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A N N U A L R E P O R T 2 016/17 S U R F L I F E S AV I N G Q U E E N S L A N D


SLSQ SNAPSHOT


CONTENTS Our Commitment to Saving Lives

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Education 39

Patron’s and Premier’s Message

3  

Fundraising 43

Board Biography

4 

Corporate Governance

46

Patrons and Honours

5

Human Resources

47

President’s and CEO’s Report

6

Media and Public Affairs

48

Lifesaving Services

9

Marketing and Partnerships

49

Australian Lifeguard Service Queensland

17

Our Partners

51

Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service

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SLSQ Committees and Panels

52

Community Awareness

25

SLSQ Life Members

53

Membership Development

29

Award Winners

54

Surf Sports

33

Statistics, Sporting Results and Financials

59

Surf Life Saving Clubs

Operations Support

North Queensland Branch

Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service Rescue water craft service Jet rescue boat service Offshore rescue boat service SurfCom communications centres Duty Officer program Coastalwatch cameras Brisbane Lifesaving Service Remote coastal beacons Emergency response groups Gold Coast dawn patrol

Port Douglas Ellis Beach Cairns Etty Bay Mission Beach North Barrier Branch Forrest Beach Arcadian Townsville Picnic Bay Ayr Bowen Eimeo Mackay Sarina Wide Bay Capricorn Branch Yeppoon Emu Park Tannum Sands Agnes Water Moore Park Bundaberg Elliott Heads Hervey Bay Sunshine Coast Branch Rainbow Beach Noosa Heads Sunshine Beach Coolum Beach Marcoola Mudjimba

Maroochydore Alexandra Headland Mooloolaba Kawana Waters Dicky Beach Metropolitan Caloundra Bribie Island Redcliffe Peninsula South Coast Branch Point Lookout Coochiemudlo Island Southport Surfers Paradise Northcliffe Broadbeach Kurrawa Mermaid Beach Nobbys Beach Miami Beach North Burleigh Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park

Australian Lifeguard Service Servicing: Brisbane City Council Bundaberg Regional Council Burdekin Shire Council Cairns Regional Council Cassowary Coast Regional Council City of Gold Coast City Parkland Services Pty Ltd The Department of National Parks, Sport, and Racing

Point Danger Branch Tallebudgera Pacific Palm Beach Currumbin Tugun Bilinga North Kirra Kirra Coolangatta Tweed Heads & Coolangatta Rainbow Bay

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

Douglas Shire Council Fraser Coast Regional Council Gladstone Regional Council Gympie Regional Council Hinchinbrook Shire Council Livingstone Shire Council Mackay Regional Council Moreton Bay Regional Council Noosa Shire Council Redland City Council Sunshine Coast Council Townsville Regional Council

Registered office of SLSQ – “Surf Rescue House” 18 Manning Street, South Brisbane, Queensland 4101

Notice of SLSQ Annual General Meeting The 2016/17 Annual Report will be presented at the 87th Annual General Meeting of Surf Life Saving Queensland, to be held at Surf Rescue House in South Brisbane on Friday 25 August 2017 at 6pm.

Surf Life Saving Queensland 18 Manning Street, South Brisbane QLD 4101  P: 07 3846 8000  F: 07 3846 8008 E: slsq@lifesaving.com.au  W: lifesaving.com.au

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OUR COMMITMENT TO SAVING LIVES Who we are

Unfortunately, despite significant advances in technology, techniques and knowledge, people still drown on Queensland beaches.

Surf Life Saving Queensland (SLSQ) is the state’s leading authority on aquatic safety and surf rescue, and one of the largest volunteer-based community service organisations in Australia.

SLSQ aims to set the benchmark in lifesaving service provision, rescue practices, emergency care and training and education as we strive to make our stunning coastline safer for everyone who uses it. A commitment to continuous improvement across all areas of our operation ensures we are highly regarded across Australia and around the world.

From humble beginnings, when the first official rescue was recorded on a Queensland beach in 1909, SLSQ has developed into a groundbreaking and highly innovative organisation encompassing 58 clubs and more than 31,000 men, women and children across the state.

We are leaders in our industry, and are committed to maintaining this stance to ensure we are equipped for the future.

Since its inception, SLSQ’s volunteer surf lifesavers and lifeguards have directly saved the lives of more than 130,000 people through in-water rescues, and educated in excess of 10 million people about surf and aquatic safety through targeted and grassroots community awareness programs.

Our vision Zero preventable deaths in Queensland public waters.

SLSQ is directly affiliated with, and is part of, Surf Life Saving Australia (SLSA) and the International Life Saving Federation (ILS).

Our mission

As a not-for-profit organisation, SLSQ relies heavily on community support and donations to continue our vital work both on and off Queensland’s beaches. It is the generous support of Queenslanders that enables us to help keep beachgoers safe.

SLSQ will operate as a proactive and effective peak body, leading the way in lifesaving service provision, education, sport, beach safety advocacy and community leadership.

Our strategic imperatives

Why we exist

Committed To Our Community: To advocate water safety management and continue to enhance the reputation of SLSQ as the peak body.

SLSQ is built on a fundamental principle: to save lives. Our organisation encompasses several diverse arms – lifesaving and lifeguarding services, community education, membership services, surf sports, fundraising, commercial training and member training – all supporting one overarching purpose.

Connected To Our People: To recruit and retain the best people through support and development of their skills and knowledge. Effective In Our Business: To plan and execute our day-to-day operations to an outstanding level of efficiency, with continuous improvement always in mind.

Queensland’s mainland coastline is extensive, stretching more than 6,000 kilometres from the Gulf of Carpentaria in the west and Cape York in the north to Point Danger in the southeast. With more than 700 accessible beaches along this expanse, the state boasts some of the world’s most popular sandy stretches, attracting approximately 20 million visitors to our beaches every year.

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

Sustainable For Our Future: To ensure SLSQ is equipped for the future through continuous growth, strong financial management and sound governance.

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PATRON’S MESSAGE

His Excellency

Paul de Jersey AC Governor of Queensland It gives me great pleasure as Governor and Patron of Surf Life Saving Queensland (SLSQ) to congratulate the Board, partners, staff, and volunteers of this wonderfully uplifting Queensland institution on another successful year.

SLSQ were kept busy off the beach as well, with personnel lending a hand in the lead up to, and in the aftermath of, Tropical Cyclone Debbie, and the continuation of beneficial outreach and community education programs.

Few places in the world can claim the beauty of our Queensland beaches, and I express enormous gratitude to the volunteer surf lifesavers and professional lifeguards whose tireless work contributes every day to keeping our beaches safe.

It would be truly difficult to imagine the beach and community landscape without SLSQ. Queenslanders the length and breadth of the state, and our visitors, owe their thanks – and sometimes their lives – to the brave men and women of SLSQ.

‘Swim between the flags’ is a familiar mantra on our Queensland beaches, thanks to the continuing role that SLSQ plays in the education of Aussies and visitors alike. This summer, that mantra, alongside targeted initiatives to eliminate drownings, kept over eight million beachgoers safe.

Governor of Queensland

His Excellency the Honourable Paul de Jersey AC

PREMIER’S MESSAGE

Annastacia Palaszczuk MP Premier of Queensland Minister for the Arts For generations, our surf lifesavers have helped keep Queenslanders safe as we enjoy our state’s beautiful beaches. We all recognise the iconic red and yellow flags and the role that surf lifesavers play in our communities up and down the coast – but Surf Life Saving Queensland’s (SLSQ) efforts also extend beyond the coastline.

SLSQ’s generous and selfless volunteers are at the heart of this community organisation. In performing 648,479 preventative actions and saving 2,561 beachgoers in our state in 2016/17, SLSQ has clearly demonstrated the benefits it provides to both Queenslanders and holidaymakers alike.

This year, SLSQ’s lifeguards and surf lifesavers assisted the people and communities in need during Tropical Cyclone Debbie, and in the immediate aftermath. They provided their valuable skills, experience and resources to help Queenslanders affected by this natural disaster. The incredible work performed by SLSQ in the wake of Cyclone Debbie is testament to the commitment of our surf lifesavers to helping Queenslanders – and saving lives.

It is wonderful that members of SLSQ will also be involved with a range of initiatives to support the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games, as we welcome visitors, athletes and officials from 70 nations and territories to Queensland. On behalf of all Queenslanders, I thank SLSQ and its volunteers for their incredible efforts on our beaches and in our communities during the past summer and our state’s recent natural disaster

In recognition of the important services provided by our surf lifesavers and lifeguards, my Government is providing SLSQ with $17 million over three years to continue its great work ensuring the public’s safety on Queensland’s beaches.

Annastacia Palaszczuk MP

SLSQ is also part my Government’s new Emergency Volunteers Advisory Forum, which aims to support and strengthen our state’s emergency services volunteer network. With over 31,000 members,

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Premier of Queensland Minister for the Arts

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BOARD BIOGRAPHY Michael White

Mark Fife OAM President

Director

Since joining Surf Life Saving in 1975, Mark has become the epitome of the iconic Aussie surf lifesaver. Mark is a former Club and Branch President, was the Australian Director of Lifesaving for five years, and is the only person to have been recognised as both the Australian Surf Lifesaver of the Year and Australian Volunteer of the Year. He is a Life Member of Broadbeach SLSC, South Coast Branch, SLSQ, and SLSA. In 2013 he received an OAM for his contributions to surf lifesaving and was inducted into SLSA’s National Hall of Fame in 2015.

Michael has been involved in the surf lifesaving movement for more than 20 years. He is a former Director and Secretary of Alexandra Headland SLSC, and a former member of SLSQ’s Judiciary. He has been a patrol captain for 10 years and a helicopter rescue crewman for six years. An accomplished athlete, Michael has competed at the international level and has won 24 medals on the national stage. He is a barrister at the Sunshine Coast Barristers Chambers, and has also acted as an Independent Director to a number of community association boards.

Laurie Murphy

Darren Woodward

Deputy President

Director

Laurie joined the movement as a nipper in 1971 before completing his Bronze Medallion at Mooloolaba in 1974. While most of his seasons have been spent at Maroochydore SLSC, he has been a member of a numerous clubs in Queensland and New South Wales, holding a variety of positions including Secretary, Captain, and Boat Captain. Outside of Surf Life Saving, he is the chief executive officer of a large privatelyowned group of companies operating across Australia and internationally.

Darren joined Point Lookout SLSC as a nipper in 1974 and is currently a Long Service Member. He has previously held a number of club roles including President, Deputy President, and Vice Captain. He joined the South Coast Branch Board of Examiners in 1987 and has since held the positions of Director and Deputy Director of Junior Activities. Darren returned to the SLSQ Board of Directors in August 2016, having previously served on the Board from 2010-2014. Away from Surf Life Saving, Darren has held senior management positions with a number of large organisations operating extensively within the mining and resource industries.

Darrin Bragg Director of Finance

Warwick Agnew

Darrin joined the surf lifesaving movement in 1974 as a nipper at Mackay SLSC. He is currently President of Townsville Picnic Bay SLSC. Darrin chairs SLSQ’s Audit, Finance and Compliance Committee, and is President of the Cairns SLSC Supporters Club. He is a Life Member of North Barrier Branch and is principal of his own accounting and taxation practice.

Independent Director Warwick is currently a Deputy Under Treasurer at Queensland Treasury. Warwick has commercial experience in both public and private sectors. Over the past 20 years, his experience includes senior leadership positions in Queensland Treasury (including Queensland Treasury Corporation), Macquarie Capital, and Transfield Services. Warwick has a background in surf lifesaving and recently returned as a nipper parent at Metropolitan Caloundra SLSC in 2015.

Kaitlyn Akers Director Kaitlyn joined Mudjimba SLSC in 2001 and has since held a number of senior roles within Surf Life Saving at State, Branch, and Club level. In 2010/11 she was named the Queensland Surf Lifesaver of the Year. Off the beach, Kaitlyn is contracted to leading people strategy and operations for a private Allied Health organisation nationally and managing a project on cultural shift for an NDS services provider. She holds an Executive MBA, is a Fellow of AIM, and has completed a postgraduate certificate in Strategic Talent Management from Stanford University along with Strategic Innovation and Sustainability Reporting at Harvard Business School.

Christina Sutherland Independent Director Christina is a senior lawyer and was admitted as a solicitor of the Supreme Court of Queensland in 1989. Christina is also a director of Powerlink Queensland and is Chairperson of Powerlink’s Audit and Compliance Committee. Through her legal knowledge and practical experience, Christina provides advice and guidance on issues relating to business, employment, workplace health and safety and corporate governance.

Tanya O’Shea Director Tanya has been a member of Bundaberg SLSC since 2005, initially joining as a nipper parent before being elected as the Junior Activities Chair. As the CEO of IMPACT Community Services, she balances a strong academic and practical background in business management and mental health, applying sound business principles to the governance and strategic vision of an organisation that delivers a diverse and innovative suite of programs to some of the most vulnerable within the community. Tanya is continually seeking opportunities to grow, diversify, innovate, and improve the sustainability and financial viability of ‘for purpose’ organisations.

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PATRONS AND HONOURS Vale

Life Members 2016/17*

SLSQ offers its deepest respect and sympathy to the friends and family of members who have passed away this year. In particular, condolences are extended to the loved ones of our Life Members who passed away during the 2016/17 season, Robert (Bob) Holden, Ron Tallon OAM, and Ron Davidson OAM.

Marcia Fife Peter Lucas Andrew McNeilly Jeff Paskin * A full list of SLSQ’s Life Members can be found on page 53.

Condolences are also extended to the members of Surf Life Saving who have suffered bereavements in their families.

Patron

Australian Honours

His Excellency the Governor of Queensland, the Honourable Paul de Jersey AC.

Awarded Queen’s Birthday 2016:

Vice Patrons

Mr Noel Christmas AM – Officially made a Member (AM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia for significant service to the real estate and property development sectors, and to tourism, local government, youth and sporting groups. This includes extensive service and contribution to Surfers Paradise SLSC.

Hon Curtis Pitt MP Hon Cameron Dick MP Hon Shannon Fentiman MP Hon Kate Jones MP

Mrs Tina Patane OAM – Awarded a Medal (OAM) in the General Division for service to both performing arts and to the community, including significant contributions to Etty Bay SLSC and Surf Life Saving North Queensland.

Hon Dr Steven Miles MP

Mr Ashley Robinson OAM – Awarded a Medal (OAM) in the General Division for service to the community of the Sunshine Coast, including significant contributions to Alexandra Headland SLSC.

Mayor Allan Sutherland

Mr Eric Cullen OAM – Awarded a Medal (OAM) in the General Division for service to both swimming and to the community, including significant contributions to Moore Park SLSC.

Mayor Jenny Hill

Awarded Australia Day 2017:

Mayor Mick Curran

Mr Glynn Topfer OAM - Awarded a Medal (OAM) in the General Division for service to surf lifesaving.

Mayor Tom Tate

Commissioner Ian Stewart Commissioner Katarina Carroll Lord Mayor Graham Quirk Mayor Bill Ludwig Mayor Bob Manning OAM Mayor Karen Williams Mayor Mark Jamieson

Mr Daniel Gschwind Mr Stephen Maitland OAM RFD

Mr David McLean ESM – Awarded the Emergency Services Medal (ESM) for service as a volunteer surf lifesaver and long-term commitment to coastal and public safety.

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

Mr Mick Power AM Mr Jim McGowan AM

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PRESIDENT’S REPORT

Mark Fife OAM President

It has been an honour to have served as President of Surf Life Saving Queensland (SLSQ) for the past 12 months. I would like to extend my sincere thanks and appreciation to the SLSQ Board, Council, and all staff members for their support and hard work throughout the season. It has been a pleasure to have worked alongside such a dedicated group of people, all striving collectively towards the common goal of saving lives.

As President, it is a genuine privilege to represent SLSQ’s diverse membership base, and I can assure them that the Board will continue to work hard to progress the organisation for the benefit of all. Importantly, there have been a number of positive developments across the past 12 months, with the introduction of LIMSOC technology into patrols and the transition across to the State Operations Communications Centre high amongst them. In addition, we have implemented programs to develop leaders within the lifesaving movement while achieving positive state-wide membership growth.

I also wish to acknowledge the tireless work of our volunteer members who continue to serve our organisation so proudly. Whether it’s raising the red and yellow flags as a patrolling surf lifesaver, or helping their clubs behind the scenes, every individual within SLSQ has a vital and valued role to play when it comes to protecting Queensland’s coastline. Our members are the lifeblood of our organisation and, based on what I’ve seen this season alone, we are certainly in safe hands moving forward.

Meanwhile, the Board has continued to investigate the feasibility of developing a Lifesaving Centre of Excellence in Cleveland. If this project comes to fruition, it would represent a significant and exciting step forward for SLSQ, providing our members with state-of-the-art training facilities and a dedicated search and rescue hub in the state’s south east.

Earlier this year I had the pleasure of presenting a Lifesaving Excellence Award to Jayke Menefy, a young nipper from Mermaid Beach. On Easter Sunday Jayke and his family were driving home from a family trip to the Sunshine Coast when they noticed a man caught in a rip at an unpatrolled stretch of beach, desperately struggling to keep his head above water. At just 12 years of age, Jayke immediately sprung into action, grabbing a surf board and navigating the tricky conditions to paddle out and stabilise the patient before further help could arrive. It was an incredibly brave effort from the young lifesaver, and one which allowed a father to return home safely to his wife and two children. Jayke’s efforts were further recognised when he was honoured with Surf Life Saving Australia’s award for the National Rescue of the Month.

It has certainly been a historic year for SLSQ and the future looks brighter than ever. On a personal note, I would like to recognise the efforts of Chris Donnelly and Phil Chipman who will be stepping down as the Presidents of the Wide Bay Capricorn and South Coast Branches respectively. Their contributions to surf lifesaving within these roles have been nothing short of outstanding, and I thank them both for their commitment and efforts.

As remarkable as Jayke’s story is, it’s also worth nothing that it is just one of almost 3,000 rescues successfully carried out by our highlyskilled surf lifesavers and lifeguards across the state this year alone. The enormity of this figure should never be underestimated. These are mothers, fathers, daughters, sons, husbands, and wives who are all still alive today thanks to the outstanding efforts of the brave men and women who raise the flags and patrol our beaches each year.

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

Mark Fife OAM President - Surf Life Saving Queensland

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CEO’S REPORT

John Brennan OAM Chief Executive Officer

Effective in our business

On behalf of Surf Life Saving Queensland (SLSQ) I am proud to bring you our Annual Report for 2016/17.

We continue to implement innovative strategies to enhance our operations at all levels. The past season saw a significant change in the way SLSQ collects coastal data, with the launch of the Lifesaving Incident Management System and Operational Console. This sees patrols equipped with smart device technology to log rescues, incidents, and real-time beach conditions into a central database, providing them with unprecedented access to a live stream of information from all patrolled beaches.

It has been another historic year for SLSQ as we continued to experience strong growth, both on and off the beach. It is important to acknowledge the collective achievements of our organisation during the past season have only been made possible through the hard work of many people working tirelessly behind the scenes. With that in mind, I wish to formally thank SLSQ president Mark Fife OAM and the Board of Directors, along with our staff members for their outstanding contributions. I also wish to thank our volunteer members who have proven time and time again to be lifesavers in every sense of the word.

Meanwhile, SLSQ’s professional lifeguard arm, the Australian Lifeguard Service Queensland, continues to solidify its reputation as a global leader. This was evident in 2016/17 when the service secured contract extensions with South Bank Parklands, and Sunshine Coast and Noosa Regional Councils. Meanwhile, SLSQ’s lifeguards also celebrated 25 years of partnership with Burdekin Shire, Livingstone Shire, Gladstone Regional, and Bundaberg Regional Councils.

SLSQ’s overarching vision is supported through the four strategic imperatives outlined below.

Committed to our community: The surf lifesaving movement in Queensland can be traced all the way back to 1909, when the first official rescue was successfully performed at Greenmount Beach. A lot has changed in the years since, but one thing that remains the same is our unwavering commitment to saving lives.

The past season also saw SLSQ celebrate two significant milestones, with the Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service and Surf Communications Centre both notching 40 years of saving lives. As an organisation, we owe a great deal of gratitude to the founding members of each service, along with the volunteers and staff whose efforts have taken them from strength to strength in the years since.

This was reflected by the actions of our men and women on patrol this season. In 2016/17, SLSQ’s volunteer surf lifesavers and professional lifeguards combined to perform 648,479 preventative actions, treat 74,370 first aid patients, and save the lives of 2,561 people through in-water rescues. Even a quick glance at these figures highlights the importance of SLSQ’s lifesavers and lifeguards to the Queensland community and its expanding tourism market.

Sustainable for our future Our overarching vision as an organisation is ‘Zero preventable deaths in Queensland public waters’ and, importantly, that continues to form the crux of every decision made, both on and off the beach. While there’s no doubt this is an ambitious vision, I am confident that the programs and structures we have established in SLSQ’s 2020 Strategic Plan have positioned us well to meet any challenges head on as we move into the next season and beyond.

Moving forward, we will continue to look for opportunities to build upon our service delivery in a bid to increase protection for Queensland communities and, ultimately, eliminate drowning deaths.

Connected to our people:

In 2016/17 we continued to take innovative and progressive steps towards increasing our reach along Queensland’s coastline and boosting safety at all public waterways across the state. This was made possible thanks to vital support from the Queensland Government and a raft of passionate corporate supporters. In the past 12 months we continued to strengthen these relationships, which will no doubt deliver significant flow-on benefits to SLSQ and all Queenslanders.

During the past 12 months, SLSQ continued to look for opportunities to engage with our volunteers and staff members, while providing them with tangible development and progression opportunities. In 2016, hundreds of surf lifesavers and lifeguards attended SLSQ’s State Conference on the Sunshine Coast. Held across three days, the Conference incorporated all key business and operational areas, providing a unique opportunity for our members to upskill.

It is an exciting time for SLSQ as we move into the future, and I look forward to working with you once again to save lives and reduce drowning deaths across all waters in Queensland.

In the sporting arena, SLSQ continued to build upon its championship events which attracted strong competitor numbers. Time and time again our athletes have proven themselves to be amongst the best in Australia and across the world. We will continue to look for opportunities to enhance our sporting programs for the benefit of all members. Our efforts to engage with members continue to pay dividends, most notably when it comes to recruitment and retention. In 2016/17 SLSQ recorded a healthy 3.1 per cent growth in membership. This is a wonderful result and a reflection of the hard work being done behind the scenes to provide our members with a diverse range of leadership and development programs.

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

John Brennan OAM Chief Executive Officer - Surf Life Saving Queensland

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VOLUNTEER PATROL HOURS

24,751 FIRST AID TREATMENTS BY VOLUNTEER SURF LIFESAVERS

1,125

RESCUES BY VOLUNTEER SURF LIFESAVERS

L IF E S AV ING SERVI CES

343,084


LIFESAVING OPERATIONS The past season proved to be one of extremes for Queensland’s surf lifesavers and lifeguards, with sustained and unseasonably warm temperatures attracting record crowds of beachgoers. The 12 months from 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017 saw more than 20.7 million people visit Queensland’s beaches, representing an increase of 11.6 per cent when compared to the year before. When coupled with unpredictable surf conditions, this led to numerous instances where lifesavers and lifeguards combined to rescue more than 50 people in a day. In addition, Queensland’s ‘red and yellow army’ were also required to contend with periods of heavy swell, king tides and, at times, challenging coastal conditions. In March 2017, Tropical Cyclone Debbie created dangerous surf across much of the state, with lifesavers and lifeguards working directly with councils and key stakeholders to close beaches and protect communities in and around the coastline. A number of factors including, amongst others, sustained northerly winds and warm water temperatures also saw a significant influx in the number of bluebottles across the state this season. In total, surf lifesavers and lifeguards treated 57,769 minor stings in 2016/17, up from just 11,645 in 2015/16. Despite these challenges, the efforts of SLSQ’s lifesavers and lifeguards continued to shine through. Collectively they performed 648,479 preventative actions, treated 74,370 first aid patients, and directly saved the lives of 2,561 people via in-water rescues. Importantly, this helped ensure there were zero drownings recorded on Queensland beaches during the peak holiday months of December and January, and just two drownings in 2016/17. While this is a significant drop when compared to 11 drownings the year before, it is still two too many as far as SLSQ is concerned. The past season saw a number of regional and state-wide initiatives introduced across the season as SLSQ worked towards achieving its vision of ‘Zero preventable deaths in Queensland public waters.’ Importantly, moving forward, the organisation will continue to implement proactive and positive strategies to improve operations and widen our reach in a bid to break the drowning cycle along Queensland’s coastline and in all waterways across the state.

INCIDENT ANALYSIS In total there were two beach-related coastal drowning deaths recorded across Queensland in 2016/17. This represents a significant decrease when compared to 11 drownings in 2015/16, and is also the lowest number of annual drownings recorded on Queensland beaches since SLSQ began tracking coastal statistics. There was one drowning recorded on Green Island in North Queensland, involving a male Asian tourist, and one drowning was recorded at Currimundi on the Sunshine Coast involving an elderly Australian male.

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BLACKSPOT INITIATIVES

Gold Coast – Marina Mirage to Southport Spit • Increased roving patrols were conducted by Waverunners 5 and 6 to monitor beach usage and protect swimmers;

Each year SLSQ reviews data related to coastal drownings, rescues, and key incidents along Queensland’s coastline to identify particular ‘high-risk’ coastal blackspots. In September 2016 SLSQ identified six locations as coastal blackspots for 2016/17, including two on the Gold Coast, two on the Sunshine Coast, one in North Queensland, and one in Wide Bay Capricorn. The following targeted initiatives were introduced to improve safety at these locations:

Gold Coast – Surfers Paradise Tower 33-35 • Night vision camera technology was installed and rolled out at Surfers Paradise;

• Remote and proactive surveillance was conducted via SLSQ’s coastal camera; • Jet ski patrol hours were extended during peak periods; and • SLSQ provided key tourism operators with surf safety information and collateral to help educate and protect potential beachgoers.

Sunshine Coast – Discovery Beach to Point Arkwright

• Dusk patrols at Surfers Paradise were reintroduced and extended during the Christmas and Easter holiday periods, with lifesavers positioned on-site through to 10:30pm on weekends and public holidays. This service directly saved the lives of two swimmers, rescued after dark by lifesavers;

• The lifeguard service at Discovery Beach was increased to 365 days a year; • Roving jet ski patrols were conducted during the peak September, Christmas, and Easter holiday periods to proactively protect beachgoers; and

• Local airlines, hotels, and tourism agencies were provided with surf safety information and collateral in a bid to educate potential beachgoers; • Surf safety posters and coasters were provided to pubs, clubs, and cafes to help educate potential beachgoers about the dangers of drinking and swimming; and

• SLSQ continued its welcoming service at Sunshine Coast Airport during peak periods to greet inbound travellers and provide them with vital surf safety information.

Wide Bay Capricorn – Fraser Island (ocean side)

• Surf safety clinics were rolled out during peak periods at key locations.

• SLSQ conducted a signage audit on the western side of Fraser Island and at the Rainbow Beach barge site; • Dedicated surf safety collateral was developed and, moving forward, will be included with vehicle and camping permits; and

North Queensland – Green Island • Following an aquatic safety audit of Green Island, Australian Standard safety signage was implemented at 23 sites to help beachgoers identify potential hazards;

• SLSQ’s Westpac Helicopter conducted a number of surveillance patrols during the peak holiday periods to gather further information on visitation and beach usage.

• SLSQ met biannually with key stakeholders with regards to incidents and regulations on Green Island;

Sunshine Coast – Noosa River to Rainbow Beach Tower

• SLSQ attended a Queensland Government-led roundtable discussion on snorkeller safety alongside other key industry representatives; • Seabob technology was introduced to assist lifeguards with search, rescue, and patrol activities; • SLSQ continued its welcoming service at Cairns Airport during peak periods to greet inbound travellers and provide them with vital surf safety information; and • Lifeguards continued to trial the use of the multilingual SurfSpeak booklet to help communicate with international tourists.

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• SLSQ’s Westpac Helicopter conducted a number of surveillance patrols during the Christmas and New Year holiday periods to gather further information on visitation and beach usage; and • Dedicated surf safety collateral was developed and distributed to educate beachgoers and campers, providing them with surf safety information and warning them about the dangers of rips.

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I got into surf lifesaving after my daughter joined Nippers when she was eight. For the first year I mainly watched and helped a little with the under-9 age group at carnivals, and was then persuaded to do my Bronze Medallion so I could do water safety while my husband became an Age Manager. Being named Queensland Surf Lifesaver of the Year was very humbling, and it means a great deal to both myself and the club to have our efforts recognised. But, outside of the award, my greatest achievement was obtaining my Bronze Medallion. This involved considerable work, coming to the movement later in life and, particularly, having grown up away from the coast and having to learn surf skills from scratch. My favourite thing about surf lifesaving is the family atmosphere and friendships. Surf lifesaving provides you with life skills, the opportunity to give back to your community, and to be part of a family. Kirsty Glithero - Yeppoon SLSC 2015/16 Queensland Surf Lifesaver of the Year

OPERATIONAL INITIATIVES

• Lifesaving and lifeguard services from Mackay to Port Douglas successfully transitioned from analog to digital radios, ensuring that all clubs and patrols across the state are linked into SLSQ’s communications network;

The past 12 months have seen SLSQ introduce a number of key services and initiatives in a bid to extend our reach along Queensland’s coastline and improve the effectiveness and efficiency of patrolling members. Importantly, these initiatives have been developed with one overarching objective in mind: to save lives.

• Roving patrols at Moreton Island were rolled out during the Christmas and Easter holidays, with a particular focus on Tangalooma and North Point; • Waverunner 18 patrols were implemented as an ongoing service within the Noosa region following successful trials in 2015/16;

LIMSOC Launched in July 2016, the Lifesaving Incident Management System Operational Console (LIMSOC) has led to significant improvements in the way SLSQ records and responds to coastal incidents. The LIMSOC system now sees all patrol services equipped with smart device technology to log rescues, incidents, beach usage, and conditions in real-time, into a central database monitored by SurfCom. This provides SLSQ with unprecedented access to a live stream of data from all patrolled beaches, ensuring that lifesavers and lifeguards can respond to incidents more effectively and efficiently than ever before.

State Operations and Communications Centre SLSQ’s State Operations and Communications Centre (SOCC) officially opened its doors in January 2017. Located at Mermaid Beach on the Gold Coast, the SOCC operates 365 days of the year, providing patrols and other services with a centralised facility for state-wide support and radio communications. Meanwhile, SurfCom continues to operate on the Sunshine Coast on weekends and public holidays during the patrol season.

Other key initiatives

• Lifeguard services continued at Tallebudgera Creek, Southport Broadwater, and Paradise Point during peak holiday periods; • Aerial patrols via SLSQ’s Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service were increased during peak periods, including regular patrols both during and after Tropical Cyclone Debbie; • SLSQ’s annual Coast Safe Report was released in September 2016 to analyse aquatic safety and drowning trends on Queensland beaches and, for the first time, inland waterways; • Night operations training was regularly conducted on the Gold and Sunshine Coasts in conjunction with the Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service and the Queensland Water Police; • Dawn patrol services on the Gold Coast continued to operate 365 days of the year; • SLSQ continued to utilise its network of coastal surveillance cameras, now totalling 34, at high-risk locations across the state;

SLSQ continues to pursue innovative surf safety strategies in a bid to eliminate drownings across the state. In addition to specific and targeted blackspot strategies, the past season also saw a number of other key initiatives rolled out across the state, including: • SLSQ significantly built upon its media presence and strategy to increase surf warnings and safety messaging; • SLSQ implemented roving patrols at Noosa North Shore, spanning from Rainbow Beach to Noosa River mouth;

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

• SLSQ implemented RWC patrols at Elliott Heads and Hervey Bay on weekends and public holidays during the Christmas school holidays, continuing through to the end of season;

12

• Once again, SLSQ worked closely with both local and state governments via its seat on the Local Disaster Management Group and State Disaster Coordination Group; and • SLSQ continued to operate a dedicated phone number, available 24/7, for emergency service agencies to seek urgent assistance with coastal and/or aquatic emergencies.

