Page 1

PRIME SELECTIONS FOR AN OKC STAYCATION P. 36

The

Music Issue From Maurice Johnson’s solo shows to massive outdoor festivals, the best part of great music is hearing it live. BY JERRY CHURCH


Hormone Replacement Therapy

BENJAMIN J. BARENBERG, M.D., F.A.C.O.G.

The Optimal Health Associates approach to Hormone Replacement Therapy is simple due to our vast experience. Clinical scientific studies show HRT is not only effective, but when monitored, is safe for treating symptoms for both women and men. In addition, mounting evidence continues to show it is significantly life extending.

NOEL R. WILLIAMS, M.D., F.A.C.O.G.

BioTE® hormone pellet therapy goes above and beyond in the treatment of hormone imbalance to provide the best results. Hormone pellet therapy has several advantages over these other methods. These benefits include:

• It has the same molecular structure as human hormones • It lasts longer than other treatments, typically around three

to five months

• It’s the most widely studied form of natural hormone therapy • It provides a steady stream of hormones in your blood • It provides individualized dosing • It’s inserted under the skin

CALL TODAY TO SCHEDULE YOUR APPOINTMENT FOR THIS OR ANY OF YOUR HEALTHCARE NEEDS

405.715.4496 // OptimalHealthAssociates.com NORTH OKC - 9800 BROADWAY EXTENSION, SUITE 200 // SOUTH OKC - 3110 S.W. 89TH, SUITE 104 Optimal Health AssociatesTM DBA Optimal Health

BioTE® optimizes hormone levels with tiny pellets just under the skin that release all-natural bioidentical estrogen and testosterone, and are absorbed consistently into the body as needed.


Furniture & design for sophisticated living. w w w. H e n r y I n t e r i o r s . c o m

Brookhaven Village | 3720 W. Robinson St. | Norman, OK | 405.321.1000

MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

1


NIGHT.

Life.

DALL AS IS A CIT Y WITH M ANY SIDEs. That’s what makes it such a great place to visit. Take in the largest zoological experience in Texas at the award-winning Dallas Zoo. Then experience the Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden at the Dallas Arboretum or explore the Trinity River Audubon Center in the Great Trinity Forest. At night, unleash your own wild side at a Deep Ellum club, laid-back lounge or exclusive speakeasy. With every hot spot and habitat imaginable, you’ll love being a party animal in Dallas.

Get the most out of your getaway and learn more about CityPASS at VisitDallas.com.

PICTURED: DJ PAUL PAREDES LOCATION: THE DALLAS ZOO


COME SEE THE Many Sides of Dallas Dallas Blooms at the Arboretum Experience the largest floral festival in the Southwest, with gardens bursting with over 500,000 blossoms, including tulips, daffodils, hyacinths, Japanese cherry trees and more. Plus, bring the kids and enjoy the interactive magic of the Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden.

WHEN?

February 23–April 7, 2019

WHERE?

Dallas Arboretum

dallasarboretum.org

St. Patrick’s Day Parade & Festival Dallas’s wildest (and greenest) party is back for its 40th year. Come early for the two-mile parade with more than 90 floats. Then enjoy the postparade concert and the amazing afterparty scene at bars and restaurants all along historic Greenville Avenue.

WHEN?

March 16, 2019

WHERE?

Greenville Avenue

dallasstpatricksparade.com

Margarita Mile Dallas is the official home of the frozen margarita! Now, Dallas’s best and brightest margs are collected in the city’s newest attraction, the Margarita Mile, a one-of-a-kind experience that will keep you and your friends coming back again and again. Think of it as the ultimate margarita bucket list—and the perfect way to discover the diverse flavors of Dallas.

WHEN?

Anytime you’re visiting MargaritaMileDallas.com

WHERE?

Various locations


in this issue

MARCH 2019

Features

28

LIVE MUSIC IS BETTER

There’s no substitute for being there – music of every variety gains an extra dimension from witnessing it performed live, and feeling the connection with the performer and the camaraderie of the crowd. If seeing and hearing is believing, mark your calendar for these festivals old and new, and get ready to savor the magic.

36

In this period of booming growth and development, now’s a better time than ever to spend your vacation right here at home. For lovers of art, history, food or adventure, these recommendations should help you enjoy exploring OKC like a tourist.

4

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

PHOTO BY STEVE THRASHER

A STAYCATION CELEBRATION


5521 North Pennsylvania Ave, Oklahoma City, OK 73112

(405)-608-8802

OfďŹ cial Sponsor of the Oklahoma Sooners

www.diamondsdirect.com


in this issue

MARCH 2019

In the 405 15 Stylish head scarves; Fanny Bolen’s interior touch; exploring the Color of the Year; when celebrity chats go awry; the importance of colon cancer screenings

Culture 26 The search for clarity in alcohol pricing

Travel

43 Destinations near and far for unforgettable musical experiences

Home

55 Inside the colorful Pryor home; decor that brings Living Coral to life

Dining

61 Nostalgia sparkles at Ned’s Starlite Lounge; luscious lasagna from chef Sean Cummings; the Emerald Isle reigns at Black Raven; Whiskey Cake’s Irish spirits

Events

73 The Norman Depot sends off the Winter Wind; OVAC’s Momentum boosts young artists

In Every Issue

12 From the Publisher 66 Food and Drink 76 On Location 78 Speakerbox 79 On the Radar 80 Backstory

Vegetable Bounty Red pepper, carrot, tomatillo, squash … home cooks won’t be starved for color or flavor when following chef Sean Cummings’s recipe for delectable vegetarian lasagna.

64

ON THE COVER Renowned OKC guitarist and author Maurice Johnson. Photo by Shevaun Williams

VOLUME 5 / NUMBER 3, 405 MAGAZINE (PERIODICALS 21350) IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY, 12 TIMES A YEAR, BY 405 MAGAZINE, INC., 1613 NORTH BROADWAY AVENUE, OKLAHOMA CITY, OK 73103. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT OKLAHOMA CITY, OK AND ADDITIONAL MAILING OFFICES. POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO 405 MAGAZINE, P.O. BOX 16765, NORTH HOLLYWOOD, CA 91615-6765.

6

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019


BARKOCY CONSTRUCTION

Expand your Possibilities Get inspired with exciting custom options from Pella.

