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Surf Life Saving Queensland

Annual Report 2014 –2015


Snapshot Snapshot

PREVENTATIVE ACTIONS

VOLUNTEER PATROL HOURS

12,723

19,105

PEOPLE TRAINED IN FIRST AID AND CPR

FIRST AID TREATMENTS

LIVES SAVED

30,653 TOTAL MEMBERS

HELICOPTER SURF PATROLS

TOTAL NIPPERS

601,693 PEOPLE REACHED VIA COMMUNITY AWARENESS PROGRAMS

PREVENTATIVE ACTIONS PERFORMED


Contents Patron's and Premier’s Message

3  

Australian Lifeguard Service Queensland

27 

Board Biography

4  

Education 31 

Patrons and Honours

5

Surf Sports

35  

President’s Report

6

Community Awareness

41 

CEO’s Report

8    

Membership Development

45 

Corporate Governance

10

Fundraising in Queensland

49

Human Resources

11

Our Partners

55

Marketing and Communications

12

Committees, Panels and Life Members

56

Lifesaving Services

17

Award Winners

58

Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service

25

Statistics, Results and Financials

61

Introduction Surf Life Saving Clubs North Queensland Branch Port Douglas Ellis Beach Cairns Etty Bay Mission Beach North Barrier Branch Forrest Beach Arcadian Townsville Picnic Bay Ayr Bowen Eimeo Mackay Sarina Wide Bay Capricorn Branch Yeppoon Emu Park Tannum Sands Agnes Water Moore Park Bundaberg Elliott Heads Hervey Bay Sunshine Coast Branch Rainbow Beach Noosa Heads Sunshine Beach Peregian Beach Coolum Beach Marcoola Mudjimba

Operations Support Maroochydore Alexandra Headland Mooloolaba Kawana Waters Dicky Beach Metropolitan Caloundra Bribie Island Redcliffe Peninsula South Coast Branch Point Lookout Coochiemudlo Island Southport Surfers Paradise Northcliffe Broadbeach Kurrawa Mermaid Beach Nobbys Beach Miami Beach North Burleigh Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park Point Danger Branch Tallebudgera Pacific Palm Beach Currumbin Tugun Bilinga North Kirra Kirra Coolangatta Tweed Heads & Coolangatta Rainbow Bay

Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service Rescue Water Craft service Jet Rescue Boat service Offshore Rescue Boat service SurfCom communications centres Duty Officer program Coastalwatch cameras Brisbane Lifesaving Service Remote coastal beacons Emergency Response Groups

Australian Lifeguard Service Servicing: Bundaberg Regional Council Burdekin Shire Council Cassowary Coast Regional Council Cairns Regional Council City Parklands Transition Services Council of the City of Gold Coast Douglas Shire Council Fraser Coast Regional Council Gladstone Regional Council

Gympie Regional Council Hinchinbrook Shire Council Livingstone Shire Council Mackay Regional Council Moreton Bay Regional Council Noosa Shire Council Redland City Council Rockhampton Regional Council Sunshine Coast Council Townsville City Council Whitsunday Regional Council

Registered office of SLSQ – “Surf Rescue House” 18 Manning Street, South Brisbane, Queensland 4101

Notice of SLSQ Annual General Meeting The 2014/15 Annual Report will be presented at the 85th Annual General Meeting of Surf Life Saving Queensland, to be held at Surf Rescue House in South Brisbane on Friday, 21 August 2015 at 6pm.

Surf Life Saving Queensland 18 Manning Street, South Brisbane QLD 4101  Phone: 07 3846 8000  Fax: 07 3846 8008 Email: slsq@lifesaving.com.au  Web: lifesaving.com.au


Our Commitment To Saving Lives Who we are Surf Life Saving Queensland (SLSQ) is the state’s peak beach safety and rescue authority and is one of the largest volunteer-based community service organisations in Australia. From humble beginnings when the first recorded rescue was made on a Queensland beach in 1909, SLSQ is now an efficient and vibrant organisation, with more than 30,000 members. The organisation was established in 1930 and is the governing body for surf lifesaving in Queensland, comprising of 58 affiliated surf life saving clubs in six regional branches. The organisation also includes supporters clubs, which have more than 200,000 members, with this number growing. SLSQ is directly affiliated with, and is part of, Surf Life Saving Australia (SLSA) and the International Life Saving Federation (ILS).

Why we exist SLSQ is built on a fundamental principle: to save lives.

SLSQ aims to set the benchmark in lifesaving service provision, rescue practices, emergency care and training and education as we strive to make our stunning coastline safer for everyone who uses it. A commitment to continuous improvement across all areas of our operation ensures we are highly regarded across Australia and around the world. We are leaders in our industry, and are committed to maintaining this stance to ensure we are equipped for the future.

Our vision Zero preventable deaths in Queensland waters.

Our mission SLSQ will operate as a proactive and effective peak body, leading the way in lifesaving service provision, education, sport, beach safety advocacy and community leadership.

Our strategic imperatives

Our organisation encompasses several diverse arms – lifesaving services, community education, membership services, surf sports, fundraising, commercial training – all supporting one overarching purpose.

Committed to our community: To advocate water safety management and continue to enhance the reputation of SLSQ as the peak body.

Queensland’s mainland coastline is extensive, stretching more than 6,000 kilometres from the Gulf of Carpentaria in the west and Cape York in the north to Point Danger in the southeast. With more than 700 accessible beaches along this expanse, the state boasts some of the world’s most popular sandy stretches, attracting approximately 30 million visitors to our beaches every year.

Effective in our business: To plan and execute our day-to-day operations to an outstanding level of efficiency, with continuous improvement always in mind.

Unfortunately, despite significant advances in technology, techniques and knowledge, people still drown or die on Queensland beaches.

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SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

Connected to our people: To recruit and retain the best people through support and development of their skills and knowledge.

Sustainable for the future: To ensure SLSQ is equipped for the future through continuous growth, strong financial management and sound governance.


Patron’s Message His Excellency

Paul de Jersey AC

Governor of Queensland The iconic red and yellow flags and uniforms of Surf Life Saving Queensland (SLSQ) are part of any visit to the beach in our state. Instantly recognisable, those highly visible symbols clearly demonstrate the organisation’s core commitment to beach safety. In 2014-2015, that commitment is revealed by the 3,648 rescues, 19,105 first aid treatments, and the more than 648,000 preventive actions undertaken, and the more than 500,000 people reached through instruction in water safety. There have also been exceptional outcomes away from the beach, with an expanded relationship with the Queensland Police Service and Emergency Response Groups now providing state-wide coverage. The year has also seen the continued rapid growth of the Brisbane Lifesaving Service, equipping people in the community to respond in times of emergency, and the continued adoption of technology, particularly the expanded network of coastal cameras.

The service SLSQ provides to the people of this state and to our national and international visitors is truly extraordinary and is possible only because of the dedicated membership of the organisation, the far-sighted leadership of the Board, the loyalty and hard work of management and staff, and the generosity of philanthropic partners, grant-giving bodies, community donors, and volunteers. As your proud Patron, I congratulate SLSQ on another successful year and, on behalf of all Queenslanders, thank the organisation’s many supporters for their continued commitment to this fine Queensland institution which has now been serving our state for 107 years.

His Excellency the Honourable Paul de Jersey AC Governor of Queensland

Premier’s Message Annastacia Palaszczuk MP Premier of Queensland Minister for the Arts

Surf Life Saving Queensland’s (SLSQ) iconic red and yellow flags and uniforms have been beacons of safety for generations of Queenslanders. There is perhaps no greater measure of the dedication of our men and women in red and yellow than the number of people who owe their lives to their vigilance every year. During the 2014−15 season alone, more than 3,600 beachgoers were saved from drowning. Queensland’s professional and volunteer lifesavers have also been kept busy performing more than 19,000 first aid treatments and an impressive 649 000 preventative actions. When it comes to safety in the surf, ‘prevention is better than cure’. In addition to their front-line work, a key focus for the organisation is surf safety awareness and education. I commend SLSQ for, this year, educating more than half-a-million people about surf and aquatic safety through a wide range of programs.

One such program I had the pleasure of launching during my time as Minister for Multicultural Affairs is the On the Same Wave program. Targeting people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds as well as international visitors, the program has gone from strength to strength. In addition to educational workshops at schools, the program also promotes surf safety messages at multicultural festivals and events across the State. To date, these messages have been translated into more than 25 languages, and throughout the year the program has reached more than 148,000 people. On behalf of all Queenslanders, I congratulate SLSQ’s 30,000 plus members on yet another mighty effort, both on our beaches and behind the scenes.

Annastacia Palaszczuk MP Premier of Queensland Minister for the Arts


Board Biography Ralph Devlin QC President

Gerard O’Brien Director

Ralph has been involved in surf lifesaving since 1971. Professionally, he was admitted as a barrister in 1977 and, after eight years as a Crown Prosecutor, entered private practice. Ralph was elevated to Senior Counsel in 2005 and now practices in the areas of criminal law, environmental law, Commissions of Inquiry and Inquests. In 2013 Ralph was promoted to Queen’s Counsel. Ralph is a Life Member of Maroochydore SLSC, the Sunshine Coast Branch, SLSQ and SLSA. He is currently the Deputy President of SLSA.

Gerard completed his Bronze Medallion with Noosa Heads SLSC in 2001. He served the club as Nipper Age Manager, Patrol Captain, Treasurer and ultimately as President from 2008-14. Gerard completed a Commerce Degree in 1984 and an MBA at Georgetown University in 1992. He has an extensive management career and spent 10 years as CEO of a Sunshine Coast-based public company. Gerard was awarded the Clive Hammond OAM medal in 2012 for his service to the Noosa Heads SLSC.

Barry Woodger Deputy President

Kaitlyn Akers Director

Barry joined Mooloolaba SLSC in 1974 before relocating to Currumbin SLSC. He has held various positions at Currumbin including Club Captain, Vice-Captain, Deputy President and Team Manager. Barry won the 1982 Australian Junior Ironman title and the Open Ironman at the 1983 Hawaiian Championships. In 2000, he received the Australian Sports Medal for Surf Life Saving, and in 2004 was inducted into SLSA’s Hall of Fame for his dedication as a founding member of Currumbin’s Patrol Team. Barry has been the Director of his own consultancy company since 2005.

Kaitlyn joined Mudjimba SLSC in 2001 and has since held a number of roles including Club Captain, President and Treasurer. In 2010/11 she was named Queensland’s Surf Lifesaver of the Year. Off the beach, Kaitlyn is leading an outsource partnership with a Federal Government agency. She holds an Executive MBA, is a Fellow of AIM, and recently completed a postgraduate certificate in Strategic Talent Management at Stanford University and Strategic Innovation and Sustainability Reporting at Harvard Business School.

Darrin Bragg Director of Finance Darrin is a principal of his own accounting and tax practice, which he established in 1998. With a Bachelor of Commerce, Accounting and a Bachelor of Science, Mathematics and Statistics, he has a wealth of knowledge and experience within the finance sector. Darrin’s involvement with surf lifesaving began as a nipper in Mackay in 1974 and he has remained heavily involved ever since, as a member of Picnic Bay and Burleigh Heads SLSCs. He has previously held senior positions at both clubs including Treasurer and Club Captain. He is a Life Member of the North Barrier Branch and currently serves as President of the Cairns SLS Supporters Club.

Laurie Murphy Director Laurie joined the surf lifesaving movement as a nipper in 1971, before completing his Bronze Medallion at Mooloolaba in 1974. He has been a member of several clubs in Queensland and New South Wales, holding a variety of positions including Secretary, Captain and Boat Captain. Most of his seasons have been spent as a member at Maroochydore SLSC. Professionally, he is the CEO of a large privately-owned group of companies operating across Australia and internationally. He also holds Director positions on other organisational boards.

Jack Noye Independent Director David McLean JP (Qual) Director David joined Marcoola SLSC in 1976. He has been an active member ever since, holding most club positions including President and Captain. A qualified plumber, drainer and gasfitter, David owned and operated three major commercial plumbing contracting companies with a combined turnover of $30 million, before recently selling his interests. In 1999 he was named Queensland’s Volunteer of the Year and, in 2007 and 2010, Queensland’s Surf Lifesaver of the Year. In 2010 he was also named Australian Surf Lifesaver of the Year. David is a Justice of the Peace, and a Life Member of Marcoola SLSC, the Sunshine Coast Branch and SLSQ.

The Director-General of the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries in 2014/15, Jack has an extensive background in managing complex government agencies and intergovernmental relations, policy development, strategic planning, risk management and service delivery. In a previous role, Jack was responsible for the State Government’s relationship with SLSQ. He also assisted the Victorian Government with the amalgamation of Surf Life Saving and Royal Life Saving.

Christina Sutherland Independent Director Christina is a senior lawyer and was admitted as a solicitor of the Supreme Court of Queensland in 1989. Christina is also a director of Powerlink Queensland and is Chairperson of Powerlink’s Audit and Compliance Committee. Through her legal knowledge and practical experience, Christina provides advice and guidance on issues relating to business, employment, workplace health and safety and corporate governance.

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SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15


Patrons and Honours Vale

Vice Patrons

SLSQ offers its deepest respect and sympathy to the friends and family of members who have passed away this year. Condolences are extended to the members of Surf Life Saving who have suffered bereavements in their families.

Lord Mayor Graham Quirk Mayor Tom Tate Mayor Mark Jamieson Mayor Bill Ludwig Mayor Gail Sellers Mayor Rodger Bow Mayor Karen Williams Mayor Gerard O’Connell Mayor Deirdre Comerford Mayor Paul Pisasale Mayor Mal Foreman Mayor Bob Manning Mayor Bill Shannon Mayor Allan Sutherland Mayor Jenny Hill Mr Ian Stewart Mr Daniel Gschwind Mr Stephen Maitland OAM RFD Mr Mick Power AM Mr Jim McGowan AM Mr Tony Hawkins Ms Julieanne Alroe

Australian Honours Awarded Australia Day 2015 • Ms Susanne McDonald OAM – Awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia for service to the surf lifesaving movement. • Mrs Kristy Ellis AM – Awarded Member of the Order of Australia for significant service to surf lifesaving, particularly as a competitor and role model, and through contributions to ethical standards. Awarded Queen’s Birthday 2015 • Mr Ian Young OAM – Awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia for service to surf lifesaving, and to the community of Noosa.

Patron Life Members 2014/15* His Excellency the Governor of Queensland, the Honourable Paul de Jersey AC.

David McLean and Michael Stevens * A full list of SLSQ’s Life Members can be found on page 56

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

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President’s Report my retirement from the President’s chair at the end of next season, I am hopeful that the SLSQ Board will even better reflect this diversity.

Ralph Devlin QC President

I am honoured and delighted to present the Annual Report for 2014/15. I thank and congratulate our volunteers and staff for their grand efforts again this year. Our fundamental goal of ‘zero preventable deaths in Queensland waters’ remains firmly in the consciousness of our women, men, girls and boys who carry out our humanitarian mission so generously and so well. This report contains the impressive statistics of ‘Vigilance and Service’ provided yearround to the bathing and boating Queenslanders and to our many thousands of visitors.

Surf Club Anniversaries Surf Life Saving Queensland (SLSQ) was formed in January 1931 by an act of goodwill on the part of the ‘surf’ clubs south of the Brisbane River and the ‘Royal’ clubs north to Cairns, and has just completed its 84th summer season. A number of clubs reached milestone anniversaries this past season, including Cairns SLSC, which celebrated its 90th anniversary in fine style. Two of our regional clubs – Rainbow Beach and Elliott Heads SLSCs – also celebrated 50th anniversaries. It was a privilege to attend their celebrations of sustained service to their communities. Next season my own club, Maroochydore SLSC, celebrates its centenary – barely a week ahead of the famous Kirra SLSC in Point Danger. What excitement lies ahead for the second and third clubs to be established (after Tweed Heads and Coolangatta SLSC in 1909).

Upcoming Projects Our Cairns SLSC Supporters Club initiative continues to bear fruit, with the joint venture doing very well. I wish to thank inaugural chairman Barry Woodger, who recently retired from the position after four years of excellent work. SLSQ Director of Finance Darrin Bragg is our new Chair and I thank him for taking on this role, as we endeavour to make the surf club building stage two a reality. Our next big project for the future is the SLSQ Lifesaving College. Though still in its conceptual phase, each year brings us closer to delivering a multi-purpose campus for our wide range of administration, teaching and learning activities to be conducted under one roof. Three board members – Barry Woodger, David McLean and Laurie Murphy – are working with our CEO and senior management to advance this project. It’s pleasing to see three of SLSQ’s emerging leaders – Brianna Heaney, Tom Sealy and Jack Alexson – have also agreed to join the working group.

Membership I remain personally committed to the advancement of women at the top levels of our association. SLSQ’s entire active membership now sits roughly at a 50/50 gender balance and, importantly, we continue to see our female members being elected to senior roles. However, more can be done to better reflect our excellent gender diversity at club level and, by the time of

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Another theme for this year has been the mission to provide more opportunities for our emerging leaders. The State Membership Services Committee under Rob Campbell is continuing to do a wonderful job of engaging the talents and energy of our young members. During the year I had the honour and pleasure to address three different forums, including the State Leadership Camp at Lake Moogerah, the Leadership Development Camp at Surf Rescue House, as well as SLSA’s National Leadership College in Sydney. Surf Life Saving excels in leadership and youth development, but we need to do more to enable our talented young lifesavers to lead at the top levels. I remain committed to this initiative and thank Rob, his very able committee and our staff team, led by Brenda Lofthouse, for the vital role they play in the development of our people. Rob’s committee is also busy with a special project endorsed by the Board to assess and address our overall volunteer membership in Queensland. The Membership Sustainability Project will no doubt show us new ways to remain connected to our existing membership in the modern era and effectively engage with prospective members into the future. An urgent challenge is to find more ways to engage with the many culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) groups in our communities. SLSQ has conducted programs for CALD groups over some years now, assisted by government funding. But, as an association rooted in Australia’s history we must continue to do more. The time for action is now. Ray ‘Freddie’ Fien leads a fine team in Junior Activities throughout the state. Our Nippers and youth are our future, and Ray, you look after them so well. Thanks to our junior club leaders, officials and parents your efforts play a significant part in keeping our young people safe in the water and our surf clubs viable in terms of new memberships. You all do a terrific job.

Lifesaving Services Our lifesaving services continue to grow and prosper. Under the leadership of Peter Lucas, Queensland continues to perform effectively in our core business: prevention of drownings. Peter’s hardworking committee brings together our surf club volunteers and staff, magnificently supported by COO George Hill and Peta Lawlor, who are so dedicated to our overarching vision. Thank you to all; the results vindicate the important work the Lifesaving Committee does for the bathing public of Queensland. The Operations Support units of our organisation are to be congratulated on another successful year, under the leadership of Kevin Dunn. Similarly, the Brisbane Lifesaving Service continues to thrive under the guidance of Helen Hallett. This force of 140 surf lifesavers stands ready to assist in disaster management deployment in the Brisbane city area, as well as patrolling regularly wherever they are needed as back up for our clubs. The Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service provides outstanding aerial coverage across Queensland, with our Queensland Police Service helicopters continuing their great collaborative work in that area also. Welcome to new chief pilot Paul Gibson and thank you to outgoing chief pilot Peter Bird for more than a decade of outstanding service.


Surf Sports

Conclusion

Surf sport is the means by which a great many of our lifesavers stay fit and ‘rescue-ready’. Charles Melloy is our Surf Sports chairman, supported by Stu Hogben and his able crew. March 2015 saw a highly successful State Championships series conducted at Maroochydore Beach, including the inaugural Youth State Championships, staged as a feeder event to the Australian Youth Surf Life Saving Championships at North Kirra. All eyes were on how Queensland could deliver our State ‘Nipper’ Championships in this new form. I would like to think that our youth and their parents were pretty impressed. I was!

There are so many facets to our association, and I cannot do justice to them all in my President’s Report. I commend this fine Annual Report to you. In doing so, I warmly acknowledge the support of Federal, State and Local Governments for your unwavering commitment to surf safety.

A week later we saw the 2015 Masters and Open Surf Life Saving Championships successfully held on the same beach. SLSQ was joined by our new Patron, The Hon. Paul de Jersey AC, Governor of Queensland, and Mrs Kaye de Jersey. His Excellency was delighted with what he witnessed: our women and men in full competition mode, battling out the State Championships. I was very proud to show our new Governor and Patron our people at their best – not only competing and testing themselves against the elements, but also taking time to speak with our Patron and explain their passion. The day will rank as a highlight of my time as your President; I was so proud of you all.

Summer Surf Girl Program 2015 This season marked the first Summer Surf Girl program run by SLSQ for many years. In the intervening years the event was within the portfolio of the Surf Life Saving Foundation. I acknowledge the great work of Megan Walker and her team, together with our many volunteers who make this event such a success. Well done to our 14 entrants who raised an impressive $800,000 for their clubs. Special congratulations to Tiffany Di Ianni of Marcoola SLSC, named the 2015 Summer Surf Girl.

Branches and Clubs Our six regions are charged with the responsibility of delivering lifesaving services efficiently and effectively. From Port Douglas to Rainbow Bay, they cover local issues encompassing everything from crocodiles and stingers to sharks and dangerous surf. Thank you to our Branch Presidents, Executives and Councils, branch staff and SLSQ regional managers, for your excellent work this season. Thank you also to our clubs; you are at the heart of your communities and you serve them so well. You are the instantly-recognised keepers of our traditions of over a century and, at the same time, innovators and givers of your precious time. The public truly appreciate your humanitarian work. Scores of Queenslanders are alive today because of your work this season.

Thank you to CEO John Brennan OAM and COO George Hill and the Senior Management Group for your passion, drive and leadership. Thank you to our staff for your hard work and constancy. Your promotion of our important goals is greatly appreciated by all. I also wish to acknowledge the work of the SLSQ Board of Directors. Thank you for all you do and thank you for your support of, and advice to me, as your Chairman. Our Queensland association, now 84 years old and over 30,000 strong, is complex. We always have a lot to do, together, to prevent drowning deaths in Queensland. I have been privileged and proud to serve another season as your President.

Ralph Devlin QC President - Surf Life Saving Queensland Deputy President - Surf Life Saving Australia


CEO’s Report they remain engaged, motivated and committed to SLSQ for many years to come.

John Brennan OAM Chief Executive Officer

On behalf of Surf Life Saving Queensland (SLSQ), I am proud to bring you our Annual Report for 2014/15. It has been another year of significant accomplishments for SLSQ as we continued to take great strides towards achieving our vision of ‘zero preventable deaths in Queensland waters’. I would like to take this opportunity to thank and formally acknowledge SLSQ President Ralph Devin QC and the entire Board of Directors for their dedication, professionalism and tireless efforts over the past 12 months.

As we move ahead, we will continue to roll out positive programs to enhance and build upon our members’ personal experiences within the surf lifesaving movement.

Effective in our business In 2014/15, SLSQ continued to embrace technology in lifesaving and remained committed to exploring innovative practices and forward thinking to protect beachgoers across the state. This year we trialled new rescue equipment, including portable electric watercraft for use in search and rescue missions, while drones and unmanned aerial vehicles remain an area of interest.

SLSQ’s overarching vision is supported through the four strategic imperatives outlined below.

As we move into the next 12 months, we will continue to focus on new, targeted initiatives aimed at reducing beach-related drownings and eliminating the various factors that contribute to the drowning cycle.

Committed to our community

In September 2014, we launched the Parliamentary Friends of Surf Life Saving Queensland, a bi-partisan group for all Members of Parliament to support, promote, and actively engage with SLSQ on matters of coastal safety. I wish to thank all Members of Parliament for their support and in particular, Michael Hart MP and Fiona Simpson MP for their efforts in establishing this vital initiative.

From its humble beginnings almost a century ago, SLSQ has developed into an innovative and ground-breaking organisation encompassing 58 clubs and more than 30,000 highly skilled members working enthusiastically across the state. Today we exist for one reason and one reason only: to realise our vision of zero preventable deaths in Queensland waters. It was another successful season for SLSQ’s ‘red and yellow army’ of professional lifeguards and volunteer surf lifesavers, who spent more than 350,000 hours on patrol. During this time they performed a staggering 648,831 preventative actions, 19,105 first aid treatments and, most importantly, saved 3,648 lives in the process. These are extraordinary figures and, if nothing else, serve to reinforce the critically important role our lifesavers and lifeguards play along Queensland’s coastline each and every year. From the sea to the sky, SLSQ remains committed at all levels to helping people in their hour of need and, in 2014/15, we rolled out new initiatives and extended existing services in a bid to increase our reach and offer even greater support to the Queensland community. Despite these efforts, it is important to note there were ten preventable drownings on Queensland beaches this season, all of which occurred outside of patrol hours and/or away from the red and yellow flagged areas. These tragedies served to strengthen our resolve to improve and increase services at all levels as we strive to protect swimmers and, ultimately, eliminate drownings across the state.

Sustainable for the future This season saw another first for SLSQ with the appointment of a full-time Enterprise Risk Manager, tasked with the responsibility of developing and integrating an effective risk management strategy into our day-to-day business operations. There is no doubt this appointment will have both long term and positive benefits for our organisation. It is certainly an exciting time for SLSQ and our members as we look to build on our achievements and solidify our reputation as the state’s peak authority on coastal safety. With that in mind, SLSQ recently finalised and signed-off on a new strategic plan for the next five years which lays a strong foundation for sustained growth and development. We will also move forward with an updated overarching vision of ‘zero preventable deaths in Queensland public waters.’ While we are a unique organisation with our own set of challenges, SLSQ stakeholders should have every confidence in our ability to meet these challenges head on and maximise opportunities as and when they arise.

Connected to our people Our organisation is built on the strength and passion of its people and, with that in mind, we have continued to focus strongly on the recruitment, retention and development of our volunteers and staff alike. In 2014/15 SLSQ appointed a full-time Human Resources Manager and Administrator to streamline our internal systems and processes, while providing much-needed support to the organisation. We are also aware of the need to provide our volunteer members with clear pathways and personal development opportunities to ensure

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John Brennan OAM Chief Executive Officer - Surf Life Saving Queensland


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Corporate Governance With a membership base of more than 30,000, SLSQ is one of the largest volunteer-based community organisations in Queensland. It is important that there is an effective governance structure in place acknowledging the role of volunteers in the organisation. Ultimately, control of the affiliated branches, clubs and auxiliary organisations across Queensland is vested in the SLSQ Board of Directors.

The role of the Board and Committee

Attendance Position

Meeting Attendances

Ralph Devlin QC

President

8/8

Barry Woodger

Deputy President

8/8

Darrin Bragg

Director of Finance

8/8

Kaitlyn Akers

Director

8/8

David McLean

Director

7/8

Gerard O’Brien

Director

7/8

Laurie Murphy

Director

6/6

Barry Crichton

Director

1/1

Jack Noye

Independent Director

7/8

Christina Sutherland

Independent Director

8/8

Name

SLSQ’s Board and Committee structure is critical to ensuring volunteer representation in key decisions and strategic planning. The various committees outlined on page 56 were established by the Board to assist SLSQ assess and improve management standards. The Board, where necessary, can establish special purpose committees and panels to oversee the management of projects, programs or other initiatives. The following standing committees can be established by the Board to assist in the better management of the organisation and surf lifesaving practices across the state: Lifesaving, Surf Sports, Membership Services, Administration, and Information Technology.

Code of conduct

The primary functions of the Board are to govern and provide leadership to SLSQ, members, and affiliated branches and clubs in accordance with the aims and strategic objectives of SLSQ, its constitution, and the law. The Board is responsible for acting on all issues in accordance with SLSQ’s objectives. It operates for the benefit of SLSQ, its members and the wider Queensland community.

Nominees for Director positions are required to agree to SLSQ’s ‘Code of Conduct’ for Directors. Candidates must sign their acceptance to comply with this code on their nomination form. The Code of Conduct is contained within the Directors’ Handbook, which is provided to all Directors upon their election at the annual general meeting.

The role of Directors and management

Independence

SLSQ’s chief executive officer (CEO) is tasked with managing the day-to-day business requirements of SLSQ, under the direction of the Board. The President is the nominated head of SLSQ and the SLSQ Board is responsible for the appointment of a CEO to manage and administer the organisation. The CEO is accountable to the Board and reports to the Board at each meeting.

At the commencement of each Board meeting, the Chair asks for Directors to declare conflicts of interest in any agenda items.

The CEO ensures the resolutions of the Board are properly and efficiently carried out, and transacts all business of SLSQ between Board meetings and general meetings of the Council.

Independent Advice

Board composition SLSQ’s Board comprises the President, the Deputy President, the Director of Finance, four Directors, two Independent Directors and the CEO who is a non-voting member. A Director must be a member of SLSQ and Independent Directors may or may not be individual members of SLSQ.

The Council may elect up to two Independent Directors each year. Nominees for these positions shall be endorsed and recommended to the Council by the Board.

SLSQ’s Board and management are assisted in aspects of its operations with external advice. Our auditors, Ernst & Young, conduct an annual audit, providing the Board with independent assurance and advice on financial management matters. Other consultants engaged by SLSQ in 2014/15 include: • Jardine Lloyd Thompson Australia Pty Ltd (insurance advice and services) • WattsNext (human resources services)

Board meetings and access to management The Board meets as often as is deemed necessary in every calendar year for the dispatch of business. At any time, five Directors may ask the CEO to convene a meeting of the Board and, subject to SLSQ’s Constitution, questions at any meeting are decided by a majority of votes by the Board of Directors.

