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Swept Away FABULOUS FALL FASHIONS

Ride Along with the Abernathy Boys Mobile Merchants Kick into High Gear Stars Aligning Inside Galileo’s World


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FEATURES

42

September 2015

From the Ground Up For pedestrians, they’re a treat. For vendors, they’re home sweet home. As the OKC metro enthusiastically continues to embrace the outdoor festival experience, the success of such public events has paved the way for a new crop of pop-up businesses that bring their own distinctive user experience to where the action is.

On the cover

48

Visions of Beauty A good outfit can draw attention, but a great one can make it seem like there’s nothing else in the world. Despite the desert setting, the lavish looks in our fall fashion feature aren’t mirages – they’re waiting at local retailers.

2 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

A nude illusion dress with embroidered orchids by For Love & Lemons makes for a stunning silhouette; available at 200 Park For Her. Photo by Simon Hurst


SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 3


DEPARTMENTS

64

TAILGATING TREATS

Want your food to be the pregame center of attention? These sliders and fried cheese curds are a recipe for praise. 14 From the Editor UP FRONT 18 Chatter The Turnpike Troubadours’ triumphant return, a look ahead to Oktoberfest, the Energy FC’s Special Olympian Sidekicks and other area topics of conversation. 22 Details It’s an ideal time of year to get organized, especially with the aid of eyecatching products like these.

rt l Inse Specia

D FOOR ’S LOVEIDE GU

24 Style File Merlot’s rich redness makes a beautiful shade to incorporate into fall ensembles and décor. 26 Retro-Spective Remembering the way we were with a look back at the earliest days and recent resurgence of the OKC Farmer’s Public Market.

32

28 Exchange A conversational give and take about adoption, persistence, specialized instruction for students and sharing the rewards of being an educator with Norman High School Teacher of the Year Shawn Sheehan. 30 Mingling Making an appearance on central Oklahoma’s social scene.

22 4 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

32 77 Counties Travels through Oklahoma with author and photographer M.J. Alexander. FARE 62 A Bon Voyage Deep Deuce bar and purveyor of gourmet corn dogs, Anchor Down beckons as a trendy and tempting port of call.

September 2015

PURSUITS 72 Top Ten Prime picks for a variety of September entertainment. 74 Orchestrating a Season of Highlights Brahms piano concertos to Broadway powerhouses – the OKC Philharmonic is ready to unleash a bundle of musical prowess. 76 It’s Galileo’s World … Organizers at OU are preparing to drop some historical science on visitors in a massive exhibition highlighting Galileo’s life, achievements and legacy. 78 Bigger, Better Block Blowout Toast the expansion of a homegrown neighborhood in the annual Plaza District Festival. 79 175 Degrees of Art Although the pieces are small, the Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition’s 12 x 12 Art Fundraiser is big fun and a bigger vehicle for creative support. 80 Cruising Cuisine To find new heights of delicious refinement, head to sea and explore the improved dining possibilities on luxury cruises. 83 See & Do The sights, sounds and various happenings that are enlivening the metro this month. 86 Last Laugh 88 Last Look

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September 2015

Volume 6 Issue 9

PUBLISHER Elizabeth Meares elizabeth.meares@sliceok.com EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Heidi Rambo Centrella heidi.centrella@sliceok.com EDITORIAL Associate Editor Steve Gill steve.gill@sliceok.com Contributing Stylists Timothy Fields, Fashion timothy.fields@sliceok.com Sara Gae Waters, Home saragae.waters@sliceok.com Contributing Writers M.J. Alexander, Bobby Anderson, Mark Beutler, Mia Blake, Lauren Hammack, Jill Hardy, Greg Horton, Caryn Ross ART Art Director Scotty O’Daniel scotty.odaniel@sliceok.com Graphic Designer Brian O’Daniel brian.odaniel@sliceok.com Production Assistant Tiffany McKnight tiffany.mcknight@sliceok.com Contributing Photographers M.J. Alexander, Justin Avera, David Cobb, Shannon Cornman, Terrell Fry, Simon Hurst, Quit Nguyen, Carli Wentworth ADVERTISING Business Development Manager Heidi Turner heidi.turner@sliceok.com Executive Director of Advertising Cynthia Whitaker-hill cynthia.whitakerhill@sliceok.com Account Executives Jamie Hamilton jamie.hamilton@sliceok.com Debbi Knoll debbi.knoll@sliceok.com Account Manager Ronnie Morey ronnie.morey@sliceok.com ADMINISTRATION Distribution Raymond Brewer WEBSITE AND SOCIAL MEDIA sliceok.com

8 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015


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PROMOTION

September 2015

EVENTS // PRODUCTS // EXCLUSIVE OFFERS

A Life Lived Creatively “Growing up,” says local artist Dennis Johnson, “I always knew that creating art is what I was meant to do with my life.” He has spent his life honing his craft – learning new techniques, experimenting with various mediums and styles and creating a diverse body of work while investigating still lifes and landscapes, Fauvism and Impressionism and more. And over the last 30+ years, that body of work has come full circle back to the style he loved most from the beginning: richly colored abstract paintings.

DENNIS JOHNSON A Retrospective Thursday, September 24 through Saturday, October 17 This retrospective exhibit on display at the Howell Gallery will include many neverbefore-seen acrylic works from Johnson’s oeuvre in the 1980s and ’90s, together with completely new oil paintings – a true visual progression of the often-lauded artist’s career. 



THE HOWELL GALLERY

6432 N Western Avenue, OKC | 405.840.4437 | howellgallery.com

A Farewell to Imperial Treasures This month marks the final opportunity for metro residents to witness a collection of irreplaceable artworks rich with history – the exhibit Fabergé: Jeweler to the Tsars will depart from the Oklahoma City Museum of Art on September 27. Containing more than 230 pieces created by the fabled House of Fabergé with many commissioned by the Russian imperial family, the collection is at once an overview of the Romanovs’ reign and a testament to the incredible craftsmanship and skill of Peter Karl Fabergé’s namesake firm. On September 27, Fabergé coordiRussian. Crown Brooch, 1890–1910. Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. Bequest of Lillian Thomas Pratt. nating curator Michael Anderson will Photo: Travis Fullerton. © Virginia Museum of Fine Arts deliver a gallery talk about the exhibition’s concept and design; join his tour at 1 pm in the museum lobby. This is the exhibition’s final stop in the U.S. before traveling to China; don’t miss out on its spectacular wonders!

OKLAHOMA CITY MUSEUM OF ART

415 Couch Drive, OKC | 405.236.3100 | okcmoa.com 10 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

Volume 6 Issue 9

READER SERVICES SLICE 729 W. Sheridan, Suite 101 Oklahoma City, OK 73102 Phone 405.842.2266 Fax 405.604.9435 info@sliceok.com, sliceok.com Advertising Inquiries sales@sliceok.com Job/Internship Inquiries jobs@sliceok.com Story Ideas and Letters to the Editor Your views and opinions are welcome. Include your full name, address and daytime phone number and email to editor@sliceok.com. Letters sent to Slice magazine become the magazine’s property, and it owns all rights to their use. Slice magazine reserves the right to edit letters for length and clarity. Single Copies Single copies are $4.95 each. For rack locations, see sliceok.com/subscribe or contact our office. Back Issues Back issues are $9.50 (includes P&H) each. For back issue availability and order information, please contact our office. Bulk Orders For multiple copy order information, please contact our office. Subscriptions Slice Magazine is available by subscription for $14.95 (12 issues), $24.95 (24 issues) or $34.95 (36 issues). Subscription Customer Service Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. - 7 p.m. CST SLICE P.O. Box 16765 North Hollywood, CA 91615-6765 Phone 818.286.3160 Fax 800.869.0040 subscriptions@sliceok.com sliceok.com/subscribe Slice Volume 6, Number 9, September 2015. Slice is published monthly by Open Sky Media, Inc. at 729 W. Sheridan, Suite 101, Oklahoma City, OK 73102, 405.842.2266. © Copyright 2015 Open Sky Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction of Slice content, in whole or part by any means, without the express written consent of the publisher is strictly prohibited. Slice is not responsible for the care of and/or return of unsolicited materials. Slice reserves the right to refuse advertising deemed detrimental to the community’s best interest or in questionable taste. Opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of ownership or management. Basic annual subscription rate is $14.95. U.S. single-copy price is $4.95. Back issues are $9.50 each

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Slice, P.O. Box 16765, North Hollywood, CA 91615-6765. Subscription Customer Service: Slice, P.O. Box 16765, North Hollywood, CA 91615-6765, Phone 818.286.3160, Fax 800.869.0040, subscriptions@sliceok. com, sliceok.com/subscribe


SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 11


ON THE WEB

THIS MONTH ON SLICEOK.COM

Desert Visions It’s quite a drive from OKC to the sands of Little Sahara State Park, especially if you’re trying to allow time enough for a photo shoot once you get there. Fortunately, we discovered that thanks to that otherworldly atmosphere, contributions from local fashion retailers and the assistance of model Sierrah Hull, the visual results were more than worth the trip. If you’d like to see more of the ensembles in our fall fashion feature, visit sliceok.com/ fashionoasis/ – we promise it’s not a mirage.

Staying in Touch Slice brings more of the metro to your inbox every week: Weekend 101 provides a selection of our suggestions for good times to be had around town; Snapshot! collects moments captured by our photographers at local events; and Insider offers exclusive deals and special promotions. Remember that we have a habit of giving away prizes to subscribers – signing up is free, and as easy as visiting sliceok.com/newsletters/. 12 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015


From the Editor

FORWARD MOMENTUM

SIMON HURST

I

HEIDI RAMBO CENTRELLA

Editor-in-Chief heidi.centrella@sliceok.com

14 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

experience most life change during the summer months. And this year was no different: I both moved into a new house, and embraced a new career path by becoming the editor-in-chief at Slice. But here we are at summer’s end, and the transformation is still flourishing. Whether running to a yoga class, cycling the streets of Oklahoma City or attending an event downtown, I see the landscape growing and changing for the better. And as I step into this new role, I’m excited to be a part of the alterations taking shape in this award-winning magazine. Of course, with major life adjustments come not only new beginnings, but also necessary endings. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed my 20-some-year journalism career, but must admit that being back in the print media/magazine world is much like coming home. And after working from a home office for the past two years – during which time I often was accused of spending my days in fuzzy slippers – I’m thrilled to be back in heels. From a seasonal perspective, spring showers (or floods in our case) lead to sweltering summers, which eventually turn to cooler temperatures that necessitate the modification of ensembles, shoes and accessories. Yes, fall fashion is upon us, and while I personally am no fashionista, this issue is full of inspiration, with exceptional wardrobe possibilities from retailers who are in the know when it comes to styling for the seasonal switch (see our “Visions of Beauty” feature on page 48). As the new girl in the Slice House on Film Row, I am grateful to work with a team of talented individuals who bring so much to what is evolving into a more provocative and engaging city and lifestyle magazine – one that defines what it means to live in the 405. You’ll see some names throughout the publication that are familiar yet new to Slice, but have no fear: The writers and photographers you’ve come to follow over the years for solid story-telling, news writing and stunning visual images will continue to provide exceptional content about the developing community we all share. Stay tuned …


AND OUR #1 MISSION IS FIGHTING WOMEN’S #1 CAUSE OF DEATH As women, we feel responsible for the well-being of our families, but keeping our kids healthy starts with our health. Many of us count calories, get regular exercise and never miss our yearly wellness exams, but you might have overlooked the largest threat to your health – heart disease. We tend to think of heart disease as a man’s disease, but the fact is it kills more women each year than anything else. And for women, the symptoms are different: in addition to chest pain, shortness of breath and upper body pain, unshakable fatigue and sleeplessness can also be signs of a heart attack. When you’re a patient of INTEGRIS, you have access to cardiologists from INTEGRIS Heart Hospital, and you can make an appointment now to see a cardiologist at any of our metro facilities. To schedule an appointment at the location most convenient for you, call 405.951.2277.

Heart Hospital Visit integrisheart.com to learn more.

405-951-2277


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16 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

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UP FRONT A BOUNTIFUL HISTORY

COURTESY OKLAHOMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Almost 90 and still blooming, the OKC Farmer’s Public Market is an iconic piece of the past enjoying a modernday renaissance. See page 26.

CHATTER Topics of conversation from around the metro 18

STYLE FILE Beautiful merlot-shaded items and accessories 24

MINGLING Glimpses of central Oklahoma’s social scene 30

DETAILS Stylish merchandise for heading back to school or sprucing up the office 22

EXCHANGE Norman teacher Shawn Sheehan talks specialized education and positivity 28

77 COUNTIES Travels through the state with author and photographer M.J. Alexander 32

SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 17


UP FRONT | Chatter

Getting in Tune

LOCAL FAVORITES SET TO BUILD FOLLOWING WITH THIRD ALBUM

All the Fun, with Less Heat and Fewer Bugs If you love your outdoor movie opportunities during the summer, no need to fret over their absence just yet; September still holds a couple of showings for the al fresco film lover. The Boathouse District is featuring Guardians of the Galaxy Sept. 4, and Annie (the 2014 version) is showing Sept. 11 at Ted Anderson Park in Edmond.

OKLAHOMA HIP HOP GOES LIVE

The inaugural Oklahoma Hip Hop Festival (Sept. 18-19) will not only showcase local, regional and national artists in a musical mindblower, but also will have interactive opportunities in the form of dance workshops, a graffiti wall and dance and MC battles. Food trucks and other vendors will round out the festival, set to take place at the Paramount on Film Row. The event will raise funds for the Elemental Hip Hop Program, an afterschool youth program that fosters teamwork and community awareness through hip-hop music. 18 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

The Turnpike Troubadours have long had a loyal fan base in Oklahoma and Texas – and have even garnered attention in other parts of the U.S. with their energetic live shows and no-holdsbarred Red Dirt sound – but the release of their self-titled third album on Sept. 18 may prove to be their long-overdue intro to the world at large. This past April, Playboy magazine featured the Troubadours as part of a feature on “The New Bad Boys of Country Music.” Citing the “spit shining, polishing and commodification” of most current Top 40 Country Music, the article pinned The Turnpike Troubadours (along with Whiskey Myers and the Dirty River Boys) as acts to watch for a new infusion of grit and honesty into the genre. The Troubadours recorded the album in California, at the Prairie Sun recording complex, and their self-produced efforts are both a reward to their faithful fans and a great introduction for anyone who goes Googling for them after reading the article. From the drawling and danceable “Time of Day” to the simple-but-eloquent Cajun flavor of “The Bird Hunters,” the new album has plenty of new ammunition for the band’s dynamic concerts, as well as heartfelt verse for the lyric-minded music fan.

Energy Sidekicks Win Big The Oklahoma Energy Football Club will close out its 2015 regular season Sept. 16 against Arizona United, but whatever the outcome of that game, the Energy have won big this year with their Sidekicks program. An endeavor that pairs an Energy player with a Special Olympian or TOPSoccer athlete (from the U.S. Youth Soccer outreach program) for events and games, Sidekicks is a great vehicle for showcasing soccer’s accessibility and appeal, and also highlights the team’s commitment to building solid fan relationships.