Pella Window & Door Showrooms Oklahoma City, OK | 537 East Britton Road Tulsa, OK | 4340 South Mingo Pella.com/405MagazineOKC | 866-618-4129

40

%

OFF

QUALIFYING INSTALLATIONS1 AND NO MONEY DOWN, NO PAYMENTS, NO INTEREST FOR 18 MONTHS2

SALE ENDS

APRIL 11 Offer excludes Encompass by Pella®and Pella® 250 Series products. Valid only for replacement customers who purchase Pella® products and have them installed through their local Pella Window and Door Showroom. The 40% off applies only to the cost of installation. Discount does not apply to the cost of product and trim. Discount applies to retail list price. Only valid on select Pella® products and installation methods. Not valid with any other offer or promotion. Repairs to existing products including parts such as sash and panel replacements excluded. Prior sales excluded. Other restrictions may apply. See store for details. To be eligible for advertised offers, in-home consultation must be scheduled by 04/11/2019 and purchase must be made by 04/18/2019.

1

2

Subject to qualifying credit approval. Interest accrues during the promotional period but all interest is waived if the purchase amount is paid before the expiration of the promotional period. Financing for GreenSky® consumer credit programs is provided by federally insured, federal and state chartered financial institutions without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex or familial status. © 2019 Pella Corporation


MARCH 2019

The Right Step

Andrew Flinton, CFP® President

Publisher | Editor-in-Chief Heidi Rambo Centrella heidi.centrella@405magazine.com

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Steve Gill steve.gill@405magazine.com

Wherever you are on the path to retirement, talking with an experienced, professional financial advisor is a step in the right direction. Retirement Investment Advisors act as a fiduciary – required by law to put your best interests above all else. One of our CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professionals will work with you to ensure the design of an investment portfolio that is balanced for retirement, while providing asset protection with less volatility. The retirement path can be a long journey. Fortunately, the first step is easy. Visit us online at TheRetirementPath.com or call Retirement Investment Advisors for a no obligation consultation.

Retirement Investment Advisors has been awarded for ethical business practices and community service while being recognized more than 35* times by national publications as among the best in the nation. *Criteria available upon request

Oklahoma City 2925 United Founders Boulevard Edmond 2952 Via Esperanza Frisco, Texas 9300 John Hickman Pkwy Suite 504 TheRetirementPath.com

8

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

VOLUME 5 • NUMBER 3

405.942.1234 405.246.0404 972.377.2850

Style Editor Sara Gae Waters saragae.waters@405magazine.com Travel Editor Matt Payne matt.payne@405magazine.com Contributing Writers M.J. Alexander, Mark Beutler, Jerry Church, Christine Eddington, Greg Horton, Lance McDaniel, Lauren Roth, Elaine Warner

ART Art Director Scotty O’Daniel scotty.odaniel@405magazine.com Graphic Designer Brian O’Daniel brian.odaniel@405magazine.com Contributing Photographers M.J. Alexander, Rachel Maucieri, Charlie Neuenschwander, Don Risi, Shevaun Williams

JOIN THE CONVERSATION

Follow 405 Magazine on Facebook and @405Mag on Instagram and Twitter

Story Ideas and Letters to the Editor Your views and opinions are welcome. Include your full name, address and daytime phone number and email to editor@405magazine.com. Letters sent to 405 Magazine become the magazine’s property, and it owns all rights to their use. 405 Magazine reserves the right to edit letters for length and clarity.


22kt Hand Fabricated Rings by Valerie Naifeh

405.607.4323 | CASADY SQUARE | NORTH PENNSYLVANIA & BRITTON ROAD NAIFEHFINEJEWELRY.COM MON – FRI 10AM – 5:30PM | SAT 10AM – 5PM

“Coming this spring to Nichols Hills Plaza!”


MARCH 2019

VOLUME 5 • NUMBER 3

Executive Director of Advertising Cynthia Whitaker-hill cynthia.whitakerhill@405magazine.com

Senior Account Executive Stephanie Van Horn stephanie.vanhorn@405magazine.com Account Executive Gary Noske gary.noske@405magazine.com Account Manager Ronnie Morey ronnie.morey@405magazine.com

www.teners.com 4320 w. reno ave, okc 405.946.5500

READER SERVICES 405 Magazine 1613 N. Broadway Oklahoma City, OK 73103 Phone 405.842.2266 Fax 405.604.9435 info@405magazine.com, 405magazine.com Back Issues Back issues are $9.50 (includes P&H) each. For back issue availability and order information, please contact our office. Bulk Orders For multiple copy order information, please contact our office.

NEW COUNTERTOPS FREE SINK! RECEIVE A FREE RUVATI 32" SINK WITH YOUR CAMBRIA QUARTZ COUNTERTOP PURCHASE* ®

Add luxury to lifest yle and value to your home. Bring this ad to our gallery by March 31st and experience over 160 stunning Cambria quartz designs — all with guaranteed performance. A boutique cabinetry experience pushing the envelope of both design and quality. K I T C H E N + B AT H + O U T D O O R

320 W Wilshire Blvd wilshirecabinetco.com 405- 286 - 6282

Subscriptions 405 Magazine is available by subscription for $14.95 (12 issues), $24.95 (24 issues) or $34.95 (36 issues). Subscription Customer Service 405 Magazine P.O. Box 16765 North Hollywood, CA 91615-6765 Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. - 7 p.m. CST Phone 818.286.3160 Fax 800.869.0040 subscriptions@405magazine.com 405magazine.com/subscribe ADMINISTRATION Distribution Raymond Brewer

405 Magazine Volume 5, Number 3, March 2019. 405 Magazine is published monthly by 405 Magazine, Inc. at 1613 N. Broadway, Oklahoma City, OK 73103, 405.842.2266. © Copyright 2019 405 Magazine, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction of 405 Magazine content, in whole or part by any means, without the express written consent of the publisher is strictly prohibited. 405 Magazine is not responsible for the care of and/or return of unsolicited materials. 405 Magazine reserves the right to refuse advertising deemed detrimental to the community’s best interest or in questionable taste. Opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of ownership or management. Basic annual subscription rate is $14.95. U.S. single-copy price is $4.95. Back issues are $9.50 each

@ wilshirecabinet CIRCULATION AUDITED BY

*No cash value. Ruvati RVH8300 sink MSRP $845. Minimum 60-square foot Cambria quartz purchase required. Countertop fabrication and installation charges apply. Ruvati sink will only be installed into new Cambria quartz countertop purchase. Upgrade to another Ruvati sink allowable at MSRP of $845 only. May not be combined with any other offers. Expires 3/31/19.

