa) 3 Mikayla Williams (Alexandra Headland) U19 Female Surf Board Relay 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A U19 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Alexandra Headland Team B 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A U19 Female Surf Boat 1 Dicky Beach 2 Noosa Heads 3 Alexandra Headland U19 Female Surf Race 1 Jade Slee (Mermaid Beach) 2 Brielle Cooper (Kurrawa) 3 Bay Wildin-Snedden (Kurrawa) U19 Female Surf Ski 1 Mackenzie Duffy (Northcliffe) 2 Leah Cassidy (BHMP) 3 Bay Wildin-Snedden (Kurrawa) U19 Female Surf Ski Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 BHMP Team A 3 Mermaid Beach Team A U19 Female Surf Team 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A U19 Female Taplin 3 person 1 Mermaid Beach Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Southport Team A U19 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Callum McInnes (Tallebudgera) 2 Jack Graham-Jones (Ballina Lighthouse and Lismore) 3 Lachlan Craven (Alexandra Headland) U19 Male Beach Flags 1 Saxon Beale (Anglesea) 2 Liam Farrelly (Alexandra Headland) 3 Mitchell Haigh (Tannum Sands) U19 Male Beach Relay 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A U19 Male Beach Sprint 1 Caleb Enright (Kurrawa) 2 Caleb Grimley (Kurrawa) 3 Corey Linton (Alexandra Headland) U19 Male Double Ski 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A U19 Male Ironman 1 Mitchell Coombes (Northcliffe) 2 Cooper Williams (Alexandra Headland) 3 Jy Timperley (Currumbin)

U19 Male Surf Board 1 Campbell Guthrie (Alexandra Headland) 2 Joe Engel (Currumbin) 3 Mitchell Coombes (Northcliffe)

2018 Queensland Masters Surf Life Saving Championships 110+ Years Female Surf Board Relay 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Palm Beach Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A

150+ Years Female Surf Board Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Mermaid Beach Team A 150+ Years Female Surf Ski Relay 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A

110+ Years Female Surf Ski Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A

150+ Years Female Surf Team 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Mermaid Beach Team A 3 Mudjimba Team A

U19 Male Surf Board Relay 1 Northcliffe Team B 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A

110+ Years Female Surf Team 1 North Burleigh Team B 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A

150+ Years Female Taplin 3 person 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team B

U19 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Northcliffe Team B 3 Northcliffe Team A

110+ Years Female Taplin 3 person 1 North Burleigh Team B 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

150+ Years Male Surf Board Relay 1 Surfers Paradise Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Mermaid Beach Team A

U19 Male Surf Boat 1 Noosa Heads 2 Dicky Beach 3 Currumbin

110+ Years Male Surf Board Relay 1 Elliott Heads Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 North Burleigh Team B

150+ Years Male Surf Ski Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Mermaid Beach Team A 3 Surfers Paradise Team A

U19 Male Surf Race 1 Mitchell Coombes (Northcliffe) 2 Ky Kinsela (Currumbin) 3 Toby Wilson (Northcliffe)

110+ Years Male Surf Ski Relay 1 North Burleigh Team C 2 North Burleigh Team B 3 North Burleigh Team A

150+ Years Male Surf Team 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Coolum Beach Team A

U19 Male Surf Ski 1 Miskell Cooper (BHMP) 2 Hensen-Thompson Samuel (Alexandra Headland) 3 Fenn Joshua (Northcliffe)

110+ Years Male Surf Team 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Coolangatta Team A

U19 Male Surf Ski Relay 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Currumbin Team A U19 Male Surf Team 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Northcliffe Team B

110+ Years Male Taplin 3 person 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Surfers Paradise Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A 130+ Years Female Surf Board Relay 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 North Burleigh Team A

U19 Male Taplin 3 person 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A

130+ Years Female Surf Ski Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A

U23 Female Surf Boat 1 Tallebudgera 2 Coolum Beach 3 BHMP

130+ Years Female Surf Team 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

U23 Male Surf Boat 1 Currumbin 2 Currumbin 3 Coolangatta

130+ Years Female Taplin 3 person 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Byron Bay Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A

Open Lifesaver Relay 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A

130+ Years Male Surf Board Relay 1 Palm Beach Team A 2 Surfers Paradise Team A 3 Currumbin Team A

Open March Past March Past 1 BHMP Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A

130+ Years Male Surf Ski Relay 1 Mooloolaba Team B 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Palm Beach Team A

Surf Boat Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team B 3 Kurrawa Team A

130+ Years Male Surf Team 1 Surfers Paradise Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 Noosa Heads Team A

U17 March Past March Past 1 BHMP Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

130+ Years Male Taplin 3 person 1 Palm Beach Team A 2 BHMP Team A 3 Currumbin Team A 140+ Years Female Beach Relay 1 Coolum Beach Team A 2 Nobbys Beach Team A 140+ Years Male Beach Relay 1 Palm Beach Team A 2 Nobbys Beach Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

150+ Years Male Taplin 3 person 1 Surfers Paradise Team A 2 Surfers Paradise Team B 3 Northcliffe Team A 170+ Years Female Beach Relay 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Palm Beach Team A 3 Mudjimba Team A 170+ Years Male Beach Relay 1 Mudjimba Team A 2 Nobbys Beach Team A 3 Coolangatta Team A 170+ Years Open Surf Board Relay 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team B 3 Northcliffe Team A 170+ Years Open Surf Ski Relay 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team B 170+ Years Open Surf Team 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Surfers Paradise Team A 3 Mermaid Beach Team A 170+ Years Open Taplin 3 person 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 Byron Bay Team A 200+ Years Female Beach Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Nobbys Beach Team A 200+ Years Male Beach Relay 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A 230+ Years Open Beach Relay 1 Nobbys Beach Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A 30-34 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Lara Muller (North Burleigh) 30-34 Female Beach Flags 1 Kate Tomba (Coolum Beach) 2 Lara Muller (North Burleigh) 3 Nicole Lowe (Tannum Sands) 30-34 Female Beach Sprint 1 Kate Tomba (Coolum Beach) 2 Nicole Lowe (Tannum Sands)

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

73


150+ Years Female Surf Board Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Mermaid Beach Team A 150+ Years Female Surf Ski Relay 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A 150+ Years Female Surf Team 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Mermaid Beach Team A 3 Mudjimba Team A 150+ Years Female Taplin 3 person 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team B 150+ Years Male Surf Board Relay 1 Surfers Paradise Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Mermaid Beach Team A

30-34 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Lara Muller (North Burleigh) 2 Shelley Roberts (Palm Beach) 3 Nicole Lowe (Tannum Sands) 30-34 Female Surf Board 1 Kate Tomba (Coolum Beach) 2 Samantha Hemsley (Mooloolaba) 3 Shelley Roberts (Palm Beach) 30-34 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Coolum Beach Team A 30-34 Female Surf Race 1 Frances Adcock (Mooloolaba) 2 Lara Muller (North Burleigh) 3 Samantha Hemsley (Mooloolaba) 30-34 Female Surf Ski 1 Rachel Pearson (Alexandra Headland)

35-39 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Sybilla Ingwersen (North Burleigh) 2 Lee Vrolyks (Northcliffe) 3 Cathryn Rayward (Kurrawa)

40-44 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Kym Lingard (Hervey Bay) 2 Belinda Marshall (Palm Beach) 3 Tamiel Benjamin (Alexandra Headland)

35-39 Female Surf Board 1 Tiarne Smith (Northcliffe) 2 Lee Vrolyks (Northcliffe) 3 Britt Murray (North Burleigh)

40-44 Female Surf Board 1 Kirsty Holmes (Alexandra Headland) 2 Tamiel Benjamin (Alexandra Headland) 3 Emma Rahui (Coolum Beach)

35-39 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 North Burleigh Team B

40-44 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Coolum Beach Team A 3 Noosa Heads Team A

35-39 Female Surf Race 1 Lee Vrolyks (Northcliffe) 2 Sybilla Ingwersen (North Burleigh) 3 Britt Murray (North Burleigh)

40-44 Female Surf Race 1 Kirsty Holmes (Alexandra Headland) 2 Belinda Marshall (Palm Beach) 3 Wakana Yoshida (Northcliffe)

35-39 Female Surf Ski 1 Lee Vrolyks (Northcliffe) 2 Tiarne Smith (Northcliffe) 3 Cathryn Rayward (Kurrawa)

40-44 Female Surf Ski 1 Kirsty Holmes (Alexandra Headland) 2 Tamiel Benjamin (Alexandra Headland) 3 Larissa Hallam (Maroochydore)

150+ Years Male Surf Ski Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Mermaid Beach Team A 3 Surfers Paradise Team A

30-34 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Drew Calabria (Palm Beach) 2 Hiro Uraguchi (Northcliffe) 3 Ashleigh McNicol (Alexandra Headland)

35-39 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Simon Thompson (Sunshine Beach) 2 Todd Muller (Ballina Lighthouse & Lismore)

40-44 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Mackenzie Glen (Southport) 2 Free Jason (Southport) 3 Thomas Jason (Alexandra Headland)

150+ Years Male Surf Team 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Coolum Beach Team A

30-34 Male Beach Flags 1 Laurie Hughes (Kurrawa) 2 Daniel Buckley (Nobbys Beach) 3 Ashleigh McNicol (Alexandra Headland)

35-39 Male Beach Flags 1 Luke Bradley (Nobbys Beach) 2 Hamish Dutton (Palm Beach) 3 Todd Muller (Ballina Lighthouse & Lismore)

40-44 Male Beach Flags 1 Tumaka Read (Alexandra Headland) 2 Aaron Morris (Nobbys Beach) 3 Barry Lee (Nobbys Beach)

30-34 Male Beach Sprint 1 Daniel Buckley (Nobbys Beach) 2 Drew Calabria (Palm Beach) 3 Laurie Hughes (Kurrawa)

35-39 Male Beach Sprint 1 Scaysbrook Rohan (Coolangatta) 2 Dutton Hamish (Palm Beach) 3 Muller Todd (Ballina Lighthouse & Lismore)

40-44 Male Beach Sprint 1 Tumaka Read (Alexandra Headland) 2 Ryan Veitch (Mudjimba) 3 Mark Bird (Palm Beach)