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• Astute Consulting (leadership and governance) • Brand Ambassadors (sponsorship support) • Marine Tourism Australia (peak body advocates) • Landers and Rogers (legal services) • GPP Consulting (advisory services for aviation, ALAQ and ALS)


Human Resources Making strategic HR decisions

Workplace relations

It was a landmark year for SLSQ with the establishment of Human Resources (HR) as a division in its own right, including representation within the senior management group.

During the year, the 2015 SLSQ Enterprise Agreement was completed and incorporated into operations from June 2015.

The appointment of a HR Manager and Administrator ensures SLSQ is well placed to strategically grow and meet its overarching vision of zero preventable deaths in Queensland waters. From reviewing existing procedures and processes through to alleviating the senior management team’s workload to allow them to progress organisation-wide issues and projects, the HR division has already proved invaluable through the implementation of streamlined systems and strategic decision-making. SLSQ maintains the support of an external HR consultancy, but the instatement of an internal division is reaping rewards and receiving positive feedback from across the organisation.

Hiring practices and supportive inductions During the year, a number of new roles were created at SLSQ to assist with the organisation’s strategic growth. New staff during 2014/15 represented a balance of internal appointments to nurture the organisation’s focus on career progression, complemented by external recruitment to enhance SLSQ through each new employee bringing diverse skills and experience. The appointment of a HR Administrator role increased the organisation’s ability to improve candidates’ experience when applying for job opportunities, while SLSQ’s induction process was reviewed. The HR division is actively working to improve how SLSQ introduces new employees to the organisation. Its focus is to move away from a one-day induction to a broader four-week induction process beginning prior to the employee’s first day.

Performance reviews During the year, work started on evolving systems to ensure team members’ roles, performance and work were aligned with the organisation’s vision and values. The HR team is actively reviewing: • Role descriptions and relevance to current staff

Implementation of this agreement included: • A review of the staff handbook to ensure its relevance to the current environment • A review and update of SLSQ’s policies to ensure compliance with current legislative requirements as well as optimum conditions for staff • New initiatives were introduced focusing specifically on team members’ health and wellbeing including awareness days, Employee Assistance Program, health checks and staff benefits

Learning from feedback As a progressive organisation SLSQ reviews staff satisfaction levels to identify desired areas for improvement. This was completed in 2014/15 and key findings showed: • 86% of employees took part in the survey, representing a 20% increase compared with last year • 95% of respondents said they were proud to work at SLSQ, a 22% increase compared with 2013/14 • 78% of respondents indicated they would recommend SLSQ as an employer • 87% believed their role was valued • 78% rated staff morale across the organisation as seven or higher out of 10 • 92% of respondents rated their job satisfaction as seven or higher out of 10 • 87% of staff believed their managers were approachable and easy to talk with • 81% believed there were career progression opportunities available within SLSQ • 85% believed they received adequate training to perform their roles Moving forward, the HR department will work closely with internal stakeholders and SLSQ staff at all levels to review findings of the engagement survey and roll out a number of key initiatives.

• Improving performance reviews to align with current vision and values • A succession-planning forum • Setting outcomes from biannual reviews SLSQ’s biannual reviews give managers and their teams the opportunity to review performance while identifying development and training needs. The process was conducted for all divisions during 2014/15 and provided an opportunity for open, honest and quality discussions around a variety of topics. SLSQ aims to provide a supportive environment for the professional development of staff. With HR now firmly committed to strategic decision-making, there has been a strong focus on providing targeted development to staff to ensure a return on investment.

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

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Marketing and Communications SLSQ’s communications department encompasses media, public relations, marketing and sponsorship. Its aim is to increase brand awareness, ensure the long-term sustainability of the surf lifesaving movement, and publicly position SLSQ as the state’s peak authority on coastal and aquatic safety.

Media and Public Relations SLSQ’s media team plays a key role in delivering proactive and reactive messaging in all regions across the state. In 2014/15 SLSQ secured 4,167 stories across radio, print and television media. This coverage reached an audience of 127,179,019 people with an approximate editorial value of $28.7 million. Key media events across the year included the Queensland Surf Life Saving Championships, Summer Surf Girl, Breaka Beach to Bush and the Surf Safe Appeal. State Championships The 2015 Youth and Senior State Championships were held at Maroochydore on the Sunshine Coast across two weekends in March. SLSQ’s media strategy resulted in more than 200 articles valued at $1,557,147, with an approximate audience of 5,196,749 people. Summer Surf Girl The 2015 Summer Surf Girl media campaign ran from July 2014 to May 2015, with the 14 entrants achieving more than 100 articles, resulting in $356,677 of editorial value in all regions across the state. This saw the program’s key messages reach an estimated 2,039,301 people. Digital communications SLSQ continues to expand its digital footprint through our website, e-newsletters and social media platforms. More than 17,000 people now follow SLSQ on its official social media accounts, representing an increase of almost 45 percent when compared to last season. In addition, regular communication to members and clubs was facilitated via two electronic monthly publications while, on average, SLSQ’s website received more than 30,000 page views each month over the summer season.

2014 /15 Media Coverage by Medium (Volume)

Marketing SLSQ’s marketing department provides vital support to clubs and branches, focusing on building and protecting the organisation’s brand, while assisting all internal departments with their day-to-day communication requirements. In 2014/15 the team worked closely with the Australian Lifesaving Academy Queensland, the Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service and various other internal arms to refine communication streams and develop branding strategies. Other key projects across the season included the Awards of Excellence Gala Ball, the Queensland Surf Life Saving Championships, the Gold Coast 600 V8s, Memorial Day, and the design and production of various publications and collateral. V8 Supercars Gold Coast 600 The iconic ‘swim between the flags’ message received a high-octane makeover when SLSQ partnered with Team Jeld-Wen at the 2014 V8 Supercars Gold Coast 600. Team Jeld-Wen drove home the surf safety message – quite literally – with much of their car’s regular promotional paintwork making way for a sea of red and yellow messaging in a bid to raise awareness and much-needed funds for surf lifesavers. The campaign was spearheaded by SLSQ’s marketing team with support from the media department. SLSQ’s community awareness team was also heavily involved, attending across the weekend to spread vital surf safety messaging. The campaign communicated with an estimated audience of more than two million people. ‘Red and Yellow Heroes’ Documentary Leading into the 2014/15 season, SLSQ’s marketing and media teams worked closely with Network Ten to produce ‘Red & Yellow Heroes’ – an hour-long documentary showcasing the men, women and children who selflessly donate their time each year to protect Queensland beachgoers. Hours of footage and production went into the final product, which was aired nationally on One HD on 3 September 2014, providing significant exposure for our organisation. The documentary was watched by more than 118,000 people across Australia.

2014 /15 Media Coverage by Region (Volume)

12%

8%

4%

7% 9%

19%

18%

11%

Print Radio Television

70%

North Queensland North Barrier Wide Bay Capricorn Sunshine Coast Gold Coast Metro Interstate

42% *SLSQ multiplies the Advertising Space Rate (ASR) provided by Media Monitors (online media clipping service) by 2.5, as editorial content is more credible than advertising and therefore of greater value.

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SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15


SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

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SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15


SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

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Lifesaving Services

352,805 VOLUNTEER PATROL HOURS

648,831 PREVENTATIVE ACTIONS

3,648 LIVES SAVED

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

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Lifesaving Operations SLSQ is proud to report no lives were lost between our red and yellow flags during the 2014/15 season thanks to the dedication, training and professionalism of volunteer surf lifesavers and professional lifeguards along Queensland’s coastline. This was an outstanding result in a season which experienced king tides, heavy swells and tropical cyclones, creating periods of rough surf and dangerous conditions across the year. However, despite this, there were also plenty of opportunities for beach lovers to take advantage of Queensland’s glorious coastline and waterways, and the SLSQ team made every effort to maintain the highest level of safety and protection for visitors. Throughout 2014/15 SLSQ’s lifesavers and lifeguards combined to perform 19,105 first aid treatments, 648,831 preventative actions and, most importantly, save 3,648 lives in the process through in-water rescues.

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SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

Tragically, despite the tireless work of the organisation, there were ten beach-related drownings over the year, representing an increase from seven in 2013/14. These drownings all occurred outside of patrol times and/or at unpatrolled locations which was disappointing to see and something SLSQ will continue to address moving forward. These incidents are heartbreaking and it remains of upmost importance to SLSQ to continue to strive towards the vision of zero preventable deaths in Queensland waters. SLSQ remains focused on implementing new operational and educational initiatives to increase protection of beachgoers and swimmers across Queensland. This includes state-wide and targeted community awareness programs, increased protection at identified black spots, extending services and frequent aerial and water patrols.


Incident Analysis

New Operational Initiatives

There were ten preventable beach-related coastal drowning deaths during the reporting period, and a review of the incidents has shown:

Staying in touch with our services

• There were no drownings between SLSQ’s red and yellow flags; • All victims were male; • Six of the ten victims were aged 50 or older. Three were aged in their thirties and one was 19; • Three drownings were recorded in North Queensland (two on Green Island and one on Nudey Beach), three on the Sunshine Coast (Yaroomba Beach, Sunshine Beach and Marcoola Beach), two in Wide Bay Capricorn (Fisherman’s Beach and Fraser Island) and two on the Gold Coast (both at Surfers Paradise); • Five drownings occurred on the weekend, with five on weekdays; • Seven out of ten victims were Australian residents. This differs from previous years which have seen international visitors record more drownings; • There were five coastal drowning deaths during the summer months, which is traditionally the peak period for lifesaving and lifeguard services; and • One drowning death occurred while the victim was riding a surf craft, two occurred while snorkelling and the rest occurred while the victim was swimming or wading in the water. SLSQ continues to review all coastal drowning deaths across the state to help identify black spots, which are areas with a high concentration of coastal/inland waterway incidents and a high risk of ongoing occurrences.

Ten year drowning snapshot In the past ten years there have been 78 beach-related coastal drowning deaths in Queensland. The most common locations for drowning deaths during this period of time are outlined below: Beach

Drownings

Surfers Paradise, Gold Coast

8

Green Island, North Queensland

7

Southport, Gold Coast

6

North Stradbroke Island

6

Kurrawa Beach, Gold Coast

3

Northcliffe, Gold Coast

3

As the peak authority on beach safety and aquatic rescue, SLSQ is constantly looking at how it can improve its services and successful implementation in the community. In 2014/15 a number of new initiatives were introduced, and existing services expanded, to increase our reach along the coastline and offer greater protection for swimmers and beachgoers. SLSQ is grateful for the vital government and community support it received throughout the year, and remains committed to adopting innovative practices and forward thinking to eliminate drownings in Queensland waters. Key initiatives from this season include: • The introduction of a lifeguard service at Wellington Point across the peak summer months; • Emergency Response Beacons and cameras were installed at Elliott Heads, Innes Park, Mon Repos Beach and Wild Cattle Creek; • A portable Emergency Response Beacon was placed at Magnetic Island; • SLSQ transitioned from analog to digital radios in SEQ (from Rainbow Bay to Hervey Bay); • Services were boosted on Green Island in Cairns, including the employment of a third permanent lifeguard for year-round patrols; • SLSQ’s emergency response groups (ERGs) continue to strengthen and now operate in all regions across the state. A number of SLSQ’s ERGs were placed on standby to assist during Tropical Cyclone Marcia; • Night operations training was regularly conducted to ensure crews have the necessary skills and experience to respond to search and rescue missions after-hours; and • SLSQ continued to operate a dedicated phone number, available 24/7, for emergency service agencies to seek urgent assistance.

Strong support for Brisbane Lifesaving Service Membership of SLSQ’s Brisbane Lifesaving Service (BLS) continues to surge, with numbers almost double the figures from 2012/13. The BLS contingent now sits at 173, up from 141 in 2013/14. As membership increases, so does the organisation’s ability to increase patrol activity, with the number of volunteer hours on the beach increasing 24% from 3,192 hours to nearly 4,000 hours in 2014/15. Providing exemplary service, 15 BLS members patrolled more than 100 hours during the course of the season, with three individuals clocking in excess of 200 hours. The team provided strong support to a number of clubs in SEQ, including Peregian Beach, Kirra, Rainbow Bay and Bilinga SLSCs. BLS members also performed regular patrols at Tallebudgera Creek and Southport Broadwater. SLSQ was proud to present 322 accredited awards during the year to BLS members; this was an increase from 301 in the previous season, and included 51 Bronze Medallions and two Gold Medallions.

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

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Expanding Our Reach

This season SLSQ conducted a number of trials in a bid to boost services and increase protection of beachgoers. SLSQ investigations during the year included:

Patrolling more beaches

• Testing the viability of stand up paddleboards on patrol and in search and rescue operations

SLSQ continues to increase its patrols with the mindset the greater the coverage on Queensland’s coastline, the more lives that can be saved. In 2014/15 this included:

• The use of drones to provide aerial services to unpatrolled and remote locations in Queensland • Trials of the Seadoo Spark rescue water craft

• Roving and fixed surveillance patrols at Moreton Island from Tangalooma to North Point during the peak holiday periods.

• Trials of Seabob, a portable electronic watercraft, in patrol scenarios

• Roving patrols at Noosa North Shore and Double Island Point during the peak holiday periods.

• The use of a patrol tracker app

• Dawn patrol services on the Gold Coast 365 days a year. From September to May this included the use of two four-wheel drives (4WD) and two Rescue Water Crafts (RWC) to patrol beaches before traditional services commenced. In the winter months, one 4WD and RWC were used. • SLSQ continued to operate mid-week patrols during the peak school holiday periods on the Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast. Three RWC were used on the Sunshine Coast and two on the Gold Coast. • SurfCom on the Sunshine Coast operates 365 days a year. • Lifeguard services on the Gold Coast at Broadwater and Tallebudgera Creek during peak times. The ALS and BLS are responsible for these patrols. • The Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service operates from Tweed River to Inskip Point. The service remains one of the core lifesaving assets and is permanently on-call. • The network of coastal cameras, positioned at high-risk black spots, protecting beachgoers around the clock. During the year the network of cameras was extended to 36 across the state, including surveillance at Wild Cattle Creek, Innes Beach, Mon Repos Beach, Agnes Water, Kelly’s Beach and Elliott Heads.

Lifesaving Assistance Funds Queensland Fire and Emergency Services Each year, vital funding from the Queensland Fire and Emergency Services (QFES) ensures SLSQ has the resources to provide safer beaches across the state. This season the QFES provided funding to SLSQ across several key areas: • Lifesaving Services Development Fund: QFES/SLSQ Sustainability and More Beaches Under Guard Grants. These enable SLSCs and branches to make an application for lifesaving equipment to sustain and expand beach patrols • Volunteer Marine Rescue Support Package: This includes funding for all clubs and branches to maintain current services across the state • Regional Development Fund: Funding is provided to improve beach safety services for Queensland communities north of the Sunshine Coast • Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service: This funding helps SLSQ conduct a dedicated rescue helicopter service in South East Queensland

Future service priorities SLSQ continually evaluates its strategies to plan how it can build on its success and achieve its goal of zero preventable deaths in Queensland waters. Actions for 2015/16 include: • Continuing to grow and expand BLS in all areas of SEQ • Investigating the use and integration of unmanned aerial vehicles into surf lifesaving patrols and search and rescue • Building upon the after-hours call out and emergency response capabilities • Expanding SLSQ’s digital radio network in all regions • Developing and opening a state communications centre to manage and oversee SLSQ’s radio network • Further enhancing the Emergency Response Beacon and camera system

Research and Development SLSQ remains committed to innovation and receptive to new technology, tools and equipment that will assist the team to deliver the best lifesaving techniques.

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SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

Federal Government black spot funding Upon review and identification of danger areas, a number of SLSQ applications were successful in receiving Federal Government black spot funding in 2014/15. These included: • A digital radio network upgrade for Wide Bay Capricorn • Coastal audits for the Sunshine Coast, North Stradbroke Island and Cairns region • Installation of an Emergency Response Beacon at Wild Cattle Creek

Coastal Risk Management As the peak advisory body on coastal safety, SLSQ provides aquatic public safety risk assessments as well as risk management services to help reduce incidents of injuries and fatalities. Over the course of 2014/15 a number of positive outcomes were achieved through work with partners and land managers, including the collection of data on all Australian beaches to establish a framework to deliver a safer aquatic environment. This project was run with Australian CoastSafe, the strategic and intelligence beach safety unit of SLSA.


SLSQ also maintained the employment of a dedicated Coastal Safety Officer to conduct coastal audits of black spots and make recommendations to improve safety and lower the state’s drowning figures. In 2014/15 SLSQ worked with stakeholders and land managers to achieve the following: • An aquatic public safety risk assessment was conducted for Mossman Gorge in Cairns • A public safety risk assessment for the Noosa Shire Council, Redland City Council and Sunshine Coast Regional Council • SLSQ designed and developed surf safety signage for the Noosa North Shore Wilderness Camp emergency beacon • SLSQ regularly consulted with the Redland City Council in regards to its mainland and North Stradbroke Island surf safety signage • Representatives met with Queensland Parks and Wildlife directors to discuss beach safety signage • The organisation consulted with key stakeholders about beach safety signage at Broadwater and Tallebudgera Creek on the Gold Coast • SLSQ provided the Queensland Coroner with copies of all aquatic public safety risk assessments, and provided QAS with beach access emergency market numbers and details surrounding access • SLSQ conducted an internal investigation into beach-related fatalities

Around The Regions SLSQ is committed to providing beach safety services across the state, from Port Douglas in the north to Rainbow Bay on the southern Gold Coast. Some of the key achievements and developments across each region in 2014/15 are outlined below.

North Queensland (Port Douglas to Mission Beach) • Volunteers saved eight lives and performed 1,584 preventative actions • The NQ Branch signed off on its five-year strategic plan, laying a strong foundation for sustained growth • Lifeguard services were significantly increased on Green Island in Cairns • Moving forward SLSQ remains committed to addressing declining membership within the region

North Barrier (Forrest Beach to Sarina) • Volunteer members across the region performed 95 first aid treatments, 2,112 preventative actions and saved 36 lives • Townsville lifeguards trialled an emergency response beacon at Picnic Bay Magnetic Island with successful results • SLSQ continued to work closely with the Department of Environment and Heritage Protection with regards to crocodile management. There were a number of crocodile sightings forcing beach closures and the cancellation of various carnivals and Nipper programs. SLSQ worked closely with rangers in to protect local communities

Dan Capps, Noosa Heads SLSC “I joined SLSQ 11 years ago to give something back to the community and to be part of the iconic red and yellow team. For me, the purpose of surf lifesaving is not only to enjoy the amazing beach lifestyle we have but, more importantly, to be able to share it with everyone. Contributing to efforts to raise the profile of my club, witnessing it become Australian Club of the Year in 2012/13 and watching it grow so rapidly through positive leadership and strategic planning has been a highlight. Being able to experience Noosa Heads SLSC’s Seahorse Nippers Program, a program designed for children who are unable to participate in the standard nippers program, has also been incredible. The best part about being a lifesaver is the friends, the family atmosphere of the club and spending time on the beach. It is motivating to have the constant challenge of both maintaining fitness and skills and managing beach rescue scenarios. Surf lifesaving is dynamic and presents a lot of opportunities for young people. Don’t just be part of the red and yellow movement, be the momentum.” - Dan Capps, Noosa Heads SLSC Dan won 2013/14 Queensland Surf Lifesaver of the Year

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Wide Bay Capricorn (Yeppoon to Hervey Bay) • Eight clubs across the Wide Bay Capricorn region combined to perform 6,988 preventative actions, 226 first aid treatments and 42 rescues this season • A surf safety surveillance camera was successfully installed at Wild Cattle Creek (Tannum Sands) • New cameras with attached emergency response beacons were also installed at Palmer’s Creek (Innes Park), Elliott River Mouth (Elliott Heads) and Mon Repos Beach thanks to a Federal Government Grant to the Bundaberg Regional Council • Lifeguard services were increased at Neilson Park Beach across the Christmas holiday period, along with Kellys Beach and Agnes Water Main Beach during the winter months • Yeppoon and Emu Park SLSCs both sustained significant damage during Tropical Cyclone Marcia, prompting local clubs to assist with beach patrols and other areas of need

Sunshine Coast (Rainbow Beach to Redcliffe Peninsula) • The Sunshine Coast’s 14 clubs combined to record 60,387 preventative actions, 2,432 first aid treatments and saved 1,028 lives • The future of volunteer patrol services at Peregian Beach was secured after a Queensland-first arrangement with Noosa Heads. The agreement saw Peregian Beach formally wind-up and transfer the operation and ownership of the club to its northern neighbor • An emergency response beacon was installed at the Noosa North Shore Beach campground, providing vital support to this unpatrolled stretch of coastline

Gold Coast (Point Lookout to Rainbow Bay) • Surf lifesavers from 23 Gold Coast clubs performed 40,228 preventative actions, 3,636 first aid treatments and 795 rescues across the season • ALS lifeguards patrolled Southport Broadwater every day from September through to April, and continued services at Tallebudgera Creek on weekdays during the peak periods and across weekends in winter. Meanwhile, dawn patrols continued every day of the year • SLSQ was invited to join the Gold Coast City Council’s Local Disaster Management Group • Gold Coast clubs successfully transitioned from an analogue radio system to a digital network

Lifesaving Excellence Awards Lifesavers and lifeguards are the everyday heroes of the SLSQ organisation. Every year they perform acts of bravery and selflessness, which serve as a testament to their training while enhancing the reputation of the surf lifesaving movement. The SLSQ Lifesaving Excellence Awards are designed to formally recognise clubs, individuals and members of the community for brave acts of lifesaving excellence and/or for their outstanding commitment.

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SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

In 2014/15, awards were presented to: • The Westpac Lifesaver Helicopter Rescue Service, for the multiple rescues it performed on the Gold Coast on 1 December 2013 • Kyle Wegner, Jim Ham, Daniel Mole, Scott L’Barrow and Joseph Curtin for the successful resuscitation of a student during an inter-school sporting event, 14 June 2014 • Peter LaGros, Steve Pickett and Scott Burgess who resuscitated a fellow Tallebudgera club-member who suffered a heart attack at the Surf Club on 14 July 2014 • William Twigger, Jordan Twigger, Steven Boyd and David McLean for their efforts and involvement in performing CPR on a 26-year-old male on 5 October 2014 at Sunshine Beach • Jackson Law for the successful rescue of a 20-year-old female and male from a rip at Sunshine Beach on 9 November 2014 • Rob Stark, Brett Dorrington and Jorg Schumacher for the rescue of two lost bushwalkers at Lamington National Park, 15 November 2014 • Geoff Maxwell, Mel Webber and Jon Wall for the rescue of a male swimmer at Main Beach (Emu Park) on 16 November 2014 • Reece Muir, Samuel Cartwright, Mathew Baldock and Shae Harry for resuscitating a 48-year-old male at Double Island Point on 2 January 2015 • Daniel Kelly for providing assistance to an injured young male swimmer at Gardner Falls on 4 January 2015 • Peter Harvey, Keely Hughes, James Crockatt, Kye Burke and Mitchell Davison for the rescue of a 10-year-old boy caught in a rip at Mudjimba Beach on 5 January 2015 • Damian Collins, Ben McCauley, Daniel Smith, Ben Bowcock and Dean Johns for the successful rescue of a 25-year-old female and 28-year-old male at Kawana Waters on 26 January 2015 • Todd Johnson for assisting three swimmers caught in a rip and taken further out to sea after competing at South Coast Branch Championships on 1 March 2015 • Noosa SLSC Patrol Group 11 for the rescue of a pilot of an ultralight aircraft that crashed into the Noosa River on 29 March 2015 • Off-duty lifesavers Donal McKill, Alison McKill, Amelia Lorentson, Adam Quinn, Craig Moore, Gemma Ellis-Moore, Rob Neely and Ian Widdicombe. The group resuscitated a man on Main Beach, Noosa on 23 April 2015 • Donna Walls for her outstanding efforts to increase beach safety through community awareness programs • Redland City Council was recognised for its efforts to increase beach safety through signage, coastal auditing and assisting in the association with National Parks, and implementing a lifesaving service at Wellington Point


Dangerous Marine Creatures With its eyes on the water, the ground and on the horizon, SLSQ plays a key role in the management of dangerous marine creatures, including box jellyfish, crocodiles and sharks. The organisation reports risk to local governments, tourist organisations and the general public in order to avoid harm. SLSQ continues to lead the Marine Stinger Prevention and Awareness Strategies on behalf of the Queensland Government, with the aim of ensuring the safety of swimmers and beachgoers. SLSQ also plays a key role in estuarine crocodile management, working closely with the Department of Environment and Heritage Protection, and sitting on the North Queensland Community Advisory Group for Crocodile Management. Meanwhile SLSQ representatives consult closely with the Queensland Government to help protect swimmers from sharks, with the organisation an active member of the Shark Marine Advisory Group on the Gold Coast. Marine Stings

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

Physalia “Bluebottle” Stings:

5,628

1,426

8,042

566

3,740

Sightings:

89,516

10,761

80,623

3,869

19,231

Stings:

144

290

420

265

522

Sightings:

189

669

2,130

2,106

900

Cyanea “Hair Jelly”

Catostylus “Blubber” Stings:

161

533

2,914

1,211

2,239

1,803

30,198

63,170

38,881

37,732

5

2

45

5

68

422

265

298

537

535

Stings:

11

16

2

6

7

Sightings:

59

74

14

2

32

Sightings: Chironex “Box Jelly” Stings: Sightings: Carukia “Irukandji”

TOTAL Stings:

5,949

2,267

11,423

2,053

6,576

Sightings:

91,989

41,967

146,235

45,395

58,430

SLSQ Lifesaving Services Quality Assurance Lifesaving services, operations support, and professional lifeguard services were certified by quality auditors under the Australian Quality Management Standard ISO 9001 2008. This provides clients with the assurance that services meet current and future requirements, while ensuring lifesaving services remain a clear leader in aquatic safety and rescue services. (Certification Number – QEC22945).

SLSQ is constantly looking at how it can improve.

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

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403

HELICOPTER SURF PATROLS

Photo Credit: Scott Wensley

200

PREVENTATIVE ACTIONS


Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service The Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service (WLRHS) remains a core lifesaving weapon for SLSQ across South East Queensland. One of the oldest community-based helicopter rescue services in the world, the WLRHS has been operating in Queensland for almost four decades. With a highly-trained team of skilled men and women, encompassing experienced pilots, professional staff and volunteer members, the service exists for one reason: to save lives. Today the WLRHS is a full-time service, operating 365 days a year and providing coastal surveillance and search and rescue support to surf lifesavers, lifeguards and other emergency service agencies as required. Across the season, SLSQ’s two helicopters – Lifesaver 45 and Lifesaver 46 – combined to perform 403 surf patrols, 200 preventative actions and directly save 15 lives in the process.

Snapshot of achievements • The service continues to experience strong growth. In 2014/15, 18 professional staff were employed including nine pilots, three aircrew and six lifeguards. In addition, the service also encompassed 28 trained volunteer lifesavers (nine aircrew and 19 rescue crew). • There was a continued focus on upskilling pilots and crew, with staff and volunteers successfully completing a variety of courses including water winch, hoist, and helicopter underwater escape training. • The skill and training of WLRHS personnel was highlighted when Rob Stark (pilot), Brett Dorrington (aircrew) and Jorg Schumacher (rescue crew) were presented with SLSQ’s Rescue of the Month award for the successful search and rescue of two lost hikers at Lamington National Park on 15 November 2015. This award is not only a reflection of their courage and professionalism but also served to highlight the growing importance of WLHRS in operations away from the beach. • Chief training officer Andrew McNeilly and senior crewman Paul Brennan were approved by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority to train and certify persons for winch and rappelling operations.

Changing of the guard In 2014/15 the WLRHS underwent a significant changing of the guard, with the appointment of a new chief pilot to spearhead the service moving forward. After more than a decade at the helm of the WLRHS, Peter Bird stepped down from the role in December 2015 and handed over the reins to Paul Gibson. Mr Gibson comes to the role with more than 28 years of experience in the aviation industry, including the past two as a senior pilot with SLSQ. Mr Bird continues as Deputy Chief Pilot.

PolAir The relationship between the Queensland Police Service and the WLHRS grew from strength to strength across the past 12 months. SLSQ has successfully operated the QPS helicopter on the Gold Coast (PolAir 1) since September 2012 and, in 2014/15, we extended this service to include an additional helicopter for aerial policing duties in Brisbane (PolAir 2). Based at Archerfield Airport, PolAir 2 services a population of more than 1.8 million people. Importantly, this extended relationship with the QPS continues to broaden our core service by providing for safer communities and, ultimately, saving lives across the state.

Activity

Lifesaver 45

Lifesaver 46

Total

Surf patrols

173

230

403

Preventative actions

27

173

200

Rescue support

2

23

25

Rescues Beach surveillance

3

12

15

12,859

14,340

27,199

Searches

20

23

43

Flights

201

297

498

Demonstrations / PR

13

20

33

• The WLRHS continued to work closely with Emergency Management Queensland, the Queensland Police Service, and the Australian Maritime Safety Authority to provide search and rescue services in times of need.

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

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Australian Lifeguard Service Queensland

1,435 LIVES SAVED BY ALSQ LIFEGUARDS

12,458

FIRST AID TREATMENTS PERFORMED

522,462

PREVENTATIVE ACTIONS PERFORMED BY ALSQ LIFEGUARDS

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Saving Lives is our Business

• ALS provided a Safety Ambassador Service at South Bank Parklands to remind and encourage parents to keep a close eye on their children while in the water

The Australian Lifeguard Service (ALS) is the professional arm of SLSQ, providing integral support to local governments, land managers and private resorts along beaches and waterways located across the state.