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EMERGENCY RESPONSE SERVICES

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

SLSQ’s emergency response groups (ERGs) continue to strengthen and now operate in all regions across the state. The ERGs are designed to be an after-hours callout service to support other emergency agencies through the provision of skills and equipment during times of need.

SLSQ continues to trial new equipment and technology in a bid to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of our operations. Trials across 2016/17 included the following: • SLSQ continued trials into the viability of the Seabob, a portable electronic watercraft, following its integration into lifeguard patrols on Green and North Stradbroke Islands; and

A number of these ERGs were activated in March 2017 when SLSQ provided emergency relief and care to communities in the aftermath of Tropical Cyclone Debbie. With the state’s south reeling from some of the worst flooding seen in years, SLSQ deployed assets and personnel to assist in some of the hardest-hit regions. Working directly with the Queensland Police Service and other emergency agencies, lifesavers navigated the challenging floodwater using IRBs to assist with search and rescue missions and welfare checks. Meanwhile, as the cyclone bore down on north and central Queensland, SLSQ’s ERGs from Townsville through to Mackay were placed on standby with rescue equipment, first aid kits, and volunteers ready to respond if and when required. The Westpac Helicopter was also tasked to assist a male in his 50s who was stranded on the roof of his car in rising floodwaters near Laravale.

• Investigations continued into the use of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (drones), with SLSQ conducting trials with several operators to assess platforms and operational limitations.

PEAK BODY ADVICE As the state’s peak authority on coastal and aquatic safety, SLSQ regularly works with, and for, governments, local councils, and stakeholder groups to provide strategic advice about mitigating risk and protecting swimmers. In 2016/17, SLSQ:

SLSQ had significant engagement with emergency service agencies and Local Disaster Management Groups from Cairns through to the Gold Coast in the lead up to, during, and after Tropical Cyclone Debbie.

• Provided a formal submission to the National Senate inquiry into the efficacy and regulation of shark mitigation and deterrent measures; • Provided strategic advice to the Queensland Government about improving safety within the snorkelling industry, including revision of its pre-existing Code of Practice;

BRISBANE LIFESAVING SERVICE

• Attended a Queensland Government-led roundtable discussion focusing on snorkeller safety in NQ; • Reviewed the State Government’s Queensland Crocodile Management Plan; • Liaised with the Department of National Parks, Sport, and Racing and provided advice on best practice safety signage within Queensland national parks (including Green Island);

SLSQ’s Brisbane Lifesaving Service (BLS) continues to provide vital support to surf clubs and operations support across SEQ. In 2016/17, the service’s 99 members patrolled a number of beaches including Bilinga, Peregian, and Surfers Paradise. In total, members combined to perform in excess of 1,672 volunteer patrol hours. BLS members also contributed in excess of 311 hours to SLSQ’s operations support services.

• Provided strategic advice to the Department of National Parks, Sport, and Racing regarding best practice stinger management strategies at Fraser Island; and • Provided top-level advice to the Queensland Department of Education and Training regarding the importance of learning to swim programs in primary schools.

FUTURE PRIORITIES Every year SLSQ conducts an extensive review of its services, along with relevant coastal data, to determine the best strategies moving forward to protect swimmers and eliminate drowning deaths across the state. As a result of this review, the following priorities have been identified for 2017/18: • Increase focus on, and investments in, blackspot reduction programs to increase protection and improve water safety awareness at high-risk locations;

COASTAL RISK MANAGEMENT SLSQ conducts regular public safety risk assessments on beaches and inland waterways, using its extensive lifesaving experience to assist councils, governments, and land managers. In 2016/17 SLSQ worked in consultation with various councils and land managers to conduct a number of risk audits, with successful outcomes. This included audits at the following locations:

• Further develop LIMSOC to improve reporting capabilities and user interface;

• Fraser Island (western side)

• Increase focus on inland waterways through coastal risk and signage audits; and

• Townsville

• Continue to grow and expand Brisbane Lifesaving Service in all regions across SEQ.

• Cairns Lagoon

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• Redland City • Green Island

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DANGEROUS MARINE CREATURES

Cory Charitable Foundation Crucial funding from the Cory Charitable Foundation allowed SLSQ to purchase a number of helmets and personal flotation devices for surf life saving clubs across the state. SLSQ thanks the Cory Charitable Foundation for its support, which helps ensure that lifesavers have the resources and equipment they need to patrol Queensland’s coastline.

SLSQ continues to play a leading role in the management of dangerous marine creatures including sharks, crocodiles, and marine stingers. Each year SLSQ works closely with a range of key stakeholders including surf life saving clubs, local governments and councils, tourism operators, and the general public to educate and protect Queensland beachgoers.

John Villiers Trust With thanks to vital funding from the John Villiers Trust, SLSQ will deliver a pilot Indigenous Youth Education Program in the coming months to educate young North Queenslanders from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander backgrounds, and equip them with the knowledge to stay safe at the beach. SLSQ is grateful for the continued support of the John Villiers Trust.

As part of this, SLSQ leads the Marine Stinger Prevention and Awareness Strategies on behalf of the Queensland Government. In addition, SLSQ also plays a key role in estuarine crocodile management, working closely with the Department of Environment and Heritage Protection, and sits on the North Queensland Community Advisory Group for Crocodile Management. Meanwhile, SLSQ representatives work with the Queensland Government to help protect swimmers from sharks, with the organisation an active member of the Shark Marine Advisory Group on the Gold Coast.

Other funds SLSQ is also grateful for support received through other grants across the year: • Unitywater Community Sponsorship Program to support SLSQ’s inaugural Little Lifesavers Legends program; and

LIFESAVING ASSISTANCE FUNDS

• Brisbane City Council Lord Mayor’s City Hall and King George Square Community Service Obligation Funding.

SLSQ LIFESAVING SERVICES QUALITY ASSURANCE

Queensland Fire and Emergency Services Vital funding from the Queensland Fire and Emergency Services (QFES) ensures that SLSQ has the resources and capacity to protect Queensland beachgoers. This season QFES provided funding across several key areas: • Lifesaving Services Development Fund: QFES Sustainability and More Beaches Under Guard grants. These enable SLSCs and branches to make an application for lifesaving equipment to sustain and expand beach patrols; • Volunteer Marine Rescue Support Package: This includes funding for all clubs and branches to maintain current services across Queensland; • Regional Development Fund: Funding is provided to improve beach safety services for Queensland communities north of the Sunshine Coast; and

SLSQ was certified under the Australian Quality Management Standard 9001:2008 for the provision of professional lifeguard services, operations support (including, but not limited to, rescue water craft, rescue boats and communication centres), helicopter surveillance and rescue services (for SLSQ and police operations), the support of club patrol services, community awareness programs and coastal risk assessments. This provides the communities in which we operate with the assurance that services meet current and future requirements, while ensuring that lifesaving services remain a clear leader in aquatic safety and rescue services. (Certification Number – QEC22945).

• Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service: This funding helps SLSQ provide a dedicated search and rescue helicopter service in SEQ.

Federal Government Blackspot Funding In 2016/17, a number of SLSQ projects were successful in receiving Federal Government blackspot funding. This included: • An airport welcoming service was rolled out on the Sunshine Coast, with qualified lifesavers stationed at the arrivals hall to greet passengers and provide them with vital surf safety information; and • Development continued on the SurfSpeak booklet, featuring a range of translated phrases to help lifesavers and lifeguards communicate with international beachgoers in their primary language.

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FIRST AID TREATMENTS PERFORMED BY ALSQ LIFEGUARDS

572,296

PREVENTATIVE ACTIONS PERFORMED BY ALSQ LIFEGUARDS

1,436 RESCUES BY ALSQ LIFEGUARDS

AU ST R ALIAN LIFE GUA RD SE RVIC E QUEENS L A N D

49,619


As the professional lifeguard arm of SLSQ, the Australian Lifeguard Service Queensland (ALSQ) provides vital patrol and aquatic safety support to governments, councils, and land managers across the state.

• ALSQ introduced LIMSOC technology for aquatic and coastal data collection across all patrols; • Patrols at Discovery Beach were increased to a 365-day service, from May 2017 onwards;

In 2016/17 ALSQ patrolled at 79 beaches and waterways across the state, making it the largest provider of professional lifeguard services in Queensland. Not restricted to Queensland’s coastline, ALSQ lifeguards can also be found at lagoons, creeks, and other waterways across the state. Many of these sites are actively patrolled 365 days of the year, providing a crucial cog in SLSQ’s operations and its overarching goal of eliminating drowning deaths.

• Forty lifeguards, representing all regions across Queensland, attended SLSQ’s State Conference on the Sunshine Coast in August 2016 to upskill ahead of the peak summer season; • Lifeguards were involved in the trialling of drone technology in patrol operations on North Stradbroke Island; • A concerted effort to proactively protect swimmers saw the number of preventative actions performed by ALSQ lifeguards surpass half-a-million across the year;

A proud industry leader in aquatic safety, ALSQ continues to set a world-class benchmark through nationally-accredited training programs, highly skilled and experienced staff, and best practice in operations. This season, ALSQ was comprised of 72 permanent lifeguards (including nine supervisors), who were supported by an additional 338 casuals. Collectively, their experience is unrivalled in Queensland, with the team boasting 1,518 years of lifeguarding experience and more than 1.5 million career patrol hours.

• Seabob technology was permanently introduced at Green Island to assist lifeguards with patrols and rescue operations; • Lifeguards provided first aid and water safety services at the 2017 Queensland and Australian Surf Life Saving Championships;

In 2016/17, ALSQ lifeguards combined to perform a remarkable 572,296 preventative actions, while treating 49,619 injured first aid patients, and directly saving the lives of 1,436 beachgoers.

• ALSQ continued to provide a Safety Ambassador Service at South Bank Parklands to proactively engage with parents and encourage them to supervise their children; • ALSQ celebrated 25 years of partnership with City Parkland Services (South Bank), and a number of regional councils across the state;

Key achievements and developments From trialling new technology through to expanding existing services and upskilling lifeguards, ALSQ continues to actively pursue innovative strategies for protecting Queensland beachgoers. Some of its key developments and achievements from the past 12 months include:

• Service agreements were renewed with City Parkland Services (South Bank), Sunshine Coast Council, and Noosa Shire Council;

• Queensland lifeguards continued to solidify their reputations as some of the nation’s finest. This was evident when Sunshine Coast senior lifeguard Shane Bevan was awarded the industry’s top individual honour, named SLSA’s Australian Lifeguard of the Year in October 2016;

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• ALSQ continued to integrate its services with the Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service, with six lifeguards now qualified crewmembers; and • A sustained focus on upskilling saw 77 lifeguards complete their Provide Advanced First Aid unit of competencies.

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COUNCIL/CORPORATION

YEARS OF SERVICE

YEAR COMMENCED

BEACHES/AREAS PATROLLED

FAR NORTH QUEENSLAND REGION LIFEGUARD SERVICES Douglas Shire Council

28 years

1989

Four Mile Beach

Cairns Regional Council

28 years

1989

Holloways Beach, Yorkeys Knob Beach, Ellis Beach, Palm Cove, Trinity Beach, Clifton Beach, Bramston Beach, Kewarra Beach, Green Island, Esplanade Lagoon

Cassowary Coast Regional Council

22 years

1995

Etty Bay, North Mission, Mission Beach

The Department of National Parks, Sport, and Racing

2 years (previously with Cairns Regional Council)

2015

Green Island

22 years

1995

Forrest Beach

27 years

1990

The Strand Net 1, The Strand Net 2, The Strand Water Park, Alma Bay, Picnic Bay, Horseshoe Bay

14 years

2003

Balgal Beach, Riverway Lagoon, The Strand Rock Pool

6 years

2011

Pallarenda

Burdekin Shire Council

25 years

1992

Alva Beach

Whitsunday Regional Council

9 years

2008

Horseshoe Bay (Bowen)

9 years

2008

Blue Water Lagoon

26 years

1991

Harbour Beach, Lamberts Beach, Eimeo Beach

24 years

1993

Sarina Beach

25 years

1992

Emu Park Beach, Yeppoon Beach

22 years

1995

Agnes Water Beach

25 years

1992

Tannum Sands Beach

25 years

1992

Moore Park Beach, Oaks Beach, Kelly’s Beach, Elliott Heads Beach, Mon Repos Beach, Nielsen Park Beach

25 years

2011

Woodgate

25 years

1992

Torquay Beach

NORTH QUEENSLAND REGION LIFEGUARD SERVICES Hinchinbrook Shire Council

Townsville City Council

Mackay Regional Council

WIDE BAY CAPRICORN REGION LIFEGUARD SERVICES Livingstone Shire Council Gladstone Regional Council

Bundaberg Regional Council Fraser Coast Regional Council

SOUTH EAST QUEENSLAND REGION LIFEGUARD SERVICES Noosa Shire Council

5 years

2012

Noosa West, Noosa, Sunshine, Sunrise, Peregian, North Peregian, Noosa North Shore (Roving)

Sunshine Coast Council

5 years

2012

Coolum North, Coolum Beach, Yaroomba, Palmer Coolum Resort, Boardwalk, Marcoola,Discovery Beach, Mudjimba, Twin Waters, Maroochydore, Alexandra Headland, Mooloolaba, Mooloolaba Spit, Buddina, Wurtulla, Currimundi, Dicky Beach, Kings Beach, Bulcock Beach, Golden Beach, Kings Pool

Gympie Regional Council

24 years

1993

Rainbow Beach

Moreton Bay Regional Council

22 years

1995

Woorim Beach

City Parkland Services (South Bank)

25 years

1992

Streets Beach Lagoon

Redland City Council

24 years

1993

Cylinder Beach, Main Beach, Adder Rock, Wellington Point

Council of the City of Gold Coast

4 years

2013

Paradise Point, Southport Broadwater, Tallebudgera Creek

9 years

2008

Double Island Point

2 years

2015

Noosa North Shore

8 years

2009

Moreton Island

Non Local Government Areas

I started working as a lifeguard in the summer of 2004 and fell in love with it. Since then, it’s just continued to grow on me and has become a real passion of mine. I just really enjoy helping people, whether it’s tracking down a missing child or finding a missing wallet. There’s a real sense of relief there as well after rescuing someone, knowing that if a lifeguard wasn’t there, they would have drowned. It’s a good feeling to know that you’ve been able to help someone and save them. Preventative actions are always a big focus for us. If we identify someone who doesn’t look like a strong swimmer, then we don’t want them even getting close to a position where they’ll need to be rescued. It could be as simple as getting on the PA system, giving them some instructions, and helping to educate them. Shane Bevan, Sunshine Coast senior lifeguard 2015/16 Queensland and Australian Lifeguard of the Year

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HELICOPTER SURF PATROLS

88

PREVENTATIVE ACTIONS

14

LIVES SAVED

WE S TPAC LIFESAV ER RES CUE HE LI COPTER SE RVI CE

447


An iconic sight along Queensland’s coastline, SLSQ’s Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service (WLRHS) has flown in excess of 10,000 missions since its inception, helping it forge a reputation as one of the world’s finest aerial search and rescue services.

• Additional and extended aerial patrols were conducted across South East Queensland to support surf lifesavers and lifeguards during peak periods; and

On 5 December 2016, the service celebrated a significant and historic milestone when it officially notched up 40 years of operation. During this time, the WLRHS has been directly responsible for saving more than 850 lives, often providing the last line of hope for exhausted swimmers struggling to keep their heads above water. The service has developed into a vital part of SLSQ’s rescue operations, and continues to play a key role in the organisation’s bid to deliver on its vision of ‘Zero preventable deaths in Queensland public waters.’ Today, the WLRHS operates two helicopters from hangars on the Gold and Sunshine Coasts, with its highly-trained pilots and crew on call around the clock, 365 days of the year.

• The service continues to benefit from its integration with the Australian Lifeguard Academy Queensland, with six SEQ lifeguards now qualified as rescue crew.

Heli Legends On Saturday, 24 September 2016, the WLRHS celebrated its 40th anniversary at the second annual Heli Ball on the Gold Coast. One of the evening’s highlights came when SLSQ formally honoured six individuals for their outstanding contributions to saving lives through distinguished and sustained service to the WLRHS. These men, many of whom were instrumental in creating and building the service 40 years ago, were inducted as inaugural ‘Heli Legends.’ Congratulations are extended to:

In 2016/17, the WLRHS consisted of 19 professional staff including four full-time crewmembers, eight pilots, six lifeguards, and one administration assistant. The service also encompassed 26 highlytrained volunteer surf lifesavers (including 15 rescue crew and 11 aircrew).

Heli Legend Number 1: Garth Bennett ‘GB’ Andrews OAM Heli Legend Number 2: Ron Rankin AM Heli Legend Number 3: Tom Ward DFC

Some of the key achievements across the year include:

Heli Legend Number 4: Gary ‘GT’ Terrell

• The WLRHS celebrated its 40th anniversary with a number of special events and activities across the season including its annual Heli Ball, a luncheon for current and former crewmembers, media opportunities, and a Hangar Open Day at Carrara;

Heli Legend Number 5: Daniel Hoyland OAM Heli Legend Number 6: Ian Grant OAM

• A concerted effort was made to engage with, and educate, surf life saving clubs, lifeguard services, and individual operators about drone safety;

ACTIVITY

LIFESAVER 45

LIFESAVER 46

TOTAL

Surf patrols

196

251

447

Preventative actions

64

24

88

• A continued focus on training and upskilling saw staff and volunteer crew successfully complete a wide range of courses including water winch, hoist, and helicopter underwater escape training. In addition, two rescue crew were trained and endorsed as aircrew;

Rescue Support

14

3

17

Searches

46

31

77

• Lifesaver 45 was placed on standby to assist in the lead up to, and immediately after, Tropical Cyclone Debbie. Crew were tasked to assist a male in his 50s who was stranded in floodwater near Laravale;

Mission hours

309

348

657

Rescues Beach surveillance

5

14

15,955

33,442

Polair

• The WLRHS continued to work closely with Queensland Fire and Emergency Services, the Queensland Police Service, and the Australian Maritime Safety Authority to provide search and rescue services during times of need; • The service’s commitment to excellence at all levels was evident through regular and extensive fitness testing for crew;

Through the WLRHS, SLSQ has successfully operated the Polair helicopters on behalf of the Queensland Police Service (QPS) for the past five years. Importantly, SLSQ’s relationship with QPS continues to broaden our core service by delivering safer communities across the state. In 2016 SLSQ secured a six year extension of its existing contract with the QPS, through to June 2022.

Principal Partner

Aviation Partners

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

9 17,487

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L to R: WLRHS chief pilot Paul Gibson, Gold Coast Mayor Tom Tate, and SLSQ COO George Hill ESM.

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PEOPLE REACHED VIA COMMUNITY AWARENESS INITIATIVES

41,019 MULTICULTURAL PARTICIPANTS IN SLSQ’S ON THE SAME WAVE PROGRAM

39,731 SCHOOL STUDENTS EDUCATED

CO M M U NITY AWAREN ES S

464,124


Outside of its front-line patrols, SLSQ continues to advocate the importance of surf safety education and awareness as a crucial part of breaking the drowning cycle. In 2016/17, SLSQ delivered a raft of targeted community awareness programs across the state in a bid to educate beachgoers, change behaviours, and save lives. In total, these efforts have seen SLSQ engage with 464,124 people this season, equipping them with potentially lifesaving knowledge, skills, and awareness. Some of the key achievements from the past season include: • An extensive business plan was signed-off to oversee growth and development of SLSQ’s community awareness activities moving forward; • The launch of SLSQ’s Little Lifesavers Legends on the Sunshine Coast saw a tailored water-safety program offered for children with physical, social, and emotional challenges. In total 73 enthusiastic young children participated in three programs; • Surf safety iMaps were produced and distributed to all regions across Queensland, with a particular focus on identified coastal blackspots;

Little Lifesavers Since its inception in 1993, the award-winning Little Lifesavers program has developed into one of SLSQ’s most popular water safety initiatives. This year, 609 children participated in the program, learning vital skills and water safety awareness. The 2016/17 season also saw a number of firsts, with a full-time program introduced at Raby Bay and the launch of Little Lifesavers Legends for children with physical, emotional, and social challenges. Both were received extremely well and will be built on over the coming seasons. SLSQ acknowledges the support of the South Bank Corporation, Brisbane City Council, Redland City Council, Cairns Regional Council, Bundaberg Regional Council, Mackay Regional Council, Sunshine Coast Council, and the Council of the City of Gold Coast. SLSQ also extends its appreciation to program partner Star Outdoor for its support.

Breaka Beach to Bush

• The Little Lifesavers program was recognised as the Best School Holiday Activity, and nominated in two other categories, at the National What’s On 4 Kids Awards;

SLSQ once again partnered with Breaka Flavoured Milk to spread vital surf safety messages to remote and rural communities across Queensland. Now in its 16th season, the program continues to educate thousands of potential beachgoers every year. The 2016/17 program saw lifesavers directly engage with almost 13,000 students and, for the first time, visit Thursday Island. SLSQ extends its thanks to Breaka Flavoured Milk for its ongoing support of the Beach to Bush initiative.

• Volunteer surf lifesavers visited the Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital on multiple occasions to engage with young patients;

Queensland Health Beach Safe Schools Program

• An extensive ‘Don’t Drink and Swim’ campaign was rolled out at key locations, with educational posters and coasters distributed to almost 500 pubs and nightclubs;

• The popular Little Lifesavers initiative was expanded to include a full-time program at Raby Bay;

• A rip safety campaign, ‘Don’t Risk the Rip’, was launched in consultation with SLSA;

The Beach Safe Schools Program was developed to educate primary school students about surf safety, dangerous marine creatures, and the importance of sun safety. The initiative seeks to provide students with the skills and awareness to safely manage their own risk at the beach. This season, 39,731 students in 137 schools across Queensland participated in the program. SLSQ thanks Queensland Health for its continued support of this initiative.

• The Beach Safe Seniors program was once again delivered this season; and

Gold Coast Beach Safe Program

• The Community Awareness team attended a number of key events including the Gold Coast 600, various NRL matches, festivals, and school fetes;

• SLSQ joined the Federal Government’s ‘Sporting Schools’ program to offer surf lifesaving activities to students across the state.

One of the tourism capitals of Australia, the Gold Coast attracts thousands of domestic and international travellers each and every week. With that in mind, the Gold Coast Beach Safe Program sees qualified surf lifesavers stationed at the airport arrivals gate to welcome tourists and provide them with crucial beach safety information. In 2016/17, the program reached196,947 people. Importantly, this was only made possible through the support of Harbour Town Shopping Centre, Gold Coast Airport, Gold Coast Cabs, and the Council of the City of Gold Coast.

KEY EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS

Airport welcoming services

On The Same Wave Historically, SLSQ’s coastal statistics have indicated that international and multicultural beachgoers pose a higher risk of drowning or serious injury while swimming in the surf. With that in mind, On The Save Wave sees surf lifesavers directly engage with, and educate, migrants, refugees, international travellers, and people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds about how to protect themselves in and around the water. In 2016/17 the program directly engaged with 41,019 potential beachgoers.

Following the success of its Gold Coast airport program, SLSQ has expanded the initiative to include both Cairns and the Sunshine Coast. This season, surf lifesavers returned to both airports and provided arriving guests with multilingual surf safety information on patrol times, locations, and other safety messaging. Collectively, these initiatives reached a total of 80,528 potential beachgoers. SLSQ acknowledges the support of the Sunshine Coast Airport and Cairns Airport for its support of these vital programs.

SLSQ thanks the Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Partnerships, the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services, and The University of Queensland for their support of this program.

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GROWTH IN MEMBERSHIP

10,219 NIPPERS

9,026 ACTIVE PATROLLING MEMBERS

M EM B E RS HIP DEV ELOPMEN T

3.1%


As a volunteer movement, SLSQ can only be as strong as its members. With that in mind, 2016/17 saw SLSQ’s Membership Development team work closely with key divisions and regional staff to ensure the recruitment and retention of volunteers remained a key focus area across all facets of the organisation.

across the state were recognised at a grassroots level this season with the inaugural ‘Breaka Nipper of the Week’ awards. The awards are presented to junior members for displaying one or more of SLSQ’s core values – respect, leadership, teamwork, safety, trust, and community.

A number of programs were rolled out across the year, ensuring SLSQ recorded positive membership growth for the first time since 2014/15. In total, SLSQ’s six branches and 58 surf life saving clubs now comprise of 31,093 members from all walks of life. This represents an increase of 3.1 per cent when compared to 30,139 members the season before.

Moving forward, SLSQ will continue to provide safe, quality, and ageappropriate activities in a bid to enhance the development of its junior members. This is supported by the Junior Activities Advisory Panel, which plays an active role in providing recommendations regarding Junior Activities across Queensland.

This increase was underpinned by solid growth across junior activities (two per cent), active juniors (six per cent), active seniors (two per cent), and associate (four per cent) membership categories, amongst others. Importantly, the number of total active patrolling members also increased, recording growth of one per cent from 8,910 last season to 9,026 in 2016/17. The past season also saw SLSQ work closely with key stakeholders including clubs, branches, and committees to ensure the diverse needs of volunteers are continually met. In addition to recruitment and retention, other key focus areas across the year included membership development, member protection and welfare, sustainability, and member recognition.

KEY PROGRAMS Junior Activities The youth of today represent our surf lifesaving leaders of tomorrow. As a result, SLSQ remains committed to providing a clear, structured, and rewarding pathway for junior surf lifesavers to join and progress through the movement. In 2016/17 SLSQ recorded a two per cent growth in the number of its junior members when compared to last season, from 9,923 to 10,219, making it the highest number since 2011/12. SLSQ’s junior members currently represent 32.5 per cent of total membership, reinforcing their importance to the overall sustainability and viability of SLSQ as a leading volunteer-based organisation in Queensland. With thanks to support from Breaka Flavoured Milk, junior members

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

Pathways Officially launched last season, the Pathways project continues to provide SLSQ with a vital tool to support the recruitment and retention of volunteer members. The project, supported by a dedicated website (lifesavingpathways.com.au), provides existing and potential members with an extensive overview of the diverse opportunities and career pathways available within surf lifesaving.

MEMBER DEVELOPMENT The UQ SLSQ Leadership Excellence Program Some of the top young surf lifesavers from across the state converged on St Lucia across three days from 7-10 July 2016 for The University of Queensland (UQ) SLSQ Leadership Excellence Program. The annual program seeks to develop the communication, teamwork, and management skills of future leaders within the movement for the benefit of their clubs, branches, and SLSQ as a whole. In total, 42 lifesavers aged 18-30 participated, under the expert guidance of four leaders, two mentors, and three coordinators. SLSQ thanks UQ for its support of this key membership program.

Breaka Youth Excellence Program Held from 6-9 April 2017, the Breaka Youth Excellence Program saw 77 young lifesavers converge on Maranatha Recreation Camp in Yandina to develop their involvement, leadership, and responsibility within the movement. The program encompasses a range of activities focusing

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Member welfare and protection

on team-building, communication, mentoring, and problem solving with the idea to equip them with a range of skills and knowledge for use on and off the beach. SLSQ thanks Breaka Flavoured Milk for its continued support.

The welfare and protection of members remains of upmost importance to SLSQ. To maintain compliance with government legislation and SLSA’s policies, SLSQ conducts regular reviews of its strategies, policies, and practices in a bid to safeguard all of its members regardless of age, location, gender, and ethnicity.

National Leadership College Representatives from across Queensland travelled to the University of Sydney for SLSA’s National Leadership College from 5-11 February 2017. The Queensland delegates were Jessica Simpson (Dicky Beach), Samantha Fien (Point Danger Branch), Jesse Witt (Etty Bay), James Crockatt (Mudjimba), Lauren Soars (North Burleigh), and Gemma Henricksen (Bundaberg). In addition, two young leaders returned to help lead and conduct the program, Jamie Findlay (Bundaberg) as a facilitator and Michael White (Alexandra Headland) as a mentor.

Throughout the year, SLSQ continued to advocate the Child Youth Risk Management Strategy within clubs and branches to operate in line with the Working with Children (Risk Management and Screening) Act 2000. SLSQ is appreciative of the Point Danger Branch, for making its online Child and Youth Risk Management Strategies induction available for wider use as a alternative method for members to be inducted. SLSQ also adheres to SLSA’s Member Protection Policy, and works closely with the Public Safety Business Agency on ‘working with children’ checks (Blue Cards).

SLSA Masterclass

SLSQ’s Peer Support Program continues to provide support for members during times of need, trauma, or distress. In 2016/17 there were 48 qualified peer support officers located around the state, who assisted with a variety of incidents, both on and off the beach.

Three Queenslanders attended the SLSA Masterclass from 1-4 September 2016 at Surf House, Bondi Beach, to extend their strategic leadership capabilities alongside likeminded members from across the country. The Queensland delegates were Amanda Findlay (Bundaberg), Kathryn McKenzie (Northcliffe) and Mark Wyer (Emu Park).

MEMBERSHIP SUSTAINABILITY PROJECT In line with SLSQ’s Strategic Plan, a number of initiatives were refined this season and remain a key feature of the department’s commitment to long-term sustainability. This included: • Promotion of the Family Participation Program; • Active member management, including refinements to the Patrol Gap Calculator; and • Further development of state-wide retention data to help SLSQ manage future planning and further gauge membership dynamics.

Being named the DHL Australian Club of the Year is one of the greatest achievements a club could have, and knowing that it is our title is absolutely phenomenal. At Pacific we are such a small, family-orientated club, so all members deserve this recognition for the immense amount of hard work they put into volunteering. The club has successfully created a family culture that results in personal and team successes, not just in surf sports. Over one year our patrol hours increased to nearly 1,000 hours, as our patrol groups are getting stronger and our volunteers are dedicating more hours to keeping the beach safe. We are very proud of our high youth retention rate at Pacific. We encourage our youth through all the opportunities that surf life saving provides, in order to boost their personal and professional development. Personally, Pacific has developed my leadership capabilities, which has made me more confident to step up and make a positive difference in the surf club, the community, and in my own life. Therefore, my goal is for every youth member to have the opportunity to develop these skills also. Hayley Bowers – Pacific SLSC Pacific was named the 2015/16 Queensland and Australian Surf Life Saving Club of the Year, and Queensland Youth Development Club of the Year.