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UP FRONT | Chatter

Calendar Watch Sept. 7 Labor Day – So long, Summer Sept. 13 Grandparents’ Day Sept. 15 Beginning of Hispanic Heritage Month (Ends Oct. 15) Sept. 19 International Talk Like a Pirate Day – Confound your scurvyridden co-workers Sept. 23 Yom Kippur

SCHOOL’S IN; THE BASH IS ON Metro-area museums want to help your child get excited about going back to school (and give you an acceptable mode of celebration) Sept. 1. At its Back to School Bash, the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum will host an engaging evening of family fun with trunks from the Oklahoma History Museum to investigate, and living history characters for educational interaction. Teachers are encouraged to visit – staff members will be on hand to answer questions and offer information about programs going on throughout the year – and door prizes will be awarded throughout the night. 20 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

ON THE PAGE

OKLAHOMA AUTHOR SHEDS LIGHT ON FAMOUS CRIME Black Mass, the movie about legendary Boston criminal James “Whitey” Bulger starring Johnny Depp, opens this month nationwide. Viewers who want a little background about Bulger – and the details of the crime that proved to be his undoing – can find all that and more in One Murder Too Many, by Laurence J. Yadon and Robert Barr Smith. Yadon and Smith both have ties to Oklahoma (Yadon, an attorney, lives in Tulsa, and Smith is a professor emeritus at the University of Oklahoma College of Law), as does the chilling murder that ultimately ended Bulger’s long criminal career. Computer tycoon Roger Wheeler was known as a ruthless businessman, but one with a strong moral and ethical code. When he bought into World Jai Alai – an enterprise particularly appealing to organized crime due to its lucrative earning potential through gambling – Wheeler understood that the refusal to go along with underworld demands for partnership would be dangerous. When he was gunned down in the parking lot of his Tulsa country club, there wasn’t much mystery about why it had happened, but proving who was behind it – and finding him – was a decades-long process. Yadon and Smith provide copious detail about the backgrounds of both Bulger and Wheeler, and their stories are woven together in a way that will keep readers guessing about particulars, even with the end result being understood from the first chapter. The parallel biography presents an opportunity to compare the two men, and also to contrast the relative prices that each end up paying; one for doing the right thing, and the other for choosing a life of crime.

Get a Jump on Oktoberfest

While most of the metro’s Oktoberfest celebrations will take place in, well, October, you can warm up your stein-tipping hand this month in Choctaw at the annual nine-day celebration (Sept. 4-12) organized by The Old Germany restaurant. The celebration continues Sept. 14 in Grove for the city’s second annual Oktoberfest. After all, one month seems insufficient for celebrating sauerbraten and polka dancing.

MOVEABLE FEAST

If you love the excitement of hunting down food trucks, but occasionally long for a more lavish cuisine and set-up, then POACH (poach.com) may be just the ticket. Billed as an “underground dining experience,” the location and menus change with every event, and the collective of talented chefs (Guy Romo, of Moto Chef fame, was a founding member) are sure to provide a singular dining experience.


“Magnificent!”

—The Wall Street Journal on the Dugout Canoes exhibit.

Exhibit Closing Sept. 27 Explore the world exposed when 101 ancient canoes were found in a dry lake bed. The acclaimed exhibit, with videos, interactive play and canoes, old and new.

Sulphur, OK 580-622-7130 canoes2015.com

Produced by the Florida Museum of Natural History with support from the AEC Trust, Lastinger Family Foundation, State of Florida and VisitGainesville.

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SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 21


UP FRONT | Details

Good on Paper By Sara Gae Waters // Photos by Carli Wentworth

EVERY FALL, I’M INSPIRED by this quote from one of my favorite movies, You’ve Got Mail: “Don’t you love New York in the fall? It makes me wanna buy school supplies. I would send you a bouquet of newly sharpened pencils if I knew your name and address.” Since I don’t know your address, but you are reading this, I’ve got a bouquet of pencils for you ... and some really great paper products, organizational supplies and just allaround pretty stuff to help you mark this great time of year.

22 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015


From Pencil Shavings shoppencilshavingsstudio.com

4

3

2

1

1. Color Me Fabulous notepad 2. Beach towel striped foldover notepad 3. To Do foldover notepad 4. Signature washi tape 5. Citrus iPhone case 6. Lucite trays with gold foil sprinkles, gold foil anchor or chain link patterns From Antique Garden, Norman 7. ban.do floral agenda 8. Petal Lane arrow magnets 9. Emily Ley simplified planner From Plenty, OKC 10. Emerald Don’t Wait notebook with clothespin clip light 11. Sugar Paper Market List on sunshine yellow clipboard 12. Esperos azul backpack 13. Color Dunes classic striped tote 14. My Ideas journal and stick colored pencils

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From Sara Kate Studios, OKC 15. Stop Talking business cards

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SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 23


UP FRONT | Style File

Red, Red Wine By Timothy Fields // Photos by Carli Wentworth

THIS FALL’S GO-TO COLOR IS MERLOT. You can find plenty of fashionable items available around the metro – from purses to nail polish – to add a splash of style to your fall fashions. Drink up!

Rain or shine, this Worth patent leather coat has you covered. Match it with Worth wool pant and knit turtleneck, all from R Meyers in Nichols Hills Plaza. Antonio Melani suede sandal with fringe detail, from Dillard’s at Penn Square Mall

Loeffler Randall leather purse with horsehair treatment, from Balliets in Classen Curve

Makeup can be a glamorous way to add this season’s must-have hue. Try this “Bloodroses” lipstick by Kevyn Aucoin – and anyone can wear their wine with “Skirting the Issue” nail polish by Essie, both from The MakeUp Bar in Wilshire Village.

24 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015


PROMOTION

ANTERBURY

It’s more than a concert. It’s an experience.

Share in an outpouring of musical beauty from Oklahoma’s largest vocal ensemble, the 125-memberstrong Canterbury Choral Society, as they celebrate sounds old and new during a season in song.

OCTOBER 2

DECEMBER 6

APRIL 9

Belshazzar’s Feast

Canterbury Christmas

More Than Drums

Canterbury opens its season with a powerful musical tale inspired by a Biblical miracle – the captive Israelites’ triumph over a Babylonian king. It’s accompanied by a rendition of Stravinsky’s “Symphony of Psalms,” and food trucks will provide treats beforehand.

Special guest Kyle Dillingham lends his virtuosity on the fiddle to Canterbury’s annual celebration of the season and its music. The familiar carols, hymns and standards are likely to awaken happy memories in most listeners, so it’s no surprise the traditional sing-along is such a hit year after year.

One of Canada’s hottest instrumental groups, Duo Percussion joins the Canterbury ensemble for a high-energy season finale. It’s a multi-media marvel that illustrates the limitless possibilities of percussion – including a broad array of instruments and household objects.

T

he season is an opportunity to, as director Randi Von Ellefson puts it, “sense the power and inspiration of great music, great choral music that lifts all of us. It gives us vision, life and excitement.” And it’s a powerful feeling to be a part of – as each member of the chorus adds his or her voice to make the whole sound richer and more resonant, each Canterbury supporter and audience member helps the ensemble maintain its strength and potential for educating young musicians, inspiring listeners through performance and enriching the cultural landscape of central Oklahoma. That should be music to your ears.

All performances are scheduled for the OKC Civic Center. For individual or season tickets, call 232.SING or visit canterburyokc.com.


o r t Respective

EVERYTHING OLD IS NEW AGAIN By Mark Beutler // Photos courtesy the Oklahoma Historical Society

IT’S AN ICONIC PIECE OF OKLAHOMA CITY HISTORY. Depression-era farmers came to peddle their produce, while country music aficionados two-stepped to Bob Wills and his Texas Playboys. The Oklahoma City Farmer’s Public Market opened in the summer of 1928 on the site of the former Delmar Gardens Amusement Park, 311 S Klein, just west of downtown. It cost a then-whopping $500,000 to build the 40,000-square-foot, two-story structure. A multi-million-dollar restoration began in 2002 when new owners Burt and Jody McAnally acquired the property. Today, the market has specialty vendors, a bakery and restaurant, while the refurbished upstairs boasts the largest hardwood floor in the state, which makes sense as it once housed a skating rink. At nearly 90 years old, the market has become one of the trendiest new locales in the metro. 26 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015


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UP FRONT | Exchange

FIRST CLASS By Lauren Hammack // Photo by Shannon Cornman

A Conv er with sation Sha Shee wn han

THE MORNING I MET SHAWN SHEEHAN, he had just finished reading an article on his phone about whether it’s a good time to be a teacher. I asked the Norman Public Schools 2015 Teacher of the Year, “Well? Is it?” “Of course it is,” Sheehan insisted. “If not now, when? If not us, who?” If I’d met Sheehan in 2009, when he first arrived in Oklahoma, he might have given a different response to the same question; he had a journalism and public relations degree from Arizona State University and no job to go with it. At least that’s what he thought at the time. The right job had been there all along.

Congratulations on becoming Norman Public Schools Teacher of the Year! Does this make you a finalist for the Oklahoma Teacher of the Year? Thank you! Yes, I am one of 12 finalists. What led you into the teaching profession? I really just happened into it. I was a military brat, and I always thought I’d go into the Air Force after college, but I had a medical issue that prevented me from doing what I’d always thought I’d do. I got my degree in journalism and public relations from Arizona State, and when I came to Norman in 2009, I didn’t have a job yet, so I thought I’d like to substitute teach for a while. And you were a hit! One principal told me he thought I was really doing some great things in the classes where I substituted and he encouraged me to be a teacher. By then, I’d also been a job coach for adults with learning differences and I thought, “Why not get on the front end of that and make a difference?” So I received a master’s degree in special education from OU. I’m not crazy about the term “special education.” Neither am I. In fact, I call it “specialized education.” Part of what we try to accomplish through a campaign I started called “Teach Like Me” is to remove the stigma that comes with labels and change perceptions about different students’ learning styles. It may still be called “special education,” but it’s very different than it was 20 – or even 10 – years ago. My students are still successful ath28 28 SLICE SLICE //// SEPTEMBER MAY 2015 2015

letes, still cheerleaders and they still succeed in college; they just have bigger hurdles to overcome in the classroom. Teaching comes with a few hurdles of its own. It does – and I’m equally passionate about redefining the public perception of teaching. As a profession, it has a negative image, so why do people continue to choose a teaching career? Your PR degree is starting to show. What are some tangible measures of success through the Teach Like Me campaign? An increase in finding quality teachers and in retaining quality teachers would be great measures of success. What do you think prepared you most for the classroom? I was a server in a restaurant when I was younger – I learned how to deal with chaos and meet the needs of several demanding people at once. It was a great prep for teaching. Who is your real-life hero? My mom. I was the youngest of eight kids, and my mom did so much for us.

naturally, but managing the constant work doesn’t. Luckily, I’ve had several excellent mentors at Norman High School.

with retailers within a year. Within five years, I plan to have an app developed as a resource for teachers.

What is a risk worth taking? Devoting yourself entirely to something you believe in.

What are you most grateful for? My parents who adopted me, which gave me the incredible opportunity to live in this country and to be surrounded by so many good people.

What do you value most in your friends? Positivity. I think it’s so important to surround yourself with positive people.

What lessons did your parents teach by example? Attention to detail. Compassion. The importance of volunteering.

Shawn Sheehan sounds Irish. But somehow … Yeah, I was adopted from the Philippines into an IrishAmerican family when I was 4 days old.

What do you hope people will never assume about you? That teaching came naturally.

Do you feel strongly about adoption? I feel very strongly about it – I plan to adopt children one day.

That’s going to surprise a lot of people, coming from the NPS Teacher of the Year. I’d say the patience and compassion came

Where do you see the Teach Like Me campaign a year, and five years, from now? I hope we’ll secure more teacher discounts

SIGNAL BOOST Created in 2013, the Teach Like Me Campaign (teachlikeme.org) is Sheehan’s undertaking but a true group effort, giving teachers a forum to share their triumphs and draw inspiration from each other; reminding the public how challenging and rewarding the profession can be and encouraging businesses who offer discounts for educators. As social campaigns go, it gets a gold star.


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UP FRONT | Mingling Greg and Leslie Dolezal, Holly and Robert Cuthbertson

Mark and Sonya Terpening, Sinda and Owen Lafferty, Tony Beals

HOWELL GALLERY WESTERN ART RECEPTION Photos by Terrell Fry The beauty-filled gallery hosts a range of landscapes, character studies and more at the opening of its aptly titled Western Art Show.

Amy Hofmeister, Trevor Mathews

ZOOBILATION Photos by Terrell Fry

Pama and Mike Palmer

Travis Stephens, Laura Howell Tirrell

Supporters of the OKC Zoo seize the opportunity to get just a bit wild at the animal-packed locale’s annual “no tie” gala.

Ethan Sarani, Jeff Olivarez Julie Costilla, Marilyn Kraemer, Michelle and Barney Kaminsky

Bob and Margaret Mills

ST. ANTHONY POP! CHAMPAGNE TASTING St. Anthony CEO Bill Thompson, Cindy Lani, Tammy Powell

Photos by Terrell Fry

Guests gather at Mercedes-Benz of OKC to raise a glass to a future filled with even more elite health care from the St. Anthony hospital network.

David Thompson, Mike Joseph, Mark Funke 30 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

Lisa Knight, Amanda Knight

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DEADCENTER KICKOFF PARTY

Photos by Justin Avera

The 15th annual deadCENTER Film Festival gets underway with a costume-encouraging, pyrotechnically enhanced blowout at the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum. Lance, Tom, Brenda, Mark and Stacy McDaniel

Monty Milburn, Bud Moore, Kevin Watson, Andrea Maxwell Melissa Scaramucci, Mary Blankenship Pointer Gentner and Wendy Drummond, Paula Love, Justin McSpedden

Aubrey Crowder, Lynn Crowe

SLICE MAGAZINE’S FOUNDERS FROLIC Photos by Terrell Fry

With the deadCENTER Film Festival in full swing, cinema-lovers stop by the IAO Gallery to party and dance the night away.

Don Pritchett, Marc Longbrake, Elizabeth Zellner, Roger Runge Jacie Upchurch, Marco Rodrigues, Brett Hayes, Kassie Smith

Micaelene Stephenson, Ian Lawler

Cate Jones, Allison McMichael, Cecilia Nguyen Want more photos? Sign up for our Snapshot! newsletter at sliceok.com/newsletters.

Brett Hayes, Kristin Reynolds, Heath Holt SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 31


UP FRONT | Wanderlust

77 COUNTIES: TILLMAN COUNTY

The Astounding Adventures of the

Abernathy Boys ing an Ohio newspaper to note, “The Abernathy boys are beating all records for juvenile fame. They couldn’t have become better known if they had got themselves kidnapped and ransomed.”

E

MAYBE MORE THAN ANY OTHER STORY IN OKLAHOMA HISTORY, THE TALE OF THE ABERNATHY BOYS SEEMS, QUITE LITERALLY, UNBELIEVABLE. By M.J. Alexander

A

century ago, in the years between statehood and the beginning of World War I, 9-year-old Louis “Bud” Abernathy and his 5-year-old brother, Temple, hankered for adventure. Their dreams were not unusual. What was out of the ordinary was that their father said yes. After the boys asked to ride their horses by themselves from Oklahoma to Santa Fe to see the new mansion of the governor, Jack Abernathy seriously considered their request. Their mother had died, and they were growing up fast. With every confidence in their horsemanship, he laid down some guidelines, opened a checking account for each with $100 apiece and encouraged them to saddle up. 32 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

They set out in June 1909 from Oklahoma to Santa Fe and back in a journey that was covered by not only local newspapers, but The New York Times: “Anxious to emulate the strenuous life and carry out their father’s instructions to ‘toughen up,’ Temple and Louis Abernathy, aged 5 and 8 [sic], respectively, sons of United States Marshal John Abernathy, left late today for a 1,300mile horseback trip.” It would be the first of six treks over four years covering more than 10,000 miles that would include meetings with mayors and governors and presidents, an offer to fly with the Wright Brothers and crowds ripping at their clothes to get a piece of them. The brothers would become two of the best-known children in the world, inspir-

ven among the rough-and-tumble characters of the Wild West, Jack Abernathy stood out. He worked as a saloon pianist in Sweetwater, Texas, at the age of 6, surviving a gun battle that left bullet holes in the piano; was a full-time range rider on the A-K-X ranch at age 9, patrolling the still-fenceless prairie with a .38 pistol because a .45 was too heavy; and, at 15, won a job as a top bronc buster and “first saddle” on the J-A Ranch. At 18, he fell in love with gray-eyed music teacher Jessie Pearl Jordan and devised an elaborate escape plan to elope on March 10, 1894, brandishing his pistol at porters trying to block their path, one step ahead of her angry family. What would bring him fame, however, was his ability to jump from horseback and wrestle with wild wolves and coyotes, sticking his hand in their jaws to immobilize them, then wiring their muzzles shut and binding their legs. The skill bestowed a nickname that would follow him the rest of his life: Jack “Catch ‘Em Alive” Abernathy. Stories of his unusual talent made their way to Pres. Teddy Roosevelt, who trekked to Frederick in 1905 to meet the 29-year-old wolf catcher, described as “not more than 5 foot 2 [inches], but he is built like an ox, and his muscles are like steel.” Abernathy’s skill so impressed the president over five days hunting in Oklahoma Territory’s Big Pasture that Roosevelt declared, “This beats anything I have seen in my life, and I have seen a good deal!”  The next year, Roosevelt appointed him U.S. Marshal for the Western District of Oklahoma. The plum job made Abernathy the top federal law enforcement official in the state, granted a salary of $5,000 plus expenses and made him the youngest U.S. Marshal in history.