• 46 ALS lifeguards completed their Certificate III in Public Safety (Aquatic Search & Rescue) taking Queensland’s total to 66

The ALS is the largest provider of professional lifeguard services in the state, operating at more than 70 locations in Queensland. Many of these sites are patrolled seven days a week, 365 days of the year. The ALS is made up of 68 permanent lifeguards and 339 casual employees. Their experience is unparalleled, with the team boasting 1,445 collective years of experience between them and more than 1.3 million career patrol hours. Across the year, ALS Queensland lifeguards performed 12,458 first aid treatments, 522,462 preventative actions and saved 1,435 lives. Recognising the importance of the lifeguards’ role, the ALS sets international benchmarks through best practice operations. This includes nationally accredited training programs and ongoing support and development of the highly skilled team members. Similarly, SLSQ’s professional lifeguards are committed to maintaining their fitness and training to ensure they provide the communities they serve with the very best rescue, first aid, resuscitation capabilities and beach management.

Key Achievements During the year ALS made significant steps to improve safety along Queensland’s coastline, with some of its key achievements including: • The employment of a third full-time permanent lifeguard to patrol Green Island in Cairns, ensuring greater protection for beachgoers all year round • ALS mid-week patrols on the Sunshine Coast during school holidays • Mid-week patrols at Tallebudgera and Southport Broadwater at peak times (September – May) • A daily patrol service was added to Noosa North Shore and Wellington Point in Redland City across Christmas and Easter school holidays

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• 37 lifeguards completed the Silver Medallion Aquatic Rescue • 48 lifeguards completed their Silver Medallion Advanced First Aid Certificate

Spotlight on our Queensland Success Queensland is leading the country in professional lifeguard services with Tim Wilson awarded one of the highest individual accolades at the SLSA Awards of Excellence in November 2014, where he was named Australian Lifeguard of the Year for 2013/14. A professional lifeguard with ALS for almost a decade, Tim beat five other finalists from across Australia to win the prestigious award.

The Year Ahead ALS Queensland will continue to collaborate with SLSQ’s volunteer lifesavers to deliver safer beaches across the state for the benefit of the entire community and work towards the vision of zero preventable deaths in Queensland waters.

The ALS is the largest provider of professional lifeguard services in the state.


Council/Corporation

Years of Service

Beaches/areas patrolled

FAR NORTH QUEENSLAND REGION LIFEGUARD SERVICES Douglas Shire Council

26 years (started in 1989)

Four Mile Beach

Cairns Regional Council

26 years (started in 1989)

Holloways Beach, Yorkeys Knob Beach, Ellis Beach, Palm Cove, Trinity Beach, Clifton Beach, Bramston Beach, Kewarra Beach, Green Island, Esplanade Lagoon

Cassowary Coast Regional Council

20 years (started in 1995)

Etty Bay, North Mission, Mission Beach

NORTH QUEENSLAND REGION LIFEGUARD SERVICE Hinchinbrook Shire Council

20 years (started in 1995)

Forrest Beach

25 years (started in 1990)

The Strand Net 1, The Strand Net 2, The Strand Water Park, Alma Bay, Picnic Bay, Horseshoe Bay

12 years (started in 2003)

Balgal Beach, Riverway Lagoon, The Strand Rock Pool

4 years (started in 2011)

Pallarenda

Burdekin Shire Council

23 years (started in 1992)

Alva Beach

Whitsunday Regional Council

7 years (started in 2008)

Horseshoe Bay (Bowen)

7 years (started in 2008)

Blue Water Lagoon

24 years (started in 1991)

Harbour Beach, Lamberts Beach, Eimeo Beach

22 years (started in 1993)

Sarina Beach

Townsville City Council

Mackay Regional Council

WIDE BAY CAPRICORN REGION LIFEGUARD SERVICES Livingstone Shire Council Gladstone Regional Council

Bundaberg Regional Council Fraser Coast Regional Council

23 years (started in 1992)

Emu Park Beach, Yeppoon Beach

20 years (started in 1995)

Agnes Water Beach

23 years (started in 1992)

Tannum Sands Beach

23 years (started in 1992)

Moore Park Beach, Oaks Beach, Kelly’s Beach, Elliott Heads Beach, Mon Repos Beach, Nielsen Park Beach

4 years (started in 2011)

Woodgate

24 years (started in 1992)

Torquay Beach

SOUTH EAST QUEENSLAND REGION LIFEGUARD SERVICES Noosa Shire Council

3 years (started in 2012)

Noosa West, Noosa, Sunshine, Sunrise, Peregian, North Peregian, Noosa North Shore (Roving)

Sunshine Coast Council

3 years (started in 2012)

Coolum North, Coolum Beach, Yaroomba, Palmer Coolum Resort, Boardwalk, Marcoola,Discovery Beach, Mudjimba, Twin Waters, Maroochydore, Alexandra Headland, Mooloolaba, Mooloolaba Spit, Buddina, Wurtulla, Currimundi, Dicky Beach, Kings Beach, Bulcock Beach, Golden Beach, Kings Pool

Gympie Regional Council

22 years (started in 1993)

Rainbow Beach

Moreton Bay Regional Council

20 years (started in 1995)

Woorim Beach

City Parklands Transition Services (South Bank)

23 years (started 1992)

Streets Beach Lagoon

Redland City Council

22 years (started in 1993)

Cylinder Beach, Main Beach, Adder Rock, Wellington Point

Gold Coast City Council

2 years (started in 2013)

Paradise Point, Southport Broadwater, Tallebudgera Creek

7 years (started in 2008)

Double Island Point

4 years (started in 2011)

Inskip Point

Non Local Government Areas

Tim Wilson, Australian Lifeguard Service Queensland “Receiving the Queensland and Australian Lifeguard of the Year was an honour but being able to help out is the most rewarding part of my involvement. Establishing three new services on the Gold Coast has been a massive achievement for me. Along with this, I trained and mentored 15 new lifeguards in the area. I am always looking for ways to further SLSQ’s development. It feels great to be able to give back to the service that has helped me so much throughout the years.

Through lifeguarding I have met some amazing people and worked with some incredible lifeguards. SLSQ has equipped me with great skills and I have found out so much about myself. It has been a real privilege and I’m going to find it hard to ever leave the job.” - Tim Wilson, Professional Lifeguard Tim won 2013/14 Queensland and Australian Lifeguard of the Year. He is a lifeguard on the Gold Coast and North Stradbroke Island.

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Education

(Commercial Training and Member Education)

12,723 PEOPLE TRAINED IN FIRST AID AND CPR

31,313 UNITS OF COMPETENCY DELIVERED

268%

INCREASE IN COMMERCIAL TRAINING SALES THIS YEAR

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This season saw SLSQ adopt a more structured and streamlined approach to the delivery of its education and training programs. This involved an internal restructure, which now sees SLSQ position commercial training and member education under the overarching umbrella of the Member Services Department. SLSQ remains focused on providing educational programs for its members and the community as a significant step to improve safety through knowledge, with the overall aim to reduce drownings.

Commercial Education Australian Lifesaving Academy Queensland

• The appointment of a Chief Trainer reflecting the growth of the business. • ALAQ employed a dedicated Business Development Executive in May 2015.

Future training delivery SLSQ is constantly reviewing how it can improve its educational programs. E-learning remains a key focus area and ALAQ is continuing to explore how best to integrate technology into its program delivery and assessment. ALAQ remains committed to growth, with an emphasis on flexibility and strong customer service while embracing new technology. Moving forward, ALAQ is committed to solidifying its position as an industryleader in emergency care training.

The Australian Lifesaving Academy Queensland (ALAQ) is the trading name of SLSQ as a registered training organisation, set up to deliver lifesaving education to the wider community.

Member Education

ALAQ provides a valuable service to the community through its first aid and CPR courses. Its goal is to bring more than a century of lifesaving experience from the beach to the home, school or workplace. SLSQ believes these lifesaving skills can be applied to many different environments and circumstances.

SLSQ remains committed to delivering effective and efficient member education to ensure the future sustainability of the movement.

ALAQ offers a range of emergency care and aquatic rescue training courses through flexible, quality, community-focused programs aimed at making Queensland a safer state. In recent years ALAQ has successfully applied its training to a variety of industries including education, sport and recreation, retail, finance, construction, mining, government and medical.

In 2014/15 SLSQ employed dedicated education coordinators in the Gold Coast, Sunshine Coast and North Barrier regions to provide on-theground support to branches and clubs. These coordinators worked closely with club trainers and assessors across the season to ensure members’ training needs were met.

Highlights and key achievements

Importantly, all trainers and assessors of ALAQ are qualified surf lifesavers and all profits are invested directly back into supporting beach safety initiatives across the state.

• The 34th edition of the Public Safety and Aquatic Rescue Training Manual was published with changes to assessments and online learning

Serving as a valuable internal resource, this season SLSQ’s Lifesaving Committee unanimously agreed ALAQ should also deliver member emergency care training from 1 November 2014. The move provides volunteers with access to professional and experienced trainers, while increasing the standard and consistency of courses.

• Online learning remained a key focus area of the ongoing operation of the Bronze Medallion Online Theory Assessment

Highlights and key achievements

• SLSQ will roll out new training packages to clubs and members, including the Certificate IV in Training and Assessment

• New standards for registered training organisations were introduced nationally, prompting a review of SLSQ policies and procedures. The process is currently before an external consultant

• ALAQ reported strong growth in the number of people trained during the year, with sales increasing 268% from $220,000 to $590,000

• The organisation provides representation within key industry bodies, and an SLSQ representative currently sits as the secretary of the Australian Resuscitation Council – Queensland Branch

• ALAQ assumed responsibility for emergency care training provided to club members including First Aid, CPR, Advanced Resuscitation, Advanced First Aid, Spinal Management and Pain Management

• Helicopter Underwater Escape Training (HUET) for pilots and crew of the Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service and the Queensland Police Helicopter Service was reintroduced

• Significant advancement was made towards establishing ALAQ as an industry leader in the delivery of emergency care training – as evidenced by agreements and partnerships made during 2014/15, including: o A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Clubs Queensland to provide exclusive emergency care training to staff and discounted training to member and affiliate organisations o An MOU with the Pharmacy Guild of Queensland confirming ALAQ as its preferred supplier of emergency care training o An MOU with the Queensland Fire and Rescue Service (south-western region) to provide emergency care training

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• SLSQ also rolled out Emergency Breathing Systems Training for the first time

Its goal is to bring more than a century of lifesaving experience from the beach to the home, school or workplace.


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Sports Photos: Harvie Allison


Surf Sports

4,403

ATHLETES AT SLSQ CHAMPIONSHIP EVENTS

241,344

VIEWERS WHO WATCHED TELEVISION COVERAGE SLSQ’S STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS

351

PARTICIPANTS SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED COACHING COURSES

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Sharpening Lifesaving Skills Through Sport

Laerdal Queensland Surf Rescue Championships

Every year SLSQ’s diverse sporting events bring together thousands of lifesavers from across the state to compete under the banners of mateship, camaraderie and mutual respect.

The event at Alexandra Headland saw the Gold Coast’s Northcliffe SLSC (76 points) take out the competition ahead of the home club (73 points) and Sunshine Beach SLSC (40 points).

Queensland’s surf sport events continue to grow in size and stature as athletes and host communities alike indulge in their passion for competition and strive for personal excellence.

Queensland Board Riding Championships

Sport is one of the foundations of the surf lifesaving movement, with training and competition being fundamental tools to improve the skills required to keep Queensland’s beaches safe.

The Queensland Board Riding Championships were held on 1415 February at Alexandra Headland and featured more than 100 competitors from under-11s through to Masters showcasing their skills on both the long and short boards.

Surf carnivals promote a healthy lifestyle choice for our members, allowing them to showcase SLSQ’s culture while transferring some of the core skills of lifesaving into the competitive sporting arena. Sporting competition is a fundamental strategy helping SLSQ attract and retain recruits. During 2014/15 Queensland’s athletes continued to thrive and performed with impressive results. SLSQ remains committed to the investment in developing regional sport and building participation across the state. SLSQ wishes to thank the Queensland Government (Sport and Recreation Services) for its vital support of our sporting program, and its grassroots support of Queensland clubs via the ‘Get In The Game’ initiative.

Queensland Championship Events Queensland Pool Rescue Championships Pool rescue competitions continue to grow as a popular drawcard for SLSQ. The 2014 Queensland Pool Rescue Championships were held across two days from 26-27 July with roughly 300 participants at the Caboolture Aquatic Leisure Centre. Competitors tested their rescue skills with events such as obstacle manikin tows and tube swims. After a tough challenge, Currumbin SLSC took out the competition finishing on 357 points, ahead of Northcliffe SLSC (298 points) and Maroochydore SLSC (282 points).

Queensland Endurance Championships More than 500 competitors lined up at Alexandra Headland on 11 October for the 2014 State Endurance Championships. Open to children in the under-11 category through to masters, lifesavers competed in a number of gruelling events including long-distance swimming, board paddling, surf skiing and beach running. At the end of the day, host club Alexandra Headland took out the event ahead of Mooloolaba SLSC and Maroochydore SLSC.

More than 200 of Queensland’s top surf lifesavers converged on the Sunshine Coast to put their patrol skills to the test at the 2015 Queensland Surf Rescue Championships, held on 13-15 February.

Alexandra Headland SLSC won the event ahead of Noosa Heads SLSC and Coolum Beach SLSC.

Queensland Youth Surf Life Saving Championships A highlight of the sporting calendar was the introduction of the Queensland Youth State Championships on the Sunshine Coast from 20-22 March. Replacing the Junior Championships, the event saw the inclusion of the under 11-15 age categories with more than 1,600 young lifesavers lining up to compete. Host club Maroochydore made the most of the local conditions to record a resounding victory, finishing on 364 points, ahead of Alexandra Headlands SLSC (234 points) and Northcliffe SLSC (225 points).

Queensland Surf Life Saving Championships More than 1,500 of the state’s top surf sport athletes flocked to Maroochydore Beach to contest the 2015 Queensland Championships, held on 27-29 March. The Gold Coast’s Northcliffe SLSC successfully defended its title, taking its winning streak at the championships to an impressive 11 consecutive years. Mooloolaba SLSC finished in second place, with Currumbin SLSC rounding out the podium. Meanwhile, in the Masters competition, it was a Sunshine Coast whitewash with Mooloolaba SLSC taking the title ahead of Alexandra Headland SLSC and Noosa Heads SLSC.

Queensland IRB Championships More than 300 surf lifesavers converged on Mooloolaba Beach across two days from 4-5 July for the Queensland Inflatable Rescue Boat Championships. Reigning champions North Burleigh successfully defended their title to solidify their position as one of the state’s IRB surf rescue powerhouses. A series of strong performances across the two days of competition saw the Gold Coast club finish on 103 points ahead of Kawana Waters SLSC (63 points) and Point Lookout SLSC (38 points).

Sport is one of the foundations of the surf lifesaving movement.

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Summer of Surf Series In 2014/15 Surf Life Saving Australia partnered with Fox Sports to launch an exciting new partnership, ‘Summer of Surf’, featuring a range of sporting events broadcast across a 12-week series. A number of Queensland events were featured including legs of the Ocean Assault Series and the Queensland Championships. Approximately 241,344 people tuned in to watch the Queensland Championships, representing the highest rating leg of the ‘Summer of Surf’ programming and the highest rating surf sports program ever broadcast on Fox Sports.

Sports Development Throughout the year, SLSQ made a concerted effort to boost regional and grassroots participation in surf sport, and foster the ongoing development of Queensland’s emerging athletes. SLSQ facilitated a number of competitions and events to provide increased opportunities for lifesavers to participate in high-level contests. The Fastest Man on Sand and Ocean Roar IRB series ran successfully across the season, and the Ocean Assault Series returned to the SLSQ calendar after a five year hiatus.

Pool rescue competition Pool rescue competitions continue to be embraced by branches and clubs across the state and, throughout the season, SLSQ successfully held a number of development clinics in this discipline. As with previous years, a pool rescue competition was held as part of the North Australian Championships and a Queensland Country High Performance Pool Rescue Squad was named to compete at the Australian Pool Rescue Championships, where they won nine gold, five silver and three bronze medals.

Regional Sport SLSQ remains committed to developing regional sport and building participation across all corners of Queensland.

North Australian Championships More than 500 athletes hit the sand for the 2014 North Australian Championships held in Mackay on 24-26 October. Cairns SLSC returned as champions and extended the club’s winning streak to five years running. Arcadian SLSC finished in second place with Picnic Bay SLSC taking third.

Interbranch Championships Coaches, officials and athlete development Throughout 2014/15 SLSQ worked with clubs and branches to roll out a variety of training and development opportunities for coaches, athletes and officials, including: • 19 Level 1 officials courses were delivered to 266 participants. This represented a 72% growth in participant numbers on 2013-14.

The Interbranch Championships provide some of the state’s younger lifesavers with a taste for representative honours with athletes aged under 13-17 invited to comptete for their regions. This year the championships once again featured a Queensland Country team of 40 youngsters, selected following the North Australian Championships. The 2014 event was held on the Gold Coast on 28-29 November and the Sunshine Coast contingent proved unbeatable.

• Two Level 1 coaching courses were delivered to 57 participants. Nine participants completed the Foundation Coaching Course and 28 completed the Development Coaching Course. • A number of athlete development clinics were held, including an IRB racing clinic at the North Australian Championships and two pool rescue clinics on the Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast.

Interstate Championships Each year SLSA’s Interstate Championships provide local athletes with an opportunity to represent Queensland in elite lifesaving competition as part of the state Cyclones team. The Interstate Championships are contested across ocean, surf boats, IRB and pool rescue competition. In 2014/15 Queensland’s IRB team won its competition, while the ocean and surf boat teams finished second behind New South Wales.

Surf boat competition Surf boat competition and development continues to prosper across Queensland. Many of Queensland’s top crews competed in the Navy Surf Boat and Queensland Cup series, while a surf boat short course event was held as part of the North Australian Championships.

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Queensland Cyclones Team Youth Nikolas Green (Alexandra Headland) Alex Wright (Mooloolaba) Jy Duffy (Maroochydore) Jayden Erskine (Currumbin) Lachlan Sergis (Northcliffe) Cody Rychvalsky (Maroochydore) Alyssa Koenen (Northcliffe) Alyssa Bull (Alexandra Headland) Ella Brown (Mooloolaba) Karlee Nurthen (Mooloolaba) Cassie Lee (Maroochydore) Nicole Kay (Mooloolaba)

Open Ky Hurst (Kurrawa) Tanyn Lyndon (Northcliffe) Nicklaas Gale (Northcliffe) Cory Hill (Northcliffe) Matt Poole (Mooloolaba) Jason Gough (Mooloolaba) Elizabeth Pluimers (North Burleigh) Jordan Mercer (Noosa Heads) Rebecca Creedy (Northcliffe) Maddy Dunn (Northcliffe) Emma Dick (Mermaid Beach) Melissa Howard (Kurrawa)

Team management Bronwyn Champness – Team Manager (Alexandra Headlands) Julie Davis – Assistant Team Manager (Moore Park) Julian Norton-Smith – Ocean Coach (Mermaid Beach) Rhys Drury – Assistant Ocean Coach (Maroochydore) Ryan Hoffman – Beach Coach (Kurrawa) Nick Marshall – Physiotherapist

Queensland Cyclones Surf Boat Crews U19 Men - Alexandra Headland Steve Davies (sweep) Tim Minett Ned Archer Blake Primrose Ned Jenkinson

U23 Women - Maroochydore Patrick McGuire (sweep) Catherine Ulrich Elise Buchanan Lucy Dewar Alexandra French

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U23 Men - Currumbin Ben Elliott (sweep) Andrew Beale Edwin Hibberd Evan Mills Samuel Robinson

Reserve Grade - Maroochydore Michael Brooks (sweep) Dave Hoffman Johnny Naughton Will Sparrow /Matt Keillor Corey Stone

Open Women - Tugun Bruce Zillman (sweep) Genevieve Bassingthwaite Marianne Bassingthwaite Sascha Lahey Lisa Webber

Open Men - Currumbin Matt Wildman (sweep) Robert Apanui Joe Fraser Andrew Pyke Cain Hayward

Queensland Cyclones IRB Team Andy Kelckhoven (North Burleigh) Tim Watene (North Burleigh) Jack Watson (North Burleigh) Brendon Phillips (North Burleigh) Scott Ward (North Burleigh) Kane Domio (Kawana Waters) Ben Bowcock (Kawana Waters) Ben McCauley (Kawana Waters) Kate Czerny (North Burleigh) Sarah Kiely (North Burleigh) Mikaela Rawlings (North Burleigh) Talor Marshall (North Burleigh) Kaitlyn Brown (North Burleigh) Rebecca Turner (Dicky Beach) Jessica Simpson (Dicky Beach) Samantha Kerr (Dicky Beach) Zeke Pitt (North Burleigh) Samantha Thornton (Alexandra Headland)

Team management Bronwyn Champness – Team Manager (Alexandra Headland) Jeff Hutchison – Assistant Team Manager (North Burleigh) Adam Barbour – Coach (North Burleigh) Patient Coordinator – Scott Wheeler (Kurrawa) For a snapshot of 2014/15 results, see page 70

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Photo Credit: Casey Eveleigh Photography


Community Awareness 601,693 PEOPLE REACHED VIA COMMUNITY AWARENESS INITIATIVES

59%

INCREASE IN COMMUNITY AWARENESS PARTICIPANTS

157,629

MULTICULTURAL PARTICIPANTS IN SLSQ’S ON THE SAME WAVE PROGRAM

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SLSQ has taken every opportunity to spread its surf safety messages in the community – away from the beach – representing a crucial role in reducing drowning incidents.

Highlights and Initiatives

Each year SLSQ invests considerable time and resources educating communities about beach and aquatic safety, in support of the proven belief that ‘prevention is better than cure’. SLSQ prescribes to the idea an educated swimmer is far less likely to find themselves in trouble while in the water.

Achievements 2014/15 built on the success of previous years for SLSQ’s community awareness programs. Highlights included:

During the 2014/15 season, SLSQ’s community awareness programs reached out to more than 600,000 people, educating them on coastal and beach safety.

• Almost 150,000 multicultural participants educated via SLSQ’s On The Same Wave program – up from 40,000 in 2013/14

Complementing general public awareness initiatives, SLSQ has tailored programs to target high-risk groups, including:

• Lifesavers educated more than 50,000 students via the Queensland Health Beach Safe Schools Program

• Men aged 18-25 years • Rural populations • International and domestic tourists • People from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds • School students Through targeted programs, educational resources and school and community visits, SLSQ is ensuring the community learns comprehensive and engaging surf safety messages in an effort to save lives.

SLSQ’s community awareness programs reached out to more than 600,000 people, educating them on coastal and beach safety

• SLSQ received grant funding from the Lord Mayor’s Charitable Trust to run a beach safety program for children with disabilities • The introduction of a dedicated Little Lifesavers program for children from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds • The number of people educated about surf safety increased by 59% when compared to last season

An eye on the year ahead Moving forward, SLSQ will look to build on the success of its existing programs by increasing the reach of key initiatives to new communities. This will include the expansion of the Little Lifesavers program to the Sunshine Coast, the On The Same Wave program to the Cairns region, and rolling out the Little Lifesavers program at South Bank to include a program for children with cerebral palsy.

Key Education Programs On The Same Wave SLSQ’s On The Same Wave program is an educational initiative targeting international visitors and Queenslanders from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds. This year, the initiative educated 157,629 potential beachgoers. The initiative sees trained lifesavers deliver surf safety educational sessions for children, migrants and refugees. Safety messages are also disseminated through information translated in more than 25 languages and SLSQ attends key multicultural events and festivals to reach diverse communities. This year the program expanded to offer increased opportunities for people from CALD backgrounds to join the surf lifesaving movement as fully-fledged volunteers. As a result of its efforts, SLSQ has already trained a number of international refugees and migrants to Bronze Medallion standard. SLSQ thanks the Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs for their support of this initiative.

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Queensland Health Beach Safe Schools Program

Breaka Beach to Bush

The Beach Safe Schools Program was developed to educate primary students about surf and water safety, dangerous marine creatures and the importance of sun safety. During the year, the program provided 54,272 school children with lifesaving skills and strategies to manage risk.

Continuing a successful partnership with Breaka, the Beach to Bush program aims to reduce the rate of drowning incidents among children from regional and rural areas. Successfully delivered across Australia for more than ten years, the program has grown to become one of the largest surf education initiatives in the country.

SLSQ thanks Queensland Health for its ongoing and generous support of this program, which is providing children with valuable, lifesaving knowledge ahead of their beach visits.

In Queensland, almost 5,000 children were reached during 2014/15. SLSQ thanks Breaka for its continued support of this vital safety initiative.

Little Lifesavers

Gold Coast Beach Safe Program

Running for more than 20 years, the Little Lifesavers program is one of SLSQ’s most popular water safety initiatives with more than 550 children participating during the financial year. Little Lifesavers is designed to be fun and engaging while providing children with essential surf safety skills and a pathway into the lifesaving movement.

As one of Australia’s most popular tourist destinations, great focus is placed on welcoming visitors to the Gold Coast to ensure they enjoy a safe holiday.

The success of this program is a direct result of the ongoing support SLSQ receives from its community partners including the South Bank Corporation, Brisbane City Council, Redland City Council, Cairns Regional Council, Bundaberg Regional Council, Mackay Regional Council, Sunshine Coast Council and the Council of the City of Gold Coast. Thank you to program partner Star Outdoor for their support.

The airport welcoming service sees surf lifesavers provide information to visitors as soon as they step off the plane, including a free map listing every patrolled beach. This year more than 137,000 people were educated through the program, which is sponsored by Harbour Town Shopping Centre and supported by Gold Coast Airport, Gold Coast City Council and Gold Coast Cabs.

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Membership Development

30,653 MEMBERS

10,116 NIPPERS

8,871 ACTIVE PATROLLING MEMBERS

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A Snapshot SLSQ’s volunteers are the lifeblood of the organisation with their acts of bravery and selfless commitment providing an invaluable service to the community.

The Peer Support Program is instrumental in protecting members, particularly those on the front line. In 2014/15, 16 new peer support officers were trained, an increase of 28%, boosting the network to 58. Peer support officers provide psychological first aid during times of need, trauma or distress.

It is pleasing to report SLSQ membership grew 1.2%, from 30,293 last season to 30,653 in 2014/15.

Young Achievers

Healthy membership is the cornerstone of any successful volunteer organisation and the need to attract new members and nurture existing volunteers is paramount to the ongoing viability of SLSQ.

Junior Activities

With a number of successful recruitment campaigns facilitated in 2014/15, looking to the year ahead membership development will continue to be a key focus for the entire organisation.

Fostering the skills and progression of junior lifesavers is imperative, as they are the key to SLSQ’s successful future. Junior members represent the largest membership category. Importantly, SLSQ experienced growth of almost 4% in this area during 2014/15.

SLSQ works closely with its stakeholders, including clubs and committees, operational divisions and regional staff, to ensure the organisation is meeting the diverse needs of volunteers. It is also working on strategies to engage with inactive and prospective members to grow its volunteer base, for example encouraging Nippers’ parents to play an active role. A full time Project Officer has been appointed within the Membership Development team, and regional teams have reviewed their roles and responsibilities to ensure attention is being paid to membership development across every level of the organisation.

Surf Club Open Day A highlight of the SLSQ calendar is the recruitment drive via the Surf Club Open Day, which allows the organisation to showcase its members and high calibre services. The sixth annual Surf Club Open Day was held on 31 August and 27 clubs across the state opened their doors to the community. The North Queensland Open Day was held on 28 March to coincide with the local patrol season. Surf Club Open Days provide clubs with a platform to increase participation and sign up new members. Club participation was down on last year however the 2014/15 campaign was judged to be a success in reaching new recruits and achieving strong regional media coverage.

Member Welfare and Protection SLSQ places the welfare and protection of its members at the heart of the organisation, recognising they are vital to the continued success of the movement. To maintain compliance with government legislation and SLSA’s policies, regular reviews of the Queensland strategies, policies and practices are prioritised to safeguard all members regardless of age, location, gender and ethnicity. Throughout the year SLSQ continued to advocate the Child Youth Risk Management Strategy within clubs and branches to operate in line with the Working with Children (Risk Management and Screening) Act 2000. SLSQ also adheres to SLSA’s Member Protection Policy updated in 2014, and works closely with the Public Safety Business Agency on Blue Cards and ‘working with children checks’.

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SLSQ is committed to providing safe, quality and age-appropriate activities to further each junior member’s development. It has established the State Junior Activities Advisory Panel, which plays an active role in providing recommendations regarding the conduct and development of Junior Activities across the state. The panel is working on major plans for the next 12 months to improve engagement with younger members. The Junior Activities Forum Series ran again, with seven forums conducted in 2014/15 including two in North Queensland. A highlight of the year was the roll out of Nippers programs for children with special needs at a number of clubs. Nobby’s Beach SLSC and North Burleigh SLSC introduced programs for the first time this year.

Breaka Under-14 Junior Surf Lifesaver of the Year In March 2015, Redcliffe Peninsula’s Harry Graham was formally recognised as Queensland’s top nipper, taking out this season’s Breaka Under-14 Junior Surf Lifesaver of the Year Award. Five other nominees from across the state were also shortlisted for the award, which remains the highest individual accolade for Queensland’s young surf lifesavers. Congratulations to other finalists including Harriet Grant (North Queensland), Joachim Born (North Barrier), Jordan Winning (Wide Bay Capricorn), Ky Curtis (South Coast) and Sophie Clemson (Point Danger).