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4,764

1,546

COMPETITORS AT SLSQ’S 2017 YOUTH CHAMPIONSHIPS

918

COMPETITORS IN THE UQ SECONDARY SCHOOL SURF LEAGUE

SU R F SPORTS

ATHLETES AT SLSQ CHAMPIONSHIP EVENTS


QUEENSLAND CHAMPIONSHIP EVENTS

Healthy sporting competition is one of the core foundations of the surf lifesaving movement in Queensland and, with that in mind, SLSQ remains committed to delivering a wide range of events for all members regardless of age, location, gender, and experience. Importantly, the flow-on benefits of a strong and vibrant sporting program to the wider surf lifesaving movement are numerous. In addition to providing SLSQ with a vital recruitment and retention tool, surf sport also promotes a healthy and active lifestyle choice for members. Furthermore, carnivals provide all members with a unique opportunity to refine their core lifesaving skills within a competitive setting. For these reasons, our competition continues to support SLSQ’s vision of saving lives, making it truly unique when compared to any other sporting code in the world. The past season saw thousands of surf lifesavers line up at one of SLSQ’s carnivals, reflecting a genuine thirst amongst members for quality sporting competition. In 2016/17 SLSQ facilitated and delivered a raft of competitive opportunities, from regional and branch carnivals through to prestigious state championship events. Increasing regional and junior participation, and boosting grassroots competition, remain key focus areas for SLSQ, along with fast-tracking the development of coaches and officials. SLSQ wishes to thank the Queensland Government (Sport and Recreation Services) for its continued support of our sporting programs and championship events. Furthermore, its support of all Queensland clubs via the ‘Get in the Game’ initiative is also greatly appreciated.

Queensland IRB Championships More than 270 lifesavers cast off the winter blues and lined up at Mermaid Beach from 2-3 July for the 2016 Queensland Inflatable Rescue Boat (IRB) Championships. North Burleigh finished on an even 100 points to comfortably take home the overall title ahead of Point Lookout (56 points) and Kawana Waters (52 points).

Queensland Pool Rescue Championships The 2016 Queensland Pool Rescue Championships were held across two days, from 9-10 July, at the Gold Coast Aquatic Centre. In total, 365 competitors lined up to compete, with Maroochydore (476 points) taking the top honours ahead of Currumbin (429 points) and Northcliffe (267 points).

Queensland Endurance Championships A total of 572 competitors lined up to compete at the Queensland Endurance Championships at Mermaid Beach on 1 October 2016. Following a gruelling day of competition, Noosa Heads (195.5 points) was declared the champion club ahead of Northcliffe (181 points) and Maroochydore (169 points).

Laerdal Queensland Surf Rescue Championships The Surf Rescue Championships saw 144 competitors line up at Dicky Beach on the Sunshine Coast across three days of action from 24-26 February 2017. Sunshine Coast club Alexandra Headland (86 points) reigned supreme, ahead of Northcliffe (72 points) and Maroochydore (47 points).

Queensland Board Riding Championships The Queensland Board Riding Championships were held at Palm Beach on the Gold Coast from 13-15 January 2017. In total, 201 lifesavers lined up across the three days of action, representing a 13.5 per cent increase when compared to the previous year. Alexandra Headland (77 points) took the top honours ahead of Currumbin (63 points) and Tallebudgera (44 points).

Queensland Youth Surf Life Saving Championships The Queensland Youth Championships were held at Hervey Bay across three days from 17-19 February 2017. In total, 1,546 young lifesavers took to the surf and sand to compete in a wide range of lifesaving events. Alexandra Headland (284 points) capped off a strong performance by claiming the overall title ahead of Maroochydore (277 points) and Northcliffe (234 points). SLSQ thanks the Fraser Coast Regional Council for its vital support of this event.

Queensland Surf Life Saving Championships A total of 1,666 lifesavers lined up at the Queensland Surf Life Saving Championships at North Kirra from 10-12 March 2017. Northcliffe continued its recent dominance of the event, finishing on 509 points, to extend its winning run to 13 consecutive years ahead of Currumbin (363 points) and Alexandra Headland (294 points). Meanwhile, Alexandra Headland (370 points) reigned supreme in the masters competition ahead of Noosa Heads (308 points) and Northcliffe (253 points). SLSQ thanks the Council of the City of Gold Coast for its wonderful support of this event.

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OTHER SPORTING EVENTS

Interbranch Championships The Interbranch Championships were held on the Gold Coast across two days from 25-26 November 2016. The Sunshine Coast Branch extended its recent dominance at the event, taking out the overall honours for the ninth consecutive year ahead of the South Coast Branch, Point Danger Branch, and the Queensland Country Team.

Summer of Surf Series SLSQ again worked in consultation with Castle Media and SLSA to host two rounds of the annual Summer of Surf Series in Queensland. This year’s series featured legs at Alexandra Headland (Round 1) and Surfers Paradise (Round 6), with highlights broadcast as part of the televised series on Fox Sports.

Surf boat competition Surf boat competition continues to prove popular amongst Queensland athletes, with crews regularly competing in the Navy Surf Boat and Queensland Cup series. A number of crews also ventured interstate to compete in the ASRL Open, Ocean Thunder, and other key carnivals.

Fastest Man on Sand SLSQ’s Fastest Man on Sand series saw some of Queensland’s top beach sprinters battle it out over three rounds this summer, with legs held at Kurrawa, Mooloolaba and Coolangatta. In total, 974 athletes competed over the series, representing a 30 per cent increase when compared to the year before.

SPORTS DEVELOPMENT

Interstate Championships The Interstate Championships provide Queensland athletes across all disciplines with an opportunity to represent their state in elite competition as part of the Cyclones team. A strong performance across 2015/16 saw the Queensland Cyclones secure the Alan B Whelpton AO Perpetual Shield for the second year running as the best performing state across the Interstate Championship events. In 2016/17, the Cyclones won the ocean event before finishing second in the surf boats, with IRB and pool events still to determine the overall winner.

SLSQ remains committed to enhancing competition and increasing surf sport participation across all corners of Queensland. A number of development initiatives were rolled out across 2016/17 for athletes, coaches, and officials.

Athlete development • Six-week development programs for athletes aged 15-19 were held on the Gold and Sunshine Coasts, covering a range of topics from nutrition and sports psychology to training and recovery. In total, 87 emerging athletes participated;

Ocean Roar IRB Series

• A one-day development clinic was held at Kurrawa for beach athletes, with 38 participants;

SLSQ’s annual Ocean Roar IRB series continues to provide crews across Queensland with additional competitive opportunities to hone their craft over the winter months. This season, rounds were held at Burleigh, Mudjimba, Rainbow Beach, Bribie Island, and Broadbeach. Kurrawa took home the top honours on 368 points, ahead of Broadbeach (363 points) and North Burleigh (217 points). SLSQ thanks the Gympie and Moreton Bay Regional Councils for their valued support of this year’s series.

• Pool rescue development programs were held at Palm Beach, Cairns, and Kawana with 105 participants; • Forty-five competitors from the Wide Bay region attended a three-day development clinic run by SLSQ and featuring elite athletes Bonnie Hancock and Matt Bevilacqua; and • The 2017 Athlete and Coach Performance Development conference was held on 22 July, featuring a number of presenters from a range of elite sporting environments.

North Australian Championships

Coaches and officials development

Held in Mackay from 21-23 October 2016, the North Australian Championships saw 420 competitors from Port Douglas down to Hervey Bay line up across three days of racing. Cairns (1,143 points) took home the overall honours ahead of Tannum Sands (979 points) and Arcadian (647 points). In doing so, the club extended its winning streak at the event to seven consecutive years. SLSQ thanks the Mackay Regional Council for its continued support of this event.

• A series of videos were developed to provide all coaches, regardless of location, with an opportunity to develop their skillset. In total these videos were watched more than 1,500 times; and • SLSQ held two coaching and development seminars with 80 people in attendance and more than 1,300 people watching via an online video stream.

The University of Queensland Secondary School Surf League Thanks to support from The University of Queensland (UQ), SLSQ delivered the Secondary School Surf League in 2016/17. In total, 918 athletes lined up across six regional competitions throughout the season, representing a 20 per cent growth in participation when compared to last year. This culminated in the UQ Secondary Schools Surf League Championships at Coolangatta on 27 April 2017. Palm Beach Currumbin State High School took out the UQ Cup on 214 points, ahead of Marymount College (146 points) and Sunshine Beach State High School (143 points).

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

FUTURE PRIORITIES Moving forward, SLSQ will continue to provide a diverse and highquality calendar of events for all members to enjoy while, at the same time, working to identify and address any barriers impacting participation. SLSQ will also endeavour to revitalise and inject new blood into its officiating ranks, and further engage with participants across all levels of our sport.

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QUEENSLAND CYCLONES TEAMS 2016 Queensland Cyclones IRB Team Andy Kelckkoven (North Burleigh) Tim Watene (North Burleigh) Jack Watson (North Burleigh) Brendon Phillips (North Burleigh) Ben MacKie (North Burleigh) Joel Di Tripani (North Burleigh) Jonathan Hagan (Point Lookout) Kane Brady (Point Lookout) Ben Domeraki (Kirra) Isaac Nation (Kirra) Shaun Capps (Dicky Beach) Kate Czerny (North Burleigh) Sarah Kiely (North Burleigh) Mikaela Rawlings (North Burleigh) Kaitlyn Brown (North Burleigh) Caitlyn Knight (Dicky Beach) Jessica Simpson (Dicky Beach) Samantha Thornton (Alexandra Headland)

Open: Samantha Lee (Northcliffe) Pamela Hendry (Maroochydore) Mariah Jones (TH&C) Alyssa Koenen (Northcliffe) Chris Dawson (Northcliffe) Matt Davis (Currumbin) Sam Bell (Maroochydore) Liam Ryan (North Burleigh)

Team Management: Head Coach – Craig Holden (Elliott Heads) Team Manager – Steven Fry (Northcliffe) Medical – Nick Marshall (Nobbys Beach)

2017 Queensland Cyclones Ocean Team Youth Team:

2016 Queensland Cyclones Pool Rescue Team

Hannah Sculley - Northcliffe Brielle Cooper - North Burleigh Megan Kreuter - Northcliffe Abigail Pugh - Kurrawa Tiarnee Massie - Maroochydore Taylor Stickler - Kurrawa Jackson Collins - North Burleigh Nicholas Sloman - Sunshine Beach Daniel Raward - Kurrawa Cooper Williams - Noosa Heads Kobe Shultz - Northcliffe Alex Innes - Met Caloundra

Under-14:

Open Team:

Lani Pallister (Alexandra Headland) Tahlia Dilkes (Kurrawa) Rory Blair (Northcliffe) Jack Sparke (Currumbin)

Alyssa Bull - Alexandra Headland Courtney Hancock - Northcliffe Maddy Dunn - Northcliffe Bonnie Hancock - Northcliffe Lana Rogers - Noosa Heads Bree Masters - Kurrawa Ben Carberry - Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park Hayden White - Currumbin James Lacy - Mermaid Beach AEME Luke Cuff - Mermaid Beach AEME Tanyn Lyndon - Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park Timothy Delahunty - Currumbin

Team Management: Manager – Bronwyn Champness (Alexandra Headland) Assistant Manager – Cathie Palmer (North Burleigh) Coach – Adam Barbour (North Burleigh) Patient Coordinator – Andrew McAuliffe (Kirra)

Under-15: Harmana Williams (Maroochydore) Summer Short (Maroochydore) Hayden Cotter (Maroochydore) Kurt Lorne (Maroochydore)

Under-17: Tanya Stovgaard (Northcliffe) Brielle Cooper (Kurrawa) Toby Wilson (Northcliffe) Jyah Seymour-Poyd (Noosa Heads)

Under-19: Prue Davies (Currumbin) Chelsea Gillet (Maroochydore) Jacob Hales (Currumbin) Tom Montgomery (Currumbin)

Team Management: Coach – Darren Mercer (Noosa Heads) Assistant Coach – Gavin Hill (Northcliffe) Beach Coach – Ryan Hoffman (Kurrawa) Team Manager – Bronwyn Champness (Alexandra Headland) Assistant Team Manager – Stephen Fry (Northcliffe) Physiotherapist – Nick Marshall (SurfLife Physio)

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2017 Queensland Cyclones Surf Boat Crews Open Men – Currumbin: Lyle Clark (sweep) Glen Williams Mac Hamilton Nick Winkler Randall Martin

Open Women – Tallebudgera: Gary Williams (sweep) Lisa Webber Kirsty Morrison Kelissa Brockett Tara Dreaver-Coates

Reserve Grade Men – Maroochydore: Michael Brooks (sweep) Troy Slade Johnny Naughton Dave Hoffman Corey Stone

Reserve Grade Women – Palm Beach: Arnie Eussen (sweep) Samantha Ashe Rebecca Petersen Isabelle Gros Isabella Hardmen

Under-23 Men – Mermaid Beach: Graeme Huegill (sweep) Lachlan Weston David Moreton Elliott Creagh Zach Thompson-Smith

Under-23 Women – Burleigh Heads: Steve Purcell (sweep) Sophie Holyman Abbey Holyman Edwina Wright Teagan McFarlane

Under-19 Men – Northcliffe: Damien Clayphan (sweep) Ewan Van Rensburg Lachlan Bowman Declan Comerford Joshua Bunney

Under-19 Women – Dicky Beach: Rob Flood (sweep) Luca Sullivan Kate Morcom Victoria Barbour Natalie Dean

Team managers: Craig Williams Charles Melloy


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42,188

13,552 PEOPLE TRAINED IN FIRST AID AND CPR

400%

INCREASE IN COMMERCIAL TRAINING SALES SINCE 2014

E DUCATION

UNITS OF COMPETENCY DELIVERED


The Australian Lifesaving Academy Queensland (ALAQ) is the trading name for SLSQ as a registered training organisation, set up to deliver emergency care and lifesaving training education to both members and the wider community.

Key highlights and developments

Through the ALAQ, SLSQ remains committed to providing world-class educational programs to increase lifesaving and emergency care knowledge and, ultimately, help reduce drowning deaths.

• The ALAQ exceeded budget to record a significant increase in net profit when compared to last year; • There was a significant increase recorded in the commercial sale of courses and the supply of valuable first aid equipment such as automated external defibrillators. Sales have now grown by more than 400 per cent in the past three years; • The ALAQ was granted reregistration of its Registered Training Organisation (RTO) status through to 2024;

PUBLIC EDUCATION

• A departmental restructure saw the appointment of a second full-time trainer for commercial work and a new part-time administration assistant based in Brisbane. An increased demand from returning clients, in addition to a high level of word-of-mouth referrals, necessitated this staffing realignment;

Through its commercial training arm, SLSQ continues to equip thousands of people each and every year with the skills, awareness, and confidence to provide basic treatment and life support following an accident or emergency situation. Like every other facet of SLSQ’s operations, the ALAQ exists for one reason and one reason only: to save lives. Its overarching purpose is to bring more than a century of lifesaving experience from the beach to the home, school, or workplace. Importantly, all trainers are highlyqualified surf lifesavers in their own right, often bringing decades of practical and hands-on experience in emergency care management to each session.

• A dedicated ALAQ website (alaq.com.au) was launched in May 2017, providing a valuable marketing tool and a central hub of information on course offerings, scheduling, and equipment available for purchase; • A concerted effort to promote ALAQ via digital and social media led to a strong increase in public awareness and engagement; • The ALAQ continued to maintain, and build on, a number of third-party agreements with surf clubs to deliver emergency care training on SLSQ’s behalf;

The ALAQ provides a range of emergency care and aquatic rescue training courses through flexible and high quality programs aimed at upskilling community members and making Queensland a safer state. In recent years ALAQ has delivered training courses to a range of industries including education, sport and recreation, mining, construction, government, and medical.

• The ALAQ continues to provide representation within key industry bodies, with a representative sitting as the secretary of the Australian Resuscitation Council Queensland Branch; and • The ALAQ was represented at the 11th International Spark of Life Conference, and the Vocational Educational and Learning Group industry conference.

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MEMBER EDUCATION In addition to offering a suite of industry-leading public training courses, the ALAQ is also tasked with delivering effective and efficient member education to upskill surf lifesavers and ensure the future viability of the movement in Queensland.

At 11.20am, on Monday 1 May 2017, a member of the public rushed into the clubhouse to advise that a man had collapsed out the front. All members rushed outside and located an elderly man aged 70 on the grass near the lifeguard tower, unconscious, unresponsive, and with no signs of life. Teamwork was in place and every member assisted each other and made a concerted effort to save the life of the patient. CPR was performed by John Hamrey (compressions) and Jamie Miller (breaths/oxygen). Further assistance was then provided by Jack Seymour (defibrillation/oxygen), Stephen Spencer (logistics), Meg Seymour (communications – Surfcom) and Michael Seymour (logistics).

Emergency Care Training Review In 2016/17, under direction from the SLSQ Board, an independent review was conducted into emergency care training in Queensland. A number of recommendations stemming from this review were subsequently endorsed by the State Lifesaving Committee in an effort to improve standards across training and assessment. Work has already commenced on the implementation of these recommendations, meeting RTO standards for registered training organisations.

CPR continued for approximately 35 minutes, with 25 cycles carried out. The patient was transported to the Gold Coast Hospital in an unconscious and unresponsive state by QAS. He was later released from the ICU and remained in hospital for several weeks for ongoing treatment and tests. It was ascertained later that he had suffered a massive cardiac arrest at Bilinga that day.

The review challenged the emergency care training system, and was supported by more than 80 per cent of key stakeholders, along with the recommendation that it be expanded into other areas of training and assessment.

Key highlights and developments: • SLSQ continued to work hard behind the scenes to improve the efficiency of courses for the benefit of its members. Participants in IRB Driver and Crew courses are now provided with pre-printed assessment portfolios in advance, helping to streamline delivery and minimise paperwork errors; • A project officer was employed (through Queensland Government QFES funding) to develop the Certificate IV TAE 40116 within the ALAQ’s scope of courses;

I was extremely proud of our members and the manner in which they performed their duties. To be faced with a confronting incident, and deal with that incident to achieve the ultimate outcome to save the life of a person is a challenge. The outcome is achieved by our ongoing training and working together as a professional team. It is what we do as lifesavers and, on the last day of the season, Bilinga SLSC stood up again and did what we do. John Hamrey - President, Bilinga SLSC

• October 2016 saw the release of SLSA’s e-learning platform for Bronze Medallion training, allowing members to participate in blended learning both at home and/or at their respective surf clubs; • The development of broader e-learning options continued to progress at a national level, with courses now made available to Queensland members; • The 2016 State Lifesaving Conference featured a number of sessions on member education, including the latest guidelines on best practice in both first aid and resuscitation. Also included within the Conference were sessions on RTO compliance, delivered by an external consultant; • SLSQ has begun delivering Helicopter Underwater Escape Training (HUET) to the general public via the Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service; and • ALAQ continued to work on the development of a pool lifeguard skillset for Australian Lifeguard Service (Queensland) employees, which is set to commence in 2017/18.

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RAISED THROUGH THE SURF SAFE APPEAL

$25,000 RAISED THROUGH THE HELI BALL

$410,419 RAISED THROUGH SUMMER SURF GIRL

FU NDR A ISING

$292,224


KEY FUNDRAISING EVENTS

BENEFICIARY EVENTS

It is important to note that SLSQ’s lifesaving work would not be possible without the support of the communities in which we operate. No matter how big or small, every donation made in 2016/17 directly contributed towards saving lives, and SLSQ is appreciative of everyone who dug deep to support our cause.

Surf Safe Appeal Now in its 13th year, the Surf Safe Appeal remains one of SLSQ’s largest fundraising programs, ensuring that volunteer surf lifesavers have the resources they need to patrol Queensland’s coastline. The 2016 Appeal, which ran from 24-30 October, saw hundreds of volunteers take to the streets to raise vital funds. For the first time, their efforts were supported by a team of workplace volunteers who donated their time to raise funds and help sell special red and yellow pins.

Gold Coast 600 SLSQ’s long-standing partnership with the Gold Coast 600 continues to grow from strength to strength. In 2016 SLSQ was proud to have again been named as the event’s official charity partner and beneficiary. Held from 21-23 October 2016, the event raised crucial funds and awareness for the surf lifesaving movement in Queensland. Once again, Preston Hire Racing was outstanding in its support of our organisation. The team donated $5,000 to support volunteer surf lifesavers, and transformed its race car into a sea of red and yellow messaging to promote our cause. Team drivers and crew also donned special red and yellow shirts in support of SLSQ. In total, more than $12,000 was raised across the weekend. SLSQ thanks Supercars for its continued support, along with Charlie Schwerkolt and Preston Hire Racing.

The Queensland Government generously donated $50,000 to kick start the Appeal and this was followed by donations of money and equipment from a number of corporate partners. In total, $292,224 was raised across the week-long Appeal.

SkyPoint Sea to Sky Q1 Stair Challenge

SLSQ would like to thank Network Ten for its media support, as well as the Queensland Government and our corporate partners including Brisbane Airport, JLT, The Star Gold Coast, and Transit Australia Group.

2016 Heli Ball The second annual Heli Ball was held at Royal Pines on Saturday, 24 September 2016. In addition to raising vital funds for SLSQ’s Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service, the evening also helped celebrate the 40th anniversary of the service in Queensland. In total, 457 guests attended to help raise in excess of $25,000. SLSQ wishes to acknowledge the vital support of our long-term partner Westpac, in addition to the generosity of all suppliers and partners who supported the evening through the donation of prizes and auction items.

Summer Surf Girl

The SkyPoint Sea to Sky Q1 Stair Challenge was held on 22 February 2017, with SLSQ proud to have been selected as the event’s official charity partner. In total, more than 750 people ran, walked, and crawled up 77 gruelling flights of stairs, with all proceeds going back into funding vital beach safety initiatives. In total, more than $26,500 was raised during the event. SLSQ wishes to thank SkyPoint for its show of support in selecting SLSQ as the official charity partner of its 2017 Stair Challenge.

The Surf Life Saving Foundation SLSQ continues to receive vital fundraising support from the Surf Life Saving Foundation (SLSF). In particular, the SLSF oversees a number of key programs across Queensland including Guardians of the Surf, workplace giving, bequests, lotteries, and grant seeking. SLSQ is grateful for their continued support, which plays an important role when it comes to training surf lifesavers and equipping them with the resources necessary to carry out their role.

Since its inception 53 years ago, SLSQ’s iconic Summer Surf Girl program has directly injected in excess of $16 million into clubs and lifesaving services across the state. This year’s program saw 13 qualified female lifesavers embark on a nine month campaign to spread the surf safety message and raise vital funds for their clubs. In total, $410,419.51 was raised during this year’s program. Following the final judging week in Brisbane, Palm Beach lifesaver Shelley Roberts was officially crowned the 2017 Summer Surf Girl. She also received the Innovation Award for her fundraising, development, and community awareness efforts across the past 12 months. Meanwhile, Mermaid Beach’s Monica Wilkie was named Runner Up, and Ayr’s Jo Morgan received the Highest Fundraiser award after raising an incredible $66,126.96 for her club. SLSQ wishes to acknowledge this year’s supporting partner, Zupps Mount Gravatt, for its generous donation of a Holden Spark as the program’s major prize. SLSQ also acknowledges Engine, the 2017 Summer Surf Girl uniform partner, as well as its other program supporters including Emma Marie Makeup, Rachel Jane Makeup, Hare’s Hair, Etiquette and Manners Australia, and Screen Offset Printing. Special thanks are extended to this year’s judging panel of George Hill ESM, Megan Crockford, and Lainey Loneragan.

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I joined Surf Life Saving over 20 years ago, and have been a member of Palm Beach SLSC for 18 years. Our whole family went through Nippers at Palm Beach, and I’m so grateful to my parents for getting us involved with the surf club from a young age. Not only have I made lifelong friends, developed invaluable skills both in and out of the surf, and been able to give back to my local community; but this season, I had the opportunity to do all this and more by participating in the Summer Surf Girl program. I initially entered this program to raise funds for our club, increase our profile, and boost club morale; but soon realised there was so much more to the program. Personally, I grew as an individual, developed new skills and friendships, and experienced things I have never done before. At the club level, not only did we raise funds and boost morale, but brought our club together in so many ways. Being named the 2017 Summer Surf Girl was one of the proudest and most incredible moments of my life, especially seeing the reaction of my fellow Palm Beach members. Our club has never won this title before, and considering how much we pulled together and put into the program this season, it was really special to see it had paid off. Shelley Roberts - Palm Beach SLSC 2017 Summer Surf Girl

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CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Attendance

With a membership base of more than 31,000, SLSQ is one of the largest volunteer-based community organisations in Queensland. Control of SLSQ is vested in the Board of Directors, which is accountable to the State Council which, in turn, represents the members.

POSITION

MEETING ATTENDANCES

Mark Fife OAM

President

9/9

Laurie Murphy

Deputy President

9/9

The role of the State Council

Darrin Bragg

Director of Finance

8/8

The State Council comprises the SLSQ President and the six Branch Presidents. As the voting members of SLSQ, its duties include electing the Board and Life Members, and approving changes to the constitution. Representing the interests of the six branches and, ultimately the clubs, the Council met on three occasions throughout the year.

Kaitlyn Akers

Director

9/9

Tanya O’Shea

Director

9/9

Michael White

Director

7/7

Darren Woodward

Director

7/7

Christina Sutherland

Independent Director

8/9

Warwick Agnew

Independent Director

4/4

NAME

The role of the Board and Committees SLSQ’s Board and Committee structure is critical to ensuring volunteer representation in key decisions and strategic planning. The various committees outlined on page 52 were established by the Board to assist SLSQ in the operational management of the volunteer members. Where necessary, the Board can establish special purpose committees and panels to oversee the management of projects, programs or other initiatives. The primary function of the Board is to govern and provide leadership to SLSQ, members, affiliated branches and clubs in accordance with the aims and strategic objectives of SLSQ, its constitution, and the law. The Board is responsible for acting on all issues in accordance with SLSQ’s objectives. It operates for the benefit of SLSQ, its members and the wider Queensland community.

The role of Directors and management SLSQ’s CEO is tasked with managing the day-to-day business requirements of SLSQ, under the direction of the Board. The President is the nominated head of SLSQ and the SLSQ Board is responsible for the appointment of a CEO to manage and administer the organisation. The CEO is accountable to the Board and reports to the Board at each meeting. The CEO ensures the resolutions of the Board are properly and efficiently carried out, and transacts all business of SLSQ between Board meetings and general meetings of the Council.

Code of conduct Nominees for Director positions are required to agree to SLSQ’s ‘Code of Conduct’ for Directors. Candidates must sign their acceptance to comply with this code on their nomination form. The Code of Conduct is contained within the Directors’ Handbook, which is provided to all Directors upon their election at the annual general meeting.

Independence At the commencement of each Board meeting, the Chair asks for Directors to declare conflicts of interest in any agenda items. The Council may elect up to two Independent Directors each year. Nominees for these positions shall be endorsed and recommended to the Council by the Board.

Independent Advice SLSQ’s Board and management are assisted in aspects of its operations with external advice. Our auditors, BDO, conduct an annual audit, providing the Board with independent assurance and advice on financial management matters. Other consultants engaged by SLSQ in 2016/17 include: • Community Sports Management (government liaison) • GPP Consulting (strategic planning and advisory services)

Board composition

• The Grants Guru (grant applications)

SLSQ’s Board comprises the President, the Deputy President, the Director of Finance, four Directors, two Independent Directors and the CEO, who is a non-voting member. A Director must be a member of SLSQ, and Independent Directors may or may not be individual members of SLSQ.

• Ian Fullager (legal services) • Jardine Lloyd Thompson Australia Pty Ltd (insurance advice and services) • Sports Marketing Australia (sporting guidance) • WattsNext (human resources services)

Board meetings and access to management The Board meets as often as is deemed necessary in every calendar year for the dispatch of business. At any time, five Directors may ask the CEO to convene a meeting of the Board and, subject to SLSQ’s Constitution, questions at any meeting are decided by a majority of votes by the Board of Directors.

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HUMAN RESOURCES The past season was another landmark year for Human Resources (HR) at SLSQ, as the organisation continued to reap the benefits of its decision two years ago to establish the department as a standalone division in its own right. Notable achievements in 2016/17 include:

into the experience and skillset of volunteers from outside of SLSQ, while providing the community with a unique opportunity to directly contribute to saving lives.

• The introduction of a more tailored approach to sourcing top-level talent, including the use of digital marketing, profilematching, and head hunting; • Development of an annual schedule of activities, ensuring that all projects are aligned with, and supporting, SLSQ’s wider organisational needs; • Information sessions on health, wellbeing, mindfulness, and resilience made available for all SLSQ staff; • A shift in SLSQ’s Employee Assistance Program, from manager-referral to self-referral, resulting in an increase in take-up of this vital initiative;

The WVP provides vital support for SLSQ’s key programs and initiatives. This was evident in October 2016 when volunteers worked alongside surf lifesavers to collect funds during the Surf Safe Appeal, representing the first time that non-members have been actively involved in fundraising of this nature. Volunteers were also engaged to support SLSQ’s workforce through a range of programs including the Heli Ball, Q1 Stair Challenge, work experience, internships, and corporate support from clean-up days through to facilitating business improvement workshops. In total, 301 volunteers were recruited this year, collectively donating 2,450 hours of their time to support SLSQ. Development has begun on a new marketing plan for the WVP moving forward. To be rolled out in 2017/18, the ‘Volunteer Your Way’ campaign will build on the program’s existing success through the recruitment of additional volunteers.

• A greater focus on improving the effectiveness of SLSQ’s on-boarding, reducing costs and increasing the transfer-oflearning process and effectiveness of employees; • Continued application of the newly developed biannual performance reviews framework, providing managers and their employees with valuable time to engage in open and honest dialogue;

2017 Employee Engagement Survey

• Commencement on an extensive review of all SLSQ employee policies; • A greater focus on effective HR metrics and reporting, leading to improved strategic workforce planning and significantly lowering indirect costs in recruitment and training;

For the first time since 2014, an extensive Employee Engagement Survey was conducted to measure morale and feedback across a range of areas. The 2017 survey was largely consistent with the 2014 survey, allowing for valid and accurate comparison. In total, 85 per cent of the 102 employees approached for feedback participated in the survey. Key highlights are identified below:

• The successful implementation of the Human Resource Information System (HRIS) / Payroll System and Employee Portal, improving efficiencies across SLSQ;

• 95 per cent of respondents indicated they were proud to work at SLSQ, a result consistent with the 2014 survey; • 85 per cent rated coming to work as a seven or higher out of ten (with ten being excellent), a 1 per cent increase on 2014;

• An extensive review conducted into casual staff numbers to ensure that all employees were actively engaged, and staff requirements were aligned with organisational needs; and

• 78 per cent indicated they would recommend SLSQ as an employer, a result consistent with 2014;

• A series of videos were produced with senior managers, focusing on SLSQ’s values, for inclusion within the onboarding process.

• 79 per cent believed their role is valued, slightly down on 2014; • 69 per cent rated staff morale as a seven or higher out of ten, slightly down on 2014;

HR Support Plan

• 90 per cent believe their managers are approachable and easy to talk to, a 3 per cent increase on 2014;

There was a large focus this year to increase the strategic and targeted approach to HR-related activities at SLSQ. This was underpinned by the development of a divisional support plan (Business Plan), providing internal stakeholders with an overarching strategy for how the HR department will add value to SLSQ’s operations moving forward.

• 54 per cent rate communication as a seven out of ten or higher, a 12 per cent increase on 2014; • 37 per cent believe there are career progression opportunities available at SLSQ, a 10 per cent decrease on 2014;

The Support Plan now sees the HR department working towards a team vision ‘To ignite a framework for a positive, passionate, and productive workplace.’

Moving forward, SLSQ’s senior managers will work closely to assess the feedback and identify key areas that can be addressed to maintain and strengthen employee engagement, satisfaction, and productivity.