A

s their father’s star rose, the Abernathy boys continued with elementary school and dreamt of their next big adventure. Despite the hoopla surrounding their first trek, the Santa Fe trip had been riddled with near-disasters. Bud’s horse Sam Bass, borrowed from his father, and the Shetland pony mix named Geronimo were sure-footed. But Temple contracted diarrhea by drinking gypsum water and sprained both ankles trying to dismount. Bud was forced to lie awake one night, firing his shotgun into the darkness toward a pack of wolves that circled while his brother slept. The boys ran out of both food and water between stops, and were saved by the kindness of strangers. The most chilling episode was a note scribbled by the point of a lead-tipped bullet on a brown paper sack, addressed to “The Marshal of Oklahoma” and delivered to the Abernathy home. “I don’t like one hair on your head, but I do like the stuff that is in these kids. We shadowed them through the worst part of New Mexico to see that they were not harmed by sheepherders, mean men, or animals.” It was signed A.Z.Y., the initials of a rustler whose friend had been killed in a shootout with Abernathy. Jack was tickled by the note: “It just goes to show you there’s good in all men. He’d have killed me at the drop of a hat, but he was honorable to protect my innocent boys.” As school was about to shut down for summer, the boys asked if they could go to New York City to witness the reception for Roosevelt, which was planned to welcome his return from 15 months abroad on safari in Africa and speaking in the capitals of Europe.

Jack asked how they planned to pay for their train ticket. Temple said it was all settled: Their round-trip tickets were “out in the barn eatin’ hay.” The brothers argued that a trip east, though longer, would likely have better roads and more amenities. Jack agreed and planning was under way. Almost famous after their Santa Fe trip, by the time they set out for New York in 1910, the Abernathy Boys approached celebrity status. Easterners were fascinated by the brothers’ pluck and by the growing legend of their father. Red carpets were unrolled, bands were assembled, speeches were made. An account noted: “Kids envied them. Women adored them. Grown men pulled hair from their horses’ tails to keep as souvenirs.” But the boys still had long, lonely stretches by themselves. The pony Geronimo foundered in Hominy, Oklahoma, and Temple was forced to leave him behind and buy a new horse: a red-and-white pinto he named Wylie Haynes. Temple’s Navajo saddle blanket was stolen at a livery in Chicago. Unimpressed kids challenged them to fight. They pressed ahead in driving rain and muddy roads, guided only by directions from one stable to the next. Bud nearly crushed his leg in a fall. Temple suffered a bronchial infection, and a doctor in New Jersey measured his temperature at 103 and ordered him to rest. Even so, they drove a train in St. Louis, slept in a firehouse in Cincinnati, were made deputies for the day in Dayton and were guests of honor at a Halley’s Comet viewing party in West Virginia. In Washington, the House of Representatives stopped its proceedings so members could hear of their adventures. In New Jersey,

they were followed by “local armies of small boys” riding stick horses. In describing the mob scene at the boys’ hotel in Manhattan, New York Times headlines blared: ABERNATHY BOYS PUT BAN ON KISSING Fearless Youngsters, Who Have Ridden Here From Oklahoma, Mobbed by Women. Surrounded by Mounted Police, They Have a Triumphal March to Their Broadway Hotel. The brothers – now joined by Jack, who had arrived by train – were among the VIPs allowed on one of the cutters sent out in a flotilla to greet Roosevelt. Bud and Temple rode Sam Bass and Wylie Haynes just behind his carriage and in front of the Rough Riders in the five-mile parade up Broadway and onto Fifth Avenue and 59th Street. At the end of the route, Roosevelt jumped out of his carriage and strode toward the boys with an oversized teddy bear he’d been given, draped in the flags of the world, and created a perfect ending to a perfect day: “Here, Temple, this is for you.”

J

ack shipped the boys’ horses back to Oklahoma and, after a few more days of sightseeing, planned to follow by train. But Bud and Temple had a better idea: Why not buy a horseless carriage? Jack was skeptical, but told the boys he would consider the request if they could find a small, simple automobile that they could handle themselves. He gave them one day to search. At their last stop in Manhattan’s new auto showrooms, they discovered a small, red Brush Runabout. It featured a single cylinder, a chain drive, a fuel pump that would help

THE BIRTH OF JACK ABERNATHY

John R. “Jack” Abernathy was born Jan. 28, 1876, in Bosque County, Texas, to

Martin Van Buren Abernathy – a veteran of the Confederate Army’s Waco Rifles who fought through the Vicksburg and Atlanta campaigns before being injured and taken prisoner of war – and his wife, Kittie Williams Thompson Abernathy, widow of a Confederate soldier. In addition to caring for the four sons and two daughters from Kittie’s first marriage, the couple had five additional children; Jack was the baby.

His eldest son, Louis “Bud” Van Abernathy, named for his grandfather, was born in

Bosque County on Dec. 17, 1899. Temple Reeves Abernathy, named in honor of Sam Houston’s youngest son, was born March 25, 1904, in Tipton, Oklahoma Territory.

SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 33


UP FRONT | Wanderlust with climbing hills and a price tag of $485. The salesman promised if it broke down on the way, he would pay the freight back and refund their money. Bud spent an afternoon on driving lessons, and Jack was inspired to buy a sturdier Maxwell touring car, and hire a chauffeur to drive him back home. The boys – mostly Bud, but sometimes Temple – drove themselves. Clad in goggles and dusters, they made good time and stopped along the way to visit Niagara Falls and the Brush factory in Detroit. Their dad’s car caught fire along the way, burning the boys’ souvenirs, including the teddy bear from Roosevelt. The car was salvageable, and they motored into Oklahoma City on July 30, guests of honor at a reception at the fairgrounds sponsored by the new Oklahoma Auto Club. The trip took 23 days to travel 2,512 miles. Promoters soon realized there was money to be made off the Abernathys’ fame. The boys starred as themselves in a 1910 silent movie, Abernathy Kids to the Rescue, “a story of the real wild and woolly western type which will arouse your enthusiasm, which will bubble with excitement and interest.” They were hired as spokesmen for the Brush Company for the 1911 auto show in New York, paid to sit in a booth and talk about their adventures. Fred Thompson and Skip Dundy, who built the Hippodrome Theater and owned Luna Park on Coney Island, paid Bud and Temple to sit astride their horses on the boardwalk and talk of their adventures. To keep the boys in the public eye, Thompson and Dundy arranged an elephant-and-donkey race from New York to Washington, ostensibly to predict the winner of the upcoming presidential race. Accompanied by animal trainers, Bud rode the 7,000-pound elephant, and Temple settled for the donkey. The race was called off in Philadelphia when the elephant was too exhausted to continue. Not to be thwarted, promoters cooked up an even grander scheme: a $10,000 challenge for the boys to travel from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific on horseback in 60 days. Bud, now 11, and 7-year-old Temple, would be allowed to rest on Sundays and to sit out bad weather without counting toward the 60-day total. They would be allowed one change of horses. And finally, in an odd and cruel twist, the boys would not be allowed to eat or sleep under a roof for the duration of the journey. So it was that on the stroke of midnight Aug. 11, 1911, the boys on their horses emerged from knee-deep water in the Atlantic Ocean, carrying a flask of sea 34 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

The First Three Adventures of the Abernathy Boys

Syracuse

Albany

Rochester Buffalo

Poughkeepsie

Detroit

Battle Creek

Newark

Cleveland Omaha

Toledo Chicago

New York City

Trenton Philadelphia

Wheeling

Wilmington

Columbus Dayton

Baltimore Washington D.C.

Cincinnati

Terre Haute Kansas City St. Louis

Wichita

Coffeyville

Chetopa Santa Fe

Enid Amarillo

Springfield Hominy

El Reno Oklahoma City

Portales

100

200

miles

Lawton Estelline

SCALE 0

Frederick

Roswell

miles

LEGEND 1. Frederick to Santa Fe and back on horseback 2. Frederick to New York City on horseback 3. New York City to Frederick by automobile

The Last Three Adventures of the Abernathy Boys

Rochester

Syracuse

Albany

Buffalo Rock Springs

Kelton

Chicago

Laramie

New York City Toledo

Sidney

Sacramento Salt Lake City

Omaha

Cheyenne

Reno

Cleveland

Trenton Philadelphia

Columbus

North Plains

Indianapolis

San Francisco

Cincinnati Terre Haute

Kansas City St. Louis Wichita

Enid

Tipton

SCALE 0

100

miles

Oklahoma City Lawton Frederick

200

miles

LEGEND 1. Luna Park to Philadelphia on donkey & elephant 2. New York City to San Francisco on horseback 3. Frederick to New York City on motorcycle

water to dump in the Pacific at San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park. Thousands of vacationers cheered their departure. The boys did not dawdle for receptions and parades. They slept on the ground in bedrolls and, as summer turned into fall, would burrow into haystacks for the warmth at night. Some sympathetic towns would have a table laden with food and drink set up outside, so the boys could keep their word and never have a meal indoors. Others had never heard of them, nor cared to, and chased them off their property when they tried to set up camp. They traveled through the Rockies, over the Continental Divide and into the Great Salt Lake Desert, where they woke one morning to find their horses had disappeared. The boys spent three days searching the shadeless desert. “I think we both suddenly realized that we could die there in the heat,” Temple would say later. “We had little food and almost no water left. Without the horses, survival would be almost impossible.” But at last they found one of the horses, and caught up with the other in Kelton, Utah,

where he had wandered in search of water. Bolstered with food, drink and fresh supplies, they followed the railroad tracks out of town. Soon, a westbound train screeched to a stop. The men aboard offered a ride to the boys and their horses, which would spare them three more days of desert riding. Bud did not hesitate: “No sir, we can’t do that. It would be breaking our contract.” “We’ll never tell,” said one of the crew. Another agreed: “That’s right. No one will ever know.” “We’d know,” Bud said. The exhausted boys pressed on, making it through Nevada to California, then San Francisco and into Golden Gate Park to dump their flask of Atlantic water into the Pacific. They had covered 3,619 miles in 62 days of traveling, missing the goal by two days but setting a record for crossing the continent on horseback, breaking the old mark of 182 days. Their expenses were $2,800; their payout was zero. Reports noted that neither seemed disheartened at missing out on the prize. The taciturn Bud had few words to share: “It was too hard. We averaged nearly 60 miles a day


The Abernathy Boys statue in Frederick, Oklahoma

THE DEATH OF JESSIE PEARL ABERNATHY Thirty-year-old

Jessie

Pearl

Abernathy died in Guthrie on May 7, 1907, three months after giving birth to a sixth child. She left behind four daughters (Pearlie Mae, Kittie Joe, Vera Golda and Johnnie “Jack” Martin) and the two boys. Abernathy’s father and sister stepped in to help raise the children. Jack remarried the next July, eloping with Almira Pervaine, the teenaged daughter of a wealthy farmer near Guthrie. The union would last less than two years, as Abernathy filed for divorce in April 1910, weeks after the arrival of the daughter they named for Roosevelt: Theodora Lucile.

In June 1909, The New York Times

quoted Jack – whom they called “the cowboy Sheriff of Oklahoma” – saying of his sons: “They got all their good points from their mother, who died about three years ago.” The newspaper noted, “There was a touch of sadness in his voice.”

when we rode, and it was too far.” Temple said: “Gee, but it’s great to get here. I liked the trip all right, but sometimes it got cold, and then I didn’t like it so well. I want the deepest feather bed I can get in this town.”

T

he boys’ final ride came in 1913, when the maker of Indian Motocycles (spelled at the time without the r) offered a custom-made, two-seat, twinengine machine if the boys would travel on it from Oklahoma to New York City. Temple had just turned 9, and Bud was 13. The company sent along a second bike, for a mechanic to ride along. After teaching themselves to drive the 500pound cycle, they headed out in June, stopping along the way to give demonstrations and visit dealerships. Roads had improved so much that they were able to hit speeds of up to 70 miles per hour on some paved stretches. In the book Bud and Me, authored by his wife, Alta Abernathy, Temple talked of their arrival in New York: “We were salesmen now, not celebrities as before, and we didn’t have to deal with reporters and crowds. I missed the excitement, but all in all I liked it better, because we were free to do as we pleased. … Although we didn’t realize it at the time, our cross-country travels as the ‘Abernathy boys’ were at an end.”

A

statue commemorating the Abernathy boys was dedicated on the lawn of the Tillman County courthouse on April 22, 2006 – a month after what would have been Temple’s 102nd birthday. Their bronze figures oversee the town of Frederick’s annual Abernathy Day celebration, held the first Saturday in June. Although instilled with cowboy swagger, the likeness of 9-year-old Bud and 5-yearold Temple appear to be even smaller than their ages would suggest. After their celebrity childhood wound down with the coming of World War I, the boys enrolled in military school in San Antonio. Jack became a wildcatter, and relocated to Wichita Falls, Texas. Temple joined his father in the oil and gas business. Bud would go on to graduate from University of Oklahoma Law School, becoming a lawyer and, eventually, a judge. Near the end of his life, Temple Abernathy said: “We’d been royally entertained by some folks, and coldly turned away by others, and we’d always faced the question of whether it was worthwhile to go on. I’m glad we always pressed ahead. That is where the future is.” Editor’s note: This installment is part of author M.J. Alexander’s “77 Counties” series, chronicling her travels across Oklahoma. The full series is available at sliceok.com/travel/ SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 35


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The 14th annual Taste of Western returns this year to Will Rogers Theatre from 6-9p.m. Oct. 15th. Come and celebrate the restaurants that make our district delectable and also celebrate Oklahoma City’s distinct flavor of local art as we again take the event to the streets with the installation of three more murals into our district. This event is a fusion of art and cuisine, featuring delicious offerings from 10 of our restaurants paired with fine wine and entertainment for all. Tickets go on sale in September at tasteofwestern.com

Two convenient Oklahoma City locations 5101 N. Western Avenue

The festival will be held between NW 41st to NW 43rd streets with food trucks lining the new streetscape alongside the existing restaurants. A beer garden featuring local breweries will be located next to the Barrel. Although there will be food trucks, WestFest is to promote the existing bars, restaurants and retail that make this area unique. Visit westfestok.com for more information.

10900 Hefner Pointe Drive

Western Avenue Association serves to promote and facilitate the good times and good finds on Western Avenue through community engagement, small business support and everything in between. visitwesternavenue.com

405.848.2001 | fnbok.com Presenting Sponsor

Since 1917, banking the way it should be

live. dine. shop. play. explore.

For the premiere of WestFest, a new annual festival on historic Western Avenue, Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey is headlining the free event from noon to 10 p.m. Sept. 19 with local acts Tallows, Beau Jennings and the Tigers and DEERPEOPLE.


Up

From the

Ground

MOBILE BUSINESSES DRIVING AT FULL SPEED TO METRO-AREA STREET FESTIVALS

By Jill Hardy // Photos by Shannon Cornman

The food truck phenomenon took off in Oklahoma in a way that not many could have predicted. In just a few short years, it’s grown from a novelty into an integral part of a burgeoning street festival scene, providing Oklahomans with not only new culinary and entertainment pursuits, but unique business opportunities, as well.