10

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019


We’re even stronger together. Mercy welcomes Orthopedic Associates. We’re glad to announce that Orthopedic Associates has joined Mercy. That means even better care for you. We’re combining our strengths to build on our commitment to exceptional, compassionate care in ways we couldn’t have done alone.

Gary B. Anderson, MD

John W. Anderson, MD

Jennifer Barber, APRN

Steven P. Brantley, MD

Joel M. Davis, MD

David J. Flesher, MD

Greg E. Halko, MD

Meghan Harms, PA-C

Faustino M. Kazenske, DO

Michael E. Kiehn, MD

Richard A. Ruffin, MD

Nick Wilson, PA-C

Call for an appointment, or learn more at mercy.net/OKorthopedic Mercy Clinic Orthopedic Associates 405.947.0911 | 888.947.0911 3301 Northwest 50th Street | Oklahoma City, OK 73112 2017 W I-35 Frontage Road | Edmond, OK 73013 2115 Parkview Drive | El Reno, OK 73036 3735 Legacy | Weatherford, OK 73096

Your life is our life’s work.


FROM THE PUBLISHER

The Music of Memories T HE L A ST CONCERT I attended in college was the first Lol-

HEIDI R A MBO CEN TRELL A Publisher | Editor-in-Chief heidi.centrella@405magazine.com

12

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

PHOTO BY SIMON HURST

lapalooza in Dallas. It was late August 1991, but I don’t remember sweltering temperatures – of course, I was decades younger then, and the heat or physical discomfort didn’t really register in my memory compared to the eager anticipation for those who were about to take the stage. I was most excited about Violent Femmes, Jane’s Addiction and Siouxsie and the Banshees – and that list is in no respective order, but Siouxsie … well, I’m still a fan. While memory may not serve quite as well as it should for such an event, I live to tell part of the story. A group of us drove down for the weekend, not knowing this trip would represent something of an end to an era … akin to St. Elmo’s Fire and its characters’ wrap of youth and innocence as they segued to the next grand chapter of real life and responsibility. Plus, it sounded great. Music from the ’80s and ’90s still conjures memories of special moments in the lives of many Gen Xers, as most other decades do with generations who came before and after X. Here at 405 HQ, where the editorial team hails from that very era, we often swap stories that the likes of REM, The Smiths, Guns ‘N Roses, Iron Maiden, The Cure, Echo and The Bunnymen, Prince, Pixies, Ratt, David Bowie, U2, New Order, Queen (take a breath) and too many others invoke at the first measure. While the phenomenon is strong in adolescence and young adulthood, it’s not limited to the formative years. No matter how long it’s been since high school, a great performance can stay vivid in your mental jukebox for decades – especially when you heard it played live. Music, quite possibly, is the one thing powerful enough to dissolve – or redirect – any conflict or conversation. Music has the ability to bring very different people together in a common headspace, forging connections based on a shared time, place and sonic experience. Festivals, from the aforementioned Lollapalooza to the local ones we cherish today, serve the same purpose, intentional or otherwise. Within these pages (beginning on pg. 28), Jerry Church delves into the histories, growth and differing focuses of music festivals in the 405 area and beyond – some older, some younger, but all with a common thread: collective appreciation of performance and coming together in harmonious unity. I hope you’ll add some to your calendar, and make some great-sounding memories.


Discover Big Cedar’s newest overnight experience, Camp Long Creek, combining camping and comfort. Situated on Table Rock Lake, enjoy a serene backdrop while relaxing in one of the unique accommodations: shepherds huts, camp cabins or glamping tents. This new addition is specially designed for the whole family and features petfriendly units and a full-service marina, all just minutes from the Big Cedar activities and attractions you love. Opening summer 2019. Make your reservations today!

855.494.1077 CAMPLONGCREEK.COM


rb2019_3x4_ad.pdf

1

1/29/19

3:29 PM

2019

HOME SCHEDULE C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

TAFT STADIUM

2501 N MAY AVE OKLAHOMA CITY

SWEAT. SMILE. REPEAT. MIDTOWN

NORMAN

1501 N. BROADWAY AVE 405.458.0405

3501 WELLSITE DR. STE #125 405.777.3202

CROSSFIT405.COM // INFO@CROSSFIT405.COM PHOTO BY ORE ADESINA PHOTOGRAPHY LLC

14

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019


405

in the

Wrapped in Fashion

PHOTO BY SHEVAUN WILLIAMS

Versatile enough to complete an ensemble or reinvent it entirely, a fine silk head scarf – such as this Chloé Carré beauty paired with a Yigal Azrouel floral print grommet dress and ivy brooch, all from Balliets – makes an extremely stylish crowning touch.

MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

15


in the 405 FASHION

NECESSARY ACCESSORY Turning heads with stylish scarves W HET HER K NOT T ED underneath chins, looped around necks or fastened with blingy barrettes, sumptuous silk head scarves turn heads – even in the fashion-forward audiences of this spring and summer’s runway shows. As one of Jackie O’s favorite accessories, this brightly-colored extra instantly elevates an outfit and makes a statement. And let’s face it; it’s also a great way to disguise a less-than-perfect hair day. Drape yourself in style! (clockwise from top left) Salvatore Ferragamo tapestry scarf in navy and Derek Lam 10 Crosby shirt from Balliets, Athena drop earrings from Siempre Viva; Salvatore Ferragamo Indonesia scarf from Balliets, with America & Beyond fern green contrast velvet kimono from Siempre Viva; Echo Silk Scarf from Balliets, with cross-stitch top and white tortoise palm earrings from Siempre Viva; Salvatore Ferragamo tapestry scarf in brick from Balliets, with mustard thread earrings from Siempre Viva and L.K. Bennett London tea dress from Balliets

Photography - Shevaun Williams; Fashion Stylist - Samia Moses Harroz; Hair and Makeup - Ashley Tolman Beauty; Model - Kait Hamlin/Prim Management​; Style and Photo Assist Heather Hanson Balliets, 5801 NW Grand, OKC, balliets.com; Siempre Viva Clothing, 3 NW 9th, OKC, siemprevivaclothing.com

16

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019


rooms4kids.com

M E L A N I A C L A R A | J O H N N Y WA S | P E N D L E TO N | K L E E N | A L E M B I K A | C U T L O O S E | TA R A G A S PA R I A N | M E L A N I A C L A R A

1st time buyers, register for $100 off coupon

Buffalo Ally 710 0 N. WESTERN AVENUE | 405.858.70 0 0

J O H N N Y WA S | P E N D L E TO N | K L E E N | A L E M B I K A | C U T L O O S E | TA R A G A S PA R I A N

101 N Portland Ave, OKC | 405.605.1150

MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

M E L A N I A C L A R A | J O H N N Y WA S | P E N D L E TO N | K L E E N | A L E M B I K A | C U T L O O S E | TA R A G A S PA R I A N | M E L A N I A C L A R A

Multi-functionality for your young multi-taskers

J O H N N Y WA S | P E N D L E TO N | K L E E N | A L E M B I K A | C U T L O O S E | TA R A G A S PA R I A N

17


in the 405 FAVORITE THINGS

Alicia Adams reversible alpaca classic throw, $445 “Evoking comfort is important in decorating a room, and a cozy throw is the perfect accessory, whether the temps are frigid outside or your AC is blasting inside.”