Breaka Youth Excellence Program Held on 23-25 January 2015, 87 of Queensland’s best and brightest young members participated in the annual Breaka Youth Excellence Program. At Lake Moogerah, participants aged 15-17 experienced a weekend of activities focused on leadership, team building, improving selfconfidence, mentoring, communication, negotiating and problem solving. The weekend was intended to encourage and develop the teenagers’ involvement and leadership within SLSQ. These young members are aspiring to become future leaders within the organisation.

Leadership Excellence Program SLSQ invests in its future through the Leadership Excellence Program, and this year engaged in the expertise of the Australian Defence Force


to physically and mentally challenge participants. Held annually, the program provides attendees with the knowledge and skills to advance as leaders within their clubs, branches and state. SLSQ is pleased to report 39 participants aged 18-25 completed the program held from 13-15 March 2015 in Brisbane. A highlight of the weekend was the training day at the Gallipoli Barracks.

National Leadership College SLSA’s National Leadership College is another forum providing opportunities for young people within the movement to develop their leadership skills and contribute to the success of their clubs. Seven members and two facilitators participated in the 2015 National Leadership College in Sydney on 3-8 February 2015.

IAVE World Youth and Volunteer Conference Queensland was privileged to host the 23rd International Association of Volunteer Effort (IAVE) World Volunteer Conference, held on the Gold Coast from 15-20 September 2014. IAVE is an organisation working to promote, strengthen and celebrate volunteering efforts around the world. SLSQ was well represented with four members attending the World Youth Conference and a further six attending the World Volunteer Conference.

Australian Emergency Management Volunteers Forum (AEMVF) Leadership training via the AEMVF was held at Surf Rescue House in May 2015. Four Queensland representatives attended the over-30 program while a further three attended the 18-29 years program.

State Youth Advisory Panel In 2014/15 the Membership Services Committee tabled a proposal to establish a State Youth Advisory Panel. With support from the SLSQ Board, a two-year trial will start next season.

Membership Sustainability Project Work on the SLSQ Membership Sustainability Project has continued in 2014/15. The following initiatives have been developed and are ready to be rolled out to clubs across next season: • Patrol Service Contract Management Project – a patrol gap calculator has been developed which will assist clubs in proactively forecasting and managing active volunteers. • Family Participation Program – resources have been developed and trialled to educate the families of our junior members about the volunteer opportunities available to them, both on and off the beach, in a bid to increase their active participation within the movement. • Statistics Reporting Project - a phase one report identifying baseline trends for all clubs and branches has been developed to help identify membership trends at club level.

Harry Graham, Redcliffe Peninsula SLSC “I started surf lifesaving in January 2009 after touching down in Australia from the UK. Where I had come from in the middle of England I would only visit the beach once a year, as it was too far to travel. Through my involvement in SLSQ, I have seen myself and others around me grow in teamwork and confidence. I enjoy being able to help people both on the beach and in everyday life with my newfound confidence and knowledge of first aid. It is great to be able to help young Nippers be the best they can be, have fun and aid them in becoming the great lifesavers of the future. I strive to continue to build my qualifications with SLSQ, eventually achieving my Bronze Medallion, building my skills and certifications and mentoring young Nippers.” - Harry Graham, Redcliffe Peninsula SLSC Harry won SLSQ’s Breaka 2014/15 Under-14 Junior Surf Lifesaver of the Year Award. He is the first member of his club to win the prestigious award.

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

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48|

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15


Fundraising in Queensland

$793,493

RAISED BY 14 SUMMER SURF GIRL PARTICIPANTS

$446,000

RAISED THROUGH THE SURF SAFE APPEAL

$628,197 RAISED THROUGH GRANT APPLICATIONS

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

|49


In these challenging economic times, SLSQ is extremely appreciative of the Queensland community and our business partners for their unwavering support of our cause. Importantly, proceeds raised through SLSQ’s various fundraising initiatives are used to maintain and purchase rescue equipment, enhance training and development programs, expand community safety initiatives, and fund aquatic safety research and development.

Queensland Fundraising Events Summer Surf Girl The Summer Surf Girl program is one of Queensland’s largest clubbased fundraising initiatives, having injected more than $15.4 million into the lifesaving movement since its inception in 1964. This year 14 qualified lifesavers participated in the program, raising vital funds and spreading the surf safety message at the same time. In total, this year’s program raised $793,493.96. Maroocola’s Tiffany Di Ianni was named the 2015 Summer Surf Girl, with Mackay’s Fiona Dunn named Runner-Up. Kristy Mitchell from Burleigh Heads/Mowbray Park was awarded the Highest Individual Fundraiser after raising a staggering $232,832 for her club – the highest ever individual total in Summer Surf Girl history. Rounding out the presentations, the Entrants’ Choice Award was presented to Bonnie Rogers from Broadbeach. We thank our valued program supporters including Jupiters Hotel and Casino, Engine Swim, Zupps Mt Gravatt, Get Hummered, Flutter Beauty, Hair’s Hare, Screen Offset Printing, and Etiquette & Manners Australia.

50|

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

Surf Safe Appeal One of SLSQ’s largest annual fundraising initiatives, the Surf Safe Appeal ensures our volunteer members have the necessary resources and training to continue saving lives on Queensland beaches. Thousands of lifesavers from 53 clubs participated in the annual doorknock and street appeal from 1-14 September 2014. The Queensland Government generously donated $50,000, while corporate partners pledged more than $168,000 worth of cash and equipment. In total, more than $446,000 was raised through club activities and corporate donations. We are grateful for the support of Network Ten across the Appeal as well as the Queensland Government and our corporate partners: AA Radio, Black and White Cabs, Brisbane Airport Corporation, Foxtel, Jupiters Hotel and Casino, Laerdal and Tradelink.

Fundraising Events Castrol Edge Gold Coast 600 In October 2014, the Gold Coast played host to one of Australia’s most exciting motorsport events, the Gold Coast 600. Once again SLSQ was fortunate to be named as the major beneficiary of the event, raising more than $10,000 across the weekend. The event was also a wonderful opportunity to spread the surf safety message to local and international visitors. We extend our thanks to V8 Supercars Australia for their continued support, along with Charlie Schwekolt, Team Jeld-Wen and the organisers of the V8 Runners Hot Lap.


‘Hands Up’ fundraising campaign This year SLSQ partnered with Surf Life Saving Australia in one of the organisation’s largest national fundraising initiatives. The ‘Hands Up’ campaign was launched in December 2014, featuring an engaging television commercial and campaign visuals which ran across the summer months. The initiative is part of a long-term strategy to raise funds and awareness of Surf Life Saving nationally.

The Surf Life Saving Foundation Grants The Grant Seeking Unit (GSU), operated by the Surf Life Saving Foundation, continues to play a vital role in securing funds for Queensland clubs. In 2014/15, the GSU successfully secured 39 grants, which resulted in $628,197 awarded to SLSQ clubs across the state.

Guardians of the Surf While all donors play an important and valued role supporting our cause, special mention must be made to those individuals who have committed to monthly donations via the Guardians of the Surf program. It is pleasing to see continued growth of this program, with our monthly Guardians of the Surf now numbering 15,627 in Queensland. We sincerely thank all donors for their support, which goes a long way to helping save lives along Queensland’s coastline.

Workplace Giving Surf Life Saving’s Workplace Giving program was introduced into the Surf Life Saving Foundation’s philanthropic portfolio in 2011. In the 2014/15 financial year, 28 companies actively participated in the program, providing vital support to lifesaving services across the state.

Bequests The 2014/15 year saw awareness of our bequest program continue to increase, as more people advised us of their intention to leave a gift to Surf Life Saving. The total number of known bequest program participants in Queensland has grown to 424, and this support will play a key role in ensuring the state’s beaches remain safe for generations to come.

Surf Life Saving Lotteries The prize home lotteries program once again performed well and remains an integral part of our fundraising activities. Having operated in Queensland for more than 50 years, the Surf Life Saving Lotteries continue to record strong growth in ticket sales and popularity. The program assists in the provision of increasing funds for surf lifesaving programs, both on and off the beach.

Other fundraising initiatives In 2014/15 SLSQ also partnered with the Surf Life Saving Foundation on a number of other fundraising initiatives, including the Pin & Win Trade Promotion program, charity Christmas cards, the sale of Entertainment Books, and the Surf Breaks travel portal.

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

|51


Funding Body & Grant Program

Applicant Entity

Project Details

Reef Hotel Casino CBF Round 35

North Queensland Branch

Radio and first aid trailer

Gambling CBF Round 80

Point Lookout SLSC

Removal of ceiling asbestos

$24,750

Jupiters Casino CBF Round 85

Sunshine Coast Branch

Building works

$26,900

Gambling CBF Round 80

Eimeo SLSC

ATV and accessories

Jupiters Casino CBF Round 85

Rainbow Beach SLSC

All purpose equipment trailer

$7,920

Reef Hotel Casino CBF Round 35

Cairns SLSC

All purpose trailer

$8,249

Gambling CBF Round 80

Bilinga SLSC

Roof structure for outdoor deck

Redland City Council Community Grants - Project Support

Coochiemudlo Island SLSC

Age Manager Training Project

Jupiters Casino CBF Round 85

Metropolitan Caloundra SLSC

ATV and accessories

$30,142

Gambling CBF Round 80

Southport SLSC

ATV and accessories

$26,815

Aurizon Community Giving Fund Round 6

Ayr SLSC

IRB motor, two hand held radios and two base radios

Gambling CBF Round 81

South Coast Branch

Training room refurbishment

$32,593

Gambling CBF Round 81

Mackay SLSC

Clubhouse roof reseal and paint

$35,000

Breakwater Island Casino CBF Round 53

Mackay SLSC

Six digital radios

$4,999

Breakwater Island Casino CBF Round 53

North Barrier Branch

Training and education program IT equipment

$2,742

Gambling CBF Round 81

Port Douglas SLSC

PFDs, IRB hull and motor

$19,780

Gambling CBF Round 81

Mudjimba SLSC

Digital radios and first aid training equipment

$19,196

Gambling CBF Round 81

Surfers Paradise SLSC

Mobile patrol tower and accessories

$19,228

Arrow Energy Brighter Futures

Tannum Sands SLSC

Expand CPR and first aid training capability

$2,225

Suncorp Safer Qld Community Grants

Sarina SLSC

Upgrade security

$1,390

Mackay Regional Council Grants Program

Eimeo SLSC

Automated external defibrillator (AED) and first aid cabinet

$2,468

Gambling CBF Round 82

Emu Park SLSC

IRB motor and safety equipment

$17,214

Gambling CBF Round 82

Ayr SLSC

ATV

$23,867

QLD Dept of NPRSR Get In the Game - Get Playing

Moore Park SLSC

Clubhouse/gear and equipment shed

$100,000

QLD Dept of NPRSR Get In the Game - Get Going

Sarina SLSC

Pilot development and coaching program for cadets

$8,000

QLD Dept of Communities, Child Safety & Disability Services Caring for Our Communities

Nobbys Beach SLSC

Five digital radios

$4,750

QLD Dept of Communities, Child Safety & Disability Services Caring for Our Communities

Eimeo SLSC

IT package

$5,000

QLD Dept of Communities, Child Safety & Disability Services Caring for Our Communities

Ayr SLSC

3 oxy kits

$4,750

QLD Dept of Communities, Child Safety & Disability Services Caring for Our Communities

North Queensland Branch

Personal flotation devices

QLD Dept of Communities, Child Safety & Disability Services Caring for Our Communities

Sarina SLSC

Two rescue boards

Gambling CBF Round 83

Kirra SLSC

Tractor

$33,700

Gambling CBF Round 83

Tannum Sands SLSC

ATV

$28,650

Gambling CBF Round 83

Palm Beach SLSC

ATV

$28,611

Gambling CBF Round 83

Wide Bay Capricorn Branch

IRB service (motor, fuel cell, trailer, radios, PFDs)

$15,382

Gambling CBF Round 83

Elliott Heads SLSC

Shade sail over IRB wash bay

Redlands Foundation

Point Lookout SLSC

IRB hull

Fraser Coast Regional Council Community Grants Program

Hervey Bay SLSC

IRB road trailer

$3,850

Lord Mayor's Charitable Trust - General Grant Round

SLSQ

Aquatic program for youth with a disability

$9,985

Rio Tinto Hail Creek Mine Sponsorship

Eimeo SLSC

World's largest game of beach flags

$5,500

TOTAL

52|

Granted $7,557

$9,867

$35,000 $4,244

$8,910

$560 $3,128

$4,775 $500

$628,197

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15


Tiffany Di lanni, Marcoola SLSC “I joined Marcoola SLSC in 1994 and have now been involved with SLSQ for 21 years. The highlight of my time with SLSQ has been my involvement in the Summer Surf Girl program. It has been an incredible experience. I have met some amazing people and made memories that will stay with me for a lifetime. The program has taught me a lot about myself and has strengthened my passion for the organisation. As an ambassador for the next 12 months, I hope to be able to continue to promote both SLSQ and my surf club. There are so many opportunities that stem from being involved with the organisation and I want to help others recognise the benefits and experiences, which come from being a member. What you gain from being a part of SLSQ is hard to put into words. It is a fantastic organisation to be a part of.” - Tiffany Di lanni, Marcoola SLSC Tiffany won SLSQ’s 2015 Summer Surf Girl competition and raised $78,000 for her surf club.

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

|53


Our Partners Partners Principal

Premium

Government

Community

Media

Business

Supporters

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

|55


SLSQ Committees and Panels

SLSQ Life Members

SLSQ Council D. Duffield, G. Clarke, C. Donnelly, J. Thorpe, M. Fife OAM, K. Hunter

GB Andrews OAM*, EC Avery*, JR Barlow*, R Bartlett, PJ Berigan OAM*, JJ Betts*, KC Bird OAM, D Bird*, R Blackman*, KF Bostock, DJ Boulton OAM, WJ Broadhurst*, DW Brockhurst*, RA Brumley, NF Bullpitt MBE*, DS Burchill OAM, FE Burke, RA Burrell*, RJ Butler OAM, MC Buttrum, SM Byrnes OAM, J Church*, MJ Claybourn OAM*, MA Clyde, KJ Collins*, PJ Connell, BF Coomber*, S Costa*, TR Cramond AO, OBE, D Crevola, SL Crichton, BJ Crichton OAM, WJ Daley*, W Darwen*, RJ Davidson OAM, JB Dearlove MBE, RP Devlin QC, VA Doig OAM, AR Donaldson*, CG Englert*, PJ Fenner AM, KC Dunny, T Eldridge, MA Fife OAM, R Findlater*, DC Foreman*, AB Frizzell OBE OAM*, JC Galea, RJ Gear AM*, JL Gordon*, IJ Grant OAM, JE Gray*, FJ Grell, AG Griffiths, RF Griffiths, R Halpin*, RJ Harding OAM, CA Hargrave*, WJ Harris, K Hart, J Hayes, NJ Heywood OBE, R Holden, C Honey*, KF Hoskins OAM, N Howland*, D Howlett*, DP Hoyland OAM, TJ Imrie OAM, AJ Inwood, D Irvine*, H Irvine, CJ Jeanneret OAM, JM Jones OAM*, DL Johnson*,SA Johnson MBE*, NT Kelk OAM, A Kennedy OAM*, MJ Klingner*, DJ Lennox, PJ Madden*, MM Mahon, WJ Massey, DJ Mathison, JG McCarthy*, HF McGrath*, GD McKenzie OAM*, DM McLean, W McLennan, JW McMaster AM*, DFC, M McNeilly MBE, RA McPherson*, JA Menico OAM, GS Merry AM, ME Mulcahy*, J Mullins*, A Nicholson OAM*, GF Nicklin*, HJ Nix*, WH Nixon OAM*, AG Nixon*, KL O’Connell, S O’Connor OAM, JD Ogilvie OAM, AB Parkyn OAM*, JC Paterson, FC Payne, R Pollard, CD Pratt*, GD Radel*, RE Rankin AM, CF Richards*, P Roubin*, JR Sellars*, H Silman*, CG Smith, EJ Smith AM*, C Sparkes, MD Stevens, JH Spencer*, JR Spender OBE*, JJ Stewart*, RC Tallon OAM, JC Taylor OAM, CE Taylor*, MR Taylor*, CJ Taylor OAM*, GJ Terrell, RJ Thomas, BR Thorne, FO Venning*, BL Walsh, MA Webb OAM*, HJ Weimer*, PJ White, RT Whitmore OAM, ST Wilcox OAM*, BF Wilkes*, CM Williams, A Williams*, BD Williamson OAM, JA Williamson AM, SW Winders MBE*, JR Winders OBE*, NS Woodroffe*, R Wyeth, IJ Young OAM, R Zillman*

Administration and IT Committee C Williams (Chair), T McCulloch, A Fry, J McDougall, T Duncan, M Waters, K Shultz, D Boulton OAM, B Kelly, L Cremer, L Hogben, L Mathison, M Burnett, Z Ballarin, Ben Whibley (Res), SLSA Delegate Audit, Finance and Compliance Committee D Bragg (Chair), D Cahill, T O’Shea, D Moffrey, R Murphy, J Brennan, C Williams Communications Panel T Sweeney (Chair), M Corlett, M Chivertson, J Aleckson, K Dunn, J Argent (Sec) Helicopter Operations Panel G Hill (Chair), P Bird, J Brennan, P Gibson, A McNeilly, R Murphy, T Hughes, K Dunn, A Watts (Sec) IRB Competition Panel M Cook (Chair), A Barbour, A Dunn, R Shillam, G Tanner, N Ward, R Bennett (Sec) IRB Lifesaving Advisory Panel G Tanner (Chair), T Burgess, C Donnelly, G Jeffcoat, M Cook, C Fife (Sec) Jet Rescue Boat Panel K Hart (Chair), K Dunn, , G Minter, C Donney, R Whitmore, B O’Brien, R Jenkinson, N Fife(Sec) Junior Activities Advisory Panel R Fien (Chair), T Smith, F Grant, G Miller, S Paskin, D Love, A Cassone, D Glassock, B Lofthouse, T Draman / F Jones (Sec) Lifeguard Advisory Panel G Cahill (Chair), J Campton, J March, R Blanchard, H Ridland, J Davis, A King, R Drury, C Lovitt, S Murray, R Barber (Sec) Lifesaving Operations Support Panel K Dunn (Chair), T Sweeney, T Hughes, K Hart, G Ferreira, P Lucas, J Keller, J Argent (Sec) Lifesaving Education Panel B Middleton (Chair), K Lynch, L Messer, M Kearney, A Mikelat, R Gibb, C Neumann, R Fien, P Lucas, M Fife, G Cahill, D Kerr, A Fisher (Sec) Life Members & Civil Honours Panel R Devlin QC (Chair), R Tallon OAM, R Whitmore OAM, I Young, M Fife OAM, D Hoyland OAM, K Bostock, S Crichton, W Massey, J. Menico OAM, B Lofthouse (Sec) March Past Panel D Donnelly (Chair), N Huth, A Seeney Membership Services Committee R Campbell (Chair), J Aleckson, T Demopoulos, S Fien, D Glassock, M Hooper, K Phillips, B Seymour, S Steinhofer, R Fien, B Heaney, T Sealy, B Lofthouse, T Draman / F Jones (Sec) Meritorious Awards and Lifesaving Selection Panel P Lucas (Chair), R Campbell, K Phillips, J Aleckson, B Lofthouse (Sec) Officials/Assessors Finance Committee C Melloy (Chair), P Lucas, D Mathison, K Bostock, M Buttrum, S Crichton, P Hall, J Hamrey, L Henshaw, K Litzow, J Paskin, R Tallon OAM, D Burchill OAM, C Williams (Non-voting) Rescue Water Craft (RWC) Panel G Ferreira (Chair), G Palmer, W Baker, P Whitty, R Pollock, A Ryan, D Westby, N Steer, M Comerford, K Burns, W Foxwell, L Passmore, K Dunn, T McClintock (Sec) R&R Panel C Melloy (Chair), G Clarke, G Crawford, T Holmes, J Taylor, S Byrnes, G Shaw, F Major State Coaching Advisory Panel G Hill (Chair), W Sinclair, R Bennett (Sec) State Lifesaving Committee P Lucas (Chair), K Dunn, M Stevens, F Burke, C Swanton, P Reed, K Brown, K Clark, B Middleton, G Hill, G Cahill, P Lawlor, S Blair-Smith(Sec) Surf Sports Committee C Melloy (Chair), M Goodman, A Dunn, B Cremer, S Della Bianca, K Litzow, N Ward, D Mathison, P Hall, W McLennan, G Hill, T Smith, C Harris, S Hogben, R Bennett, S Hesse (Sec) Surf Sports Selection Panel C Melloy (Chair), N Kelk, W Lee, A Moore, R Bennett (Sec) Surf Boat Panel P Hall, V O’Keefe, P Wessell, J Melloy, J Western, R Blyth State Championships Organisational Panel C Melloy (Chair), S Della Bianca, W McLennan, B Brassington, M Walker, C Williams, S Hogben, S Hesse (Sec) State Officials Advisory Panel D Mathison (Chair), C Melloy, R Bartlett, K Bostock, R Griffiths, W Massey, A Seeney, B Walsh, B Cremer, P Thomas SLSQ Judiciary Committee M Reaburn (Chair), P Kelly, R Bartlett, K Bostock, D Boulton OAM, S Crichton, M White, R Whitmore, I Young, C Williams (Sec) State Supporters Club Committee C Cooper (Chair), D McEnroe, I Young, A Johnston, C Williams, Z Ballarin (Sec)

56|

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

*Deceased


SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

|57


2014/15 Award Winners Clive Hammond Silver Medal • North Queensland: Jesse Witt (Etty Bay) • North Barrier: James Heery (Townsville Picnic Bay) • Wide Bay Capricorn: Mark Bryant (Tannum Sands) • South Coast: Craig Chapman (Surfers Paradise) • Point Danger: Michael Kearney (North Kirra) * The Sunshine Coast Branch finalist had not been announced at the time of print.

Sunshine Coast: • Rescue Water Craft 12 - Paul Weedman • Rescue Water Craft 14 - Bruce Hayes • Rescue Water Craft 15 - John Lawrance • Rescue Water Craft 16 - Ross Pike • Rescue Water Craft 17 - Frank Liberato • Rescue Water Craft 19 - Trevor King • Jet Rescue Boat Three Crewperson - Rebecca Tregoning • Jet Rescue Boat Three Driver - Mark Imrie

Summer Surf Girl • 2015 Summer Surf Girl - Tiffany Di Ianni (Marcoola) • 2015 Summer Surf Girl Runner Up - Fiona Dunn (Mackay) • 2015 Summer Surf Girl Highest Fundraiser - Kristy Mitchell (Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park) • 2015 Summer Surf Girl Entrants’ Choice - Bonnie Rogers (Broadbeach)

Operations Support Awards

• Jet Rescue Boat Three Skipper - Tony Leroux • SurfCom Operator - Sue Della Bianca • WLRHS Crewperson - Elliot Bates • WLRHS Crewperson - Lewis Moes • WLRHS Crewmember - Gillian Howard • Duty Officer - Guy Tanner

Youth Awards • 2015 Breaka Under-14 Junior Surf Lifesaver of the Year - Harry Graham, Redcliffe Peninsula

Gold Coast: • Rescue Water Craft 1 - Chris Damic • Rescue Water Craft 3 - Brenden Scoffell • Rescue Water Craft 4 - Gino Tumini • Rescue Water Craft 5 - Matthew Ma • Rescue Water Craft 6 - David Chiverton • Rescue Water Craft 8 - Dave Finter • Jet Rescue Boat Two Crewperson - Gino Tumini • Jet Rescue Boat Two Driver - Leon Leis • Jet Rescue Boat Two Skipper - Peter Whitty • SurfCom Operator - Bruce Chirstie

Sports Club Championships • 2014 Queensland State Endurance Championships Alexandra Headlands • 2015 Laerdal Queensland State Surf Rescue Championships Northcliffe • 2015 Queensland State Board Riding Championships Alexandra Headland • 2015 Queensland Youth Surf Life Saving Championships Maroochydore • 2015 Queensland Masters State Championships - Mooloolaba • 2015 Queensland State Championships - Northcliffe

• WLHRS Crewperson - Brett Dorrington

• 2015 Queensland State IRB Championships - North Burleigh

• WLHRS Crewperson - Jared Clark • WLHRS Crewperson - Clayton Webster

• 2015 Queensland State Pool Rescue Championships Currumbin

• Duty Officer - Peter Anderson

• 2014 North Australian Championships - Cairns

58|

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15


2013/14 Award Winners* • U18 Junior Surf Lifesaver of the Year - Christie Short (Northcliffe ) • 18-25 Young Surf Lifesaver of the Year - Shannon Morgan (Townsville Picnic Bay) • Andy Frizzell OAM, OBE Award for Services to Junior Activities - Kevin Schofield (Pacific) • Surf Lifesaver of the Year - Daniel Capps (Noosa Heads) • Clive Hammond Gold Medal - Rob Campbell (Dicky Beach) • Assessor of the Year - Michael Stevens (Ellis Beach) • Club of the Year - Mermaid Beach AEME

2014 SLSQ Annual Awards of Excellence Gala Ball

• Trainer of the Year - Gary Williams (Ellis Beach) • Volunteer of the Year - Rob Campbell (Dicky Beach) • Lifeguard of the Year - Timothy Wilson (South East Queensland) • Youth Development Club of the Year - Noosa Heads • Community Education Program of the Year - Noosa Heads • Athlete of the Year - Shannon Eckstein (Northcliffe) • Coach of the Year - Brett Robinson (Currumbin) • Junior Athlete of the Year - Jarrod Shute (Northcliffe) • Masters Athlete of the Year - Kylie Zikarsky (Alexandra Headland)

Rob Campbell, 2013/14 Clive Hammond Gold Medalist and Volunteer of the Year

• Official of the Year - Bronwyn Champness (Alexandra Headland) • Rookie Coach of the Year - Julie Arbeithuber (Eimeo) • Rookie Official of the Year - Robyn Groom (Moore Park) • Team Manager of the Year - Marsha Maynard (Currumbin SLSC) & Leigh Hartland (Mooloolaba) • Team of the Year - The Tugun Hunters • The Presidents Cup - Alexandra Headland

*These awards were announced at SLSQ’s 2014 Awards of Excellence Gala Dinner, after the 2013/14 Annual Report was tabled. Zoe Jolley, Lifesaving Excellence Award recipient

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

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60|

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15


Statistics, Results and Financials

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

|61


General

Honorary

Leave/ Restricted

Life Member

Long Service

Non-Member

Past Active

Probationary

Reserve Active

Total per Club

50 39 59 49 90 91 14 21 17 12 442

7 5 6 6 11 7 3 3 1 4 53

2 1 10 5 13 10 8 10 1 60

7 13 17 7 39 29 9 5 5 5 136

25 43 50 78 17 22 1 3 11 10 260

10 10 7 5 4 8 5 4 3 4 60

1 22 23 46

0

0

3 2 16 8 9 5 1 1 45

1 9 1 11

1 1

2 1 2 1 6

7 14 1 21 20 1 64

7 3 5 3 1 19

112 128 172 162 220 193 69 71 38 38

16 9 39 38 85 83 39 40 54 46 36 51 44 46 626

1 3 7 4 16 9 4 9 4 7 4 4 8 5 5 90

6 3 8 5 9 11 4 7 8 2 7 7 4 5 86

15 9 52 26 29 38 34 21 3 21 9 40 14 10 6 327

3 17 10 22 53 55 21 37 2 1 39 51 26 43 23 36 439

1 2 1 1 3 1 2 2 6 19

0

1 1 1 3

1 1

2 4 16 3 17 1 9 2 1 1 1 14 2 12 6 91

12 1 7 1 1 22

0

5 6 1 12

3 2 2 14 19 1 3 2 3 1 6 7 63

1 1 2 1 1 6

48 45 137 101 241 229 112 119 10 3 132 113 138 130 108 119

M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F

45 44 55 65 69 85 29 26 22 21 51 44 41 40 78 91 806

5 9 11 9 5 8 2 2 8 14 20 4 10 5 8 120

8 6 8 8 5 9 1 1 3 12 5 3 9 7 4 89

32 19 31 28 40 28 13 2 11 14 42 27 19 13 24 11 354

2 5 49 62 27 54 16 28 11 18 43 54 20 38 16 27 470

12 11 1 1 4 5 1 1 2 4 2 1 22 22 89

14 14 1 2 1 32

1 1 2 1 5

0

15 6 15 1 7 2 8 2 15 1 9 2 6 3 92

5 3 1 2 1 12

0

1 1 3 1 2 8

2 5 18 21 2 3 2 2 55

1 1 3 1 6

134 114 179 179 181 219 58 60 56 67 188 160 101 117 159 166

M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F

36 34 248 294 117 85 93 85 53 53 55 51 120 173 271 265 158 156 97 71 255 233 141 132 84 88 110 130 3,688

10 9 40 34 5 6 14 10 13 3 16 24 16 17 37 35 28 32 2 7 12 13 14 21 19 12 2 13 464

15 11 42 36 21 8 15 12 10 8 23 22 23 18 33 33 47 43 8 49 28 17 3 10 6 9 7 557

28 16 177 89 55 25 94 30 56 23 57 43 86 44 172 108 213 100 64 26 111 43 59 26 48 25 25 11 1,854