Midtown’s H&8th, a monthly street festival situated at NW Eighth Street and Hudson Avenue, serves as a stellar example of how Oklahoma can take a common practice and put a unique spin on it. Not only is H&8th one of the region’s most popular street festivals, it’s become one of the largest in the U.S., regularly hosting thousands in what has, essentially, become a mini-village that pops up on the final Friday of each month. Other food truck-based festivals abound – Edmond’s Heard on Hurd and Premiere on Film Row are two popular choices – and their standard dates have been staggered well enough that those who long for the atmosphere of a pop-up festival can find one on practically any given week of the month. Food trucks alone can provide the base for any good festival, but the addition of mobile businesses to the mix arguably has built the Oklahoma street festival into its fully actualized self. The ability to walk around, listen to great music and browse through a few businesses – shopping for art or clothes, or playing games – extends the experience into something beyond standing and enjoying good food. Oklahoma City’s large area and low population density make it difficult for many to experience some of the typical metropolitan benefits, like the ability to walk from your front door to a coffee shop, boutique, eatery or concert venue. Efforts have been underway for quite a while to beef up public transportation and make Oklahoma City more walkable, more amenable to outdoor activity and more districtfocused, with some eye toward building more of that into our infrastructure. But there will always be limits as to how much a city can change, and there’s much about Oklahoma City that’s fine the way it is. The ever-expanding list of street festivals (and their growing roster of mobile businesses) have given some of us a chance to condense our community once a month and get a taste of concentrated urban life, while giving some others a chance to test the waters of small business ownership, in an atmosphere with significantly reduced overhead and a ready-made audience. The addition of Industry Flea – a booth market where vendors sell everything from vintage goods to old records, stationery or stuffed animals – to the H&8th event added one such opportunity maker, as well as the benefit of yet another chance to shop local, in a micro sense. But other independent mobile businesses have popped up as well, giving a depth to the street festival marketplace that not only illustrates its positive impact on the state’s culture, but possibly cements its status as a new fixture in our metro’s landscape. We’ve highlighted a few stand-outs here, pop-up entrepreneurs and artists who are helping to build the local movement, and possibly adding to the phenomenon that has helped our wide-spread population feel just a little closer for a few nights a month.

42 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015


MaKayla Mattingly showcases her Okie creations, from T-shirts and framed art to skateboards.

The Struggle Bus

MaKayla Mattingly had been selling her art and T-shirts through SHARING THE OKIE ESSENCE booths at local fairs and festivals for several years when inspiration struck: Why not just develop a self-contained vehicle to peddle her wares? Enter The Struggle Bus, Mattingly’s pale blue gallery on wheels. The moveable shop meant no more laborious breakdown and setup (welcome news for Mattingly’s father, who was helping her do both), and the ability to just pull up to any venue and open the door. “I actually had the idea for the mobile shop when I visited some friends in Dallas,” Mattingly says. “Dallas has amazing festivals and parks where there are always food trucks and vendors out and about. Lucky for me, Oklahoma City is starting to become an awesome, artsy area much like [Dallas].” Mattingly is encouraged by the rise in popularity of street festivals, and believes that it bodes well for her business. “It’s very exciting to see that my style and mobile shop will fit in perfectly with things like LIVE! on the Plaza, Paseo Art Walk and H&8th,” she says. And her style most certainly fits with any gathering of assorted Oklahomans. T-shirts and other items emblazoned with things like the old Indian Territory map, a dreamcatcher and a buffalo, or a single line from an old beloved song (“Mama Tried”), Mattingly tries to imbue her creations with a state pride that captures, in her words, “the essence of being an Okie.”

SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 43


Short Order Poems VERSE SUPPLIED WHILE YOU ABIDE

In 2014, Chad Reynolds and Timothy Bradford wanted to start a reading series, but didn’t want it to be a typical reading series. (You know, only attended by … reading series types. Not that there’s anything wrong with that.) With an eye toward creating something that would reach the general public, and with a written form that has generally fallen out of vogue (poetry), Reynolds posited the idea of something akin to Chicago’s Poems While You Wait. (Reynolds is a friend of the founder, Kathleen Rooney.) Bradford thought it was a great idea, as did H&8th director Brian Bergman, so Short Order Poems began dispensing verse that year. Patrons can visit the Short Order Poems table, fill out a form stating their desired subject matter, and return within 10 or 20 minutes to find a personalized poem, pecked out for them on a vintage typewriter. The poets have appeared in other festivals – notably deadCENTER and Art Moves – but H&8th is, in Bradford’s words, the group’s “bread and butter.” “There’s nothing like H&8th,” Bradford says. “The crowd, the atmosphere, the energy and the demand. We and the guest poets write between 40 and 60 poems in four hours, which is pretty amazing.” Guest poets have included a number of published and well-respected artists, including Kerri Shadid and Oklahoma Poet Laureate Benjamin Myers. When asked what Short Order Poems brings to festivals, Bradford eloquently explains. “Art, culture and the power of words. Plus, we’re directly communicating with our readers about something that matters, often deeply, to them,” he says. “We hope to remind people of the power and play of language. It is meditative, redemptive and joyful, but it requires attention and patience.”

44 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015


Timothy Bradford (left) and Chad Reynolds type poems at Elemental Coffee, where their journey with Short Order Poems began.

SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 45


Cargo Room owner Heather Parsons shows the fitting room in her mobile boutique.

The Cargo Room

Heather Parsons’ Fashion Merchandising degree initially led FASHION ON THE GO her into a standard industry position with a designer in New York. Longing for home and family brought her back to Oklahoma; a desire to do her own thing led her to investigate opening her own business; and the results of her research sent her scurrying into a job with an investment firm. But boredom with the button-down world eventually drove her back to her dream, and after a return to school for a Master’s in Entrepreneurship, Parsons felt she had the knowledge and planning skills to take the plunge of becoming a boutique owner. With a twist. Instead of a brick-and-mortar store – with its significant overhead and dependence on demographics for success – Parsons elected instead to create a boutique on wheels, The Cargo Room. Eighty-four square feet of charming clothing and accessories brightly lit through a large window and containing a diminutive dressing area, The Cargo Room is a marvel of interior planning holding a wealth of stylish offerings to browse. Parsons loves the opportunity to both develop a faithful following, and introduce herself to new customers at every event. She gives partial credit to the food truck boom for giving her the idea of a mobile boutique. “I looked at the food trucks, how much support Oklahoma has provided them,” Parsons says. “I thought it was a great opportunity for me to do something and get in on it, too.” As a mobile business owner, Parsons is also grateful for the chance to take part in a new and exciting development in the city’s social and economic life. “I’m amazed at how much support has been given to this idea, of local, mobile businesses. I think maybe 10 years ago, this wouldn’t have been possible. The direction our city is moving in, the opportunity it’s giving us … I feel very blessed to be a part of it.”

46 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015


Bridget Trowbridge opens the passage door to the Escape Crate, where curiosity draws you in and clues get you out.

The Escape Crate

The sight of a large shipping crate with the word POP-UP BRAIN GAME ESCAPE emblazoned on it might not seem like something you’d want to jump into, but if you’re looking for a way to add fun to your street festival experience, you should. A pared-down, mobile version of The Escape, a metro-area live action escape game where different scenarios are housed in rooms, The Escape Crate offers a quicker (15 minutes) and smaller version of its brick-and-mortar counterpart. Two to 4 players can hop in and take their best shots at solving the riddles and puzzles that will allow them to escape the crate – which is fully furnished and airconditioned, just in case you were wondering. (And yes, they let you out even if you don’t solve the puzzles.) Built out of an 8-foot by 20-foot shipping container, The Escape Crate represents another facet of the mobile business boom. While the “escape game” craze is one that’s sweeping the nation, The Escape Crate may be one of the first moveable versions, a distinction that The Escape’s marketing director, Bridget Trowbridge, explains

came from a realization that their company needed to adapt in a few different ways. “First, we realized that traditional marketing doesn’t work for our product due to its unusual nature,” Trowbridge says. “People really have to try it to understand how to play the game. This gives people a small chance to try it out without fully committing to a full hour of game play. “Secondly, we observed the influx of pop-up shops and food trucks, and thought there should be no reason our experience is limited to a store. We wanted to join in on all the festival fun, and it was worth it. We really enjoy the community atmosphere at OKC’s many outdoor markets and festivals,” she says. “We also recognized that corporate team building, as well as private parties, are a good portion of our guests, and wanted to provide a portable solution to cater to special events. The Crate answered all of our problems, and while it turned out to be a much bigger build than expected, our creative team had a blast developing the game.” The Crate definitely adds a dose of fun to an already festive atmosphere, and will give your brain a workout in the process. Double win.

SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 47


48 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015


Visions of Beauty LUXURIOUS LOOKS MAKE FASHION BLOOM IN THE DESERT BY TIMOTHY FIELDS // PHOTOS BY SIMON HURST

The arid sand dunes of Little Sahara State Park in northwest Oklahoma beckoned us. The desert’s constantly shifting, seemingly endless hills have a stark beauty all their own, making a perfect backdrop to showcase this season’s fashion. Enjoy!

Special thanks to model Sierrah Hull from Brink Model Management, make up artist Sharon Tabb and Oklahoma Parks and Tourism.

SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 49


Let your outfit show that your sense of style is not to be tangled with: a Missoni black-and-white wool poncho perfect for a desperado, paired with a Bailey44 check top and Paige black denim skinny jean. Available from Balliets in Classen Curve, along with Loeffler Randall gray leather satchel with fringe, Prada sunglasses with silver studs and Lucky Star silver hoop earrings with chain fringe. The field hat is the stylist’s own.

50 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015


SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 51


Knits are an outstanding staple for any closet – this Missoni Zebra knit dress answers the call in style. The gold earrings by Julie Vos and the Stella McCartney black kid suede bag with gold chain detail add a deftly fashionable finishing touch; all available at Balliets in Classen Curve.

52 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015


Eye-catching glamour in any conditions: CĂŠdric Charlier navy and black gown with Moschino gold cuffs, from The Consortium in Nichols Hills Plaza

SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 53


200 Park For Her hits the mark with this Bohemian look: Free People paisley print crepe dress with looseknit crochet vest, gold necklace and earrings by Sarah Briggs and a Hammitt tan leather bag that features gold grommet detailing with this season’s must-have detail – fringe.

54 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015


At the top of our list for this season are comfy cable-knit sweaters, and this Vince cable-knit cardigan in gray and cream native print tops off a sumptuously comfy weekend outfit when matched with boyfriend jeans and a heather longsleeved tee; from CK & Co. in Nichols Hills Plaza.

SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 55


FASHION {LOCAL}

PAID ADVERTISMENT

A SUCCESSFUL VISION

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A VA I L A B L E A T A VA I L A B L E A T A VA I L A B L E A T

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T & The Shoppes at Northpark N.W. 122nd & May | Oklahoma City | 405.748.5200 56 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

he optical industry is a quickly changing one; lens design is continually evolving, and frame styles need to adapt to fashion trends, and build on certain classic standards. For the customer who needs high-quality lenses and wants frames to fit their individual needs, finding an optical provider who can be counted on do all things well can be a challenge. Enter TSO Optical. For almost 30 years, Edmond’s TSO Optical has given its customers well-constructed, high-quality optical designs, as well as a full range of ophthalmic services, including routine eye exams, contact lens fittings and surgeries. TSO’s full-service lab means that lenses are cut on site, and they can also provide custom digital lenses. Most prescriptions can receive same-day service – including progressive no-line bifocals, which typically take up to two weeks with other providers. Owner Phil Clayton is passionate about remaining at the forefront of innovative products and services, and the commitment and dedication shows. For the customer searching for unique and modern eyewear, combined with the highest quality eye care and attention to detail, TSO Optical is the place to look.

3840 S Boulevard, Edmond | 405.341.6941 | tsooptical.com


New & Beautiful... hand-crafted mouth blown glass and silver jewelry

Painted Door gift boutique

®

Tuesday-Saturday 10am-6pm . 124 E. Sheridan . 405.235.4410 . Complimentary Gift Wrap! ©PDG2015


FASHION {LOCAL}

NICHOLS HILLS PLAZA | 6471 AVONDALE DRIVE 405.842.1478 | RMEYERSOKC.COM |

TRUNK SHOW SEPTEMBER 9-15

SIZES 2-16 10440 N. BROADWAY EXTENSION | 405.751.8888 | salonsparen.com

58 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

SHOPPES AT NORTHPARK • 12100 N. MAY • OKLAHOMA CITY (405) 748-7227 • SHOPNANCYS.COM


from 1-4

TRAINA Photography

2015

O k l a h o m a H i s t o ry C e n t e r 800 Nazih Zuhdi Drive, Oklahoma City admission $12 at the door; BOGO with pre-registration

405-206-2931 www.OKCPWG.com

SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 59

FASHION {LOCAL}

Sunday1 September 13


FASHION {LOCAL}

Grand Opening Event

YOUR CLOTHES THAT ARE TOO SMALL CAN DO

BIG THINGS FOR OTHERS. YOUR DONATIONS TO GOODWILL速 HELP FUND JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING FOR PEOPLE IN YOUR COMMUNITY.

At our campus corner location August 27, 6pm-9pm 3 Metiorons Locat

DONATE STUFF. CREATE JOBS.

588 Buchanan | Campus Corner | 405.928.4341 1201 N.W. 178th Street | Edmond | 405.359.1189 7302 N. Western Avenue | OKC | 405.242.3255

60 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

TO FIND YOUR NEAREST DONATION CENTER GO TO GOODWILL.ORG


FARE A HAPPY HARBOR FOR DINERS

SHANNON CORNMAN

It fills a niche for noshing with its gourmet corn dog menu and ample bar – come sail away to Anchor Down. See page 62.

SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 61


FARE | Matters of Taste

on.” The one we had was a boar sausage (it’s spicy, surprisingly light and not at all gamey), accompanied by a ferocious ghost pepper ranch dipping sauce. Roger – the classic, where the kitchen demonstrates that they can excel at execution, as well as innovation; a simple all-beef dog dipped in “OG” batter, with yellow mustard and ketchup. And if you’re not feeling meaty at the moment, there are still a couple of tempting options: the Guard Dog is a Field Roast frank dipped in masa batter (both vegan components) and served with a maple mustard that’s

AAnchorBON VOYAGE Down, Deep Deuce’s new port of call By Steve Gill // Photos by Shannon Cornman THINK ABOUT SPECIALIZATION. It’s one of the reasons humanity invented civilization in the first place; so that not everyone would have to be hunting and gathering all the time, and some people could concentrate on making bread or hats instead. In terms of restaurants, it’s often a function of population – a small town might have one diner, a larger town can also support a pizza place and a Mexican restaurant, et cetera. The bigger a city is, the more variety it can support, and with more disposable income for its residents comes a greater willingness to experiment a little more in ideas. All of which is to say that the mere existence of a bar that specializes in gourmet corn dogs should indicate enough about OKC’s development 62 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

to put a smile on your face. And once you actually try Anchor Down in Deep Deuce … well, keep that smile handy. Each entry on the corn dog menu comes with chips (which are fine if not remarkable) and is served in two half-sized versions (“puppies,” so to speak) – the better to trade and share with a comrade in consumption: Bird – chicken sausage speckled with pepper; the onion in the batter is more aromatic than overpoweringly sharp in flavor, so don’t let that be a deterrent. There’s more tang in the accompanying onion dip, and it’s delicious, which is not something I ever expected to say about onion dip. Wild – the ingredients vary, described on the menu as “whatever we get our hands

something of a house specialty; meanwhile, the Cheese Dog is a battered slab of Tilamook cheddar with a luscious rosemary-spiked tomato gravy. Plus, whether you order them as the starters they ostensibly are, according to the menu, or the dessert they are in spirit, don’t overlook the gooey strawberry fritters with vanilla sugar: they are basically the earthly reflections of the funnel cakes we will someday eat in heaven. As rewarding as the corn dogs alone are for your inner child and outer flavor aficionado, the bar part of the equation is equally inviting, thanks to its well-chosen beer taps, specialty cocktails and even combinations of both. I can hardly overstate how thoroughly I relished the Old Bessie, a draw of the hefty Left Hand brew Milk Stout Nitro that was jazzed up with doses of bourbon and ginger honey liqueur. And my brother, who was back in town visiting after moving to near University of Texas, was impressed by the presence of Austin Eastciders on the drinks menu – their craft ciders are apparently trendy and legit. All in all, Anchor Down makes an easily recommendable hangout spot and fills a niche we as a metro are fortunate to have. The menu isn’t huge, and its range is pretty specific, so if you’re in the mood for, say, a light salad, you might want to keep moving. But if you’re looking for some excellent drinks with gustatory accompaniment you can’t find anywhere else, set sail and enjoy.