Gregory lamp by Christopher Spitzmiller in shell pink, $3,065 “Classics that will endure are always in style. We have been using Christopher Spitzmiller lamps in our projects since the mid-’90s. The timeless shapes and fabulous range of colors breathe life into a room.”

Paul Lange, “Vera,” $6,000 “Paul Lange’s fine art photographs capture the exceptional beauty and form of nature’s flowers. A photo like this one from his ‘Big Blooms’ series would dazzle any room.”

Fanny Bolen and Bebe MacKellar

“Large Circles” by Kayce Hughes, $5,900 “Whether you are a traditionalist, modernist or somewhere in between, a piece of contemporary art adds sophistication to a room. I have a large piece by Kayce in my living room, and it is a showstopper with my chintz sofas.”

18

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

The appeal of Fanny Bolen Interiors I T ’S NO WON DER Fanny Bolen Interiors’ new shop at 2761 W Country Club has a calming, “Let’s stay a while,” feeling to it when you enter. After all, owners Fanny Bolen and Bebe MacKellar also have that effect on people, both individually and collectively. Affable and welcoming with great skill and experience, they are undoubtedly the secret behind the success of their company. Having moved locations from a long-time home in Nichols Hills Plaza, their new space has ample room for design projects while housing exquisite wares for the home. Bolen and MacKellar each have more than 25 years of experience, and exceptional eyes for beauty in design. “We know the items we need to make a house a home,” says Bolen. “Great lamps, pretty throws, books, cachepots, vases, original art and handmade objects are as important to good design as a great chair or sofa. We feel we have a curated collection that complements what we do as designers.” This team excels at creating beautiful spaces, and they have done it to perfection in their new shop, as well. - SAR A GAE WATERS

Bunny Williams Home silver hourglass table, $4,800 “Bunny Williams’ hourglass table has become a go-to for decorators. It comes in both gold and silver patina and is the perfect size for a lamp, a cachepot and some books. We love it!”

Murano glass bookends, pair $975 “We have a beautiful collection of mid-century Murano glass in the shop; this apple and pear pairing would look stunning on a bookshelf or coffee table.”

PHOTOS: PRODUCTS COURTESY FANNY BOLEN INTERIORS; PORTRAIT BY DON RISI

Kenis braided bowl by Palecek, $359 “You really can never have too many baskets, and this braided beauty would look great filled with orchids, fruit or magazines.”

Great Spaces a Specialty


in the 405 TRENDS

From Cayman’s: Wilt tee, $68; EMU Australia coral slippers, $60

From rosegold: 7-Free Nail lacquer in Bikini Coral by Floss Gloss, $9

From Tulips: Coral Liz crossbody bag, $29; S’well bottle, $48

A Pop of Coral Living large with the color of the year

From Naifeh Fine Jewelry: Red, white and pink coral bead necklace and coral earrings set in 22k gold with diamond accents, prices upon request

From Balliets: Trish McEvoy “flirt,” $28.50; Bobbi Brown “cheeky peach,” $37; Laura Mercier “creamsicle,” $25; Surratt eyeshadow “ponceau,” $20; “satin saumon,” $20 From Betsy King: Darla heels in rosebud, $225

20

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

Betsy King, 3001 Paseo, OKC, betsykingshoes.com; Tulips, 570 Buchanan, Norman, tulipshome.com; Rosegold, 7302 N Western, OKC, shoprosegold.com; Balliets, 5801 NW Grand, OKC, balliets.com; Cayman’s, 2001 W Main, Norman, shop-caymans.com; Naifeh Fine Jewelry, 9203 N Penn, OKC, naifehfinejewelry.com

PHOTOS BY SCOTTY O’DANIEL

“A N I M AT I NG A N D L IF E -A F F IR MI NG … with a golden undertone that energizes and enlivens with a softer edge” – sounds nice, doesn’t it? That’s Pantone’s description for its Color of the Year choice: Living Coral. While their select shade is one specific hue, spring is a great season for exploring the coral-ish spectrum from orange to pink and everywhere in between. There isn’t a more perfect hue to throw into the mix to make your wardrobe, your cheeks and lips, or even your nail color pop! Here are just a few splurges to help you be in the know when it comes to the it color of the year. - SAR A GAE WATERS


Tatyana Fazlalizadeh: Oklahoma is Black Now through 05/19

Don’t miss the exhibition by this Oklahomagrown, internationally known artist. Learn about free programs and activities:

okcontemp.org/tf.

Photo: Chevy Anderson

Exhibitions at Oklahoma Contemporary are always free. oklahomacontemporary.org | @okcontemporary | 3000 General Pershing Blvd. | Oklahoma City | 405 951 0000


in the 405 LAUGH LINES

What the Hack, John Prine? Real fans and red flags FOR A L L T HE T HI NGS I pooh-pooh

about social media, I do love how it connects us to people we admire or find inspiring. Ordinarily, I don’t give two flips about celebrities (exceptions made for Rob Lowe, Jude Law and Bradley Cooper, of course), but people like to interact with them via social media. My husband is no exception. He recently dashed into the room to read an exciting Instagram notification: John Prine started following you! The news got better – his lifelong idol, singer-songwriter John Prine, was not only following him on Instagram, but had messaged him, too. John Prine wanted to be Insta buddies! They began exchanging messages innocuously enough: John Prine: Hello. How are you today? Mr. Roth: Doing great! How are you? I’ve been a huge fan of yours for decades! Hope to make it to a show this year. JP: I hope you come. “John Prine wants us to try to make it to one of his shows!” Mr. Roth announced with a giddiness that reminded me of the thrill that might have washed over 10-year-old me if Tiger Beat had included a pull-out poster of Tony “Heartbeat, It’s a Lovebeat” DeFranco (who is still scorching hot, btw). “He’s just such a good human being,” Mr. Roth said. “I’m not surprised that he would just be friendly like that.” Before long, JP amped up the friendly with messages that became more frequent, almost daily. (Red flag #1.) Mr. Roth could not have been happier. For John, however, Instagram was a hassle. To continue the deeper conversations he was apparently missing during his hectic touring schedule, he suggested that the discussion move to Google Hangouts. (Red flag #2.) JP: How is your day going?

