SLO LIFE Magazine Feb/Mar 2022

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LIFE SLO magazine

UPCOMING HAPPENIN

TAKING IN THE VIEW

FAMILY OUTING RIDING THE RAILS LOCAL BREW

NEWS BREIFS

HISTORIC DISTRICT

HEALTHY LIFESTYLE PLA

SWEET TREATS

DENT GHT

CENTRAL COA WINE TASTING

BEHIND THE S C ENES FEB/MAR 2022 SLOLIFEMAGAZINE.COM

TIMELI

MEET

VINCENT SHAY

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75 YEARS

DOESN’T HAPPEN BY ACCIDENT.

805.543.6844 | 2226 Beebee Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 | www.prpco.com

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M O D E R N • C L A S S I C • J E W E L R Y

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G A R D E N

S T R E E T

S A N

L U I S

O B I S P O

W W W . B A X T E R M O E R M A N . C O M

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To the drivers who show a continued dedication to providing essential transportation for our community.

To the riders who promote the health and wellness of our community by continuing to follow healthy guidelines.

SLO TRANSIT

THANKS YOU.

Thank you for supporting one another during this unprecedented time. We’re here for you now, and always. 4

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“ I started this at Cal Poly with just me and my van. Our relationship with American Riviera has been crucial in managing our rapid growth.” – NAOMI NEILSON

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Jay Beck Fifteen years of banking on the Central Coast

This is True Community Banking Naomi Neilson, Founder and CEO, Native Trails, with Jay Beck, SVP, Regional Commercial Banking Manager

Combining our expertise with yours to find solutions for your unique needs.

Visit us at AmericanRiviera.Bank • 805.965.5942 FEB/MAR 2022

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Offering the only Level III NICU in San Luis Obispo County. When you want confidence and peace of mind for delivering your bundle of joy, we’re here for you. Our services include: The only Level III NICU in San Luis Obispo County, providing intensive care for critically ill and premature babies born at 23 or more weeks gestation The only OB hospitalist program in San Luis Obispo County, allowing for immediate obstetric emergency care 24/7 Trial of Labor after Cesarean (TOLAC) capability for those who had a prior c-section and desire a natural childbirth Our dedicated team of neonatal experts offer families advanced care close to home. We are a community built on care.

Learn more at TenetHealthCentralCoast.com/OBGYN 6

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CONTENTS 26 Timeline 28 Briefs 30 View 32 Q&A

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NOW HEAR THIS

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PUBLISHER’S MESSAGE 14 Info 16 Sneak Peek 18 Inbox 22 Contributors

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Volume 13 Number 1 Feb/Mar 2022

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MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR


The tree-lined streets of downtown San Luis Obispo are popping with color and at the heart of it is The San Luis Obispo Collection with 30 World Class & locally owned brands all located downtown. Right in the place you want to be.

Spring is in Season Court Street

SEPHORA POTTERY BARN LUSH SEEDS BANANA REPUBLIC OPEN AIR FLOWERS SLO SWEETS BROWN BUTTER COOKIE CO.

Monterey Street

LULULEMON WILLIAMS SONOMA MARINE LAYER H&M THE JUNKGIRLS URBAN OUTFITTERS MCCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS MINT+CRAFT FRANCESCA’S

Downtown Centre

APPLE ANTHROPOLOGIE ATHLETA BARNES & NOBLE JAMBA JUICE TORTILLA TOWN THE MOVIE EXPERIENCE SEQUOIA SANDWICH CO. STARBUCKS SUNGLASS HUT

Around Town

BLUEMERCURY VICTORIA’S SECRET MOONDOGGIES BEACH CLUB SHOE PALACE BULL’S TAVERN SAN LUIS TAQUERIA IKE’S LOVE & SANDWICHES

www.sanluisobispocollection.com #sanluisobispocollection FEB/MAR 2022

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58

dwelling

72

Real Estate

76

Health

82 TASTE

46 ARTIST

48 Author

WINE NOTES

50 Explore

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54 On the Rise

92 brew

56 pet collective

96 Happenings

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| PUBLISHER’S MESSAGE

Truck’s in the Mail Years ago, I set out to buy a used truck. After a few days spent sifting through Craiglist posts, I found the one I wanted: a near-perfect Toyota Tundra with an incredible price, and an equally incredible story. The seller, pictured next to the vehicle, wore camouflage. He was tanned and toned with a pair of dog tags reflecting the sun—the embodiment of the soldier, G.I. Joe. Turns out, he was stationed in Afghanistan and a little down on his luck, which explained the incredible price. I received an email reply back from him almost instantly. I’m stuck here in Kandahar and can’t get back to the states to show my truck. It’s packaged up and ready to ship out from my home base in Georgia. What can I say? She’s a beauty. Like new, but I need the money. Looking for a quick sale. My loss is your gain. We continued to correspond and when I expressed concern over not being able to actually do a test drive, he dropped the price. Twice. Finally, he said, “You seem like a nice guy and I really want you to have the truck, so why don’t you just send me a deposit, just $5k, and it’s fully refundable. Then, you can pay the rest once you receive it. That way, if you don’t like it, you don’t have to pay me another dime.” “Sounds great,” my fingers sprinted across the keyboard. “Where do I send the deposit?” The wiring instructions came over immediately. Almost too immediately. Doubt crept in for the first time, so I asked him for a bill of sale. “Not until you have a chance to check it out and decide to buy it,” he said. “I don’t want you feeling boxed in like you have to take it if you don’t want it.” “Okay,” I replied, “but I don’t want you to go through all the trouble and expense of shipping it if I don’t end up making the purchase.” “No worries,” he said, “the truck is yours! I want you to have it. You’re such a nice guy. Just shoot me the deposit and we’ll sort it out later. I trust you.” But I continued to have some lingering doubts about this whole thing. It all seemed too good to be true. Since my father-in-law happened to be in town, I asked him what he thought of G.I. Joe’s story. He, too, was skeptical, so he sent the guy another email also expressing his interest in the truck. After a few quick back-and-forth messages, he read the email out loud: “No worries,” he said, “the truck is yours! I want you to have it. You’re such a nice guy. Just shoot me the deposit and we’ll sort it out later. I trust you.” Sitting shoulder-to-shoulder, laptop-to-laptop, at the dining room table, we conspired to bluff. “Okay,” I typed, “just wired the money.” Then, my father-in-law, with a hearty chuckle, did the same: “Funds sent, please confirm receipt.” We both received the same reply: “Didn’t get it! Doublecheck the numbers to make sure they went to the right account.” “Oops,” I typed. “Looks like I sent them to the wrong account! My bad.” My father-in-law fibbed a line about his “dementia acting up.” We both asked for patience as we again and again “messed up” the wire transfer. Each time, the fraudster became increasingly agitated with his communication. This went on for a day-and-a-half and the whole time we congratulated ourselves for keeping the guy “off the streets,” thwarting his ability to scam anyone else while we tied him up with a scam of our own. A month or two ago, my phone rang. The number that popped up on my screen said, “P.G.E.” I answered and the bumbling agent informed me through labored breathing that my account was past due. “Really?” I said, “I thought we had automatic payments with you guys?” “Nope,” he answered, “and your power will be shut off today if you don’t pay your account in full. A total of $1,537.19 is due now. I can take your payment over the phone.” The very faint crowing of a rooster could be heard on the other end of the line. “How would you like pay?” “Uh,” I snorted a laugh to myself, “how about if I ship you my truck? What’s your address?” Thank you to everyone who has had a hand in producing this issue of SLO LIFE Magazine and, most of all, to our advertisers and subscribers—we couldn’t do it without you. Live the SLO Life!

Tom Franciskovich tom@slolifemagazine.com 12

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LIFE SLO magazine

4251 S. HIGUERA STREET, SUITE 800, SAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIFORNIA SLOLIFEMAGAZINE.COM info@slolifemagazine.com (805) 543-8600 • (805) 456-1677 fax PUBLISHER Tom Franciskovich

Elder Placements realizes the IMPORTANCE of listening to the client, in order to find the appropriate:

Independent Living Assisted Living Alzheimer’s & Dementia Care Homes Let their experienced Certified Senior Advisors take you on a tour to find the Retirement Home or Community that fits your loved ones Medical, Financial and Social needs, at NO Cost to you.

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Sheryl Franciskovich CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Charlotte Alexander Jeff Al-Mashat Brant Myers Lauren Harvey Paden Hughes Zara Khan Jaime Lewis Joe Payne Brian Schwartz CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Mariah Dingman Jo Anna Edminson David Lalush Jess Lerner Lucia Kiel Todd Meaney Mark Nakamura Zachary Scott CONTRIBUTIONS Have some comments or feedback about something you’ve read here? Or, do you have something on your mind that you think everyone should know about? Submit your story ideas, events, recipes, and announcements by visiting us online at slolifemagazine.com and clicking “Share Your Story” or emailing us at info@slolifemagazine.com. Be sure to include your full name and city for verification purposes. Contributions chosen for publication may be edited for clarity and space limitations. ADVERTISING If you would like to advertise, please contact Tom Franciskovich by phone at (805) 543-8600 or by email at tom@slolifemagazine.com or visit us online at slolifemagazine.com/advertise and we will send you a complete media kit along with testimonials from happy advertisers.

Nicole Pazdan, CSA,

SUBSCRIPTIONS Ready to live the SLO Life all year long? It’s quick and easy! Just log on to slolifemagazine.com/subscribe. It’s just $24.95 for the year. And don’t forget to set your friends and family up with a subscription, too. It’s the gift that keeps on giving! NOTE The opinions expressed within these pages do not necessarily reflect those of SLO LIFE Magazine. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part without the express written permission of the publisher.

Contact us today for FREE placement assistance.

CIRCULATION, COVERAGE, AND ADVERTISING RATES Complete details regarding circulation, coverage, and advertising rates, space, sizes and similar information are available to prospective advertisers. Please call or email for a media kit. Closing date is 30 days before date of issue.

(805) 546-8777

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR info@slolifemagazine.com 4251 S. Higuera Street, Suite 800 San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

elderplacementprofessionals.com

Letters chosen for publication may be edited for clarity and space limitations.

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B E C AU S E YO U D E S E RV E T H E V E RY B E ST C E N T R A L C OAST R E A L E S TAT E R E P R E S E N TAT I O N .

THE AVENUE CENTRAL COAST REALTY REAL ESTATE

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PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

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IN-HOUSE MARKETING

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T H E AV E N U E S LO. C O M

FEB/MAR 2022

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| SNEAK PEEK

O N T H E C O V E R W I TH VI NC E NT SHA Y

behind the scenes PHOTOGRAPHY BY ZACHARY SCOTT

I met Vince in front of his shop, Mermaid Market, at Port San Luis Harford Landing. He was super stoked. With a background in film making he jumped right in to help me set up the gear for his portrait! I decided to shoot on the jetty adjacent to the sport launch. The light was great, filtered setting sun and we mixed in a soft fill from my strobe kit.

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Vince asked me what he should wear, and I said I always start with what my subject is already wearing. In his case a tank top, hat, sunglasses, and shorts. The image you see on the cover, that was just a few shots in. As I shot against a canvas backdrop, without directing him at all, he went into full double shaka, and hooted. You can’t help but feel good vibes when you hang out with Vince.