ANCHOR DOWN

30 NE 2 St., OKC | 405.605.8070 facebook.com/anchordownokc Tuesday–Saturday 4 p.m.-2 a.m.


QUICK TIPS

Red marks the spot. You honestly shouldn’t need the street address, because nothing else nearby looks like this distinctive establishment. Just get somewhere in the vicinity of NE Second Street and Oklahoma Avenue and look for the bright red shipping containers. Plan for parking. With the success of the urban living model (and tenant bustle) in the neighboring Level, Mosaic and Maywood developments, streetside parking is a dicey proposition – it might be easier to carry a little cash and use the Bricktown lot that opens north off E Main Street. There’s even a staircase up the hillside. Don’t wait to be noticed. During peak hours, a waiter provides cocktail service to outdoor tables, but you can’t go wrong by stepping up to the bar.

SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 63


FARE | In the Kitchen

CHARGER BURGER

1 pound ground chuck 1 pound pork sausage (hot or regular) 2 teaspoons seasoning salt pepper to taste sliced pepper jack cheese 1 package potato slider buns ½ pound bacon, cooked crispy fresh tomato, sliced fresh lettuce Preheat a grill to medium-high heat. In a medium-sized bowl, combine the ground chuck and sausage. Divide the meat mixture into 12 balls and form into burger patties. Right before grilling, sprinkle the burgers with seasoning salt and pepper. Place on grill and cook to desired temperature. Five minutes before the burgers are done, top them with the pepper jack cheese slices and cook until melted. Remove from heat, and place on the slider buns with a dollop of my secret sauce on the top bun, then build your burger with bacon, tomato and lettuce.

SASSY’S SECRET BURGER SAUCE ¾ cup mayonnaise 2 tablespoons ketchup 2 tablespoons Wickle’s Pickle Relish 1 teaspoon sugar 1 teaspoon minced onion 1 teaspoon white vinegar teaspoon Tabasco

Mix all of the ingredients in a small bowl and store in an airtight container for future burgers and sandwiches.

TAILGATING TREATS

By Caryn Ross // Photos by Carli Wentworth

IT NEVER FAILS: As soon as school starts, my house goes into full football mode. Being the mom of a varsity football player, we do a lot of tailgating. In fact, at Heritage Hall, all the fans tailgate before every away game. No matter if we are in Cushing or Kingfisher, we roll out the grills and tables. These tailgates are all about fellowship, football and, of course, food. You can find almost any food: homemade dolmas to stroganoff. So I use this captive audience many times to try out new recipes. I’ve found that one staple of a good tailgate is the slider – small, portable bites that hit the spot yet allow for enjoying other food, too. Therefore, I’m always trying out new and fun twists on the classic burger. My latest favorite is what I like to call the Charger Burger. It’s a blend of ground chuck and pork sausage topped with a pepper jack cheese and bacon; the kicker is my Sassy’s Secret Burger Sauce. It’s simple to make and adds a powerful punch to any burger. Another favorite is fried cheese curds. I have loved to get bags of this “squeaky” cheese for years, but once I had them fried, I was in love. It’s a hybrid of sorts, where a hush puppy meets a grilled cheese sandwich in one bite. All I can say is once you make them, be ready to make more – so addictive, and I have yet to find someone who doesn’t love them. Experiment with your cheese curd flavors; some of my family’s favorites are jalapeño, bacon and onion. 64 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

FRIED CHEESE CURDS

Vegetable oil (for frying) 1 cup self-rising flour 1 cup milk 1 egg, beaten 1 teaspoon sugar 1 teaspoon seasoning salt 1 (9-ounce) package fresh cheese curds, room temperature Heat oil in a large Dutch oven or fryer until it reaches a temperature of 375 degrees. In a medium-sized bowl, combine the flour, milk, egg, sugar and seasoning salt. Add cheese curds and place a scoop of dough into oil, then fry until golden brown. Drain the cooked curds on a wire rack and serve warm.


For over 21 years, Second Chance Animal Sanctuary, a non-profit organization operating solely on donations from kind and loving people, has been working to help homeless dogs and cats find their way to a safe, permanent and loving home. We are a no-kill facility, so each pet we bring to our sanctuary will remain there until they are either adopted, or fostered by one of our many foster families. Please keep us in mind when you are in search of a new pet!

Why SWAT yourself… when you can SWAT your yard! CALL THE PROFESSIONALS TODAY!

Installation of permanent systems Monthly yard and event fogging We service any existing system

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405.610.SWAT (7928) • www.SWATokc.com

SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 65


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There’s something about LIVE entertainment! Arcadia • Sept.18-27 Acts of War, Three One-Act Operas • Sept. 24-27 Richard O’Brien’s

The Rocky Horror Show, rated R • Oct. 30-Nov. 7 Oklahoma Festival Ballet’s

The Nutcracker • Dec. 4-13 Young Choreographers’ Showcase • Jan. 28-31 The Trojan Women • Feb. 12-21 Eugene Onegin • March 3-6 Thoroughly Modern Millie • April 8-17 Contemporary Dance Oklahoma • April 29-May 7 Announcing Ragtime • Oct. 16-18 You can add this special event to your season.

Buy your season tickets today! OU FINE ARTS BOX OFFICE

(405) 325-4101 theatre.ou.edu The University of Oklahoma is an equal opportunity institution. www.ou.edu/eoo

68 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

UNIVERSITY THEATRE

LIVE

2015-2016 THEATRE SEASON

The UNIVERSITY of OKLAHOMA®

photo by Mutz Photography


TRAVEL & OUTDOORS

OKC’S NEW ROWING FUSION FITNESS STUDIO

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SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 69


TRAVEL & OUTDOORS

The Sooner Theatre Theatre • Concerts • Classes

You’re A James McMurtry Good Man, in concert Nov. 6, 2015 Charlie Brown Oct. 16-18 & 23-25, 2015

Patty Griffin in concert

w/Darlingside Nov. 14, 2015

Home For The Delbert McClinton Bonnie & Clyde Holidays: A The Musical in concert April 8-10 & March 10, 2016 Celebration for 15-17, 2016 the Entire Family Dec. 9-13, 2015

Season and individual tickets ON SALE NOW! 101 E Main St. • Downtown Norman • (405) 321-9600

www.soonertheatre.com

See the world. Visit an Oklahoma Museum.

Oklahoma offers more than 500 museums and cultural attractions across all 77 counties of our great state. A journey around the world is only a short trip to your local Oklahoma museum.

www.okmuseums.org EDUCATE• INFORM• ENTERTAIN• 70 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015


PURSUITS

NOTHING BUT HIGH NOTES

COURTESY OKC PHILHARMONIC

All tuned up and ready to represent, the OKC Philharmonic kicks off a fresh series of colossal concerts. See page 74.

TOP 10 Prime starting points for making the most of the month 72

175 DEGREES OF ART Small creations enable huge rewards for creativity at OVAC’s 12 x 12 Art Fundraiser 79

IT’S GALILEO’S WORLD … A new exhibit at the University of Oklahoma showcases a scientific treasure trove 76

CRUISING CUISINE Luxury cruise liners have elevated their culinary feats 80

BIGGER, BETTER BLOCK BLOWOUT The Plaza District celebrates its growth with a party par excellence 78

SEE & DO September’s music, theater, visual arts and other delights 83 SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 71


PURSUITS | High Points

The Top By Steve Gill

IT’S A BIG, BUSY METRO OUT THERE – IF YOU CAN’T MAKE IT TO EVERYTHING, HERE’S WHERE TO START.

WATCH THE ROTATION

Sept. 18-19, OCCC Theater The OKC Ballet season generally doesn’t start until October, but this year they’re putting a slightly different spin on proceedings with a special blast from their past. Spectacular cellist Zoe Keating performs live during Exurgency, a whirl of abstract contemporary dance that turned heads when it debuted in 2014, and two world premieres from choreographer Brian Enos and OKC principal dancer Yui Sato seal the deal.

ALL THAT JAZZ

RENEWED ELEGANCE

Sept. 11, OKC Golf & Country Club This is a noteworthy milestone for the OKC Museum of Art’s Renaissance Ball – 2015 marks the 40th iteration of the gala – but while the tradition becomes more venerable with passing years, the occasion itself still feels glamorously fresh and filled with discovery. Perfectly fitting for an annual celebration of rebirth. Enjoy cocktails, dinner, dancing and black-tie refinement to enable more wonders in the Museum’s future.

THE PLACE TO PARTY

Sept. 19, 4200 Block of Western Avenue It’s probably a sign that things are going well for your city if its residents keep organizing more and more public festivals to have fun hanging out with their neighbors. Presenting West Fest, a free block party along the recently renovated stretch of Western Avenue that boasts a local beer garden, food trucks and musical entertainment headlined by the fabulous Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey. It’s a new event; help start it off right. 72 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

Bert Seabourn, “Sitting Bull”

Riding the Wind

Sept. 10-Jan. 9, Oklahoma Hall of Fame Museum

“My art is like the Oklahoma wind,” says Bert Seabourn, “constantly changing, growing and finding new directions.” Over the course of his career, its primary direction has been toward increased acclaim, as the painter has won a raft of awards and become a true cultural ambassador for the state. The new exhibit Bert Seabourn: American Expressionist offers a closer look at the oeuvre of one of Oklahoma’s living treasures.

PHOTOS: EXURGENCY COURTESY OKC BALLET, “SITTING BULL” COURTESY OKLAHOMA HALL OF FAME MUSEUM

Sept. 21-26, Downtown OKC The key word is “all” – the second annual OKC Jazz Festival is a musical cavalcade that will recognize Kent Kidwell, welcome guest performers including pianist David Benoit and the U.S. Navy Band, and suffuse downtown with sound all week: performance locations include Deep Deuce for the kickoff concert, the OKC Civic Center, the bank of the Oklahoma River, Bicentennial Park, various restaurants and the OKC Museum of Art roof terrace.


A New Song

Sept. 25-27, Guthrie Cottonwood Flats

Music remains one of the best ways to bring people together – that’s why the organizers of Guthrie’s new TALOA Festival (its name is derived from a Choctaw word for “to sing”) have worked to make the lineup for this initial gathering a mixture of genres and styles appealing to multiple ages and encouraging cross-cultural commingling. Oklahoma legend Leon Russell, Graham Colton, Earphunk, ZOOGMA, The New Deal and many, many more.

Leon Russell

ABSTRACT THOUGHT

Sept. 24-Oct. 17, Howell Gallery It would be presumptuous to declare what any Dennis Johnson abstract means; the painter himself prefers to leave that determination to individual viewers. On the other hand, the career retrospective on display at the Nichols Hills gallery definitely represents an unmatched opportunity to engage with such a broad spectrum of the renowned OKC artist’s richly colored work, as it includes pieces from the 1980s up through the last year.

Dennis Johnson, “Fulcrum”

PHOTOS: LEON RUSSELL COURTESY TALOA; “FULLCRUM” COURTESY HOWELL GALLERY; HERITAGE HILLS COURTESY HERITAGE HILLS

RAPPERS, DELIGHT

Sept. 12, Grand Casino OK, seriously, look at this list: Biz Markie. Young MC. Rob Base. Vanilla Ice. DJ Kool. Tone Loc. The Shawnee casino’s Rappin’ Up the Summer blowout is an outdoor event, which is probably for the best because this much old-school rap star power collected in one place might tear the roof off any building you could name. Don’t just sit there – bust a move toward ticket acquisition.

ALL THE WORLD’S A SCREEN

Sept. 4-26, Carpenter Square Theater While the staff of this small movie house doesn’t find itself swept away through the magic of movies into realms of fantasy and romance (it’s less Cinema Paradiso and more cinema ennui), the overlapping fragments of their mundane days add up to a wry, poignant, richly characterized whole in Pulitzer winner The Flick. Join Carpenter Square as the curtain rises on its new season.

A JOURNEY FOR THE AGES

Sept. 26-27, Heritage Hills At once vintage and vibrant, carefully preserved and happily used, the titular stops on the annual Heritage Hills Historic Homes Tour represent architecturally engaging examples of how the past and present can coexist – temporal housemates, if you will. Each of the six participating homes and the Overholser Mansion will offer the opportunity for exploration on the excursion, and it’s self-guided, so take your time. SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 73


PURSUITS | Spotlight

Feb. 6
- Symphonie Fantastique! Special guest: Andrea Segar, violin Program highlights: He Zhanhao and Chen Gang’s The Butterfly Lovers Violin Concerto, Symphonie Fantastique by Berlioz   March 5 - Grieg’s Piano Concerto Special guest: Jon Nakamatsu, piano Program highlights: Prokofiev’s Symphony #5, Grieg’s Piano Concerto   April 2 - A Night at the Opera Special guest: Sarah Coburn, Soprano Program highlights: Wagner’s prelude to Die Meistersinger, Rossini’s La Cenerentola Overture
 Sarah Coburn

ORCHESTRATING A SEASON OF HIGHLIGHTS

By Steve Gill

A MUSICAL COMPOSITION THAT STARTS OUT AT FULL INTENSITY and continues without abatement would quickly grow cacophonous – but a season of musical performances in which each concert is an utter blast is not only a promising idea, but on the verge of getting underway. The OKC Philharmonic has lined up a slate of 14 installments in its Classics and Pops Series between now and May 2016, and there’s not a sour note in the bunch. “Every concert just has something special about it,” says Executive Director Eddie Walker, citing the 15-percent increase over last year’s sales at this point in the calendar as an indication of the energy and overall zest this season has in store. CLASSICS SERIES Sept. 12 - Gala Opening Night Special guest: Emanuel Ax, piano Program highlights: Stravinsky’s Firebird Suite, Brahms’ Piano Concerto #2 Music isn’t the only spec  tacle this season has in Oct. 17 – Tall Tales, Magic and Majesty store – the Orchestra Special guest: Augustin Hadelich, violin 
 League’s inaugural Maestro’s Ball is set for Program highlights: The Sorcerer’s Apprentice by Oct. 17, and in addition Dukas, Sibelius’ Violin Concerto to a lavish dinner and   party, they’re building Nov. 21 - Paradise, Sizzle and Storm off the concert’s theme Special guest: Joshua Roman, cello of “Tall Tales, Magic and Program highlights: Bates’ Cello Concerto, Majesty” by welcoming international man of legBeethoven’s Symphony #6 (Pastorale) erdemain Rob Lake for an   eye-popping show. Visit Jan. 9
- A Masterpiece; A Surprise okcorchestraleague.org Special guest: Stephen Hough, piano for tickets before the Program highlights: Tchaikovsky’s Symphony #6 opportunity vanishes. (Pathetique), Dvorak’s Piano Concerto (an Oklahoma City premiere!)

A Magical Evening

74 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

May 14 - A Philharmonic Gala Program highlights: Bernstein’s “West Side Story” Symphonic Dances, Mussorgsky’s Pictures at an Exhibition DIRECTOR’S COMMENTARY: “Augustin Hadelich is someone we’ve been trying to bring to Oklahoma City for, I’d say, four years. We’re also featuring two artists in this Classics series who are from Oklahoma: Joshua Roman and Sarah Coburn, who have international careers, so that’s going to be special. The other thing about this season is that it offers some of the best classical repertoire out there, from Pictures at an Exhibition to the Firebird Suite to Tchaikovsky’s Pathetique Symphony. “Joshua Roman is going to do the Mason Bates cello concerto, which was composed for him – it’s energetic, it’s exciting, I think the audience is going to love it. We’re doing the Butterfly Concerto; totally unknown to us, we weren’t familiar with the piece, but [Robert] Moody, who is the guest conductor, had done it and said ‘Take a listen to this’ – and we fell in love with it. Never been done here before. I think Joel [Maestro Joel Levine] has done a fantastic job of putting the classics together.”    POPS SERIES Nov. 13-14 - The Music of the Eagles An orchestral take on one of the best-selling bands of all time. Walker grins, “We’re going to offer this music in a way that the Eagles can’t. ‘Desperado’ and ‘Hotel California’ with lush strings, ‘Heartache Tonight’ with a pounding brass section behind it – it’s going to be an Eagles experience that nobody but an orchestra can offer.”