Importantly, this strategic approach is helping to streamline services, improve the recruitment, retention and on-boarding processes, and ensure that HR activities are aligned with SLSQ’s wider business objectives.

Staff snapshot

Workplace Volunteer Program Now in its second season, SLSQ’s Workplace Volunteer Program (WVP) has continued to strengthen. The program is designed to tap

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

In 2016/17, SLSQ encompassed 125 full-time staff members, 27 permanent part-time staff members, and a further 405 casuals. In addition, some 40 permanent lifeguards were employed, along with 22 permanent part-time lifeguards, and a further 281 casuals. In total, 72.35 per cent of employees this season were male, with 27.64 percent female.

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MEDIA AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS SLSQ’s Media and Public Affairs (MPA) unit continues to play a key role when it comes to shaping and enhancing the organisation’s public profile through the delivery of proactive and reactive messaging across the state. In 2016/17, the MPA unit continued to work closely with all divisions across SLSQ, providing communications advice and strategic media programs to assist as they worked towards their respective target achievements. A departmental restructure this season saw the MPA unit increase in size and widen its focus to providing an around-the-clock media service, seven days a week, during the patrol season. This helped build meaningful and positive relationships with key media contacts and internal stakeholders, while ensuring that surf safety messaging was proactively communicated during peak periods.

Digital media A concerted and strategic focus on building SLSQ’s social media channels paid dividends in 2016/17, with strong growth recorded across both followers and engagement. This was underpinned by a departmental restructure, which saw the appointment of a dedicated, full-time, social media officer for the first time in SLSQ’s history. Importantly, social and digital media continues to play a crucial role when it comes to supporting communication campaigns and promoting vital surf safety messaging.

Key media campaigns Surf Safe Appeal

Key developments and achievements • Off the back of increased demand and heightened communication priorities, the MPA unit increased in size and now encompasses four full-time staff members including a dedicated manager (up from three in 2015/16); • MPA shifted to seven-day coverage during the 2016/17 patrol season, with a representative stationed on the beach alongside duty officers in South East Queensland. This was designed to build stronger and more positive relationships with internal stakeholders, while maximising on-the-ground media coverage, with positive feedback from all parties including journalists; • The media team continued to build closer working relationships with key agencies and other emergency service organisations including the Queensland Police Service, Bureau of Meteorology, and the Australian Maritime Safety Authority; • The second annual SLSQ Coast Safe Report was published for external stakeholders, with significant involvement from the MPA unit. The document was released via five concurrent media launches organised across the state to coincide with the start of the 2016/17 patrol season; and • SLSQ’s media team worked closely with athletes, coaches, and other key stakeholders to achieve significant media coverage for the 2017 Queensland Youth and Senior Surf Life Saving Championships. In total, SLSQ’s media activities reached an audience in excess of eight million people, while its digital campaign reached more than 511,000 people online.

SLSQ’s media unit worked to achieve considerable coverage of the 13th annual Surf Safe Appeal, held across one week in October 2016. The overarching campaign objective was to generate public awareness around the financial cost of establishing and maintaining volunteer beach patrols in Queensland, and this key messaging was incorporated into all communications activities. From a media perspective, the Appeal was kick-started with an exclusive story strategically placed in The Courier Mail, designed to generate community debate and initial awareness of the campaign. This was followed up with a number of regional stories, and supported by a dedicated social media campaign. This approach ensured the average daily value of media coverage throughout the Appeal period increased by more than 10 per cent when compared to the year before. Westpac Helicopter – 40th anniversary On 5 December 2016, the Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service commemorated its 40th anniversary and, to mark the occasion, SLSQ’s media unit rolled out a six month project plan to raise awareness of the service and celebrate its achievements over the years. The extensive communications campaign featured two media calls on the Gold and Sunshine Coasts to highlight the milestone, with a raft of dedicated media stories successfully pitched and set up in the months leading up to the anniversary date. The campaign was successful in elevating the public profile of SLSQ’s helicopter service, with dozens of stories achieved across regional, metropolitan, and national media outlets. End of summer media activation On 1 March 2017, the Gold Coast was awash in red and yellow of a different variety when SLSQ’s media unit laid 1,400 pairs of surf lifesaving thongs on the sand to mark the official end of summer. Each pair of thongs represented one of the rescues performed by SLSQ’s lifesavers and lifeguards over the peak season. The stunt was designed to generate mass media coverage to promote the work of SLSQ’s patrolling members, highlight the importance of swimming between the red and yellow flags, and celebrate a drowning-free summer holiday period. The activation resulted in significant and widespread coverage across the state encompassing radio, television, print, and online media.

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MARKETING AND PARTNERSHIPS SLSQ’s Marketing and Partnerships department is directly responsible for overseeing strategic marketing direction, brand management, fundraising initiatives, and the organisation’s suite of corporate and government partnerships. As ‘custodians of the brand’, the department also seeks to work collaboratively with internal and external stakeholders to create a sense of value and community engagement for SLSQ and its affiliates.

• With thanks to Breaka Flavoured Milk, SLSQ launched the ‘Nipper of the Week’ program at all surf life saving clubs across the state, recognising junior members on a weekly basis across the season; • In June 2017, SLSQ welcomed a new accommodation partner, Mantra Group, which has committed to support surf lifesaving through a multi-year agreement; and • The UQ academic partnership continued to gain momentum, with the University’s research unit commencing a number of exciting programs aimed at assisting SLSQ with best practices in lifesaving operations and communication strategies.

Marketing One of the key departmental roles is to provide marketing strategy and support across the organisation to protect and grow SLSQ and its affiliated brands. The team also works to assist all other internal departments with their day-to-day marketing and design needs to deliver key messages with brand consistency and help position SLSQ as the peak authority on aquatic safety. These collective efforts help build trust, loyalty, and credibility within our membership and across the wider Queensland community. Key marketing achievements from the past season include: • An overarching Marketing and Fundraising Business Plan was drafted and signed off, providing an extensive and overarching blueprint for development across the next five years;

Events As a not-for-profit organisation, SLSQ continues to rely heavily on the generous support of the community to ensure it has the resources and capacity to save lives along Queensland’s coastline. Each year SLSQ’s marketing team develops and executes a wide range of key fundraising events and initiatives, from state-wide campaigns through to regionalised and targeted initiatives. A summary of fundraising events is outlined on page 44 and includes, amongst others, the annual Surf Safe Appeal and Summer Surf Girl program.

• An inaugural website was developed and launched for the Australian Lifesaving Academy Queensland (alaq.com. au), providing a vital marketing tool, facilitating online registrations, and promoting growth in course delivery; and • The department maintained a high level of marketing and graphic design support, producing in excess of 200 collateral projects to help position SLSQ as a leading authority.

Partnerships SLSQ’s partners are crucial to the success and survival of the surf lifesaving movement in Queensland. With that in mind, SLSQ maintains a range of partners who actively share in, and seek to align with, our core vision and values. Importantly, these partnerships ensure that SLSQ has the capacity to deliver its lifesaving services and various other youth development, member education, surf safety, and community awareness initiatives across the state. SLSQ extends its thanks to all national partners, particularly Westpac and DHL, whose continued support helps the organisation maintain its frontline operations. From a state perspective, SLSQ boasts more than 20 partners including the Queensland Government, The University of Queensland (UQ), and Breaka Flavoured Milk. SLSQ thanks all of our partners for their valued support. A full list of SLSQ’s partners can be found on page 51, with all Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service partners listed on page 22. Key partnership achievements across the past 12 months include: • SLSQ maintained support from the Queensland Government, which continues to invest in a variety of areas including frontline patrols, sporting programs, and community awareness programs; • Breaka Flavoured Milk renewed its partnership with SLSQ, reaffirming its commitment to developing and nurturing the next generation of surf lifesavers through programs such as the Youth Excellence Program, Beach to Bush, and the Under-14 Junior Surf Lifesaver of the Year award;

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O U R PAR TNER S Principal

Premium

Government

Community

Media

Business

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SLSQ COMMITTEES AND PANELS

SLSQ Council

Lifesaving Committee

M. Fife OAM (President), G. Boothe (North Queensland), G. Morgan (North Barrier), C. Donnelly (Wide Bay Capricorn), J. Thorpe (Sunshine Coast), P. Chipman (South Coast), K. Hunter (Point Danger)

C. Swanton (Chair), K. Dunn, M. Stevens, L. Johnson, L. Messer, J. Palmer, E. Thomas, M. Kearney, B. Middleton, G. Hill ESM, G. Cahill, P. Lawlor, D. Meredith (Sec)

SLSQ Board

Lifesaving IRB Advisory Panel

M. Fife OAM (President), L. Murphy, D. Bragg, K. Akers, D. Woodward, M. White, T. O’Shea, J. Noye, C. Sutherland, J. Brennan OAM (Sec)

G. Tanner (Chair), T. Carle, P. Reid, T. Burgess, J. Heaton, P. Hallett, P. Lawlor, C. Fife (Sec)

Administration and IT Committee

Meritorious Awards and Lifesaving Selection Committee

C. Williams (Chair), T. McCulloch, A. Fry, J. McDougall, T. Duncan, N. Banner, K. Barnes, B. Kelly, M. Gerry, J. Benneche, M. Williams, J. Sparkes, N. Edwards (Sec)

C. Swanton (Chair), R. Campbell, K. Phillips, N. Palmer (Sec) Membership Services Committee R. Campbell (Chair), T. Sealy, F. Grant, W. Hagan, K. Phillips, S. Morgan, B. Heaney, R. Fien, B. Lofthouse, T. Draman, N. Palmer (Sec)

Audit, Finance and Compliance Committee D. Bragg (Chair), I. Barfoot, D. Cahill, A. Lawson, E. Moffatt, C. Williams, R. Murphy (Sec)

Officials Advisory Panel Coaching Advisory Panel C. Melloy (Chair), J. Norton-Smith, M. Palmer (Sec)

C. Melloy (Chair), D. Mathison, B. Walsh, R. Bartlett, A. Seeney, W. Massey, K. Bostock, B. Cremer, R. Griffiths

Education Panel

Officials and Assessors Finance Committee

B. Middleton (Chair), K. Glithero, A. Grant, R. Morgan, T. Pade, G. Gage, R. Gibb, C. Neumann, R. Fien, C. Swanton, M. Fife, J. Campton

C. Melloy (Chair), C. Swanton, T. Tallon OAM, J. Hamrey, S. Della Bianca, P. Hall, R. Griffiths, A. Seeney, M. Buttrum, S. Crichton, K. Bostock, D. Burchill OAM, J. Paskin, J. Hamrey

Helicopter Operations Panel

Operations Support Panel

G. Hill ESM (Chair), P. Gibson, P. Bird, R. Murphy, K. Richardson, H. Gynther, A. McNeilly, S. Krantz, K. Dunn, T. Hughes, A. Watt (Sec)

K. Dunn (Chair), J. Crockatt, B. Goulding, T. Hughes, G. Ferreira, T. McClintock, G. Long, D. McLean, R. Melton, C. Swanton, G. Hill ESM, N. Fife, J. Argent (Sec)

IRB Competition Panel

R&R Competition Panel

T. Carle (Chair), M. Stevens, C. Pashalis, J. Heaton, G. Tanner, T. Burgess, P. Reid, C. Sealy, S. Stephenson, S. Urban, R. Turner, M. Palmer (Sec)

C. Melloy (Chair), Scott Byrnes Rescue Water Craft Panel

Judiciary Committee

G. Ferreira (Chair), I. Garofolo, B. Scoffell, J. Doyle, P. Rennex, W. Harrison, M. McDonald, C. Dreyer, K. Burns, S. Urban, D. James, K. Dunn, J. Argent, T. McClintock (Sec)

M. Raeburn (Chair), P. Kelly (Chair), D. Boulton OAM, R. Whitmore OAM, C. Melloy, R. Bartlett, I. Young OAM, S. Crichton, K. Bostock, C. Williams (Sec), N. Edwards (Minute Sec)

Sport Meritorious Awards Selection Panel

Junior Activities Panel R. Fien (Chair), T. Smith, C. Cameron, J. Wells, S. Paskin, A. Cordingley, D. Love, K. Schofield, N. Palmer (Sec)

C. Melloy (Chair), D. Mathison, M. Goodman, S. Della Bianca, N. Ward, S. Hogben, M. Sanagan (Sec) Sport Selection Panel

Lifeguard Advisory Panel

C. Melloy (Chair), N. Kelk OAM, W. Lee, A. Moore, M. Palmer (Sec)

G. Cahill (Chair), J. March, R. Blanchard, H. Ridland, J. Davis, A. King, R. Drury, T. Robinson, J. Campton, C. Lovitt, G. Willey, G. Hill ESM, P. Lawlor, R. Barber (Sec)

Surf Boat Panel

Life Members and Civil Honours Panel

Surf Sports Committee

M. Fife OAM (Chair), R. Tallon OAM, D. Hoyland OAM, R. Whitmore, I. Young OAM, W. Massey, R. Bartlett, S. Crichton, K. Bostock

C. Melloy (Chair), M. Goodman, J. Heery, B. Cremer, S. Della Bianca, S. Dick, D. Mathison, P. Wessel, W. McLennan, J. Norton-Smith, T. Smith, D. Abel, S. Hogben, R. Bennett, M. Palmer, M. Sanagan (Sec)

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

P. Wessel (Chair), P. Grayson, G. Williams, G. Huegil, B. Bell, J. Bean

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SLSQ LIFE MEMBERS

GB Andrews OAM*, EC Avery*, JR Barlow*, R Bartlett, PJ Berigan OAM*, JJ Betts*, KC Bird OAM, D Bird*, R Blackman*, KF Bostock, DJ Boulton OAM, WJ Broadhurst*, DW Brockhurst*, RA Brumley, NF Bullpitt MBE*, DS Burchill OAM, FE Burke, RA Burrell*, RJ Butler OAM, MC Buttrum, SM Byrnes OAM, J Church*, MJ Claybourn OAM*, MA Clyde, KJ Collins*, PJ Connell, BF Coomber*, L Coomber, S Costa*, TR Cramond AO OBE*, D Crevola, SL Crichton, BJ Crichton OAM, WJ Daley*, W Darwen*, RJ Davidson OAM*, JB Dearlove MBE, RP Devlin AM QC, VA Doig OAM, AR Donaldson*, KC Dunn, T Eldridge, CG Englert*, PJ Fenner AM, M Fife, MA Fife OAM, R Findlater*, DC Foreman*, AB Frizzell OBE OAM*, JC Galea, RJ Gear AM*, JL Gordon*, IJ Grant OAM, JE Gray*, FJ Grell, AG Griffiths, RF Griffiths, BJ Guilfoyle*, R Halpin*, RJ Harding OAM, CA Hargrave*, WJ Harris, K Hart, J Hayes, NJ Heywood OBE, R Holden*, C Honey*, KF Hoskins OAM, N Howland*, D Howlett*, DP Hoyland OAM, TJ Imrie OAM, AJ Inwood, D Irvine*, H Irvine, CJ Jeanneret OAM, JM Jones OAM*, DL Johnson*, SA Johnson MBE*, NT Kelk OAM, A Kennedy OAM*, MJ Klingner*, DJ Lennox, P Lucas, PJ Madden*, MM Mahon, WJ Massey, DJ Mathison, JG McCarthy*, HF McGrath*, GD McKenzie OAM*, DM McLean ESM, W McLennan, JW McMaster AM DFC*, A McNeilly, M McNeilly MBE, RA McPherson*, JA Menico OAM, GS Merry AM, ME Mulcahy*, J Mullins*, A Nicholson OAM*, GF Nicklin*, HJ Nix*, WH Nixon OAM*, AG Nixon*, KL O’Connell, S O’Connor OAM, JD Ogilvie OAM, AB Parkyn OAM*, J Paskin, JC Paterson, FC Payne, R Pollard, CD Pratt*, GD Radel*, RE Rankin AM, CF Richards*, P Roubin*, JR Sellars*, H Silman*, CG Smith, EJ Smith AM*, C Sparkes, MD Stevens, JH Spencer*, JR Spender OBE*, JJ Stewart*, RC Tallon OAM*, JC Taylor OAM, CE Taylor*, MR Taylor*, CJ Taylor OAM*, GJ Terrell*, RJ Thomas, BR Thorne, FO Venning*, BL Walsh, MA Webb OAM*, HJ Weimer*, PJ White, RT Whitmore OAM, ST Wilcox OAM*, BF Wilkes*, CM Williams, A Williams*, BD Williamson OAM, JA Williamson AM, SW Winders MBE*, JR Winders OBE*, NS Woodroffe*, R Wyeth, IJ Young OAM, R Zillman* *denotes deceased

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2016/17 AWARD WINNERS 2017 Summer Surf Girl

Clive Hammond OAM Silver Medal • North Queensland – Gary Williams (Ellis Beach)

• Summer Surf Girl – Shelley Roberts (Palm Beach)

• North Barrier – Darrin Bragg (Townsville Picnic Bay)

• Runner-Up – Monica Wilkie (Mermaid Beach)

• Wide Bay Capricorn – Kirsty Glithero (Yeppoon)

• Innovation Award – Shelley Roberts (Palm Beach)

• Sunshine Coast – Scott Summers (Sunshine Beach)

• Highest Fundraiser – Jo Morgan (Ayr)

• South Coast – Wayne McLennan (Broadbeach) • Point Danger – Mary Farrell (Palm Beach)

2015/16 AWARD WINNERS*

Operations Support Awards

• Breaka U14 Junior Surf Lifesaver of the Year – Chloe Boland (Surfers Paradise)

Gold Coast: • Operations Support Person of the Year – Jack McNeil

• U18 Junior Surf Lifesaver of the Year – Sandi Davis (Moore Park)

• Duty Officer of the Year – Matthew Crooks • SurfCom Operator of the Year – Bryan Durham • WaveRunner 1 – Skye Bond

• U18-25 Young Surf Lifesaver of the Year – Benjamin Ellwood (Maroochydore)

• WaveRunner 3 – Scott Gilbert

• Surf Lifesaver of the Year – Kirsty Glithero (Yeppoon)

• WaveRunner 4 – Nicolas Offroy

• Volunteer of the Year – Michael Hughes (Mudjimba)

• WaveRunner 5 – Ben Wilson

• Clive Hammond OAM Gold Medal – Kevin Schofield (Pacific)

• WaveRunner 6 – Carter De Wilde

• Lifeguard of the Year – Shane Bevan

• WaveRunner 8 – Mike Stone

• Club of the Year – Pacific • Andy Frizzell OAM, OBE Award for Services to Junior Activities – Sharon Brennan (Point Lookout)

Sunshine Coast: • Operations Support Person of the Year – Scott Summers • Duty Officer of the Year – Sebastian De Paula

• Operations Support Person of the Year – Kamen Burns (Sunshine Coast Region)

• SurfCom Operator of the Year – Tony Jackson

• Assessor of the Year – Guy Tanner (Mudjimba)

• WaveRunner 12 – Robbie Schwartz

• Trainer of the Year – Peter Gabbert (Nobbys Beach)

• WaveRunner 14 – Dion Pola

• Youth Development Club of the Year – Pacific SLSC

• WaveRunner 15 – John Lawrence

• Junior Athlete of the Year – Lani Pallister (Alexandra Headland)

• WaveRunner 16 – Andrew Owen

• Athlete of the Year – Shannon Eckstein (Northcliffe)

• WaveRunner 17 – Frank Liberato

• Coach of the Year – Ryan Hoffman (Kurrawa)

• WaveRunner 18 – Chris Vaughan

• 15-18 Youth Athlete of the Year – Nicole Kay (Kurrawa)

• WaveRunner 19 – Ricky Halket

• Masters Athlete of the Year – Lee Vrolyks (Northcliffe) • Official of the Year – Scott Byrnes (Kirra)

Sports Club Championships

• Rookie Coach of the Year – Brock Redwood (Sunshine Beach)

• 2016 Queensland IRB Championships – North Burleigh

• Rookie Official of the Year – Jesse Witt (Etty Bay)

• 2016 North Australian Championships – Cairns

• Team Manager of the Year – Jason Wells (Townsville Picnic Bay)

• 2016 Queensland Pool Rescue Championships – Maroochydore

• Team Manager of the Year – Danyelle Lipponen (Coolangatta)

• 2016 Queensland Endurance Championships – Noosa Heads

• Team of the Year – Open Patrol Competition Team (Alexandra Headland)

• 2017 Laerdal Queensland Surf Rescue Championships – Alexandra Headland

• President’s Cup – Alexandra Headland

• 2017 Queensland Board Riding Championships – Alexandra Headland

• Community Education Program of the Year – Little Lifesavers Southbank

• 2017 Queensland Youth Surf Life Saving Championships – Alexandra Headland

• Multicultural Outstanding Volunteer of the Year – Mohammad Farahani (Brisbane Lifesaving Service)

• 2017 Queensland Surf Life Saving Championships – Northcliffe

• Multicultural Outstanding Service of the Year – Brisbane Lifesaving Service

• 2007 Queensland Masters Surf Life Saving Championships – Alexandra Headland

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

* These awards were announced at SLSQ’s 2016 Awards of Excellence Gala Dinner, after the 2015/16 Annual Report was produced and tabled.

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Chloe Boland, 2015/16 Breaka Under-14 Junior Surf Lifesaver of the Year

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

Michael Hughes, 2015/16 Queensland Volunteer of the Year

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LIFESAVING EXCELLENCE AWARDS Each year SLSQ’s Lifesaving Excellence Awards seek to recognise the efforts of clubs, individuals, and members of the community for their bravery and/or lifesaving actions. These awards honour the individuals whose dedication and selflessness have directly saved the life or lives of others. In 2016/17, awards were presented to:

suspected spinal injuries at South Stradbroke Island on 4 March 2017; • Rachel Eddy for the outstanding rescue of two swimmers caught in a rip in unstable conditions almost 100 metres offshore in fading light at Kurrawa Beach on 4 March 2017**;

• Henry Dingle for the successful rescue of a fellow competitor during the North Australian Championships at Main Beach, Mackay, on 31 October 2015;

• Sam Archer, Connor Buhk, Lex Heilbronn, Christopher Vorbach, and Matthew Cleverly for the outstanding mass rescue of 12 people caught in a flash rip at Alexandra Headland on 5 March 2017;

• Bill Partridge for the outstanding rescue of two males, aged 68 and 70, caught in a rip at Nielson Park Beach, Bargara, on 17 August 2016;

• Nicholas Langenberg, Sarah Sammut, Jesse Mantel, and Bailie Nash for the outstanding rescue of two swimmers in dangerous surf conditions at South Gorge, North Stradbroke Island, on 11 March 2017;

• Teisha Towner for the outstanding rescue of four swimmers aged 38, 26, five and eight, caught in a rip at Oaks Beach, Burnett Heads, on 1 October 2016**; • Daren Keena for the outstanding rescue of two male swimmers, aged 15 and 31, swept 300 metres offshore at Elliott Heads River mouth on 17 October 2016;

• Ryan Weeks and Boaz Bragg for the successful rescue of a young male in the aftermath of Tropical Cyclone Debbie at Moneys Creek Lagoon on 31 March 2017;

• Christian Damic, Michael Gray, Fletcher Ericson, and Julie Davis for the outstanding rescue of a 31-year-old Korean male and 20-year-old German female at Elliott Heads River mouth on 18 October 2016;

• Shannon Kurz, Andrew McNeilly, and Paul Brennan for outstanding emergency care management during the evacuation of two 15-year-old tourists at North Gorge, North Stradbroke Island, on Wednesday 12 April 2017;

• Sherylea Gray for the vital assistance provided during the successful rescue of a 31-year-old Korean male and 20-year-old German female at Elliott Heads River mouth on 18 October 2016;

• Jy Taylor for the outstanding tube rescue of a 25-year-old male at Coolangatta Beach on 16 April 2017;

• Daniel Robinson, Aaron Jones, and Corey Jones for the successful resuscitation of a 65-year-old male at Happy Valley on 7 November 2016;

• Jayke Menefy for the outstanding rescue of a 38-year-old father of two at an unpatrolled stretch of beach near Teewah on Sunday 16 April 2017** (pictured bottom right);

• Matthew Crooks and Jack McNeil for outstanding bravery during the successful rescue of a male swimmer caught in a rip after dark at Surfers Paradise Beach on 24 December 2016;

• John Hamrey, Jamie Miller, Michael Seymour, Jack Seymour, Stephen Spencer, and Meaghan Seymour for the successful resuscitation of a 70-year-old male following a heart attack near Bilinga SLSC on 1 May 2017;

• Aaron Fowler for the outstanding rescue of 11 people at Tallebudgera Beach across three separate days including 27 and 31 December 2016, and 1 January 2017*; • Teresa Hartley and Matthew Scott for the outstanding rescue of a semi-conscious male who slipped on rocks, broke his leg, and was struggling to stay afloat at Point Vernon, Hervey Bay, on 29 December 2016;

• Geoffrey Wright, Garna Dowling, Tai Dowling, Leon Dunstan, and Kerri-Ann Whichello for the outstanding rescue of three swimmers caught in a rip at the unpatrolled Tugun Beach on 21 May 2017;

• Douglas Rodgers, Patrick Rodgers, Meghean Seymour, Jack Seymour, Tremayne Saxby, and John Hamrey for the outstanding rescue of an elderly male swimmer caught in a rip at Bilinga Beach on 31 December 2016;

• Sunshine Coast Airport in appreciation of its outstanding support for SLSQ’s vision of saving lives; • Cairns Airport in appreciation of its outstanding support for SLSQ’s vision of saving lives;

• Tallebudgera SLSC Patrol Group Nine for the outstanding rescue of a male swimmer in difficult surf conditions on 31 December 2016;

• Peter Bird for distinguished service to SLSQ, through its Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service, and for outstanding professionalism and bravery across 19 years of aerial surveillance, search, and rescue operations;

• Hayden Phelan for outstanding leadership under extraordinary circumstances at Main Beach, Emu Park, on 19 January 2017; • Connor O’Sullivan for his exceptional vigilance on patrol, assisting multiple tourists to shore on an extremely busy day at Green Island on 17 February 2017*;

• Kevin Dunn for outstanding leadership and commitment to SLSQ while serving as Operational Support Officer from 2002 to 2017;

• Declan Ebzery and Damian Ebzery for the successful rescue of a 15-year-old male at North Burleigh Beach on 4 February 2017;

• Karen Morris in appreciation of her support of SLSQ’s ‘On The Same Wave’ program; and

• Kimberly Rase, Gemma Price, and Laurien Grondona-Paz for the outstanding rescue of a 45-year-old fisherman at North Gorge, North Stradbroke Island, on 18 February 2017; • Nathan Long and Grahame Long for the outstanding first aid treatment and care provided to a 27-year-old male with

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

• Charlie Schwerkolt for loyal and dedicated support of SLSQ and our surf safety message to ‘Always swim between the flags’. * Denotes Queensland Rescue of the Month winners ** Denotes Queensland and Australian Rescue of the Month winners

56

2 0 1 6 – 17


Top: Lord Mayor of Brisbane Graham Quirk at SLSQ’s Little Lifesavers program. Bottom: Nipper Jayke Menefy meets Christian Nunez, the man he rescued.