27 38 187 279 92 112 75 88 51 65 21 36 123 149 229 303 141 185 41 76 179 232 91 108 48 70 83 99 3,228

2 40 20 3 3 8 22 16 11 1 5 30 16 21 13 54 21 15 10 26 9 3 3 7 6 1 366

35 32 1 8 3 79

4 4 4 2 86 28 1 1 8 21 1 1 161

3 2 2 2 1 1 2 3 1 2 19

12 19 1 16 2 27 1 17 3 4 1 54 3 44 3 38 2 10 1 15 2 23 2 29 2 1 1 333

2 1 70 16 13 1 23 2 1 1 102 20 59 23 108 26 15 3 22 4 17 3 8 3 7 3 553

1 1

8 3 6 2 1 3 23

2 4 6 2 4 2 1 3 3 1 1 1 1 11 2 6 3 20 6 4 4 2 2 91

9 6 1 4 1 2 1 3 18 7 4 10 3 1 1 71

132 115 880 813 322 242 356 255 226 169 182 187 652 475 874 785 824 596 260 207 701 571 374 307 256 214 245 268

M F M F M F M F M F

TOTAL

NORTH BARRIER BRANCH

Forrest Beach Arcadian Townsville Picnic Bay Ayr Bowen Eimeo Mackay Sarina

M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F

TOTAL

WIDE BAY CAPRICORN BRANCH

Yeppoon Emu Park Tannum Sands Agnes Water Moore Park Bundaberg Elliott Heads Hervey Bay TOTAL Rainbow Beach Noosa Heads Sunshine Beach

SUNSHINE COAST BRANCH

Coolum Beach Marcoola Mudjimba Maroochydore Alexandra Headland Mooloolaba Kawana Waters Dicky Beach Metropolitan Caloundra Bribie Island Redcliffe Peninsula TOTAL

62|

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

Total Membership

Award

Mission Beach

Associate

Etty Bay

Active Senior (18+ yrs)

Cairns

Active Junior (15-18 yrs)

Ellis Beach

Active Cadet (13-15 yrs)

Port Douglas

Jnr Activities (5-13 yrs)

NORTH QLD BRANCH

Membership

240 334 413 140 76 1,203 93 238 470 231 13 245 268 227 1,785 248 358 400 118 123 348 218 325 2,138 247 1,693 564 611 395 369 1,127 1,659 1,420 467 1,272 681 470 513 11,488


Past Active

Probationary

Reserve Active

Total per Club

66 72 61 50 184 153 62 60 190 140 59 63 109 93 147 153 93 74 105 81 157 119 150 150 2,591

17 19 5 5 13 14 6 3 31 25 8 17 11 9 22 18 17 11 14 13 4 5 30 28 345

19 12 7 8 13 9 4 6 76 57 14 12 24 20 20 14 22 16 24 16 10 18 23 22 466

38 12 9 13 138 62 68 18 161 73 70 28 88 52 79 42 85 31 45 21 115 57 112 69 1,486

68 99 23 29 172 184 46 54 101 120 61 77 95 111 141 171 56 52 65 87 94 92 149 187 2,334

36 27 2 3 11 18 9 10 2 2 14 2 13 13 3 9 3 4 9 4 15 9 9 6 233

2 3 15 13 33

19 7 10 3 6 3 1 1 3 1 3 1 6 22 86

1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 10

16 3 5 1 25 3 14 1 18 3 15 3 15 1 24 12 2 23 21 2 21 1 229

19 4 51 3 25 1 63 16 5 3 79 21 14 2 18 2 73 19 39 10 467

1 1

6 4 9 1 1 3 2 6 3 3 1 1 9 2 51

2 1 1 1 18 4 1 1 18 2 1 15 4 5 6 15 20 3 1 2 5 126

3 3 1 1 1 4 2 1 16

309 260 114 110 647 455 242 154 663 439 249 207 455 329 465 419 311 214 306 226 510 340 551 499

135 129 51 54 147 118 202 145 112 78 47 44 60 66 53 61 35 28 103 108 100 87 1,963

13 9 13 3 11 7 12 16 5 11 2 6 6 7 10 3 10 15 7 12 7 5 190

14 11 2 5 28 13 25 24 7 7 3 13 6 16 21 6 4 8 5 7 3 228

64 35 35 19 49 20 113 34 85 21 24 3 43 10 46 15 60 31 55 23 37 16 2 2 842

77 95 17 21 84 109 112 110 64 108 36 35 49 54 46 52 26 32 67 78 71 92 1 1 1,437

1 1 1 1 27 14 2 2 1 3 8 7 2 2 5 3 4 1 85

1 1 2

6 1 1 3 2 1 1 3 1 7 1 27

1 1 1 1 1 5

16 1 8 1 23 19 25 5 20 31 13 22 1 10 2 197

26 4 2 2 92 4 56 3 6 18 5 16 4 23 4 10 1 2 1 279

2 2

2 16 11 1 1 1 40 4 3 1 80

3 2 2 8 5 4 4 12 1 3 2 3 1 4 2 3 7 2 1 2 71

1 1 8 1 2 1 1 1 16

357 288 131 114 352 271 633 373 360 230 121 93 202 144 234 166 175 118 340 242 256 209 9 6

M F

2,428 2,126 4,554

274 261 535

385 309 694

1,621 707 2,328

1,721 2,050 3,771

178 140 318

19 16 35

73 40 113

8 7 15

403 23 426

639 107 746

3 3

100 31 131

116 81 197

27 5 32

M F

0

1 1

16 12 28

59 45 104

0

4 1 5

0

0

0

1 1

1 1

0

1 1

0

0

M F

5,199 4,917

625 638

838 676

3,418 1,685

3,574 4,594

485 372

101 91

181 101

21 14

894 94

1,128 217

5

127 54

258 212

102 32

16,951 30,653 13,702

10,116

1,264

1,542

5,207

8,168

862

192

282

35

989

1,346

5

182

470

134

30,653

M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F

TOTAL Tallebudgera Pacific Palm Beach (QLD)

POINT DANGER BRANCH

Currumbin Tugun Bilinga North Kirra Kirra Coolangatta Tweed Heads Coolangatta Rainbow Bay Point Danger Branch

M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F

TOTAL

Gold Coast TOTAL

Brisbane Lifesaving Service TOTAL State Total Surf Life Saving Queensland

Total Membership

Non-Member

Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park

Long Service

North Burleigh

Life Member

Miami Beach

Leave/ Restricted

Nobbys Beach

Honorary

Mermaid Beach

General

Kurrawa

Award

Broadbeach

Associate

Northcliffe

Active Senior (18+ yrs)

SOUTH COAST BRANCH

Surfers Paradise

Active Junior (15-18 yrs)

Southport

Active Cadet (13-15 yrs)

Coochiemudlo Island

Jnr Activities (5-13 yrs) Point Lookout

569 224 1,102 396 1,102 456 784 884 525 532 850 1,050 8,474 645 245 623 1,006 590 214 346 400 293 582 465 15 5,424

7,992 13,898 5,906 13,898 82 59 141

Total Male Membership

16,951

Total Male Nippers

5,199

Total Active Patrolling Male Membership

5,468

Total Female Membership

13,702

Total Female Nippers

4,917

Total Active Patrolling Female Membership

3,403

Grand Total Membership

30,653

Grand Total Nippers

10,116

Total Active Patrolling Membership

8,871

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

141

|63


Advanced Resuscitation Techniques Certificate

WBCB

SSCB

SCB

PDB

BLS

Lifeguards

Academy

SLSQ

TOTAL

Advanced Resuscitation Techniques [AID]

NBB

Award

NQB

Lifesaving Awards

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

400

14

414

-

9

3

20

31

12

19

23

12

3

132

18

18

19

73

83

74

-

11

1

10

307

Assessor Advanced Resuscitation Techniques

-

-

-

1

2

-

-

1

-

-

4

Assessor Apply First Aid

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

Assessor Bronze Medallion

-

3

1

8

4

-

-

7

-

-

23

Assessor IRB

-

2

2

1

1

1

-

-

-

-

7

Assessor JRB

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

Assessor Radio

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

Assessor Rescue Water Craft (RWC)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

Assessor Resuscitation

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

Assessor Silver Medallion Aquatic Rescue

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Assessor Silver Medallion Basic Beach Management

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Assessor Spinal Management

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Apply (Senior) First Aid

Assessor Surf Rescue

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

ATV Operator

34

33

22

207

151

44

37

18

-

-

546

Bronze Medallion

52

88

96

473

450

212

36

18

-

11

1, 436

Facilitator Advanced Resuscitation Techniques [AID]

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

29

1

30

Facilitator Advanced Resuscitation Techniques

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Facilitator First Aid [AID]

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

35

-

35

Facilitator Apply First Aid

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Faciliator Assessor

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

Facilitator Bronze Medallion

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

Facilitator Helicopter

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

Facilitator IRB

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Facilitator Pain Management (Methoxyflurane)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

3

Facilitator Radio

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Facilitator Rescue Water Craft

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

Facilitator Silver Medallion Aquatic Rescue

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

Facilitator Silver Medallion Basic Beach Management

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

1

-

-

4

Facilitator Spinal Management

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

4

-

5

Facilitator Surf Rescue Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Facilitator Trainer

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

3

First Aid [AID]

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

859

21

880

Gold Medallion (Advanced Lifesaving)

-

-

9

-

-

5

-

44

-

-

58

Helicopter Crew Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

7

Introduction to Search and Rescue

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

19

19

IRB Crew Certificate

25

26

20

211

171

88

15

-

-

-

556

JRB Crew Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

5

JRB Skipper Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

JRB Driver Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Marine Stinger Management

-

7

5

-

-

-

-

32

-

-

44

ORB Crew Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

ORB Driver Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

ORB Skipper Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

14

16

8

39

36

27

-

-

-

-

140

Junior Activities Accreditation Officer

64|

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15


Award

NQB

NBB

WBCB

SSCB

SCB

PDB

BLS

Lifeguards

Academy

SLSQ

TOTAL

Junior Activities Age Manager Course

17

4

13

62

45

24

-

-

-

-

165

Pain Management Certificate (Methoxyflurane)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

60

15

87

QLD Training Officer Age Managers Course

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

QLD Training Officer 4 Wheel Drive

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

QLD Training Officer Tractor Induction

-

-

-

1

2

-

-

-

-

-

3

QLD 4 Wheel Drive Induction

-

-

-

-

-

8

-

42

-

-

50

QLD Disaster Management Arrangements

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

15

-

-

41

20

13

-

-

-

-

89

QLD RWC Induction

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

QLD Tractor Induction

-

-

-

35

104

31

-

-

-

-

170

QLD Observers Certificate

Radio Operators Certificate

43

89

97

526

345

217

-

20

-

2

1,339

Rescue Water Craft Operator Certificate

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

51

-

61

116

Resuscitation [AID]

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,145

29

1,174

Resuscitation Certificate

-

53

26

193

196

67

-

8

-

3

546

Silver Medallion Advanced First Aid

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Silver Medallion Aquatic Rescue

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

31

31

Silver Medallion Basic Beach Management

12

5

44

116

55

48

-

86

-

-

366

Silver Medallion IRB Driver

2

3

11

71

57

47

10

-

-

-

201

Spinal Management

-

-

-

13

-

21

-

49

219

-

302

Surf Aware One

65

54

100

486

301

241

-

-

-

-

1,247

Surf Aware Two

47

55

103

425

298

221

-

-

-

-

1,149

Surf Play One

27

58

53

302

282

221

-

-

-

-

943

Surf Play Two

63

64

96

333

310

229

-

-

-

-

1,095

Surf Rescue Certificate (CPR Endorsed)

66

64

106

379

200

149

-

-

-

-

964

Surf Safe One

61

49

90

468

268

227

-

-

-

-

1,163

Surf Safe Two

37

51

70

400

228

148

-

-

-

-

934

Surf Smart One

31

45

77

319

220

167

-

-

-

-

859

Surf Smart Two

34

34

55

256

182

148

-

-

-

-

709

TAF Induction

1

-

6

9

22

-

-

-

-

4

42

Training Officer Advanced Resuscitation Techniques

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

-

-

2

Training Officer Apply First Aid

-

-

-

3

3

-

-

-

-

-

6

Training Officer ATV

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Training Officer Bronze Medallion

-

5

3

14

5

2

-

3

-

-

32

Training Officer Helicopter Crew

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

Training Officer IRB

-

1

3

4

4

-

-

-

-

-

12

Training Officer JRB

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Training Officer Radio

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Training Officer Marine Stinger

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

5

Training Officer Resuscitation

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

Training Officer RWC

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

Training Officer Silver Medallion Aquatic Rescue

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Training Officer Silver Medallion Basic Beach Management

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Training Officer Spinal Management

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Training Officer Surf Rescue Certificate

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

VHF Marine Licence

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

664

837

1,142

5,505

4,076

2,692

117

428

2,767

256

18,484

TOTAL

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

|65


Lifesaving Patrol Activity

Rescue Tube

Body Board

Rescue Board

IRB

RWC

Other

Total Rescues

Prevent Actions

Closure 0 Sharks

Mssing Persons

Spinal Injuries

Fractures

Defib Cases

Oxygen Therapy

Resus (CPR)

Minor

Major

Minor

Major

FIRST AID TREATMENTS

Without Gear

RESCUES

Port Douglas

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

683

1:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

-

2

-

-

Ellis Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

558

0:00

1

-

1

-

-

-

8

-

-

-

2

11

Cairns

-

-

2

4

-

-

1

7

222

0:00

6

2

1

-

-

-

6

-

12

-

115

136

Etty Bay

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

121

0:00

1

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

6

-

1

9

Mission Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

BRANCH TOTAL

-

-

2

5

-

-

1

8

1,584

1:00

8

2

2

-

-

-

25

-

20

-

118

167

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

187

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

-

1

-

-

8

-

-

-

2

2

-

-

4

162

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

11

-

21

1

-

33

Total F/Aid

First Aid Other

Marine Stings

North Queensland 11

North Barrier Forrest Beach Arcadian (Alma Bay/The Strand Net 2) Picnic Bay (Magnetic Island/ The Strand Net 1)

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

213

6:00

3

1

-

-

1

-

5

-

3

-

-

10

Ayr

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

2

87

0:00

-

-

1

-

-

-

3

-

1

-

-

5

Bowen

-

7

-

18

3

-

-

28

-

0:00

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

-

2

9

Eimeo

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

249

0:00

2

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

4

-

-

7

Mackay

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

935

0:00

-

-

1

-

1

-

4

1

-

-

1

8

Sarina

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

279

0:00

-

-

2

-

1

-

5

-

3

1

3

15

BRANCH TOTAL

2

7

-

20

7

-

-

36

2,112

6:00

6

1

4

-

3

-

38

1

40

2

6

95

Yeppoon

1

-

1

-

-

-

-

2

1,256

0:00

2

-

-

-

-

-

7

-

20

-

3

30

Emu Park

2

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

109

0:00

-

-

1

-

-

-

5

-

4

-

2

12

Tannum Sands

-

-

3

2

-

-

-

5

19

0:00

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

3

-

2

6

Agnes Water

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Moore Park

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

2

408

0:00

-

-

-

-

1

-

3

-

10

-

1

15

Bundaberg

-

-

1

1

-

-

-

2

4,068

0:00

2

-

-

-

-

-

40

6

46

-

7

99

Elliott Heads

1

-

-

3

20

-

-

24

918

0:00

1

1

1

-

1

-

10

-

8

1

1

23

Hervey Bay

-

1

-

3

1

-

-

5

209

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

29

-

4

-

8

41

BRANCH TOTAL

4

1

5

11

21

-

-

42

6,988

0:00

5

1

2

-

3

-

94

6

95

1

24

226

Wide Bay Capricorn

Sunshine Coast Rainbow Beach

3

6

-

9

-

-

-

18

1,733

0:00

4

-

-

-

2

-

122

2

14

1

8

149

Noosa Heads

9

19

4

10

9

-

2

53

2,772

2:00

40

5

12

-

7

-

235

3

81

2

18

363

Sunshine Beach

5

13

1

13

3

-

3

38

1,695

0:00

-

4

3

-

3

-

132

1

23

1

7

174

Peregian Beach

2

12

-

4

-

-

-

18

1,776

0:00

-

1

1

-

2

-

44

-

1

-

-

49

Coolum Beach

11

50

4

27

23

-

1

116

1,606

0:00

-

3

2

-

7

-

117

-

22

-

5

156

Mudjimba

4

30

9

7

7

-

30

87

1,178

0:00

6

1

4

-

1

-

140

-

14

1

21

182

Marcoola

-

5

-

6

-

-

-

11

1,439

0:00

-

2

-

-

3

-

37

1

5

2

4

54

Maroochydore

10

35

6

27

28

-

32

138

1,489

1:00

1

3

6

-

2

-

27

2

14

-

10

64

Alexandra Headland

35

95

7

39

30

-

3

209

2,898

0:00

5

6

8

-

11

-

85

-

34

-

18

162

Mooloolaba

13

30

1

11

16

-

-

71

25,385

0:00

6

11

12

-

11

-

49

3

3

-

12

101

Kawana Waters

4

11

1

10

6

-

3

35

1,525

0:00

-

1

2

-

3

-

30

1

6

2

7

52

Dicky Beach

10

70

2

23

13

-

1

119

5,180

0:00

7

2

9

-

10

-

83

4

33

-

13

154

Metropolitan Caloundra

10

39

-

16

21

-

5

91

4,177

0:00

23

12

13

-

12

-

105

4

58

5

15

224

Bribie Island

1

13

1

3

-

-

2

20

6,950

0:00

4

2

4

-

6

-

239

7

8

-

6

272

Redcliffe Peninsula

2

-

-

-

2

-

-

4

584

0:00

7

1

-

-

4

-

216

4

43

1

7

276

119

428

36

205

158

-

82

1,028

60,387

3:00

103

54

76

-

84

-

1,661

32

359

15

151

2,432

BRANCH TOTAL

66|

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15


Rescue Tube

Body Board

Rescue Board

IRB

RWC

Other

Total Rescues

Prevent Actions

Closure - Sharks

Mssing Persons

Spinal Injuries

Fractures

Defib Cases

Oxygen Therapy

Resus (CPR)

Minor

Major

Minor

Major

Other

FIRST AID TREATMENTS

Without Gear

RESCUES

Point Lookout (Main Beach)

2

27

-

5

27

-

-

61

-

0:00

4

2

2

-

2

-

8

-

12

2

33

61

Point Lookout (Cylinder Beach)

1

1

-

2

8

-

-

12

3,625

0:00

6

-

2

-

1

-

141

-

26

2

8

180

First Aid

Total F/Aid

Marine Stings

South Coast

Coochiemudlo Island

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

31

0:00

-

-

-

-

1

-

36

3

29

1

2

72

Southport

3

73

5

19

16

-

7

123

3,103

20:00

4

1

7

-

8

-

296

3

28

2

120

465

Surfers Paradise

-

47

-

41

5

-

1

94

16,018

0:00

6

-

4

-

-

-

141

1

30

2

12

190

Northcliffe

8

25

3

9

9

-

4

58

1,566

0:00

-

5

1

-

4

-

134

1

9

-

4

158

Broadbeach

6

3

2

1

-

-

-

12

1,255

0:00

-

-

-

-

1

-

53

-

4

-

1

59

Kurrawa

2

17

-

12

5

-

-

36

1,958

6:00

3

2

1

-

4

-

152

-

14

-

15

188

Mermiad Beach

2

8

3

6

3

-

2

24

1,088

0:00

-

3

1

-

5

-

73

-

8

1

4

95

Nobbys Beach

2

5

-

6

1

-

-

14

936

4:00

-

1

5

-

-

-

44

-

10

1

6

67

Miami Beach

-

2

3

7

2

-

-

14

313

0:00

-

1

2

-

-

-

61

-

31

1

3

99

North Burleigh

9

34

2

16

2

-

-

63

852

0:00

4

2

4

-

3

-

69

2

34

1

3

118

Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park

6

43

-

17

6

-

-

72

2,333

1:00

18

2

1

-

4

-

570

5

23

3

3

611

BRANCH TOTAL

41

285

18

141

84

-

14

583

33,078

7:00

45

19

30

-

33

-

1,778

15

258

16

214

2,363

Tallebudgera

1

6

-

3

28

-

-

38

513

0:00

-

-

-

-

3

-

28

-

5

1

2

39

Pacific

3

5

-

4

-

-

1

13

933

0:00

2

-

-

-

2

-

42

-

2

-

2

48

Palm Beach

2

3

-

6

1

-

1

13

1,253

0:00

-

1

2

-

1

-

58

1

9

1

2

75

Currumbin

-

21

1

19

4

-

1

46

323

0:00

-

2

-

-

2

-

57

1

10

2

-

74

Tugun

12

3

-

2

1

-

-

18

290

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

34

1

1

-

2

38

Bilinga

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

32

0:00

-

1

1

-

1

-

18

1

-

-

-

22

North Kirra

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

168

0:00

5

-

-

-

1

-

62

1

-

-

3

67

Kirra

4

2

3

4

1

-

7

21

692

0:00

6

1

1

1

3

1

210

4

15

1

1

238

Coolangatta

2

7

3

-

1

-

4

17

586

0:00

4

-

-

-

-

-

57

3

7

-

4

71

Tweed Heads & Coolangatta

7

2

-

15

3

-

1

28

1,458

0:00

12

-

1

-

6

1

222

4

37

2

3

276

Point Danger

Rainbow Bay

2

-

4

1

8

-

3

18

902

0:00

6

-

3

-

4

-

228

6

61

14

9

325

BRANCH TOTAL

33

49

11

54

47

-

18

212

7,150

0:00

35

5

8

1

23

2

1,016

22

147

21

28

1,273

GOLD COAST TOTAL

74

334

29

195

131

-

32

795

40,228

7:00

80

24

38

1

56

2

2,794

37

405

37

242

3,636

CLUB TOTAL

199

770

72

436

317

-

115

1,909 111,299

17:00

202

82

122

1

146

2

4,612

76

919

55

541

6,556

Jet Rescue Services

-

-

-

-

-

-

30

30

509

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Rescue Water Craft Services

8

-

-

6

-

245

-

259

14,350

0:00

-

2

1

-

-

1

-

1

76

1

4

86

Aerial Rescue Services

-

-

-

-

-

-

15

15

200

0:00

43

-

-

1

1

1

-

-

-

1

1

5

6M ORB Rigid Hull

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

LOS TOTAL

8

-

-

6

-

245

45

304

15,070

0:00

43

2

1

1

1

2

-

1

76

2

5

91

VOLUNTARY SERVICES

207

770

72

442

317

245

160

2,213 126,369

17:00

245

84

123

2

147

4

4,612

77

995

57

546

6,647

SLSQ LIFEGUARDS

286

80

40

703

-

259

67

1,435 522,462 0:15:30

245

76

135

5

90

10

5,670

86

5,486

117

783

12,458

GRAND TOTAL

493

850

112

1,145

317

504

227

3,648 648,831 17:15:30

490

160

258

7

237

14

10,282

163

6,481

174

Total lives saved

3,648

Total first aid treatments

Total preventative actions

648,831

Total lives saved (voluntary service)

19,105 2,213

Total preventative actions (voluntary service)

5,468

Total Active Patrolling Female Membership

3,403

1,329 19,105

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

|67


Lifeguard Activity

Rescue Tube

Body Board

Rescue Board

IRB

RWC

Other

Total Rescues

Prevent Actions

Closure 0 Sharks

Mssing Persons

Spinal Injuries

Fractures

Defib Cases

Oxygen Therapy

Resus (CPR)

Minor

Major

Minor

Major

Other

FIRST AID TREATMENTS

Without Gear

RESCUES

Four Mile Beach

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

4,081

0:00

-

1

1

-

1

-

85

1

61

-

2

152

TOTAL

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

4,081

0:00

-

1

1

-

1

-

85

1

61

-

2

152

27

First Aid

Total F/Aid

Marine Stings

Douglas Shire Council

Cairns Regional Council Holloways Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2,020

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

-

19

-

-

Yorkeys Knob Beach

3

1

3

10

-

1

1

19

3,658

0:30

-

1

-

-

-

-

9

-

17

-

-

27

Ellis Beach

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1,150

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

1

7

-

-

18

Palm Cove

3

-

-

-

-

1

-

4

4,155

0:00

-

-

-

-

1

-

39

5

20

1

3

69

Trinity Beach

4

1

-

-

-

-

-

5

3,947

0:00

-

-

-

1

1

1

67

-

53

1

1

125

Clifton Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,062

0:00

2

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

5

-

-

10

Bramston Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

124

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

1

Kewarra Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

832

0:00

4

-

-

-

-

-

3

1

8

-

1

13

Green Island

41

16

1

116

-

-

7

181

16,998

2:00

12

-

-

1

-

1

166

-

323

-

5

496

Esplanade Lagoon

43

-

-

-

-

-

1

44

3,378

0:00

10

1

7

1

2

1

-

-

99

2

22

135

TOTAL

95

18

4

126

-

2

9

254

37,324

2:30

28

2

7

3

4

3

307

7

552

4

32

921

Cassowary Coast Regional Council Etty Bay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

758

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

15

-

-

18

North Mission

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

459

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

-

3

Mission Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

514

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

2

-

-

6

Mission Beach Rove

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

TOTAL

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,731

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

-

17

-

-

27

Hinchinbrook Shire Council Forrest Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

93

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

-

-

2

TOTAL

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

93

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

-

-

2

The Strand Net 1

1

-

-

-

-

4

41

46

1,205

0:00

3

-

-

-

3

-

14

5

62

-

2

86

The Strand Net 2

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

853

0:00

-

-

1

-

1

-

10

1

24

-

-

37

The Strand Water Park

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,211

0:00

19

1

3

-

1

-

3

-

149

-

6

163

Alma Bay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

782

0:00

8

-

1

-

1

-

17

1

92

-

3

115

Picnic Bay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Horshoe Bay

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

2

1,800

0:00

8

-

-

-

-

-

26

-

74

1

2

103

Townsville City Council

Balgal Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

96

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

1

-

-

3

Riverway Lagoon

8

1

-

-

-

-

-

9

5,062

0:00

21

-

2

-

2

-

-

-

207

-

15

226

The Strand Rock Pool

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1,009

0:00

5

-

2

-

1

-

9

-

146

3

6

167

Pallarenda

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

3

410

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

21

3

-

29

10

1

-

4

-

6

41

62

12,428

0:00

64

1

9

-

9

-

86

7

776

7

34

929

Alva Beach

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

2

62

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

4

TOTAL

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

2

62

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

-

4

TOTAL

Burdekin Shire Council

Whitsunday Regional Council Horshoe Bay - Bowen

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

500

0:00

2

-

-

-

-

-

19

-

31

1

2

53

TOTAL

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

500

0:00

2

-

-

-

-

-

19

-

31

1

2

53

Blue Water Lagoon

64

-

-

-

-

-

-

64

63,889

0:00

-

1

2

-

2

-

-

-

51

4

6

66

Harbour Beach

1

-

-

2

-

-

-

3

4,358

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

1

-

2

6

Lamberts Beach

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1,964

0:00

4

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

-

1

3

Eimeo Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

770

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Blacks Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

20

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Sarina Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

819

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

66

-

-

2

-

-

-

68

71,820

0:00

4

1

2

-

2

-

4

-

53

4

9

75

Emu Park Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

160

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

Yeppoon Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

488

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

3

TOTAL

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

648

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

1

4

10

13

5

13

-

9

1

51

15,621

2:00

5

1

5

-

1

-

179

-

125

6

13

330

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

261

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

4

-

-

10

10

13

5

13

-

9

2

52

15,882

2:00

5

1

5

-

1

-

185

-

129

6

13

340

Mackay Regional Council

TOTAL

Livingstone Shire Council

Gladstone Regional Council Agnes Water Beach Tannum Sands Beach TOTAL

68|

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15


Rescue Board

IRB

RWC

Other

Total Rescues

Prevent Actions

Closure - Sharks

Mssing Persons

Spinal Injuries

Fractures

Defib Cases

Oxygen Therapy

Resus (CPR)