Something for the Kids On top of all these musical goings-on, the orchestra also wants to instill a love of instrumental performance in the next generation of listeners – so kids aged 4 to 13 are invited to the hour-long educational concerts of the Discovery Family Series. Calling this year’s “maybe our best ever,” Walker enthuses about the opening cowboythemed Wild, Wild West performance; the closer Peter and the Wolf; and in between, a jazz/blues/ gospel-fueled celebration of Black History Month.

Dec. 3-5 - The Christmas Show The theme is the same from year to year, but with the help of guest singer Michele Ragusa the show that’s been an OKC family hit for two decades remains fresh, fun and festive. Jingle jingle!   Jan. 29-30 - Do You Hear the People Sing? A surge of musical power from the creative team behind Les Miserables, Miss Saigon and more Broadway shows. “I saw this in Indianapolis when they premiered it,” says Walker. “Full orchestra, big chorus – you’re just kind of in tears at the end.” Feb. 19-20 - The Name’s Bond. James Bond. The most famous four notes since Beethoven’s Fifth are only the beginning in an evening packed with music from the Bond series and other spy thrillers. Dame Shirley Bassey is not expected to perform Goldfinger, sadly, but the show will still impress the living daylights out of listeners.

March 18-19 - Kristin Chenoweth in Concert! Definitely a highlight among highlights, the triumphant return of OKC’s own Emmy- and Tony-winning singer and actress will be a new, smashing production that will, we fearlessly predict, be a sellout. Do not sleep on tickets. May 6-7 - Classic FM Radio Hits A symphonic tour of five decades of classic rock and pop, Walker says it spans “from Frankie Valli to Simon and Garfunkel, and everything between and beyond: ABBA, Neil Diamond, the Beatles.”     More information about any or all of these shows is waiting at okcphilharmonic. org, or call 842.5387 to discuss tickets for the season, individual shows or flexible mini-packages.

SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 75


PURSUITS | Spotlight

A 1632 copy of Galileo’s “Dialogo,” containing notes in his own handwriting.

“Every Oklahoman has the right to take pride that a little bit of Tuscany has been planted in our soil.” – KERRY MAGRUDER

IT’S GALILEO’S WORLD

WE JUST LIVE IN IT By Bobby Anderson

AS THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA CELEBRATES ITS 125TH ANNIVERSARY this fall, the stars truly will align when a first-of-itskind historical exhibition comes to seven locations across the university’s three campuses. OU Libraries is sponsoring Galileo’s World, which has pooled all 12 first-edition manuscripts the noted Italian astronomer, physicist, engineer, philosopher and mathematician published during his lifetime. Four of those editions contain Galileo’s own handwriting. The exhibition will feature 300 rare books, instrument replicas, digital resources and student projects in 20 themed exhibits. Kerry Magruder, curator of the university’s History of Science collections, notes this will be the first time all 12 Galileo manuscripts will be on display at any one time in world history. 76 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

“It’s a wonderful opportunity for the public to come,” Magruder says. “Every Oklahoman has the right to take pride that a little bit of Tuscany has been planted in our soil.” The works will be on display in Norman, Oklahoma City and Tulsa. In addition to Bizzell Memorial Library, Norman sites include the Sam Noble Museum, the National Weather Center, Headington Hall student residence center and the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. The Robert M. Bird Health Sciences Library on the OU Health Sciences campus in Oklahoma City also will host exhibits, as will the Schusterman Library at OU-Tulsa. Planning began in 2012, and different portions of Bizzell have undergone renovation since to coincide with the exhibition and anniversary … including a one-tenth scale model of the Tower of Pisa being installed by the College of Engineering. The exhibition officially opened Aug. 1, but Magruder expects most to get their first look during the open house set for Sept. 5 from noon to 5 p.m. The event intentionally coincides with Oklahoma’s first home football game against Akron, which kicks off at 6 p.m. OU’s History of Science Collection dates back to 1949, when oilman and alumnus Everette Lee Degolyer loaned 129 rare history of science volumes to the university. The collection now approaches 100,000 volumes, which are stored in climate-controlled vaults in the library. “It’s a special collection known to researchers around the world,” says Magruder, noting an endowed fellowship exists allowing scholars to travel to Norman to study the works. “Every student at the university can take a course (on the subject). Every semester, students are working with rare books at our reading room just as they might work with a state-of-the-art microscope. “This part of the experience we have always given our students. What we have not done is make it available to the public, and that’s what we’re doing.” Galileo was a titan in his field. Albert Einstein called him the father of modern science.


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Pages from astronomer Peter Apian’s “Cosmographia,” 1545

This will be the first time all 12 Galileo manuscripts will be on display at any one time in world history.

Noted skeptic Stephen Hawking ceded Galileo probably had more responsibility for the birth of modern science that anyone else in history. A $500,000 endowment from the university’s athletic department made possible the acquisition of three of Galileo’s works. “How many Big 12 athletic programs are donating rare books to the library?” Magruder says. “I think this is an illustration of the remarkable vision (Athletic Director) Joe Castiglione and the athletic department has for the university experience.” Galileo’s World Project Coordinator Chelsea Julian highly recommends those planning a visit to check galileo.ou.edu first. “It’s been set up to be very accessible,” Julian says. “You don’t have to be very knowledgeable about science in general to get a lot out of it.” For those who can’t attend, Julian said each work is currently being digitized and put on display online. Links to lesson plans also will be available. “That, in itself, is another presentation of the library moving just beyond a book,” Julian says. “We are a service for the community.”

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SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 77


PURSUITS | Spotlight

BIGGER, BETTER BLOCK BLOWOUT

By Steve Gill // Photos courtesy Plaza District

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78 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

TO SAY THAT OKC’S PLAZA DISTRICT has been having a good decade would be a fairly colossal understatement – the stretch of NW 16 Street went from largely overlooked to rejuvenated to bustling to booming, and the progression hasn’t stopped yet. That exceptional growth gives its residents, retailers, restaurants and supporters plenty to celebrate, so in the short term, don’t expect the area to be any less crowded: the Plaza District Festival returns Sept. 26. This annual shindig is the (much) bigger brother to the monthly gathering LIVE! on the Plaza; Plaza District Executive Director Cayla Lewis explains that the festival encompasses more visual artists, live music onstage, more activities, more food trucks … “It’s more of a huge block party,” she says. “I would say it’s LIVE! on the Plaza amped up quite a bit.” Speaking of enlargement, she adds that the festival’s growth mirrors the district’s. “Whereas three or four years ago we were expecting 8,000 [visitors], now we’re expecting around 30,000.” The event is free to explore from noon to 10 p.m., and in addition to the tastes, sounds, playfulness and overall fun (including a blanket fort), attendees will receive something that can’t be faked: grassroots authenticity. “It’s a celebration of ‘local,’” Lewis says. “We have only local musicians, only local artists, all of our businesses are locally owned … it’s like all of your friends are gathered together to do what they’re really good at or to enjoy each other’s company.” Bigger genuinely is better sometimes. Get a full list of performers and more information at plazadistrictfestival.com, and get ready to add yourself to the mix.


PURSUITS | Spotlight

NOTEWORTHY NEWBIES

Sue Moss Sullivan, “Shelter”

175 DEGREES OF ART OVAC HOSTS 26TH ANNUAL 12X12, SUPPORTING LOCAL ARTISTS STATEWIDE

By Mark Beutler OKLAHOMA CITY HAS GROWN BY LEAPS AND BOUNDS in becoming a bigleague city. It’s not just sports and the Thunder putting us on the proverbial map; it’s a passion for the arts, as well. Since 1988, the Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition, or OVAC, has helped artists throughout the state realize their full potential through education, exposure and funding. One of the year’s most colorful events of the year takes place Sept. 11 when OVAC hosts the 26th annual 12x12 Art Fundraiser. “It is truly one of the best events of the year,” says OVAC Executive Director Holly Moye. “With work from 175 Oklahoma artists, we feature art measured 12 inches square. Visitors can bid on work to support our efforts in a silent, blind auction. With bids starting at only $175, 12x12 remains an exciting way to begin or grow an art collection.” In addition to bidding on artwork, guests can enjoy live music from local acts, and sample flavors from some of the city’s favorite restaurants. The Science Museum

Oklahoma’s mezzanine will be converted into a chic lounge and bustling art gallery for the evening’s event. “The 12x12 Art Fundraiser largely supports our grant-giving program,” Moye says. “Last year, we awarded over $37,000 to Oklahoma visual artists. These grants are crucial in helping them create visual art for public presentation, develop their professional practices and lead community projects.” The organization itself grew from a group of artists who got together for drinks and discussed the lack of opportunities for artists in Oklahoma, Moye said. “The issues brought forth from the ‘Café Society,’ as they called themselves, spurred John McNeese into creating an organization that would not only bring artists together, but also provide them with the funds and foundations to building a professional practice,” she says. More than 1,700 Oklahoma artists benefit from the work OVAC does throughout the year. They reach audiences numbering

Artists who are asked to participate in 12X12 will create works specifically designed for the event. Last year, Moye said nearly all the art was sold, prompting them to increase the number of artists this year from 150 to 175 and thus giving guests a look at several new participating artists. Norman painter Jason Cytacki’s works examine the American character and its construction throughout history, popular culture and mythology, and explore the way Americans view themselves and their country. Choctaw metal artist Dan Garrett has experimented with many art forms, and now prefers working with metal and mixed media. Sunni Mercer from Bethany is a widely exhibited sculpture artist whose work is archived at the Smithsonian Institution, and has been featured in more than 100 publications. Oklahoma City’s Marissa Raglin is a mixed-media artist who creates simplistic, harmonious collages with images found in vintage books and postcards – mostly plucked from thrift stores. Her most recent work combines multiple layers and textures, creating one unified composition, telling one story. Other new artists this year include Oklahoma City’s Desmond Mason, and Claremore’s John Hammer. “I would love for Slice readers to know that by attending the 12X12 Art Fundraiser, you are making Oklahoma a place where art and artists thrive,” Moye says. “Any support, big or small, contributes to raising the profile of our state as a hub of creativity and a better place to live.”

in the thousands, allowing them to focus on their creative work and make communities better places to live. “Our programs support artists in creating compelling work,” Moye says, “connecting them with a comprehensive network. We also offer artists professional development workshops, project funding, information resources and career-boosting awards.” Visit the OVAC website at ovac-ok.org for tickets. SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 79


PURSUITS | Getting Away

Cruising Cuisine

AMID SOME NEGATIVE HEADLINES ABOUT CRUISES, THE PUBLIC HAS MISSED OUT ON HEARING ABOUT INCREDIBLE CULINARY CHANGES TAKING PLACE ON THE HIGH SEAS. By Caryn Ross

Foodies travel hundreds of miles to satisfy their culinary curiosity. What if I told you that without grabbing a cab you can dine at some of the finest restaurants the world has to offer? Eat at a celebrity chef’s restaurant? How about an exclusive nine-course meal prepared by an executive chef for 20 guests only? If that tempts your taste buds, consider booking a cruise. You might be surprised at what’s cooking on the ocean. Cruising has become the new foodie heaven. It is now all about the total experience of dining. The cruise industry as a whole has made huge strides in moving away from the “eating constantly” concept to more of an elegant dining atmosphere. In the past, cruise lines encouraged bigger, bolder buffets for breakfasts and lunches, then forced passengers to pick a set dinner time for the week and eat while sitting with strangers. Well, the passengers demanded change, and the industry got on board. 80 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

NOT YOUR MAMA’S BUFFET

However close the concepts might seem, dining and eating are not the same in execution. The higher-end cruise lines still provide a buffet; however, instead of colossal mounds of food, it is about well-prepared foods. Salads are created in front of you as you stand in line, and international cuisines are represented with imported cheeses and meats, as well as the more traditional dishes. The difference is in the preparation, and plating each small portion. The buffet option is always available, and frankly, when traveling with small children, it is a superb choice.

THE JUICY DETAILS

Recently, I had the opportunity to travel on three different cruise lines. Each had its own perspective on cuisine. All did a phenomenal job of bringing unique and intimate dining to passengers. I was the impressed with Norwegian Cruise Line’s Getaway ship. The Getaway is one of the newest “mega ships” based out of Miami, and cuisine is their No. 1 concern. In fact, they were the first to introduce the concept of Freestyle Dining. Gone are the days when passengers are forced to dine at a particular time and table with people they may or may not know. Norwegian Cruise Line (NCL) recognized that their passengers wanted more dining options and f lexibility, so they switched to a straightforward concept: The Getaway offered 28 different dining options. Some restaurants are included in the price of the cruise while others had a nominal surcharge. This way, passengers could choose each night whether they might be in the mood for Italian or French, or would just prefer to sit topside enjoying a burger and beer. The option is theirs, and they welcome it.


Norwegian Getaway on the Caribbean Sea

Norwegian Cruise Line offers a more individualized approach to dining, with custom pastas, crepes and more.

PHOTOS: NCL GETAWAY ©DANNY LEHMAN; PASTA STATION AND DELMONICO STEAK ©JOHN MONTANA; CREPE STATION BY GEORGE CONTORAKES

LIFESTYLES OF THE RICH AND FAMOUS

While on board the higher-end luxury ships, you will find that the high seas have lured some of the most famous restaurants in the world, as well as celebrity chefs. The Getaway plays host to Geoffrey Zakarian’s Ocean Blue restaurant. Here, you dine at sea while enjoying some of the most creative and delicious dishes fresh from the ocean. Another exquisite dining experience is on board Holland America’s Eurodam. It offers an exclusive special evening when the ship transforms one of its existing restaurants into New York’s Le Cirque. The menu, china and flatware are all from the famed Manhattan eatery; even the art on the walls was changed to emulate what you would find in New York. The kitchen staff – trained by Le Cirque’s own chefs on their most popular dishes – provides a dining

treat that makes you forget you’re at sea, as if you instead were dining in New York City among the rich and famous.

PLAY WITH YOUR FOOD

Interactive specialty restaurants also have been added to cruise lines’ already outstanding restaurant options. While cruising with Celebrity onboard the Silhouette, we loved dining at the top of the ship. The Lawn Club Grill transforms the top of the vessel with a green grass exterior to make a quasipark atmosphere with an intimate outdoor dining experience. We enjoyed making gourmet appetizer pizzas, which included tossing the dough and assembling the toppings. The main course included perfectly cooked steaks that melt in your mouth. If you’re up for a culinary adventure, then don’t miss Qsine. This restaurant focuses on

Grilled Delmonico steak with roasted shallots and watercress from the Ocean Blue Restaurant by Geoffrey Zakarian.

the world of food with dramatic presentations. Dishes range from sushi lollipops to a Mediterranean dollhouse filled with 12 compartments, each containing a unique dish. And the Rubik’s Cube dessert menu? A brilliant finish. SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 81


PURSUITS | Getting Away

The creativity in each and every dish is delightful. NCL also offered their take on an authentic Brazilian Steakhouse called Moderno Churrascaria. There, we turned our cards over to green and dined on perfectly seared and roasted meats cut freshly from a hot skewer, or a fish filet cooked in a banana leaf. The salad bar was filled with typical Brazilian dishes, including a freshly prepared ceviche. Each meal was memorable because of the phenomenal presentation, as well as the fun atmosphere they created.

FOR THE DIY CROWD

Cooking classes at sea are also a new addition to activities on many ships. Some have seminars provided by their chefs, wine tastings and even napkin folding instructions. NCL has taken the seminar approach a step further by providing “hands on” pastry decorating classes sponsored by The Cake Boss. Each participant

Double Wedding Ring Quilt, 1940. Pieced cotton plain weave top, cotton plain weave back and binding; quilted. Gift of the Pilgrim / Roy Collection, 2014.1945. Photograph © 2015 Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

.

A Potential End to Chronic Suffering The cake-decorating class provides sweet results.

receives his or her own set of cupcakes or an entire cake to decorate, depending on the class that day, which is taught by the executive pastry chef. They show a variety of techniques ranging from working with fondant to using pastry bags and decorating tips. Perhaps most impressive was that each class focused on a different decorating concept. One class was all about cupcakes; another taught us how to make an ocean-inspired cake out of fondant. I was truly amazed at the excellent instruction, but better yet were the delicious confections we took back to the stateroom.