170+ Years Female Beach Relay 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Palm Beach Team A 3 Mudjimba Team A

30-34 Male Double Ski 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A

35-39 Male Double Ski 1 North Burleigh Team B 2 Mooloolaba Team B 3 Tallebudgera Team A

40-44 Male Double Ski 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 North Burleigh Team B 3 Kurrawa Team A

170+ Years Male Beach Relay 1 Mudjimba Team A 2 Nobbys Beach Team A 3 Coolangatta Team A

30-34 Male Ironman 1 Thomas Trembath (North Burleigh) 2 Adam Jeffrey (North Burleigh) 3 Ashleigh McNicol (Alexandra Headland)

35-39 Male Ironman 1 Michael Bush (Currumbin) 2 Stuart Louth (Maroochydore) 3 Ben Sutherland (Currumbin)

40-44 Male Ironman 1 Andrew Keegan (Surfers Paradise) 2 David Bear (Kurrawa) 3 Justin Gordon (Surfers Paradise)

170+ Years Open Surf Board Relay 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team B 3 Northcliffe Team A

30-34 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Blair Day (Alexandra Headland) 2 Drew Calabria (Palm Beach) 3 Hiro Uraguchi (Northcliffe)

35-39 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Michael Bush (Currumbin) 2 Simon Thompson (Sunshine Beach) 3 Luke Bradley (Nobbys Beach)

40-44 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Ben Kibble (Noosa Heads) 2 Andrew Keegan (Surfers Paradise) 3 Peter Halfweeg (Maroochydore)

170+ Years Open Surf Ski Relay 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team B

30-34 Male Surf Board 1 Thomas Trembath (North Burleigh) 2 Daniel Buckley (Nobbys Beach) 3 Adam Jeffrey (North Burleigh)

35-39 Male Surf Board 1 Bruce Taylor (North Burleigh) 2 Gary Gee (Coolangatta) 3 Robert Adsett (Alexandra Headland)

40-44 Male Surf Board 1 Justin Gordon (Surfers Paradise) 2 Jonathon Locke (North Burleigh) 3 Craig Holden (Elliott Heads)

35-39 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Coolum Beach Team A 3 Currumbin Team A

40-44 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Surfers Paradise Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A

35-39 Male Surf Race 1 Michael Bush (Currumbin) 2 Steven Meredith (Mooloolaba) 3 Robert Adsett (Alexandra Headland)

40-44 Male Surf Race 1 Cameron Dixon (Noosa Heads) 2 Robert Brown (Brunswick) 3 David Bear (Kurrawa)

150+ Years Male Taplin 3 person 1 Surfers Paradise Team A 2 Surfers Paradise Team B 3 Northcliffe Team A

170+ Years Open Surf Team 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Surfers Paradise Team A 3 Mermaid Beach Team A 170+ Years Open Taplin 3 person 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 Byron Bay Team A 200+ Years Female Beach Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Nobbys Beach Team A 200+ Years Male Beach Relay 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A 230+ Years Open Beach Relay 1 Nobbys Beach Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A 30-34 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Lara Muller (North Burleigh) 30-34 Female Beach Flags 1 Kate Tomba (Coolum Beach) 2 Lara Muller (North Burleigh) 3 Nicole Lowe (Tannum Sands) 30-34 Female Beach Sprint 1 Kate Tomba (Coolum Beach) 2 Nicole Lowe (Tannum Sands)

74

30-34 Female Ironwoman 1 Samantha Hemsley (Mooloolaba)

30-34 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Nobbys Beach Team A 30-34 Male Surf Race 1 Blair Day (Alexandra Headland) 2 Thomas Trembath (North Burleigh) 3 Luke Lorenzin (Surfers Paradise) 30-44 Female Double Ski 1 Alexandra Headland Team B 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A 35-39 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Cathryn Rayward (Kurrawa) 2 Michelle Weller (Kawana Waters) 3 Kylie Giles (Elliott Heads) 35-39 Female Beach Flags 1 Kylie Giles (Elliott Heads) 2 Fiona McDonnell (Hervey Bay) 3 Julia Allison (Southport) 35-39 Female Beach Sprint 1 Brooke Elsum (Met Caloundra) 2 Fiona McDonnell (Hervey Bay) 3 Kylie Giles (Elliott Heads) 35-39 Female Ironwoman 1 Lee Vrolyks (Northcliffe) 2 Tiarne Smith (Northcliffe) 3 Britt Murray (North Burleigh)

SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND

35-39 Male Surf Ski 1 Aaron Frankland (Mooloolaba) 2 Bruce Taylor (North Burleigh) 3 Stuart Louth (Maroochydore) 40-44 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Wakana Yoshida (Northcliffe) 2 Selena Tranter (Nobbys Beach) 3 Kym Lingard (Hervey Bay) 40-44 Female Beach Flags 1 Catherine Donaldson (Kurrawa) 2 Selena Tranter (Nobbys Beach) 3 Leanne Brookes (Nobbys Beach) 40-44 Female Beach Sprint 1 Selena Tranter (Nobbys Beach) 2 Leanne Brookes (Nobbys Beach) 3 Heidi Dunne (Coolum Beach) 40-44 Female Ironwoman 1 Kirsty Holmes (Alexandra Headland) 2 Tamiel Benjamin (Alexandra Headland)

40-44 Male Surf Ski 1 Shannon Porche (North Burleigh) 2 Brad Rodgers (North Burleigh) 3 Brett Monaghan (Mooloolaba) 45-49 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Jodie Watson (Bribie Island) 2 Helen Murray (Byron Bay) 3 Jennifer Langton (Palm Beach) 45-49 Female Beach Flags 1 Willow Smith (Mudjimba) 2 Jennifer Langton (Palm Beach) 3 Michelle Slattery (Pacific) 45-49 Female Beach Sprint 1 Lee-Anne Nelson (Surfers Paradise) 2 Helena Grono (Currumbin) 3 Cherie Bell (Mooloolaba) 45-49 Female Ironwoman 1 Hedstrom Ashfield Elin (North Burleigh) 2 Katrina Egan (Maroochydore) 3 Helen Murray (Byron Bay)


45-49 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Tania Lewis (Sunshine Beach) 2 Helen Murray (Byron Bay) 3 Joanne Kay (Byron Bay)

50-54 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Joanne Carroll-Thompson (Noosa Heads) 2 Briony McSwan (Alexandra Headland) 3 Alison Pegg (Noosa Heads)

55-59 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Louise Roberts (Mermaid Beach) 2 Barbara Roker (Alexandra Headland) 3 Lisa Maddison (Kurrawa)

60-64 Male Beach Sprint 1 Steven Jeisman (Mudjimba) 2 Bruce Serisier (Nobbys Beach) 3 James Furlong (Miami Beach)

45-49 Female Surf Board 1 Elin Ashfield Hedstrom (North Burleigh) 2 Katrina Egan (Maroochydore) 3 Joanne Kay (Byron Bay)

50-54 Female Surf Board 1 Amanda Hanmer (Kurrawa) 2 Briony McSwan (Alexandra Headland) 3 Sandra Penman (Mermaid Beach)

55-59 Female Surf Board 1 Margaret Kyle (Northcliffe) 2 Alison Fisk (Noosa Heads) 3 Wendy Callard (Palm Beach)

60-64 Male Ironman 1 Russell Henry (Tallebudgera) 2 Adrian Russell (Brunswick) 3 Gregory Perren (Alexandra Headland)

45-49 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Byron Bay Team A 2 Dicky Beach Team A 3 North Burleigh Team A

50-54 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Mermaid Beach Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Kurrawa Team A

55-59 Female Surf Race 1 Louise Roberts (Mermaid Beach) 2 Lisa Maddison (Kurrawa) 3 Barbara Roker (Alexandra Headland)

60-64 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Stephen Fry (Northcliffe) 2 Russell Henry (Tallebudgera) 3 Bruce Serisier (Nobbys Beach)

45-49 Female Surf Race 1 Tania Lewis (Sunshine Beach) 2 Katrina Egan (Maroochydore) 3 Helen Murray (Byron Bay)

50-54 Female Surf Race 1 Pegg Alison (Noosa Heads) 2 Duke Kylie (Nobbys Beach) 3 Penman Sandra (Mermaid Beach)

45-49 Female Surf Ski 1 Elin Ashfield Hedstrom (North Burleigh) 2 Tamara Thorogood (Maroochydore) 3 Samantha Williams (Alexandra Headland)

50-54 Female Surf Ski 1 Sally Hunt (North Burleigh) 2 Briony McSwan (Alexandra Headland) 3 Sally Taylor (Mooloolaba)

55-59 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Mark Lepper (Bribie Island) 2 Peter Mirls (Southport)

60-64 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Northcliffe Team B

45-49 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Nicholas Fawaz (Coolangatta) 2 Scott Sewell (Byron Bay) 3 Jonathon Simon (TH&C)

50-54 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Michael Tinker (Alexandra Headland) 2 Stephen Lucas (Met Caloundra) 3 Roger Belmar (Northcliffe)

55-59 Male Beach Flags 1 Craig Parker (Mooloolaba) 2 Martin Ashfield (Surfers Paradise) 3 Andrew Walpole (Maroochydore)

60-64 Male Surf Race 1 Colin Mustoe (Byron Bay) 2 Stephen Fry (Northcliffe) 3 Russell Henry (Tallebudgera)

45-49 Male Beach Flags 1 Todd McSwan (Mudjimba) 2 Brian Carroll (Elliott Heads) 3 Christopher Atkinson (Coolum Beach)

50-54 Male Beach Flags 1 Tony Grima (Hervey Bay) 2 Jason Johansson (Alexandra Headland) 3 Shane Urban (Coolum Beach)

55-59 Male Beach Sprint 1 Craig Parker (Mooloolaba) 2 Martin Ashfield (Surfers Paradise) 3 Andrew Walpole (Maroochydore)

60-64 Male Surf Ski 1 Christopher Lange (Mooloolaba) 2 David Rossiter (Mooloolaba) 3 Robert Forsyth (Northcliffe)

45-49 Male Beach Sprint 1 Tim Matchett (Palm Beach) 2 Todd McSwan (Mudjimba) 3 Brian Carroll (Elliott Heads)