Minor

Major

Minor

Major

Other

Moore Park Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

308

0:00

-

-

-

-

2

-

3

1

-

-

1

7

Oaks Beach

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

2

843

3:00

-

-

-

-

1

-

6

-

5

-

-

12

Kelly's Beach

-

1

-

17

-

4

-

22

3,406

1:00

-

-

2

-

-

-

71

1

38

-

7

119

Elliott Heads Beach

1

-

5

-

-

1

-

7

330

1:00

-

-

-

-

1

-

10

-

4

-

4

19

Nielsen Park Beach

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

1,567

1:00

2

-

-

-

-

-

18

-

21

1

1

41

TOTAL

1

1

5

20

-

5

-

32

6,454

6:00

2

-

2

-

4

-

108

2

68

1

13

198

Marine Stings

First Aid

Total F/Aid

Without Gear

Body Board

FIRST AID TREATMENTS

Rescue Tube

RESCUES

Bundaberg Regional Council

Fraser Coast Regional Council Torquay Beach

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

259

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

2

-

-

8

TOTAL

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

259

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

2

-

-

8

Rainbow Beach

1

1

-

10

-

-

-

12

11,795

0:00

32

1

3

-

-

-

72

1

30

-

4

111

TOTAL

1

1

-

10

-

-

-

12

11,795

0:00

32

1

3

-

-

-

72

1

30

-

4

111

Noosa West

2

-

-

13

-

3

1

19

2,704

0:00

1

2

4

-

2

-

163

9

160

6

3

349

Noosa

3

-

-

18

-

20

-

41

34,287

0:00

10

9

5

-

13

-

1,025

15

1,045

21

284

2,417

Sunshine

1

3

-

22

-

-

-

26

6,039

0:00

1

2

4

-

1

2

105

1

50

1

8

174

Sunrise

1

-

-

1

-

-

-

2

1,801

0:00

-

-

-

-

1

-

77

1

32

-

-

111

North Peregian

-

-

-

10

-

-

-

10

1,927

0:00

-

1

-

-

-

-

71

-

10

-

-

82

Peregian

1

-

-

3

-

-

2

6

4,551

0:00

-

1

2

-

1

-

87

1

53

2

-

147

TOTAL

8

3

-

67

-

23

3

104

51,309

0:00

12

15

15

-

18

2

1,528

27

1,350

30

295

3,280

Gympie Regional Council

Noosa Shire Council

Sunshine Coast Council Coolum North

-

-

1

20

-

-

-

21

3,877

0:00

-

1

2

-

-

-

173

-

40

-

2

218

Coolum

1

3

12

57

-

8

-

81

4,073

0:00

2

-

4

-

2

2

82

2

31

2

4

129

Yaroomba

-

1

-

6

-

-

-

7

1,473

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

-

1

-

-

11

Boardwalk

-

-

3

7

-

1

-

11

570

0:00

-

1

-

-

1

-

17

1

2

1

2

25

Marcoola

-

2

-

2

-

-

-

4

1,225

1:00

1

-

-

-

-

-

24

-

2

-

-

26

Discovery Beach

3

-

1

15

-

-

-

19

3,675

0:00

1

-

-

-

-

-

83

-

10

-

1

94

Mudjimba

-

1

-

33

-

2

-

36

2,429

0:00

-

2

1

1

3

1

25

-

9

-

2

44

Twin Waters

-

-

-

7

-

1

-

8

3,326

0:00

-

1

1

-

1

1

46

-

23

1

3

77

Maroochydore

-

1

-

60

-

35

-

96

15,114

0:00

1

3

9

-

5

-

367

8

404

5

155

956

Alexandra Headland

1

2

3

29

-

9

-

44

15,314

0:00

1

2

7

-

8

-

220

2

199

7

6

451

Mooloolaba

2

6

-

35

-

19

1

63

25,861

0:00

12

11

15

-

3

-

208

5

193

-

5

440

Mooloolaba Spit

-

1

-

12

-

3

2

18

8,782

0:00

2

5

9

-

6

-

174

3

203

2

3

405

Buddina

-

-

-

6

-

3

-

9

3,935

0:00

-

1

1

-

1

-

64

1

121

-

3

192

Wurtulla

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

4

4,639

3:30

-

-

-

-

-

-

64

-

67

1

-

132

Currimundi

3

-

-

40

-

5

-

48

6,366

0:00

-

4

-

-

1

-

74

-

20

-

1

100

Dicky Beach

3

-

-

10

-

8

-

21

4,981

0:00

2

1

3

-

2

-

34

-

42

1

4

87

Kings Beach Pool

4

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

1,262

0:00

5

2

2

-

1

-

4

-

148

4

7

168

Kings Beach

-

3

-

27

-

21

-

51

11,959

0:00

7

3

9

-

7

-

131

1

58

1

6

216

Bulcock Beach

-

-

-

17

-

8

-

25

1,670

0:00

-

-

1

-

-

-

75

9

170

-

-

255

Golden Beach

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

2

286

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

2

14

-

-

23

17

20

20

389

-

123

3

572

120,817

4:30

34

37

64

1

41

4

1,882

34

1,757

25

204

4,049

TOTAL

Moreton Bay Regional Council Woorim Beach

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

4,630

0:00

-

4

-

-

1

-

89

-

7

-

3

104

TOTAL

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

4,630

0:00

-

4

-

-

1

-

89

-

7

-

3

104

Streets Beach Lagoon

70

18

1

5

-

-

3

97

94,152

0:00

46

6

18

-

6

-

-

-

221

16

138

405

TOTAL

70

18

1

5

-

-

3

97

94,152

0:00

46

6

18

-

6

-

-

-

221

16

138

405

Southbank Corporation

Redland City Council Cylinder Beach

-

-

-

3

-

3

-

6

24,849

0:30

3

-

5

-

-

-

613

3

81

4

12

718

Main Beach

-

1

-

14

-

7

1

23

22,602

0:00

-

2

3

-

1

-

73

-

42

6

7

134

Adder Rock

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

5,110

0:00

-

1

-

-

-

-

190

1

22

1

2

217

Wellington Point

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,494

0:00

2

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

9

-

5

19

TOTAL

-

1

-

18

-

10

1

30

54,055

0:30

5

3

8

-

1

-

881

4

154

11

26

1,088

Southport Broadwater

2

3

2

25

-

-

1

33

6,418

0:00

9

2

1

-

1

-

5

1

105

5

1

121

Tallabudgera Creek

3

-

-

12

-

79

3

97

21,527

0:00

-

1

-

-

-

-

260

2

104

7

3

377

TOTAL

5

3

2

37

-

79

4

130

27,945

0:00

9

3

1

-

1

-

265

3

209

12

4

498

164

Gold Coast City Council

Non Local Government Areas Noosa North Shore

-

-

-

9

-

1

-

10

2,864

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

107

-

56

-

1

Double Island Point

2

-

3

1

-

-

-

6

3,613

0:00

2

1

-

1

1

1

35

-

5

-

2

46

TOTAL

2

-

3

10

-

1

-

16

6,477

0:00

2

1

-

1

1

1

142

-

61

-

3

210

286

80

40

703

-

259

67

245

76

135

5

90

10

5,670

86

5,486

117

783

12,458

GRAND TOTAL

1,435 522,462 0:15:30

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

|69


Results Queensland Senior Surf Life Saving Championships Open Female 2km Beach Run 1 Ella Coates (Northcliffe) 2 Sarah Prebble (Paekakirriki) 3 Kate Thornton (Alexandra Headland) Open Female 5 Person R&R 1 Mermaid Beach Open Female Beach Flags 1 Melissa Howard (Kurrawa) 2 Chanel Hickman (Currumbin) 3 Bree Masters (Kurrawa) Open Female Beach Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A Open Female Beach Sprint 1 Olivia Eaton (Currumbin) 2 Melissa Howard (Kurrawa) 3 Nicole Kay (Mooloolaba) Open Female Double Ski 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A Open Female Ironwoman 1 Rebecca Creedy (Northcliffe) 2 Kirsty Higgison (Mooloolaba) 3 Maddy Dunn (Northcliffe) Open Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 Currumbin Team B Open Female Surf Belt 1 Rebecca Creedy (Northcliffe) 2 Devon Halligan (Northcliffe) 3 Leah Jones (TH&C) Open Female Surf Board 1 Jordan Mercer (Noosa Heads) 2 Amy Annabel (BHMP) 3 Amy Nurthen (Mooloolaba) Open Female Surf Board Relay 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 Noosa Heads Team A Open Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Northcliffe Team B 2 North Burleigh Team E 3 Northcliffe Team A Open Female Surf Boat 1 Metrolpolitan Caloundra Hammers 2 Tallebudgera Kaylews 3 Northcliffe Team A Open Female Surf Race 1 Eliza Smith (Northcliffe) 2 Maddy Dunn (Northcliffe) 3 Kristyl Smith (Northcliffe) Open Female Surf Ski 1 Alyce Burnett (Maroochydore) 2 Brianna Massiey (Maroochydore) 3 Alyssa Bull (Alexandra Headland) Open Female Surf Ski Relay 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 North Burleigh Team A

70|

Open Female Surf Team 1 Northcliffe Team B 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A

Open Male Taplin 6 person 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Northcliffe Team B 3 Kurrawa Team A

U17 Female Taplin 3 person 1 Northcliffe Team B 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A

Open Female Taplin 3 person 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Northcliffe Team B

Open Mixed 6 Person R&R 1 Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park Team A

U17 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Jack Adams (Nobbys Beach) 2 Jack Lund (Tallebudgera) 3 Toby Redler (Northcliffe)

Open Male 2km Beach Run 1 Lachlan Pascoe (Kurrawa) 2 Samuel Fuller (Southport) 3 Liam Brewis (Currumbin) Open Male 5 Person R&R 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A Open Male Beach Flags 1 Benjamin Mispelhorn (Kurrawa) 2 Paul Cracroft-Wilson (Kurrawa) 3 Murdoch Finch (Currumbin) Open Male Beach Relay 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A Open Male Beach Sprint 1 Jason Gough (Mooloolaba) 2 Benjamin Mispelhorn (Kurrawa) 3 Conor Loughnan (Mooloolaba) Open Male Double Ski 1 Maroochydore Team C 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 Kurrawa Team A Open Male Ironman 1 Matt Bevilacqua (Mooloolaba) 2 Hayden White (Mooloolaba) 3 Jackson Maynard (Currumbin) Open Male Rescue Tube Race 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A

Open Mixed Double Ski 1 Northcliffe Team C 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 Currumbin Team C Reserve Grade Surf Boat 1 Maroochydore Force 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Currumbin Coal Trains Restricted Surf Race 1 Leon Zagel (Surfers Paradise) 2 Blair Day (Mooloolaba) 3 Dylan Newbiggin (Maroochydore) U17 Surf Belt 1 Toby Wilson (Northcliffe) 2 Bayden Botha (Northcliffe) 3 Brock Redwood (Sunshine Beach) U17 Surf Ski Relay 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 Sunshine Beach Team B U17 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Gabriella Dalton (Mermaid Beach) 2 Jazmin Lewsam (Southport) 3 Drew Beveridge (Mooloolaba) U17 Female Beach Flags 1 Nicole Kay (Mooloolaba) 2 Olivia Eaton (Currumbin) 3 Mikayla Jensen (Alexandra Headland) U17 Female Beach Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 Mackay Team A

U17 Male Beach Flags 1 Joshua Clemson (North Kirra) 2 Jayden Desmond (Tallebudgera) 3 Mitchell Gilmour, Palm Beach U17 Male Beach Relay 1 Mackay Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Sunshine Beach Team B U17 Male Beach Sprint 1 Jack Fildes (Northcliffe) 2 Mathew Currie (Currumbin) 3 Elliot Keevil (Mooloolaba) U17 Male Ironman 1 Nick Sloman (Sunshine Beach) 2 Ethan Clouston (Currumbin) 3 Tainui Kaihau (Maroochydore) U17 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Kobe Schulz (Northcliffe) 2 Nick Sloman (Sunshine Beach) 3 Cody Roth (Picnic Bay) U17 Male Surf Board 1 Conor Burrows (Noosa Heads) 2 Joshua Linton (Mooloolaba) 3 Robert Fischer (Kurrawa) U17 Male Surf Board Relay 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A U17 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Sunshine Beach Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team B 3 Mooloolaba Team A

Open Male Surf Belt 1 Stefaan Demopoulos (Northcliffe) 2 James Lacy (Mermaid Beach) 3 Pierce Leonard (Southport)

U17 Female Beach Sprint 1 Olivia Eaton (Currumbin) 2 Olivia Fien (Currumbin) 3 Emma Sykes (Mooloolaba)

Open Male Surf Board 1 Samuel Hamilton (Tugun) 2 Anthony Dougherty (Tugun) 3 Mark Bint (Southport)

U17 Female Ironwoman 1 Megan Kreuter (Northcliffe) 2 Laura Taylor (Northcliffe) 3 Brielle Cooper (Kurrawa)

Open Male Surf Board Relay 1 Mooloolaba Maroon 2 Mooloolaba White 3 Noosa Heads Team A

U17 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Laura Taylor (Northcliffe) 2 Bay Wildin-Snedden (Mooloolaba) 3 Brielle Cooper (Kurrawa)

Open Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Southport Team A 3 Surfers Paradise Team A

U17 Female Surf Board 1 Hannah Sculley (Northcliffe) 2 Brielle Cooper (Kurrawa) 3 Bay Wildin-Snedden (Mooloolaba)

Open Male Surf Boat 1 Currumbin Barbarians 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Tugun Team A

U17 Female Surf Board Relay 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Maroochydore Team B 3 Mooloolaba Team A

Open Male Surf Race 1 Joshua Brown (Byron Bay) 2 Samuel Sheppard (Northcliffe) 3 George O’Brien (Kurrawa)

U17 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Maroochydore Team C 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

U19 Surf Belt 1 Nikolas Green (Northcliffe) 2 Ben Cochrane (Northcliffe) 3 Ben Johnston (Currumbin)

Open Male Surf Ski 1 Cory Hill (Northcliffe) 2 Murray Stewart (Northcliffe) 3 Hayden White (Mooloolaba)

U17 Female Surf Race 1 Megan Kreuter (Northcliffe) 2 Xanique Taylor-Rolls (Northcliffe) 3 Laura Taylor (Northcliffe)

U19 Surf Boat 1 Maroochydore Force 2 Coolum Beach Active Health 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

Open Male Surf Ski Relay 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 North Burleigh Team B 3 Tugun Team A

U17 Female Surf Ski 1 Chloe Travers (Maroochydore) 2 Rielly Bryant (Northcliffe) 3 Megan Kreuter (Northcliffe)

U19 Surf Ski Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Tugun Team A

Open Male Surf Team 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 Northcliffe Team B

U17 Female Surf Team 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 North Burleigh Team A

U19 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Greta Petersen (Northcliffe) 2 Eve Aulsebrook (Alexandra Headland) 3 Megan Domarecki (Northcliffe)

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

U17 Male Surf Race 1 Liam Christie (Kurrawa) 2 Jack Brazier (Mooloolaba) 3 Nick Sloman (Sunshine Beach) U17 Male Surf Ski 1 Connor Buhk (Alexandra Headland) 2 Finlay Cavanagh (Mackay) 3 Daniel Raward (Kurrawa) U17 Male Surf Team 1 Sunshine Beach Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A U17 Male Taplin 3 person 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A U19 Double Ski 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Maroochydore Team B 3 Mackay Team B


U19 Female Beach Flags 1 Elizabeth Forsyth (Kurrawa) 2 Madison Kidd (Currumbin) 3 Maegan Cass (Mackay)

U19 Male Surf Board Relay 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park Team A

110+ Years Male Surf Ski Relay 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Tallebudgera Team A

150+ Years Male Taplin 3 person 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Surfers Paradise Team A 3 Surfers Paradise Team B

U19 Female Beach Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

U19 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Currumbin Team B 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A

110+ Years Male Surf Team 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Sunshine Beach Team A

170+ Years Female Beach Relay 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Mermaid Beach Team A 3 Mudjimba Team A

U19 Female Beach Sprint 1 Sakisha Dovey (Currumbin) 2 Madison Kidd (Currumbin) 3 Elizabeth Forsyth (Kurrawa)

U19 Male Surf Race 1 Nikolas Green (Northcliffe) 2 Matthew Davis (Currumbin) 3 Jack Gray (BHMP)

110+ Years Male Taplin 3 person 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Coolangatta Team B

170+ Years Male Beach Relay 1 North Kirra Team A 2 Southport Team A 3 Mackay Team A

U19 Female Ironwoman 1 Karlee Nurthen (Mooloolaba) 2 Ella Brown (Mooloolaba) 3 Alexandra Nolan (Noosa Heads)

U19 Male Surf Ski 1 Lincoln Dews (Currumbin) 2 Jayden Erskine (Currumbin) 3 Scott Sinclair (Alexandra Headland)

130+ Years Female Surf Board Relay 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

170+ Years Open Surf Board Relay 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team B 3 Northcliffe Team A

U19 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Northcliffe Team B

U19 Male Surf Team 1 Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A

130+ Years Female Surf Ski Relay 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 Noosa Heads Team A

170+ Years Open Surf Ski Relay 1 Mooloolaba Team B 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A

U19 Female Surf Board 1 Karlee Nurthen (Mooloolaba) 2 Mieke Kassulke (Northcliffe) 3 Georgina McDermott (Mooloolaba)

U19 Male Taplin 3 person 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A

130+ Years Female Surf Team 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

170+ Years Open Surf Team 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A

U19 Female Surf Board Relay 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Northcliffe Team D 3 Northcliffe Team A

U19 Mixed Double Ski 1 Alexandra Headland Team B 2 Maroochydore Team B 3 Currumbin Team A

130+ Years Female Taplin 3 person 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 North Burleigh Team A

U19 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 Currumbin Team A

U23 Female Surf Boat 1 Maroochydore Assets 2 Currumbin Dance Enhancers 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

130+ Years Male Surf Board Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 Dicky Beach Team A

U19 Female Surf Race 1 Lana Rogers (Noosa Heads) 2 Greta Petersen (Northcliffe) 3 Alyssa Koenen (Northcliffe)

U23 Male Surf Boat 1 Noosa Heads Dolphins 2 Tannum Sands Gorlocks 3 Currumbin Cougar Bait

130+ Years Male Surf Ski Relay 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 North Burleigh Team A

230+ Years Open Beach Relay 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Nobbys Beach Team A

U19 Female Surf Ski 1 Mieke Kassulke (Northcliffe) 2 Ellie Picken (Mooloolaba) 3 Brianna Massie (Maroochydore)

Open Lifesaver Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Mooloolaba Maroon 3 Currumbin Team B

130+ Years Male Surf Team 1 Maroochydore Team B 2 Southport Team A

30-34 Female Beach Flags 1 Michelle Jeffress (Kurrawa) 2 Nicole Lowe (Tannum Sands)

U19 Female Surf Team 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 Northcliffe Team C

Open March Past 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A

130+ Years Male Taplin 3 person 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 Currumbin Team A

30-34 Female Beach Sprint 1 Michelle Jeffress (Kurrawa) 2 Rachel Pearson (Alexandra Headland) 3 Nicole Lowe (Tannum Sands)

140+ Years Female Beach Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team B

30-34 Female Ironwoman 1 Lee Vrolyks (Northcliffe) 2 Melanie Driscoll (Kurrawa)

140+ Years Male Beach Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Mudjimba Team A 3 Currumbin Team A

30-34 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Alana Dall’Alba (Mooloolaba) 2 Nadene Hennessy-Rasmussen (TH&C)

U19 Female Taplin 3 person 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Northcliffe Team B U19 Male 2km Beach Run 1 William Brighton (Yamba) 2 Michael Gilliman (Dicky Beach) 3 Jack Gilmour (Southport)

Surf Boat Relay 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

Queensland Masters Surf Life Saving Championships

150+ Years Female Surf Board Relay 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A

U19 Male Beach Flags 1 Jason Gough (Mooloolaba) 2 Brandon McMahon (Kurrawa) 3 Jake Hurley (Currumbin)

110+ Years Female Surf Board Relay 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A

U19 Male Beach Relay 1 Currumbin Team B 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 Noosa Heads Team A

110+ Years Female Surf Ski Relay 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A

150+ Years Female Surf Team 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A

U19 Male Beach Sprint 1 Sam Mispelhorn (Kurrawa) 2 Jake Hurley (Currumbin) 3 Jayden Gilfillan (Currumbin)

110+ Years Female Surf Team 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A

150+ Years Female Taplin 3 person 1 Noosa Heads Team B 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A

U19 Male Ironman 1 Lincoln Dews (Currumbin) 2 Alex Wright (Mooloolaba) 3 Nikolas Green (Northcliffe)

110+ Years Female Taplin 3 person 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A

150+ Years Female Surf Ski Relay 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A

150+ Years Male Surf Board Relay 1 Surfers Paradise Team C 2 Mermaid Beach Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

170+ Years Open Taplin 3 person 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team B 200+ Years Male Beach Relay 1 Surfers Paradise Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Hervey Bay Team A

30-34 Female Surf Board 1 Lee Vrolyks (Northcliffe) 2 Melanie Driscoll (Kurrawa) 30-34 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Northcliffe Team A 30-34 Female Surf Race 1 Lee Vrolyks (Northcliffe) 2 Georgina Keily (Northcliffe) 3 Nadene Hennessy-Rasmussen (TH&C) 30-34 Female Surf Ski 1 Lee Vrolyks (Northcliffe) 2 Melanie Driscoll (Kurrawa) 3 Rachel Pearson (Alexandra Headland) 30-34 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Rohan Scaysbrook (Coolangatta) 2 Matthew Jedra (Nobbys Beach) 3 Lindsay Macdonald-Clow (Mudjimba)

U19 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Sunshine Beach Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A

110+ Years Male Beach Relay 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Currumbin Team A

150+ Years Male Surf Ski Relay 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Mermaid Beach Team A 3 Dicky Beach Team A

30-34 Male Beach Flags 1 Christopher Ireland (Kurrawa) 2 Steven Stockley (Coolum Beach) 3 Matthew Jedra (Nobbys Beach)

U19 Male Surf Board 1 Joshua Clouston (Currumbin) 2 Jake Dale (Maroochydore) 3 Scott Sinclair (Alexandra Headland)

110+ Years Male Surf Board Relay 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Currumbin Team A

150+ Years Male Surf Team 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Surfers Paradise Team A

30-34 Male Beach Sprint 1 Steven Stockley (Coolum Beach) 2 Matthew Jedra (Nobbys Beach) 3 Rohan Scaysbrook (Coolangatta)

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

|71


30-34 Male Double Ski 1 Tallebudgera Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Coolangatta Team A

35-39 Male Beach Sprint 1 Garry Ryan (Bundaberg) 2 Tumaka Read (Alexandra Headland) 3 Scott Nichols (Alexandra Headland)

40-44 Male Beach Flags 1 Todd McSwan (Mudjimba) 2 Ryan Miller (Moore Park) 3 Philip Daniels (Mudjimba)

45-49 Male Beach Flags 1 Wendy Sierp (Alexandra Headland) 2 Joanne Briody (Mermaid Beach) 3 Chantelle Minter (Mooloolaba)

30-34 Male Ironman 1 Stuart Louth (Maroochydore) 2 Scott McLeod (Rainbow Bay) 3 Rohan Scaysbrook (Coolangatta)

35-39 Male Double Ski 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 North Burleigh Team B 3 Dicky Beach Team A

40-44 Male Beach Sprint 1 John-Paul Smith (Salt) 2 Todd McSwan (Mudjimba) 3 Ryan Miller (Moore Park)

45-49 Male Beach Sprint 1 Ross McSwan (Alexandra Headland) 2 Kent Street (Sarina) 3 Rod Finney (Mackay)

30-34 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Scott McLeod (Rainbow Bay) 2 Daniel Manton (Mudjimba)

35-39 Male Ironman 1 Michael Gray (Currumbin) 2 Justin Gordon (Surfers Paradise) 3 Robert Brown (Brunswick)

40-44 Male Double Ski 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Maroochydore Team C 3 North Burleigh Team A

45-49 Male Double Ski 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team B

30-34 Male Surf Board 1 Jamo Borthwick (Currumbin) 2 Stuart Louth (Maroochydore) 3 Scott McLeod (Rainbow Bay)

35-39 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Robert Brown (Brunswick) 2 Timothy Walker (North Burleigh) 3 Thomas Lingham (Bribie Island)

40-44 Male Ironman 1 Darren Naylor (Alexandra Headland) 2 Michael Chan (Currumbin) 3 Mark Forrester (North Burleigh)

45-49 Male Ironman 1 Michael Waide (North Burleigh) 2 Carl Greenhalgh (Southport) 3 Paul Davis (Brunswick)

40-44 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Mark Forrester (North Burleigh) 2 Guy Peirce (Mudjimba) 3 Jason Hooper (Sunshine Beach)

45-49 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Ian Spence (Northcliffe) 2 Carl Greenhalgh (Southport) 3 Bradley Edwards (Surfers Paradise)

40-44 Male Surf Board 1 Mark Jacobs (Alexandra Headland) 2 Michael Chan (Currumbin) 3 David Hogben (Coolangatta)

45-49 Male Surf Board 1 Michael Waide (North Burleigh) 2 Paul Davis (Brunswick) 3 Rick Van Kampen (Coolangatta)

40-44 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Dicky Beach Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

45-49 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Brunswick Team A

40-44 Male Surf Race 1 Matt Norling (Tallebudgera) 2 Mark Forrester (North Burleigh) 3 Michael Manton (Mermaid Beach)

45-49 Male Surf Race 1 Ian Spence (Northcliffe) 2 John Baxter (Maroochydore) 3 Glenn Torepe (Kurrawa)

40-44 Male Surf Ski 1 Cameron Marshall (North Burleigh) 2 Gary Scott (Dicky Beach) 3 Darren Naylor (Alexandra Headland)

45-49 Male Surf Ski 1 Martin Kenny (Alexandra Headland) 2 Kirk Jarrott (Maroochydore) 3 Peter Kelly (Mooloolaba)

45-49 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Dana Craven (Alexandra Headland) 2 Jodie Watson (Bribie Island) 3 Amelia Lorentson (Noosa Heads)

50-54 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Julie Davis (Moore Park) 2 Belinda Marsh (Cairns)

30-34 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Maroochydore Team B 2 Currumbin Team A 30-34 Male Surf Race 1 Stuart Louth (Maroochydore) 2 Scott McLeod (Rainbow Bay) 3 Daniel Manton (Mudjimba) 30-34 Male Surf Ski 1 Bruce Taylor (North Burleigh) 2 Darryl Dyer (Tallebudgera) 3 Jamo Borthwick (Currumbin) 30-44 Female Double Ski 1 Alexandra Headland Team B 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A 35-39 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Jasmin Boyd (Sunshine Beach) 2 Cathryn Rayward (Kurrawa) 3 Jessica Baird (Alexandra Headland)

35-39 Male Surf Board 1 Clint Irwin (Maroochydore) 2 Michael Murray (North Burleigh) 3 Justin Gordon (Surfers Paradise) 35-39 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 North Burleigh Team A 35-39 Male Surf Race 1 Robert Brown (Brunswick) 2 Timothy Walker (North Burleigh) 3 Steven Boyd (Sunshine Beach) 35-39 Male Surf Ski 1 Nicholas Crilly (North Burleigh) 2 Aaron Rodgers (North Burleigh) 3 Shaun Spencer (North Burleigh) 40+ Female Double Ski 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 Noosa Heads Team B

35-39 Female Beach Flags 1 Cathryn Rayward (Kurrawa) 2 Anthea Oorloff (Bundaberg) 3 Jessica Baird (Alexandra Headland)

40-44 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Willow Smith (Mudjimba) 2 Melissa Aitken (Noosa Heads) 3 Allison Johnstone (Sunshine Beach)

35-39 Female Beach Sprint 1 Cathryn Rayward (Kurrawa) 2 Jasmin Boyd (Sunshine Beach) 3 Anthea Oorloff (Bundaberg)

40-44 Female Beach Flags 1 Helena Grono (Kurrawa) 2 Willow Smith (Mudjimba) 3 Kirsty Glithero (Yeppoon)

35-39 Female Ironwoman 1 Tiarne Smith (Northcliffe) 2 Tamiel Benjamin (Alexandra Headland) 3 Alena Greensill (Mooloolaba)

40-44 Female Beach Sprint 1 Helena Grono (Kurrawa) 2 Willow Smith (Mudjimba) 3 Samantha Williams (Alexandra Headland)

35-39 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Kirsty Bowlay (North Burleigh) 2 Tiarne Smith (Northcliffe) 3 Fiona McLarty (Nobbys Beach)

40-44 Female Ironwoman 1 Kylie Zikarsky (Maroochydore) 2 Alison Olander (Noosa Heads) 3 Nadine McCubbery (Mooloolaba)

35-39 Female Surf Board 1 Tiarne Smith (Northcliffe) 2 Tamiel Benjamin (Alexandra Headland) 3 Alena Greensill (Mooloolaba)

40-44 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Lisa Lower (North Kirra) 2 Maggie Mills (Nobbys Beach) 3 Natalie McMaster (Sunshine Beach)

35-39 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A

40-44 Female Surf Board 1 Lisa Lower (North Kirra) 2 Alison Olander (Noosa Heads) 3 Pip Fawcett (Dicky Beach)

35-39 Female Surf Race 1 Tiarne Smith (Northcliffe) 2 Kirsty Bowlay (North Burleigh) 3 Cathryn Rayward (Kurrawa)

40-44 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Noosa Heads Team B

45-49 Female Beach Flags 1 Wendy Sierp (Alexandra Headland) 2 Joanne Briody (Mermaid Beach) 3 Chantelle Minter (Mooloolaba) 45-49 Female Beach Sprint 1 Liesl Kett (Mooloolaba) 2 Carol Jones (Mooloolaba) 3 Wendy Sierp (Alexandra Headland) 45-49 Female Ironwoman 1 Elin Ashfield Hedstrom (North Burleigh) 2 Joanne Carroll-Thompson (Noosa Heads) 45-49 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Joanne Carroll-Thompson (Noosa Heads) 2 Briony McSwan (Alexandra Headland) 3 Gun Meskanen Hopkins (Sunshine Beach) 45-49 Female Surf Board 1 Elin Ashfield Hedstrom (North Burleigh) 2 Joanne Marrable (Northcliffe) 3 Julie Stanton (Noosa Heads)

50-54 Female Beach Flags 1 Gloria Ellis (Mudjimba) 2 Belinda Marsh (Cairns) 50-54 Female Beach Sprint 1 Gloria Ellis (Mudjimba) 2 Amanda Noble (Mooloolaba) 3 Belinda Marsh (Cairns) 50-54 Female Ironwoman 1 Alison Pegg (Noosa Heads) 2 Sandra Penman (Mermaid Beach) 3 Sally Hunt (North Burleigh) 50-54 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Alison Pegg (Noosa Heads) 2 Sandra Penman (Mermaid Beach) 3 Louise Roberts (Mermaid Beach) 50-54 Female Surf Board 1 Alison Pegg (Noosa Heads) 2 Sandra Penman (Mermaid Beach) 3 Susan Halton (North Burleigh)