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

57

2 0 1 6 – 17


S TATIS TICS, R ES ULT S A N D FINANCIA L S


General

Honorary

Leave/ Restricted

Life Member

Long Service

Non-Member

Past Active

Probationary

Reserve Active

Total per Club

38 37 31 39 41 54 20 32 25 22 339

8 4 10 5 14 12 5 8 2 68

2 1 3 4 18 10 6 8 4 3 59

11 12 26 15 51 30 17 13 9 7 191

18 33 19 32 17 22 2 2 145

6 5 5 4 4 10 5 9 2 5 55

1 1 25 28 55

-

-

3 2 13 7 13 2 5 1 1 2 49

1 1 8 1 11

2 2

1 1 2

11 9 1 7 2 14 13 57

4 1 2 1 8

97 105 113 110 175 145 83 100 57 56

13 16 46 53 47 49 20 18 63 47 19 25 28 25 469

3 1 4 5 14 15 3 5 8 7 7 3 7 82

1 1 8 5 11 9 4 5 5 4 3 8 4 5 73

18 13 39 24 24 20 39 24 18 14 29 18 7 8 295

3 10 15 26 35 49 9 19 34 50 29 27 11 22 339

1 1 1 1 1 1 3 9

1 1

2 7 4 1 2 1 1 1 1 20

1 1 2

5 4 16 3 17 2 11 3 1 5 3 18 3 12 8 111

4 5 5 1 1 16

-

1 1 1 3

1 1 1 1 2 1 1 8

1 1 1 1 1 5

44 45 137 117 157 146 84 72 8 4 132 128 115 92 70 82

M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F

64 48 42 68 54 71 16 11 21 21 67 62 50 45 52 71 763

6 8 13 5 10 10 4 1 9 10 5 7 1 6 95

5 8 7 4 5 6 1 4 9 4 5 8 13 11 90

30 13 26 17 32 18 7 1 9 5 39 32 13 6 19 7 274

1 2 38 61 22 34 6 5 10 18 48 54 28 34 10 11 382

6 8 5 2 2 4 6 3 5 1 3 7 7 59

39 43 1 1 1 85

1 1 1 3 6

2 1 3 2 1 1 1 11

9 2 11 1 7 1 9 3 12 1 10 3 6 4 79

4 1 2 3 10

1 1

3 1 3 1 8

1 1 1 15 20 3 7 1 2 2 53

1 3 1 2 1 8

163 134 149 162 149 168 33 25 58 58 193 173 117 112 111 119

M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F

40 38 254 264 83 81 118 102 55 48 119 107 150 113 290 291 143 152 87 100 219 206 127 104 102 108 109 89 3,699

11 9 40 30 16 16 8 15 8 4 16 13 36 36 33 44 13 16 19 6 23 16 14 14 11 12 7 11 497

11 9 82 46 14 13 14 4 15 6 19 16 13 16 43 32 19 15 6 6 31 20 9 11 18 7 5 9 509

27 20 136 77 78 31 92 39 46 25 68 44 91 49 206 151 189 84 60 34 123 56 59 28 47 30 31 17 1,938

30 46 240 289 66 102 92 114 52 62 49 91 107 145 251 311 106 164 58 90 155 208 68 97 69 96 58 85 3,301

7 5 33 29 7 6 13 24 15 10 1 9 13 11 19 12 42 18 11 7 16 11 3 1 4 7 2 336

39 43 1 1 1 1 1 87

2 1 1 1 4 3 88 40 1 24 45 1 2 213

1 2 1 1 1 1 1 8 6 4 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 3 40

13 18 1 16 2 27 1 18 3 5 5 50 3 45 3 32 2 11 1 16 2 24 2 31 2 1 334

2 1 81 19 11 2 35 4 1 1 1 68 17 72 31 97 23 17 3 23 6 14 4 6 1 5 3 548

2 4 2 8

1 1 4 1 41 4 4 2 2 1 61

8 8 1 3 1 1 1 8 6 7 6 9 6 19 10 1 1 1 2 1 100

7 5 4 1 1 2 1 7 9 1 1 5 1 45

142 128 941 814 293 254 404 311 219 164 280 288 630 438 975 882 728 532 285 257 632 537 320 264 291 266 223 218

M F M F M F M F M F

TOTAL

NORTH BARRIER BRANCH

Forrest Beach Arcadian Townsville Picnic Bay Ayr Bowen Eimeo Mackay Sarina

M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F

TOTAL

WIDE BAY CAPRICORN BRANCH

Yeppoon Emu Park Tannum Sands Agnes Water Moore Park Bundaberg Elliott Heads Hervey Bay TOTAL Rainbow Beach Noosa Heads Sunshine Beach

SUNSHINE COAST BRANCH

Coolum Beach Marcoola Mudjimba Maroochydore Alexandra Headland Mooloolaba Kawana Waters Dicky Beach Metropolitan Caloundra Bribie Island Redcliffe Peninsula TOTAL

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

60

2 0 1 6 – 17

Total Membership

Award

Mission Beach

Associate

Etty Bay

Active Senior (18+ yrs)

Cairns

Active Junior (15-18 yrs)

Ellis Beach

Active Cadet (13-15 yrs)

Port Douglas

Jnr Activities (5-13 yrs)

NORTH QLD BRANCH

MEMBERSHIP 202 223 320 183 113 1,041 89 254 303 156 12 260 207 152 1,433 297 311 317 58 116 366 229 230 1,924 270 1,755 547 715 383 568 1,068 1,857 1,260 542 1,169 584 557 441 11,716


Past Active

Probationary

Reserve Active

Total per Club

93 83 33 30 179 144 68 59 172 111 49 59 161 165 156 140 110 112 114 111 189 157 219 230 2,944

4 5 3 5 11 6 1 9 22 17 6 5 11 7 11 13 18 14 16 8 4 8 19 15 238

18 15 3 2 22 20 5 3 85 50 13 13 29 24 19 18 21 12 9 12 8 18 31 29 479

38 18 11 13 122 54 78 33 144 75 58 31 97 48 115 59 95 41 49 20 112 62 154 88 1,615

83 104 11 14 149 174 42 52 78 85 42 59 157 191 132 166 63 94 59 88 114 125 197 252 2,531

31 29 2 3 12 16 6 11 1 1 15 3 23 30 3 21 1 3 18 13 10 7 3 3 265

-

4 5 7 6 6 6 5 2 1 4 1 4 2 2 1 7 23 86

1 5 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 3 1 1 3 2 4 3 38

13 4 5 1 24 3 20 2 21 5 16 3 15 1 27 8 2 24 19 2 21 1 237

21 5 1 42 2 33 60 17 6 4 99 25 20 4 3 1 19 3 71 18 48 12 514

3 1 3 4 11

8 4 1 9 5 4 2 3 2 2 1 14 8 63

11 5 5 8 15 9 3 1 5 2 11 5 5 2 87

3 4 1 1 5 7 2 3 26

327 278 74 77 601 440 264 176 590 363 213 178 612 498 495 426 339 287 309 256 541 406 720 664

152 138 72 56 134 132 163 135 139 81 61 46 56 48 60 63 44 67 98 115 62 82 2,004

4 7 5 10 10 9 16 10 5 3 2 4 4 6 7 7 1 3 13 7 4 6 143

18 17 12 10 29 12 35 34 16 12 9 6 6 10 26 21 17 24 12 13 9 6 354

81 43 43 21 70 45 133 62 81 43 18 3 35 11 52 17 73 39 73 34 32 10 4 4 1,027

72 105 24 39 75 103 70 73 70 91 50 45 39 51 50 58 45 52 67 91 65 78 4 1 1,418

1 1 2 5 23 23 3 1 1 3 8 8 7 10 3 1 2 3 1 1 107

-

4 1 1 1 1 3 1 2 2 8 2 1 27

4 2 1 3 3 1 4 3 1 1 2 2 1 1 29

14 1 9 2 20 15 20 6 28 31 18 21 1 9 1 196

23 3 4 1 6 92 11 60 3 6 16 2 19 4 21 5 7 4 1 288

1 1 2

2 1 1 22 9 4 5 33 3 1 81

2 11 2 8 4 4 2 3 1 1 1 1 4 5 2 51

1 1 9 1 4 1 1 1 19

376 318 184 148 356 306 586 361 405 238 149 107 175 127 253 180 232 212 357 274 192 188 14 8

M F

2,584 2,364 4,948

197 184 381

452 381 833

1,768 874 2,642

1,758 2,191 3,949

176 196 372

-

61 52 113

42 25 67

405 28 433

681 121 802

3 10 13

107 37 144

90 48 138

40 5 45

M F

1 1

2 2

-

30 20 50

1 1

4 1 5

-

-

-

-

-

-

5 5 10

13 17 30

-

55 44 99

M F

5,237 4,982

575 550

864 700

3,514 1,876

3,515 4,602

418 418

109 119

196 156

68 53

896 110

1,148 239

7 17

168 60

221 165

91 20

17,027 14,066

10,219

1,125

1,564

5,390

8,117

836

228

352

120

1,006

1,387

24

228

386

111

31,093

M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F

TOTAL Tallebudgera Pacific Palm Beach (QLD)

POINT DANGER BRANCH

Currumbin Tugun Bilinga North Kirra Kirra Coolangatta Tweed Heads Coolangatta Rainbow Bay Point Danger Branch

M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F

TOTAL

Gold Coast TOTAL

Brisbane Lifesaving Service TOTAL State Total Surf Life Saving Queensland

Total Male Nippers

5,237

Total Active Patrolling Male Membership

5,462

14,066

Total Female Nippers

4,982

Total Active Patrolling Female Membership

3,564

Grand Total Membership

31,093

Grand Total Nippers

10,219

Total Active Patrolling Membership

9,026

2 0 1 6 – 17

1,041 440 953 391 1,110 921 626 565 947 1,384

694 332 662 947 643 256 302 433 444 631 380 22

8,364 14,880 6,516 14,880

17,027

61

151

5,746

Total Female Membership

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

605

9,134

Total Male Membership

Membership statistics are generated from a SurfGuard Summary Report as at 5 May 2017

Total Membership

Non-Member

Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park

Long Service

North Burleigh

Life Member

Miami Beach

Leave/ Restricted

Nobbys Beach

Honorary

Mermaid Beach AEME

General

Kurrawa

Award

Broadbeach

Associate

Northcliffe

Active Senior (18+ yrs)

SOUTH COAST BRANCH

Surfers Paradise

Active Junior (15-18 yrs)

Southport

Active Cadet (13-15 yrs)

Coochiemudlo Island

Jnr Activities (5-13 yrs) Point Lookout

99

31,093


LIFESAVING PATROL ACTIVITY Rescue Tube

Seabob

Rescue Board

IRB

RWC

Other

Total Rescues

Prevent Actions

Closure - Sharks

Missing Persons

Spinal Injuries

Fractures

Defib Cases

Oxygen Therapy

Resus (CPR)

Minor

Major

Minor

Major

Other

Total First Aid

FIRST AID TREATMENTS

Without Gear

RESCUES

Port Douglas

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

493

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

-

23

1

-

32

Ellis Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

332

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

13

-

13

-

-

26

Cairns

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

394

0:00

-

-

1

-

-

-

4

-

18

-

-

23

Etty Bay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

543

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

11

-

-

13

Mission Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

215

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

2

1

-

6

BRANCH TOTAL

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,977

0:00

-

-

1

-

-

-

30

-

67

2

-

100

Forrest Beach Arcadian (Alma Bay/The Strand Net 2) Picnic Bay (Magnetic Island/The Strand Net 1) Ayr

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

702

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

25

-

6

-

-

31

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

338

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

103

-

65

-

-

168

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

653

0:00

1

-

-

-

-

-

51

-

31

2

-

84

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

92

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

59

-

1

-

-

60

Bowen

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Eimeo

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

508

0:00

-

1

-

-

1

-

41

-

6

-

-

49

Mackay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

398

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

77

-

4

1

-

82

Sarina

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

314

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

26

-

3

1

-

30

BRANCH TOTAL

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

3,005

0:00

1

1

-

-

1

-

382

-

116

4

-

504

Yeppoon

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,947

0:33:55

-

-

-

-

1

-

26

-

28

1

-

56

Emu Park

4

-

-

-

1

-

-

5

207

1:25:12

-

-

-

-

-

-

13

-

19

2

-

34

Tannum Sands

1

-

-

4

2

-

-

7

159

0:00

-

-

-

-

1

-

14

-

13

3

-

31

Agnes Water

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

-

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Moore Park

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

897

0:01:16

-

-

-

-

1

-

131

-

22

-

-

154

Bundaberg

1

1

-

3

-

-

1

6

2,834

0:52:44

-

-

1

-

-

-

126

-

62

-

-

189

Elliott Heads

2

-

-

2

2

-

-

6

1,143

0:00

2

-

-

-

1

-

50

1

10

1

-

63

Hervey Bay

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

320

0:00

-

-

-

-

1

-

20

-

24

1

-

46

BRANCH TOTAL

8

1

-

11

5

-

1

26

7,507

2:53:07

2

-

1

-

5

-

380

1

178

8

-

573

Rainbow Beach

-

10

-

2

-

-

-

12

529

0:00

1

-

2

-

1

-

421

2

10

2

-

438

Noosa Heads

5

-

-

3

6

-

2

16

807

0:00

3

6

3

-

7

-

904

7

174

16

-

1,117

Sunshine Beach

-

3

-

1

-

-

5

9

780

0:00

2

-

-

-

1

-

572

-

25

8

-

606

Peregian Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

138

0:01:12

-

1

-

-

-

-

172

-

16

-

-

189

Coolum Beach

-

5

-

7

2

-

1

15

1,307

0:00

-

-

1

1

1

-

1,091

-

48

1

-

1,143

Mudjimba

-

13

-

-

3

-

-

16

1,433

0:50:47

2

3

-

-

-

-

874

-

42

16

-

935

Marcoola

4

6

-

2

3

-

3

18

396

0:00

2

1

-

-

3

-

162

1

19

3

-

189

Maroochydore

2

3

-

2

5

-

3

15

979

1:09:03

2

1

-

2

1

-

355

2

43

6

-

410

Alexandra Headland

-

17

-

25

21

-

-

63

1,418

0:00

2

4

3

-

1

-

537

-

43

10

-

598

Mooloolaba

2

7

-

2

22

-

2

35

7,388

0:42:56

-

13

3

-

4

-

1,913

8

221

17

-

2,179

Kawana Waters

-

1

-

7

1

-

2

11

520

0:02:58

1

1

-

-

1

-

242

1

13

2

-

260

Dicky Beach

2

6

-

5

2

-

4

19

1,284

0:00

1

-

-

-

-

-

384

-

25

6

-

415

Metropolitan Caloundra

1

14

-

7

17

-

1

40

1,679

0:00

3

3

1

-

6

-

487

6

75

14

-

592

Bribie Island

1

-

-

-

3

-

-

4

2,965

0:33:54

4

1

-

1

4

1

767

11

64

8

-

857

Redcliffe Peninsula

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

863

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

798

1

130

2

-

931

17

85

-

63

85

-

24

274

22,486

3:20:50

23

34

13

4

30

1

9,679

39

948

111

-

10,859

Point Lookout (Main Beach)

2

-

-

6

12

-

-

20

4,942

0:00

-

1

-

-

1

-

48

-

282

5

-

337

Point Lookout (Cylinder Beach)

-

-

-

8

-

-

2

10

5,291

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,051

-

115

3

-

1169

Coochiemudlo Island

-

-

-

1

-

-

1

2

178

0:00

-

1

-

-

1

-

123

-

37

-

-

162

Southport

-

26

-

20

16

-

4

66

2,599

0:18:21

2

5

-

-

2

-

997

4

47

11

-

1,066

Surfers Paradise

-

38

-

36

2

-

11

87

5,117

0:05:21

9

-

3

-

1

-

1,334

3

66

8

-

1,415

Northcliffe

1

2

-

6

2

-

1

12

619

0:00

2

1

-

-

-

-

283

-

8

3

-

295

Broadbeach

1

1

-

6

2

-

-

10

741

0:00

-

1

-

-

-

-

193

1

10

2

-

207

Kurrawa

1

1

-

14

9

-

3

28

1,412

0:00

-

-

-

-

2

-

690

2

22

1

-

717

Mermaid Beach AEME

-

7

-

6

8

-

-

21

540

0:00

-

2

-

-

1

-

314

-

17

4

-

338

Nobbys Beach

11

4

-

9

6

-

2

32

1,415

0:36:16

-

1

1

-

-

-

214

3

28

4

-

251

Miami Beach

-

3

-

10

3

-

1

17

709

0:00

1

-

1

-

1

-

163

-

23

7

-

195

North Burleigh

3

3

-

8

7

-

1

22

1,918

0:00

5

1

-

-

2

-

313

-

51

1

-

368

Burleigh Heads Mowbray Park

1

9

-

18

6

-

4

38

2,430

0:29:16

4

1

1

-

3

-

767

4

70

15

-

861

BRANCH TOTAL

20

94

-

148

73

-

30

365

27,911

1:29:14

23

14

6

-

14

-

6,490

17

776

64

-

7,381

Marine Stings

First Aid

North Queensland

North Barrier

Wide Bay Capricorn

Sunshine Coast

BRANCH TOTAL

South Coast

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

62

2 0 1 6 – 17


IRB

RWC

Other

Prevent Actions

Closure - Sharks

Missing Persons

Spinal Injuries

Fractures

Defib Cases

Oxygen Therapy

Resus (CPR)

Minor

Major

Minor

Major

Other

Total First Aid

4

1

-

11

18

-

1

35

872

0:47:34

-

5

-

-

3

-

185

1

15

1

-

210

2

12

-

8

9

-

2

33

513

0:00

-

-

1

-

1

-

75

1

8

1

-

87

Palm Beach

3

-

-

1

1

-

5

10

1,135

0:00

-

-

1

-

-

-

232

-

127

2

-

362

Currumbin

1

4

-

22

-

-

2

29

630

1:43:24

1

1

-

-

2

-

485

-

16

-

-

504

Tugun

-

-

-

2

-

-

2

4

402

0:00

-

-

-

-

1

-

125

2

2

3

-

133

Bilinga

2

-

-

5

-

-

-

7

215

0:00

-

-

-

1

1

1

59

-

9

-

-

71

North Kirra

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

1

198

0:00

-

1

-

-

1

-

238

2

13

1

-

256

Kirra

1

1

-

4

2

-

1

9

455

0:00

1

1

-

-

1

-

492

3

32

2

-

531

Coolangatta

-

11

-

17

5

-

2

35

1,108

0:18:03

-

-

-

-

2

-

267

-

11

3

-

283

Tweed Heads & Coolangatta

3

1

-

5

11

-

3

23

2,264

0:00

4

-

-

-

1

-

1,019

1

37

2

-

1,060

Total Rescues

Rescue Board

Tallebudgera Pacific

Without Gear

Seabob

FIRST AID TREATMENTS

Rescue Tube

RESCUES

Marine Stings

First Aid

Point Danger

Rainbow Bay

8

3

-

1

2

-

7

21

939

0:00:33

1

-

-

-

5

-

1,543

5

243

4

-

1,800

BRANCH TOTAL

24

34

-

76

48

-

25

207

8,731

2:49:34

7

8

2

1

18

1

4,720

15

513

19

-

5,297

GOLD COAST TOTAL

44

128

-

224

121

-

55

572

36,642

4:18:48

30

22

8

1

32

1

11210

32

1,289

83

-

12,678

CLUB TOTAL

69

214

-

298

211

-

81

873

71,617 10:32:45

56

57

23

5

68

2

21681

72

2,598

208

-

24,714

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

RWC 1

-

-

-

-

-

24

-

RWC 3

-

-

-

-

-

11

-

RWC 4

-

-

-

-

-

34

RWC 5

-

-

-

-

-

RWC 6

-

-

-

-

RWC 8

-

-

-

RWC 12

-

-

RWC 14

-

RWC 15 RWC 16

Brisbane Lifesaving Service

-

0:00

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

2

24

376

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11

109

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

34

267

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

4

350

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

29

-

29

400

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

19

-

19

498

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

20

-

20

223

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

20

-

20

104

0:00

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

15

-

15

100

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7

-

7

166

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

RWC 17

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

6

46

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

RWC 18

-

-

-

-

-

9

-

9

26

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

RWC 19

-

-

-

-

-

28

-

28

308

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

RWC 33

-

-

-

-

-

10

-

10

29

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Dawn GC

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

814

0:00

1

1

-

-

-

-

13

-

10

1

-

25

Dusk GC

1

-

-

1

-

-

-

2

662

0:00

1

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

3

-

-

6

6M ORB Rigid Hull

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

0:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

LS 45

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

9

64

0:00

31

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

2

3

LS 46

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

5

24

0:00

46

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

LOS TOTAL

1

-

-

1

-

236

14

252

4,566

0:00

79

1

1

-

-

-

16

-

14

1

2

35

VOLUNTARY SERVICES

70

214

-

299

211

236

95

1,125

76,183

10:32:45

135

58

25

5

68

2

21,697

72

2,612

210

2

24,751

AUSTRALIAN LIFEGUARD SERVICES

225

75

-

597

11

523

5

1,436 572,296 20:06:34

36

49

54

7

62

9

36,088

48

12,681

621

-

49,619

GRAND TOTAL

295

289

-

896

222

759

100

2,561 648,479 30:39:19

171

107

79

12

130

11

57,785

120

15,293

831

2

74,370

Rescue Water Craft Services

Aerial Rescue Services

Total lives saved

2,561

Total first aid treatments

Total preventative actions

648,479

Total lives saved (voluntary service)

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

74,370

63

1,125

2 0 1 6 – 17

Total preventative actions (voluntary service)

76,183

Total patrol hours (voluntary service)

343,084


LIFEGUARD ACTIVITY FIRST AID TREATMENTS

Total First Aid

Major

First Aid

Minor

Major

Minor

Resus (CPR)

Oxygen Therapy

Defib Cases

Fractures

Marine Stings

Spinal Injuries

Missing Persons

Sharks

CLOSURE DANGEROUS MARINE CREATURES Crocodiles

Prevent Actions

Total Rescues

Other

RWC

Seabob

Rescue Board

Rescue Tube

Without Gear

RESCUES

Douglas Shire Council Four Mile Beach

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

7,095

11:33:03

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

166

-

133

4

303

TOTAL

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

7,095

11:33:03

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

166

-

133

4

303

Holloways Beach

4

-

2

-

-

-

6

1,857

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

-

22

1

31

Yorkeys Knob Beach

-

-

5

-

-

-

5

3,336

0:01:42

0:12:41

-

-

-

-

-

-

39

-

84

3

126

Ellis Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

709

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

12

-

4

-

17

Palm Cove

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6,275

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

39

-

61

3

103

Trinity Beach

2

-

3

-

-

-

5

4,478

4:21:53

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

66

1

93

3

163

Clifton Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,298

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

27

-

11

-

38

Bramston Beach

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

233

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

2

-

4

Kewarra Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

679

5:22:13

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

46

-

10

1

58

Cairns Regional Council

Esplanade Lagoon

22

6

-

-

-

1

29

26,508

-

-

1

-

-

1

2

1

1

-

135

12

152

TOTAL

28

6

11

-

-

1

46

45,373

9:45:48

0:12:41

1

-

-

1

4

1

240

1

422

23

692

Department of National Parks, Sport and Racing Green Island

22

1

77

9

-

1

110

21,612

-

-

1

-

-

3

3

3

376

-

850

7

1,242

TOTAL

22

1

77

9

-

1

110

21,612

-

-

1

-

-

3

3

3

376

-

850

7

1,242

Cassowary Coast Regional Council Etty Bay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

44

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

North Mission

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

148

3:52:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

-

14

-

22

Mission Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

474

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

33

-

25

-

58

TOTAL

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

666

3:52:00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

41

-

39

-

80

Hinchinbrook Shire Council Forrest Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

65

7:00:18

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

6

1

10

TOTAL

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

65

7:00:18

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

6

1

10

The Strand Net 1

2

-

1

-

-

-

3

1,358

0:29:41

0:59:32

1

1

-

-

1

-

71

1

47

2

123

The Strand Net 2

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

853

0:36:13

0:58:55

-

-

-

-

1

-

60

-

18

2

81

The Strand Water Park

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

14,567

-

-

2

-

1

-

1

-

2

-

327

16

347

Alma Bay

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

950

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

243

1

117

4

366

Horseshoe Bay

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

1,656

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

52

3

132

8

197

Balgal Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

101

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

2

-

4

Riverway Lagoon

6

4

-

-

-

-

10

11,553

-

-

-

-

1

-

3

-

-

-

250

8

262

The Strand Rock Pool

-

1

-

-

-

-

1

896

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

36

-

124

1

161

Pallarenda

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

425

9:37:13

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

10

-

19

1

30

TOTAL

8

5

3

-

-

-

16

32,359

10:43:07

1:58:27

4

1

4

-

7

-

476

5

1,036

42

1,571

Townsville City Council

Burdekin Shire Council Alva Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

47

-

1:38:41

-

-

-

-

-

-

11

-

6

-

17

TOTAL

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

47

-

1:38:41

-

-

-

-

-

-

11

-

6

-

17

Whitsunday Regional Council Horseshoe Bay - Bowen

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

238

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

157

1

62

1

223

TOTAL

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

238

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

157

1

62

1

223

Mackay Regional Council Blue Water Lagoon

75

1

-

-

-

-

76

65,586

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,094

81

1,175

Harbour Beach

-

1

1

-

-

-

2

4,434

-

1:14:52

-

-

-

-

-

-

97

4

16

3

120

Lamberts Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,005

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

3

2

1

11

Eimeo Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

668

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

2

Sarina Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

488

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11

2

-

-

13

75

2

1

-

-

-

78

72,181

-

1:14:52

1

-

-

-

-

-

115

9

1,112

85

1,321

Emu Park Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,948

-

1:04:33

-

-

-

-

1

-

17

-

3

-

21

Yeppoon Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2,470

-

4:46:57

1

-

-

-

-

-

8

-

17

-

25

TOTAL

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4,418

-

5:51:30

1

-

-

-

1

-

25

-

20

-

46

Agnes Water Beach

-

-

18

-

-

-

18

6,664

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

334

1

204

17

556

Tannum Sands Beach

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

300

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

36

-

35

-

71

TOTAL

-

-

19

-

-

-

19

6,964

-

-

2

-

-

-

-

-

370

1

239

17

627

40

TOTAL

Livingstone Shire Council

Gladstone Regional Council

Bundaberg Regional Council Moore Park Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

554

-

1:02:39

-

-

-

-

0

-

35

-

5

-

Oaks Beach

2

1

5

-

-

-

8

1,006

-

-

-

-

-

-

0

-

54

-

20

-

74

Kelly’s Beach

-

2

5

-

1

-

8

6,568

-

2:07:00

1

1

-

-

2

-

226

1

28

3

261

Elliott Heads Beach

-

-

-

-

4

-

4

2,156

-

-

-

-

-

-

0

-

56

-

13

1

70

Nielsen Park Beach

-

3

2

-

-

-

5

1,383

-

-

-

-

-

-

0

-

79

-

9

-

88

TOTAL

-

6

12

-

5

-

25

11,667

-

3:09:39

1

1

-

-

2

-

450

1

75

4

533

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

64

2 0 1 6 – 17


Total First Aid

Major

First Aid

Minor

Major

Minor

Resus (CPR)

Oxygen Therapy

Defib Cases

Fractures

Marine Stings

Spinal Injuries

Sharks

FIRST AID TREATMENTS Missing Persons

CLOSURE DANGEROUS MARINE CREATURES Crocodiles

Prevent Actions

Total Rescues

Other

RWC

Seabob

Rescue Board

Rescue Tube

Without Gear

RESCUES

Fraser Coast Regional Council Torquay Beach

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,040

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

2

-

8

TOTAL

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,040

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6

-

2

-

8

Gympie Regional Council Rainbow Beach

2

2

16

-

1

-

21

14,994

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

969

3

90

9

1,072

TOTAL

2

2

16

-

1

-

21

14,994

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

969

3

90

9

1,072

Noosa West

-

2

4

-

-

-

6

7,135

-

-

-

3

1

1

1

1

875

1

418

11

1,312

Noosa

2

-

38

-

15

-

55

18,108

-

-

3

6

4

-

1

-

3,889

3

1,832

47

5,782

Sunshine

3

3

20

-

-

-

26

21,022

-

-

-

1

2

-

2

-

2,797

2

172

15

2,991

Sunrise

-

-

6

-

-

-

6

3,591

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

522

-

92

4

618

North Peregian

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,644

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

362

-

35

1

398

Peregian

-

-

2

-

-

-

2

7,882

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

970

1

177

2

1,150

TOTAL

5

5

70

-

15

-

95

59,382

-

-

4

10

7

1

4

1

9,415

7

2,726

80

12,251

Coolum North

-

-

2

-

-

-

2

6,501

-

2:07:57

1

-

-

-

-

-

1,424

-

119

3

1,546

Coolum

5

-

14

-

2

-

21

10,185

-

-

3

1

1

-

1

-

1,882

88

11

1,984

Yaroomba

-

-

3

-

-

-

3

1,128

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

308

-

6

-

314

Boardwalk

-

-

4

-

-

1

5

4,560

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

199

-

15

6

220

Marcoola

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

3,810

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

183

-

8

2

195

Discovery Beach

-

-

9

-

-

-

9

4,459

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

-

687

-

49

2

738

Mudjimba

-

1

8

-

4

-

13

6,459

-

1:29:06

-

-

-

-

1

-

680

2

37

5

725

Twin Waters

-

-

5

-

-

-

5

4,044

-

-

-

1

-

-

3

-

563

-

59

7

633

Maroochydore

1

2

34

-

24

-

61

9,308

-

-

2

1

2

-

1

-

2,342

-

841

10

3,197

Alexandra Headland

-

-

22

-

3

-

25

16,755

-

-

3

-

-

-

-

-

2,447

-

501

15

2,963

Mooloolaba

-

1

32

-

12

-

45

14,580

-

-

2

8

6

-

4

1

2,592

2

601

31

3,245

Mooloolaba Spit

-

-

13

-

-

-

13

7,324

-

-

-

5

2

1

4

1

2,263

2

272

17

2,567

Buddina

-

-

4

-

2

-

6

3,713

-

3:06:52

-

1

-

-

-

-

331

-

199

3

534

Wurtulla

-

-

6

-

1

-

7

3,088

-

-

1

1

-

-

1

-

438

-

307

2

749

Currimundi

-

-

18

-

4

-

22

3,400

-

0:22:30

-

1

1

-

1

-

511

-

53

4

571

Dicky Beach

-

1

18

-

1

-

20

8,956

-

-

-

2

-

-

3

-

343

-

60

6

414

Kings Beach Pool

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,863

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

12

-

338

6

357

Kings Beach

-

3

28

-

11

1

43

4,507

-

0:20:38

-

3

1

-

1

-

653

-

326

11

995

Bulcock Beach

-

-

6

-

7

-

13

2,491

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

1

272

1

458

3

737

Golden Beach

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

1,080

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

71

2

90

-

163

TOTAL

6

8

228

-

71

2

315

118,211

-

7:27:03

14

24

13

2

23

4

18,201

9

4,427

144

22,847

Noosa Shire Council

Sunshine Coast Council

Moreton Bay Regional Council Woorim Beach

1

-

3

-

-

-

4

17,425

-

0:44:18

3

2

-

-

2

-

836

4

17

4

865

TOTAL

1

-

3

-

-

-

4

17,425

-

0:44:18

3

2

-

-

2

-

836

4

17

4

865

Southbank Corporation Streets Beach Lagoon

71

36

13

-

-

-

120

89,667

-

-

1

4

26

-

11

-

-

-

140

150

331

TOTAL

71

36

13

-

-

-

120

89,667

-

-

1

4

26

-

11

-

-

-

140

150

331

Redland City Council Cylinder Beach

-

-

10

-

10

-

20

15,434

-

0:39:00

-

1

-

-

1

-

2,344

4

143

15

2,508

Main Beach

1

1

13

-

30

-

45

12,662

-

1:57:53

-

1

2

-

-

-

193

-

102

16

314

Adder Rock

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5,064

-

-

-

1

1

-

-

-

843

-

87

4

936

Wellington Point

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

6,230

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

-

170

1

91

2

265

TOTAL

1

1

24

-

40

-

66

39,390

-

2:36:53

-

4

3

-

1

-

3,550

5

423

37

4,023

Southport Broadwater

-

1

5

-

-

-

6

2,520

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

19

-

250

4

273

Tallabudgera Creek

-

1

95

-

115

-

211

2,261

-

-

2

-

-

-

1

-

249

2

273

3

528

Gold Coast City Council

Paradise Point

-

-

3

-

-

-

3

870

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

10

-

67

-

77

TOTAL

-

2

100

-

115

-

217

5,651

-

-

2

-

-

-

1

-

278

2

590

7

878

Non Local Government Areas Double Island Point

-

1

5

-

-

-

6

8,297

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

235

-

49

4

288

Noosa North Shore

1

-

1

-

-

-

2

2,646

-

-

-

2

1

-

-

-

168

-

29

1

201

Morton Island North Point

3

-

4

-

1

-

8

2,575

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

26

-

26

Moreton Isl. Tangalooma

-

-

10

2

275

-

287

10,333

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

162

1

164

-

TOTAL GRAND TOTAL

4

1

20

2

276

-

303

23,851

225

75

597

11

523

5

1,436

572,296

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

62:59:00

65

-

2

1

-

1

-

403

-

266

6

679

36

49

54

7

62

9

36,088

48

12,681

621

49,619

2 0 1 6 – 17


NQB

NBB

WBCB

SSCB

SCB

PDB

Lifeguards

SLSQ

ALAQ Surfguard

TOTAL

LIFESAVING AWARDS *Advanced Resuscitation Techniques [AID]

-

-

-

-

-

-

179

8

954

1,141

Assessor Advanced First Aid [AID]

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

1

Assessor Bronze Medallion

2

-

3

9

5

4

-

-

-

23

Assessor First Aid [AID]

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

Assessor Gold Medallion (Advanced Lifesaving)

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

2

Assessor IRB

1

-

3

5

5

1

-

-

-

15

Assessor Radio

-

-

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

5

Assessor Rescue Water Craft (RWC)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

3

Assessor Silver Medallion Beach Management

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

Assessor Surf Rescue

-

-

-

-

-

2

-

-

-

2

ATV Operator Certificate

-

-

-

2

2

-

10

-

-

14

ATV Operator Induction

10

17

11

197

202

210

37

1

-

685

Bronze Medallion

61

52

83

516

446

283

18

14

-

1,473

Facilitator Advanced Resuscitation Techniques [AID]

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5

3

8

Facilitator Bronze Medallion

-

-

-

4

-

-

-

-

-

4

Facilitator First Aid [AID]

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

8

1

9

Facilitator Pain Management

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

Facilitator Rescue Water Craft

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

1

Facilitator Resuscitation [AID]

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

Facilitator Silver Medallion Advanced First Aid [AID]

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

Facilitator Silver Medallion Beach Management

-

-

-

1

-

-

-

1

-

2

Facilitator Silver Medallion Beach Management B

-

-

-

5

-

-

-

-

-

5

*First Aid [AID]

-

-

-

-

-

-

88

3

1321

1,412

Gold Medallion (Advanced Lifesaving)