50-54 Male Beach Sprint 1 Adrian Nash (Kurrawa) 2 Trevor Smith (Southport) 3 Shane Urban (Coolum Beach)

55-59 Male Ironman 1 Noel Kolkka (Northcliffe) 2 Anthony LeMarseny (Noosa Heads) 3 Ian Wright (Mooloolaba)

60-64 Open Double Ski 1 Mooloolaba Team C 2 Mooloolaba Team B 3 Mooloolaba Team A

55-59 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Blackburn (Surfers Paradise) 2 Darryl Michael Trinca (Southport) 3 Anthony LeMarseny (Noosa Heads)

65-69 Female Surf Board 1 Norith Ladner (Mooloolaba)

45-49 Male Double Ski 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Palm Beach Team B 3 Palm Beach Team A 45-49 Male Ironman 1 Andrews Guy (Tallebudgera) 2 Cox Greg (Palm Beach) 3 Sewell Scott (Byron Bay) 45-49 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Brett McDonald (Surfers Paradise) 2 Greg Cox (Palm Beach) 3 Tim Matchett (Palm Beach) 45-49 Male Surf Board 1 Greg Cox (Palm Beach) 2 Guy Andrews (Tallebudgera) 3 Anthony Hoppitt (Mermaid Beach) 45-49 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Palm Beach Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Currumbin Team A 45-49 Male Surf Race 1 McDonald Brett (Surfers Paradise) 2 Baxter John (Maroochydore) 3 Cox Greg (Palm Beach) 45-49 Male Surf Ski 1 Kenny Martin (Alexandra Headland) 2 Prior Jason (Alexandra Headland) 3 Frost Mark (Palm Beach) 50-54 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Roberts Edwina (Nobbys Beach) 2 Marsh Belinda (Noosa Heads) 50-54 Female Beach Flags 1 Carol Jones (Mooloolaba) 2 Linda Hagan (Point Lookout) 3 Briony McSwan (Alexandra Headland) 50-54 Female Beach Sprint 1 Carol Jones (Mooloolaba) 2 Briony McSwan (Alexandra Headland) 3 Edwina Roberts (Nobbys Beach) 50-54 Female Ironwoman 1 Alison Pegg (Noosa Heads) 2 Sandra Penman (Mermaid Beach) 3 Sally Hunt (North Burleigh)

50-54 Male Ironman 1 Paul Davis (Brunswick) 2 Rick Van Kampen (Coolangatta) 3 James Marsh (Brunswick) 50-54 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Paul Davis (Brunswick) 2 Roger Belmar (Northcliffe) 3 Andrew Thomas (Surfers Paradise) 50-54 Male Surf Board 1 Paul Davis (Brunswick) 2 Rick Van Kampen (Coolangatta) 3 Christopher Price (Sunshine Beach) 50-54 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Brunswick Team A 2 Coolum Beach Team A 3 Sunshine Beach Team A 50-54 Male Surf Race 1 Rick Van Kampen (Coolangatta) 2 Riccardo Cornacchia (Coolum Beach) 3 Christopher Price (Sunshine Beach) 50-54 Male Surf Ski 1 Peter Dorries (Surfers Paradise) 2 Jeffrey Lemarseny (Alexandra Headland) 3 Wayne Marshall (Mermaid Beach) 50-54 Open Double Ski 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 Mermaid Beach Team A 55-59 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Wendy Callard (Palm Beach) 2 Margaret Kyle (Northcliffe)

55-59 Female Surf Ski 1 Alison Fisk (Noosa Heads) 2 Susan Hancock (Mooloolaba) 3 Margaret Kyle (Northcliffe)

55-59 Male Surf Board 1 Noel Kolkka (Northcliffe) 2 Martin Ashfield (Surfers Paradise) 3 Dale Penman (Mermaid Beach) 55-59 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Surfers Paradise Team A 3 Southport Team A 55-59 Male Surf Race 1 Darryl Blackburn (Surfers Paradise) 2 Anthony LeMarseny (Noosa Heads) 3 Ian Norman (Coolum Beach) 55-59 Male Surf Ski 1 Robert Dorrough (Surfers Paradise) 2 Allan Brauer (Mooloolaba) 3 Greg Bowditch (Tallebudgera) 55-59 Open Double Ski 1 Northcliffe Team B 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Byron Bay Team A 60-64 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Gay Bradley (Alexandra Headland) 2 Alison Windsor (Mudjimba) 60-64 Female Surf Board 1 Gay Bradley (Alexandra Headland)

55-59 Female Beach Flags 1 Tracey Mitchell (Nobbys Beach) 2 Jacqueline Eaton-Sinclair (Alexandra Headland) 3 Jane MacDonnell (Alexandra Headland)

60-64 Female Surf Race 1 Bradley Gay (Alexandra Headland) 2 Windsor Alison (Mudjimba) 3 Jeffery Pauline (Kurrawa)

55-59 Female Beach Sprint 1 Tracey Mitchell (Nobbys Beach) 2 Jane MacDonnell (Alexandra Headland) 3 Jacqueline Eaton-Sinclair (Alexandra Headland)

60-64 Male 1km Beach Run 1 Jim McCullagh (Urunga) 2 Bruce Serisier (Nobbys Beach) 3 Steven Jeisman (Mudjimba)

55-59 Female Ironwoman 1 Alison Fisk (Noosa Heads) 2 Margaret Kyle (Northcliffe)

60-64 Male Beach Flags 1 Steven Jeisman (Mudjimba) 2 Jim McCullagh (Urunga) 3 William Robertson (Yeppoon)

60-64 Male Surf Board 1 Bruce Kolkka (Northcliffe) 2 Clive Sharp (Mooloolaba) 3 Colin Mustoe (Byron Bay)

65-69 Male 1km Beach Run 1 Philip Harvey (Byron Bay) 2 David Quemard (Brunswick) 3 John Carter (Miami Beach) 65-69 Male Beach Flags 1 Robert Tomblin (Kurrawa) 2 Ian Murphy (Nobbys Beach) 3 Ken Eldridge (Alexandra Headland) 65-69 Male Beach Sprint 1 Robert Tomblin (Kurrawa) 2 Ken Eldridge (Alexandra Headland) 3 Ian Murphy (Nobbys Beach) 65-69 Male Ironman 1 Rodney Taylor (Mooloolaba) 2 Richard Bedford (Northcliffe) 3 Geoffrey Dews (Maroochydore) 65-69 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Rodney Taylor (Mooloolaba) 2 Barry Aplin (Surfers Paradise) 3 Graham Toohey (Mooloolaba) 65-69 Male Surf Board 1 Rodney Taylor (Mooloolaba) 2 Geoffrey Dews (Maroochydore) 3 Ian Jobson (Maroochydore) 65-69 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Maroochydore Team A 65-69 Male Surf Race 1 Rodney Taylor (Mooloolaba) 2 Paul Baker (Coolangatta) 3 Barry Aplin (Surfers Paradise) 65-69 Male Surf Ski 1 Rodney Taylor (Mooloolaba) 2 Philip Harvey (Byron Bay) 3 Ross Fisher (Noosa Heads) 65-69 Open Double Ski 1 Byron Bay Team A 2 Coolum Beach Team A 70 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Elizabeth Crilly (Kurrawa) 2 Christina Nicholls (Kurrawa)

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

75


Over 260 Years Open Surf Boat 1 Tugun Team A 2 Coolum Beach 3 Kurrawa

U11 Male Cameron Relay 1 North Burleigh Team B 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 Southport Team A

U12 Male Beach Flags 1 Thomas Basford (Met Caloundra) 2 Jack Stafford (Tallebudgera) 3 Taj Andrews (Tannum Sands)

45+ Years Female Double Ski 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Byron Bay Team A 3 Noosa Heads Team A

U11 Male Ironman 1 Kalani Creech (North Burleigh) 2 Matthew Kalogeropoulos (Southport) 3 Jax Damro (Currumbin)

U12 Male Beach Relay 1 Mudjimba Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Met Caloundra Team A

70+ Male 1km Beach Run 1 Peter Allison (Kurrawa) 2 Anthony Frost (Noosa Heads)

2018 Queensland Youth Championships

U11 Male Surf Board 1 Dillon Howell (North Burleigh) 2 Cooper Harrison (North Burleigh) 3 Oliver Dillon (Tugun)

U12 Male Beach Sprint 1 Thomas Basford (Met Caloundra) 2 Tom Johnston (Mudjimba) 3 Oliver Opray (Palm Beach)

70+ Male Beach Flags 1 Peter Allison (Kurrawa) 2 Robert Benes (Dicky Beach) 3 Glen Wilson (Maroochydore)

Junior All Age Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Tweed Heads & Coolangatta 3 Point Lookout Team A

U11 Male Surf Board Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A

U12 Male Cameron Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Tannum Sands Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A

70+ Male Beach Sprint 1 Robert Benes (Dicky Beach) 2 Peter Allison (Kurrawa) 3 Glen Wilson (Maroochydore)

U11 Female 1km Beach Run 1 Millar Brosnan-Ball (North Burleigh) 2 Paige Jones (Yeppoon) 3 Tayla O’Shanesy (Dicky Beach)

U11 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Tannum Sands Team A 3 Elliott Heads Team A

U12 Male Ironman 1 Ryley Harland (Northcliffe) 2 Ethan Callaghan (North Burleigh) 3 Herb Winter (Currumbin)

70+ Male Double Ski 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A

U11 Female Beach Flags 1 Tayla Bartholomeusz (Maroochydore) 2 Lataya Depauw (Bribie Island) 3 Aleah Stringer (Currumbin)

U11 Male Surf Race 1 Matthew Kalogeropoulos (Southport) 2 Kalani Creech (North Burleigh) 3 Kobi Holden (Elliott Heads)

U12 Male Surf Board 1 Ethan Callaghan (North Burleigh) 2 Taj Andrews (Tannum Sands) 3 Ethan Wentworth (Southport)

U11 Female Beach Relay 1 Tweed Heads & Coolangatta Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Tweed Heads & Coolangatta Team B

U11 Male Surf Team 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 North Burleigh Team B 3 Currumbin Team A