45-49 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Noosa Heads Team A

50-54 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team B

35-39 Female Surf Ski 1 Tiarne Smith (Northcliffe) 2 Sharlene Kelly (Mooloolaba) 3 Tamiel Benjamin (Alexandra Headland)

40-44 Female Surf Race 1 Lisa Lower (North Kirra) 2 Kylie Zikarsky (Maroochydore) 3 Katrina Egan (Maroochydore)

45-49 Female Surf Race 1 Joanne Carroll-Thompson (Noosa Heads) 2 Rhonda Clelland (Noosa Heads) 3 Olivia Bredhauer (Alexandra Headland)

50-54 Female Surf Race 1 Alison Pegg (Noosa Heads) 2 Sandra Penman (Mermaid Beach) 3 Sally Hunt (North Burleigh)

35-39 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Justin Gordon (Surfers Paradise) 2 Michael Gray (Currumbin) 3 Jason Thomas (Alexandra Headland)

40-44 Female Surf Ski 1 Tamara Thorogood (Maroochydore) 2 Nadine McCubbery (Mooloolaba) 3 Alison Olander (Noosa Heads)

45-49 Female Surf Ski 1 Elin Ashfield Hedstrom (North Burleigh) 2 Sally Taylor (Mooloolaba) 3 Joanne Marrable (Northcliffe)

50-54 Female Surf Ski 1 Jennifer Rogers (Mooloolaba) 2 Sally Hunt (North Burleigh) 3 Susan Halton (North Burleigh)

35-39 Male Beach Flags 1 Yoshinao Nagamizu (Maroochydore) 2 Garry Ryan (Bundaberg) 3 Tumaka Read (Alexandra Headland)

40-44 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Nicholas Fawaz (Coolangatta) 2 Phillip Stephens (Alexandra Headland) 3 Vincent Loubet (Coolangatta)

45-49 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Paul Byres (Tallebudgera) 2 Glenn Torepe (Kurrawa) 3 Anthony Hoppitt (Mermaid Beach)

50-54 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Mark Lepper (Bribie Island) 2 Peter O’Shaughnessy (Yeppoon) 3 Douglas Ripper (Noosa Heads)

72|

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15


50-54 Male Beach Flags 1 Martin Ashfield (Surfers Paradise) 2 Craig Parker (Mooloolaba) 3 Tony Grima, Hervey Bay

55-59 Male Beach Sprint 1 Colin Coles (Mackay) 2 William Robertson (Yeppoon) 3 Grant Kelly (Surfers Paradise)

50-54 Male Beach Sprint 1 Craig Parker (Mooloolaba) 2 Tony Grima, Hervey Bay 3 Adrian Nash (Mooloolaba)

55-59 Male Ironman 1 Dale Penman (Mermaid Beach) 2 Douglas Iredale (Northcliffe) 3 Russell Henry (Tallebudgera)

50-54 Male Ironman 1 Grant Kenny (Alexandra Headland) 2 Craig Chapman (Surfers Paradise) 3 Peter Denigan (Mermaid Beach)

55-59 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Stephen Fry (Northcliffe) 2 David Wilson (Mooloolaba) 3 Russell Henry (Tallebudgera)

50-54 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Craig Chapman (Surfers Paradise) 2 Stephen Bradney (Alexandra Headland) 3 Brett Williams (Mooloolaba) 50-54 Male Surf Board 1 Grant Kenny (Alexandra Headland) 2 Michael Di Betta (Currumbin) 3 Ian Wright (Mooloolaba) 50-54 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Surfers Paradise Team C 3 Northcliffe Team B 50-54 Male Surf Race 1 Grant Kenny (Alexandra Headland) 2 Craig Chapman (Surfers Paradise) 3 Scott Unicomb (Northcliffe) 50-54 Male Surf Ski 1 Jeffrey Lemarseny (Alexandra Headland) 2 Grant Kenny (Alexandra Headland) 3 Robert Dorrough (Surfers Paradise) 50-54 Open Double Ski 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Kurrawa Team A 55-59 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Georgina Lynch (Noosa Heads) 55-59 Female Beach Flags 1 Diana Power (Mudjimba) 55-59 Female Beach Sprint 1 Angie McPhee (Dicky Beach) 2 Diana Power (Mudjimba) 55-59 Female Ironwoman 1 Georgina Lynch (Noosa Heads) 2 Julie Fidler (Noosa Heads) 3 Margaret Kyle (Northcliffe) 55-59 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Georgina Lynch (Noosa Heads) 2 Gay Bradley (Mooloolaba) 3 Marie Hasemann (Alexandra Headland) 55-59 Female Surf Board 1 Georgina Lynch (Noosa Heads) 2 Margaret Kyle (Northcliffe) 3 Robyn Jenkinson (Noosa Heads) 55-59 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Noosa Heads Team B 55-59 Female Surf Race 1 Georgina Lynch (Noosa Heads) 2 Julie Fidler (Noosa Heads) 3 Margaret Kyle (Northcliffe) 55-59 Female Surf Ski 1 Julie Fidler (Noosa Heads) 2 Georgina Lynch (Noosa Heads) 3 Margaret Kyle (Northcliffe) 55-59 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Grant Kelly (Surfers Paradise) 2 Harry Pegg (Alexandra Headland) 3 Julian Reid (Noosa Heads) 55-59 Male Beach Flags 1 William Robertson (Yeppoon) 2 Colin Coles (Mackay) 3 Chris Donnelly, Hervey Bay

55-59 Male Surf Board 1 Dale Penman (Mermaid Beach) 2 Mark Bennetts (Southport) 3 Clive Sharp (Mooloolaba) 55-59 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Mackay Team A 55-59 Male Surf Race 1 Stephen Fry (Northcliffe) 2 David Wilson (Mooloolaba) 3 Mark Bennetts (Southport) 55-59 Male Surf Ski 1 Greg Bowditch (Tallebudgera) 2 Douglas Iredale (Northcliffe) 3 Chris Lange (Mooloolaba) 55-59 Open Double Ski 1 Northcliffe Team B 2 Mackay Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A 60-64 Female Surf Board 1 Norith Ladner (Mooloolaba) 60-64 Male 1km Beach Run 1 Stuart Keay (Surfers Paradise) 2 Ian Murphy (Nobbys Beach) 60-64 Male Beach Flags 1 Robert Tomblin (Kurrawa) 2 Stephen Burstow (Tallebudgera) 3 Kevin Gillard (Maroochydore) 60-64 Male Beach Sprint 1 Stuart Keay (Surfers Paradise) 2 Robert Tomblin (Kurrawa) 3 Ken Eldridge (Alexandra Headland) 60-64 Male Ironman 1 Rod Taylor (Mooloolaba) 2 Geoffrey Dews (Noosa Heads) 3 Adrian Russell (Brunswick) 60-64 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Rod Taylor (Mooloolaba) 2 Lennard Cook (Currumbin) 3 Glenn Donovan-Last (Southport)

65-69 Female Beach Sprint 1 Judith Rowland-Smith (Mooloolaba) 65-69 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Christina Nicholls (Kurrawa) 65-69 Female Surf Board 1 Leona Coureas (Mooloolaba)

70+ Open Ironperson 1 Neville De Mestre (North Burleigh) 2 Phillip Newton (Currumbin)

65-69 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Kurrawa Team A

Over 120 Years Female Surf Boat 1 Metropolitan Caloundra Mystic

65-69 Female Surf Race 1 Leona Coureas (Mooloolaba) 2 Christina Nicholls (Kurrawa) 3 Elizabeth Crilly (Kurrawa)

Over 120 Years Male Surf Boat 1 Northcliffe Team A

65-69 Male Beach Flags 1 Neil Dearberg (Alexandra Headland) 2 Paul Saffigna (TH&C) 65-69 Male Beach Sprint 1 Paul Saffigna (TH&C) 2 Neil Dearberg (Alexandra Headland)

65-69 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Christopher Shapland (Maroochydore) 2 Leonard Harris (Maroochydore) 3 Gregory Reddan (Southport) 65-69 Male Surf Board 1 Ross Fisher (Noosa Heads) 2 Gregory Reddan (Southport) 3 Jeffrey Gatenby (Kurrawa)

65-69 Male Surf Race 1 Gregory Reddan (Southport) 2 Christopher Shapland (Maroochydore) 3 Len Wood (Maroochydore) 65-69 Male Surf Ski 1 Ross Fisher (Noosa Heads) 2 Gary Hume (Kawana Waters) 3 Robert Benes (Dicky Beach)

60-64 Male Surf Ski 1 Rod Taylor (Mooloolaba) 2 Stuart Keay (Surfers Paradise) 3 David Rossiter (Mooloolaba) 60-64 Open Double Ski 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Dicky Beach Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team B 65-69 Female 1km Beach Run 1 Judith Rowland-Smith (Mooloolaba) 65-69 Female Beach Flags 1 Christina Nicholls (Kurrawa)

Over 220 Years Open Surf Boat 1 Bundaberg Team A 2 Coolangatta Cooly Blues Over 240 Years Open Surf Boat 1 Mooloolaba Wombats

Queensland Surf Rescue Championships Open Female Champion Lifesaver 1 Kate Thornton (Alexandra Headland) 2 Kathryn McKenzie (Northcliffe) 3 Tyla Mitchell (Dicky Beach)

70+ Open 1km Beach Run 1 Allan Nicholls (Northcliffe) 2 Phillip Newton (Currumbin) 70+ Open Beach Flags 1 Allan Nicholls (Northcliffe) 2 Glen Wilson (Mooloolaba)

60-64 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Noosa Heads Team A

Over 180 Years Open Surf Boat 1 Tallebudgera Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 Currumbin Crusaders

Over 260 Years Open Surf Boat 1 Kurrawa Team A

65-69 Open Double Ski 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Kawana Waters Team A 3 Coolum Beach Team A

70+ Open Double Ski 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A

Over 140 Years Male Surf Boat 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Currumbin Bezerkas 3 Byron Bay Team A

Over 200 Years Open Surf Boat 1 Noosa Heads The Condors 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 Currumbin Crocs

65-69 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Maroochydore Team A

70+ Open Beach Sprint 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A

Over 140 Years Female Surf Boat 1 Mooloolaba Team B 2 Mooloolaba Team A

Over 160 Years Male Surf Boat 1 Dicky Beach Remix 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Tweed Heads & Coolangatta Team A

65-69 Male Ironman 1 Ross Fisher (Noosa Heads) 2 Len Wood (Maroochydore)

60-64 Male Surf Board 1 Rod Taylor (Mooloolaba) 2 Ian Jobson (Maroochydore) 3 David Rossiter (Mooloolaba)

60-64 Male Surf Race 1 Rod Taylor (Mooloolaba) 2 Glenn Donovan-Last (Southport) 3 Lennard Cook (Currumbin)

70+ Open Surf Ski 1 Campbell Seward (Northcliffe) 2 Kenneth Cameron (Coolum Beach) 3 Desmond Parkes (Alexandra Headland)

Open Male Champion Lifesaver 1 Bradley Doughan (Alexandra Headland) 2 Michael White (Alexandra Headland) 3 Lucas Allan (Northcliffe) Open Mixed First Aid 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Coochiemudlo Island Team B 3 Maroochydore Team B

70+ Open Rescue Tube Race 1 Neville De Mestre (North Burleigh) 2 Peter McMahon (Alexandra Headland) 3 Peter Fraser (Alexandra Headland)

Open Mixed Patrol Competition 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Northcliffe Team B

70+ Open Surf Board 1 Allan Nicholls (Northcliffe) 2 Kenneth Cameron (Coolum Beach) 3 Neville De Mestre (North Burleigh)

U14 Female Champion Lifesaver 1 Talisa Brady (Sunshine Beach) 2 Katie Gleeson (Sunshine Beach) 3 Emily Lethbridge (Noosa Heads)

70+ Open Surf Board Rescue 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

U14 Male Champion Lifesaver 1 Jonty Redwood (Sunshine Beach) 2 Lincoln Hardy (Picnic Bay) 3 Samuel Rudland (Kirra)

70+ Open Surf Race 1 Neville De Mestre (North Burleigh) 2 Allan Nicholls (Northcliffe) 3 Peter McMahon (Alexandra Headland)

U15 Female Champion Lifesaver 1 Elizabeth Rudland (Kirra) 2 Sarah Bryan (Maroochydore) 3 Georgia Moore (Northcliffe)

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

|73


U15 First Aid 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Point Lookout Team A

Junior All Age Relay 1 Mermaid Beach Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 North Barrier Team A

U11 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Kawana Waters Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Tannum Sands Team A

U12 Male Cameron Relay 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Tallebudgera Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A

U15 Male Champion Lifesaver 1 Jarrod Shute (Northcliffe) 2 Jack Moore (Northcliffe) 3 Corey Cumner (Alexandra Headland)

U11 Female 1km Beach Run 1 Starr Scott (Tallebudgera) 2 Lila Horobin (North Queensland) 3 Mia Marks (Tallebudgera)

U11 Male Surf Board Relay 1 Kawana Waters Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Kawana Waters Team B

U12 Male Ironman 1 Joseph McMenamin (Maroochydore) 2 Ruben Rees (BHMP) 3 Oliver Monaghan (Maroochydore)

U11 Female Beach Flags 1 Lily Dobbie (BHMP) 2 Lily O’Sullivan (Tugun) 3 Ellise Lower (North Kirra)

U11 Male Surf Race 1 Caleb Silva (Kawana Waters) 2 Hugh Munro (Currumbin) 3 Matthew Magnussen (Met Caloundra)

U12 Male Surf Board 1 Joseph McMenamin (Maroochydore) 2 Oliver Monaghan (Maroochydore) 3 Taj Stokes (Kawana Waters)

U11 Female Beach Relay 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Mudjimba Team A 3 North Kirra Team A

U11 Male Surf Team 1 Kawana Waters Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A

U12 Male Surf Board Relay 1 Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park Team A 2 Maroochydore Team B 3 Currumbin Team A

U11 Female Beach Sprint 1 Georgia Kapolos (Marcoola) 2 Imogen Walker (North Kirra) 3 KianaScrase (Alexandra Headland)

U12 Female 1km Beach Run 1 Tekara Aimer (Alexandra Headland) 2 Lauren Nugent (North Barrier) 3 Charli Doolan (Mermaid Beach)

U12 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Currumbin Team B 2 Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park Team A 3 Maroochydore Team B

U11 Female Cameron Relay 1 Kawana Waters Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team B 3 Noosa Heads Team A

U12 Female Beach Flags 1 Hannah Bujold (Alexandra Headland) 2 Lauren Nugent (North Barrier) 3 Halle Singh (North Kirra)

U12 Male Surf Race 1 Joseph McMenamin (Maroochydore) 2 Samuel Short (Maroochydore) 3 Casey Wilson (Tallebudgera)

U11 Female Ironwoman 1 Sahara McCarthy (Kurrawa) 2 Reese Collie (Kawana Waters) 3 Alana Munro (Kawana Waters)

U12 Female Beach Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Tannum Sands Team A 3 Dicky Beach Team A

U12 Male Surf Team 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park Team A 3 Maroochydore Team B

U11 Female Surf Board 1 Jada Boughton (Maroochydore) 2 Lily O’Sullivan (Tugun) 3 Ruby Meehan (Currumbin)

U12 Female Beach Sprint 1 Ellie Beer (Currumbin) 2 Halle Singh (North Kirra) 3 Charli Doolan (Mermaid Beach)

U13 Female 1km Beach Run 1 Lucy Single (Kurrawa) 2 Darcy Milfull (Yeppoon) 3 Keely Walsh (Marcoola)

U11 Female Surf Board Relay 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Kawana Waters Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A

U12 Female Ironman 1 Lauren Nugent (North Barrier) 2 Sarah Perkins (Alexandra Headland) 3 Dominique Stitt (Maroochydore)

U13 Female Beach Flags 1 Laney Smith (Kurrawa) 2 Mia McWilliam (Hervey Bay) 3 Isabella Clarke (Alexandra Headland)

U11 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 Kawana Waters Team A

U12 Female Surf Board 1 Sarah Perkins (Alexandra Headland) 2 Tekara Aimer (Alexandra Headland) 3 Olivia Collins (Currumbin)

U13 Female Beach Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Dicky Beach Team A 3 Pacific Team A

U11 Female Surf Race 1 Sahara McCarthy (Kurrawa) 2 Lucy Garufi (Currumbin) 3 Indiana Armstrong (Northcliffe)

U12 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Noosa Heads Team A

U13 Female Beach Sprint 1 Isabella Clarke (Alexandra Headland) 2 Laney Smith (Kurrawa) 3 Carla Bull (Hervey Bay)

U11 Female Surf Team 1 Sunshine Beach Team A 2 Kawana Waters Team A 3 North Queensland Team A

U12 Female Surf Board Relay 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A

U13 Female Ironwoman 1 Lani Pallister (Alexandra Headland) 2 Ruby Nolan (Sunshine Beach) 3 Jenaya Massie (Maroochydore)

U11 Male 1km Beach Run 1 Harper Bourke (Tugun) 2 Mitchell Stitt (Maroochydore) 3 Axel Hunter (Mudjimba)

U12 Female Cameron Relay 1 Dicky Beach Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A

U13 Female Cameron Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A

U11 Male Beach Flags 1 Daniel Meggitt (Maroochydore) 2 Jakob Wardlaw (Agnes Water) 3 Christopher Burgess (Tallebudgera)

U12 Female Surf Race 1 Sarah Perkins (Alexandra Headland) 2 Jessica Oates (Dicky Beach) 3 Jade Zikarsky (Maroochydore)

U13 Female Surf Board 1 Lani Pallister (Alexandra Headland) 2 Jenaya Massie (Maroochydore) 3 Tamarind WIldin-Snedden (Mooloolaba)

U11 Male Beach Relay 1 Alexandra Headlands Team B 2 Dicky Beach Team A 3 Mermaid Beach Team A

U12 Female Surf Team 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park Team A

U13 Female Surf Board Relay 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Sunshine Beach Team A

U11 Male Beach Sprint 1 Daniel Meggitt (Maroochydore) 2 William Morrison (Emu Park) 3 Christopher Burgess (Tallebudgera)

U12 Male 1km Beach Run 1 Jarvis Pattison (Noosa Heads) 2 Ryker Scott (Pacific) 3 Jack Read (Tallebudgera)

U13 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 North Burleigh Team B

U11 Male Cameron Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Kawana Waters Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A

U12 Male Beach Flags 1 Sean Rolton (Currumbin) 2 Cameron Lang (Pacific) 3 Jayden Robb (Currumbin)

U13 Female Surf Race 1 Lani Pallister (Alexandra Headland) 2 Ruby Nolan (Sunshine Beach) 3 Jenaya Massie (Maroochydore)

Junior 2 Person R&R 1 North Barrier Team B 2 Tugun Team A 3 North Barrier Team A

U11 Male Ironman 1 Caleb Silva (Kawana Waters) 2 Hugh Munro (Currumbin) 3 Zeb Stokes (Kawana Waters)

U12 Male Beach Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Tweed Heads & Coolangatta A 3 Marcoola Team A

U13 Female Surf Team 1 Sunshine Beach Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 North Burleigh Team A

Junior 5 Person R&R 1 Tugun Team A 2 North Kirra Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A

U11 Male Surf Board 1 Zeb Stokes (Kawana Waters) 2 Ky Howell (North Burleigh) 3 Caleb Pont (Kawana Waters)

U12 Male Beach Sprint 1 Sol Sheining-Cruz (TH&C) 2 Max McCreed (Dicky Beach) 3 Jayden Robb (Currumbin)

U13 Male 1km Beach Run 1 Ryan McCure (North Burleigh) 2 Riley Tanner (Dicky Beach) 3 Daniel Butler (Northcliffe)

U15 Patrol Competition 1 Dicky Beach Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A U17 Female Champion Lifesaver 1 Maddi Korac (Maroochydore) 2 Laura Brown (Northcliffe) 3 Lateisha Stam (Bundaberg) U17 First Aid 1 Coochiemudlo Island Team A 2 Coochiemudlo Island Team B 3 Point Lookout Team A U17 Male Champion Lifesaver 1 Brock Redwood (Sunshine Beach) 2 Cooper Woods (Dicky Beach) 3 Kane Brady (Point Lookout) U17 Patrol Competition 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A U19 Female Champion Lifesaver 1 Charlotte Webber (Noosa Heads) 2 Emma Finnis (Bundaberg) 3 Hannah Pledge (Alexandra Headland) U19 First Aid 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Point Lookout Team A 3 Coochiemudlo Island Team A U19 Male Champion Lifesaver 1 Zach Brown (Northcliffe) 2 Scott Sinclair (Alexandra Headland) 3 Jonathan Hagan (Point Lookout) 30-39 Female Champion Lifesaver 1 Nicole Lowe (Tannum Sands) 2 Jessica Baird (Alexandra Headland) 3 Nadene Hennessy-Rasmussen (TH&C) 30-39 Male Champion Lifesaver 1 Trent Rowe (Northcliffe) 2 Matthew Cumming (Yeppoon) 3 Martin Cole (Bundaberg) 40+ Male Champion Lifesaver 1 Stephen Bradney (Alexandra Headland) 2 Shane Baird (Alexandra Headland) 3 Phillip Stephens (Alexandra Headland) 40+ Female Champion Lifesaver 1 Dana Craven (Alexandra Headland) 2 Sharon Young (Mudjimba)

Queensland Youth Surf Life Saving Championships Junior March Past 1 Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park Team A 2 Hervey Bay Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

74|

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15


U13 Male Beach Flags 1 Tom Lyons (North Barrier) 2 Jack Scott (Mooloolaba) 3 Tyler Gordon (Mudjimba)

U14 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Sunshine Beach Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team B

U15 Female Beach Sprint 1 Taylor Stickler (Mooloolaba) 2 Lillian Dick (Currumbin) 3 Veronica McNevin (Currumbin)

U15 Male Surf Board 1 Cooper Williams (Noosa Heads) 2 Hunter Pierce (Northcliffe) 3 Jackson Chapman (Coolangatta)

U13 Male Beach Relay 1 Palm Beach Team A 2 Dicky Beach Team A 3 Mermaid Beach Team A

U14 Female Surf Race 1 Madisyn Armstrong (Northcliffe) 2 Olivia Emanuel (Sunshine Beach) 3 Talisa Brady (Sunshine Beach)

U15 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Maroochydore Team C 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A

U15 Male Surf Board Relay 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Currumbin Team A

U13 Male Beach Sprint 1 Lachlan Fraser (BHMP) 2 Tyler Gordon (Mudjimba) 3 Patrick Wootton (Bribie Island)

U14 Female Surf Team 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

U15 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Ellie Bissaker (Sunshine Beach) 2 Jade Slee (Mermaid Beach) 3 Matilda Phelan (Emu Park)

U15 Surf Board Rescue 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Northcliffe Team C 3 Maroochydore Team B

U13 Male Surf Board 1 Adam Palmer (Maroochydore) 2 Seth Wood (Northcliffe) 3 Tarren Robertson (Dicky Beach)

U14 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Toby Marks (Tallebudgera) 2 Kyle Aimer (Alexandra Headland) 3 Jake Somerville (TH&C)

U15 Female Cameron Relay 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Yeppoon Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A

U15 Male Surf Race 1 Cooper Williams (Noosa Heads) 2 Matthew Palmer (Maroochydore) 3 James Rosato (Northcliffe)

U13 Male Surf Board Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Kawana Waters Team A 3 Sunshine Beach Team A

U14 Male Beach Flags 1 Lachlan Alleyne (Bribie Island) 2 Callum Street (North Barrier) 3 Kieran Croker (BHMP)

U15 Female Surf Board Relay 1 Maroochydore Team B 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A

U15 Male Surf Team 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Northcliffe Team B

U13 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 North Barrier Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A

U14 Male Beach Relay 1 Bribie Island Team A 2 North Barrier Team A 3 Coolum Beach Team A

U15 Female Surf Team 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Sunshine Beach Team A

U13 Male Cameron Relay 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Sunshine Beach Team A

U14 Male Beach Sprint 1 Thomas Baker (Coolum Beach) 2 Sam Nimmo (North Barrier) 3 Jack Davies (Dicky Beach)

U15 Female Ironwoman 1 Grace Kaihau (Maroochydore) 2 Charlotte Keevil (Mooloolaba) 3 Leah Cassidy (BHMP)

U13 Male Ironman 1 Adam Palmer (Maroochydore) 2 Jordan Sergis (Northcliffe) 3 Miller McQuitty-Brown (Northcliffe)

U14 Male Cameron Relay 1 Sunshine Beach Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 Currumbin Team A

U15 Female Surf Board 1 Grace Kaihau (Maroochydore) 2 Shaye Travers (Maroochydore) 3 Alexandra Clarke (Maroochydore)

U13 Male Surf Race 1 Ruben Zikarsky (Maroochydore) 2 Zachary Bromage (Sunshine Beach) 3 Jordan Sergis (Northcliffe)

U14 Male Ironman 1 Mackenzie Naylor (Alexandra Headland) 2 Ryan Bebendorf (Tannum Sands) 3 Jess Little (Currumbin)

U15 Surf Board Rescue 1 Maroochydore Team C 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team A

U13 Male Surf Team 1 Sunshine Beach Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A U14 2 Person R&R 1 North Kirra Team C 2 North Barrier Team A 3 North Kirra Team A U14 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Drew Younger (TH&C) 2 Jenna Breetzke (Northcliffe) 3 Isabella Brodie, Bilinga U14 Female Beach Flags 1 Taya DiBartolo (North Barrier) 2 Kirah Bembrick (Pacific) 3 Lucia Fildes (Northcliffe) U14 Female Beach Relay 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 North Barrier Team A 3 Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park Team A U14 Female Beach Sprint 1 Lily Peck (Mooloolaba) 2 Katie Gleeson (Sunshine Beach) 3 Tayla Neil (Alexandra Headland)

U14 Male Surf Board 1 Maverick Pettigrove (Sunshine Beach) 2 Ryan Bebendorf (Tannum Sands) 3 Kieran Croker (BHMP) U14 Male Surf Board Relay 1 Sunshine Beach Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team A 3 Noosa Heads Team A U14 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team B U14 Male Surf Race 1 Mackenzie Naylor (Alexandra Headland) 2 Jonty Redwood (Sunshine Beach) 3 Hayden Cotter (Mooloolaba) U14 Male Surf Team 1 Sunshine Beach Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 North Barrier Team A U15 2 Person R&R 1 North Barrier Team A 2 Tugun Team A 3 North Kirra Team C

U15 Female Surf Race 1 Nicole Conyngham (Northcliffe) 2 Imogen Rees (Northcliffe) 3 Matilda Phelan (Emu Park) U15 Female Surf Team 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Sunshine Beach Team A U15 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Jarrod Shute (Northcliffe) 2 Angus Luhrs (Noosa Heads) 3 Mason Hebbard (Emu Park) U15 Male Beach Flags 1 Alex Innes (Met Caloundra) 2 Bayley Desmond (Tallebudgera) 3 Luke Wyatt (Currumbin) U15 Male Beach Relay 1 Mermaid Beach Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A U15 Male Beach Sprint 1 Alex Innes (Met Caloundra) 2 Bayley Desmond (Tallebudgera) 3 Geordie Dalton (Mermaid Beach)

U14 Female Cameron Relay 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team B 3 Maroochydore Team A

U15 5 Person R&R 1 Tugun Team A 2 North Kirra Team A

U15 Male Cameron Relay 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Northcliffe Team D 3 Mooloolaba Team A

U14 Female Ironwoman 1 Tiarnee Massie (Maroochydore) 2 Electra Outram (Noosa Heads) 3 Olivia Emanual (Sunshine Beach)

U15 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Alexandra Clarke (Maroochydore) 2 Kate Watson (Bribie Island) 3 Kahli Henwood (Miami Beach)

U15 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Northcliffe Team C 3 Maroochydore Team B

U14 Female Surf Board 1 Electra Outram (Noosa Heads) 2 Olivia Emanuel (Sunshine Beach) 3 Emily Lethbridge (Noosa Heads)

U15 Female Beach Flags 1 Taylor Stickler (Mooloolaba) 2 Lillian Dick (Currumbin) 3 Sidney Blake (Tannum Sands)

U15 Male Ironman 1 Cooper Williams (Noosa Heads) 2 Matthew Palmer (Maroochydore) 3 Hunter Pierce (Northcliffe)

U14 Female Surf Board Relay 1 Sunshine Beach Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Noosa Heads Team A

U15 Female Beach Relay 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A

U15 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Cooper Williams (Noosa Heads) 2 Jackson Chapman (Coolangatta) 3 Clayten Fowler (Northcliffe)

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

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Financials Surf Life Saving Queensland

Statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income For the year ended 31 May 2015 2015 $

2014 $

30,270,357

24,724,696

(6,207,580) (10,829,707) (1,770,825) (524,577) (1,360,290) (1,257,497) (6,007,965) 353,478 97,837 2,763,231

(3,860,098) (10,516,764) (1,772,373) (558,516) (908,945) (1,007,472) (6,111,877) 417,169 106,466 512,286

Income tax expense Surplus after income tax

2,763,231

512,286

Other comprehensive income Total comprehensive income for the year

2,763,231

512,286

Notes Revenue Life saving services Lifeguard operations Club support Surf sports Education, youth and membership Marketing and public affairs Corporate support Net increase in investments Finance income - net Surplus from continuing operations

3.1

3.4

The above statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

1

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Surf Life Saving Queensland

Statement of financial position As at 31 May 2015 2015 $

2014 $

4 5 6

4,120,869 3,421,229 6,354,721 62,937 13,959,756

1,737,912 2,802,974 5,239,243 204,659 9,984,788

7 8 9

51,900 2,259,217 14,334,142 16,645,259 30,605,015

79,300 2,440,751 18,794,211 21,314,262 31,299,050

10 11 12

1,492,334 1,334,092 812,555 3,638,981

2,977,319 1,095,665 1,750,000 1,361,008 7,183,992

11

412,737 412,737 4,051,718

324,992 324,992 7,508,984

Net assets

26,553,297

23,790,066

Association's funds Retained earnings Total association's funds

26,553,297 26,553,297

23,790,066 23,790,066

Notes Assets Current assets Cash and cash equivalents Trade and other receivables Other financial assets Prepayments Total current assets Non-current assets Receivables Investment in controlled entities Property, plant and equipment Total non-current assets Total assets Liabilities Current liabilities Trade and other payables Employee benefit liabilities Interest-bearing loans and borrowings Revenue received in advance Total current liabilities Non-current liabilities Employee benefit liabilities Total non-current liabilities Total liabilities

The above statement of financial position should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

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Surf Life Saving Queensland

Statement of changes in association's funds For the year ended 31 May 2015 Retained earnings $

Total $

23,790,066

23,790,066

2,763,231 2,763,231

2,763,231 2,763,231

At 31 May 2015

26,553,297

26,553,297

At 1 June 2013

23,277,780

23,277,780

512,286 512,286

512,286 512,286

23,790,066

23,790,066

At 1 June 2014 Surplus for the year Other comprehensive income Total comprehensive income

Surplus for the year Other comprehensive income Total comprehensive income At 31 May 2014

The above statement of changes in association's funds should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

3

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Surf Life Saving Queensland

Statement of cash flows For the year ended 31 May 2015 2015 $

2014 $

32,386,315 (26,424,207) 164,436 (66,599) (3,255,266) 2,804,679

25,499,681 (20,848,572) 212,821 (106,250) (2,064,997) 2,692,683

Investing activities Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment Purchase of property, plant and equipment Acquisition of other financial assets Net cash flows from/(used in) investing activities

6,116,363 (4,026,085) (762,000) 1,328,278

685,685 (4,318,640) (867,963) (4,500,918)

Financing activities Repayment of borrowings Net cash flows used in financing activities

(1,750,000) (1,750,000)

(250,000) (250,000)

2,382,957 1,737,912 4,120,869

(2,058,235) 3,796,147 1,737,912

Notes Operating activities Receipts in the course of operations Payments in the course of operations Interest received Interest paid GST remitted to ATO Net cash flows from operating activities

Net increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents at 1 June Cash and cash equivalents at 31 May

4

4

The above statement of cash flows should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

4

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Surf Life Saving Queensland

Notes to the financial statements For the year ended 31 May 2015 1.