-

-

-

-

-

2

65

-

-

67

Helicopter Crew Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

IRB Crew Certificate

15

9

43

183

128

144

-

4

-

526

Junior Activities Age Manager Course

3

6

2

56

44

49

-

-

-

160

Marine Stinger Management

-

-

3

-

-

-

26

-

-

29

*Pain Management Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

29

31

QLD 4WD Induction

-

-

-

30

3

44

34

7

-

118 14

Award

Qld Club Safety Advisor Training

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

14

-

QLD Junior Activities Accreditation Officer

3

12

-

19

9

12

-

-

-

55

QLD Observers

1

-

-

72

12

52

-

3

-

140

QLD Phase 1 Search and Rescue Training Course

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

19

-

19

QLD RWC Crew Induction

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

22

-

22

QLD Tractor Induction

-

-

-

22

125

114

-

-

-

261

QLD Training Officer 4WD induction

-

2

-

2

1

7

-

-

-

12

QLD Training Officer Age Manager

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

QLD Training Officer ATV Induction

-

1

-

13

7

33

-

1

-

55

QLD Training Officer Tractor Induction

-

-

-

4

2

15

-

-

-

21

34

6

4

280

179

497

-

3

-

1,003

Rescue Water Craft Operator Certificate

-

-

-

-

-

-

53

43

-

96

*Resuscitation [AID]

-

-

-

-

-

-

90

2

1,588

1,680

Radio Operator Certificate

Silver Medallion Aquatic Rescue Silver Medallion Beach Management

-

-

-

-

-

-

12

25

-

37

13

1

27

69

74

54

49

-

-

287

Silver Medallion IRB Driver

9

3

10

59

44

47

-

-

-

172

Surf Aware One

44

57

83

497

365

247

-

-

-

1,293

Surf Aware Two

36

56

88

426

325

247

-

-

-

1,178

Surf Play One

17

45

79

291

345

253

-

-

-

1,030

Surf Play Two

25

67

90

421

412

282

-

-

-

1,297

Surf Rescue Certificate (CPR Endorsed)

33

43

88

383

271

138

-

1

-

957

Surf Safe One

36

44

95

436

288

210

-

-

-

1,109

Surf Safe Two

39

36

59

373

250

197

-

-

-

954

Surf Smart One

38

39

77

377

218

193

-

-

-

942

Surf Smart Two

31

28

54

291

178

127

-

-

-

709

TAF Induction

3

-

-

-

-

1

-

37

-

41

Training Officer Advanced First Aid [AID]

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

-

1

Training Officer Bronze Medallion

3

2

1

14

10

8

-

1

-

39

Training Officer First Aid [AID]

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

1

Training Officer IRB

2

-

2

3

7

3

-

-

-

17

Training Officer Radio

-

-

-

-

1

13

-

-

-

14

Training Officer RWC

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

4

-

4

Training Officer Surf Rescue

-

-

-

-

-

3

-

-

-

3

459

526

905

5060

3,958

3,500

664

236

3,898

19,206

TOTAL

Based off award origination organisation *denotes award is delivered to club members by the Academy under the Emergency Care Training Model

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

66

2 0 1 6 – 17


53

3

-

67

104

-

152

1,852

-

16

-

-

16

22

105

-

152

1,855

19

16

-

152

1,734

58

-

-

-

277

148

-

5

-

10

559

483

302

19

16

-

152

1,734

-

-

12

25

-

-

37

-

-

-

32

-

-

32

-

-

60

51

-

-

111

56

68

-

12

-

10

282

494

309

20

16

-

152

1,755

496

310

22

104

-

162

1,862

-

-

-

-

16

-

-

16

-

-

-

-

-

-

873

873

-

-

16

-

-

16

68

135

67

-

-

433

-

89

14

12

9

124

-

229

9

1,024

519

1,781

-

-

-

1,095

1,095

22

26

-

152

1,778

26

2,608

10,479

13,522

TOTAL

11 22

ALAQ Vetrak

ALAQ Surfguard

310

PDB

496

SCB

557

SSCB

88

WBC

55

NBB

68

NQB

SLSQ

Lifeguards

NATIONALLY-RECOGNISED AWARDS Award

Award code

Apply first aid

HLTFA311A

Apply surf awareness and self-rescue skills

PUASAR012C

Assess competence

TAEASS402B

-

-

-

-

-

-

Certificate II in Public Safety (Aquatic Rescue)

PUA21012

66

55

88

557

498

312

Communicate in the workplace

PUACOM001C

68

55

86

553

483

302

Contribute to team effectiveness

BSBFLM312C

14

-

29

69

53

54

Crew small powercraft in a rescue operation

PUASAR015A

20

10

44

186

136

Follow defined occupational health and safety policies and procedures

PUAOHS001C

68

55

86

553

Maintain safety at an incident scene

PUAOHS002B

-

-

-

-

Make a presentation

BSBCMM401A

-

-

-

-

Operate and maintain a personal water craft for rescue operations

PUASAR016A

-

-

-

-

Operate and maintain a small powercraft and motor for rescue operations

PUASAR014A

27

10

31

68

Operate communications systems and equipment

PUAOPE013A

68

55

87

554

Participate in an aquatic rescue operation

PUASAR013A

68

55

88

557

Participate in assessment validation

TAEASS403B

-

-

-

Perform rescue from a live LV Panel

UETTDRRF06B

-

-

-

Plan assessment activities and processes

TAEASS401B

-

-

-

-

-

Prepare maintain and test response equipment

PUAEQU001B

20

6

31

47

59

Provide advanced first aid

HLTAID006

-

-

-

-

-

Provide advanced resuscitation

HLTAID007

-

-

-

-

-

Provide an emergency first aid response in an education and care setting

HLTAID004

-

-

-

-

-

-

Provide basic emergency life support

HLTFA211A

68

55

88

557

498

312

Provide cardiopulmonary resuscitation [CPR]

HLTAID001

-

7

-

-

20

-

382

Provide emergency care for a suspected spinal injury

PUAEME004A

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2

2

Provide first aid

HLTAID003

-

-

-

-

-

-

157

16

1,403

4,552

6,128

Provide pain management

PUAEME005A

-

-

-

-

-

-

27

Provide work skill instruction

TAEDEL301A

-

-

-

-

-

-

Search as a member of an aquatic search team

PUASAR011C

-

-

-

-

-

-

Undertake beach safety management activities

PUAOPE027A

14

-

29

69

53

Undertake helicopter safety and escape

PMAOHS214B

-

-

-

-

Undertake helicopter safety and escape

PMAWHS214

-

-

-

-

Work autonomously

PUATEA002B

14

-

29

69

Work effectively in a public safety organisation

PUATEA004D

68

55

87

554

Work in a team

PUATEA001B

68

55

86

553

719

528

977

5,503

TOTAL *SLSQ - includes Brisbane Lifesaving, Operations Support and RPL Assessment only applications *ALAQ - Surfguard relates to courses delivered to club members under DCS/QFES Funding *ALAQ - Vetrak relates to courses delivered to paying clients/members of the public fee for service

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

67

2 0 1 6 – 17

11

66

11

115

32

-

-

32

12

25

-

-

37

54

58

-

-

-

277

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

-

-

-

9

-

16

25

53

54

58

-

-

-

277

488

309

20

16

-

152

1,749

483

302

19

16

-

152

1,734

4,849

3,214

1,473

854

5116

18,955

42,118


RESULTS 2017 Queensland Championships

Open Male 2km Beach Run 1 Patrick Hagan (Point Lookout) 2 Shane Pierce (Surfers Paradise) 3 Damien Jeffery (Northcliffe)

Open Female 2km Beach Run 1 Mieke Kassulke (Northcliffe) 2 Samantha Stredwick (Northcliffe) 3 Sally Watson (Alexandra Headland)

Open Male 5 Person R&R 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A

Open Female 5 Person R&R 1 Alexandra Headland Team A Open Female Beach Flags 1 Elizabeth Forsyth (Currumbin) 2 Olivia Eaton (Currumbin) 3 Brittanny Brymer (Currumbin) Open Female Beach Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Kurrawa Team B 3 Alexandra Headland Team B

Open Male Beach Flags 1 Murdoch Finch (Currumbin) 2 Michael Walpole (Maroochydore) 3 Brandon McMahon (Kurrawa) Open Male Beach Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Kurrawa Team B

Open Mixed 6 Person R&R 1 Alexandra Headland Team A Open Mixed Double Ski 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Northcliffe Team F Open Lifesaver Relay 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Currumbin Team B Open March Past March Past 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team B 3 Maroochydore Team A

U19 Female Surf Board Relay 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A Northcliffe Team A U19 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A U19 Female Surf Boat 1 Dicky Beach 2 Noosa Heads 3 Noosa Heads U19 Female Surf Race 1 Megan Kreuter (Northcliffe) 2 Brielle Cooper (North Burleigh) 3 Maddy Gough (North Burleigh)

Open Male Beach Sprint 1 Jordan Caldow (Currumbin) 2 Timothy Delahunty (Currumbin) 3 Kieran Gordon (Currumbin)

Reserve Grade Male 1 Maroochydore 2 Noosa Heads 3 Currumbin Team B

Open Male Double Ski 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 BHMP Team A

Restricted Surf Race 1 Matt Poole (Kurrawa) 2 Hamish Chapman (Mermaid Beach AEME) 3 Lucas Allan (Northcliffe)

Open Male Ironman 1 Caine Eckstein (Northcliffe) 2 Jackson Maynard (Currumbin) 3 Matt Bevilacqua (Kurrawa)

U23 Female Surf Boat 1 Maroochydore 2 BHMP Team A 3 Currumbin

Open Female Ironwoman 1 Harriet Brown (Northcliffe) 2 Danielle McKenzie (Northcliffe) 3 Rebecca Creedy (Kurrawa)

Open Male Rescue Tube Rescue 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Surfers Paradise Team A

U23 Male Surf Boat 1 Currumbin 2 Alexandra Headland 3 Mermaid Beach AEME

Open Female Rescue Tube Rescue 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Northcliffe Team B

Open Male Surf Belt 1 Joshua Brown (Currumbin) 2 Adam Simpson (Surfers Paradise) 3 Stefaan Demopoulos (Northcliffe)

Reserve Grade Female 1 Palm Beach 2 Alexandra Headland 3 Mermaid Beach AEME

Open Female Surf Belt 1 Natalie Peat (Currumbin) 2 Prue Davies (Currumbin) 3 Devon Halligan (BHMP)

Open Male Surf Board 1 Beau Farrell (Maroochydore) 2 Jett Kenny (Alexandra Headland) 3 Campbell McDonald (Tugun)

Surf Boat Relay 1 Currumbin 2 Alexandra Headland Team A

Open Female Surf Board 1 Harriet Brown (Northcliffe) 2 Tara Coleman (Currumbin) 3 Electra Outram (Noosa Heads)

Open Male Surf Board Relay 1 Surfers Paradise Team A 2 Mermaid Beach AEME Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

Open Female Surf Board Relay 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Northcliffe Team B 3 Kurrawa Team A

Open Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Currumbin Team B 3 Noosa Heads Team A

U19 Female Beach Flags 1 Nicole Kay (Kurrawa) 2 Caitlin Banner (Currumbin) 3 Olivia Fien (Currumbin)

Open Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Northcliffe Team B 3 Northcliffe Team A

Open Male Surf Boat 1 Currumbin 2 Tugun 3 Currumbin

U19 Female Beach Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Kurrawa Team A

Open Female Surf Boat 1 Maroochydore 2 Tallebudgera 3 Northcliffe

Open Male Surf Race 1 Nicholas Sloman (Sunshine Beach) 2 Toby Wilson (Northcliffe) 3 Bailey Armstrong (Northcliffe)

U19 Female Beach Sprint 1 Nicole Kay (Kurrawa) 2 Olivia Fien (Currumbin) 3 Mikayla Jensen (Alexandra Headland)

Open Female Surf Race 1 Harriet Brown (Northcliffe) 2 Courtney Hancock (Northcliffe) 3 Alexandra Nolan (Northcliffe)

Open Male Surf Ski 1 Nicholas Rodger (Northcliffe) 2 Nicklaas Gale (Northcliffe) 3 William Bain (Mooloolaba)

U19 Female Double Ski 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Northcliffe Team B 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

U19 Male Rescue Tube Rescue 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Currumbin Team A

U19 Female Ironwoman 1 Bay Wildin-Snedden (Maroochydore) 2 Megan Kreuter (Northcliffe) 3 Brielle Cooper (North Burleigh)

U19 Male Surf Belt 1 Tom Montgomery (Currumbin) 2 Samuel Hensen-Thompson (Alexandra Headland) 3 Toby Wilson (Northcliffe)

U19 Female Rescue Tube Rescue 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 Northcliffe Team C

U19 Male Surf Board 1 Campbell Guthrie (Alexandra Headland) 2 Conor Burrows (Noosa Heads) 3 Daniel Raward (Kurrawa)

U19 Female Surf Belt 1 Rachel Eddy (Kurrawa) 2 Tyler Cook (BHMP) 3 Bianca Heilbronn (Alexandra Headland)

U19 Male Surf Board Relay 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

U19 Female Surf Board 1 Hannah Sculley (Northcliffe) 2 Abigail Pugh (Kurrawa) 3 Chloe Travers (Maroochydore)

U19 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 Kurrawa Team A

Open Female Beach Sprint 1 Olivia Eaton (Currumbin) 2 Nicole Kay (Kurrawa) 3 Olivia Fien (Currumbin) Open Female Double Ski 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Northcliffe Team B

Open Female Surf Ski 1 Alyssa Bull (Alexandra Headland) 2 Alyce Burnett (Maroochydore) 3 Amy Nurthen (Currumbin) Open Female Surf Ski Relay 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 BHMP Team A Open Female Surf Team 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Northcliffe Team B 3 Currumbin Team A Open Female Taplin 3 person 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 BHMP Team A

Open Male Surf Ski Relay 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Mermaid Beach AEME Team A Open Male Surf Team 1 Mermaid Beach AEME Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Currumbin Team A Open Male Taplin 6 person 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 BHMP Team A 3 Currumbin Team A Open Mixed 5 Person R&R 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team B

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

U19 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Kate Taylor (Northcliffe) 2 Shiloh Young (Mermaid Beach AEME) 3 Shannon McSkimming (Northcliffe)

68

2 0 1 6 – 17

U19 Female Surf Ski 1 Lucinda Kelly (Alexandra Headland) 2 Abigail Pugh (Kurrawa) 3 Bay Wildin-Snedden (Maroochydore) U19 Female Surf Ski Relay 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Northcliffe Team B U19 Female Surf Team 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 Northcliffe Team B U19 Female Taplin 3 person 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A U19 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Jack Lund (Tallebudgera) 2 Harrison Crouch (Northcliffe) 3 Lachlan Craven (Alexandra Headland) U19 Male Beach Flags 1 Cody Rychvalsky (Maroochydore) 2 Dominic Russo (Mudjimba) 3 Tim Brang (Currumbin) U19 Male Beach Relay 1 Bribie Island 2 Kurrawa Team A

U19 Male Beach Sprint 1 Caleb Grimley (Kurrawa) 2 Cody Rychvalsky (Maroochydore) 3 Harris Franzmann (Currumbin) U19 Male Double Ski 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A U19 Male Ironman 1 Jy Timperley (Currumbin) 2 Corey Fletcher (Currumbin) 3 Daniel Raward (Kurrawa)


U19 Male Surf Boat 1 Currumbin 2 Alexandra Headland 3 Coolangatta

U17 Female Surf Team 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Noosa Heads Team A

U19 Male Surf Race 1 Nicholas Sloman (Sunshine Beach) 2 Bailey Armstrong (Northcliffe) Toby Wilson (Northcliffe)

U17 Female Taplin 3 person 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team B Noosa Heads Team A

U19 Male Surf Ski 1 Jackson Collins (North Burleigh) 2 Lincoln Waide (North Burleigh) 3 Thomas Green (North Burleigh)

U17 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Kyle Aimer (Alexandra Headland) 2 Harley Adams (Nobbys Beach) 3 Kiah Everingham (Elliott Heads)

U19 Male Surf Ski Relay 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

U17 Male Beach Flags 1 Thomas Baker (Sunshine Beach) 2 Lachlan Alleyne (Bribie Island) 3 Liam Farrelly (Hervey Bay)

U19 Male Surf Team 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Northcliffe Team B

U17 Male Beach Relay 1 Bribie Island 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Bundaberg Team A

U19 Male Taplin 3 person 1 Currumbin Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A U17 March Past 1 BHMP Team A 2 Coolangatta Team A U17 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Drew Younger (Rainbow Bay) 2 Kate Watson (Bribie Island) 3 Alexandra Clarke (Maroochydore) U17 Female Beach Flags 1 Taylor Stickler (Kurrawa) 2 Beth Underwood (Alexandra Headland) 3 Ella Cummings (Currumbin) U17 Female Beach Relay 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A U17 Female Beach Sprint 1 Lucia Fildes (Northcliffe) 2 Taylor Stickler (Kurrawa) 3 Lily Peck (Kurrawa) U17 Female Ironwoman 1 Massie Tiarnee (Maroochydore) 2 Electra Outram (Noosa Heads) 3 Kayla Osborne (Alexandra Headland) U17 Female Surf Belt 1 Imogen Rees (Northcliffe) 2 Isabel Lynch (Northcliffe) 3 Olivia Emanuel (Sunshine Beach) U17 Female Surf Board 1 Tiarnee Massie (Maroochydore) 2 Alexandra Clarke (Maroochydore) 3 Electra Outram (Noosa Heads) U17 Female Surf Board Relay 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A U17 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 Noosa Heads Team B U17 Female Surf Race 1 Jade Slee (Mermaid Beach AEME) 2 Tiarnee Massie (Maroochydore) 3 Elli Halliday (Alexandra Headland) U17 Female Surf Ski 1 Mackenzie Duffy (Maroochydore) 2 Electra Outram (Noosa Heads) 3 Mikayla Williams (Alexandra Headland) U17 Female Surf Ski Relay 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 BHMP Team A

110+ Years Female Surf Ski Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 110+ Years Female Surf Team 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Palm Beach Team A 110+ Years Female Taplin 3 person 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A 110+ Years Male Surf Board Relay 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Elliott Heads Team A 110+ Years Male Surf Ski Relay 1 North Burleigh Team B 2 North Burleigh Team C 3 Kurrawa Team A 110+ Years Male Surf Team 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Elliott Heads Team A

U17 Male Beach Sprint 1 Corey Linton (Mooloolaba) 2 Jack Davies (Met Caloundra) 3 Liam Farrelly (Hervey Bay)

110+ Years Male Taplin 3 person 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

U17 Male Ironman 1 Ky Kinsela (Currumbin) 2 Mitchell Coombes (Northcliffe) 3 Cooper Williams (Noosa Heads)

130+ Years Female Surf Board Relay 1 Coolum Beach Team A 2 Dicky Beach Team A 3 Palm Beach Team A

U17 Male Surf Belt 1 Cooper Williams (Noosa Heads) 2 Jacob Loughnan (Currumbin) 3 Matthew Palmer (Maroochydore)

130+ Years Female Surf Ski Relay 1 North Burleigh Team A 130+ Years Female Surf Team 1 Dicky Beach Team A 2 Nobbys Beach Team A

U17 Male Surf Board 1 Cooper Williams (Noosa Heads) 2 Alex Wilson (Palm Beach) 3 Ky Kinsela (Currumbin)

130+ Years Female Taplin 3 person 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 Palm Beach Team A

U17 Male Surf Board Relay 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Tugun Team A 3 Currumbin Team B

130+ Years Male Surf Board Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team B 2 Surfers Paradise Team A 3 Sunshine Beach Team A

U17 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Tugun Team A 3 Currumbin Team A

130+ Years Male Surf Ski Relay 1 Tallebudgera Team A 2 Elliott Heads Team A 3 Noosa Heads Team A

U17 Male Surf Race 1 Cooper Williams (Noosa Heads) 2 Ky Kinsela (Currumbin) 3 Mitchell Coombes (Northcliffe)

130+ Years Male Surf Team 1 Sunshine Beach Team A 2 Coolangatta Team B 3 Palm Beach Team A

U17 Male Surf Ski 1 Byron Turton (Maroochydore) 2 Jacob Molkentin (Maroochydore) 3 Cooper Miskell (BHMP) U17 Male Surf Ski Relay 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 BHMP Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A U17 Male Surf Team 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Emu Park Team A

110+ Years Female Surf Board Relay 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

150+ Years Male Surf Team 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Southport Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A 150+ Years Male Taplin 3 person 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Currumbin Team A 170+ Years Female Beach Relay 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Pacific Team A 170+ Years Male Beach Relay 1 Palm Beach Team A 2 Nobbys Beach Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team B 170+ Years Open Surf Board Relay 1 Coolangatta Team A 2 Surfers Paradise Team A 3 Noosa Heads Team A 170+ Years Open Surf Ski Relay 1 Surfers Paradise Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A 170+ Years Open Surf Team 1 Surfers Paradise Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Brunswick Team A 170+ Years Open Taplin 3 person 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Surfers Paradise Team A 3 Dicky Beach Team A 200+ Years Female Beach Relay 1 Nobbys Beach Team A 200+ Years Male Beach Relay 1 Mooloolaba Team A 2 Mudjimba Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A 230+ Years Open Beach Relay 1 Nobbys Beach Team A 30-34 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Kate Tomba (Coolum Beach) 30-34 Female Beach Flags 1 Toni Hardy (Mooloolaba) 2 Kate Tomba (Coolum Beach) 3 Michelle Jeffress (Kurrawa)

140+ Years Female Beach Relay 1 Coolum Beach Team A

30-34 Female Beach Sprint 1 Toni Hardy (Mooloolaba) 2 Kate Tomba (Coolum Beach) 3 Michelle Jeffress (Kurrawa)

150+ Years Female Surf Board Relay 1 Noosa Heads Team B

2017 Queensland Masters Surf Life Saving Championships

150+ Years Male Surf Ski Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Currumbin Team A

130+ Years Male Taplin 3 person 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

140+ Years Male Beach Relay 1 Nobbys Beach Team A 2 Pacific Team A

U17 Male Taplin 3 person 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A

150+ Years Male Surf Board Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Mooloolaba Team B

150+ Years Female Surf Ski Relay 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 150+ Years Female Surf Team 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A 150+ Years Female Taplin 3 person 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A

69

2 0 1 6 – 17

30-34 Female Ironwoman 1 Lee Vrolyks (Northcliffe) 2 Melanie Driscoll (Kurrawa) 30-34 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Jennifer Parry (North Burleigh) 2 Kate Tomba (Coolum Beach) 30-34 Female Surf Board 1 Lee Vrolyks (Northcliffe) 2 Melanie Driscoll (Kurrawa) 3 Kate Tomba (Coolum Beach) 30-34 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Coolum Beach Team A


30-34 Female Surf Race 1 Lee Vrolyks (Northcliffe) 2 Jennifer Parry (North Burleigh)

35-39 Female Surf Race 1 Britt Murray (North Burleigh) 2 Tiarne Smith (Northcliffe) 3 Belinda Marshall (Palm Beach)

40-44 Female Surf Race 1 Lisa Lower (Currumbin) 2 Kylee De Rooy (Alexandra Headland) 3 Kirsty Bowlay (North Burleigh)

45-49 Female Surf Race 1 Tania Lewis (Sunshine Beach) 2 Karen May (Dicky Beach) 3 Helen Murray (Byron Bay)

30-34 Female Surf Ski 1 Lee Vrolyks (Northcliffe) 2 Rachel Pearson (Alexandra Headland) 3 Melanie Driscoll (Kurrawa)

35-39 Female Surf Ski 1 Tiarne Smith (Northcliffe) 2 Britt Murray (North Burleigh)

40-44 Female Surf Ski 1 Tamiel Benjamin (Alexandra Headland) 2 Melissa Aitken (Noosa Heads)

45-49 Female Surf Ski 1 Helen Murray (Byron Bay) Samantha Williams (Alexandra Headland)

30-34 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Marcus Hughes (Surfers Paradise) 2 Matthew Jedra (Nobbys Beach) 3 Rohan Scaysbrook (Coolangatta)

35-39 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Oliver-Sven Schweizer (Northcliffe) 2 Matthew Adler (Coolum Beach) 3 David Austen (Pacific)

40-44 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Jeffery Damien (Northcliffe) 2 Vincent Loubet (Coolangatta) 3 Shannon Van Balen (Northcliffe)

45-49 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Nicholas Fawaz (Coolangatta) 2 Paul Byres (Tallebudgera) 3 Christopher Walker (BHMP)

30-34 Male Beach Flags 1 Laurie Hughes (Eastbourne) 2 Matthew Jedra (Nobbys Beach) 3 Luke Bradley (Nobbys Beach)

35-39 Male Beach Flags 1 Hamish Dutton (Palm Beach) 2 Shaun Slattery (Pacific) 3 Matthew Adler (Coolum Beach)

40-44 Male Beach Flags 1 John Scott (Mooloolaba) 2 Garry Ryan (Bundaberg) 3 Tim Matchett (Palm Beach)

45-49 Male Beach Flags 1 John-Paul Smith (Salt) 2 Vaughn Thomas (TH&C) 3 Michael Innes (Northcliffe)

40-44 Male Beach Sprint 1 Tim Matchett (Palm Beach) 2 Mark Bird (Palm Beach) 3 Garry Ryan (Bundaberg)

45-49 Male Beach Sprint 1 John-Paul Smith (Salt) 2 David Tranter (Nobbys Beach) 3 Vaughn Thomas (TH&C)

40-44 Male Double Ski 1 Byron Bay Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Elliott Heads

45-49 Male Double Ski 1 Mudjimba Team A 2 Palm Beach Team A 3 Southport Team A

40-44 Male Ironman 1 Robert Brown (Brunswick) 2 David Bear (Kurrawa) 3 Craig Holden (Elliott Heads)

45-49 Male Ironman 1 Greg Cox (Palm Beach) 2 Anthony Hoppitt (Mermaid Beach AEME) 3 Christopher Walker (BHMP)

40-44 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 John Lunney (Tallebudgera) 2 Cameron Dixon (Noosa Heads) 3 Robert Brown (Brunswick)

45-49 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Greg Cox (Palm Beach) 2 Robert Edwards (Southport) 3 Owen Flanagan (Coolangatta)

30-34 Male Beach Sprint 1 Laurie Hughes (Eastbourne) 2 Matthew Jedra (Nobbys Beach) 3 Luke Bradley (Nobbys Beach) 30-34 Male Double Ski 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Mermaid Beach AEME Team A

35-39 Male Beach Sprint 1 Hamish Dutton (Palm Beach) 2 Shaun Slattery (Pacific) 3 David Austen (Pacific) 35-39 Male Double Ski 1 North Burleigh Team B 2 Tallebudgera Team A 3 Pacific Team A

30-34 Male Ironman 1 Ashleigh McNicol (Alexandra Headland) 2 Ryan Bennett (Elliott Heads)

35-39 Male Ironman 1 Joshua Meyer (North Burleigh) 2 Gavin Jordan (Pacific) 3 Sheldon Anker (Mooloolaba)

30-34 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Ryan Bennett (Elliott Heads) 2 Marcus Hughes (Surfers Paradise)

35-39 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Michael Bush (Currumbin) 2 Jody Hall (Northcliffe)

30-34 Male Surf Board 1 Robert Adsett (Alexandra Headland) 2 Marcus Hughes (Surfers Paradise) 3 Ryan Bennett (Elliott Heads)

35-39 Male Surf Board 1 Joshua Meyer (North Burleigh) 2 Jonathon Locke (North Burleigh) 3 Gavin Jordan (Pacific)

30-34 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Surfers Paradise Team A 2 Elliott Heads Team A

35-39 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Currumbin Team B 3 Pacific Team A

30-34 Male Surf Race 1 Robert Adsett (Alexandra Headland) 2 Marcus Hughes (Surfers Paradise) 3 Ryan Bennett (Elliott Heads)

35-39 Male Surf Race 1 Michael Bush (Currumbin) 2 Jody Hall (Northcliffe)

30-34 Male Surf Ski 1 Shaun Robertson (Currumbin) 2 Ashleigh McNicol (Alexandra Headland) 3 Christopher Forrest (Mermaid Beach AEME)

35-39 Male Surf Ski 1 Bruce Taylor (North Burleigh) 2 Jonathon Locke (North Burleigh) 3 Joshua Meyer (North Burleigh)

30-44 Female Double Ski 1 Alexandra Headland Team A

40+ Female Double Ski 1 Noosa Heads Team B 2 Mooloolaba Team A

35-39 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Cathryn Rayward (Kurrawa) 2 Larissa Hallam (Maroochydore) 3 Annabel Kolkka (Northcliffe) 35-39 Female Beach Flags 1 Julia Allison (Southport) 2 Simone Haugh (Palm Beach) 3 Fiona McDonnell (Hervey Bay) 35-39 Female Beach Sprint 1 Brooke Elsum (Met Caloundra) 2 Emma Rahui (Coolum Beach) 3 Simone Haugh (Palm Beach) 35-39 Female Ironwoman 1 Tiarne Smith (Northcliffe) 2 Britt Murray (North Burleigh) 35-39 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Cathryn Rayward (Kurrawa) 2 Briohny Spencer (North Burleigh) 3 Rachael Bellue (Palm Beach) 35-39 Female Surf Board 1 Tiarne Smith (Northcliffe) 2 Britt Murray (North Burleigh) 3 Briohny Spencer (North Burleigh) 35-39 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Palm Beach Team B

40-44 Male Surf Board 1 Justin Gordon (Surfers Paradise) 2 Ben Kibble (Noosa Heads) 3 Craig Holden (Elliott Heads) 40-44 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team B 3 Elliott Heads Team A 40-44 Male Surf Race 1 Jason Hooper (Sunshine Beach) 2 Cameron Dixon (Noosa Heads) 3 Robert Brown (Brunswick) 40-44 Male Surf Ski 1 Shaun Spencer (North Burleigh) 2 Cameron Marshall (North Burleigh) 3 Gregory McCabe (Byron Bay)

45-49 Male Surf Board 1 Greg Cox (Palm Beach) 2 Brett Dowker (Currumbin) 3 Steven Cahill (Currumbin) 45-49 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Coolangatta Team A 45-49 Male Surf Race 1 Shaun O’Rourke (Alexandra Headland) 2 Greg Cox (Palm Beach) 3 Owen Flanagan (Coolangatta) 45-49 Male Surf Ski 1 Martin Kenny (Alexandra Headland) 2 Jason Prior (Alexandra Headland) 3 Michael De Rooy (Alexandra Headland)

45-49 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Helen Murray (Byron Bay) 2 Jodie Watson (Bribie Island) 3 Dana Craven (Alexandra Headland)

50-54 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Trudy Pieters (Coolum Beach) 2 Trudy Nielson (Nobbys Beach)

45-49 Female Beach Flags 1 Wendy Randle (Nobbys Beach) 2 Jodie Waring (Coolum Beach) 3 Chantelle Minter (Mooloolaba)

50-54 Female Beach Flags 1 Carol Jones (Mooloolaba) 2 Donna Riley (Palm Beach) 3 Trudy Nielson (Nobbys Beach)

45-49 Female Beach Sprint 1 Cherie Bell (Mooloolaba) 2 Liesl Kett (Kurrawa) 3 Wendy Randle (Nobbys Beach)

50-54 Female Beach Sprint 1 Carol Jones (Mooloolaba) 2 Donna Riley (Palm Beach) 3 Trudy Nielson (Nobbys Beach)

40-44 Female Ironwoman 1 Tamiel Benjamin (Alexandra Headland)

45-49 Female Ironwoman 1 Helen Murray (Byron Bay)

50-54 Female Ironwoman 1 Pegg Alison (Noosa Heads) 2 Penman Sandra (Mermaid Beach AEME)

40-44 Female Rescue Tube Race 2 Lisa Lower (Currumbin) 3 Kylee De Rooy (Alexandra Headland) 4 Kym Lingard (Hervey Bay)