U12 Male Surf Board Relay 1 Tannum Sands Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 North Burleigh Team A

U11 Female Beach Sprint 1 Tayla Bartholomeusz (Maroochydore) 2 Ava Usher (Currumbin) 3 Lily Alford (Tweed Head & Coolangatta)

U12 Female 1km Beach Run 1 Aspen Anderson (Currumbin) 2 Aleira Usher (Currumbin) 3 Molly Sewell (Pacific)

U12 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Tannum Sands Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Currumbin Team B

U11 Female Cameron Relay 1 Mermaid Beach Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 North Burleigh Team A

U12 Female Beach Flags 1 Elizabeth Clarke (Alexandra Headland) 2 Jasmine Single (Kurrawa) 3 Layla Martiensen (Hervey Bay)

U12 Male Surf Race 1 Ryley Harland (Northcliffe) 2 Kane Martin (Tannum Sands) 3 Herb Winter (Currumbin)

U11 Female Ironwoman 1 Allie Hughes (Tugun) 2 Milla Jansen (Currumbin) 3 Ava Usher (Currumbin)

U12 Female Beach Relay 1 Met Caloundra Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Tweed Heads & Coolangatta

U12 Male Surf Team 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Dicky Beach Team A 3 Kurrawa Team A

U11 Female Surf Board 1 Allie Hughes (Tugun) 2 Milla Jansen (Currumbin) 3 Ava Usher (Currumbin)

U12 Female Beach Sprint 1 Britney Ingr (Currumbin) 2 Havana Harris (Miami Beach) 3 Jade Bartholomeusz (Maroochydore)

U13 Female 1km Beach Run 1 Eva Parish (Northcliffe) 2 Lucy Schooth (Tallebudgera) 3 Emily Gauld (Northcliffe)

U11 Female Surf Board Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Tugun Team A 3 North Burleigh Team A

U12 Female Cameron Relay 1 Sunshine Beach Team A 2 Met Caloundra Team A 3 North Burleigh Team A

U13 Female Beach Flags 1 Emily Gauld (Northcliffe) 2 Zoe-Lee Thomsen (Bribie Island) 3 Caitlin Wallis (Mermaid Beach)

Over 140 Years Male Surf Boat 1 Maroochydore 2 Kurrawa

U11 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Kawana Waters 3 Tugun Team A

U12 Female Ironwoman 1 Summer Hooper (Sunshine Beach) 2 Leah Pilkington (Alexandra Headland) 3 Lucia Richards (Met Caloundra)

U13 Female Beach Relay 1 Tannum Sands Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

Over 160 Years Female Surf Boat 1 Mermaid Beach 2 TH&C 3 BHMP

U11 Female Surf Race 1 Milla Jansen (Currumbin) 2 Chaise Montey (Mermaid Beach) 3 Ava Usher (Currumbin)

U12 Female Surf Board 1 Maggie Tapp (Emu Park) 2 Isabel Monaghan (Maroochydore) 3 Chelsea Wood (BHMP)

U13 Female Beach Sprint 1 Tahli Devine (Kurrawa) 2 Tenley Snow (Mooloolaba) 3 Imogen Harvey (Alexandra Headland)

Over 160 Years Male Surf Boat 1 Noosa Heads 2 Northcliffe 3 Emu Park Team A

U11 Female Surf Team 1 Currumbin Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 Dicky Beach Team A

U12 Female Surf Board Relay 1 Met Caloundra Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team B 3 Maroochydore Team A

U13 Female Cameron Relay 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Southport Team A 3 Mermaid Beach Team A

Over 180 Years Open Surf Boat 1 Mermaid Beach 2 Met Caloundra Team A 3 Alexandra Headland

U11 Male 1km Beach Run 1 Soma Byres (Kurrawa) 2 Cooper Harrison (North Burleigh) 3 Beau Williamson (Point Lookout)

U12 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 BHMP Team A 2 Met Caloundra Team A 3 Tallebudgera Team A

U13 Female Ironwoman 1 Jamie Perkins (Maroochydore) 2 Eva Parish (Northcliffe) 3 Alyssa Bailey (Mermaid Beach)

Over 200 Years Open Surf Boat 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team B

U11 Male Beach Flags 1 Beau Williamson (Point Lookout) 2 Oscar Wemmerslager (Tannum Sands) 3 Blake Kruska (Northcliffe)

U12 Female Surf Race 1 Leah Pilkington (Alexandra Headland) 2 Savannah Murdocca (Currumbin) 3 Brooke Casey (Kawana Waters)

U13 Female Surf Board 1 Jamie Perkins (Maroochydore) 2 Morgan Trinca (Southport) 3 Emily Gauld (Northcliffe)

Over 220 Years Open Surf Boat 1 Mooloolaba 2 Noosa Heads 3 Alexandra Headland

U11 Male Beach Relay 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Mudjimba Team A 3 Noosa Heads Team A

U12 Female Surf Team 1 Met Caloundra Team A 2 Kawana Waters Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A

U13 Female Surf Board Relay 1 Mermaid Beach Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Southport Team A

Over 240 Years Open Surf Boat 1 Coolangatta 2 Mooloolaba 3 Alexandra Headland

U11 Male Beach Sprint 1 Isaac Barrett (Elliott Heads) 2 Findlay Booker (Mooloolaba) 3 Cooper Harrison (North Burleigh)

U12 Male 1km Beach Run 1 Jake French (Tugun) 2 Tai Smith (Currumbin) 3 Bailin Haji (Bribie Island)

U13 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A

70 Female Surf Board 1 Christina Nicholls (Kurrawa) 70 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Kurrawa Team A 70 Female Surf Race 1 Elizabeth Crilly (Kurrawa) 2 Christina Nicholls (Kurrawa)

70+ Male Ironman 1 Neville De Mestre (North Burleigh) 70+ Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Len Wood (Maroochydore) 2 Peter Allison (Kurrawa) 3 Neville De Mestre (North Burleigh) 70+ Male Surf Board 1 Neville De Mestre (North Burleigh) 2 Jeffrey Gatenby (Kurrawa) 70+ Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A 70+ Male Surf Race 1 Neville De Mestre (North Burleigh) 2 Len Wood (Maroochydore) 3 Chez Suska (Redhead) 70+ Male Surf Ski 1 Robert Stewart (Mooloolaba) 2 Chez Suska (Redhead) 3 Kenneth Cameron (Coolum Beach) Over 140 Years Female Surf Boat 1 Met Caloundra Team A 2 Mooloolaba

76

SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND


U13 Female Surf Race 1 Jamie Perkins (Maroochydore) 2 Mia Collins (Currumbin) 3 Morgan Trinca (Southport)

U14 Female Cameron Relay 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 Kawana Waters Team A

U15 5 Person R&R 1 Tweed Heads & Coolangatta Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Tweed Heads & Coolangatta Team B

U15 Male Surf Board Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A

U13 Female Surf Team 1 Mermaid Beach Team A 2 Southport Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A

U14 Female Ironwoman 1 Grace Otto (Sunshine Beach) 2 Ruby Meehan (Currumbin) 3 Finella Gibbs-Beal (Noosa Heads)

U15 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Daisy Fahey (North Burleigh) 2 Lauren Nugent (North Barrier Branch) 3 Bronte Naylor (Alexandra Headland)

U15 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Sunshine Beach Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Northcliffe Team B

U14 Female Surf Board 1 Ruby Meehan (Currumbin) 2 Belle Anderssen (Noosa Heads) 3 Charlotte Cross (North Burleigh)

U15 Female Beach Flags 1 Ellie Beer (Currumbin) 2 Izzey O’Hara (Mudjimba) 3 Emma Thompson (Dicky Beach)

U15 Male Surf Race 1 Joseph McMenamin (Maroochydore) 2 Zachary Tabuai (Kurrawa) 3 Samuel Short (Maroochydore)

U14 Female Surf Board Relay 1 Sunshine Beach Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Sunshine Beach Team B

U15 Female Beach Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Noosa Heads Team A

U15 Male Surf Team 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Kurrawa Team A

U14 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Kawana Waters Team A 2 Southport Team A 3 Sunshine Beach Team A

U15 Female Beach Sprint 1 Ellie Beer (Currumbin) 2 Marianna Konopka (Bundaberg) 3 Brodie Monro (Dicky Beach)

Junior 2 Person R & R 1 Point Lookout Team A 2 Southport Team B 3 Tweed Heads & Coolangatta Team D

U14 Female Surf Race 1 Finella Gibbs-Beal (Noosa Heads) 2 Francesca McKinley (Sunshine Beach) 3 Lila Horobin (Kurrawa)

U15 Female Cameron Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 North Barrier Branch Team A

Junior March Past 1 BHMP Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Miami Beach Team A

U14 Female Surf Team 1 Sunshine Beach Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Sunshine Beach Team B

U15 Female Ironwoman 1 Tayla Halliday (Alexandra Headland) 2 Sarah Perkins (Maroochydore) 3 Dominique Stitt (Maroochydore)

U14 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Jacob Bristow (Maroochydore) 2 Brayden Mercer (Kurrawa) 3 Oliver Lukin (North Queensland Branch)

U15 Female Surf Board 1 Keeley Wood (BHMP) 2 Brooke Taber (Mooloolaba) 3 Samantha Mackie (North Burleigh)

U14 Male Beach Flags 1 Elliot Smethills (Alexandra Headland) 2 Charles Passmore (Currumbin) 3 Jayden Marshall (Alexandra Headland)

U15 Female Surf Board Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A

U14 Male Beach Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Kurrawa Team A

U15 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 North Barrier Branch Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team B 3 Noosa Heads Team A

U14 Male Beach Sprint 1 Alexander Innes (Alexandra Headland) 2 Elliot Smethills (Alexandra Headland) 3 Charles Passmore (Currumbin)

U15 Female Surf Race 1 Perkins Sarah (Maroochydore) 2 Halliday Tayla (Alexandra Headland) 3 Nugent Lauren (North Barrier Branch)

U14 Male Cameron Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Met Caloundra Team A

U15 Female Surf Team 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

U14 Male Ironman 1 Zach King (Currumbin) 2 Jack Eveleigh (BHMP) 3 Thomas Auty (Sunshine Beach)