We went about midway down the pier to a floating dock occupied by a giant sea lion. I casually walked close to the sea lion and continued to shoot and direct Vince. As I was shooting, the sea lion lunged and barked at me in one loud, violent motion. It scared the crap out of me! Probably because I wasn’t looking at it when it happened—it was like somebody sneaking up on you in the dark. After my heart rate returned to normal, we both laughed. Vince thought it was “classic.” The seal eventually ignored us and we continued shooting up and down the pier. SLO LIFE


Hiya Neighbor! Did you know there is a brand-new neighborhood coming to town? A place that was designed to celebrate everything that you already know and love about San Luis Obispo. Introducing Avila Ranch, nestled amongst the vineyards just south of downtown and promising to deliver the idyllic sun-drenched SLO lifestyle that you’ve been dreaming of. We are building this neighborhood with new homes, parks, trails, and all-around SLocal fun-loving amenities for you, the SLocal. We’ve been spreading the word around town about Avila Ranch so that SLocals get priority when it comes time to reserve a home site. Visit our website to join the Interest List today for the SLocal VIP treatment, including priority status on the waitlist for home sites and updates on construction! @AVILARANCHSLO

AVILARANCHSLO.COM

@AVILARANCH

Images are representational only and may differ from homes as constructed. Square footages are approximate. Seller makes no representations or warranties that the view from the property will remain the same. Future development changes to and growth of landscaping and the like may impact any current views from the property. Homes are constructed and marketed by WCP Developers LLC (CA Contractor License #1035148) and real estate sales brokered by WCP Real Estate, Inc. (CA DRE License #02055906), on behalf of Avila Ranch Developers, Inc., a California corporation. ©2022 Wathen Castanos Homes. All rights reserved. Equal Housing Opportunity. FEB/MAR 2022 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 17


| INBOX

TAKE US WITH YOU

Send your photos and comments to info@slolifemagazine.com or visit us online at slolifemagazine.com WAIMEA CANYON, KAUAI

SHINGLETOWN

MARV and MARY

ATASCADERO

THE BRANNEN FAMILY

PACIANO, UMBRIA, ITALY

LAURA HEIDEN

CABO SAN LUCAS

SANDEE and BILL BECKERS 18

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JIM, RHONDA, and NOELLE SEYBERT


AYSO REGIONAL TOURNAMENT

CHEFCHAOUEN, MOROCCO

THE HURRICANES

SNAKE RIVER, MAGIC VALLEY, IDAHO

JIM and SALLY BROOKS-SCHULKE

COSTA RICA VAL VAZ with LUKE and ISABEL MACHADO

FLATHEAD RIVER, MONTANA

MARGARET and TOM LOUSEN with CHRISTIAN

AMANDA, RYAN, STEWART, MAGNOLIA, and EDITH CALDWELL FEB/MAR 2022

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| INBOX

SLO LIFE TRAVELS

Send your photos and comments to info@slolifemagazine.com or visit us online at slolifemagazine.com TUNNELS BEACH, HAENA, KAUAI

PLAYA MADERAS, NICARAGUA

JEN and LYN

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK

HEIDI CRAWFORD and PAT PALANGI

DUBAI

RICK and CINDY JONES

BORA BORA

JIM GERPHEIDE

LAILA KOLLMANN 20

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| CONTRIBUTORS

1.

1. CHARLOTTE ALEXANDER is an awardwinning writer and editor with more than twenty years in nonprofit organizations, higher education, and media. 2. JEFF AL-MASHAT is a writer and visual artist with an MFA in painting from Georgia State University. He lives in Grover Beach.

10.

3. MARIAH DINGMAN has a background in neuroscience and is an active photographer, artist, musician, and outdoor enthusiast. 4. LAUREN HARVEY is a creative writer fueled by a love of cooking, adventure, and naps in the sun.

6.

5. PADEN HUGHES is co-owner of Gymnazo and enjoys exploring the Central Coast.

2. 11.

6. In addition to being an interior designer, ZARA KHAN is also a shoe aficionado and horror movie enthusiast. 7. DAVID LALUSH is an architectural photographer here in San Luis Obispo. 8. JESS LERNER is a photographer based in SLO who loves the outdoors. You can check out her coastal photography at jesslerner.com or @jesslernerphotography.

7.

3.

12.

4.

9. JAIME LEWIS writes about food, drink, and the good life from her home in San Luis Obispo. Find her on Instagram and Twitter @jaimeclewis. 10. TODD MEANEY is a landscape, product, and lifestyle photographer living the SLO Life with his brewery-loving Great Dane.

8.

11. BRANT MYERS is a the founder at slobiig.com, a hospitality consulting firm, and Toddler Timber, where he makes wooden children’s toys.

5.

13.

12. MARK NAKAMURA pursues his passion in landscape photography, as well as capturing the joys of weddings, families, events, and sports around the Central Coast. Find him on Instagram @nakamuraphoto. 13. ZACHARY SCOTT is a photographer known for his humorous and highly stylized work that has been featured in the New York Times Magazine, as well as GQ, Time Magazine, Wired, and New York Magazine. 14. BRIAN SCHWARTZ is a publishing consultant and advocate for local authors. He can be reached at brian@selfpublish.org.

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Selling Paso - by Miranda Battenburg

Selling Paso - by Miranda Battenburg Over 20 years local experience Miranda brings strong branding & marketing to your listing Berkshire Hathaway HomeSerivces knows great homes Full service local brokerage Complementary market analysis Represents buyers and sellers Quality properties

Miranda Battenburg Realtor DRE#02131203

800 11th St. Paso Robles CA 93446 805-712-1362 805-237-4700 miranda@sellingpaso.com www.sellingpaso.com ©2021 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of Columbia Insurance Company, a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate.® Equal Housing Opportunity. If your property is currently listed with a real estate broker, please disregard this offer. It is not my intention to solicit your listing.

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SPONSORED

ENCOURAGING a loved one TO TEST THEIR

hearing

Peter A. Lucier Hearing Instrument Specialist

Did you know that one in three people over the age of 65 experience some degree of hearing loss? Chances are, there is someone in your life who experiences a hearing loss and might not even know it yet. As an invisible condition, hearing loss affects many different areas of one’s life but is not immediately understood as the root of the problem. If you believe that your loved one may have a hearing loss, it is important to encourage them to take a hearing test. Hearing tests are simple and painless, and they provide useful information on a person’s hearing abilities. Because hearing loss is a sensitive topic, here are a few tips for the conversation. Do Your Research: Studies are published about how hearing loss affects your cognitive abilities (Johns Hopkins University), how untreated hearing loss may lead to lower earning power, and how hearing loss has been linked to an increased risk of accidents and falls. Before talking to your loved one, make sure you have the facts straight. Check to see the signs and symptoms of hearing loss match what you experience with your loved one. Arm yourself with useful facts about hearing loss that could help encourage your loved one to take a hearing test. Find a Quiet Time and Place: Hearing loss makes speech recognition

difficult. With hearing loss, people may ask others to repeat themselves or they may check out completely if they cannot compete with background noise to hear. For this reason, it is important to have your conversation in quiet place. Moreover, hearing loss may be a taboo subject for some. Rather than gathering a huge group of people – which may put your loved one on the defensive – have a one on one conversation so that you can clearly communicate your concerns.

Speak from Your Own Experiences: Data show that the mere process of aging can often result in social isolation. Add hearing issues to the mix, and those with untreated loss pose higher risks for finding themselves in a dark corner. They may feel abandoned by the family, ignored by friends, and excluded from activities, all because they cannot hear well enough in these social situations.

Talk about the Benefits of Treating Hearing Loss: Treating hearing loss helps people stay in

touch with their loved ones and to their communities. Studies indicate that people who do not treat their hearing loss have a smaller “life space”—they are not as mobile as people who treat their hearing or have normal hearing. Hearing loss interferes with the ability to drive and communicate, and also leads to a higher rate of accidents and falls. By treating hearing loss, your loved one would be investing in their own independence and security.

Support Your Loved One: Taking a hearing test is a simple and painless procedure, but of course there’s more to it than that. Ensure your loved one that you will be there to support them on their journey to better hearing—from making the appointment, to accompanying them to the hearing test, and—if a hearing loss is detected—helping them adjust to their new hearing aids. To begin the process, schedule a consultation, or talk to a hearing expert, contact us at Hearing Aid specialists of the Central Coast today.

Peter A. Lucier, has been a practicing Hearing Instrument Specialists for 22 years. If you would like more information, please contact us today for an appointment.

HEARING AID SPECIALISTS OF THE CENTRAL COAST, INC. WWW.SLOCOUNTYHEARINGAIDS.COM 24

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Do you or a loved one have hearing aids that are not working to their full potential, or even worse, you have stopped using them altogether?

At Hearing Aid Specialists of The Central Coast, we have developed a solution that brings your old hearing aids back to life. The practice owner, Peter Lucier, has over 22 years of experience. He has repaired and restored just about every brand of hearing aid. Peter has an All Make Repair Lab at both offices in San Luis Obispo and Atascadero.

$49

CLEAN & RESTORE YOUR HEARING AID

money back guarantee

Call us today so you can hear better again! We accept Anthem Blue Cross, PG&E, Cal PERS, AARP, Alignment, United Healthcare and many other insurance plans.

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1 2 3 2 6 L o s O s o s Va l l e y R o a d . S a n L u i s O b i s p o . ( 8 0 5 ) 4 3 9 - 3 5 8 6 7070 Morro Road, Suite D . Atascadero . (805) 460-7385 FEB/MAR 2022

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| TIMELINE

LOCAL

december 1

The SLO County Airport breaks an all-time heat record, measuring a temperature of eighty-six degrees around noon. According to PG&E meteorologist John Lindsey, the previous daily heat record at the airport was set in 1995, coming in at just eighty-two degrees. Most other parts of the County only reached the high seventies—still higher than normal for December on the Central Coast.

december 8

The City of San Luis Obispo files a motion in federal court to dismiss a lawsuit filed in September aiming to prevent the city from enforcing health, safety, and environmental ordinances for public spaces. The lawsuit, submitted by California Rural Legal Assistance on behalf of Hope’s Village of SLO and several homeless individuals, alleges unconstitutional treatment of the homeless. The twenty-four-page motion, which argues that the city does not criminalize homelessness, is scheduled for hearing on February 14.

december 8

California State Parks awards the City of San Luis Obispo a grant of $2.81 million to revitalize the three-acre Emerson Park in the downtown area. One of only 112 communities in the state to receive the funding, the city will use the funds to make much-needed improvements to create better access for people of all abilities and income levels. Likely upgrades to the neighborhood park include new lighting, new fencing and landscaping, a new dog park, expanded playgrounds, a new educational section for the community garden, a renovated multi-purpose basketball court, and new public art installations.

december 11

december 2 The City of San Luis Obispo announces a new program, Keys for Trees, making

it the first destination in the country to

launch an innovative urban reforestation sustainability initiative funded by

On the dramatic final day of the 2021 International Surfing Association World Para Surfing Games held in Pismo Beach December 6-11, Team USA wins its second gold medal in the Para Surfing Team Championship. The top para surfers in the world, including Team USA gold medal winners Liv Stone (Women’s Stand I), Sarah Bettencourt (Women’s Prone I), and Jose Martinez (Men’s Prone II), competed during the world’s largest international adaptive surfing event, which for the first time since the Games began in 2015, brought hundreds of surfers, coaches, trainers, and fans to the Central Coast.

local hotels. In partnership with the Environmental Center of San Luis

Obispo, the SLO Tourism Improvement District will dedicate one percent of

its annual revenue from local tourism

dollars to planting trees throughout the community, helping to plant 10,000

trees by 2035. Visitors’ hotel fees will be helping offset tourism’s impact by capturing carbon emissions. 26

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december 28

Hall of Fame NFL coach and announcer John Madden—who played football and baseball at Cal Poly in the late 1950s—dies unexpectedly at the age of eighty-five. One of the university’s most famous alumni, he was known for winning a Super Bowl title and for his success with the Oakland Raiders, as well as his quirky musings as a broadcaster (winning an unprecedented sixteen Emmy Awards for outstanding sports analyst/ personality). Madden was inducted into Cal Poly’s Hall of Fame as a charter member in 1987. A public memorial service is scheduled in Oakland, California, on February 15.


REVIEW january 1

Cal Poly universities’ “Stargrazers” float, adorned with 20,000 colorful blooms from across the nation, receives the Animation Award at the 133rd Rose Parade on New Year’s Day. The entry exemplifies the parade’s 2022 theme of “Dream. Believe. Achieve.”—a celebration of education’s ability to open doors, open minds, and change lives. More than eighty students, equally split between Cal Poly SLO and Cal Poly Pomona campuses, worked to finish the float during the challenges of the pandemic and last year’s parade cancellation. It was one of only six self-built entries in this year’s extravaganza, which included forty-one other floats.

january 8

The SLO Vet Center, in collaboration with the Veterans Services Office and Veterans Outreach, hosts a drive-through 2022 New Year Salute to Veterans and Families, celebrating the beginning of a new year by enjoying hot dogs, live music, and goodie bags filled with information about helpful resources for vets including counseling, mental and physical health care, and even homelessness.

january 5

SLO County Superior Court Judge Tana Coates rejects a motion by the State of California, the California Department of General Services, and the California Coastal Commission to throw out a lawsuit filed in 2021 by Friends of Oceano Dunes to establish a property right for the public to drive off-highway vehicles and camp at Oceano Dunes State Vehicular Recreation Area. The lawsuit, seeking to “quiet title” against the state, is set to proceed to trial in March 2023. The goal, according to the off-roading advocacy group, is to protect beach driving and camping the way it has been occurring for the past 100 years.

january 5

The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) hosts a virtual meeting for Central Coast residents to offer comments about the scope of an environmental assessment associated with a proposed wind farm encompassing 376 square miles off the coasts of Morro Bay and Cambria. Concerns about the Morro Bay Wind Energy Area include its potential effects on the fishing industry and maritime vessel traffic, in addition to its environmental, economic, noise, and visual impacts. The BOEM expects to publish the environmental assessment for review and comment this spring.

january 12

SLO County Citizens for Good Government, a local nonpartisan citizens’ group dedicated to “a fair and free democracy for SLO County,” files a civil lawsuit against the County of San Luis Obispo to overturn a controversial redistricting map, backed by the local Republican Party and scheduled to go into effect on January 13, that was adopted by the Board of Supervisors in December 2021. The group, which has raised more than $200,000 from more than 1,000 donors, claims the Supervisors ignored California’s Fair Maps Act requirements, and requests that the county take no action based on the new map until the suit is resolved.

january 13

Jordan Cunningham announces he will not run in 2022 for a fourth term in the 35th Assembly District. Without citing a reason for his decision, and while indicating his time in politics may not be over, the moderate Republican says he will spend more time with family, coach youth sports, and help grow his family businesses. The geographic makeup of San Luis Obispo County’s Assembly district was changed significantly during the statewide redistricting process in 2021: the old District 35 is becoming District 30, shifting north to pick up coastal communities in Monterey and Santa Cruz counties. At least two Democratic candidates and one Republican have announced plans to run for the District 30 seat. SLO LIFE FEB/MAR 2022

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| BRIEFS

CAT

Travelers at the SLO County Regional Airport are seeing some new technology in action designed to speed up the check-in process: Credential Authentication Technology, or CAT, allows flight passengers to board with just their TSA-approved identification, such as a driver’s license, passport, or passport card—no boarding pass needed. The airport’s two CAT units are now the primary way travelers check-in for flights.