45-49 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Tania Lewis (Sunshine Beach) 2 Leanne Major (Palm Beach) 3 Jodie Waring (Coolum Beach)

40-44 Female Surf Board 1 Lisa Lower (Currumbin) 2 Tamiel Benjamin (Alexandra Headland) 3 Kylee De Rooy (Alexandra Headland)

45-49 Female Surf Board 1 Helen Murray (Byron Bay) 2 Jodie Waring (Coolum Beach) 3 Tania Lewis (Sunshine Beach)

40-44 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Coolum Beach Team A 3 Palm Beach Team A

45-49 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Dicky Beach Team A 2 Nobbys Beach Team A 3 Coolangatta Team A

40-44 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Lee-Anne Nelson (Surfers Paradise) 2 Jessica Baird (Alexandra Headland) 3 Sally Gordon (Palm Beach) 40-44 Female Beach Flags 1 Helena Grono (Queenscliff) 2 Louise Ruff (Palm Beach) 3 Kym Lingard (Hervey Bay) 40-44 Female Beach Sprint 1 Lee-Anne Nelson (Surfers Paradise) 2 Deborah Steele (Maroochydore) 3 Louise Ruff (Palm Beach)

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

70

2 0 1 6 – 17

50-54 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Pegg Alison (Noosa Heads) 2 Kylie Duke (Nobbys Beach) 3 Louise Roberts (Mermaid Beach AEME) 50-54 Female Surf Board 1 Alison Pegg (Noosa Heads) 2 Sandra Penman (Mermaid Beach AEME) 3 Amanda Hanmer (Kurrawa) 50-54 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Mermaid Beach AEME Team A


50-54 Female Surf Race 1 Alison Pegg (Noosa Heads) 2 Sandra Penman (Mermaid Beach AEME) 3 Louise Roberts (Mermaid Beach AEME)

55-59 Female Surf Race 1 Georgina Lynch (Noosa Heads) 2 Barbara Roker (Alexandra Headland) 3 Rita Stefanovic (Mudjimba)

60-64 Male Beach Sprint 1 Steven Jeisman (Mudjimba) 2 James Furlong (Miami Beach) 3 Ken Eldridge (Alexandra Headland)

50-54 Female Surf Ski 1 Amanda Hanmer (Kurrawa) 2 Alison Pegg (Noosa Heads) 3 Sandra Penman (Mermaid Beach AEME)

55-59 Female Surf Ski 1 Margaret Kyle (Northcliffe) 2 Wendy Callard (Palm Beach) 3 Barbara Roker (Alexandra Headland)

60-64 Male Ironman 1 Stuart Keay (Surfers Paradise) 2 Adrian Russell (Brunswick) 3 Anthony Caldwell (Dicky Beach)

55-59 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Peter Mirls (Southport)

60-64 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Peter Reaburn (Southport) 2 David Wilson (Mooloolaba) 3 Lennard Cook (Currumbin)

50-54 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Mark Lepper (Bribie Island) 2 Grant Sawtell (Mermaid Beach AEME) 3 Michael Tinker (Alexandra Headland) 50-54 Male Beach Flags 1 Matthew Sierp (Alexandra Headland) 2 Martin Ashfield (Surfers Paradise) 3 Andy Gordon (Queenscliff) 50-54 Male Beach Sprint 1 Matthew Sierp (Alexandra Headland) 2 Tony Grima (Hervey Bay) 3 Martin Ashfield (Surfers Paradise) 50-54 Male Ironman 1 Craig Chapman (Surfers Paradise) 2 Michael Waide (Currumbin) 3 Jeffrey Lemarseny (Alexandra Headland) 50-54 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Adam Sambrook (Southport) 2 Rick Van Kampen (Coolangatta) 3 Craig Chapman (Surfers Paradise) 50-54 Male Surf Board 1 Martin Ashfield (Surfers Paradise) 2 Michael Di Betta (Currumbin) 3 Gerard Crow (Sunshine Beach) 50-54 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Surfers Paradise Team B 2 Southport Team A 3 Brunswick Team A 50-54 Male Surf Race 1 Adam Sambrook (Southport) 2 Craig Chapman (Surfers Paradise) 3 Christopher Price (Sunshine Beach) 50-54 Male Surf Ski 1 Jeffrey Lemarseny (Alexandra Headland) 2 Christopher Maynard (Currumbin) 3 Grant Kenny (Alexandra Headland) 50-54 Open Double Ski 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Mooloolaba Team B 3 Mermaid Beach AEME Team A 55-59 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Wendy Callard (Palm Beach) 2 Georgina Lynch (Noosa Heads) 55-59 Female Beach Flags 1 Jacqueline Eaton-Sinclair (Alexandra Headland) 2 Darlsy Powell (Palm Beach) 55-59 Female Beach Sprint 1 Darlsy Powell (Palm Beach) 2 Jacqueline Eaton-Sinclair (Alexandra Headland) 55-59 Female Ironwoman 1 Margaret Kyle (Northcliffe) 55-59 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Georgina Lynch (Noosa Heads) 2 Barbara Roker (Alexandra Headland) 3 Alison Fisk (Noosa Heads) 55-59 Female Surf Board 1 Wendy Callard (Palm Beach) 2 Sharon Garrick (Alexandra Headland) 3 Alison Fisk (Noosa Heads) 55-59 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A

55-59 Male Beach Flags 1 Craig Parker (Mooloolaba) 2 Michael Coleman (Mudjimba) 3 Bruce Dunne (Coolum Beach) 55-59 Male Beach Sprint 1 Craig Parker (Mooloolaba) 2 Michael Coleman (Mudjimba) 3 John Buckley (Nobbys Beach) 55-59 Male Ironman 1 Robert Dorrough (Surfers Paradise) 2 Anthony LeMarseny (Noosa Heads) 3 Noel Kolkka (Northcliffe) 55-59 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Stephen Fry (Northcliffe) 2 Darryl Blackburn (Surfers Paradise) 3 Bruce Serisier (Nobbys Beach) 55-59 Male Surf Board 1 Noel Kolkka (Northcliffe) 2 Bruce Dunne (Coolum Beach) 3 Ian Wright (Mooloolaba) 55-59 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Southport Team A 2 Surfers Paradise Team A 3 Nobbys Beach Team A 55-59 Male Surf Race 1 Stephen Fry (Northcliffe) 2 Darryl Blackburn (Surfers Paradise) 3 Anthony LeMarseny (Noosa Heads) 55-59 Male Surf Ski 1 Robert Dorrough (Surfers Paradise) 2 Douglas Iredale (Northcliffe) 3 Greg Bowditch (Tallebudgera) 55-59 Open Double Ski 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Noosa Heads Team A 60-64 Female Beach Flags 1 Robyn Jenkinson (Noosa Heads) 60-64 Female Beach Sprint 1 Robyn Jenkinson (Noosa Heads) 60-64 Female Ironwoman 1 Julie Fidler (Noosa Heads) 2 Robyn Jenkinson (Noosa Heads)

60-64 Male Surf Board 1 Bruce Kolkka (Northcliffe) 2 Adrian Russell (Brunswick) 3 Neil Grimshaw (Alexandra Headland) 60-64 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Brunswick Team A 60-64 Male Surf Race 1 Peter Reaburn (Southport) 2 Kenneth Denton (Dicky Beach) 3 David Wilson (Mooloolaba) 60-64 Male Surf Ski 1 Bruce Kolkka (Northcliffe) 2 Peter Fidler (Noosa Heads) 3 Kevin Jeffery (Kurrawa) 60-64 Open Double Ski 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Dicky Beach Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A 65-69 Female Beach Flags 1 Nancy Nicholls (Kurrawa) 65-69 Female Beach Sprint 1 Nancy Nicholls (Kurrawa) 2 Mitchell Patricia (Kurrawa)

70+ Open Beach Sprint 1 Wilson Glen (Maroochydore) 70+ Open Double Ski 1 North Burleigh Team A 70+ Open Rescue Tube Race 1 Leonard Harris (Maroochydore) 2 Peter Andersen (BHMP) 3 Neville De Mestre (North Burleigh) 70+ Open Surf Board 1 Allan Nicholls (Northcliffe) 2 Terry McLardy (Alexandra Headland) 3 Neville De Mestre (North Burleigh) 70+ Open Surf Board Rescue 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 North Burleigh Team A 70+ Open Surf Race 1 Leonard Harris (Maroochydore) 2 Terry McLardy (Alexandra Headland) 3 Neville De Mestre (North Burleigh) 70+ Open Surf Ski 1 Terry McLardy (Alexandra Headland) 2 Russell Trueman (Northcliffe) 3 Neville De Mestre (North Burleigh) 70+ Open Ironperson 1 Terry McLardy (Alexandra Headland) 120+ Years Female Surf Boat 1 Mooloolaba

65-69 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Kurrawa Team A

140+ Years Male Surf Boat 1 Kurrawa 2 BHMP

65-69 Female Surf Race 1 Elizabeth Crilly (Kurrawa) 2 Nancy Nicholls (Kurrawa)

160+ Years Female Surf Boat 1 Mermaid Beach AEME 2 BHMP Team A

65-69 Male 1km Beach Run 1 Richard Bedford (Northcliffe) 2 Denis Griffith (BHMP) 3 John Rynne (Northcliffe)

160+ Years Male Surf Boat 1 Maroochydore 2 Currumbin 3 Etty Bay Team A

65-69 Male Beach Flags 1 Denis Griffith (BHMP) 2 Ian Murphy (Nobbys Beach)

180+ Years Open Surf Boat 1 Dicky Beach Team A 2 Mooloolaba 3 Noosa Heads Team A

60-64 Female Surf Board 1 Angie McPhee (Dicky Beach) 2 Robyn Jenkinson (Noosa Heads) 3 Gay Bradley (Alexandra Headland)

65-69 Male Ironman 1 Richard Bedford (Northcliffe) 2 Ross Fisher (Noosa Heads)

60-64 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Noosa Heads Team A

65-69 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Paul Jenkinson (Noosa Heads) 2 Ian Murphy (Nobbys Beach) 65-69 Male Surf Board 1 Richard Bedford (Northcliffe) 2 Ross Fisher (Noosa Heads) 3 John Rynne (Northcliffe)

60-64 Male 1km Beach Run 1 Steven Jeisman (Mudjimba)

65-69 Male Surf Race 1 Richard Bedford (Northcliffe) 2 Stephen Maitland (Met Caloundra) John Rynne (Northcliffe)

60-64 Male Beach Flags 1 David Wilson (Mooloolaba) 2 Steven Jeisman (Mudjimba) 3 Ken Eldridge (Alexandra Headland)

65-69 Male Surf Ski 1 Wayne Skeen (Mooloolaba) 2 Richard Bedford (Northcliffe) 3 Ross Fisher (Noosa Heads)

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

70+ Open Beach Flags 1 Glen Wilson (Maroochydore)

140+ Years Female Surf Boat 1 TH&C

65-69 Male Beach Sprint 1 Denis Griffith (BHMP) 2 Robert Tomblin (Kurrawa) 3 John Rynne (Northcliffe)

60-64 Female Surf Ski 1 Jenkinson Robyn (Noosa Heads)

70+ Open 1km Beach Run 1 William Ryan (Coolangatta) 2 Anthony Frost (Noosa Heads)

65-69 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Elizabeth Crilly (Kurrawa) 2 Nancy Nicholls (Kurrawa)

60-64 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Gay Bradley (Alexandra Headland) 2 Robyn Jenkinson (Noosa Heads)

60-64 Female Surf Race 1 Gay Bradley (Alexandra Headland) 2 Julie Fidler (Noosa Heads) 3 Pauline Jeffery (Kurrawa)

65-69 Open Double Ski 1 Mooloolaba Team A

71

2 0 1 6 – 17

200+ Years Open Surf Boat 1 Evans Head-Casino Team A 2 Etty Bay Team A 3 Coolangatta 220+ Years Open Surf Boat 1 Mooloolaba 2 Noosa Heads 3 Maroochydore 240+ Years Open Surf Boat 1 Mooloolaba 2 Kurrawa 3 Alexandra Headland 260+ Years Open Surf Boat 1 Tugun Team A 2 Kurrawa 3 Coolum Beach


2017 Queensland Youth Surf Life Saving Championships

U11 Male Ironman 1 Ryley Harland (Northcliffe) 2 Herb Winter (Currumbin) 3 Ethan Callaghan (North Burleigh)

U12 Male Beach Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Tweed Heads & Coolangatta Team A

U13 Female Surf Team 1 Sunshine Beach Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team B 3 Kawana Waters Team A

U11 Male Surf Board 1 Ethan Callaghan (North Burleigh) 2 Ryley Harland (Northcliffe) 3 Herb Winter (Currumbin)

U12 Male Beach Sprint 1 Jayden Boreham (Kawana Waters) 2 William Graham (Currumbin) 3 Bailey Parker (North Barrier Branch)

U13 Male 1km Beach Run 1 Jacob Bristow (Maroochydore) 2 Harper Bourke (Tugun) 3 Callum Brennan (Point Lookout)

U11 Male Surf Board Relay 1 Tannum Sands Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 North Burleigh Team A

U12 Male Cameron Relay 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Sunshine Beach Team A

U13 Male Beach Flags 1 Tyler Kerr (North Barrier Branch) 2 Caleb Case (Tallebudgera) 3 Elliot Smethills (Alexandra Headland)

U11 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Tannum Sands Team A 2 Currumbin Team B 3 Currumbin Team A

U12 Male Ironman 1 Lucas Miller (Northcliffe) 2 Connor McAreavey (Alexandra Headland) 3 Euan Lynch (Northcliffe)

U13 Male Beach Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Mudjimba Team A 3 Currumbin Team A

U11 Male Surf Race 1 Ryley Harland (Northcliffe) 2 Herb Winter (Currumbin) 3 Matthew Lowe (Kurrawa)

U12 Male Surf Board 1 Sean Lunney (Tallebudgera) 2 Sol Shilling (Point Lookout) 3 Braxon Holmstrom (Kawana Waters)

U13 Male Beach Sprint 1 Elliot Smethills (Alexandra Headland) 2 Daniel Meggitt (Maroochydore) 3 Kalani Mitchell-Darley (Currumbin)

U11 Male Surf Team 1 North Burleigh Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Sunshine Beach Team A

U12 Male Surf Board Relay 1 Tallebudgera Team A 2 Kawana Waters Team A 3 Sunshine Beach Team A

U13 Male Cameron Relay 1 Currumbin Team A 2 Met Caloundra Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A

U12 Female 1km Beach Run 1 Elizabeth Bryant (Bilinga) 2 Eva Parish (Northcliffe) 3 Emily Gauld (Northcliffe)

U12 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 Tallebudgera Team A

U13 Male Ironman 1 Hugh Munro (Currumbin) 2 Mitchell Stitt (Maroochydore) 3 Kade Aitchison (Northcliffe)

U12 Female Beach Flags 1 Emily Gauld (Northcliffe) 2 Brooke Linford (Hervey Bay) 3 Isabella Catalano (Kurrawa)

U12 Male Surf Race 1 Lucas Miller (Northcliffe) 2 Matthew Lewis (Sunshine Beach) 3 Peyton Craig (Tannum Sands)

U13 Male Surf Board 1 Zeb Stokes (Kawana Waters) 2 Hugh Munro (Currumbin) 3 Mitchell Stitt (Maroochydore)

U12 Female Beach Relay 1 Kurrawa Team A 2 Mermaid Beach AEME 3 Maroochydore Team A

U12 Male Surf Team 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Sunshine Beach Team A

U13 Male Surf Board Relay 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 Currumbin Team A

U12 Female Beach Sprint 1 Tahli Devine (Kurrawa) 2 Imogen Harvey (Alexandra Headland) 3 Mia Bell (Tannum Sands)

U13 Female 1km Beach Run 1 Mia Marks (Tallebudgera) 2 Lila Horobin (North Queensland) 3 Bella Smith (Noosa Heads)

U13 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Kawana Waters Team B 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Currumbin Team A

U12 Female Cameron Relay 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Southport Team A

U13 Female Beach Flags 1 Neve Underwood (Alexandra Headland) 2 Libby Ward (Mudjimba) 3 Mackenzie Jackson (Coolum Beach)

U13 Male Surf Race 1 Coby Richardson (Tannum Sands) 2 Hugh Munro (Currumbin) 3 Callum Brennan (Point Lookout)

U12 Female Ironwoman 1 Jamie Perkins (Maroochydore) 2 Morgan Trinca (Southport) 3 Eva Parish (Northcliffe)

U13 Female Beach Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Mudjimba Team A

U13 Male Surf Team 1 Met Caloundra Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A

U12 Female Surf Board 1 Morgan Trinca (Southport) 2 Jamie Perkins (Maroochydore) 3 Emily Gauld (Northcliffe)

U13 Female Beach Sprint 1 Amy Kibble (Noosa Heads) 2 Neve Underwood (Alexandra Headland) 3 Letitia Fox (Noosa Heads)

U14 2 Person R&R 1 Tugun Team A 2 Tugun Team B 3 Northcliffe Team A

U12 Female Surf Board Relay 1 Southport Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A

U13 Female Cameron Relay 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 Sunshine Beach Team B

U14 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Lauren Nugent (North Barrier Branch) 2 Tekara Aimer (Alexandra Headland) 3 Daisy Fahey (North Burleigh)

U12 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A Currumbin Team A

U13 Female Ironwoman 1 Abbie Tolano (Sunshine Beach) 2 Charlotte Cross (North Burleigh) 3 Ruby Meehan (Currumbin)

U14 Female Beach Flags 1 Ellie Beer (Currumbin) 2 Lauren Nugent (North Barrier Branch) 3 Emma Thompson (Dicky Beach)

U12 Female Surf Race 1 Jamie Perkins (Maroochydore) 2 Morgan Trinca (Southport) 3 Grace Gallagher (Northcliffe)

U13 Female Surf Board 1 Charlotte Cross (North Burleigh) 2 Alana Munro (Kawana Waters) 3 Ruby Meehan (Currumbin)

U14 Female Beach Relay 1 Sunshine Beach Team A 2 Mudjimba Team A 3 Dicky Beach Team A

U11 Male Beach Relay 1 Tweed Heads & Coolangatta Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A Met Caloundra Team A

U12 Female Surf Team 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Kurrawa Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A

U13 Female Surf Board Relay 1 Kawana Waters Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A

U14 Female Beach Sprint 1 Ellie Beer (Currumbin) 2 Alessia Catalano (Kurrawa) 3 Gwyneth Richards (North Burleigh)

U11 Male Beach Sprint 1 Thomas Basford (Met Caloundra) 2 Darcy Ramm (BHMP) 3 Jake Lateo (Tweed Heads & Coolangatta)

U12 Male 1km Beach Run 1 Peyton Craig (Tannum Sands) 2 Connor Lilley (Mooloolaba) Read Ethan (Tallebudgera)

U13 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Sunshine Beach Team A 2 Kawana Waters Team A 3 North Queensland Team D

U14 Female Cameron Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 North Barrier Branch Team A

U11 Male Cameron Relay 1 Tannum Sands Team A 2 Noosa Heads Team A 3 Currumbin Team A

U12 Male Beach Flags 1 Jayden Boreham (Kawana Waters) 2 Joshua Webber (Coolum Beach) 3 Jake O’Hara (Mudjimba)

U13 Female Surf Race 1 Lulu Korac (Sunshine Beach) 2 Lila Horobin (North Queensland) Finella Gibbs-Beal (Noosa Heads)

U14 Female Ironwoman 1 Sarah Perkins (Maroochydore) 2 Tayla Halliday (Alexandra Headland) Bronte Naylor (Alexandra Headland)

Junior All Age Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Tugun Team A U11 Female 1km Beach Run 1 Aspen Anderson (Currumbin) 2 Aleira Usher (Currumbin) 3 Molly Sewell (Pacific) U11 Female Beach Flags 1 Jasmine Single (Kurrawa) 2 Elizabeth Clarke (Alexandra Headland) 3 Zara Richters (Met Caloundra) U11 Female Beach Relay 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Met Caloundra Team A 3 Currumbin Team A U11 Female Beach Sprint 1 Cyra Bender (Northcliffe) 2 Jade Bartholomeusz (Maroochydore) 3 Layla Martiensen (Hervey Bay) U11 Female Cameron Relay 1 Met Caloundra Team A 2 Kawana Waters Team A 3 BHMP Team A U11 Female Ironwoman 1 Jahly Stokes (Kawana Waters) 2 Lucia Richards (Met Caloundra) 3 Summer Hooper (Sunshine Beach) U11 Female Surf Board 1 Jahly Stokes (Kawana Waters) 2 Allana Glowaski (Tallebudgera) 3 Maggie Tapp (Emu Park) U11 Female Surf Board Relay 1 Kawana Waters Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 BHMP Team A U11 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Emu Park Team A 2 Kawana Waters Team A 3 BHMP Team A U11 Female Surf Race 1 Jahly Stokes (Kawana Waters) 2 Leah Pilkington (Alexandra Headland) 3 Tara Newton (North Burleigh) U11 Female Surf Team 1 Kawana Waters Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Alexandra Headland Team A U11 Male 1km Beach Run 1 Matthew Lowe (Kurrawa) 2 Jake French (Tugun) 3 Jack Stringer (Currumbin) U11 Male Beach Flags 1 Jack Stafford (Tallebudgera) 2 Jake French (Tugun) 3 Fynn O’Rielley (Noosa Heads)

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72

2 0 1 6 – 17


U14 Female Surf Board 1 Sarah Perkins (Maroochydore) 2 Tekara Aimer (Alexandra Headland) 3 Breeann Sullivan (Southport)

U15 Female Beach Flags 1 Tayla Clifford (Alexandra Headland) 2 Isabella Clarke (Alexandra Headland) 3 Mia McWilliam (Alexandra Headland)

U15 Male Surf Board Relay 1 Noosa Heads Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A

U14 Female Surf Board Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 North Burleigh Team A

U15 Female Beach Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team B 3 Tweed Heads & Coolangatta Team A

U15 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Northcliffe Team B 2 Maroochydore Team A 3 Noosa Heads Team A

U14 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 North Barrier Branch Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 BHMP Team A

U15 Female Beach Sprint 1 Tayla Clifford (Alexandra Headland) 2 Carla Bull (Alexandra Headland) 3 Mia McWilliam (Alexandra Headland)

U15 Male Surf Race 1 Jordan Sergis (Northcliffe) 2 Zachary Bromage (Sunshine Beach) 3 Joshua Williams (Emu Park)

U14 Female Surf Race 1 Tayla Halliday (Alexandra Headland) 2 Dominique Stitt (Maroochydore) 3 Sarah Perkins (Maroochydore)

U15 Female Cameron Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A

U15 Male Surf Team 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Sunshine Beach Team A

U14 Female Surf Team 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Alexandra Headland Team A 3 North Barrier Branch Team A

U15 Female Ironwoman 1 Lani Pallister (Alexandra Headland) 2 Ruby Nolan (Sunshine Beach) 3 Jenaya Massie (Maroochydore)

Junior 2 Person R & R 1 North Barrier Branch Team A 2 Tweed Heads & Coolangatta Team A 3 Northcliffe Team B

U14 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Riley Shilling (Point Lookout) 2 Tuy Schieb (Tugun) 3 Ryder Jensen (Surfers Paradise)

U15 Female Rescue Tube Race 1 Lani Pallister (Alexandra Headland) 2 Emily Holyman (Mermaid Beach AEME) 3 Tamarind Wildin-Snedden (Maroochydore)

Junior March Past 1 BHMP Team A 2 Bundaberg Team A 3 Hervey Bay Team A

U14 Male Beach Flags 1 Kai Thompson (Noosa Heads) 2 Sol Sheining-Cruz (Tweed Heads & Coolangatta) 3 Cameron Lang (Pacific)

U15 Female Surf Board 1 Lani Pallister (Alexandra Headland) 2 Emma Woods (Alexandra Headland) 3 Ruby Nolan (Sunshine Beach)

U14 Male Beach Relay 1 North Queensland Team A 2 Tweed Heads & Coolangatta Team A 3 Bundaberg Team A U14 Male Beach Sprint 1 Sol Sheining-Cruz (Tweed Heads & Coolangatta) 2 Kai Thompson (Noosa Heads) 3 Fraser Toon (Point Lookout) U14 Male Cameron Relay 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 BHMP Team A 3 Maroochydore Team B U14 Male Ironman 1 Joseph McMenamin (Maroochydore) 2 Kai Watson (BHMP) 3 Sunny Williams (Maroochydore) U14 Male Surf Board 1 Kai Watson (BHMP) 2 Hamish Farquharson-Selby (Sunshine Beach) 3 Joseph McMenamin (Maroochydore) U14 Male Surf Board Relay 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 Sunshine Beach Team A U14 Male Surf Board Rescue 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 Currumbin Team A 3 BHMP Team A U14 Male Surf Race 1 Joseph McMenamin (Maroochydore) 2 Kai Watson (BHMP) 3 Zachary Tabuai (North Queensland) U14 Male Surf Team 1 Maroochydore Team A 2 BHMP Team A 3 Northcliffe Team A U15 2 Person R&R 1 Tugun Team A 2 North Barrier Branch Team A 3 Tugun Team B

U15 Female Surf Board Relay 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A U15 Female Surf Board Rescue 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 Maroochydore Team D U15 Female Surf Race 1 Lani Pallister (Alexandra Headland) 2 Ruby Nolan (Sunshine Beach) 3 Jenaya Massie (Maroochydore) U15 Female Surf Team 1 Alexandra Headland Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 Maroochydore Team A U15 Male 2km Beach Run 1 Ryan McCure (Mermaid Beach AEME) 2 Max Williams (Alexandra Headland) 3 Zachary Bromage (Sunshine Beach) U15 Male Beach Flags 1 Samuel Dalton (Mermaid Beach AEME) 2 Jack Scott (Mooloolaba) 3 Tyler Gordon (Mudjimba) U15 Male Beach Relay 1 Mudjimba Team A 2 Northcliffe Team A 3 Palm Beach Team A U15 Male Beach Sprint 1 Khyle Jones (Mudjimba) 2 Patrick Wootton (Bribie Island) 3 Tyler Gordon (Mudjimba) U15 Male Cameron Relay 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Sunshine Beach Team A 3 Currumbin Team A U15 Male Ironman 1 Jordan Sergis (Northcliffe) 2 Jayden Morrow (Noosa Heads) 3 Zachary Bromage (Sunshine Beach)

U15 5 Person R&R 1 Northcliffe Team A 2 Tweed Heads & Coolangatta Team A

U15 Male Rescue Tube Race 1 Jayden Morrow (Noosa Heads) 2 Joshua Williams (Emu Park) 3 Jordan Sergis (Northcliffe)

U15 Female 2km Beach Run 1 Lucy Single (Kurrawa) 2 Brodee Trinca (Southport) 3 Liv Stephenson (BHMP)

U15 Male Surf Board 1 Sam Frost (Currumbin) 2 Jordan Sergis (Northcliffe) Max Moore (Sunshine Beach)

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

73

2 0 1 6 – 17


FINANCIALS

Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

General purpose financial report for the year ended 31 May 2017

1

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

74

2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Consolidated statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income For the year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ Consolidated Group 2017 Notes

Revenue

3.1

$

2016 restated $

31,694,658

30,737,939

Life saving services

(3,796,115)

(3,026,268)

Lifeguard operations

(11,356,486)

(10,957,352)

(1,787,486)

(1,786,541)

(646,414)

(626,655)

Education, youth and membership

(1,443,965)

(1,661,162)

Marketing and public affairs

(1,428,358)

(1,771,210)

Aviation

(6,642,184)

(6,310,176)

Corporate support

(2,846,580)

(2,100,054)

Cairns SLSSC operating expenses

(2,604,383)

(2,994,653)

(2,489,000)

-

489,177

252,184

17,637

104,530

(2,839,499)

(139,418)

(2,839,499)

(139,418)

(2,839,499)

(139,418)

Club support Surf sports

Impairment of property, plant and equipment

7

Net increase in investments Finance income net

3.4

Surplus/(deficit) from continuing operations Income tax expense Surplus/(deficit) after income tax

1(l)

Other comprehensive income for the year Total comprehensive income for the year

The above consolidated statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

2

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75

2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Consolidated statement of financial position As at 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ 2017

Assets

Current assets Cash and cash equivalents Trade and other receivables Other financial assets Inventories

Notes

$

Consolidated Group 2016 restated $

1 June 2015 restated $

4

1,383,154

4,772,745

4,250,241

5

2,243,602

2,358,225

3,456,141

6

9,109,296

6,606,001

6,354,721

195,603

262,817

Other current assets

Total current assets

332,704

43,366

46,793 79,179

13,264,359

14,043,154

14,187,075

-

-

51,900

14,862,706

16,869,692

16,392,267

14,862,706

16,869,692

16,444,167

28,127,065

30,912,846

30,631,242

8

1,877,802

1,561,430

1,854,225

9

1,618,673

1,690,028

1,372,279

779,642

1,121,382

812,555

4,276,117

4,372,840

4,039,059

650,419

499,978

412,737

650,419

499,978

412,737

4,926,536

4,872,818

4,451,796

Net assets

23,200,529

26,040,028

26,179,446

Association's funds Retained earnings Total Association's funds

23,200,529

26,040,028

26,179,446

23,200,529

26,040,028

26,179,446

Non-current assets Receivables Property, plant and equipment Total non-current assets Total assets

7

Liabilities

Current liabilities Trade and other payables Employee benefit liabilities Revenue received in advance Total current liabilities Non-current liabilities Employee benefit liabilities Total non-current liabilities Total liabilities

9

The above consolidated statement of financial position should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

3

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76

2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Consolidated statement of changes in Association’s funds For the year ended 31 May 2017 Consolidated Group $

2016 restated $

26,040,028

26,179,446

2017 Association's funds Retained earnings

Balance at the beginning of the financial year Surplus/(deficit) for the year

(2,839,499)

Balance at the end of the financial year

23,200,529

Other comprehensive income for the year

-

(139,418)

-

26,040,028

The above consolidated statement of changes in Association's funds should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

4

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

77

2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Consolidated statement of cash flows For the year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ Consolidated Group

Cash flows from operating activities Receipts in the course of operations Payments in the course of operations Interest received

2016

$

$

34,529,796

36,037,240

(30,176,510)

(30,650,039)

(1,061,746)

(1,402,878)

3,309,177

4,088,853

24,907

90,145

(4,709,557) (2,014,118)

(3,656,494)

(6,698,768)

(3,566,349)

-

-

(3,389,591)

522,504

4,772,745

4,250,241

1,383,154

4,772,745

17,637

GST remitted to ATO

Net cash (used in)/generated from operating activities

2017 Notes

4

Cash flows from investing activities Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment Purchase of property, plant and equipment Acquisition of other financial assets

Net cash (used in)/generated from investing activities Cash flows from financing activities Net cash (used in)/generated from financing activities Net increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

Cash on hand at the beginning of the financial year Cash on hand at the end of the financial year

4

104,530

The above consolidated statement of cash flows should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.

5

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

78

2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements For the year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ 1.