U15 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Riley Shilling (Point Lookout) 2 Adam Page (Tallebudgera) 3 Jack Read (Tallebudgera)

U14 Male Surf Board 1 Ben Wischusen (Maroochydore) 2 Levi Penn (Alexandra Headland) 3 Charles Passmore (Currumbin)

U15 Male Beach Flags 1 Kai Thompson (Noosa Heads) 2 Fraser Toon (Kurrawa) 3 Ky Woods (Bundaberg)

U14 Male Surf Board Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A

U15 Male Beach Relay 1 Bundaberg Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 North Barrier Branch Team A

U14 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Kawana Waters Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

U15 Male Beach Sprint 1 Kai Thompson (Noosa Heads) 2 Fraser Toon (Kurrawa) 3 Mason Peut (Alexandra Headland)

U14 Male Surf Race 1 Zach King (Currumbin) 2 Jack Eveleigh (BHMP) 3 Kai Harland (Northcliffe)

U15 Male Cameron Relay 1 Northcliffe Team B 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Maroochydore Team B

U14 Female Beach Relay 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 North Barrier Branch Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

U14 Male Surf Team 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Met Caloundra Team A 3 Currumbin Team A

U15 Male Ironman 1 Kai Watson (Northcliffe) 2 Connor Peabody (Kurrawa) 3 Zachary Tabuai (Kurrawa)

U14 Female Beach Sprint 1 Neve Underwood (Alexandra Headland) 2 Amy Kibble (Noosa Heads) 3 Letitia Fox (Alexandra Headland)

U15 2 Person R&R 1 North Barrier Branch Team A 2 Tugun Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A

U15 Male Surf Board 1 Oliver Monaghan (Maroochydore) 2 Beau Meehan (Currumbin) 3 Kai Watson (Northcliffe)

U13 Male 1km Beach Run 1 Peyton Craig (Tannum Sands) 2 Jed Walter (Tallebudgera) 3 Connor Lilley (Mooloolaba) U13 Male Beach Flags 1 Jayden Boreham (Kawana Waters) 2 Sol Shilling (Point Lookout) 3 Peyton Craig (Tannum Sands) U13 Male Beach Relay 1 Met Caloundra Team A 2 Dicky Beach Team A 3 Noosa Heads Team A U13 Male Beach Sprint 1 James Gelling (Noosa Heads) 2 Izaac Meuleman (Marcoola) 3 Jayden Boreham (Kawana Waters) U13 Male Cameron Relay 1 Tallebudgera Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A U13 Male Ironman 1 Euan Lynch (Northcliffe) 2 Lucas Miller (Northcliffe) 3 Braden Bamford (Northcliffe) U13 Male Surf Board 1 Oliver James (Northcliffe) 2 Euan Lynch (Northcliffe) 3 Taj Crellin (Mermaid Beach) U13 Male Surf Board Relay 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Mermaid Beach Team A 3 Kawana Waters Team A U13 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Tallebudgera Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Northcliffe Team B U13 Male Surf Race 1 Sam Harris (Maroochydore) 2 Lucas Miller (Northcliffe) 3 Coeby Frigo (Currumbin) U13 Male Surf Team 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A U14 2 Person R&R 1 North Barrier Branch Team A 2 Point Lookout Team A 3 Point Lookout Team B U14 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Mia Marks (Kurrawa) 2 Jazzy Shults (Maroochydore) 3 Anna Bradley (Point Lookout) U14 Female Beach Flags 1 Amy Kibble (Noosa Heads) 2 Neve Underwood (Alexandra Headland) 3 Ella Milfull (Yeppoon)

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

77


FINANCIALS Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

General purpose financial report for the year ended 31 May 2018

Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Consolidated statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income For the year ended 31 May 2018

______________________________________________________________________________________ Consolidated Group 2018 $

2017 $

31,757,485

31,694,658

Life saving services

(3,970,818)

(3,796,115)

Lifeguard operations

(11,531,559)

(11,356,486)

(1,744,985)

(1,787,486)

(739,729)

(646,414)

Notes Revenue

3.1

Club support Surf sports Education, youth and membership

(1,528,226)

(1,443,965)

Marketing and public affairs

(1,408,073)

(1,428,358)

Aviation

(6,766,326)

(6,642,184)

Corporate support

(1,962,799)

(2,846,580)

Cairns SLSSC operating expenses

(3,024,579)

(2,604,383)

(3,125,641)

(2,489,000)

412,118

489,177

1,438

17,637

(3,631,694)

(2,839,499)

(3,631,694)

(2,839,499)

(3,631,694)

(2,839,499)

Impairment of property, plant and equipment

7

Net increase in investments Finance income net

3.4

Surplus/(deficit) from continuing operations Income tax expense Surplus/(deficit) after income tax Other comprehensive income for the year Total comprehensive income for the year

1(l)

The above consolidated statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income should be read in 1 conjunction with the accompanying notes.

78

SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Consolidated statement of financial position As at 31 May 2018

______________________________________________________________________________________ Consolidated Group Notes

2018

2017

$

$

Assets Current assets Cash and cash equivalents

4

1,711,325

1,383,154

Trade and other receivables

5

1,610,337

2,243,602

Other financial assets

6

7,371,414

9,109,296

Inventories

376,465

332,704

Other current assets

159,490

195,603

11,229,031

13,264,359

Total current assets Non-current assets

13,525,603

14,862,706

Total non-current assets

Property, plant and equipment

7

13,525,603

14,862,706

Total assets

24,754,634

28,127,065

Liabilities Current liabilities Trade and other payables

8

1,995,520

1,877,802

Employee benefit liabilities

9

2,000,438

1,618,673

827,084

779,642

4,823,042

4,276,117

362,757

650,419

Revenue received in advance Total current liabilities Non-current liabilities Employee benefit liabilities Total non-current liabilities

9

362,757

650,419

5,185,799

4,926,536

19,568,835

23,200,529

Retained earnings

19,568,835

23,200,529

Total Association's funds

19,568,835

23,200,529

Total liabilities Net assets Association's funds

The above consolidated statement of financial position should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

3

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

79


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Consolidated statement of changes in Association’s funds For the year ended 31 May 2018 Consolidated Group 2018

2017

$

$

Balance at the beginning of the financial year

23,200,529

26,040,028

Surplus/(deficit) for the year

(3,631,694)

(2,839,499)

Association's funds Retained earnings

Other comprehensive income for the year

-

-

Balance at the end of the financial year

19,568,835

23,200,529

The above consolidated statement of changes in Association's funds should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

4

80 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Consolidated statement of cash flows For the year ended 31 May 2018

______________________________________________________________________________________ Consolidated Group

Cash flows from operating activities Receipts in the course of operations

Notes

Payments in the course of operations Interest received GST remitted to ATO Net cash (used in)/generated from operating activities

4

Cash flows from investing activities Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment Purchase of property, plant and equipment Acquisition of other financial assets Disposal/Withdrawal of other financial assets Net cash (used in)/generated from investing activities Cash flows from financing activities Net cash (used in)/generated from financing activities Net increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents Cash on hand at the beginning of the financial year Cash on hand at the end of the financial year

4

2018

2017

$

$

35,339,747

34,529,796

(31,065,210)

(30,176,510)

1,438

17,637

(1,235,403)

(1,061,746)

3,040,572

3,309,177

100,456

24,907

(4,962,857) -

(4,709,557) (2,014,118)

2,150,000

-

(2,712,401)

(6,698,768)

-

-

328,171

(3,389,591)

1,383,154

4,772,745

1,711,325

1,383,154

The above consolidated statement of cash flows should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

5

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

81


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements For the year ended 31 May 2018

______________________________________________________________________________________ 1.

Summary of significant accounting policies

(a)

Basis of preparation

This general purpose financial report has been prepared in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements of the Australian Accounting Standards Board for distribution to the members to fulfil the directors' financial reporting requirements under the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 and the Associations Incorporation Act Queensland 1981. The Association is a not-for-profit entity for financial reporting purposes under Australian Accounting Standards. Material accounting policies adopted in the preparation of these financial statements are presented below and have been consistently applied unless stated otherwise. Australian Accounting Standards set out accounting policies that the Australian Accounting Standards Board has concluded would result in financial statements containing relevant and reliable information about transactions, events and conditions. Material accounting policies adopted in the preparation of the financial statements are presented below and have been consistently applied unless stated otherwise. The financial statements, except for the cash flow information, have been prepared on an accrual basis of accounting and are based on historical costs and the going concern assumption. Cost is based on the fair values of the consideration given in exchange for assets. The accounting policies adopted are consistent with those of the previous year. The financial report is presented in Australian dollars ($) The amounts presented in the financial statements have been rounded to the nearest dollar.

(b)

New accounting standards and interpretations

(i)

Changes in accounting policies, new and amended standards and interpretations

The accounting policies adopted are consistent with those of the previous financial year. (ii)

Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued but not yet effective

Certain Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations that have recently been issued or amended but are not yet effective and have not been adopted by the Association for the annual reporting period ended 31 May 2018. The directors have not early adopted any of these new or amended standards or interpretations. The directors have not yet fully assessed the impact of these new or amended standards (to the extent relevant to the Association) and interpretations.

(c)

Principles of Consolidation

The consolidated financial statements incorporate all of the assets, liabilities and results of the parent (Surf Life Saving Queensland) and all of the subsidiaries (including any structured entities). Subsidiaries are entities the parent controls. The parent controls an entity when it is exposed to, or has rights to, variable returns from its involvement with the entity and has the ability to affect those returns through its power over the entity. A list of the subsidiaries is provided in Note 12. The assets, liabilities and results of all subsidiaries are fully consolidated into the financial statements of the Group from the date on which control is obtained by the Group. The consolidation of a subsidiary is discontinued from the date that control ceases. Intercompany transactions, balances and unrealised gains or losses on transactions between group entities are fully eliminated on consolidation. Accounting policies of subsidiaries have been changed and adjustments made where necessary to ensure uniformity of the accounting policies adopted by the Group. Business combinations Business combinations occur where an acquirer obtains control over one or more businesses. A business combination is accounted for by applying the acquisition method, unless it is a combination involving entities or businesses under common control. The business combination will be accounted for from the date that control is attained, whereby the fair values of the identifiable assets acquired and liabilities (including contingent liabilities) assumed are recognised (subject to certain limited exceptions).