County of the Year The SLO County Farm Bureau has received top recognition from the California Farm Bureau.The local agency was lauded for its Central Coast Agritourism Intensive, farmworker mass-vaccination effort, and partnership with County Fire on an Ag Pass program allowing emergency access to areas threatened during a disaster.

SB-9 Senate Bill 9, a new state law is designed to ease the current housing crisis by allowing up to four units on a single-family lot. Some local homeowners worry that it will degrade residential quality of life, and planning commissioners for the City of SLO have asked staff to keep an eye on the new law. City officials have said current design standards and the city’s high percentage of rentals will reduce the law’s local impact.

22,445 The number of vibrant orange and black western monarch butterflies overwintering at Pismo State Beach Butterfly Grove this fall/winter season, a mighty increase over the 200 or so last season. The Grove, home to thousands of butterflies for more than seventy years, is one of only five sites in the state with usual counts of over 10,000 butterflies annually. 28

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D1

The rains of December decreased the local drought severity according to the US Drought Monitor. The entire Central Coast improved to a Moderate “D1” Drought classification from a Severe “D2” Drought level at the beginning of January.

“This year-round farmers market is the place to be on Thursday nights.” So proclaims the website “Eat This, Not That,” naming the Downtown SLO Farmers’ Market the best in California. The website, which advertises itself as “the leading authority in food, nutrition and health,” picked markets that “not only sell fantastic fall goodies but also excel when it comes to serving as community gathering spaces.”

$868,522 According to the SLO Chamber of Commerce, the amount shoppers pumped into local businesses as part of the 2021 Holiday Buy Local Bonus program. That’s nineteen percent more than shoppers spent through the 2020 program. More than 4,400 shoppers, who spent an average of $171 each, saved their receipts and received $25 gift cards to local restaurants, retailers, and personal service providers as an incentive.

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SLO County League of Women Voters is celebrating six decades of serving all citizens of the county, as well as a milestone of more than 200 members, at the start of 2022. An all-volunteer organization, it is one of more than 700 local Leagues nationwide dedicated to informing voters, advocating on policy issues, and promoting public engagement in government.

“I am thrilled to donate Templeton Farms to my alma mater.” UC Davis alumna and dedicated equestrian Gina Bornino Miller, on giving to the university the spectacular fifty-twoacre state-of-the-art facility that she and her late husband opened in Templeton in 2011 as a world-class sport horse training, sales, and breeding center. The university plans to use it to advance equine health and veterinary education.

20%

The percentage of Cal Poly graduates who have gone on to work for one of the following five employers: Apple (which employs a whopping eight percent of all Cal Poly grads), Amazon, Ernst & Young, Northrop Grumman, and Workday Inc. Also according to the recent study, conducted by GradReport, the most popular jobs for Cal Poly alumni include software developer/engineer, project manager, electronics engineer, mechanical engineer, and business analyst. SLO LIFE


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CONTRASTING

| VIEW

BY MARK NAKAMURA

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hile most of my landscape photographs are in color, I love a rich black and white photograph. I find that color can sometimes be a distraction when it comes to shapes, texture, lines, and form.

It was late in the afternoon when I set out to climb the San Luis Obispo hills above Flora Street. I captured some images, including the one seen here, following a storm—I love to photograph right after a storm when the sunbeams shining through the clouds make dramatic light and contrast. Using my 100-400mm lens (at the 100mm end), I photographed 30

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this scene at sunset with the long telephoto zoom lens to compress the layers of hills to the west. After making the exposure and color adjustments in Lightroom (a photo editing and organizing program), I exported this image to Photoshop and used the Nik Silver Efex plug-in to convert the image to black and white, reducing the texture and grain to give a dramatic, high contrast look. I agree with photographer Helen Rushton, “For me, great black and white images fall into two categories: Very dramatic with stormy skies and bold compositions and at the other end of the spectrum a calm and minimalist composition.” SLO LIFE


COMPOSITION

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| Q&A

Michelle Shoresman A few months ago, following the mayor’s unexpected exit, MICHELLE SHORESMAN was appointed to fill a vacated seat on the San Luis Obispo City Council. Up to that point, the longtime resident had been active in the community as a volunteer in a wide variety of roles. She has spent her career in public health and is employed by the County Health Agency. We had a chance to visit with her recently. Here is some of what she had to say…

Okay, Michelle, where are you from? I was born and raised in the southern part of Santa Clara County, a little town called San Martin between Gilroy and Morgan Hill. It was pretty out in the sticks. We had an acre property, and lots of horses around us. There was one elementary school for the kids that lived all scattered around that rural area. I was a pretty studious kid, pretty active. Got good grades, participated in a lot of extracurricular activities. I wasn’t super athletic, but I was a cheerleader and was involved in drama and band, and all the things. What did your parents do for a living? They were both teachers, so education was always really important in my family, something that was really valued. My dad taught high school and my mom taught elementary school, but she, well, she got very sick when I was about six and passed away pretty quickly from breast cancer. I don’t have a lot of memories of her, unfortunately, but I know that she was very loved in our community; she was very active in her church, and we had a lot of support as a family. I don’t think it’s ever easy for a kid to lose their parent, leaving a big gaping hole. It was just my dad and me, and he was a wonderful father and very attentive; but I know it was really hard on him to raise a child on his own for the most part. How did you end up here? I came down here to go to Cal Poly and Montaña de Oro just stole my heart. I was like, “This place is amazing, it’s so beautiful!” And so, I was hooked. I majored in political science, so I was more of a liberal arts person, but I still made the most I could have out of the learn by doing philosophy at Cal Poly. I studied abroad in London for a semester, and I did an internship with a women’s organization while I was there, and did an internship in Washington, D.C. for a group called the Congressional Caucus for Women’s Issues. That fueled my activism, I think, from an early start, and sparked my interest mostly in women’s issues and improving the lives of women and children. And that eventually moved into my 32

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career in public health. Let’s talk about what you do for work. Sure. I’ve been in public health for twenty years now. Currently, I’m a division manager, which means that I oversee several programs. I started out as an HIV/AIDS program manager, helping deliver services to people with HIV in the early 2000s. And then I started doing emergency planning and preparedness, so a lot of the pandemic response stuff that we’ve been doing for the last two years. And for about the last, I would say, last seven to eight years, I’ve been working on healthcare access issues. So, I oversee the medical care in the juvenile hall, and a nurse navigation program to try and connect individuals in the community with Medi-Cal, Covered California—just also just trying to help people figure out how to navigate the healthcare system, because it’s complicated—even for those who have insurance. Most people don’t know how to wade their way through co-pays, out of pocket maximums, and billing from their insurance company, nor do they know how to advocate for themselves with doctors and providers. We try to help people one on one with that sort of navigation. Why did you agree to join the city council? Well, I’ve been asked multiple times by people during different election cycles if I would be willing to run, and as you can see, I’ve been a public servant for a long time, so making a difference in my community is really important. And each time I’ve been asked I’ve felt like, “Oh, I can’t do that right now, it’s not the right time in my life. My son is too young, my work is too demanding,” whatever. There are many, many reasons that I think women, in particular, come up with excuses for themselves of why they shouldn’t run, and I think I just got to the point with the recent appointment process that I had been asked enough times. They say it takes most women an average of seven times to be asked to run for office before they’ll go ahead and do it. I guess I met that threshold, and it just felt like now is the right time to throw my hat in the ring and give it a shot and see what I could do. SLO LIFE


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| NOW HEAR THIS

Countryside Soul

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BY JOE PAYNE PHOTOGRAPHY BY JO ANNA EDMINSON

Generations of local musicians and bands have put in the hours of rehearsing, recording, and gigging with their eyes on the prize of “making it,” and transplanting to Los Angeles and all its celebrated live music venues. But how often do you see the reverse? Just a couple of years ago, R&B and soul group The Charities were several guys packed into a bungalow in Hermosa Beach, practicing by day and cutting up sets in the venues along Sunset and Santa Monica boulevards by night. Now, the six-piece band is based out of a ranch house along a winding SLO County country road. The group made the move in 2019, and country living has been a creative boon for this soul band from the city. “It’s really hard to play in a city and not get bothered by police, so we wanted a place we can play until four in the morning and not get bothered,” explains lead singer and songwriter Brock Van Pelt. “Living together is the biggest thing, just having enough space and having a practice space in the house is just everything a band could need.” The current iteration of the band includes Van Pelt along with bassist Derek Doszkocs, guitarist Sage Provins, guitarist Mike Butler, keyboardist Jack McChesney, and drummer Shane Nowak. The group has everything they need, from room for all their instruments to a self-constructed skateboarding ramp, a touch of the city out in the boonies. The group also brought along their distinct, soul-infused sound. Reminiscent of the R&B songs of yesteryear, The Charities blend funky electric guitars with the smooth sound of Fender Rhodes keyboard and syncopated drums. It’s a familiar sound, but unto itself, with lyrics about love and beachside vibes equally at home in LA or Avila Beach. The band’s first EP, Alma, was entirely self-produced and recorded back in LA. The project reflects Van Pelt’s formative years as a musician, growing up hearing his dad spin vinyl of the Isley Brothers and other iconic R&B groups. But it wasn’t just at home that he heard that style of music. “The Southern California area has a very big Chicano culture,” he ruminates, “The oldies are golden, I mean, it’s the prized possession of that culture and that whole scene, whether it’s the lowrider scene or hip-hop, which is all sampled from that music.” The Charities sound has found a receptive audience among locals, as well, between the shared nostalgia and the band’s original groove. They’ve played several gigs at Downtown Brew and other nearby venues, with an upcoming concert scheduled for March 5 at The Siren in Morro Bay. Whether they’re using their SLO countryside home as a launchpad to the Bay Area or back to their hometown in LA or performing here on the Central Coast, “SLO loves funky music, they love to dance, that was one thing I noticed right away,” Van Pelt shares, “The countryside is beautiful, the whole Central Coast is insanely beautiful, and we’ve been loving it here, for sure.” SLO LIFE FEB/MAR 2022

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| MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR

pro file PHOTOGRAPHY BY ZACHARY SCOTT

Thirteen years ago VINCENT SHAY lost everything. Already struggling to scratch out a living in one of the country’s most expensive housing markets, the Great Recession delivered a crippling right cross to his dream of buying a home. The more immediate problem was finding somewhere—anywhere—to live until he could come up with a plan to bounce back. As he had so many times before when things turned bleak, he returned to the ocean. This time, he began sharing his vast experience with local tourists. Out of that, a business was born—Avila Beach Paddlesports— which he and his wife, Emily, recently sold so they could spend more time together at the home they own in the Avila Valley. Here is his story…