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82 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

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If you consider yourself a serious foodie, then you won’t want to miss NCL’s The Chefs Table. This event is only offered one night for the first 20 people who have pre-reserved the dining experience. Your evening begins by being escorted to The Haven, an ultra-private dining room where the chef prepares a two and one-half hour, nine-course meal, including wine pairings for each course. It’s unlike anything you’ve ever experienced at sea. The executive chef plays host by introducing each dish. During our experience, he even offered to send us recipes to our stateroom so we could take home memories from this great night. The dishes ranged from molecular gastronomy creations to simple, elegant, savory tarts. I highly recommend signing up early and experiencing this incredible evening while onboard an NCL cruise.

PHOTO COURTESY CARYN ROSS

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See & Do DANCE Exurgency Sept. 18-19 A special adjunct to the OKC Ballet season, this exciting set of works brings a modern hit from the troupe’s repertoire back to OKC audiences. OCCC Theater 7777 S May Ave, OKC, 848.8637, okcballet.com

EVENTS Ace High Sept. 2 The museum deals out a full spread of entertainment and auction treats in this fundraiser; it’s a solid bet. National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum 1700 NE 63rd St, OKC, 478.2250, nationalcowboymuseum.org Flight for Futures Sept. 3 Now boarding for fine food catered by local restaurants, beverages aplenty, live music and dancing to benefit the community-improving work of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Oklahoma County. Wiley Post Airport 5915 Philip J Rhoads Ave, Bethany, 706.7484, bgcokc.org

for a monthly fiesta. OKC Plaza District 1618 N Gatewood Ave, OKC, 367.9403, plazadistrict.org OKC Museum of Art Renaissance Ball Sept. 11 Happy 40th to the Museum’s exceptionally elegant gala, marking a rebirth of appreciation and support for the world-class facility and its artistic efforts each fall. OKC Golf & Country Club 7000 NW Grand Blvd, OKC, 236.3100, okcmoa.com Greek Festival Sept. 11-13 Live music, dancing, kids’ activities and plenty of authentic Greek food fill this day of fun benefiting the Bethel Foundation. St. George Greek Orthodox Church 2101 NW 145th, OKC, 751.1885, greekfestokc.com Hello Kitty’s Supercute Friendship Festival Sept. 11-13 Sometimes the name says it all. It’s the Sanrio crew’s first ever live North American tour, so if you’re a fan of Badtz-

NW 15th St, OKC, 826.9689, townhall. publishpath.com

others. Skirvin Hilton 1 Park Ave, OKC, 947.6272, asteccharterschools.com

State Fair of Oklahoma Sept. 17-27 Distinctively delicious food, a monstrous midway studded with rides and games, booth after booth of products and displays and prizewinning creations - there’s always plenty to enjoy. State Fairgrounds 333 Gordon Cooper Blvd, OKC, 948.6700, okstatefair.com

Taste of Northwest Sept. 24 Hosted by the Northwest OKC Chamber, this tasting event and auction brings together restaurateurs and supporters from a thriving corner of the metro to toast past and future development. Oklahoma History Center 800 Nazih Zuhdi Dr, OKC, 789.1256, nwokc.com

Outdoor Dinner Series Sept. 18 Chef Jonathan Krell provides the upscale barbeque fare, the Tap Band provides the soundtrack and diners reap the enjoyment in this meal under the stars. Myriad Gardens 301 W Reno Ave, OKC, 445.7080, oklahomacitybotanicalgardens.com Premiere on Film Row Sept. 18 The downtown OKC street festival is family-friendly, pet-welcoming, free to wander through and filled with

STATE FAIR OF OKLAHOMA

Sept. 17-27, State Fairgrounds

Art After 5 Sept. 3-24 A special Thursday evening treat draws downtowners and visitors to the OKCMOA’s rooftop terrace for drinks and a spectacular view. OKC Museum of Art 415 Couch Dr, OKC, 236.3100, okcmoa.com 1st Friday Gallery Walk Sept. 4 The historic arts district’s name means “stroll,” which happens to be the preferred form of locomotion while taking in its wonders during a monthly display of arts and culture. Paseo Arts District 3022 Paseo St, OKC, 525.2688, thepaseo.com Arts Festival Oklahoma Sept. 5-7 A Labor Day weekend tradition on the OCCC campus, uniting thousands of guests with nearly 100 artists. OCCC 7777 S May Ave, OKC, 682.7576, occc. edu/afo Crescendo Sept. 6 The college is already hosting its massive arts festival, but this special fundraiser helps reify future iterations, as well as being a delicious, sweet-sounding ball in its own right. OCCC Theater 7777 S May Ave, OKC, 682.7591, occc.edu/afo/ crescendo Wiggle Out Loud Sept. 6 The free active-family festival combines music, art, activity and healthy snacks to encourage kids to move and groove toward better health. Bicentennial Park 500 Couch Ave, OKC, wiggleoutloud.com 12 x 12 Sept. 11 The Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition’s annual show and sale of donated pieces one foot square is a high-energy occasion with plenty of treats. Science Museum Oklahoma 2100 NE 52nd St, OKC, 879.2400, ovac-ok.org 2nd Friday Circuit of Art Sept. 11 A monthly community-wide celebration of creativity, focused on historic Downtown Norman. Norman Arts Council 122 E Main St, Norman, 360.1162, normanarts.org Live on the Plaza Sept. 11 Vendors, artists, residents and passerby unite

Broadway Ball Sept. 25 Lyric Theatre celebrates the premiere of its new flapper musical - and this event’s own two-decade anniversary - by giving its annual gala fundraiser the theme “The Roaring 20th,” so dress like the cat’s pajamas. Embassy Suites OKC 741 N Phillips Ave, OKC, 524.9312, lyrictheatreokc.com H & 8th Night Market Sept. 25 Midtown becomes a primetime paradise in this after-hours street festival boasting live music and a convoy of awesome food trucks. Hudson Ave & 8th Street 801 N Hudson Ave, OKC, 633.1703, h8thokc. com Wine, Women and Shoes Sept. 25 The commingling of the three title ingredients gives ladies much to talk about, shop for and imbibe while enjoying one another’s company for the philanthropic efforts of Impact Oklahoma. OKC Golf & Country Club 7000 NW Grand Blvd, OKC, 842.4542, impactok.org ZooBrew Sept. 25 Live music, food, auction fun and more than two dozen beers to choose from fill this beveragebased safari. OKC Zoo 2101 NE 50th St, OKC, 425.0612, zoofriends.org

Maru, Chococat or Hello Kitty herself, take note. Cox Center 1 Myriad Gardens, OKC, 602.8500, coxconventioncenter.com Magic: The Gathering Grand Prix Sept. 11-13 Magic is still the all-time king of collectible card games, and this event draws the greatest players from around the world to compete for upwards of $35,000 in prizes. Cox Center 1 Myriad Gardens, OKC, 602.8500, coxconventioncenter.com Sept.temberfest Sept. 12 Free admission to a suite of historically themed activities for kids and families, bringing to life the story of Oklahoma so far. Oklahoma History Center 800 Nazih Zuhdi Dr, OKC, 522.0765, okhistory.org Auto Alley Shop Hop Sept. 17 Discounts, giveaways, special mini-events and have-to-be-there fun fill this monthly mercantile excursion. Automobile Alley 1015 N Broadway Ave, OKC, 235.3500, automobilealley.org Town Hall: Dr. Eben Alexander III Sept. 17 The OKC Town Hall Lecture Series opens a new season of guest presentations with a look at the afterlife, from a prominent neurosurgeon who has been there and returned. St. Luke’s UMC 222

treats for the ears and taste buds. Film Row 706 W Sheridan Ave, OKC, 232.6060, Sunset Cruises Sept. 18-25 Music, appetizers, a cash bar, the quiet breeze and gentle motion of the ship proceeding languidly down the river on a Friday evening - relaxation like this is a true pleasure. Oklahoma River 1503 Exchange Ave, OKC, 702.7755, okrivercruises.com Downtown Edmond Historic Tours Sept. 19 Learn a little something new about the legacy and story of the city in this 45-minute walking tour. Downtown Edmond 32 N Broadway Ave, Edmond, 715.1889, visitedmondok.com Heard on Hurd Sept. 19 A free monthly festival of live music, food trucks and pop-up shops - come enjoy! Downtown Edmond 32 N Broadway Ave, Edmond, 341.6650, facebook.com/heardonhurd West Fest Sept. 19 Western Avenue invites the community to have a drink, enjoy food truck fare, take in some amazing music and have a great time at this free street festival. 4200 N Western Ave, OKC, westfestok.com Door-Opener Awards Sept. 24 ASTEC Charter Schools is the beneficiary of this gala honoring community leaders who create opportunities for

Gumdrops and Lollipops Ball Sept. 26 Sunshine and rainbows and the like (plus food and music and dancing) fill the annual fundraiser for the foster family support Anna’s House Foundation. Bricktown Events Center 429 E California Ave, OKC, 563.1150, annashousefoundation.org Plaza District Festival Sept. 26 A jovial outpouring of creativity and joie de vivre in one of OKC’s most vibrant neighborhoods. OKC Plaza District 1618 N Gatewood Ave, OKC, 367.9403, plazadistrict.org Heritage Hills Historic Homes Tour Sept. 26-27 It’s one of OKC’s most beautifully venerable neighborhoods, and this is the best time to get a look up close, as six residences throw open their doors for exploration. Heritage Hills 405 NW 15th St, OKC, 659.9308, heritagehills.org UPCOMING Fandango at the Harn Oct. 1 An especially jubilant hootenanny benefiting the continued operation of the pioneer homestead museum. Harn Homestead 1721 N Lincoln Blvd, OKC, 235.4058, harnhomestead.com Oklahoma Regatta Festival Oct. 1-4 Rowing, kayaking, dragon boat racing and more fill days - and even nights - of river competition, with plenty to eat, drink and enjoy on the side. Boathouse District 725 S Lincoln Blvd, OKC, 552.4040, boathousedistrict.org Art on Tap Oct. 2 Patrons at this spirited fundraiser will have live music, a spread of food from local restaurants

SEPTEMBER 2015 // SLICE 83


PURSUITS | See & Do

and a spate of over 80 varieties of beer to enjoy. OKC Museum of Art 415 Couch Dr, OKC, 236.3100, okcmoa.com EdFest Oct. 2 Third time’s even more charming - this collection of local food, brews and musicians is all kinds of fun to benefit the good works of Edmond Mobile Meals. Festival Market Place 30 W 1st St, Edmond, 341.3111, edfestokc.com

FILM Classics Series Sept. 1-29 Catch a masterpiece you missed the first time around or just want to re-experience on the big screen: “The Sound of Music” Sept. 1, “Fletch” Sept. 8, “North by Northwest” Sept. 15, “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” Sept. 22 and “Raising Arizona” Sept. 29. Harkins Theatres 150 E Reno Ave, OKC, 321.4747, harkinstheatres.com Circle Theater Shows Sept. 3-27 The OKC Museum of Art screens overlooked treasures and unsung independent films for cineastes who want to step outside the multiplex. OKC Museum of Art 415 Couch Dr, OKC, 236.3100, okcmoa.com Glow Sept. 4 The free movie being screened is Marvel’s “Guardians of the Galaxy,” and there’s no extra charge for the live local music or outstanding river atmosphere. Boathouse District 725 S Lincoln Blvd, OKC, 552.4040, boathousedistrict.org

GALLERIES ONGOING Swan and Elder Through Sept. 11 MAINSITE Contemporary Art Norman, 360.1162, mainsite-art.com Fine Arts Institute Sept. 3-30 Painting and pottery entwine as the FAI hosts a collection of works from collaborative duo Atlas Pine. Fine Arts Institute of Edmond 27 E Edwards St, Edmond, 340.4481, edmondfinearts.com PhotoFest Sept. 4 Two-dimensional though the images may be, the entries in this annual juried photography exhibition show a remarkable depth. Paseo Art Space 3022 Paseo St, OKC, 525.2688, thepaseo.com Firehouse Talent Sept. 4-Oct. 17 The Firehouse showcases the crème de la community creativity in this exceptional exhibition. Firehouse Art Center 444 S Flood Ave, Norman, 329.4523, normanfirehouse.com Sept.tember at the Elms Sept. 2-26 The cozy gallery in the Paseo is home to intriguing art, inside and out: this month it welcomes layered paintings from David Crismon and drawing and sculptures from Sohail Shehada educators both. JRB Art at the Elms 2810 N Walker Ave, OKC, 528.6336, jrbartgallery.com Shel Wagner Sept. 4-26 The community art space for public exploration of art welcomes an engaging solo show. The Project Box 3003 Paseo St, OKC, 609.3969, theprojectboxokc.com Rita Ortloff Sept. 4-26 The arresting gallery in the Paseo Arts District prepares to dazzle visitors and

84 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

passerby via distinctive acrylic paintings from studio artist Ortloff. In Your Eye Gallery 3005 Paseo St, OKC, 525.2161, inyoureyegallery.com

the Sally Pollack Duo Sept. 17 and Dr. Tess and Friends Sept. 24. Downtown Library 300 Park Ave, OKC, 231.8650, mls.lib.ok.us

Dennis Johnson Sept. 24 Enjoy a rare opportunity to revisit some of the famed painter’s earlier works in this first career retrospective, which also includes new creations. Howell Gallery 6432 N Western Ave, OKC, 840.4437, howellgallery.com

Riverwind Shows Sept. 4-25 Riverwind opens the floodgates to hit musicians and hilarity this month: Mickey Gilley Sept. 4, the wondrously funny Jim Gaffigan Sept. 11, Peter Cetera Sept. 18 and Herman’s Hermits starring Peter Noone Sept. 25. Riverwind Casino 1544 W Hwy 9, Norman, 322.6464, riverwind. com

MUSEUMS ONGOING A World Unconquered Through Sept. 6 Fred Jones Jr Museum of Art Norman, 325.3272, ou.edu/fjjma Fabergé: Jeweler to the Tsars Through Sept. 27, OKC Museum of Art OKC, 236.3100, okcmoa.com Orly Genger: Terra Through Oct. 2 Campbell Park OKC, 951.0000, oklahomacontemporary.org End of the Trail Centennial Celebration Through Oct. 25 National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum OKC, 478.2250, nationalcowboymuseum.org Celebrating Edmond History Through Dec. 19, Edmond Historical Society Edmond, 340.0078, edmondhistory.org Enter the Matrix: Indigenous Printmakers Through Jan. 17 Fred Jones Jr Museum of Art Norman, 325.3272, ou.edu/fjjma Navajo Weavings From the Parrish Collection Through May 8 National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum OKC, 478.2250, nationalcowboymuseum.org Red Earth Master Artist Show Sept. 1-Jun 30 Artists from across the continent gather for the annual Red Earth Festival each June - the works on display in this exhibit represent some of their very finest creations. Red Earth Museum 6 Santa Fe Plaza, OKC, 427.5228, redearth.org Immortales: The Hall of Emperors Sept. 5-Dec. 6 The Capitoline Museum in Rome is among the world’s oldest repositories of art, including these 20 ancient and immensely impressive busts. Fred Jones Jr Museum of Art 555 Elm Ave, Norman, 325.3272, ou.edu/fjjma Galileo’s World Sept. 5-Aug. 31 The University of Oklahoma celebrates its 125th anniversary with a trove of treasures from the history of science; artifacts, informational exhibits and much more about the legendary astronomer and connections between scholarly disciplines. Across the OU Campus 401 W Brooks St, Norman, 325.4142, galileo.ou.edu Bert Seabourn: American Expressionist Sept. 10-Jan. 9 Creative vitality and stylistic diversity from an acclaimed and often-lauded Oklahoma treasure. Oklahoma Hall of Fame Museum 1400 Classen Dr, OKC, 235.4458, oklahomahof.com

MUSIC Noon Tunes Sept. 3-24 Free lunchtime serenades to sonically spice up your Thursdays: Martha Stallings Sept. 3, Jim Garling & Suzanne Wooley Sept. 10,