6

82 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2018

______________________________________________________________________________________ 1.

Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(d)

Current versus non-current classification

The Association presents assets and liabilities in the statement of financial position based on current/non-current classification. An asset is current when it is: 

Expected to be realised or intended to be sold or consumed in the Association's normal operating cycle

Held primarily for the purpose of trading

Expected to be realised within twelve months after the reporting period, or

Cash or cash equivalent unless restricted from being exchanged or used to settle a liability for at least twelve months after the reporting period

The Association classifies all other assets as non-current. A liability is current when: 

It is expected to be settled in the Association's normal operating cycle

It is held primarily for the purpose of trading

It is due to be settled within twelve months after the reporting period, or

There is no unconditional right to defer the settlement of the liability for at least twelve months after the reporting period

The Association classifies all other liabilities as non-current.

(e)

Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and short-term deposits in the statement of financial position comprise cash at banks and on hand and short-term deposits with a maturity of three months or less, which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value. For the purpose of the statement of cash flows, cash and cash equivalents consist of cash and short-term deposits as defined above, net of outstanding bank overdrafts if applicable.

(f)

Trade and other receivables

Trade receivables and other receivables, which generally have 30 day terms, are recognised initially at fair value and subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, less an allowance for impairment. Collectability of trade receivables is reviewed on an ongoing basis at an operating unit level. Individual debts that are known to be uncollectible are written off when identified. Receivables expected to be collected within 12 months of the end of the reporting period are classified as current assets. All other receivables are classified as non-current assets.

(g)

Financial assets

Financial assets classified as held for trading are included in the category ‘other financial assets'. They represent financial assets at fair value through profit or loss. Financial assets are classified as held for trading if they are acquired for the purpose of selling in the near term.

7

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

83


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2018

______________________________________________________________________________________ 1.

Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(h)

Property, plant and equipment

Property, plant and equipment are stated at cost, net of accumulated depreciation and any accumulated impairment losses. Such cost includes the cost of replacing part of the property, plant and equipment and borrowing costs for long-term construction projects if the recognition criteria are met. When significant parts of property, plant and equipment are required to be replaced at intervals, Surf Life Saving Queensland recognises such parts as individual assets with specific useful lives and depreciates them accordingly. Likewise, when a major inspection is performed, its cost is recognised in the carrying amount of the plant and equipment as a replacement if the recognition criteria are satisfied. Land and buildings are measured at cost less accumulated depreciation on buildings and impairment losses recognised. Depreciation is calculated over the estimated useful life of the assets as follows: Class of assets Depreciation method Deprecation rate / useful life Buildings Straight line 2.5% Leasehold improvements Straight line Life of associated lease Plant and equipment – Other Straight line 10% - 40% Plant and equipment – Helicopter Usage – operating hours 1,000 – 10,840 hours (components) Plant and equipment – Helicopter Straight line 6.67% - 100% (other) The residual values, useful lives and methods of depreciation of property, plant and equipment are reviewed at each financial year end and adjusted prospectively, if appropriate. Impairment The carrying values of property, plant and equipment are reviewed for impairment at each reporting date, with the recoverable amount being estimated when events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may be impaired. The recoverable amount of property, plant and equipment is the higher of fair value less costs to sell and value in use. Impairment exists when the carrying value of an asset or cash exceeds its estimated recoverable amount. The asset is then written down to its recoverable amount. Impairment losses, if any, are recognised in the statement of comprehensive income as a separate line item. Derecognition and disposal An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal. Gains and losses on disposals are determined by comparing proceeds with the carrying amount. Any gain or loss arising on derecognition of the asset is included in profit or loss in the year the asset is derecognised.

(i)

Trade and other payables

Trade payables and other payables represent the liability outstanding at the end of the reporting period for goods and services received by Surf Life Saving Queensland during the reporting period which remain unpaid and arise when Surf Life Saving Queensland becomes obliged to make future payments in respect of the purchase of these goods and services.

8

84 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2018

______________________________________________________________________________________ 1.

Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(j)

Employee benefit liabilities

The Association does not expect its long service leave or annual leave benefits to be settled wholly within 12 months of each reporting date. The Association recognises a liability for long service leave and annual leave measured as the present value of expected future payments to be made in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date. Consideration is given to t h e expected future wage and salary levels, experience of employee departures, and periods of service. Expected future payments are discounted using market yields at the reporting date on corporate bonds with terms to maturity and currencies that match, as closely as possible, the estimated future cash outflows.

(k)

Revenue recognition

Revenue is recognised to the extent that it is probable that the economic benefits will flow to Surf Life Saving Queensland and the revenue can be reliably measured. The following specific recognition criteria must also be met before revenue is recognised:

(l)

Revenue from the provision of services is recognised as the relevant services are performed.

Revenue from donations is recognised on receipt.

Revenue from sponsorships is recognised on a straight-line basis over the period of the sponsorship agreement when the Association has the unconditional right to receive sponsorship donations.

Taxes

Current income tax Surf Life Saving Queensland is exempt from income tax pursuant to Section 50-10 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997. Surf Life Saving Queensland is a Public Benevolent Institution (PBI) and has been endorsed by the Australian Taxation Office to receive tax concessions. Further, Surf Life Saving Queensland is endorsed as a Deductible Gift Recipient (DGR). Goods and services tax (GST) Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of GST, except: •

When the GST incurred on a sale or purchase of assets or services is not payable to or recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office (ATO), in which case the GST is recognised as part of the revenue or the expense item or as part of the cost of acquisition of the asset, as applicable.

When receivables and payables are stated inclusive of the amount of GST receivable or payable.

The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the ATO is included as part of receivables or payables in the statement of financial position. Commitments and contingencies are disclosed net of the amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the ATO. Cash flows are included in the statement of cash flows on a gross basis and the GST component of cash flows arising from investing and financing activities, which is recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority is classified as part of operating cash flows.

(m)

Government grants

Government grants are recognised when there is reasonable assurance that the grant will be received and all attaching conditions will be complied with. If conditions are attached to the grant which must be satisfied before the entity is eligible to receive the contribution, the recognition of the grant as revenue will be deferred until those conditions are satisfied. Revenue received for capital grants is recognised upon acquisition of the underlying asset within the statement of comprehensive income.

9

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2018

______________________________________________________________________________________ 1.

Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(n)

Interest-bearing loans and borrowings

All loans and borrowings are initially recognised at the fair value of the consideration received less directly attributable transaction costs. After initial recognition, interest-bearing loans and borrowings are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method. Fees paid on the establishment of loan facilities that are yield related are included as part of the carrying amount of the loans and borrowings. Borrowings are classified as current liabilities unless the Association has an unconditional right to defer settlement of the liability for at least 12 months after the reporting date.

(o)

Financial risk management objectives and policies

Surf Life Saving Queensland 's principal financial instruments comprise receivables, payables, cash and short-term deposits, interest bearing loan and borrowings and investments held in equities. Surf Life Saving Queensland manages its exposure to key financial risks in accordance with the financial risk management policy. The main risks arising from Surf Life Saving Queensland 's financial instruments are credit risk, liquidity risk and price risk. Surf Life Saving Queensland uses different methods to measure and manage different types of risks to which it is exposed. These include ageing analyses and monitoring of specific credit allowances undertaken to manage credit risk. Liquidity risk is monitored through the development of future rolling cash flow forecasts. The Board reviews and agrees policies for managing each of these risks. Credit risk arises from the financial assets of Surf Life Saving Queensland, which comprise cash and cash equivalents, trade and other receivables. Surf Life Saving Queensland 's exposure to credit risk arises from potential default of the counter party, with a maximum exposure equal to the carrying amount of these instruments. Surf Life Saving Queensland trades only with recognised, creditworthy third parties, and as such collateral is not requested nor is it Surf Life Saving Queensland 's policy to securitise its trade and other receivables. In addition, receivable balances are monitored on an ongoing basis with the result that Surf Life Saving Queensland 's exposure to bad debts is not significant. There are no significant concentrations of credit risk within Surf Life Saving Queensland. Liquidity risk arises from the timing differences between cash inflows and cash outflows. Surf Life Saving Queensland 's objective is to maintain a balance between continuity of funding and flexibility. The Board has in place capital working capital and reinvestment targets and regularly monitors forward cash flow forecasts. Equity securities price risks a r i s e from investments in equity securities. To limit this risk Surf Life Saving Queensland diversifies its portfolio in accordance with limits set by the Board in conjunction with its investment fund manager Perpetual. The majority of the equity investments is of a high quality and is publicly traded on the ASX. The price risk appears immaterial in terms of a possible impact on profit and loss and as such a sensitivity analysis has not been completed. Primary responsibility for identification and control of financial risk rests with the Board. The Board reviews and agrees policies for managing each of these risks identified.

10

86 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2018

______________________________________________________________________________________ 2.

Significant accounting judgements, estimates and assumptions

The preparation of the Group's financial statements requires management to make judgements, estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of revenues, expenses, assets and liabilities, and the accompanying disclosures, and the disclosure of contingent liabilities. Uncertainty about these assumptions and estimates could result in outcomes that require a material adjustment to the carrying amount of assets or liabilities affected in future periods. (i) Estimation of useful lives or assets The estimation of the useful lives of assets has been based on historical experience as well as manufacturers' warranties (for plant, equipment and helicopters), lease terms (for leased equipment) and turnover policies (for motor vehicles). In addition, the condition of the assets is assessed at least once per year and considered against the remaining useful life. Adjustments to useful lives are made prospectively, if appropriate. (ii) Impairment of leasehold improvements Impairment indicators were identified relating to the carrying value of the leasehold improvements for the Cairns Surf Life Saving Supporters Club Inc. An impairment assessment was performed, with a recoverable amount determined based on value-in-use calculations. In determining value-in-use, projected future cash flows are discounted using a risk adjusted discount rate. From this impairment assessment, an impairment of property, plant and equipment of $2,681,900 (2017: $2,489,000) has been recognised. (iii) Impairment of helicopter equipment Impairment indicators were identified relating to the carrying value of the helicopter models, contained within the plant and equipment class of property, plant and equipment. An impairment assessment was performed, with a market value determined based on an independent valuation report produced by Valuations & Appraisal Services Australasia Pty Ltd on the 4 June 2018. From this impairment assessment, a further impairment of property, plant and equipment of $443,741 (2017: $Nil) has been recognised. (iv) Value of assets in Agnes Water Surf Life Saving Club Inc at date of gaining control As disclosed in Note 12, Surf Life Saving Queensland obtained control of Agnes Water Surf Life Saving Club Inc on 28 October 2015. The judgement has been made that the property, plant and equipment of Agnes Water Surf Life Saving Club Inc had a $nil value in use at 28 October 2015. This judgement is made since the Agnes Water Surf Life Saving Club Inc is not generating significant surpluses. (v) Value of assets in Bowen Surf Life Saving Club Inc at date of gaining control As disclosed in Note 12, Surf Life Saving Queensland obtained control of Bowen Surf Life Saving Club Inc on 26 April 2017. The judgement has been made that the property, plant and equipment of Bowen Surf Life Saving Club Inc had a $nil value in use at 26 April 2017. This judgement is made since (i) the Bowen Surf Life Saving Club Inc is not generating significant surpluses, and (ii) the lease of the property has expired and is currently be renegotiated.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2018

______________________________________________________________________________________ 3.

Revenue and expenses

3.1.