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kay, Vince, let’s take it from the beginning. Where are you from originally? I was born in Omaha, Nebraska, and we moved all over the place. Pretty much, we’d leave every six months or so. I really resented it, all the moving around, because it was really hard to make friends, and then to leave those friends over and over. My dad was a drug dealer. That’s what he did. Shay is not my real last name, that’s my adopted father’s name. And, so, my mom pretty much abandoned us when we were really young, my brother and me, who’s thirteen months younger. And then she showed up again when I was seven. That’s when we moved from the inner city of San Francisco to the mountains, to Feather Falls, so my dad could grow pot. We were very feral, no structure. That’s where I first developed my love of the outdoors. I mean, before that, I had never really seen trees before. And later, my mom met a guy who was a pipefitter, and he traveled a lot for work. He took us with him everywhere, all over the country, eventually landing at Diablo Canyon. How was the transition? It was magical to us. We lived in Los Osos and it was incredible—the dunes, the ocean, the hills, everything. We boogie boarded pretty much all day, every day, when we got here. We didn’t even know what wet suits were. Then we moved into San Luis, near Bishop Peak. We’d hike up there all the time. But the ocean became my life. One thing led to another. I started surfing, then later, scuba diving, whatever I could do to be in the water. It was just an awesome place to grow up. But, you know, it was also a very difficult place to grow up. A lot of the kids around here are—a lot of them are pretty well off. So, you’re always trying to keep up with your friends, and it’s not always easy. For me, if I got in trouble, I didn’t have a lot of people bailing me out. And, at some point, I started to realize that there’s not many jobs here, so you see people leave. I was determined to stay. How did you do it? Well, when I was sixteen, my family was set to move again, this time to Texas. Instead of going with them, I moved out. I grew up kind of fast from there. I played football and wrestled, but the athletic director at the time told me about some recruiting rule where you had to live with your family in order to be eligible. I was a pretty decent running back, small but fast. So, instead, I got into rugby. I joined the SLO Rugby Club. They sort of took me in, and I ended up bouncing around living with different guys from the team, mostly in their mid-twenties while I was in high school. So, getting in trouble was always the thing to do. I hung out with the wrong people. It was an aggressive group back then. It’s not so much like that anymore, from what I understand, but it was a little different in those days. I was a young, impressionable kid, trying to keep up with the older guys. And I had a lot of anger to sort out. Were you able to sort it out? Actually, yes. I got good, really good at rugby, and went on to make the under-nineteen national team. I had a lot of fun doing that. Then, a few years later, I got hurt. I blew my knee out, my ACL, and that was the end of it for me because I had no money and no insurance, so I couldn’t get it fixed. I had to stop playing. But I could pedal a bike, so I started riding and eventually racing. Very slowly, I started to heal. By the time I was twenty-five, I had recovered, and I said to myself, “I’m going to make a comeback.” In my first game back, I remember running with the ball around the scrum and a guy comes at me to take me out and I just wanted nothing to do with it. In that moment, I had this weird thought flash through my mind, this realization: “The anger’s gone—I’m over it.” What came next? So, I started a landscaping business. Got my contractor’s license a year later at twenty-six. I also got deeper into cycling and into photography, which has always been a passion of mine. My brother gave me my first camera when I was seventeen. I still have the very first shot I ever took: a squirrel at the dunes [laughter]. At some point, I started shooting weddings and doing some video work, too. For a while, I did a local sports show. Things were going so well that I decided to sell the landscaping business. I also went to Vietnam to do a film there. That was such a great experience. But, you know, I’ve never had lots of money. I’ve only ever just scraped by. I had no direction. I didn’t know what to do. And then 2008 rolls around, the economy falls apart, in about a two-week span I lost everything. >> FEB/MAR 2022

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Ah, man… You know, I started doing guided kayak tours and stuff. I figured, well, I like people, and I love the ocean, so why not start sharing the ocean with people? And that’s what really led me to start Avila Beach Paddlesports. So, to be honest with you, I was pretty much rock-bottom and homeless when I started the business. It was twelve years of blood, sweat, and tears. Totally self-made. Well, I can’t say no one really helped me. That’s the thing for me is that my friends, the people I knew, who really like me, I’m always very thankful for them, because I couldn’t have done anything without my friends. And, especially my wife, Emily, none of this would have been possible without her. And what was the goal? I just decided that I was going to create something I can really, really embrace, and really get into, and really make a real business, so one day I might be able to buy a house. And so that was it, there was no giving up. I put everything I had into it, Emily did, too. The first year we met, were able to get a single-wide mobile home on O’Connor Way in San Luis. The property owner, she since passed away, but she was a really nice older lady who rented the place to us. I 40

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remember we had no money because everything was going into building the business. I mowed her grass for her after work, just to pay my rent. So, there was really no option but to make the company work. Now we live in the San Luis Bay Estates, which I always feel weird about, but we bought a condo up there and we’re living the good life in Avila. There’s just something about starting from scratch like that and growing it to that extent, where you can actually buy a house. It’s a pretty good feeling knowing you really earned it. So, how did you and Emily meet? We were surfing. Emily’s a legend from Morro Bay—great surfer, just a gnarly, hardcore surfer. And she is an awesome soul, a teacher with amazing water skills, and much better with people than I was. Back then, I had a real chip on my shoulder about people from the Valley coming here, trashing our beaches, and making everything so crowded. I remember this one time, I got really upset about it, and Emily said, “You know what, Vince, don’t get upset. Be happy. Because if everyone was like us, it’d be really super easy. Right? And, think about it, what do you want to accomplish? You want to teach people >>


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something, right? So, embrace those people, because they are the ones that need us the most.” Sage advice. Sure was, and that’s really when I realized that we could use this little company to help make a positive change. That’s what I love most about it, just seeing the learning, the understanding, the love of these beautiful sea creatures that you discover when you’re out there. We had people come for years and years to us [to rent kayaks] since they were little kids. I had a girl that came in, her name’s Izzy, and she’s taken a photo with me every year for like the past eight years. I’ve known this girl since she was like six or seven. And so, she has these photos of us, as she’s getting taller than me, and it’s pretty funny. She just came in a couple of weeks ago, and it was really cool to see her. I’ve been going through a bunch of old photos lately, after selling the company, it’s like, wow, did we do all this? It was a pretty cool realization. What was it like working in Port San Luis? You know, it wasn’t an easy place to break in, and if it wasn’t for me and Emily being who we are, I 42

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don’t know who else could have done it. Because Port San Luis is a little animal upon itself. It’s a real neat community, I love the community, I embrace the community, but they’re resistant to change, a lot of those guys up there. A lot of those fishermen are losing their livelihood out there all the time. Next thing you know, you get a bunch of kayakers who are happy all the time, and it’s not always the best combination. There can be a little bit of resentment there. But Emily grew up around fisherman. She really understands the culture, which helped me out a lot, too, because I didn’t understand that community all the time. It was a little different than I am. But we all love the ocean, that’s the common factor, we all love the ocean. Fishermen love the ocean. I don’t know any fisherman who doesn’t love the ocean’s environment. So, I just think that a lot of those guys are a little resentful because of regulation which I agree, for sure. How have things changed out there in the twelve years since you opened? Port San Luis Harbor, God, was so different back then, too. It’s changed a lot. I don’t think those guys [the fishermen] thought we >>


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would make it, to be honest. I think they thought we would fail. It was only because of our tenacity and our, I don’t know, it was just something that, you know, you do when you have no other choice. I bet you’ve interviewed hundreds of people, right, so you already know that story: When you have no other choice, you make it work. Because we had no choice, we had to do it. I had to do it. And, I was forty years old at the time, so there was no Plan B. I had to reinvent myself. I had to say, “This is either going to work, or I’m going to move from the area, because I can’t live here, it’s too expensive.” But I wasn’t willing to leave. This is home. So, there was no choice. And how did you end up selling the business? Well, about a year-anda-half ago, Emily and I had been talking about how we needed to slow it down because we’ve been running Mermaid Market along with the paddlesport business. We had been pushing so hard for so long and we just needed a break. So, one day, we had a customer who had just come in after being out on the water for a couple of hours and she says, “Hey, Vince, would you mind sitting down with me to talk about how you made this company? Because I would like to do something similar one day.” 44

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And I go, “No, I don’t have a problem with talking to you about how we did it.” And then I just sort of blurted out almost joking, “You can always buy us out.” She looked at me and says, “We can talk about that.” So we’re keeping the market, but that’s how we ended up selling the paddling business—to be able to build a company and to sell it, not to mention have our marriage survive all of it, that’s huge. It’s a big thing. A really big thing. So, what’s the best advice you can give to someone just getting started? Great question. In my opinion, I think one of the things when I was really young, like in my early twenties when I lost my way, I saw no light at the end of my tunnel, and I gave up a little bit, lost a lot of drive, and saw my friends going further than me because they had backing and I didn’t have anything. I always thought everything had to be perfect. I thought I had to know everything about something in order to go do it. One thing I would always tell people is, “Hey, don’t let that deter you. You just got to get out there and make a lot of mistakes. You’ve got to be creative, but most of all you’ve got to just do it. Don’t be scared to just do it. That’s the law. You’re going to fail, everybody fails. So, just get started. Don’t wait.” SLO LIFE


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| ARTIST

Kit Gould BY JEFF AL-MASHAT PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARIAH DINGMAN

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but any for San Luis artist her work is about artists areObispo searching, or Kit are Gould, on a journey for answers, the questions themselves. In many ways, her art is about raising the questions that we all wonder about. Such as, why do we value objects? Why do we collect things? Why is something that means so much to one person, meaningless to another? And what value do objects bring into our life, when we live in a society where so much effort is dedicated to acquiring more? Gould is a prolific artist who immerses herself deeply in the process of making art. Consumption is a major theme in her art. Her work includes a variety of media, but much of it seems to stem from collage. Many of the images she uses come from thrifting. In her recent work entitled Food, the images came from old cookbooks. Boxes full of them, along with small drawers filled with found objects, and stacks of other potential materials that will be employed into pieces at some point, are all around her multi-roomed studio. It is worth noting that many of these objects and images are grouped by color, size, texture, or some other defining characteristic. “I love having these objects around me,” Gould says. “I love to collect and organize them. Giving new life to something that belonged to someone else is fun.” In the creation of the work itself, Gould spreads images all around her on tables throughout her studio, noting, “Collage is immediate. But it also allows me to pause to think about why I am placing something in a particular spot.” Gould uses glass panels to hold image pieces in place while she methodically contemplates the arrangement. “The glass serves as a way of capturing the image and setting it in a place in time.” What is remarkable about the final product is the abundance of white space available in the piece. “What is not there is just as important as what is. I see it as creating movement and curiosity,” she explains. Curiosity is abundant in the work, and it is always present when Gould talks about her art. The questions she is regularly posing seem like ones that she knows the answers to, but she is striving to get others to think about them as deeply as she has over time. SLO LIFE

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| AUTHOR

Catherine Ryan Hyde INTERVIEW BY BRIAN SCHWARTZ

W

ith a plethora of bestsellers under her belt, Catherine Ryan Hyde seems to have found a way to capture ‘lightning a bottle.’ I asked her to share the magic behind her creative process.

Any honest author has to start by answering “Where do your ideas come from?” with an equally honest “I have no idea.” If I knew, I would bottle that knowledge and sell it to other authors. This is the classic author question, and it never goes away—for the simple reason that we never answer it to anyone’s satisfaction. This, of course, is because we don’t know. Harlan Ellison was once asked where his ideas come from and he answered “Schenectady.” Unfortunately, this is as good an explanation as any. Writing to trends is a losing battle because it’s two years or more from the start of a new project to its publication date, and the trends will have changed by then. I never write a story given to me by anyone else. Readers send me story ideas all the time, and I always tell them they should write their story, whether they feel up to the task or not. I write only my own ideas. Adding to this thought, I don’t ever base characters on people I know in real life. This is another very common question. And I understand why it comes up. The person asking the question does not have purely fictional characters running around in their head, and finds it hard to imagine that I do. The fact that I have made this work for me professionally does not mean it’s a bad thing that your head is not full of imaginary people. I think this makes you normal. So, here’s what I can tell you about my inspiration: Nature helps. Distractions hurt. I get my best ideas waiting to fall asleep at night. Though nothing is autobiographical and no characters are anyone I know, my fascination with human nature certainly presents fertile ground for novels. I raptly study human beings. I can’t get enough of us. I want to

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know why we say we’re fine when we’re not. I want to know why our empathy has a border. I want to know why we say we desperately want things that we don’t take the simplest steps to approach. I never get tired of our quirks, and, let me tell you, if we ever straightened out our quirks and took life head-on, I’d be out of a job. As I watch us, I have questions come up about what it means to be human. And those questions become a story. The story is not the answer to the question, because if there was an easy answer I couldn’t get a whole novel out of it. The story is my quest to get the reader to think about the question with me. As one of the most prolific writers on the Central Coast, Cambria based author Catherine Ryan Hyde’s novel, “Seven Perfect Things,” has been a bestseller since it was published last May. Her most recent release is “Boy Underground.” In addition to being a bestselling author, she is an astrophotographer, equestrian, avid hiker, and philanthropist. SLO LIFE


smart, eclectic, art to live on 1599 Monterey Street | 805.544.5900 | sloconsignment.com (at the corner of Grove Street, across from Benny’s Pizza Palace and Social Club)

Open Tuesday - Saturday 10-5pm

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| EXPLORE

Riding the Rails BY PADEN HUGHES

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Have you ever looked at something as an adult and instantly been transported back to a memory of childhood? Perhaps one that you forgot? Well, the other day I looked at a train and remembered pancake breakfasts. I haven’t thought about that association I have with trains in decades. But there it was. Trains remind me of fun spontaneous family adventures. You see, a very fond memory I have of my early childhood in Palo Alto was jumping on the train on a Saturday morning, riding it a couple of stops, and then enjoying a lovely pancake stack layered with butter and maple syrup. It was delicious and never failed to make a day extra special. I decided it was time to replicate the magic of my childhood memory and treat my kids to the fun adventure that only a train ride can bring. Perfect idea! I could pat myself on the back for turning an ordinary day into something special. Isn’t that always our goal? Two destinations came to mind. First, taking the Pacific Surfliner from San Luis Obispo to Santa Barbara takes just under three hours each way. Departing around 6am and returning around 7pm, this would be a fun-filled adventurous way to explore our southern sister city and spend a day at the zoo or shopping and dining in downtown Santa Barbara.