UCO Jazz Lab Shows Sept. 4-27 Students and townies alike step over to the Jazz Lab for some tasty tunes: Shortt Dogg Sept. 4, Smilin’ Vic Sept. 5, Miss Brown to You Sept. 12, Groove Merchants Sept. 18, Edgar Cruz Sept. 20 and 23, Mountain Smoke Sept. 27 and more. UCO Jazz Lab 100 E 5th St, Edmond, 359.7989, ucojazzlab.com Opolis Shows Sept. 4-30 Metro, meet Opolis - you’ll make beautiful music together, including Crooks on Tape Sept. 4, Turquoise Jeep Sept. 14, Shannon and the Clams Sept. 30 and more - check online for updates. The Opolis 113 N Crawford Ave, Norman, opolis.org Deep Roots Music Series Sept. 5 Solo strummers and former bandmates Camille Harp and John Calvin Abney reunite for a soulful show. Myriad Gardens 301 W Reno Ave, OKC, 445.7080, oklahomacitybotanicalgardens.com Twilight Concert Series Sept. 6-27 The Arts Council of OKC shares a free, family-friendly performance every Sunday evening: a Hip-Hop Night Sept. 6, Grassland Caravan Sept. 13, Allie Lauren Sept. 20 and Horse Thief closes the series Sept. 27. Myriad Gardens 301 W Reno Ave, OKC, 270.4848, artscouncilokc.com Blue Door Shows Sept. 11-22 Selfbilled as “the best listening room in Oklahoma,” it certainly has some of the best music, including Butch Hancock Sept. 11 and Tannahill Weavers Sept. 22 - check online for updates. The Blue Door 2805 N McKinley Ave, OKC, 524.0738, bluedoorokc.com Grand Casino Shows Sept. 12 It should sound great at the Grand, thanks to the special outoor concert Rappin’ Up the Summer, featuring the all-star talents of DJ Kool, Rob Base, Young MC, Tone Loc, Biz Markie and Vanilla Ice. Grand Casino 777 Grand Casino Blvd, Shawnee, 964.7777, grandresortok.com Philharmonic: Opening Night Sept. 12 Masterful pianist Emanuel Ax guest-stars as the OKC Philharmonic raises the curtain on a new season via Stravinsky, Nelson and Brahms. OKC Civic Center 201 N Walker Ave, OKC, 842.5387, okcphilharmonic.org Sutton Series Concerts Sept. 14-27 Join the OU School of Music for guest performances: Suzanne Tirk Sept. 14, a Musical Mosaic Sept. 20, organist Jeremy Filsell Sept. 25 and the trio of Schwartz, Watts and Stoops Sept. 27. OU Catlett Music Center 500 W Boyd St, Norman, 325.2081, ou.edu/finearts/music Tuesday Noon Concerts Sept. 15-29 Spice up your lunch break with a free concert by OU School of Music students and faculty. Fred Jones Jr Museum of Art 555 Elm Ave, Norman, 325.3272, ou.edu/fjjma

OCU Concerts Sept. 18-26 Musiclovers mingle with students for the award-winning program’s shows: a Project 21 concert Sept. 18 and the OCU Orchestra Sept. 26. OCU Petree Hall 2501 N Blackwelder, OKC, 208.5701, okcu.edu/music OKC Jazz Festival Sept. 21-26 Performing pros from near and far aid in the flow of beautiful music in this multi-day event. OKC Civic Center 201 N Walker Ave, OKC, 630.7668, okcjazzfest.com Brightmusic: From Beethoven to the Beatles Sept. 22 The skilled musicians of Brightmusic Chamber Ensemble weave through a widely varied set of classics old and new. St. Paul’s Cathedral 127 NW 7th, OKC, brightmusic.org Rick Springfield Sept. 23 It’s too early to be certain, but he’ll probably sing “Jessie’s Girl” along with a host of other hits, as the singer appears with Loverboy and Tommy Tutone. OKC Zoo Amphitheater 2101 NE 50th St, OKC, 866.977.6849, dcfconcerts.com Medicine Stone Sept. 24-26 The Old 97s, Cody Canada and the Departed, Shinyribs, John Fullbright, the Turnpike Troubadours … there’s a ton of talent coming to Tahlequah for this exceptional outpouring of music. Diamondhead Resort 12081 Oklahoma 10, Tahlequah, medicinestoneok.com TALOA Music Festival Sept. 25-27 An all-ages festival with a varied and ecletic lineup designed to appeal to multiple generations and palates, and create an atmosphere of concord. Cottonwood Flats 601 W Warner Ave, Guthrie, taloafestival.com Groovefest Sept. 27 A Norman tradition since 1986, it’s a free convocation of music, poetry, speakers and good vibes. Andrews Park 528 N Park Ave, Norman, groovefest.org Safe in Sound Festival Sept. 27 Tear it up downtown with Datsik, Zomboy, Bro Safari and more in a fete featuring PK Sound. Bricktown Events Center 429 E California Ave, OKC, tourdepalate.com Foo Fighters Sept. 29 Dave Grohl is an unstoppable force for rock, and the band is set to bring their Sonic Highways tour cruising through OKC. Chesapeake Arena 100 W Reno Ave, OKC, 800.745.3000, chesapeakearena.com UPCOMING The Texas Tenors Oct. 1 This particular three of a kind knocks out a full house every time - they’re bringing their country-tinged take on the classics to open OCCC’s Cultural Arts Series. OCCC Theater 7777 S May Ave, OKC, 682.7576, occc. edu/cas OK Int’l Bluegrass Festival Oct. 1-3 The bountiful brainchild of fiddle virtuoso Byron Berline, it’s a thrilling collection of the finest Bluegrass performers to be found … anywhere. Festival Grounds 600 E Noble Ave, Guthrie, 282.4446, oibf.com Belshazzar’s Feast Oct. 2 Canterbury Choral Society opens its season with a powerful musical tale of the Israelites’ triumph over a Babylonian king. OKC Civic Center 201 N Walker Ave, OKC, 232.7464, canterburyokc.com


SPORTS OKC Dodgers Baseball Sept. 1-7 OKC’s men of summer try to finish a sparkling season on the diamond by facing Iowa Sept. 1-3 and Memphis Sept. 4-7. Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark 2 S Mickey Mantle Dr, OKC, 218.1000, okcdodgers.com Walk for Wishes Sept. 12 A 1-mile trek helps to make reality out of the dreams of critically ill Oklahoma kids. OKC Zoo 2101 NE 50th St, OKC, 286.4000, oklahoma.wish.org Walk to End Alzheimer’s Sept. 12 Take a lap to help stamp out a condition that’s affecting more Americans all the time. Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark 2 S Mickey Mantle Dr, OKC, 319.0780, alz. org/oklahoma JDRF OneWalk Sept. 19 Millions are affected; a mile and a half could help. The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation is proud to bring supporters together for this annual fundraising excursion. Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark 2 S Mickey Mantle Dr, OKC, 810.0070, centraloklahoma. jdrf.org AIDS Walk OKC Sept. 20 The journey towards the goal of wiping out AIDS begins with steps taken together in this uplifting fundraiser. Myriad Gardens 301 W Reno Ave, OKC, 673.3786, aidswalkokc.org Bike MS Oklahoma Sept. 26-27 A 2-day cycling event takes riders from

Norman to Stillwater, while raising funds to fight MS. NCED Conference Center 2701 E Imhoff Rd, Norman, 918.488.0882, nationalmssociety.org/ chapters.oke OU Football Sept. 5-19 It’s football time in Oklahoma! The Sooners defend their home turf against Akron Sept. 5 and Tulsa Sept. 19. Owen Field 180 W Brooks St, Norman, 325.2424, soonersports.com OKC Energy FC Soccer Sept. 12 Open wide for some soccer! The OKC Energy FC closes out its second season’s home slate against the Colorado Springs Switchbacks. Taft Stadium 2901 NW 23rd St, OKC, 235.5425, energyfc.com OSU Football Sept. 12-19 The Cowboys line up to hold their ground against Central Arkansas Sept. 12 and UTSA Sept. 19. Boone Pickens Stadium 700 W Hall of Fame Ave, Stillwater, 877.255.4678, okstate.com

THEATER ONGOING Always Patsy Cline Through Sept. 12 The Pollard’s epistolary season opener leverages the divine Ms. Cline’s music to remind audiences of her tremendous presence. Pollard Theatre 120 W Harrison Ave, Guthrie, 282.2800, thepollard.org Chicago Through Sept. 13 Cellophane dudes, brassy dames, slicker-thangrease lawyers and all that jazz fill the

starting slot in Jewel Box’s season. Jewel Box Theater 3700 N Walker Ave, OKC, 521.1786, jewelboxtheatre.org Of Mice and Men Sept. 3-20 The OKC Theatre Company’s season begins with Steinbeck’s tale of hope so pure and strong it can be painful, and the responsibilities humans assume toward one another. And rabbits. OKC Civic Center 201 N Walker Ave, OKC, 626.6605, okctheatrecompany.org The Flick Sept. 4-26 This Pulitzerwinner chronicles the small-scale lives and unheralded dedication of a trio of employees at an oldschool cinema. Carpenter Square Theatre 800 W Main, OKC, 232.6500, carpentersquare.com Julius Caesar Sept. 10-26 Whether it’s called a desperate act of heroism to overthrow a tyrant or a personal vendetta for the love of power, the Ides of March - and times thereafter - see bloody business in the season closer for Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park. Myriad Gardens 301 W Reno Ave, OKC, 235.3700, oklahomashakespeare.com The Full Monty Sept. 11-20 Keep your pants on - Stage Door is back to start a new season with the saucy tale of some slightly reluctant male strippers. Stage Door Theater 601 Oak St, Yukon, 265.1590, stagedooryukon.com Arcadia Sept. 18-27 Tom Stoppard’s time-jumping masterpiece leads off the OU School of Drama’s season. OU Reynolds PAC 560 Parrington

Oval, Norman, 325.4101, ou.edu/ finearts/drama Peter and the Starcatcher Sept. 18-27 CityRep’s newest season commences with a magic-filled prequel to the more familiar tale of Peter Pan. OKC Civic Center 201 N Walker Ave, OKC, 848.3761, cityrep.com The Tortoise and the Hare Sept. 25-Oct. 9 Distractions prove costly for the speedy lagomorph in an adaptation of Aesop’s fable. Oklahoma Children’s Theatre 2501 N Blackwelder, OKC, 951.0011, oklahomachildrenstheatre.org Enchanted April Sept. 25-Oct. 11 A change of scenery and company can be restorative to the spirit to an almost magical degree - ask the four Englishwomen in this play who experience a rebirth in Italy. St. Luke’s Poteet Theater 222 NW 15th St, OKC, 609.1023, poteettheatre.com

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Last Laugh

Get me off this ride ... By Lauren Hammack

I SUPPOSE NO ONE’S BUCKET LIST INCLUDES OPEN-HEART SURGERY, but my dad recently checked this off his list of things to do and, by default, the rest of our family hopped on with him for what has been an undisputed ride from hell. Day One was as torturous as one might expect. Settling into the ICU for an extended, sedative-laced nap with a soundtrack of beeping, whooshing machinery in the background couldn’t possibly have distracted my dad from the realization that he’d just been run over by a Mack truck and a table saw. Thankfully, he has no real recollection of it. The rest of us will remember Day One as it was: an excruciating boarding for the roller coaster of emotions that would follow in the weeks to come – the lows of worry, dread and anxiousness that twisted and undulated between the highs of hope, anticipation and encouragement. As poorly prepared as we were for the ride we thought we’d be taking, we were even less prepared to discover that my dad’s quick, lucid mind had climbed off the ride long before we rounded the loop-deloop. A complete imposter had jumped on, posing as my dad. “It’s just the anesthesia,” the nursing staff would reassure us, explaining that it’s a very common phenomenon for patients to become temporarily disoriented, confused or delirious after a major surgery. For days, an obnoxious (OK, life-saving) breathing tube restricted my dad’s ability to 86 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015

speak or swallow. Despite round-the-clock hits of some really swell opiates, he slept only minutes at a time. Opiates + Sleep Deprivation = a big, fat mental vacation somewhere far, far away and a table for one. By all accounts, my dad was doing a mental Hokey Pokey, putting his left brain in, taking his left brain out and shaking it all about: had someone really just stolen his wallet while we stepped out to make a phone call? Were the nurses really going to let him run up to Braum’s for a chocolate shake before dinner? If anything could make his illusions more alarming, it was my dad’s confident, no-nonsense delivery of complete BS. It was hilarious to watch; I now see that my otherwise unassuming dad has all the wiring of a high-pressure used car salesman and when he’s under the influence of mind-altering narcotics, he’s not afraid to use it. The timing of his mental vaycay corresponded with the British Open, a golfing tradition my dad would have followed very closely had he not been trapped under a sea monster mask and strung up like a woven macramé Thinking Tiva. He became convinced that my nephew was closing in on winning the British Open and, even though all the cameras were focused on him, he should just focus on the ball. The minute he was able to speak, my dad confided this strategy to his nurse, Trevor Knight. A couple of weeks into his convalescence, the mental fog began to lift and the

sunny, jolly dad I love slowly reemerged. Still, when he was exhausted from a full day of visitors, conversations about hereand-now subjects would take unexpected twists. As expected, he was elated about my nephew’s British Open victory. He was very happy to announce that he has some vacation time coming up and he’d be taking it for once. In the same breath that he told me Blake Shelton and Miranda Lambert were calling it quits, he added that the couple had just been on his floor of the hospital the night before. Miranda, he explained, had spent the night – “not 10 feet from my bed,” he exclaimed – and was getting some surgery on her heart. They had been cardiac suite-mates ever so briefly, but Miranda’s apparent speedy recovery had ended my dad’s brush with fame. When he reads this article, he’ll probably have the surreal sense that he’s reading about someone else, or that I’ve made everything up. He won’t remember the hour he spent one evening doing charades in the ICU, earnestly signing to us to get him a Diet Dr Pepper. The “Hoarders” marathons we watched will be a distant memory. He will have traveled too far and too long to remember the names of the medical staff who took care of him during the terrifying nights when he almost fell off the ride completely. But he’ll be as grateful as the rest of his family that we’re all getting off this ride together.


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Last Look

Symbols of Solidarity Photo by Kimberli Robberson

The flag, the eagle, the beauty of the land itself – in times of fresh or remembered mourning, symbols like these (found by an Edmond resident on a trip to Montana) can be comforting reminders of the endurance and strength of the nation we share.

88 SLICE // SEPTEMBER 2015


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99

PER MO. FOR 12 MO. W/ 2-YR. AGREEMENT*

*Offer ends 11/2/15. Available to new residential customers in Cox service areas. $99.99/month includes new subscription to Cox Advanced TV, Internet Preferred, and Phone Essential service for 12 months. Rate increases by $30/month for months 13-24. HBO included at no additional charge for 2 years. Regular rates apply thereafter. See www.cox.com. 2-year agreement required. Early termination fees may apply. Free pro install limited to standard install on up to 3 pre-wired outlets. Prices exclude additional installation/activation fees, equipment charges, inside wiring fees, additional outlets, taxes, surcharges (including $3.00/mo. Broadcast Surcharge) and other fees. Not all services and features available everywhere. A credit check and/or deposit may be required. Offer may not be combined with other offers. A Cox digital receiver or Cox-provided CableCARD together with a certified compatible CableCARD retail device required for Advanced TV. A DOCSIS 3 modem is required to consistently receive optimal speeds for Internet Preferred and higher tiers, and is strongly recommended for all other tiers. Uninterrupted or error-free Internet service, or the speed of your service, is not guaranteed. Actual speeds vary. Access to fastest in-home WiFi claim based on Cox-recommended 802.11ac equipment, available for purchase at Cox Solutions Stores. Telephone modem provided; remains Cox property. Backup battery (not included) required for service, including access to e911 service, during power outage. You must monitor and replace the battery as needed (see www.cox.com/battery). Other restrictions may apply. Š2015 Cox Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.


Mister Robert F I N E

F U R N I T U R E

&

D E S I G N

Est. 1958 • 109 East Main • Norman • 405.321.1818 • MisterRobert.com •

Slice September 2015  

Slice is a lifestyle magazine serving central Oklahoma, featuring restaurants, events, shopping and culture.

Slice September 2015  

Slice is a lifestyle magazine serving central Oklahoma, featuring restaurants, events, shopping and culture.

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