22

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

ine

John Pr

day?

re you to

ow a Hello. H

MR: It has been a you? How are f yours t! a re g great day. Doing e fan o ke it n a hug I’ve bee es! Hope to ma JP: Do you have any d a c e for d ear. pictures of you I can see? w this y to a sho (Red flags #3-8.) The questions became more specific. e. ou com I hope y JP: Where are you really from? Where are your both 9:08 AM Today parents? Do you have brother ? or sister? (Attention, red flags y going your da How is #9-15 – you’re up.) . reat day een a g b “What the … is he writing a s a h It song about your family?” I asked in disbelief. ictures e any p v a h Eventually, with a total disreu o Do y ? can see gard for punctuation or syntax, of you I John Prine confided: JP: I’m looking for someone I can definitely trust cause I have got some few things I need to do and take care of without my management knowing about it so I need one of my loyal fan [sic] to handle this for me (I’ve now wrapped myself in a red flag.) MR: You bet. JP: Did you get my message about the JP: If you handle this for me, you will Brief [sic] case? never regret it. JP: Are you still busy? (Historical note: since the dawn of JP: Will you be able to help me? mankind, nothing good has ever followed JP: Please can i still hope on helping the words, “You will never regret it.”) me out as i don’t have much time to waste JP: I got in touched [sic] by the security JP: Just hold on to the bag for a period company where I have my brief case [sic] of time kept for a while which contains some huge Mr. Roth resurfaces long enough to amounts of money and some valuable assure his idol that Operation Hold This documents that belongs [sic] to me I am Bag is on. John Prine, relieved, hastily needing you to be able to take care of asks for a meeting point (insert all the the delivery to your home, I want you to red flags) to deliver the bag. Mr. Roth please be secretive concerning this. complies, giving him an address and a Days pass with Mr. Roth now snubbing final message: “John Prine,” who, instead of touring, has MR: See you Thursday at 2! taken to blowing up Google Hangouts. What the Davidson County (TenJP: Hi. nessee) sheriff did with the briefcase is JP: Hello. anyone’s guess. - LAUREN ROTH JP: What are you doing right now.


MENTION THIS AD FOR

MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

23


in the 405 HEALTH

Life-Saving Screenings The early answer for colorectal cancer I T WA S A SU N DAY MOR N I NG – July 10, 2016 –

when Jina Tolle woke up to a sharp pain under her right rib cage. She tried to go about her normal routine … but the pain persisted, and was not going away. “I had felt the pain before, and had discussed it with several friends,” Tolle says. “They ‘diagnosed’ it as probably a bad gall bladder, so I didn’t think much about it. On that Sunday morning, however, the pain would not ease. I told my husband I needed to go to the emergency room.” High liver enzyme counts in her blood work led to an ultrasound on her liver, followed by a CT scan. “I walked into the ER at noon, a 40-year-old stay-athome mom who had a stomachache,” Tolle says. “I walked out at 4 p.m. with a stage four cancer diagnosis. “Nine days after my ER visit, eight inches and an orange-sized tumor were removed from my colon. But my liver turned out the be the most involved, consumed by five tumors. The largest one was the size of a football.” Nearly three years later, Tolle has undergone seven surgeries and 46 rounds of chemotherapy. “I have been blessed with an incredible medical team, that, luckily, are fighting for me to be here on this earth,” she says. “We continue making progress on the masses in my liver, and currently my colon is clear. I will be on chemo the rest of my life. And I hope that’s a long, long time.” March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, and Oklahoma ranks as one of the highest states in the nation regarding colorectal cancer and death rates. “In 2018, deaths from colorectal cancer exceeded 50,000 (in the U.S.),” says Janet Pulliam, Senior Manager for Hospital Systems for the Oklahoma American Cancer Society. “In Oklahoma, more than 19,000 people were diagnosed and over 1,600 died from colorectal cancer just last year. The real tragedy is that many of these cancer cases and cancer deaths occur needlessly, as they could be prevented if more people took advantage of colorectal cancer screening.” When colorectal cancer is diagnosed at the localized state, Pulliam said the five-year survival rate is 90 percent, while many people live much longer than that – and in fact, many are cured. “Unfortunately, only 39 percent of cases are diagnosed at this localized stage,” she says. “If the cancer is not detected until late stage, the five-year survival rate drops to 14 percent.” Oklahoma ranks 50th in the nation regarding colorectal cancer screening, according to Dr. Christian Ellis, a surgical oncologist at Mercy Hospital in Oklahoma City.

24

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

Jina Tolle

“Screening for colorectal cancer is an essential tool to prevent and detect colon cancer earlier,” he says, “which could translate into saving lives for Oklahomans.” Ellis said if a person has a relative who has been diagnosed with colorectal cancer or advanced polyps, they should begin screening at age 40, or 10 years before the earliest diagnosis of colorectal cancer in their relative. “Other indications for screening earlier would be a personal history of inflammatory bowel disease or an inherited family disease such as ‘Lynch Syndrome,’” he says. “Your healthcare provider can help you decide if you should begin screening at an earlier age.” A colonoscopy is the gold standard for screening, Ellis said, but the best way to determine the right test for you is to talk to your physician. “Colorectal cancer is a preventable disease, but only if there is early detection and treatment,” he says. “I want to encourage you to exercise, eat nutritional foods, maintain a healthy weight and of course, avoid tobacco and other substances that can increase your risk for cancer. As a board member of the Oklahoma American Cancer Society, I speak for its members by expressing our desire for you and your family to live a healthy and cancer-free life.”