TIP! Tickets are available online through amtrak. com. The Coast Starlight trip from San Luis Obispo to Paso Robles starts $18 for oneway coach seats and the Pacific Surfliner trip from San Luis Obispo to Santa Barbara ranges from $25 to $34 for one-way coach seats.


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Second, the Coast Starlight provides a one-way train trip from SLO to Paso Robles, leaving around 3pm and arriving in just about an hour, shortly after 4pm. We decided to make an afternoon of it and chose to head north on the rails to Paso. Since it wasn’t a roundtrip, we knew one of us would be making our way by car over the grade in order to have a vehicle available for the drive home. My husband and I solved the driver’s dilemma in the fairest way possible. We had a coin toss. I lost. So, I was the driver. Michael, who is way more of a train enthusiast than I am, headed to the Amtrak station with the kids in tow—water bottles, check; face masks, check; contagious enthusiasm, always. And off they went for their inaugural ride. In the end, it worked out to be just as magical for me because, like any mom with young kids knows, getting an hour alone doing anything is, well, pretty magical. Everyone won that day. When I picked them up at the train station they couldn’t wait to tell me all about the tunnels, the long-horned cattle, and getting snacks on the train. It was a big hit! From the station, we walked a couple of blocks to Paso’s picturesque, charming downtown teeming with restaurants, tasting rooms, boutiques, and antique stores. We placed a to-go order at TASTE! Craft Eatery, threw a large blanket down at Downtown City Park, and enjoyed a lovely picnic dinner. After their bellies were full, the kids scampered over to the playground climbing, jumping, sliding, and giggling the afternoon away. Our last stop was to Negranti Creamery, which, in my opinion, is hands down the best ice cream in the county. If you haven’t tried sheep’s milk ice cream it’s the healthy upgrade traditional ice cream has been needing. We indulged in blueberry lavender, coffee chip, and salted brown sugar. It was the perfect finish to our sweet family date. SLO LIFE

Charmaine Petersen, CSA

Serving Central Coast Families

Since 1997

(805) 545-5901 FEB/MAR 2022 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 51 SENIORLIVINGCONSULTANTS.COM


SPONSORED

Celebrating 10 Years of

bliss

Founded in 2011, Bliss remains a family owned and operating restaurant, marketplace, and catering company. Our foundational commitment continues to provide the Central Coast with plant-based cuisine grown on local organic farms, made fresh from scratch with an Ayurvedic twist, and brought to life with the highest intentions of love and goodness. This 10 Year Anniversary finds us celebrating expansion and transformation and we invite you to celebrate with us! Come enjoy an organic breakfast and lunch menu on the patio overlooking Historic Mission Plaza. Sip freshly-ground espresso with a breakfast of fresh juices, whole fruit smoothies, housemade granola, and avocado toast. Our breakfast burrito, sandwich, and tacos make for the perfect brunch. Local lunch favorites are the Reuben Sandwich, Baja Chipotle Burrito, Protein Buddha Bowl, and Avocado Lemon Love Salad. Bliss Restaurant offers both creekside patio dining and an indoor lounge, which hosts a rotating art gallery of San Luis Obispo’s finest artists. Our most exciting news is the expansion of our downtown grocery store and market, with its cutting edge approach to sustainability. EVERY item in our market is plant-based and powered by eco-friendly products. The Bliss Marketplace features Ayurvedic skin care, local artists and artisans, super foods and supplements, our new Bliss Hemp line, and zerowaste lifestyle products, along with abundant snacks, drinks, and groceries for a quick downtown shopping experience. You can enjoy our housemade dressings, desserts, sautes, and pre-packed meals on the go through our ever-expanding product line; these refreshing and original flavors are also accessible through our partners across the Central Coast. All offerings are available for purchase online at blisscafeslo.com. Our kitchen and marketplace offer both delivery and pickup options. The Bliss Restaurant was awarded Best Vegetarian Food for two consecutive years by New Times “Best of SLO County 2020” and Mustang News “Poly Picks 2019”. Because our varietal menu is full of delicious and nourishing dishes, many of which are naturally gluten-free and easily modified for special diets, Bliss facilitates Cleanse Programs and Personalized Meal Plans. These programs range from 3-21 day experiences that support an easeful liquid-only cleanse and whole-food diet. This year’s BLOOM Cleanse launches in alignment with the Spring Equinox on March 20. At Bliss, we serve the evolving world. We take seriously our collective ability to address climate change with diet change. Our ingredients are local, organic, and plant-based foods, those which best conserve water, protect trees and soil, and reduce pollution. Bliss also commits to transcending the need for single-use containers by offering a dollar discount to pack your food and drink items in reusable containers - either your personal containers or our stainless steel Bliss containers available for rent or purchase. We encourage the radical self-reliance required to choose quality and care over convenience.

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10th Anniversary Celebration Feb 26th, 3-9pm We want to thank you for a decade of support! In the spirit of abundance, all attendees will receive a raffle ticket that can be entered to win a Raffle Basket or exchanged for Free Food & Drink. Ribbon Cutting Ceremony, Owners Address, DJs and Dancing, Elixir Bar, Open Mic Lounge

Discounts Please enjoy the following promotions through March 31! 10% off next order with code “SLOLife” 4-6pm Chef Special: Buy One, Get One Free with code “SLOChefSpecial” Rotating Chef Specials: Yellow Coconut Curry Eggplant Parmesiana Soup of the Day Karma Asada Chili

Upcoming Events Feb 17 Boogie Boutique Feb 18 Piscean Groove Feb 26 10th Anniversary Celebration Mar 5 Women’s March Afterparty Mar 20 - Apr 3 BLOOM Cleanse Mar 24 Gut Health Workshop Mar 29 Yoga to Awaken Apr 3 Dance Flow Apr 16 Sunset CBD Dinner featuring Fort Vine

New Hours & Contact Kitchen: 9am-4pm daily Chef Special, Elixir Bar, & Marketplace: 9am-6pm daily See our new online marketplace with pickup & delivery options www.blisscafeslo.com 778 Higuera Street, Suite D San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 blisscafeslo@gmail.com 805.547.0108 @blissslo

Join us on February 26 to celebrate our 10 Year Anniversary as we continue our journey of nurturing through wholesome foods and experiences in service to this thriving community. From our Family to Yours, Kyle, Palaka, Dara, & David, Co-Owners ~ Follow Your Bliss ~ FEB/MAR 2022

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| ON THE RISE

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

Sophia Garcia PHOTOGRAPHY BY LUCIA KIEL

An active member or Mock Trial and National Honors Society along with volunteering through Big Brothers Big Sisters, this San Luis Obispo High School senior is ready for a bright future.

What recognition have you received? Well, last year, I won Best Defense Attorney in San Luis Obispo County for Mock Trial, which is probably the award I’m most proud of. There are about twenty of us competing in the county and I was recognized for my skills in closing statements and direct- and cross-examinations. I’ve also received several Golden Tiger Awards. As a dedicated student, it meant a lot to be acknowledged for my effort and collaboration in class. What do you like to do for fun? I surf on the weekends and snowboard when the conditions are just right. I swim and play water polo. Additionally, I’m an avid reader. Another hobby I’ve learned over quarantine is cooking. My twin sister and I like to cook for our parents and they get to come home with a set table and some delicious meals. What is one of your favorite memories? So, I’m half Chilean and in the years past I’ve only been able to see my family for a few weeks at a time. But, I was able to go to Chile last winter and spend two months with my family during their summer. One afternoon that stands out during this time was when I sat with my grandmother and just asked her about her life. I really connected with her and heard some stories I never would’ve known if I hadn’t just spent that time with her. Do you have a career path in mind? As of right now I’m planning on majoring in Human Biology and then continuing onto medical school to practice neurosurgery. I’ve always wanted to be a doctor because I love science, specifically cellular science. But my freshman year I volunteered at The Village at Sydney Creek, a home for people with dementia. This experience showed me the emotional side of science. I can read about Alzheimer’s in a textbook but one never really sees the effects until one interacts with people who have the disease. The months I spent with the residents further inspired my desire to become a doctor and I hope to continue learning about neurodegenerative disease in the near future.

Who has been influential in your life? My mom and twin sister have influenced me the most. My mom is a powerful, intelligent, and determined woman. Because of my mom I am a book nerd, bilingual, and a generous woman. From her I’ve learned how to be strong and how to change my perspective from dreams to goals. When I was younger and people would compliment her she would always answer “I know but thank you anyway.” This unwavering confidence has been passed to me and I try to thank her everyday for the text book knowledge and street smarts that she’s taught me. My twin sister has been my best friend for my whole life. There’s no one else who can make me laugh like she does and she’s always there for me. Her honesty (sometimes very straightforward) has kept me motivated and I wouldn’t be who I am without her. What do you want people to know about you? I’m going to try my best to leave the world a better place. Whether that be by volunteering or curing Alzheimer’s, I have always believed that I have the ability to change the world for the better. Even though I’m an ambitious woman and I do want to be successful, I seek to find the intersection between success and global development and progress. From the people I’ve surrounded myself with, I know I’ll find that connection and leave my mark behind. What colleges are you considering? I’m mostly looking at the UCs and some top-tier universities on the East Coast. My top schools are Brown University and UCLA, which are very different in terms of location and culture. I would like to stay in California, but I’m also really interested in seeing other parts of the country and exploring a completely new environment. SLO LIFE Know a student On the Rise? Email us at info@slolifemagazine.com

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"Having our kids concurrently studying the same period of history fosters unity and connection in our family. Our kids, who at times struggle to relate to each other, bond over a shared interest in SLOCA literature books and history topics. When the older child arranges his home day so that he can listen in on his younger sibling’s literature and history reading, you know that the curriculum is quality and engaging. Semper discentes! (Always learning together.)"

–Sharon, parent of two

now enrolling at all grades: sloclassical.org

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| PET COLLECTIVE

Ellie PHOTOGRAPHY BY ZACHARY SCOTT Breed: Nebelung mix Hobbies: hiding in cabinets, stalking mice, sleeping on chairs, climbing pepper trees, cuddling on soft blankets particularly on June’s bed where she is not allowed, hanging out with her sister cats, neck rubs, nightly arrival for dinner and bedtime at the back door. SLO LIFE

Know a local animal ready for a portrait? Email us at info@slolifemagazine.com 56

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䰀漀挀愀氀 䔀琀栀椀挀愀氀 䨀攀眀攀氀爀礀 匀椀渀挀攀 ㄀㤀㜀㐀

匀瀀攀挀椀愀氀椀稀椀渀最 䤀渀

䌀甀猀琀漀洀 䌀爀攀愀琀椀漀渀 ☀ 䄀渀琀椀焀甀攀 刀攀猀琀漀爀愀琀椀漀渀 ㄀㄀㄀㐀 ☀ ㄀㄀㄀㠀 䜀愀爀搀攀渀 匀琀⸀ 䐀漀眀渀琀漀眀渀 匀䰀伀 㠀 㔀⸀㔀㐀㌀⸀㠀㄀㠀㘀 ⴀ 眀眀眀⸀䜀愀爀搀攀渀匀琀爀攀攀琀䜀漀氀搀猀洀椀琀栀猀⸀挀漀洀

Your life is here. Let’s make it beautiful. freshpaintslo.com LIC #1036406

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(805) 570-0019

HANSDUUSBLACKSMITH.COM 2976 Industrial Parkway, Santa Maria FEB/MAR 2022

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| DWELLING

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Historic Homestead BY ZARA KHAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID LALUSH

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A

fter designing, building, and living in a modern custom home in Arizona, Cheryl and Ed Cuming knew they wanted something different this time. While new, modern homes are appealing in their own way, there is something about a historic home that cannot be replicated. When the Cumings found one of three original, historic homes on their street in Arroyo Grande for sale, they knew they had to go for it. Luckily, they had an eye for the potential, and Ed, a general contractor, knew just how to execute. Their home was built in 1900 and in the 1920s the carriage garage was added on.