Summary of significant accounting policies

(a)

Basis of preparation

This special purpose financial report has been prepared for distribution to the members to fulfill the directors' financial reporting requirements under the Associations Incorporations Act Queensland 1981. It has been prepared on an accrual basis of accounting including the historical cost convention and the going concern assumption. Cost is based on the fair values of the consideration given in exchange for assets. The accounting policies adopted are consistent with those of the previous year. This is a financial report of Surf Life Saving Queensland (SLSQ) as a stand alone entity and does not consolidate the financial statements of any controlled entities. Details on controlled entities are included in Note 15. The requirements of accounting standards and other financial reporting requirements in Australia do not have mandatory applicability to SLSQ because it is not a "reporting entity". This special purpose financial report has been prepared in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards, Interpretations and other authoritative pronouncements of the Australian Accounting Standards Board and the requirements of the Associations Incorporation Act Queensland 1981 with the following exceptions in relation to disclosure: • AASB 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures • AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement • AASB 114 Segment Reporting • AASB 116 Property, Plant and Equipment • AASB 124 Related Party Disclosures • AASB 127 Consolidated and Separate Financial Statements • AASB 132 Financial Instruments: Presentation • AASB 136 Impairment of Assets The directors are of the view that the omission of the presentation and disclosure items referred to above does not retract from the true and fair presentation of the financial report of SLSQ. The financial report is presented in Australian dollars ($).

(b)

New accounting standards and interpretations

(i) Changes in accounting policies, new and amended standards and interpretations The accounting policies adopted are consistent with those of the previous financial year. (ii) Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued but not yet effective Certain Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations that have recently been issued or amended but are not yet effective and have not been adopted by the Association for the annual reporting period ended 31 May 2015. The directors have not early adopted any of these new or amended standards or interpretations. The directors have not yet fully assessed the impact of these new or amended standards (to the extent relevant to the Association) and interpretations.

5

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Surf Life Saving Queensland

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2015 1.

Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(c)

Current versus non-current classification

The Association presents assets and liabilities in the statement of financial position based on current/non-current classification. An asset is current when it is: •

Expected to be realised or intended to be sold or consumed in the Association's normal operating cycle

Held primarily for the purpose of trading

Expected to be realised within twelve months after the reporting period, or

Cash or cash equivalent unless restricted from being exchanged or used to settle a liability for at least twelve months after the reporting period

The Association classifies all other assets as non-current. A liability is current when: •

It is expected to be settled in the Association's normal operating cycle

It is held primarily for the purpose of trading

It is due to be settled within twelve months after the reporting period, or

There is no unconditional right to defer the settlement of the liability for at least twelve months after the reporting period

The Association classifies all other liabilities as non-current. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are classified as non-current assets and liabilities.

(d)

Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and short-term deposits in the statement of financial position comprise cash at banks and on hand and short-term deposits with a maturity of three months or less, which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value. For the purpose of the statement of cash flows, cash and cash equivalents consist of cash and short-term deposits as defined above, net of outstanding bank overdrafts.

(e)

Trade and other receivables

Trade receivables, which generally have 30 day terms, are recognised initially at fair value and subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, less an allowance for impairment. Collectability of trade receivables is reviewed on an ongoing basis at an operating unit level. Individual debts that are known to be uncollectible are written off when identified.

(f)

Financial assets

Financial assets classified as held for trading are included in the category 'Investments - current'. They represent financial assets at fair value through profit or loss. Financial assets are classified as held for trading if they are acquired for the purpose of selling in the near term.

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Surf Life Saving Queensland

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2015 1.

Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(g)

Property, plant and equipment

Property, plant and equipment is stated at cost, net of accumulated depreciation and/or accumulated impairment losses, if any. Such cost includes the cost of replacing part of the property, plant and equipment and borrowing costs for long-term construction projects if the recognition criteria are met. When significant parts of property, plant and equipment are required to be replaced at intervals, the Association recognises such parts as individual assets with specific useful lives and depreciates them accordingly. Likewise, when a major inspection is performed, its cost is recognised in the carrying amount of the plant and equipment as a replacement if the recognition criteria are satisfied. Land and buildings are measured at cost less accumulated depreciation on buildings and impairment losses recognised. Depreciation is calculated over the estimated useful life of the assets as follows: Class of assets Buildings Leasehold improvements Plant and equipment - Other Plant and equipment - Helicopter (components) Plant and equipment - Helicopter (other)

Depreciation method Straight line Straight line Diminishing value Usage - operating hours

Depreciation rate/Useful life 2.5% 2.5% 3.33% - 60% 3,500 - 12,400 hrs

Straight line

6.67% - 10%

The residual values, useful lives and methods of depreciation of property, plant and equipment are reviewed at each financial year end and adjusted prospectively, if appropriate. Impairment The carrying values of property, plant and equipment are reviewed for impairment at each reporting date, with the recoverable amount being estimated when events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may be impaired. The recoverable amount of property, plant and equipment is the higher of fair value less costs to sell and value in use. An impairment exists when the carrying value of an asset or cash exceeds its estimated recoverable amount. The asset is then written down to its recoverable amount. Impairment losses, if any, are recognised in the statement of comprehensive income as a separate line item. Derecognition and disposal An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal. Any gain or loss arising on derecognition of the asset (calculated as the difference between the net disposal proceeds and the carrying amount of the asset) is included in profit or loss in the year the asset is derecognised.

(h)

Trade and other payables

Trade payables and other payables are carried at amortised costs and represent liabilities for goods and services provided to SLSQ prior to the end of the financial year that are unpaid and arise when SLSQ becomes obliged to make future payments in respect of the purchase of these goods and services.

7

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Surf Life Saving Queensland

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2015 1.

Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(i)

Employee benefit liabilities

Wages, salaries and sick leave Liabilities for wages and salaries, including non-monetary benefits and accumulating sick leave which are expected to be settled within 12 months of the reporting date are recognised in respect of employees' services up to the reporting date. They are measured at the amounts expected to be paid when the liabilities are settled. Expenses for non-accumulating sick leave are recognised when the leave is taken and are measured at the rates paid or payable. Long service leave and annual leave The Association does not expect its long service leave or annual leave benefits to be settled wholly within 12 months of each reporting date. The Association recognises a liability for long service leave and annual leave measured as the present value of expected future payments to be made in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date using the projected unit credit method. Consideration is given to expected future wage and salary levels, experience of employee departures, and periods of service. Expected future payments are discounted using market yields at the reporting date on national government bonds with terms to maturity and currencies that match, as closely as possible, the estimated future cash outflows.

(j)

Revenue recognition

Revenue is recognised to the extent that it is probable that the economic benefits will flow to SLSQ and the revenue can be reliably measured. The following specific recognition criteria must also be met before revenue is recognised: • • • •

(k)

Revenue from the provision of services is recognised as the relevant services are performed. Revenue from donations is recognised on receipt. Revenue from sponsorships is recognised on a straight-line basis over the period of the sponsorship agreement when the Association has the unconditional right to receive sponsorship donations. Revenue is recognised as interest accrues using the effective interest method. This is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial asset and allocating the interest income over the relevant period using the effective interest rate, which is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts through the expected life of the financial net to the net carrying amount of the financial asset.

Taxes

Current income tax Surf Life Saving Queensland is exempt from income tax. Goods and services tax (GST) Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of GST, except: •

When the GST incurred on a sale or purchase of assets or services is not payable to or recoverable from the taxation authority, in which case the GST is recognised as part of the revenue or the expense item or as part of the cost of acquisition of the asset, as applicable

When receivables and payables are stated with the amount of GST included

The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority is included as part of receivables or payables in the statement of financial position. Commitments and contingencies are disclosed net of the amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority.

8

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Surf Life Saving Queensland

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2015 1.

Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(k)

Taxes (continued)

Cash flows are included in the statement of cash flows on a gross basis and the GST component of cash flows arising from investing and financing activities, which is recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority is classified as part of operating cash flows.

(l)

Government grants

Government grants are recognised when there is reasonable assurance that the grant will be received and all attaching conditions will be complied with. When the grant relates to an expense item, it is recognised as income over the periods necessary to match the grant on a systematic basis to the costs that it is intended to compensate. Revenue received for capital grants is recognised upon acquisition of the underlying asset within the statement of comprehensive income in accordance with AASB 1004.

(m)

Interest-bearing loans and borrowings

All loans and borrowings are initially recognised at the fair value of the consideration received less directly attributable transaction costs. After initial recognition, interest-bearing loans and borrowings are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method. Fees paid on the establishment of loan facilities that are yield related are included as part of the carrying amount of the loans and borrowings. Borrowings are classified as current liabilities unless the Group has an unconditional right to defer settlement of the liability for a least 12 months after the reporting date.

(n)

Loans from related parties

Loans from related parties that are not subject to a contract, are non-interest bearing, and have no specified repayment date are classified as contributed equity in the financial statements of the entity that received the loan. The loans do not represent shares and do not have a right to dividend distributions.

(o)

Financial risk management objectives and policies

SLSQ's principal financial instruments comprise receivables, payables, cash and short-term deposits, interest bearing loan and borrowings and investments held in equities. SLSQ manages its exposure to key financial risks in accordance with the financial risk management policy. The main risks arising from SLSQ's financial instruments are credit risk, liquidity risk and price risk. SLSQ uses different methods to measure and manage different types of risks to which it is exposed. These include ageing analyses and monitoring of specific credit allowances undertaken to manage credit risk. Liquidity risk is monitored through the development of future rolling cash flow forecasts. The Board reviews and agrees policies for managing each of these risks. Credit risk arises from the financial assets of SLSQ, which comprise cash and cash equivalents, trade and other receivables. SLSQ's exposure to credit risk arises from potential default of the counter party, with a maximum exposure equal to the carrying amount of these instruments. Exposure at balance date is addressed in each applicable note. SLSQ trades only with recognised, creditworthy third parties, and as such collateral is not requested nor is it SLSQ's policy to securitise its trade and other receivables. In addition, receivable balances are monitored on an ongoing basis with the result that SLSQ's exposure to bad debts is not significant. There are no significant concentrations of credit risk within SLSQ. Liquidity risk arises from the timing differences between cash inflows and cash outflows. SLSQ's objective is to maintain a balance between continuity of funding and flexibility. The Board has in place capital working capital and reinvestment targets and regularly monitors forward cash flow forecasts. 9

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Surf Life Saving Queensland

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2015 1.

Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(o)

Financial risk management objectives and policies (continued)

Equity securities price risk arise from investments in equity securities. To limit this risk SLSQ diversifies its portfolio in accordance with limits set by the Board in conjunction with its investment fund manager Perpetual. The majority of the equity investments is of a high quality and is publicly traded on the ASX. The price risk appears immaterial in terms of a possible impact on profit and loss and as such a sensitivity analysis has not been completed. Primary responsibility for identification and control of financial risk rests with the Audit Finance & Compliance Committee under the authority of the Board. The Board reviews and agrees policies for managing each of these risks identified.

2.

Significant accounting judgements, estimates and assumptions

The preparation of the Association's financial statements requires management to make judgements, estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of revenues, expenses, assets and liabilities, and the accompanying disclosures, and the disclosure of contingent liabilities. Uncertainty about these assumptions and estimates could result in outcomes that require a material adjustment to the carrying amount of assets or liabilities affected in future periods. Estimation of useful lives or assets The estimation of the useful lives of assets has been based on historical experience as well as manufacturers' warranties (for plant, equipment and helicopters), lease terms (for leased equipment) and turnover policies (for motor vehicles). In addition, the condition of the assets is assessed at least once per year and considered against the remaining useful life. Adjustments to useful lives are made when considered necessary.

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Surf Life Saving Queensland

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2015 3.

Revenue and expenses

3.1

Revenue 2015 $

2014 $

24,105,450 2,757,609 70,000 131,583 400,000 88,957 1,578,067 1,138,691 30,270,357

19,921,878 2,644,302 345,163 1,347 200,000 66,583 598,406 947,017 24,724,696

2015 $

2014 $

12,575,158

11,815,601

2015 $

2014 $

Depreciation of non-current assets Buildings Plant and equipment Total depreciation of non-current assets

78,074 2,286,585 2,364,659

82,061 1,813,876 1,895,937

Amortisation of non-current assets Leasehold improvements Investment in controlled entity Total amortisation of non-current assets

5,132 250,000 255,132

5,146 250,000 255,146

2,619,791

2,151,083

Rendering of services (sponsors, government and lifesaving) Distributions from Surf Life Saving Foundation and Surf Life Saving Australia Rental of property, plant and equipment General donations Distributions from Cairns Supporters Club Royalty income Net gain on disposal of property, plant and equipment Other revenues

3.2

Employee benefits expense

Wages and salaries

3.3

Depreciation and amortisation expense

Total depreciation and amortisation expense

11

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Surf Life Saving Queensland

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2015 3.

Revenue and expenses (continued)

3.4

Finance income - net

Interest expenses Interest income - other corporations

4.

2015 $

2014 $

66,599 (164,436) (97,837)

95,090 (201,556) (106,466)

2015 $

2014 $

1,156,172 2,964,697 4,120,869

293,299 1,444,613 1,737,912

Cash and cash equivalents

Current Cash at bank Term deposits

For the purpose of the statement of cash flows, cash and cash equivalents comprise the above. 2015 $

2014 $

Cash flow reconciliation Reconciliation of net surplus after tax to net cash flows from operations: Surplus for the year

2,763,231

512,286

Adjustments to reconcile surplus after tax to net cash flows: Depreciation and amortisation of property, plant and equipment Amortisation of investment in controlled entity Gain on disposal of property, plant and equipment Loss on disposal of property, plant and equipment Increase in fair value of investments

2,369,791 250,000 (18,959) 18,959 (353,478)

1,901,083 250,000 (625,586) 27,180 (417,169)

(517,599) (1,246,558) 87,745 (548,453) 2,804,679

(801,753) 19,869 1,186,333 231,366 409,074 2,692,683

Working capital adjustments: (Increase)/decrease in trade and other receivables (Increase)/decrease in other assets Increase/(decrease) in trade and other payables Increase/(decrease) in employee benefit liabilities Increase/(decrease) in revenue in advance Net cash flows from operating activities

12

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Surf Life Saving Queensland

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2015 5.

Trade and other receivables

Current Trade receivables Other receivables Other related parties Related party receivables - Surf Life Saving Clubs

2014 $

2,506,703 914,526 3,421,229

2,347,833 445,141 2,792,974

3,421,229

Total trade and other receivables

5.1

2015 $

10,000 10,000 2,802,974

Trade receivables ageing

At 31 May, the ageing analysis of trade debtors is as follows:

2015 2014

Past due but not impaired

0 - 30 Current terms $

31 - 60 days $

61 - 90 days $

+91 days $

1,362,777 1,625,357

573,000 129,678

417,676 64,724

153,250 528,074

Trade receivables are non-interest bearing and are generally on 30 day terms. Receivables past due but not considered impaired are $1,143,926 (2014: $722,476). Discussions with the counterparties and/or receipts subsequent to reporting sheet date have satisfied management that payment will be received in full.

5.2

Fair value and credit risk

Due to the short-term nature of these receivables, their carrying value is assumed to approximate their fair value. The maximum exposure to credit risk is the fair value of receivables. Collateral is not held as security, nor is it SLSQ's policy to transfer (on-sell) receivables to special purpose entities.

6.

Other financial assets

Current Financial assets at fair value

2015 $

2014 $

6,354,721

5,239,243

13

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Surf Life Saving Queensland

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2015 7.

Receivables

Non-current Receivable from Surf Life Saving Clubs

8.

2015 $

2014 $

51,900

79,300

2015 $

2014 $

10 2,818,575 (559,368) 2,259,217

10 2,750,109 (309,368) 2,440,751

2015 $

2014 $

2,440,751 68,466 (250,000) 2,259,217

2,681,734 9,017 (250,000) 2,440,751

Investment in controlled entities

Non-current Surf Life Saving Services (Queensland) Pty Ltd Investment in the Cairns SLS Supporters Club Inc Accumulated amortisation Total investment in controlled entities

Reconciliation: Surf Life Saving Services (Queensland) Pty Ltd Carrying amount at beginning of period Other Amortisation charge for the year Carrying amount at end of the period

The investment in the Cairns SLS Supporters Club Inc represents monies that have been forwarded and used for the construction of a new supporters club. The investment will be realised through distributions to SLSQ from surplus operating cash-flows from the Carins SLS Supporters Club Inc. The investment is amortised to match the distributions received from the Cairns SLS Supporters Club Inc. The amortisation period will not exceed the original lease term of the supporters club which is 10 years.

9.

Property, plant and equipment 2015 $

2014 $

Land and buildings At cost Accumulated depreciation Net carrying amount

3,708,639 (1,154,436) 2,554,203

8,111,333 (1,107,031) 7,004,302

Leasehold improvements At cost Accumulated depreciation Net carrying amount

144,363 (78,680) 65,683

200,014 (80,621) 119,393

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Surf Life Saving Queensland

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2015 9.

Property, plant and equipment (continued)

Plant and equipment At cost Accumulated depreciation Net carrying amount

Work in progress At cost Net carrying amount

Total property, plant and equipment At cost Accumulated depreciation Net carrying amount

9.1

2015 $

2014 $

19,024,760 (7,310,504) 11,714,256

15,074,224 (6,229,821) 8,844,403

-

22,877,762 (8,543,620) 14,334,142

2,826,113 2,826,113

26,211,684 (7,417,473) 18,794,211

Valuation and impairment

An independent valuation of the Helicopter fleet for fair value purposes was undertaken on 21 April 2015. In their opinion, the fair value of the Helicopter fleet is $12,062,000. The Directors believe that there is no impairment adjustment to plant and equipment at 31 May 2015.

10.

Trade and other payables

Current Trade payables Other payables Accrued expenses

2015 $

2014 $

880,126 351,635 260,573 1,492,334

1,748,706 755,091 473,522 2,977,319

10.1 Fair value Due to the short-term nature of these payables, their carrying value is assumed to approximate their fair value.

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Surf Life Saving Queensland

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2015 11.

Employee benefit liabilities 2015 $

2014 $

Current Employee entitlements

1,334,092

1,095,665

Non-current Employee entitlements

412,737

324,992

2015 $

2014 $

2,000,000 2,000,000

2,000,000 (1,750,000) 250,000

12.

Interest-bearing loans and borrowings

Financing facilities available Facilities drawn down Facilities unused

13.

Commitments

13.1 Capital commitments There are no capital commitments at 31 May 2015 (2014: $Nil).

13.2 Operating lease commitments Future minimum rentals receivable under non-cancellable operating leases as at 31 May are as follows: 2015 $ Within one year After one year but not more than five years

14.

47,308 406,218 453,526

2014 $ -

Contingent liabilities

There are no contingent liabilities as at the reporting date which would have a material effect on the Association's financial statements as at 31 May 2015 (2014: $Nil).

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Surf Life Saving Queensland

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2015 15.

Controlled entities and associated entities

During the reporting period, Surf Life Saving Saving Services (Queensland) Pty Ltd, a wholly owned controlled corporation, remained dormant. It has no significant assets or liabilities. The Cairns Surf Life Saving Supporters Club (SLSSC) is considered a controlled entity by way of control of the Board by representation of SLSQ Board Members and the ability to control the day to day finance, and operations of the Cairns SLSSC. Cairns SLSSC year end is 30 June and it prepares audited financial statements as of this date. The unaudited net assets of the Cairns SLSSC as at 31 May 2015 were $116,591 (2014: $264,060).

16.

Events after the reporting period

Subsequent to year end, the Board of SLSQ resolved to allocate $5,000 to each Surf Club in Queensland totalling $290,000 payable in the 2015-2016 financial year. These funds will not be required to be acquitted and must be used for lifesaving purposes. Other than the item mentioned above, there have been no significant events occurring after the balance date which may affect either the Association's operations or results of those operations or the Association's state of affairs.

17.

Economic dependency

SLSQ is dependent on state funds from the Department of Community Safety. A yearly contribution of $3,992,760 (2014: $3,992,760) is committed until 30 June 2015 by the Department.

18.

Interest in the Surf Life Saving Rescue Fund trust

SLSQ invests both withdrawable and perpetuity funds in the Surf Life Saving Rescue Fund Trust which is administered by Surf Life Saving Foundation as the corporate Trustee. Withdrawable funds are included in SLSQ's statement of financial position at Note 6. Earnings and movements in the fair value of withdrawable investments are included in the statement of other comprehensive income. Perpetuity Funds are held for the benefit of SLSQ and can only be distributed at the sole discretion of the Trustee. Accordingly these funds are not recognised in the statement of financial position. At 31 May 2015, SLSQ had $8,702,157 (2014: $8,221,430) held in perpetuity funds in the Trust.

19.

Auditors' remuneration

The auditor of Surf Life Saving Queensland is Ernst & Young.

Amounts received or due and receivable by Ernst & Young for: An audit of the financial report of the entity Other services in relation to the entity - Non-assurance services

2015 $

2014 $

76,000

76,000

5,000 81,000

5,000 81,000

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SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT 14–15

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Ernst & Young 111 Eagle Street Brisbane QLD 4000 Australia GPO Box 7878 Brisbane QLD 4001

Tel: + 61 7 3011 3333 Fax: +61 7 3011 3100 ey.com/au

Ernst & Young 111 Eagle Street Brisbane QLD 4000 Australia GPO Box 7878 Brisbane QLD 4001

Tel: + 61 7 3011 3333 Fax: +61 7 3011 3100 ey.com/au

Independent auditor’s report to the members of Surf Life Saving Queensland We have audited the accompanying special financial report SurfLife Life Saving Queensland Independent auditor’s report topurpose the members of of Surf Saving (the Association), which comprises the statement of financial position as at 31 May 2015, and the Queensland statement of comprehensive income, statement of changes in association’s funds and statement of cashhave flows for thethe year ended on that date, a summary of significant accounting policies, other We audited accompanying special purpose financial report of Surf Life Saving Queensland explanatory notes and the directors’ declaration. (the Association), which comprises the statement of financial position as at 31 May 2015, and the statement of comprehensive income, statement of changes in association’s funds and statement of Directors’ Responsibility the date, Financial Report cash flows for the year ended for on that a summary of significant accounting policies, other explanatory notes and the directors’ declaration. The directors of the Association are responsible for the preparation of the financial report and have determined that the basis of preparation described in Note 1 to the financial report is appropriate to Directors’ Responsibility for the Financial Report meet the financial reporting requirements of the Associations Incorporations Act 1981 [QLD] and the Association’s constitution and is appropriate to meet the needs of the Thereport directors also The directors of the Association are responsible for the preparation of members. the financial and are have responsible for such controls as they determine are necessary to enable the preparation of the determined that the basis of preparation described in Note 1 to the financial report is appropriate to financial that is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraudAct or error. meet the report financial reporting requirements of the Associations Incorporations 1981 [QLD] and the Association’s constitution and is appropriate to meet the needs of the members. The directors are also Auditor’s responsibleResponsibility for such controls as they determine are necessary to enable the preparation of the financial report that is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the financial report based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Those standards require that we comply Auditor’s Responsibility with relevant ethical requirements relating to audit engagements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether free from material Our responsibility is to express an opinion onthe thefinancial financialreport reportisbased on our audit. misstatement. We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Those standards require that we comply An audit involves performing procedures toto obtain evidence and about theand amounts and disclosures with relevant ethical requirements relating auditaudit engagements plan perform the audit to in the financial report. The procedures selected depend on our judgment, including the assessment obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report is free from material misstatement. of the risks of material misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error. In making those riskinvolves assessments, we consider internal controls relevant to the entity’s preparation fair An audit performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts andand disclosures presentation of report. the financial report in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the of in the financial The procedures selected depend on our judgment, including the assessment circumstances, but not for the purpose offinancial expressing an opinion ondue the to effectiveness of the entity’s the risks of material misstatement of the report, whether fraud or error. In making internal controls. An audit includes evaluating therelevant appropriateness of accounting policies used those risk assessments, we also consider internal controls to the entity’s preparation and fair and the reasonableness of accounting estimates madeaudit by the directors, that as well evaluatinginthe presentation of the financial report in order to design procedures areas appropriate the overall presentation of the financial report. circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal controls. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used We believe that the auditofevidence we have obtained is by sufficient and appropriate provide athe basis for and the reasonableness accounting estimates made the directors, as well as to evaluating our audit opinion. of the financial report. overall presentation

Independence We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion. In conducting our audit we have complied with the independence requirements of the Australian professional accounting bodies.

Independence

In conducting our audit we have complied with the independence requirements of the Australian professional accounting bodies.

A member firm of Ernst & Young Global Limited Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation

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SLSQ AN N Uof A LErnst R E P&O Young R T 1 4 Global – 1 5 Limited A member firm Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation


Opinion In our opinion the financial report presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Surf Life Saving Queensland as of 31 May 2015 and its financial performance and its cash flows for the Opinion year then ended in accordance with the accounting policies described in Note 1 to the financial statements. In our opinion the financial report presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Surf Life Saving Queensland as of 31 May 2015 and its financial performance and its cash flows for the Basis of Accounting and Restriction on Distribution year then ended in accordance with the accounting policies described in Note 1 to the financial statements. Without modifying our opinion, we draw attention to Note 1 to the financial report which describes the basis of accounting. The financial report is prepared to assist Surf Life Saving Queensland to meet the Basis of Accounting and Restriction on Distribution requirements of the Associations Incorporations Act 1981 [QLD] and the Association’s constitution. As a result the financial report may not be suitable for purpose. Our report intended solely the for Without modifying our opinion, we draw attention toanother Note 1 to the financial reportiswhich describes Surf Life Saving Queensland and the Department of Community Safety in Queensland and should not basis of accounting. The financial report is prepared to assist Surf Life Saving Queensland to meet the be distributed of tothe parties other than Surf Life Saving or the ofconstitution. Community As requirements Associations Incorporations ActQueensland 1981 [QLD] and theDepartment Association’s Safety in Queensland. a result the financial report may not be suitable for another purpose. Our report is intended solely for Surf Life Saving Queensland and the Department of Community Safety in Queensland and should not be distributed to parties other than Surf Life Saving Queensland or the Department of Community Safety in Queensland.

Ernst & Young Brisbane 5 August 2015 Ernst & Young Brisbane 5 August 2015

A member firm of Ernst & Young Global Limited Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation

A member firm of Ernst & Young Global Limited Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation

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Surf Life Saving Queensland Surf Rescue House, 18 Manning Street, South Brisbane QLD 4101 PO Box 3747, South Brisbane QLD 4101 +61 7 3846 8000 • lifesaving.com.au

Surf Life Saving Queensland Annual Report 2014-15  

The past 12 months has been another year of significant accomplishments for SLSQ as the organisation continued to take great strides forward...

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