Menopausal Medicine With over 35 years experience in Hormone Managment, we know that each patient deserves a care plan that is customized for their individual healthcare and lifestyle needs. Whether it is hot flashes, mood swings, vaginal dryness, insomnia or some combination of these and other symptoms – or none at all, it is important to learn about the changes your body is going through. We are here to help women through this shift in hormone function, offer explanations as to why specific symptoms occur and define opportunities to control and minimize these symptoms. It can range from simple over-the-counter medications to a natural form of hormone replacement therapy. At Optimal Health Associates, we are available to guide each woman along her individual path through menopause.

Find out how MonaLisa Touch™ can help you overcome vaginal laxity and urinary incontinence.

BioTE® optimizes hormone levels with tiny pellets just under the skin that release all-natural bioidentical estrogen and testosterone, and are absorbed consistently into the body as needed.

CALL TODAY TO SCHEDULE YOUR APPOINTMENT FOR THIS OR ANY OF YOUR HEALTHCARE NEEDS

405.715.4496 // OptimalHealthAssociates.com NORTH OKC - 9800 BROADWAY EXTENSION, SUITE 200 // SOUTH OKC - 3110 S.W. 89TH, SUITE 104 Optimal Health AssociatesTM DBA Optimal Health

NOEL R. WILLIAMS, M.D., F.A.C.O.G.

BENJAMIN J. BARENBERG, M.D., F.A.C.O.G.


culture

BLURRED LINES

POTENT PRICE POINTS

Liquor laws and discount ambiguities BY GREG HORTON

The verbiage in Title 37a of the state constitution was supposed to be very simple: No entity is permitted to sell alcoholic beverages at a price that is below a 6-percent mark-up on the price paid to the wholesaler. In other words, if a wine shop spends $100 on a bottle of wine, that wine has to end up in a customer’s bag at no less than $106. Simple, right? “There is some ambiguity about how that 6 percent is factored,” says State Sen. Stephanie Bice, R-Oklahoma City, one of the authors of the new legislation. “Is it on the landed cost? Purchase price?” Bryan Kerr, president of the Retail Liquor Association of Oklahoma, says, “There is no ambiguity. The 6 percent is on the price we pay to the wholesaler. Nothing else makes any sense. Landed cost has to do with the cost of the product plus freight, shipping, taxes, and that’s not something the retailer takes care of.” The 6-percent number is important because it ensures that no store engages in predatory pricing – marking products down below what the competition could reasonably be expected to charge. It protects small businesses with less volume from the pricing strategies of big-box stores, which could easily take a loss on one product while making money on hundreds of other products. Before the new law went into effect, liquor stores tended to mark products up in three broad categories: beer was about 8-10 percent, spirits about 2025 percent, and wine – the most volatile – between

26

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

PHOTO BY SCOTTY O’DANIEL

As we approach the six-month mark of Oklahoma’s new alcohol laws, at least two things are very clear: consumers have not experienced meaningful drops in prices because of the new laws, and uncertainty about pricing and incentives still abounds among the ABLE Commission, state legislators, wholesalers and retailers.


CUPID ISN’T ALWAYS RIGHT. 20 and 50 percent, with 45 percent being the average high on wine. The 6-percent minimum was supposed to bring prices down as retailers competed to offer better prices to drive business. “We haven’t seen much change outside of a few items,” Kerr says. “Big retailers are offering 6-percent mark-ups on 20-25 of the top 100 brands, but they’re trying to get 20 or more percent on everything else. Beer hasn’t changed much – macrobrews like Budweiser and Coors Light are at 5-6 percent and craft or local beer at 20 percent.” In other words, not much has changed, except buying local beer has been de-incentivized via pricing, and macrobrews are a little more expensive in spite of the actual alcohol content going from about 4 percent to 4.2 percent. A new argument about incentives and inducements is one on which Bice and Kerr agree. Both the old law and the new stipulate that inducements cannot be offered for the purchase of alcohol. What exactly is an inducement? “Currently, we have no good definition of an incentive or inducement,” Bice says. “Is happy hour an inducement? Two-for-one drink specials? Discount card? We’re looking at verbiage now for legislation down the line to clarify some of these issues.” “The language is too broad currently,” says Kerr. “And because of that, ABLE is trying to enforce a double standard.” Vance Gregory owns Edmond Wine Shop, where an ABLE agent recently told him that he could not offer a discount on purchases of six or 12 bottles of wine. Historically, retail liquor stores have offered 10 percent (or more) on the purchase of a case of wine. Gregory said he checked the language in Title 37a, and it’s identical to the old law. “What we have is a new interpretation, not a new law,” he says. “Inducements were always objects, prizes, so to speak. I couldn’t give a customer a signed baseball to get him to purchase alcohol. That’s an inducement, but quantity discounts were never interpreted as inducements.” Both Kerr and Gregory argued that the unambiguous 6-percent floor matters here, because discounts offered on quantity purchases should be legal as long as the total discount does not take the price below 6 percent. “The retailer should be able to decide what the discount is, as long as it’s within the law,” Kerr says. That 6-percent floor is problematic to other kinds of discount programs, though. Target regularly offers a 5-percent discount for using its branded credit card (Red Card). If a customer purchases one of the brands that is marked at 6 percent, the deduction taken at the register will bring the price below the legal minimum, which retailers argue is an obvious incentive or inducement. Bice said all the pricing issues are being discussed, although time is a factor: Floor bills have to be heard in the Senate by March 14. Stay tuned.

HOLLY HEFTON | FAMILY LAW & CIVIL LITIGATION 405.312.3366 | HOLLYHEFTON.COM PH OTO BY C H A RL IE NE UE NS C H WA ND E R

MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

27


Live

Music Better Is

BY JERRY CHURCH

28

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019


More than three decades ago, on July 3, 1986, my good friend Scott Booker and I drove south to Austin to experience the second Farm Aid mega-concert. Booker, who’s

PHOTO BY JAZMIN MONET

now the manager of the Flaming Lips and CEO of the Academy of Contemporary Music at UCO, was actually giddier to see our then-favorite band Green on Red the night before. Though I realized too late that my Mustang was covered with OU Sooners stickers and we were in enemy territory, it was only moments before we were high-fiving Texans and drinking Lone Stars straight out of the box. The festival spirit was already starting. The day itself was long, loud and brutally hot – I was fried to a crisp and Scott’s hands had turned Pantone 184, and at one point in the evening, I commandeered a box of Tetra Paks filled with water and started pitching them to the crowd like I was Donald Trump tossing rolls of paper towels in Puerto Rico – but the concert? It was amazing. Craziest lineup I’ve ever seen. A reappearance of Green on Red wearing the same clothes they had worn the night before, The Bellamy Brothers, The Blasters,