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Cheryl’s design inspiration came from Europe. She loved looking at French cottages and European farmhouses, and there was always something about English gardens that spoke to her. They decided to focus on the landscaping and carriage garage first. Cheryl and Ed zoned the backyard so there was space for all forms of entertaining. They could host an outdoor dinner, intimate wine gathering, and a space for just the two of them to enjoy their new home. The Cumings have several hobbies and they were kept in mind with the layout. Their backyard features a garden shed, chicken coup, and an outdoor shower. Cheryl has a special talent for repurposing old pieces which >>


# I N S P I R E D T O S E R V E

A HEALTHY

e d i s  u  STARTS FROM THE INSIDE. - ROBERT ULRICH

R A M S E YA S P H A LT. C O M

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never ceased to amaze me. My favorite piece in their backyard has to be an old baby’s tub which was mounted and is now a wine chiller. After perfecting and enjoying their landscaping, it was time to focus on doing the same to the interior. I was excited when Ed asked me to help them design their interior, he is one of my favorite contractors to work with and it was so special to help bring his space together. During this project I learned that Ed is quite the chef. He didn’t have many requests, but a taller ceiling height and two dishwashers

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were not negotiable. From a construction standpoint this project was challenging. Since the home was over one hundred years old, no walls were straight, and nothing was level. The team had to address the necessary areas, but overall, the strategy was to just honor the inconsistencies and work with them. Our goal was to keep the new kitchen and living area design cohesive with the rest of the home and landscaping that they had updated. It was clear that Cheryl leaned towards European touches, more specifically >>


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French, so the idea was born to incorporate an Orangeries style structure as part of the house. We opted to use as many windows as possible so that the garden could be enjoyed while dining. It was also an elegant way to bring such a historic structure into their project. All the old windows were reused, just cleaned up, so we worked around their locations while spatial planning the kitchen. We opted for a classic, white shaker cabinet style, but dressed it up with cathedral-style insets in the upper cabinets on the sink wall. Since the design elements were important to

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us, and they aren’t always the most efficient, we added a full wall of storage to make sure the kitchen was functional, too. The original wood floors were kept in the rest of the house, just re-stained, so we decided to use tile in the kitchen. We had a hard time picking a favorite handmade floor tile, but once we found the perfect pattern by Arto Tile at Green Goods, we were able to work with Chuck at Quinn Home to design the custom tile for the range statement piece. We are fortunate to have so many talented construction resources on the Central Coast. Among the aisles and aisles of furniture at >>


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the Habitat Home and Garden warehouse, Cheryl and I were able to find several gems. The two favorites were an old door from France, which we designed their pantry around. The second was an old prayer door that we dismantled and used in several places. Doing this helped pull all the spaces together. We used it as a header in the entryway to the kitchen, their fireplace mantel, as well as in constructing a window sill in the Orangeries. PJ at Pacific Coast Kitchen and bath helped us find the perfect deVOL aged brass faucet and potholder. And at American Barn and Wood, the Cumings found one-hundred-year-old barn

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wood—we cleaned it up, highlighted its character, and used it as ceiling beams. Barnick Wood Design brought all the kitchen cabinetry and fireplace built-ins to life. The building inconsistencies were really brought to light when it came to the fireplace built-ins, nothing was straight. What started as a simple design turned into quite a challenge We really wanted to incorporate an old-fashioned ladder, but we were left with an awkward gap above the track that we were unsure of what to do with. During one of our design meetings, I came over and saw that Cheryl had placed >>


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one of Ed’s fly-fishing rods inside, it could not have been a more perfect fit. Styling their bookcase was a dream. Cheryl and Ed had collected so many unique pieces over the years that we had quite the selection to play with. Cheryl has talent when it comes to finding specific pieces and repurposing them. She really enjoyed the process of talking to the previous owners in Europe, learning about where the piece came from, and then finding a new way to use it. Cheryl found a stunning old sideboard that was the perfect depth for a wine cabinet, so we had racking installed

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on the interior and it is now the home for their wine. She had an old drafting table refinished and added new hardware and it is now and Ed’s desk. There were definitely setbacks with lead times, but as construction veterans, the Cumings had very realistic expectations when it came to their project. Ed always reminds his clients to be patient and adapt to the project. There will always be unforeseen obstacles that need to be worked through. Enjoy the journey and do your best to ignore the mess—it will look pretty again. SLO LIFE


EST. 1999

D r o u g h t - To l e r a n t ,

Lifestyle Landscapes

Design . Build . Maintain

805.927.0374 . ecotoneslandscapes.com . LIC # 767033

INC

STAL WORK CONSTRUCTION + DESIGN LIC 948012 | PO BOX 391 SAN LUIS OBISPO CA 93406 805.542.0033 WWW.STALWORK.COM MAIL@STALWORK.COM

COMMERCIAL | RESIDENTIAL | INTERIORS | ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN | LANDSCAPE + MAINTENANCE

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REA L E S TAT E

BY THE NUMBERS

| SLO CITY

laguna lake

2020 Total Homes Sold 68 Average Asking Price $754,050 Average Selling Price $750,353 Sales Price as a % of Asking Price 99.51% Average # of Days on the Market 36

2021 79 $785,425 $796,567 101.42% 16

+/16.18% 4.16% 6.16% 1.91% -55.56%

tank farm

2020 48 Total Homes Sold $867,988 Average Asking Price $809,900 Average Selling Price Sales Price as a % of Asking Price 93.31% 46 Average # of Days on the Market

2021 69 $937,649 $943,549 100.63% 28

+/43.75% 8.03% 16.50% 7.32% -39.13%

cal poly area

2020 Total Homes Sold 26 Average Asking Price $1,039,261 Average Selling Price $1,022,500 Sales Price as a % of Asking Price 98.39% Average # of Days on the Market 20

2021 40 $1,169,790 $1,159,154 99.09% 28

+/53.85% 12.56% 13.36% 0.70% 40.00%

country club

2020 Total Homes Sold 24 Average Asking Price $1,217,417 Average Selling Price $1,186,813 Sales Price as a % of Asking Price 97.49% Average # of Days on the Market 32

2021 24 $1,601,292 $1,610,223 100.56% 18

+/0.00% 31.53% 35.68% 3.07% -43.75%

down town

2020 Total Homes Sold 68 Average Asking Price $908,254 Average Selling Price $888,581 Sales Price as a % of Asking Price 97.83% Average # of Days on the Market 43

2021 102 $971,901 $984,279 101.27% 33

+/50.00% 7.01% 10.77% 3.44% -23.26%

foothill boulevard

2020 Total Homes Sold 39 Average Asking Price $869,901 Average Selling Price $868,965 Sales Price as a % of Asking Price 99.98% Average # of Days on the Market 27

2021 37 $942,781 $953,028 101.14% 31

+/-5.13% 8.38% 9.67% 1.16% 14.81%

johnson avenue

2020 Total Homes Sold 66 Average Asking Price $1,061,588 Average Selling Price $1,033,274 Sales Price as a % of Asking Price 97.33% Average # of Days on the Market 44

2021 62 $1,069,565 $1,096,287 102.50% 22

*Comparing 01/01/20 - 12/31/20 to 01/01/21 - 12/31/21

+/-6.06% 0.75% 6.10% 5.17% -50.00%

SOURCE: San Luis Obispo Association of REALTORS® SLO LIFE

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Please join our team in supporting the SLO Food Bank. Every dollar you donate will buy seven nutritious meals for our neighbors whose table would otherwise be empty. Visit www.slofoodbank.org to donate.

Help us make a difference in our community this year!

Reach out to one of our local experts today! Donna Lewis

Ken Neate

Maggie Koepsell

O: (805) 335-8743 C: (805) 235-0463

O: (805) 706-8074 C: (925) 963-1015

O: (805) 335-8742 C: (805) 674-6653

donna.lewis@rate.com

ken.neate@rate.com

maggie.koepsell@rate.com

Ermina Karim

Dylan Morrow

Elieen Mackenzie

O: (805) 329-4095 C: (805) 602-0248

O: (805) 335-8738 C: (805) 550-9742

O: (805) 212-5204 C: (831) 566-9908

ermina.karim@rate.com

dylan.morrow@rate.com

eileen.mackenzie@rate.com

Zoe Thompson

Joe Hutson

Matthew Janetski

O: (831) 205-1582 C: (831) 212-4138

O: (805) 329-4092 C: (619) 300-2651

joe.hutson@rate.com

matt.janetski@rate.com

Branch Manager & SVP of Mortgage Lending

VP of Mortgage Lending

Licensed Sales Assistant

O: (805) 335-8737 zoe.thompson@rate.com

SVP of Mortgage Lending

VP of Mortgage Lending

VP of Mortgage Lending

VP of Mortgage Lending

Luana Geradis

Lisa Renelle

O: (805) 329-4087 C: (707) 227-9582

O: (805) 456-5344 C: (805) 674-2931

luana.gerardis@rate.com

lisa.renelle@rate.com

VP of Mortgage Lending

VP of Mortgage Lending

VP of Mortgage Lending

VP of Mortgage Lending

Rate.com/sanluisobispo 1065 Higuera St., Suite 100, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Applicant subject to credit and underwriting approval. Not all applicants will be approved for financing. Receipt of application does not represent an approval for financing or interest rate guarantee. Restrictions may apply, contact Guaranteed Rate for current rates and for more information. (20210903-616080) Donna Lewis NMLS #245945; CA - CA-DOC245945 | | Ken Neate NMLS #373607; CA - CA-DBO373607 | | Maggie Koepsell NMLS #704130; CA - CA-DBO704130 | Ermina Karmin NMLS #2005928; CA - CA-DFPI2005928 | Dylan Morrow NMLS #1461481; CA - CA-DBO1461481 | Luana Gerardis NMLS #1324563; CA - CA-DBO1324563 | Eileen Mackenzie NMLS #282909 | Matthew Janetski NMLS #1002317; CA CA-DBO1002317 | Joe Hutson NMLS #447536; CA - CA-DOC447536 | Lisa Renelle NMLS #269785; CA-DOC269785 Guaranteed Rate, Inc.; NMLS #2611; For licensing information visit nmlsconsumeraccess.org. • CA: Licensed by the Department of Business Oversight under the California Residential Mortgage Lending Act

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| SLO COUNTY

Thank you for making a difference. A portion of every loan we close is donated to the San Luis Obispo Noor Foundation free healthcare clinic. In 2021, we donated over $20,000. Thanks to my clients for supporting healthcare in San Luis Obispo County.

Here’s to our community’s health in 2022!

Ben Lerner 805.441.9486 www.blerner.com ben.lerner@myccmortgage.com

994 Mill St, Ste 200 - San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Equal Housing Opportunity. All loans subject to underwriting approval. Certain restrictions apply. Call for details. NMLS3029 NMLS2131793 NMLS395723 (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org) CrossCountry Mortgage, LLC. Licensed by the Department of Financial Protection and Innovation under the California Residential Mortgage Lending Act. Refinancing may result in higher total finance 74 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | FEB/MAR 2022 charges over the life of the loan.

REAL ESTATE BY THE NUMBERS REGION

NUMBER OF HOME S SOLD

AVERAGE DAYS ON MARKET

MEDIAN SELLING PRICE

2020

2021

2020

2021

Arroyo Grande

307

376

54

25

$839,826 $1,026,092

Atascadero

404

419

35

15

$614,137

Avila Beach

27

26

49

27

$1,438,424 $1,960,852

Cambria/San Simeon

162

200

71

39

$846,997

Cayucos

62

67

121

40

$1,199,272 $1,559,119

Creston

10

12

210

58

$898,000 $1,082,917

Grover Beach

149

159

38

16

$603,444 $709,830

Los Osos

159

145

31

14

$782,040

$861,588

Morro Bay

145

171

58

37

$766,352

$1,012,421

Nipomo

287

290

49

22

$755,565

$851,190

Oceano

62

53

74

22

$598,146

$666,979

Pismo Beach

148

139

49

28

Paso (Inside City Limits)

384

434

33

17

$561,710

$619,887

Paso (North 46 - East 101)

59

54

47

27

$656,797

$852,812

Paso (North 46 - West 101)

116

110

80

42

$646,398

$951,398

Paso (South 46 - East 101)

67

72

63

36

$716,204

$927,960

San Luis Obispo

398

482

45

26

$956,194 $1,039,963

Santa Margarita

21

32

109

58

$612,043

$780,120

Templeton

151

168

67

33

$877,151

$1,024,188

2,995

3,096

50

26

$764,842

$894,584

Countywide

*Comparing 01/01/20 - 12/31/20 to 01/01/21 - 12/31/21

2020

2021

$735,427

$1,114,768

$1,087,905 $1,296,936

SOURCE: San Luis Obispo Association of REALTORS® SLO LIFE


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| HEALTH

Attitude of Gratitude All the ways the simple act of giving thanks can change your life. BY LAUREN HARVEY