Revenue

Rendering of services (sponsors and lifesaving) Government grants Distributions from Surf Life Saving Foundation and Surf Life Saving Australia General donations Royalty income Net gain/(loss) on disposal of property, plant and equipment Cairns Surf Life Saving Supporters Club Inc revenue Other revenues

3.2.

Employee benefits expense

Wages and salaries

3.3.

Depreciation and amortisation expense

Depreciation of non-current assets Buildings Plant and equipment Total depreciation of non-current assets Amortisation of non-current assets Leasehold improvements Total amortisation of non-current assets Total depreciation and amortisation expense

Consolidated Group 2018 $ 20,372,945 4,938,411

2017 $ 20,713,253 4,349,704

2,316,196

2,674,793

146,978 129,565

227,400 125,040

30,501

15,816

2,585,704 1,237,185 31,757,485

2,408,575 1,180,077 31,694,658

Consolidated Group 2018 $ 16,168,870

2017 $ 15,757,953

Consolidated Group 2018 $

2017 $

78,201 2,750,709 2,828,910

90,263 3,937,736 4,027,999

270,454 270,454

190,453 190,453

3,099,364

4,218,452

12

88 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2018

______________________________________________________________________________________ 3.

Revenue and expenses (continued)

3.4

Finance income – net

Interest income - other corporations

4.

Cash and cash equivalents

Current Cash at bank Term deposits

Consolidated Group 2018 $ 1,438 1,438

2017 $ 17,637 17,637

Consolidated Group 2018 $

2017 $

1,552,126 159,199 1,711,325

1,223,955 159,199 1,383,154

For the purpose of the statement of cash flows, cash and cash equivalents comprise the above. Consolidated Group

Cash flow reconciliation Reconciliation of net surplus after tax to net cash flows from operations: Surplus/(deficit) for the year Adjustments to reconcile surplus after tax to net cash flows: Depreciation and amortisation of property, plant and equipment Impairment of property, plant and equipment (Profit)/loss on disposal of property, plant and equipment Increase in fair value of investments Working capital adjustments: (Increase)/decrease in trade and other receivables (Increase)/decrease in inventories (Increase)/decrease in other assets Increase/(decrease) in trade and other payables Increase/(decrease) in employee benefit liabilities Increase/(decrease) in revenue in advance Net cash flows from operating activities

2018 $

2017 $

(3,631,694)

(2,839,499)

3,099,364

4,218,452

3,125,641

2,489,000

(30,501)

(15,816)

(412,118)

(489,177)

633,265 (43,761) 41,113 117,718 94,103 47,442 3,040,572

114,623 (289,338) 67,214 316,372 79,086 (341,740) 3,309,177

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Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2018

______________________________________________________________________________________ 5.

Trade and other receivables

Consolidated Group

Trade receivables Other receivables Other related parties Related party receivables- Surf Life Saving Clubs Total trade and other receivables

2018 $

2017 $

992,972 617,365 1,610,337

1,758,196 385,406 2,143,602

-

100,000

1,610,337

2,243,602

Trade receivables are non-interest bearing and are generally on 30 day terms. Receivables past due but not considered impaired are $191,845 (2017: $428,703). Discussions with the counterparties and/or receipts subsequent to reporting sheet date have satisfied management that payment will be received in full. During the year, management identified the related party receivable was no longer deemed to be collectible, as a result, the full balance was written off. At 31 May, the ageing analysis of trade debtors is as follows:

5.1.

Trade receivables ageing Total

2018 2017

5.2.

992,972 1,758,196

0-30 Current terms $ 801,127 1,329,493

Past due but not impaired 31-60 61-90 days days $ $ 184,098 4,623 249,078 156,444

>90 days $ 3,124 23,181

Fair value and credit risk

Due to the short-term nature of these receivables, their carrying value is assumed to approximate their fair value. The maximum exposure to credit risk is the fair value of receivables. Collateral is not held as security, nor is it Surf Life Saving Queensland 's policy to transfer (on-sell) receivables to special purpose entities.

6.

Other financial assets

Current Financial assets at fair value

Consolidated Group 2018 $

2017 $

7,371,414

9,109,296

14

90 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2018

______________________________________________________________________________________ 7.

Property, plant and equipment

Consolidated Group 2018 $

2017 $

Land and Buildings At cost Accumulated depreciation Net carrying amount

3,693,493 (1,359,245) 2,334,248

3,693,493 (1,281,044) 2,412,449

Leasehold improvements At cost Accumulated depreciation Provision for impairment Net carrying amount

8,096,191 (1,105,003) (5,170,900) 1,820,288

5,685,386 (834,549) (2,489,000) 2,361,837

Plant and equipment At cost Accumulated depreciation Provision for impairment Net carrying amount

21,279,173 (11,543,213) (443,741) 9,292,219

19,332,681 (9,248,761) 10,083,920

78,848 78,848

4,500 4,500

33,147,705 (14,007,461) (5,614,641) 13,525,603

28,716,060 (11,364,354) (2,489,000) 14,862,706

Work in progress At cost Net carrying amount Total property, plant and equipment At cost Accumulated depreciation Provision for impairment Net carrying amount

15

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2018

______________________________________________________________________________________ 7.1.

Reconciliations

Reconciliations of the carrying amounts of each class of property, plant & equipment at the beginning and end of the current and previous financial year are set out below: Land and Buildings

Leasehold improvements

Plant and Equipment

Work in progress

Total

$

$

$

$

$

2,412,449

2,361,837

10,083,920

4,500

14,862,706

Additions

-

2,410,805

2,472,369

74,348

4,957,522

Impairment loss recognised in profit or loss

-

(2,681,900)

(443,741)

-

(3,125,641)

(78,201)

(270,454)

(2,750,709)

-

(3,099,364)

-

-

(69,620)

-

(69,620)

2,334,248

1,820,288

9,292,219

78,848

13,525,603

Carrying amount at 1 June 2017

Depreciation and amortisation expense Disposals Carrying amount at 31 May 2018

16

92 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2018

______________________________________________________________________________________ 8.

Trade and other payables

Trade Payables Other Payables Accrued expenses

8.1.

Consolidated Group 2018 $

2017 $

885,719 709,560 400,241 1,995,520

993,885 569,470 314,447 1,877,802

Fair value

Due to the short-term nature of these payables, their carrying value is assumed to approximate their fair value.

9.

Employee benefit liabilities

Consolidated Group 2018 $

2017 $

Current Employee entitlements

2,000,438

1,618,673

Non-current Employee entitlements

362,757

650,419

10.

Commitments

10.1.

Capital commitments

At 31 May 2018, Surf Life Saving Queensland was committed to a total construction contract of $Nil (2017: $4,019,512) for the redevelopment of the Cairns Surf Life Saving Club. They are responsible for a further $Nil (2017: $2,183,397) in capital commitments for plant and equipment in relation to the redevelopment of the Cairns Surf Life Saving Club.

10.2.

Operating lease commitments

Future minimum lease payments under non-cancellable operating leases as at 31 May are as follows: Consolidated Group

Within one year After one year but not more than five years After more than five years

11.

2018 $ 764,986 863,755 1,628,741

2017 $ 750,854 900,545 66,375 1,717,774

Contingent liabilities

There are no contingent liabilities as at the reporting date which would have a material effect on the Association's financial statements as at 31 May 2018 (2017: $Nil).

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Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2018

______________________________________________________________________________________ 12.

Controlled entities

The consolidated financial statements incorporate the assets, liabilities and results of the following subsidiaries, in accordance with the accounting policy described in Note 1(c): 

Cairns Surf Life Saving Supporters Club Inc

Agnes Water Surf Life Saving Club Inc

Bowen Surf Life Saving Club Inc

The Cairns Surf Life Saving Supporters Club Inc is considered a controlled entity by way of control of the Management Committee by representation of Surf Life Saving Queensland Board Members and senior management, and the ability to control the day to day finance, and operations of the Cairns Surf Life Saving Supporters Club Inc. Control was obtained in September 2008. The Agnes Water Surf Life Saving Club Inc is considered a controlled entity by way of control of the Management Committee by representation of Surf Life Saving Queensland senior management and the ability to control the day to day finance, and operations of the Agnes Water Surf Life Saving Club Inc. Control was obtained on 28 October 2015. The Bowen Surf Life Saving Club Inc is considered a controlled entity by way of control of the Management Committee by representation of Surf Life Saving Queensland senior management and the ability to control the day to day finance, and operations of the Bowen Surf Life Saving Club Inc. Control was obtained on 26 April 2017.

13.

Events after the reporting period

There have been no significant events occurring after the balance date which may affect either the Association's operations or results of those operations or the Association's state of affairs.

14.

Economic dependency

Surf Life Saving Queensland is dependent on state funds from the Queensland Fire and Emergency Services and distributions from Surf Life Saving Australia, as well as other sponsorship agreements.

15.