Steve Earle, Bon Jovi, Willie Nelson, Neil Young, X and of course, Don Johnson with Dweezil Zappa! Driving back the next day, sunburnt and exhausted, we reflected on the positives: All-day music festivals have the capacity to bring people from all backgrounds and makeup together. Music of all different genres can co-exist on one stage. People enjoying music provides total equity. Everybody can enjoy a good song. This year in Oklahoma, music lovers will have an opportunity to experience a multitude of live festivals that are dedicated to showcasing the power of music. Whether it is the blues, jazz, roots-rock, hard rock or indie tunes, there’s a bevy of chances to experience a day of outstanding music. A few points of advice: Wear sunscreen. Support local vendors and food trucks. Most festivals will have plenty of food choices and drink stations. Most of these events are free but check out their websites on what you can bring and what you can’t. Most of all, enjoy the company of your friends. You’re about to experience memory-making events, and that is a gift you can cherish forever. And remember some sage advice given in “Union Man” by the great Neil Young: “Live music is better!”

MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

29


NORMAN MUSIC FESTIVAL FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS APRIL 23-28, 2019 | BICENTENNIAL PARK, OKC ARTSCOUNCILOKC.COM

Since its inception, the Festival of the Arts has been a fantastic showcase for music and entertainment. Three stages established around Bicentennial Park provide non-stop performing art, from jazz to hip-hop to dance. “Festival of the Arts is a celebration of diversity. However, the acts do need to be family-friendly, as it is a free public event,” says Holly Hodge, communications director for Arts Council Oklahoma City. Juggling more than 300 performers over six days and three stages is no easy task. “It can be very difficult due to the limited number of spots, volume of applicants and various factors,” Hodge says. “Luckily, we have a staff liaison, two event co-chairs and a dedicated committee to help the process go smoothly and ensure that we produce an amazing experience for the performers and attendees.” Plus, of course, you also have food and art and great people-watching.

30

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

Founded in 2008, the Norman Music Festival started off as a one-day special event featuring hometown heroes Chainsaw Kittens and (Tripping Daisy) Tim DeLaughter’s Polyphonic Spree. The concert was so successful that a sequel was inevitable, but few if any could have predicted its tremendous growth and longevity. Now in its 12th year, the NMF has established itself as the premier music festival in the state, thanks in large part to incredible community support and sponsorship, branding and organization. “We loved it (playing the first NMF) and love how it’s become such a big deal over the years,” says Tyson Todd Meade, lead singer of the Kittens. Managed by nonprofit entity The Norman Music Alliance, the event now spans three days, 300-plus performers and 100,000 attendees, and it’s still free. It has become, like stormy weather, a spring staple. This year’s lineup will include The Beach Fossils from New York, rapper Black Milk with Nat Turner, Soccer Mommy, Omar Apollo, (former) Okie punk rockers Skating Polly, The Garden and Mega Ran. If you had to go to Spotify to look up these artists, you’re in good company. NMF organizers have put together an eclectic mix of rap, hip-hop, indie rock, singer-songwriters and psychedelic pop acts. Longtime fan Chad Huntington describes NMF’s lineup, “It’s a lot like getting a mix tape from that friend who’s way better at finding new music than you are, and who’s really great at introducing you to the bands that one day soon will be your favorites. “The insistence by the organizers in remaining free up to this point has caused them to be much more thoughtful with lineups than many festivals,” Huntington adds. “That model has also resulted in many more opportunities for great Oklahoma bands and other emerging artists.” Case in point: This year’s lineup also features acts from the 405 including Flock of Pigs, Jabee, Rainbows Are Free and Helen Kelter Skelter.

PHOTOS: FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS COURTESY FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS; SPORTS BY NATHAN POPPE

APRIL 25-27, 2019 | DOWNTOWN NORMAN | NORMANMUSICFESTIVAL.COM


“We loved it (playing the first NMF) and love how it’s become such a big deal over the years,”

PHOTOS: TYSON TODD MEADE BY CHARLIE NEUENSCHWANDER

- Tyson Todd Meade, lead singer of the chainsaw Kittens

HEARD ON HURD

PLAZA DISTRICT FESTIVAL

BEGINNING MARCH 16 | DOWNTOWN EDMOND CITIZENSEDMOND.COM

SEPT. 28, 2019 | PLAZA DISTRICT, OKLAHOMA CITY | PLAZADISTRICT.ORG

Presented by Citizens Bank of Edmond, Heard on Hurd is a family-friendly street festival occurring from 6-10 p.m. at the corner of Broadway and Hurd in downtown Edmond. In previous years, it has been a monthly event between March and October, but due to construction scheduled for its site, organizers will be announcing 2019 installments on a month-to-month basis. When it does return, it’s a temporary street takeover featuring local food trucks, live music, pop-up shopping and a celebration of Edmond’s community spirit. Suburbia never sounded so good!

Celebrating its 21st birthday this year (it’s legal!), the annual festival provides art, food, drink and three stages for musical performers. “We have around 35-40 performances make it into the festival,” says Selena Skorman, executive director of the Plaza District Association. “We have a music committee, made up of respected members of the local music scene, that juries in the applicants. We are looking for local, original music. We love cover bands, but do not feature them at our festival.” The Plaza District thrives on its distinctiveness, after all – why shouldn’t it encourage the same among area artists?

OKLAHOMA INTERNATIONAL BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL OCT. 3-5, 2019 | COTTONWOOD FLATS, GUTHRIE | OIBF.COM

Conceived by Byron Berline, the Oklahoma International Bluegrass Festival has become bluegrass music’s answer to the United Nations. Musicians from all over the world come to Guthrie the first weekend of October to perform and celebrate the unique genre. Historic Guthrie is a perfect setting for the festival, which was established in 1996. Now a staple and economic development driver for the central Oklahoma region, the festival draws several thousand attendees every year. MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