W 76

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hile the concept of giving thanks may be most closely associated with Thanksgiving, the benefits of gratitude stretch beyond the holiday season. In theory, gratitude is a simple concept, most commonly defined as, “the quality of being thankful.” However, as we’ll examine today, the real positive work of gratitude begins a step further, as “readiness to show appreciation for and return kindness.” Furthermore, Dr. Robert Emmons, professor at UC Davis and leading researcher on gratitude, defines it as, “a felt sense of wonder, thankfulness, and appreciation for life.” To reap the multitude of emotional, psychological, and perhaps even physical benefits of gratitude, one must take action, transforming gratitude from a state of mind to a state of being.

| FEB/MAR 2022

When gratitude becomes an action, even a lifestyle, it “can be an incredibly powerful and invigorating experience,” as researcher Jeff Huffman states. A 2021 Harvard Medical article further explains that gratitude forces us to acknowledge the goodness in our lives and, “in the process … recognize that the source of goodness lies at least partially outside [ourselves].” The result? Being grateful helps us “connect to something larger than [ourselves] as individuals—whether to other people, nature, or a higher power.” Hundreds of studies have confirmed the emotional and psychological benefits of a gratitude-infused lifestyle. Though one gray area remains—can gratitude be powerful enough to bestow upon us numerous physical benefits? Can an attitude of gratitude really be the impenetrable buffer between our mortal selves and heart disease, insomnia, and the like? This is one aspect of what we’ll examine today—how impactful an attitude of gratitude can truly be in our lives and bodies, inside and out. >>


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A FORTIFYING FORCE

TO BETTER HEALTH

Two leading gratitude researchers, Dr. Robert A. Emmons of UC Davis and Dr. Michael E. McCullough of the University of Miami, conducted a study in which participants were asked to write a few sentences each week. One group wrote about things they were grateful for, where the other two groups did not. The results were clear, “after about ten weeks, those who wrote about gratitude were more optimistic and felt better about their lives.” Keeping a gratitude journal may seem a small change, but also resulted in the participants “exercising more and having fewer visits to physicians.”

While it’s clear that gratitude is linked to increased mental and emotional health, the question remains: Is gratitude powerful enough to positively impact our physical well-being? The answer depends on which area of health you’re examining.

Dr. Gail Saltz, psychoanalyst and assistant attending physician at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, notes that gratitude, “tends to result in increased self-esteem and confidence, which improves mood.” A 2014 study published in the Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, “found that gratitude increased athletes’ self-esteem, an essential component to optimal performance.” Psychologically, gratitude can be a powerful tool in overcoming trauma, and “helps to diminish the likelihood of developing posttraumatic stress disorder after an upsetting experience,” says Dr. Saltz. Behavior Research and Therapy published a 2006 study that found, “Vietnam War veterans with higher levels of gratitude experienced lower rates of post-traumatic stress disorder.” While it may seem unlikely, these studies and others suggest gratitude may have the power to “help people feel more positive emotions, relish good experiences, improve their health, deal with adversity, and build strong relationships,” as a Harvard Medical article states. Dr. Saltz supports these ideas, that, “appreciating what you have can make you feel more optimistic and satisfied and experience less frustration, envy, and regret.” There is certainly mounting evidence that gratitude helps contribute to factors that make us happier, by decreasing stress and trauma, and increasing self-esteem and overall life satisfaction. 78

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When it comes to sleep, gratitude carries power greater than counting sheep. A 2009 study examined 401 people, 40% of whom had clinical sleep disorders. The study found, “more grateful people reported falling asleep more quickly, sleeping longer, having better sleep quality, and staying awake more easily during the day.” This and other studies, like a 2016 study whose outcomes saw women who kept a gratitude journal reporting better sleep quality to women who performed other tasks, show promising connections between gratitude practices and increased sleep quality. In addition to sleep, an attitude of gratitude can be good for the heart. A 1995 study found that people who were appreciative had improved heart rate variability, “an indicator of good heart health.” These findings are supported by more recent studies, like one that found women who kept a gratitude journal over the course of a few weeks had lower blood pressure than those who wrote about daily events. Another study by Paul Mills, Laura Redwine et al, found, “patients [with established heart conditions] who did daily gratitude journaling for eight weeks showed decreased markers of inflammation at the end of the experiment.” These and other studies (like the Gratitude Research in Acute Coronary Events study) prove a positive connotation between improved heart health and the practice of gratitude, even for patients with established heart conditions. In other realms of physical health, the findings are more mixed. While more research must be conducted for a definitive answer on whether gratitude can improve all aspects of our physical health, practicing gratitude regardless will clearly reap positive benefits in other areas of our lives. >>


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We’ve seen the numerous ways in which gratitude can increase self-esteem, help us catch some quality zzz’s, reduce stress and even blood pressure. So how does one go about incorporating more gratitude into their life? Pick one (or more) activities from this list, inspired by a Harvard Medical article, and see what gratitude can do for you. 1. Make a gratitude list. Every day write down at least three things for which you are grateful. They can be as simple or detailed as you’d like. 2. Write some thank you notes. Thank you notes need not come only after receiving physical gifts. Perhaps you’re feeling extra thankful to have a friend or loved one in your life. Sharing these feelings through a thank you note is a great way to express your gratitude and bring some joy to their life. 3. Count your blessings. Similar to a gratitude list, counting your blessings involves writing about the things in your life for which you are grateful. This can also be a nice activity to do with family or friends around the dinner table to share and discuss. You may be surprised by the small things that others greatly appreciate. 4. Pray. Also sometimes called “thanksgiving” (not the holiday), giving thanks to your higher power during religious prayer is a great way to cultivate gratitude. 5. Meditate. Try a meditation exercise where you focus on things for which you are extra appreciative. However you chose to practice gratitude on a daily basis, you’ll be sure to find positive benefits, some of which you may never have expected.

FINAL WORD Practicing gratitude is proven to improve emotional and psychological health. It also benefits sleep and heart health. Cultivate gratitude in your life by making a daily gratitude list, writing thank you notes, or meditating. SLO LIFE


Forge a Natural Connection

www.GardensbyGabriel.com lic.# 887028 805-215-0511 FEB/MAR 2022

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| TASTE

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Monika’s Macarons To owner Monika Anderson, it’s not just a bakery—it’s a lifesaver. BY JAIME LEWIS PHOTOGRAPHY BY JESS LERNER

A

few minutes into my interview with Monika Anderson of Monika’s Macarons in downtown San Luis Obispo, she puts before me a little plate of three macarons that shimmer with twenty-fourkarat edible glitter: one green, one purple, and one white. And then she tells me not to eat them. “Macarons are meant to be eaten at room temp,” she says firmly. “You’ll have to wait a minute.”

Today is Anderson’s first day off after working 100-hour weeks through the holiday season, so the macarons have been in the fridge and need a brief window of time to warm up. I struggle to concentrate on our conversation while the jewel-toned confections twinkle up at me. But then Anderson gets my attention. “My ex-husband was an alcoholic,” she says, recalling her previous life 275 miles south in Temecula, her hometown until two years ago when she moved to SLO. “He would talk about my macarons and say ‘What a waste of time, your stupid little cookies.’” He became verbally, mentally, and physically abusive, even going so far as to break Anderson’s cheekbone, sending her to the hospital. But because she and her ex-husband had children and a thriving marketing business together, she struggled to leave the relationship. It wasn’t until she started selling macarons, made with her French grandmother’s buttercream recipe, that she could afford to leave him. “He became dangerous and obsessive,” she says, recalling how restraining orders did next to nothing to ensure her safety. He attempted to break into her house several times, and succeeded twice. He stalked her, berated her, and attempted to make her feel small. “While I was going through it, this was what kept me going,” she says, pointing to the three macarons before me. “I didn’t give up.” >>

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Anderson grew up in San Luis Obispo County and had always wanted to return. When the situation with her exhusband finally forced her out of Temecula, she relied on the kindness of family friends in Los Osos to take her in. Little by little, she rebuilt her life, perfecting her macarons and writing a business plan to start her own patisserie in downtown SLO. She also worked with local law enforcement to protect herself and her daughters from her ex-husband. “When I started the business, I was afraid to put my name on the door,” she says. I ask if the story I’m writing is going to compromise her identity, but she assures me that, as of recently, it’s not a problem. “His health has deteriorated so much after years of addiction,” she says. “He is no longer an issue for us.” In February 2020, Anderson signed a lease for the little storefront next to Big Sky Cafe on Broad Street. One month later, Covid hit, but after everything Monika had already been through, the pandemic didn’t deter her. “I had been through way too much and planned for way too long—I felt like I literally crawled over broken glass and hot coals to get through that abusive, horrific relationship to get where I am—to let that stop me.” The response to Monika’s Macarons has been beyond what she could have hoped for. She can’t keep enough pretty little confections in the case to meet the demand. Part of the issue is the fact that, for now, only Anderson can make them. “What’s different about mine is the filling,” she says of her grandmother’s buttercream recipe. “My buttercream isn’t the traditional American-style buttercream. Mine is >>

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1356 Marsh Street . San Luis Obispo (805) 543-3105 . drdanielortho.com FEB/MAR 2022

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cooked down with egg and sugar and then whipped with butter.” And while piping the shells for her macarons took several years and dozens of trials to perfect, it’s the way she decorates them that sets them apart. “My dad is an amazing artist,” she says, sharing that he was a Disney Imagineer and has worked with film directors George Lucas and Peter Jackson. Her stepdad was also a world-famous artist whose paintings are displayed in the Vatican and in the homes of the Prince of Monaco, Ray Charles, and Stevie Wonder. She developed her own artistic talents during the years she spent as his apprentice. “Each macaron is a little piece of art,” she says of the dazzling airbrushed treats. When I finally get to try them, I am dazzled, too. The vanilla creme macaron surprises me with its deliciously chewy shell and silky-sweet filling. The blackberry macaron is vibrant with fruit filling, and the pistachio macaron has a nuanced, creamy nuttiness. In the little time she has to spare, Anderson is working with elected officials to inform bills written to help abused women and men put their lives back together. “It was really important to me to do something about it the moment I was able to take a breath,” she says. Meanwhile, she finds peace and purpose in her work, one macaron at a time. “I hand-pipe the shells and I love matching the tops and bottoms when I’m in the bakery really early, all by myself,” she says. “It’s extraordinarily methodical, meditative, and healing.” SLO LIFE 86

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| WINE NOTES

Finding Flavor

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rom the start, the hundreds of wineries making up the essential fabric of the San Luis Obispo wine region have always been known for two things: First, world-class wine; and second, accessibility. That’s a weird word—accessibility. What exactly does it mean? Well, there are other ways to describe the culture, the vintners, the tasting rooms, the golden grapes, all of it: Friendly. Approachable. Open. Inviting. Down-to-Earth (does that count as a word?). And, the friendliness, approachability, openness, invite-uh-ability, and Down-toI’m-even-going-to-try-it, just got turned up

SLO LIFE MAGAZINE

| FEB/MAR 2022

a notch with a new trend sweeping San Luis Obispo County’s oak-studded hillsides. Enter: The Flavor Wheel. Nobody is quite sure where or how the first iteration originated, but The Flavor Wheel— also commonly referred to as a “wine aroma wheel”—has exploded in popularity as it provides a common language for us to talk about wine. And, beyond that, it’s easy and just makes it so much more fun. So, how does it work? We’re glad you asked! >>


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Picture a target with four or five concentric rings leading to a bullseye. On the innermost ring, those sipping a new wine are offered somewhere around twenty or so different options for the aroma they are experiencing upon their initial whiff. For example, after first hoisting that glass under-nose, is it fruity? Woody or spicy? Most often several categories will apply. For each scent you detect, look at the next ring out to further focus in on the aroma. If it’s a black fruit you notice, is it more like plum or blackberry? Okay, fair enough. Now what? This is especially fun if you’re in a group and also where things get interesting and the conversation really kicks into gear. After you have decided on your scent, write it down. Then, take a sip. What are you experiencing now? Almost always, this will change as you go from sniffing to sipping as the flavors begin to compound. And, this is the genius of The Flavor Wheel, as, rather than having to come up with some fanciful language to describe it all, you have it right at your fingertips. So, spin that wheel until you find the thing that best describes whatever it is you are tasting. Don’t think about it, just react. Caught a hint of pineapple, did you? Well then, write it down. There is no right or wrong answer. That’s what makes The Flavor Wheel such an elegant tool and, here’s that word again—accessible. To really elevate the experience, keep whatever you wrote down to yourself until your group has a chance to scribble down whatever they identify from The Flavor Wheel. Then, compare notes. You are bound to get some laughs and maybe even a few surprises when someone says, “Mushrooms” and “Mocha,” while you say, “Hazelnut” and “Tobacco.” The Flavor Wheel, you see, is the antithesis of pretentious. This is all about being open and creative. We are most definitely coloring outside of the lines. It’s the ultimate wine snob antidote, and wherever it came from, it could not possibly be more SLO Life in its essence.