Summary of significant accounting policies

(a)

Basis of preparation

This general purpose financial report has been prepared in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements of the Australian Accounting Standards Board for distribution to the members to fulfil the directors' financial reporting requirements under the Associations Incorporation Act Queensland 1981. The Association is a not-for-profit entity for financial reporting purposes under Australian Accounting Standards. Material accounting policies adopted in the preparation of these financial statements are presented below and have been consistently applied unless stated otherwise. Australian Accounting Standards set out accounting policies that the Australian Accounting Standards Board has concluded would result in financial statements containing relevant and reliable information about transactions, events and conditions. Material accounting policies adopted in the preparation of the financial statements are presented below and have been consistently applied unless stated otherwise. The financial statements, except for the cash flow information, have been prepared on an accrual basis of accounting and are based on historical costs and the going concern assumption. Cost is based on the fair values of the consideration given in exchange for assets. The accounting policies adopted are consistent with those of the previous year. The financial report is presented in Australian dollars ($) The amounts presented in the financial statements have been rounded to the nearest dollar.

(b)

New accounting standards and interpretations

(i)

Changes in accounting policies, new and amended standards and interpretations

The accounting policies adopted are consistent with those of the previous financial year. (ii)

Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued but not yet effective

Certain Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations that have recently been issued or amended but are not yet effective and have not been adopted by the Association for the annual reporting period ended 31 May 2017. The directors have not early adopted any of these new or amended standards or interpretations. The directors have not yet fully assessed the impact of these new or amended standards (to the extent relevant to the Association) and interpretations.

(c)

Principles of Consolidation

The consolidated financial statements incorporate all of the assets, liabilities and results of the parent (Surf Life Saving Queensland) and all of the subsidiaries (including any structured entities). Subsidiaries are entities the parent controls. The parent controls an entity when it is exposed to, or has rights to, variable returns from its involvement with the entity and has the ability to affect those returns through its power over the entity. A list of the subsidiaries is provided in Note 12. The assets, liabilities and results of all subsidiaries are fully consolidated into the financial statements of the Group from the date on which control is obtained by the Group. The consolidation of a subsidiary is discontinued from the date that control ceases. Intercompany transactions, balances and unrealised gains or losses on transactions between group entities are fully eliminated on consolidation. Accounting policies of subsidiaries have been changed and adjustments made where necessary to ensure uniformity of the accounting policies adopted by the Group. Business combinations Business combinations occur where an acquirer obtains control over one or more businesses. A business combination is accounted for by applying the acquisition method, unless it is a combination involving entities or businesses under common control. The business combination will be accounted for from the date that control is attained, whereby the fair values of the identifiable assets acquired and liabilities (including contingent liabilities) assumed are recognised (subject to certain limited exceptions).

6

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

79

2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ 1.

Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(d)

Current versus non-current classification

The Association presents assets and liabilities in the statement of financial position based on current/non-current classification. An asset is current when it is: 

Expected to be realised or intended to be sold or consumed in the Association's normal operating cycle

Held primarily for the purpose of trading

Expected to be realised within twelve months after the reporting period, or

Cash or cash equivalent unless restricted from being exchanged or used to settle a liability for at least twelve months after the reporting period

The Association classifies all other assets as non-current. A liability is current when: 

It is expected to be settled in the Association's normal operating cycle

It is held primarily for the purpose of trading

It is due to be settled within twelve months after the reporting period, or

There is no unconditional right to defer the settlement of the liability for at least twelve months after the reporting period

The Association classifies all other liabilities as non-current.

(e)

Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and short-term deposits in the statement of financial position comprise cash at banks and on hand and short-term deposits with a maturity of three months or less, which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value. For the purpose of the statement of cash flows, cash and cash equivalents consist of cash and short-term deposits as defined above, net of outstanding bank overdrafts if applicable.

(f)

Trade and other receivables

Trade receivables and other receivables, which generally have 30 day terms, are recognised initially at fair value and subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, less an allowance for impairment. Collectability of trade receivables is reviewed on an ongoing basis at an operating unit level. Individual debts that are known to be uncollectible are written off when identified. Receivables expected to be collected within 12 months of the end of the reporting period are classified as current assets. All other receivables are classified as non-current assets.

(g)

Financial assets

Financial assets classified as held for trading are included in the category ‘other financial assets'. They represent financial assets at fair value through profit or loss. Financial assets are classified as held for trading if they are acquired for the purpose of selling in the near term.

7

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

80

2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ 1.

Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(h)

Property, plant and equipment

Property, plant and equipment are stated at cost, net of accumulated depreciation and any accumulated impairment losses. Such cost includes the cost of replacing part of the property, plant and equipment and borrowing costs for long-term construction projects if the recognition criteria are met. When significant parts of property, plant and equipment are required to be replaced at intervals, Surf Life Saving Queensland recognises such parts as individual assets with specific useful lives and depreciates them accordingly. Likewise, when a major inspection is performed, its cost is recognised in the carrying amount of the plant and equipment as a replacement if the recognition criteria are satisfied. Land and buildings are measured at cost less accumulated depreciation on buildings and impairment losses recognised. Depreciation is calculated over the estimated useful life of the assets as follows: Class of assets Depreciation method Deprecation rate / useful life Buildings Straight line 2.5% Leasehold improvements Straight line Life of associated lease Plant and equipment – Other Straight line 10% - 40% Plant and equipment – Helicopter Usage – operating hours 1,000 – 10,840 hours (components) Plant and equipment – Helicopter Straight line 6.67% - 100% (other) The residual values, useful lives and methods of depreciation of property, plant and equipment are reviewed at each financial year end and adjusted prospectively, if appropriate. Impairment The carrying values of property, plant and equipment are reviewed for impairment at each reporting date, with the recoverable amount being estimated when events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may be impaired. The recoverable amount of property, plant and equipment is the higher of fair value less costs to sell and value in use. Impairment exists when the carrying value of an asset or cash exceeds its estimated recoverable amount. The asset is then written down to its recoverable amount. Impairment losses, if any, are recognised in the statement of comprehensive income as a separate line item. Derecognition and disposal An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no further future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal. Gains and losses on disposals are determined by comparing proceeds with the carrying amount. Any gain or loss arising on derecognition of the asset is included in profit or loss in the year the asset is derecognised.

(i)

Trade and other payables

Trade payables and other payables represent the liability outstanding at the end of the reporting period for goods and services received by Surf Life Saving Queensland during the reporting period which remain unpaid and arise when Surf Life Saving Queensland becomes obliged to make future payments in respect of the purchase of these goods and services.

8

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

81

2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ 1.

Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(j)

Employee benefit liabilities

The Association does not expect its long service leave or annual leave benefits to be settled wholly within 12 months of each reporting date. The Association recognises a liability for long service leave and annual leave measured as the present value of expected future payments to be made in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date. Consideration is given to t h e expected future wage and salary levels, experience of employee departures, and periods of service. Expected future payments are discounted using market yields at the reporting date on corporate bonds with terms to maturity and currencies that match, as closely as possible, the estimated future cash outflows.

(k)

Revenue recognition

Revenue is recognised to the extent that it is probable that the economic benefits will flow to Surf Life Saving Queensland and the revenue can be reliably measured. The following specific recognition criteria must also be met before revenue is recognised:

(l)

Revenue from the provision of services is recognised as the relevant services are performed.

Revenue from donations is recognised on receipt.

Revenue from sponsorships is recognised on a straight-line basis over the period of the sponsorship agreement when the Association has the unconditional right to receive sponsorship donations.

Taxes

Current income tax Surf Life Saving Queensland is exempt from income tax pursuant to Section 50-10 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997. Surf Life Saving Queensland is a Public Benevolent Institution (PBI) and has been endorsed by the Australian Taxation Office to receive tax concessions. Further, Surf Life Saving Queensland is endorsed as a Deductible Gift Recipient (DGR). Goods and services tax (GST) Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of GST, except: •

When the GST incurred on a sale or purchase of assets or services is not payable to or recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office (ATO), in which case the GST is recognised as part of the revenue or the expense item or as part of the cost of acquisition of the asset, as applicable.

When receivables and payables are stated inclusive of the amount of GST receivable or payable.

The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the ATO is included as part of receivables or payables in the statement of financial position. Commitments and contingencies are disclosed net of the amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the ATO. Cash flows are included in the statement of cash flows on a gross basis and the GST component of cash flows arising from investing and financing activities, which is recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority is classified as part of operating cash flows.

(m)

Government grants

Government grants are recognised when there is reasonable assurance that the grant will be received and all attaching conditions will be complied with. If conditions are attached to the grant which must be satisfied before the entity is eligible to receive the contribution, the recognition of the grant as revenue will be deferred until those conditions are satisfied. Revenue received for capital grants is recognised upon acquisition of the underlying asset within the statement of comprehensive income.

9

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2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ 1.

Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)

(n)

Interest-bearing loans and borrowings

All loans and borrowings are initially recognised at the fair value of the consideration received less directly attributable transaction costs. After initial recognition, interest-bearing loans and borrowings are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method. Fees paid on the establishment of loan facilities that are yield related are included as part of the carrying amount of the loans and borrowings. Borrowings are classified as current liabilities unless the Association has an unconditional right to defer settlement of the liability for at least 12 months after the reporting date.

(o)

Financial risk management objectives and policies

Surf Life Saving Queensland 's principal financial instruments comprise receivables, payables, cash and short-term deposits, interest bearing loan and borrowings and investments held in equities. Surf Life Saving Queensland manages its exposure to key financial risks in accordance with the financial risk management policy. The main risks arising from Surf Life Saving Queensland 's financial instruments are credit risk, liquidity risk and price risk. Surf Life Saving Queensland uses different methods to measure and manage different types of risks to which it is exposed. These include ageing analyses and monitoring of specific credit allowances undertaken to manage credit risk. Liquidity risk is monitored through the development of future rolling cash flow forecasts. The Board reviews and agrees policies for managing each of these risks. Credit risk arises from the financial assets of Surf Life Saving Queensland, which comprise cash and cash equivalents, trade and other receivables. Surf Life Saving Queensland 's exposure to credit risk arises from potential default of the counter party, with a maximum exposure equal to the carrying amount of these instruments. Surf Life Saving Queensland trades only with recognised, creditworthy third parties, and as such collateral is not requested nor is it Surf Life Saving Queensland 's policy to securitise its trade and other receivables. In addition, receivable balances are monitored on an ongoing basis with the result that Surf Life Saving Queensland 's exposure to bad debts is not significant. There are no significant concentrations of credit risk within Surf Life Saving Queensland. Liquidity risk arises from the timing differences between cash inflows and cash outflows. Surf Life Saving Queensland 's objective is to maintain a balance between continuity of funding and flexibility. The Board has in place capital working capital and reinvestment targets and regularly monitors forward cash flow forecasts. Equity securities price risks a r i s e from investments in equity securities. To limit this risk Surf Life Saving Queensland diversifies its portfolio in accordance with limits set by the Board in conjunction with its investment fund manager Perpetual. The majority of the equity investments is of a high quality and is publicly traded on the ASX. The price risk appears immaterial in terms of a possible impact on profit and loss and as such a sensitivity analysis has not been completed. Primary responsibility for identification and control of financial risk rests with the Board. The Board reviews and agrees policies for managing each of these risks identified.

10

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2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ 2.

Significant accounting judgements, estimates and assumptions

The preparation of the Group's financial statements requires management to make judgements, estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of revenues, expenses, assets and liabilities, and the accompanying disclosures, and the disclosure of contingent liabilities. Uncertainty about these assumptions and estimates could result in outcomes that require a material adjustment to the carrying amount of assets or liabilities affected in future periods. (i) Estimation of useful lives or assets The estimation of the useful lives of assets has been based on historical experience as well as manufacturers' warranties (for plant, equipment and helicopters), lease terms (for leased equipment) and turnover policies (for motor vehicles). In addition, the condition of the assets is assessed at least once per year and considered against the remaining useful life. Adjustments to useful lives are made prospectively, if appropriate. (ii) Impairment of leasehold improvements Impairment indicators were identified relating to the carrying value of the leasehold improvements for the Cairns Surf Life Saving Supporters Club Inc. An impairment assessment was performed, with a recoverable amount determined based on value-in-use calculations. In determining value-in-use, projected future cash flows are discounted using a risk adjusted discount rate. From this impairment assessment, an impairment of property, plant and equipment of $2,489,000 has been recognised. (iii) Value of assets in Agnes Water Surf Life Saving Club Inc at date of gaining control As disclosed in Note 12, Surf Life Saving Queensland obtained control of Agnes Water Surf Life Saving Club Inc on 28 October 2015. The judgement has been made that the property, plant and equipment of Agnes Water Surf Life Saving Club Inc had a $nil value in use at 28 October 2015. This judgement is made since (i) the Agnes Water Surf Life Saving Club Inc is not generating significant surpluses, and (ii) the lease of the property is due to expire in October 2017. (iv) Value of assets in Bowen Surf Life Saving Club Inc at date of gaining control As disclosed in Note 12, Surf Life Saving Queensland obtained control of Bowen Surf Life Saving Club Inc on 26 April 2016. The judgement has been made that the property, plant and equipment of Bowen Surf Life Saving Club Inc had a $nil value in use at 26 April 2016. This judgement is made since (i) the Bowen Surf Life Saving Club Inc is not generating significant surpluses, and (ii) the lease of the property has expired and is currently be renegotiated.

11

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84

2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ 3.

Revenue and expenses

3.1.

Revenue

Consolidated Group

Rendering of services (sponsors and lifesaving) Government grants Distributions from Surf Life Saving Foundation and Surf Life Saving Australia General donations Royalty income Net gain/(loss) on disposal of property, plant and equipment Cairns Surf Life Saving Supporters Club Inc revenue Other revenues

3.2.

Employee benefits expense

2016 $ 19,168,610 4,368,804

2,674,793

2,491,748

227,400 125,040

442,574 100,744

15,816

(93,583)

2,408,575 1,180,077 31,694,658

2,962,588 1,296,454 30,737,939

Consolidated Group

2017 $ 15,757,953

Wages and salaries

3.3.

2017 $ 20,713,253 4,349,704

Depreciation and amortisation expense

Depreciation of non-current assets Buildings Plant and equipment Total depreciation of non-current assets Amortisation of non-current assets Leasehold improvements Total amortisation of non-current assets Total depreciation and amortisation expense

Consolidated Group 2017

2016 $ 14,070,669

$

2016 restated $

90,263 3,937,736 4,027,999

77,042 2,727,280 2,804,322

190,453 190,453

191,923 191,923

4,218,452

2,996,245

12

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85

2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ 3.

Revenue and expenses (continued)

3.4

Finance income – net

Consolidated Group 2017 $ 17,637 17,637

Interest income - other corporations

4.

Cash and cash equivalents

2016 $ 104,530 104,530

Consolidated Group

Current Cash at bank Term deposits

2017 $

2016 $

1,223,955 159,199 1,383,154

4,570,078 202,667 4,772,745

For the purpose of the statement of cash flows, cash and cash equivalents comprise the above. Consolidated Group 2017 Cash flow reconciliation Reconciliation of net surplus after tax to net cash flows from operations: Surplus/(deficit) for the year Adjustments to reconcile surplus after tax to net cash flows: Depreciation and amortisation of property, plant and equipment Impairment of property, plant and equipment (Profit)/loss on disposal of property, plant and equipment Increase in fair value of investments Working capital adjustments: (Increase)/decrease in trade and other receivables (Increase)/decrease in inventories (Increase)/decrease in other assets Increase/(decrease) in trade and other payables Increase/(decrease) in employee benefit liabilities Increase/(decrease) in revenue in advance Net cash flows from operating activities

$

2016 restated $

(2,839,499)

(139,418)

4,218,452

2,996,245

2,489,000

1,149,816

(15,816)

93,583

(489,177)

(252,184)

114,623 (289,338) 67,214 316,372 79,086 (341,740) 3,309,177

1,149,816 3,427 (183,638) (292,795) 404,990 308,827 4,088,853

13

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

86

2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ 5.

Trade and other receivables

Consolidated Group

Trade receivables Other receivables Other related parties Related party receivables- Surf Life Saving Clubs Total trade and other receivables

2017 $

2016 $

1,758,196 385,406 2,143,602

1,921,029 337,196 2,258,225

100,000

100,000

2,243,602

2,358,225

Trade receivables are non-interest bearing and are generally on 30 day terms. Receivables past due but not considered impaired are $528,703 (2016: $256,195). Discussions with the counterparties and/or receipts subsequent to reporting sheet date have satisfied management that payment will be received in full. At 31 May, the ageing analysis of trade debtors is as follows:

5.1.

2017 2016

5.2.

Trade receivables ageing 0-30 Current terms $ 1,329,493 1,764,834

Past due but not impaired 31-60 61-90 days days $ $ 249,078 156,444 107,726 14,646

91 days $ 23,181 33,823

Fair value and credit risk

Due to the short-term nature of these receivables, their carrying value is assumed to approximate their fair value. The maximum exposure to credit risk is the fair value of receivables. Collateral is not held as security, nor is it Surf Life Saving Queensland 's policy to transfer (on-sell) receivables to special purpose entities.

6.

Other financial assets

Consolidated Group

Current Financial assets at fair value

2017 $

2016 $

9,109,296

6,606,001

14

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

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2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ 7.

Property, plant and equipment

Consolidated Group 2017

Land and Buildings At cost Accumulated depreciation Net carrying amount

$

2016 restated $

3,693,493 (1,281,044) 2,412,449

3,794,428 (1,232,870) 2,561,558

Leasehold improvements At cost Accumulated depreciation Provision for impairment Net carrying amount

5,685,386 (834,549) (2,489,000) 2,361,837

3,371,546 (621,571) 2,749,975

Plant and equipment At cost Accumulated depreciation Net carrying amount

19,332,681 (9,248,761) 10,083,920

22,321,062 (10,869,963) 11,451,099

4,500 4,500

107,060 107,060

28,716,060 (11,364,354) (2,489,000) 14,862,706

29,594,096 (12,724,404) 16,869,692

Work in progress At cost Net carrying amount Total property, plant and equipment At cost Accumulated depreciation Provision for impairment Net carrying amount

15

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

88

2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ 7.1.

Reconciliations

Reconciliations of the carrying amounts of each class of property, plant & equipment at the beginning and end of the current and previous financial year are set out below:

Carrying amount at 1 June 2016 restated Additions

Land and Buildings

Leasehold improvements

Plant and Equipment

Work in progress

Total

$

$

$

$

$

2,561,558

2,749,975

11,451,099

107,060

16,869,692

24,806

2,205,595

2,479,156

-

4,709,557

Impairment loss recognised in profit or loss

-

(2,489,000)

-

-

(2,489,000)

Depreciation and amortisation expense

(90,263)

(190,453)

(3,937,736)

-

(4,218,452)

Transfers

(83,652)

85,720

100,492

(102,560)

-

Disposals

-

-

(9,091)

-

(9,091)

2,412,449

2,361,837

10,083,920

4,500

14,862,706

Carrying amount at 31 May 2017

16

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

89

2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ 8.

Trade and other payables

Consolidated Group 2017

Trade Payables Other Payables Accrued expenses

8.1.

$

2016 restated $

993,885 569,470 314,447 1,877,802

734,361 519,624 307,445 1,561,430

Fair value

Due to the short-term nature of these payables, their carrying value is assumed to approximate their fair value.

9.

Employee benefit liabilities

Consolidated Group

Current Employee entitlements

2017 $

2016 $

1,618,673

1,690,028

Non-current Employee entitlements

650,419

499,978

10.

Commitments

10.1.

Capital commitments

At 31 May 2017, Surf Life Saving Queensland was committed to a total construction contract of $4,019,512 for the redevelopment of the Cairns Surf Life Saving Club. With claims to date of $1,836,116, they are responsible for a further $2,183,397 (2016: $nil) in capital commitments for plant and equipment in relation to the redevelopment of the Cairns Surf Life Saving Club.

10.2.

Operating lease commitments

Future minimum lease payments under non-cancellable operating leases as at 31 May are as follows: Consolidated Group

2017 $ 750,854 900,545 66,375 1,717,774

Within one year After one year but not more than five years After more than five years

11.

2016 $ 720,011 1,135,117 219,424 2,074,552

Contingent liabilities

There are no contingent liabilities as at the reporting date which would have a material effect on the Association's financial statements as at 31 May 2017 (2016: $Nil).

17

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

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2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ 12.

Controlled entities

The consolidated financial statements incorporate the assets, liabilities and results of the following subsidiaries, in accordance with the accounting policy described in Note 1(c): 

Cairns Surf Life Saving Supporters Club Inc

Agnes Water Surf Life Saving Club Inc

Bowen Surf Life Saving Club Inc

The Cairns Surf Life Saving Supporters Club Inc is considered a controlled entity by way of control of the Management Committee by representation of Surf Life Saving Queensland Board Members and senior management, and the ability to control the day to day finance, and operations of the Cairns Surf Life Saving Supporters Club Inc. Control was obtained in September 2008. The Agnes Water Surf Life Saving Club Inc is considered a controlled entity by way of control of the Management Committee by representation of Surf Life Saving Queensland senior management and the ability to control the day to day finance, and operations of the Agnes Water Surf Life Saving Club Inc. Control was obtained on 28 October 2015. The Bowen Surf Life Saving Club Inc is considered a controlled entity by way of control of the Management Committee by representation of Surf Life Saving Queensland senior management and the ability to control the day to day finance, and operations of the Bowen Surf Life Saving Club Inc. Control was obtained on 26 April 2016.

13.

Events after the reporting period

There have been no significant events occurring after the balance date which may affect either the Association's operations or results of those operations or the Association's state of affairs.

14.

Economic dependency

Surf Life Saving Queensland is dependent on state funds from the Queensland Fire and Emergency Services and distributions from Surf Life Saving Australia, as well as other sponsorship agreements.

15.

Interest in the Surf Life Saving Rescue Fund Trust

Surf Life Saving Queensland invests both withdrawable and perpetuity funds in the Surf Life Saving Rescue Fund Trust which is administered by Surf Life Saving Foundation as the corporate Trustee. Withdrawable funds are included in Surf Life Saving Queensland 's statement of financial position at Note 6. Earnings and movements in the fair value of withdrawable investments are included in the statement of other comprehensive income. Perpetuity Funds are held for the benefit of Surf Life Saving Queensland and can only be distributed at the sole discretion of the Trustee. Accordingly these funds are not recognised in the statement of financial position. At 31 May 2017, Surf Life Saving Queensland had $10,406,406 (2016: $9,502,023) held in perpetuity funds in the Trust.

16.

Auditor’s remuneration

Consolidated Group

Amounts received or due and receivable for: An audit of the financial report of the entity Other services in relation to the entity - Non assurance services – taxation services - Non assurance services – feasibility analysis services - Non assurance services – policy development services

2017 $ 59,000

2016 $ 57,500

33,250 114,664 5,625 212,539

21,143 78,643

18

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

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2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ 17.

Parent information

2017 $

2016 restated $

Statement of Financial Position ASSETS Current assets

13,212,309

14,013,569

Non-current assets

15,065,841

16,349,415

TOTAL ASSETS

28,278,150

30,362,984

3,905,783

4,098,979

622,075

475,244

4,527,858

4,574,223

Retained earnings

23,750,292

25,788,761

TOTAL ASSOCIATION’S FUNDS

23,750,292

25,788,761

Total surplus/(deficit)

(2,038,469)

(64,974)

Total comprehensive income/(loss)

(2,038,469)

(64,974)

LIABILITIES Current liabilities Non-current liabilities TOTAL LIABILITIES ASSOCIATION’S FUNDS

Statement of Profit or Loss and Other Comprehensive Income

Guarantees Surf Life Saving Queensland has not entered into any guarantees, in the current or previous financial years, in relation to the debts of its subsidiaries. Contingent liabilities Surf Life Saving Queensland had no contingent liabilities as at the reporting date which would have a material effect on the Association's financial statements as at 31 May 2017 (2016: $Nil). Contractual commitments At 31 May 2017, Surf Life Saving Queensland was committed to a total construction contract of $4,019,512 for the redevelopment of the Cairns Surf Life Saving Club. With claims to date of $1,836,116, they are responsible for a further $2,183,397 (2016: $nil) in capital commitments for plant and equipment in relation to the redevelopment of the Cairns Surf Life Saving Club.

19

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

92

2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ 18. Related Party Transactions Related Parties The Group’s main related parties are as follows: a.

Key management personnel Any person(s) having authority and responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of the entity, directly or indirectly, including any director (whether executive or otherwise) of that entity is considered key management personnel. For details of disclosures relating to key management personnel, refer to Note 19.

b.

Other related parties Other related parties include close family members of key management personnel and entities that are controlled or significantly influenced by those key management personnel, individually or collectively with their close family members.

c.

Transactions with related parties Transactions between related parties are on normal commercial terms and conditions no more favourable than those available to other parties unless otherwise stated. Other than the remuneration of the Key Management Personnel (as disclosed in Note 19), there were no other transactions with related parties during the year.

19. Key Management Personnel Compensation The totals of remuneration paid to key management personnel (KMP) of the Group during the year are as follows:

Key management personnel compensation

2017

2016

$

$ 1,028,819

956,657

20

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

93

2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ 20. Financial Risk Management The Group’s financial instruments consist mainly of deposits with banks, short-term investments, held-for-trading financial assets, accounts receivable and accounts payable. The carrying amounts for each category of financial instruments, measured in accordance with AASB 139: Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement as detailed in the accounting policies to these financial statements, are as follows: Note

Consolidated Group 2017

2016

$

$

Financial assets Cash and cash equivalents

4

1,383,154

4,772,745

Loans and receivables

5

2,243,602

2,358,225

Fair value through profit or loss: –

held for trading:

6

Total financial assets

9,109,296

6,606,001

12,736,052

13,736,971

1,877,802

1,561,430

1,877,802

1,561,430

Financial liabilities Financial liabilities at amortised cost: –

trade and other payables

8

Total financial liabilities Refer to Note 21 for detailed disclosures regarding the fair value measurement of the Group’s available-for-sale assets.

21

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

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2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ 21. Fair Value Measurements The Group has the following assets, as set out in the table below, that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis after the initial recognition. The Group does not subsequently measure any liabilities at fair value on a recurring basis. The Group has no assets or liabilities that are measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis. Note

2017

2016

$

$

Recurring fair value measurements Financial assets Fair value through profit or loss: –

held for trading:

6

Total financial assets recognised at fair value

9,109,296

6,606,001

9,109,296

6,606,001

(i)

For investments in listed shares, the fair values have been determined based on closing quoted bid prices at the end of the reporting period.

(ii)

For investments in unlisted shares, the fair values have been determined using a market approach using sector price-earnings ratio of similar sized listed entities.

22

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

95

2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ 22. Correction of error

Correction of error relating to property, plant and equipment in previous years Errors were discovered in the fixed assets register relating to property, plant and equipment with: 

historic assets that have been disposed of or fully utilised still being recognised; and



assets being incorrectly capitalised.

These errors were primarily caused through historical issues in monitoring and accounting for the usage of helicopter parts as they are used and disposed. These errors resulted in an overstatement of plant and equipment assets at 31 May 2016 of $1,190,553, with this being an accumulation of errors over several years. The impact on the profit or loss in the year ended 31 May 2016 was an understatement of expenses of $89,523, with the remainder of the $1,190,553 impact relating to 2015 and earlier. This prior year overstatement error has been partially offset by another prior year error where a material leasehold improvement asset was incorrectly expensed rather than capitalised in the 2013 financial year. This error resulted in an understatement of leasehold improvements assets of $542,568 at 31 May 2016. The impact on the profit or loss in the year ended 31 May 2016 of this asset not being capitalised was an understatement of expenses of $55,647. Extracts (being only those line items affected) are disclosed below: The errors has been corrected by entries to each of the affected financial statement line items for the current financial year. The aggregate effect of the correction on the annual financial statements for the year ended 31 May 2017 is as follows:

Statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income Consolidated 2016

2016

$

$

$

Extract

Reported

Adjustment

Restated

Aviation expenses

(6,220,653)

(89,523)

(6,310,176

Corporate expenses

(2,044,407)

(55,647)

(2,100,054)

Surplus/(deficit) from continuing operations

5,752

(145,170)

(139,418)

Surplus/(deficit) after income tax

5,752

(145,170)

(139,418)

Total comprehensive income for the year

5,752

(145,170)

(139,418)

23

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

96

2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ 22. Correction of error (continued) Statement of financial position at the beginning of the earliest comparative period Consolidated 1 Jun 2015 Extract

1 Jun 2015

$

$

$

Reported

Adjustment

Restated

Assets Non-current assets Property, plant and equipment

16,895,081

(502,814)

16,392,267

Total non-current assets

31,134,056

(502,814)

30,631,242

Net assets

26,682,260

(502,814)

26,179,446

Retained earnings

26,682,260

(502,814)

26,179,446

Total equity

26,682,260

(502,814)

26,179,446

Association’s funds

Statement of financial position at the end of the earliest comparative period Consolidated 2016 Extract

2016

$

$

$

Reported

Adjustment

Restated

Assets Non-current assets Property, plant and equipment

17,517,677

(647,985)

16,869,692

Total non-current assets

17,517,677

(647,985)

16,869,692

Net assets

26,688,013

(647,985)

26,040,028

Retained earnings

26,688,013

(647,985)

26,040,028

Total Association’s funds

26,688,013

(647,985)

26,040,028

Association’s funds

24

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

97

2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Notes to the financial statements (continued) For the year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________ 23. Correction of error (continued) Notes Property, Plant and Equipment Consolidated Extract

2016

Adjustment

2016

reported $ Leasehold improvements - cost

restated $

$

2,726,957

644,589

3,371,546

Leasehold improvements – accumulated depreciation

(519,550)

(102,021)

(621,571)

Net carrying value

2,207,407

542,568

2,749,975

Plant and equipment - cost

22,321,062

-

22,321,062

Plant and equipment - accumulated depreciation

(9,679,410)

(1,190,553)

(10,869,963)

Net carrying value

12,641,652

(1,190,553)

11,451,099

Total Property, plant and equipment

17,517,677

(647,985)

16,869,692

Depreciation Consolidated Extract

2016

Adjustment

reported $ Depreciation of plant and equipment Amortisation of leasehold improvements Total depreciation and amortisation

$

2,637,757

2016 restated $

89,523

2,727,280

136,275

55,648

191,923

2,774,032

145,171

2,919,203

25

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

98

2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland ABN 27 360 485 381

Directors’ / Responsible entities’ Declaration Year ended 31 May 2017

______________________________________________________________________________________

The Directors of Surf Life Saving Queensland declare that: 1.

The consolidated financial statements, comprising the consolidated statement of profit or loss and other

comprehensive income, consolidated statement of financial position, consolidated statement of changes in

association’s funds, consolidated statement of cash flows and accompanying notes, are in accordance with the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 and the Associations Incorporation Act 1981 and: a.

comply with Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements (including the Australian

Accounting Interpretations), the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Regulation 2013 and the Associations Incorporation Act 1981; and

b. 2.

give a true and fair view of the Group’s financial position as at 31 May 2017 and of its performance for the year ended on that date.

In the directors’ opinion, there are reasonable grounds to believe that Surf Life Saving Queensland will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable.

This declaration is made in accordance with a resolution of the Board of Directors, and is signed for and on behalf of the Directors.

______________________________ Director

______________________________ Director

Dated

26

SLSQ ANNUAL REPORT

99

2 0 1 6 – 17


Surf Life Saving Queensland Surf Rescue House, 18 Manning Street, South Brisbane QLD 4101 PO Box 3747, South Brisbane QLD 4101 +61 7 3846 8000 • lifesaving.com.au

Surf Life Saving Queensland Annual Report 2016/17  

The 2016/17 season proved to be another successful year for SLSQ, as the organisation continued working towards the overarching vision of ‘Z...

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