Interest in the Surf Life Saving Rescue Fund Trust

Surf Life Saving Queensland invests both withdrawable and perpetuity funds in the Surf Life Saving Rescue Fund Trust which is administered by Surf Life Saving Foundation as the corporate Trustee. Withdrawable funds are included in Surf Life Saving Queensland 's statement of financial position at Note 6. Earnings and movements in the fair value of withdrawable investments are included in the statement of profit or loss. Perpetuity Funds are held for the benefit of Surf Life Saving Queensland and can only be distributed at the sole discretion of the Trustee. Accordingly, these funds are not recognised in the statement of financial position. At 31 May 2018, Surf Life Saving Queensland had $11,253,232 (2017: $10,406,406) held in perpetuity funds in the Trust.

16.

Auditor’s remuneration

Amounts received or due and receivable for: An audit of the financial report of the entity Other services in relation to the entity - Non assurance services – taxation services - Non assurance services – feasibility analysis services - Non assurance services – policy development services

Consolidated Group 2018 $ 67,000

2017 $ 59,000

4,619 71,619

33,250 114,664 5,625 212,539

18

94 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2018

______________________________________________________________________________________ 17.

Parent information

2018 $

2017 $

Statement of Financial Position ASSETS Current assets

12,674,675

13,212,309

Non-current assets

11,943,836

15,065,841

TOTAL ASSETS

24,618,511

28,278,150

4,233,752

3,905,783

346,948

622,075

4,580,700

4,527,858

Retained earnings

20,037,811

23,750,292

TOTAL ASSOCIATION’S FUNDS

20,037,811

23,750,292

Total surplus/(deficit)

(3,712,481)

(2,038,469)

Total comprehensive income/(loss)

(3,712,481)

(2,038,469)

LIABILITIES Current liabilities Non-current liabilities TOTAL LIABILITIES ASSOCIATION’S FUNDS

Statement of Profit or Loss and Other Comprehensive Income

Guarantees Surf Life Saving Queensland entered into a guarantee on behalf of Cairns Surf Life Savings Club Inc for $50,000 (2017: $50,000) as a requirement for Stage 2 of the leasehold improvements at the Cairns Club. Contingent liabilities Surf Life Saving Queensland had no contingent liabilities as at the reporting date which would have a material effect on the Association's financial statements as at 31 May 2018 (2017: $Nil). Contractual commitments At 31 May 2018, Surf Life Saving Queensland was committed to a total construction contract of $Nil (2017: $4,019,512) for the redevelopment of the Cairns Surf Life Saving Club. They are responsible for a further $Nil (2017: $2,183,397) in capital commitments for plant and equipment in relation to the redevelopment of the Cairns Surf Life Saving Club.

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Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2018

______________________________________________________________________________________ 18. Related Party Transactions Related Parties The Group’s main related parties are as follows: a.

Key management personnel Any person(s) having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the entity, directly or indirectly, including any director (whether executive or otherwise) of that entity is considered key management personnel. For details of disclosures relating to key management personnel, refer to Note 19.

b.

Other related parties Other related parties include close family members of key management personnel and entities that are controlled or significantly influenced by those key management personnel, individually or collectively with their close family members.

c.

Transactions with related parties Transactions between related parties are on normal commercial terms and conditions no more favourable than those available to other parties unless otherwise stated. Other than the remuneration of the Key Management Personnel (as disclosed in Note 19), there were no other transactions with related parties during the year.

19. Key Management Personnel Compensation The totals of remuneration paid to key management personnel (KMP) of the Group during the year are as follows:

Key management personnel compensation

2018

2017

$

$ 1,036,285

1,028,819

20

96 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2018

______________________________________________________________________________________ 20. Financial Risk Management The Group’s financial instruments consist mainly of deposits with banks, short-term investments, held-for-trading financial assets, accounts receivable and accounts payable. The carrying amounts for each category of financial instruments, measured in accordance with AASB 139: Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement as detailed in the accounting policies to these financial statements, are as follows: Note

Consolidated Group 2018

2017

$

$

Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents

4

1,711,325

1,383,154

Loans and receivables

5

1,610,337

2,243,602

Fair value through profit or loss: –

held for trading:

6

Total financial assets

7,371,414

9,109,296

10,693,076

12,736,052

1,995,520

1,877,802

1,995,520

1,877,802

Financial liabilities Financial liabilities at amortised cost: –

trade and other payables

Total financial liabilities

8

Refer to Note 21 for detailed disclosures regarding the fair value measurement of the Group’s available-for-sale assets.

21

ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

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Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2018

______________________________________________________________________________________ 21. Fair Value Measurements The Group has the following assets, as set out in the table below, that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis after the initial recognition. The Group does not subsequently measure any liabilities at fair value on a recurring basis. The Group has no assets or liabilities that are measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis. Note

2018

2017

$

$

Recurring fair value measurements Financial assets Fair value through profit or loss: –

held for trading:

Total financial assets recognised at fair value

6

7,371,414

9,109,296

7,371,414

9,109,296

(i)

For investments in listed shares, the fair values have been determined based on closing quoted bid prices at the end of the reporting period.

(ii)

For investments in unlisted shares, the fair values have been determined using a market approach using sector price-earnings ratio of similar sized listed entities.

22

98 SURF LIFE SAVING QUEENSLAND


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Directors’ / Responsible entities’ Declaration Year ended 31 May 2018

______________________________________________________________________________________

The Directors of Surf Life Saving Queensland declare that: 1.

The consolidated financial statements, comprising the consolidated statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income, consolidated statement of financial position, consolidated statement of changes in association’s funds, consolidated statement of cash flows and accompanying notes, are in accordance with the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 and the Associations Incorporation Act 1981 and: a.

comply with Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements (including the Australian Accounting Interpretations), the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Regulation 2013 and the Associations Incorporation Act 1981; and

b.

give a true and fair view of the Group’s financial position as at 31 May 2018 and of its performance for the year ended on that date.

2.

In the directors’ opinion, there are reasonable grounds to believe that Surf Life Saving Queensland will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable.

This declaration is made in accordance with a resolution of the Board of Directors, and is signed for and on behalf of the Directors.

______________________________ Director

______________________________ Director

01/08/2018 Dated

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ANNUAL REPORT 2017-18

99


Tel: +61 7 3237 5999 Fax: +61 7 3221 9227 www.bdo.com.au

Level 10, 12 Creek St Brisbane QLD 4000 GPO Box 457 Brisbane QLD 4001 Australia

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR'S REPORT To the members of Surf Life Saving Queensland

Report on the Audit of the Financial Report Opinion We have audited the financial report of Surf Life Saving Queensland (the registered entity) and its subsidiaries (the Group), which comprises the consolidated statement of financial position as at 31 May 2018, the consolidated statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income, the consolidated statement of changes in equity and the consolidated statement of cash flows for the year then ended, and notes to the financial report, including a summary of significant accounting policies, and the responsible entities’ declaration. In our opinion the accompanying financial report of Surf Life Saving Queensland, is in accordance with Division 60 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 and the Associations Incorporations Act 1981, including: (i)

Giving a true and fair view of the Group’s financial position as at 31 May 2018 and of its financial performance for the year then ended; and

(ii)

Complying with Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements and Division 60 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Regulation 2013 and the Associations Incorporations Act 1981.

Basis for opinion We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Our responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s responsibilities for the audit of the Financial Report section of our report. We are independent of the Group in accordance with the auditor independence requirements of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 (ACNC Act) and the ethical requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110 Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (the Code) that are relevant to our audit of the financial report in Australia. We have also fulfilled our other ethical responsibilities in accordance with the Code. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion. Other information Those charged with governance are responsible for the other information. The other information obtained at the date of this auditor’s report is information included in the registered entity’s annual report, but does not include the financial report and our auditor’s report thereon. Our opinion on the financial report does not cover the other information and accordingly we do not express any form of assurance conclusion thereon.

100

BDO Audit Pty Ltd ABN 33 134 022 870 is a member of a national association of independent entities which are all members of BDO Australia Ltd ABN 77 050 110 275, an Australian company limited by guarantee. BDO Audit Pty Ltd and BDO Australia Ltd are members of BDO International Ltd, a UK company limited by guarantee, and form part of the international BDO network of independent member firms. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation, other than for the acts or omissions of financial services licensees.

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In connection with our audit of the financial report, our responsibility is to read the other information and, in doing so, consider whether the other information is materially inconsistent with the financial report or our knowledge obtained in the audit or otherwise appears to be materially misstated. If, based on the work we have performed on the other information obtained prior to the date of this auditor’s report, we conclude that there is a material misstatement of this other information, we are required to report that fact. We have nothing to report in this regard. Responsibilities of responsible entities for the Financial Report The responsible entities of the registered entity are responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of the financial report in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements, the ACNC Act, and the Associations Incorporations Act 1981, and for such internal control as the responsible entities determine is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial report that is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. In preparing the financial report, responsible entities are responsible for assessing the Group’s ability to continue as a going concern, disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the responsible entities either intends to liquidate the Group or to cease operations, or has no realistic alternative but to do so. Those charged with governance are responsible for overseeing the registered entity’s financial reporting process. Auditor’s responsibilities for the audit of the Financial Report Our objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report as a whole is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes our opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of this financial report. A further description of our responsibilities for the audit of the financial report is located at the Auditing and Assurance Standards Board website (http://www.auasb.gov.au/Home.aspx) at: http://www.auasb.gov.au/auditors_responsibilities/ar3.pdf This description forms part of our auditor’s report.

BDO Audit Pty Ltd

D P Wright Director Brisbane, 1 August 2018 BDO Audit Pty Ltd ABN 33 134 022 870 is a member of a national association of independent entities which are all members of BDO Australia Ltd ABN 77 050 110 275, an Australian company limited by guarantee. BDO Audit Pty Ltd and BDO Australia Ltd are members of BDO International Ltd, a UK company limited by guarantee, and form part of the international BDO network of independent member firms. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation, other than for the acts or omissions of financial services licensees.

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Surf Life Saving Queensland Surf Rescue House, 18 Manning Street, South Brisbane QLD 4101 PO Box 3747, South Brisbane QLD 4101 +61 7 3846 8000 • lifesaving.com.au

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