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While there is no single Flavor Wheel, and a different version of it seems to be coming out daily, there are a couple of go-to options. Wine Folly makes one, which you can find on their website for about $20 for a set of four, which includes options for Reds, Rosés, Sparklings, and Whites. Just go to shop.winefolly.com and search, “Wine Aroma Charts.” There is also a company that does nothing but make Flavor Wheels. You can find them at winearomawheel.com and you can buy their original, flagship product for about $10, which is a great thing to have when you visit one of our many local wineries. SLO LIFE


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| BREW

Gathering Place BY BRANT MYERS PHOTOGRAPHY BY TODD MEANEY

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A

fter hearing rumblings about a new brewery quietly opening in Pismo Beach, I headed south for the winter and perched up in the spacious, yet cozy, Kulturhaus Brewing Company to learn more about this new watering hole. Sneaking in just before they opened for the day, I got to speak to founders Jennifer Harris and Eric Kirchner about their brewery and restaurant. To really understand what Kulturhaus is all about, you first need to know a little about their background. Kirchner hails from brewing royalty having manned the helms at the infamous Russian River brewpub as the Lead Brewer, where he was in charge of crafting cult favorites to the most discerning of beer aficionados and tourists alike. Harris is widely renowned as a fermentation specialist dipping her inoculated fingers in everything that can grow with microbes and age in acids. They met at the brewpub one night and shared their passion for edibles that can grow at a microscopic level. Kirchner accepted Harris’s invitation to her monthly fermentation classes, which led to a trip to a meadery, which spurned more talks and more field trips, and next thing you know they shared their dreams of taking the dedication to their craft to the next level. Life gave them both an opportunity to move to Georgia and help grow an estate brewery. Once their work was done, they made the choice to move back to Harris’s roots on the Central Coast and the concept of Kulturhaus was born.>>

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Harris has fond memories of family trips from SLO to Pismo and when they found their location on Price Street it not only brought back the nostalgia for the area, but nestled between classic seaside restaurants, they were able to find a fresh vacancy and squeeze a brew system into the kitchen of the former Chop Street restaurant. When I say squeeze, it is in the most literal sense of the word. Kirchner’s pride in his ability to apparently mash some stainless steel into a ball, fit it through the back door, and unfold it into a complete brew system is evident as he shows you the seemingly quarter-inch tolerance between the tanks and ceiling. He walks us around and points out the small miracles of fit and the customization needed to accommodate the space. Having brewed on other peoples’ equipment for so long, the excitement shines through for what he is able to accomplish on a scale perfectly suited to fill his taps with what he, and the customers, love. Slowly taking over some of the guest tap spots, and with friends like his, they’re great guest taps, his offerings on my visit included four unique beers. Kirchner pours me a flight of his brews, and I patiently wait while Todd Meaney, our photographer, lines them up perfectly for a photo. Todd, hurry up, I’m thirsty. As is the standard, I start with the lightest (body, color, flavor), a dry-hopped Cream Ale named Wassergeist. I need to pause here and mention that the entire theme is German and these names follow suit, in this case it translates directly to “water spirit.” This was so far my favorite, but it actually stayed in that number one slot

because it was the full package—light, refreshing, with a nose full of fresh hop aromas and a mouthfeel that lived up to its cream designation. A great beer to sit down with and have at least two of while still being able to get some work done later that day. I travel down the line of tasters and my next stop is Luftgeist, “air spirit,” a Belgian wheat ale utilizing clear wheat, toasted coriander, orange peel, and wit yeast. Belgians are usually characterized by their banana and clove esters, but this version gives off ripe stone fruit aromas maybe with hints of their foray in Georgia. A great nuanced twist to a well known style. We go a little less traditional with the third beer, but after all it is the hottest style of the year, and we dip into a hazy IPA named Sonnenschein. An apt beer for a beach city brewery, this “sunshine” pours darker than the rest, with an almost papaya coloring, and the hops come off not in the more traditional tropical citrus scents, but malt heavy, and it takes me back to walking the neighborhood with my son and eating pineapple guavas off our neighbor’s trees—a more earthy and tea-like offering than you see from the POG NEIPAs in the market. I finish my flight with what almost feels like the perfect finale as it combines elements of yeast from their Luftgiest, the hoppy aromas of their Sonnenschein, and the drinkability of the Wassergeist. This is their Belgian IPA named Feuergeist, mashing up the traditional flavors of a Belgian Ale combined with the hoppiness of an American IPA, utilizing the great citrus and white wine-perfumed hops that are citra and nelson sauvin. As the name suggests, this beer is fire. I’m in grognard heaven as Harris sets up one of her famous pickle plates that both enhance the beers while I’m tasting and clears my palette between quaffs. I bounce back and forth asking Kirchner about the beers and Harris about the food, which she proudly shares their dedication to local ingredients and farmers. The lacto-pickled green beans are processed the same day they’re harvested from the farm. These dilly beans are a classic and the mere one week pickle gives them a satisfying crunch. This is nothing compared to the full plate of pickled beet eggs, fennel root, cucumber, zucchini, and carrots. I’ve never been more excited to eat my vegetables. They also serve the dishes we’d expect from a German brewpub complete with pretzels and bratwursts. Would it surprise you if I mentioned that the sauerkraut is made in-house? No? Well then I won’t mention it. Kulturhaus is more than a brewery, as the name suggests it’s a gathering place where you can experience the culture that this family has created in Pismo Beach, and just like any good beer establishment the puns, portmanteaus, and double meanings are here, so come to Kulturhuas to experience the culture and ingest the cultures. Join me in hoisting a stein to the new kid on the block and say Prost! SLO LIFE

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| HAPPENINGS

Culture & Events Scholarships

Funding opportunities exist from The Community Foundation in the form of grants awarded to local nonprofit organizations. This grant program offers up to $60,000 in funding across four different funds for nonprofit agencies that directly address community needs. 2022 General Grants aim to provide support for young women, strategies to involve and center queer and trans people of color, social interaction and community building for seniors, and youth sports programs. through March 5 // cfsloco.communityforce.com

WONDERETTES PROM NIGHT GALA CELEBRATION

Make your reservations now for a onenight-only Valentine weekend musical trip down memory lane as SLO REP celebrates its re-opening with an all-inclusive evening of entertainment: wine, cocktails, preshow hors d’oeuvres, and luscious desserts, culminating with a fabulous performance of The Marvelous Wonderettes. Can’t make this special date? Catch a later performance of the show, which features more than thirty classic hits from the ’50s and ’60s and runs four weeks through March 6. February 11 // slorep.org

FAIG AHMED SPECTRUM

The California Central Coast Pastel Society’s “All Member Show” is an online showcase (with music) of the works of talented local artists Robin Angelides, Diane Breuer, Lucinda Johnson, Ji Li, Peggy Davidson Post, Joan Sullivan, Greg Trombley, and many more. Through March 31 // 3cps.org 96

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From his studio in Azerbaijan, prolific contemporary artist Faig Ahmed creates textile works that transcend and transform the history of carpetmaking in the region. Presenting his work for the first time on the Central Coast, the San Luis Obispo Museum of Art offers up a solo exhibition of works loaned from major collections all over the world that span the artist’s career, while focusing on works primarily made in the past five years. February 11-May 15 // sloma.org

THAT’S AMORE!

A loaf of bread, a jug of wine, and ... that special someone will know you speak from the heart when you share a Valentine’s Day Dinner-To-Go with them. Along with two generous entrees from Giuseppe’s Cucina Rustica, red or white wine, antipasto salad, and crusty ciabatta bread, The Monday Club promises to include extra surprises, including coffee, dessert, and a fun activity, all packaged and ready for pickup in a beautiful, lined picnic basket. February 14 // themondayclubslo.org

BACK IN THE HIGH LIFE

Humorous. Moving. Unforgettable. Cal Poly Arts presents Straight No Chaser, a massive a cappella phenomenon whose nine unadulterated human voices have sold more than one-and-a-half million concert tickets and more than two million albums worldwide. Come hear in person why legends like Paul McCartney, Stevie Wonder, Elton John, and Dolly Parton continue to collaborate with the group to produce rich, powerful, gorgeous harmonies. February 24 // calpolyarts.org


Dr. Arnie Horwitz

HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS

Are you feeling overwhelmed and confused? I can help. Specializing in

- Relationship Conflicts - Parenting & Self-Esteem - Separation and Divorce - Personal Life Planning - Grief and Loss - Career Uncertainty

BLENDFEST ON THE COAST

Paso Robles winemakers love to blend wine, mixing varieties to craft something unique and delicious. BlendFest—the only wine event dedicated to blends—celebrates rule-breaking, traditional, and unconventional wine blends throughout a long weekend with a selection of exciting events in San Simeon and Cambria: winemaker dinners, a blending seminar, a grand tasting, and coastal excursions. The Paso Robles Wine Country Alliance is your host. February 24-27 // pasowine.com

AQUARIUS 2022

The Central Coast Watercolor Society’s annual juried art exhibit offers artists a showcase for their work, and art lovers the opportunity to observe and purchase paintings. Noted California artist Frank Eber, 2022 juror and judge of awards, is scheduled to hold a two-day watercolor workshop February 28 and March 1 in conjunction with the show. The opening reception on February 27 is free and open to the public at the Art Center Morro Bay. February 24-April 4 // artcentermorrobay.org

Therapy/Counseling/Coaching Dr. Arnie Horwitz • 30 yrs. Experience

SLO CRAFT MUSIC+BEER FEST

Celebrate the brewers of craft beer while raising a toast to unique and wonderful creations from some of the best breweries in America. This specially-crafted event at the Alex Madonna Expo Center in SLO is exceptional for both novice and expert craft beer drinkers. Tickets include unlimited beer sampling, a souvenir tasting glass, selected food samples, educational seminars with guest speakers, and music from favorite local bands. February 26 // slocraftbeer.com

805-541-2752 www.doctorar nie.com

live the FINE ARTS AWARDS COMPETITION SLO County junior and senior high school students compete for cash prizes in a live, three-hour event recognizing excellence in classical music, jazz, and visual art. Judges announce the winners at the conclusion of the free event. The sixty-first annual contest sponsored by The Monday Clubhouse Conservancy is held at The Monday Club in San Luis Obispo. February 27 // themondayclubslo.org

SLO LIFE!

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| HAPPENINGS

Culture & Events SLO FILM FEST CELEBRATING OUR ARTISTS

The SLO Symphony, conducted by Maestro Andrew Sewell, gives its local musicians a chance to shine in this program of selected works by Bach, Cowell, Farrenc, Honegger, and Warlock. Featured are concertmaster Emily Lanzone (violin), Timothy Shanks (violin), Heidi Butterfield (oboe), Jessica Hoffman (oboe and English horn), Marley Eder (flute), and student musicians from the SLO Youth Symphony Concert Strings. March 5 // slosymphony.org

Founded in 1993 by a group of movie lovers, the San Luis Obispo International Film Festival is celebrating more than a quarter-century of bringing exciting, independent cinema to San Luis Obispo. The twentyeighth annual festival continues to honor industry professionals with its slate of annual awards while thriving as an oasis for independent filmmakers to screen their films and interact with enthusiastic local audiences in talk-back sessions and workshops. March 8-13 // slofilmfest.org

THE GLENN MILLER ORCHESTRA

When’s the last time you heard “In the Mood,” or “Moonlight Serenade,” or “Chattanooga Choo Choo” live and in concert? Decade after decade, The Glenn Miller Orchestra has been the number one name in the best and most enduring original American music ever made. Few bands have ever had a personality as well-known and wellloved, and it’s coming to the Central Coast for one night only. March 19 // clarkcenter.org

TO THE HANDS Women’s March SLO Event

Community members gather at Mitchell Park for a family friendly event with speakers, performers, DJ, community leaders, and local nonprofit organizations where you can hear from people who are actively engaged in making a difference. And learn how you can engage to make this world a more equitable and just place to be along with steps can you take in your own community. March 5 // womensmarchslo.com 98

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The Cal Poly Choirs’ winter concert at the Performing Arts Center promises not one but two choral masterpieces presented by students from the university’s liberal arts and engineering studies and theatre and dance departments: Buxtehude’s baroque cantata “Membra Nostri,” and Caroline Shaw’s “To the Hands,” loosely based on Buxtehude’s work but reflecting the plight of homeless political refugees. March 12 // music.calpoly.edu

rides of march

Rides of March is a vintage scooter rally centered in and around the City of San Luis Obispo. To show and ride your scooter these two guidelines must be met: your scooter must have a metal body and a manual transmission. March 25-27 // theridesofmarch.com SLO LIFE


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HAVEN PROPERTIES

To experience The Distinctive Life on the Central Coast by Haven Properties visit www.CentralCoastCollection.com

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