31


A MUSICIAN’S

PERSPECTIVE REFLECTIONS FROM MAURICE JOHNSON

Oklahoma City guitarist Maurice Johnson has become a familiar figure at music festivals, night clubs and public events – he’s been on the scene for a long time and has built a brand as a consummate professional. What was it like in the early days, getting gigs with After Five, and when you decided to pursue music as a profession? “During the early After Five years, we were a bit of an anomaly on the local music scene. Our youth, enthusiasm, diverse repertoire and perhaps the immediate word-of-mouth exposure to high-profile venue settings presented the whirlwind of opportunities that kept us working. It was surprisingly easy getting gigs, having been afforded the leverage of our popularity and broad exposure. Having pursued music as a profession, I realize that success is contingent upon my willingness to embrace change, remain in the public’s eye and maintain a sense of relevance.” As a jazz musician in Oklahoma City, have you ever reflected on the spirit and history of Charlie Christian, Jimmy Rushing and Count Basie, and what role you have in keeping OKC’s jazz history alive? “Very much so, particularly with respect to Charlie Christian. I had the privilege of co-designing and developing an official line of Charlie Christian guitars some 20-plus years ago. It was a well-deserved tribute for his significant role in jazz and the electric guitar. I perform and record with these guitars to this very day. It’s the greatest gesture that I know in keeping the depth and integrity of Oklahoma City’s jazz history alive. Charlie Christian, Jimmy Rushing and others paved the way for many Oklahoma City musicians to follow. The fact that their unique talents resonated with jazz greats the likes of Benny Goodman and Count Basie was no accident.” You’re not just an active musician; you’ve written books of mentorship and inspiration. If you had an elevator speech of advice to give to an aspiring musician, what would it be? “No doubt, we as musicians should all strive to be the best that we can be. We owe that to our audience. My suggestion to the aspiring musician is: Don’t get hung up on the idea that a music career is a contest of who’s better or the most popular. Be true to yourself and cultivate your craft.” You’ve played every room and venue imaginable. Have there been any performances or gigs that you are particularly fond of? “Yes, I’ve had the privilege of performing quite a few rooms and venues. They all hold their own memorable moments, but one in particular was the 2012 Opening Night performance in the Oklahoma City Museum of Art lobby with the Maurice Johnson Quartet. The fact that it was an up-close, personal and intimate setting appealed to me most. As guests gathered, some sat attentively on the floor just a few short feet in front of us, while others sat around on marble benches, and rows of chairs, as more stood. I’ve always been particularly partial to smaller, intimate rooms and summer night rooftop patio settings under the stars.”

32

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019


JAZZ IN JUNE JUNE 20-22, 2019 | BROOKHAVEN VILLAGE AND ANDREWS PARK, NORMAN | JAZZINJUNE.ORG

Jazz in June provides a forum over three nights to listen to contemporary and traditional jazz and blues artists under the Norman sky. It bills itself as “the hippest jazz festival around” and “a gift to our community.” It’s a gift that has kept on giving; celebrating its 36th year this summer, the festival remains free and welcoming to all ages. Stay tuned for the announcement of 2019’s special guests.

PHOTOS: MAURICE JOHNSON AND HUNTERTONES BY SHEVAUN WILLIAMS; STEPHEN SALEWON AND SOPHIA MASSAD COURTESY PASEO ARTS FESTIVAL

WOODY GUTHRIE FOLK FESTIVAL JULY 10-14, 2019 | OKEMAH | WOODYFEST.COM

The legend of Woody Guthrie was that he always had guitar in hand and was seeking an audience. He would play to anyone and often crashed union halls and meetings, ready to sing. That spirit of spreading his message is celebrated to this day. In 1997, a group of volunteers assembled to discuss ideas for honoring Woody Guthrie’s music and philosophy. They came up with the concept of a music festival, in Guthrie’s hometown of Okemah, that would allow people to visit different venues to experience his music. Getting the endorsement from Guthrie’s two children required that the festival be free and accessible to all – a promise that has been kept for the most part, although some of the multiple venues this year may include an entrance fee. The inaugural 1998 festival included Guthrie’s son Arlo Guthrie, British folk-punk-rock artist Billy Bragg, Ellis Paul, Jimmy LaFave, Joel Rafael and The Red Dirt Rangers, along with headliners Tom Paxton, Ray Wylie Hubbard, Peter Keane, Tom Skinner and Kevin Welch. This year’s lineup has not been announced, but the Woody Guthrie Coalition is working on personal invitations to artists.

PASEO ARTS FESTIVAL MAY 25-27, 2019 | PASEO DISTRICT, OKLAHOMA CITY | THEPASEO.ORG

The Paseo Arts Festival provides a fantastic opportunity to experience young up-and-coming performers from the region: with music running 10:30 a.m.-9 p.m. on two different stages Friday and Saturday, it allows 10 performance slots for each stage. Sunday is a short day, but live music is still featured. “I am always blown away by the talent in Oklahoma City and how excited bands and performers are to be a part of the festival,” says Paige Powell, program manager for the Paseo Arts Festival. “We have two stages – our North Stage has more of a chill vibe with jazz, singer-songwriters and folk musicians; on the South Stage are rock, country and performance groups. I break down the lineup by genre and try not to have two of the same genres back to back. It’s Oklahoma, and people love their country music, but I make an effort to get as many different styles and sounds as I can.”

MEDICINE STONE

AMP FESTIVAL

DATE TBD, BUT USUALLY SEPT. | DIAMONDHEAD RESORT, TAHLEQUAH | MEDICINESTONEOK.COM

AUG. 24, 2019 | FILM ROW, OKLAHOMA CITY AMPFESTOKC.COM

This unique three-day live music retreat on the beautiful Illinois River stands alone as the premier Red Dirt music experience, a genre that’s revered worldwide for its diverse sounds and quality songcraft. Aside from the music, this festival’s emphasis is focused on the great outdoors, where camping is available. The music lineup each year is always handpicked by creators Jason Boland and Turnpike Troubadours, and consists of the artists and bands whose music they themselves love and respect. It’s this kind of personal, handson attention that makes Medicine Stone feel like a “family affair,” and has drawn thousands to the event from all over the country since its inception.

The AMP (Art, Music and Power) Festival is a family-friendly, free event designed to celebrate art and music created by powerful women. Participants are selected by an open call to female artists of all mediums, female artisans and all-female or female-fronted bands or solo musicians of all music genres. Festival organizers wanted an opportunity to bring recognition to female talent, with the intent to provide an experience that will inspire future generations of female artists, artisans and musicians – entering its fourth year, it’s still rocking. A portion of the proceeds (from vendor sponsors) will support the Oklahoma City Girls Art School. MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

33


THE

SIGHTS SOUNDS OF THE

A CONVERSATION WITH CONCERT PHOTOGRAPHER TOM DUNNING

After a long career in state government, Edmond’s Tom Dunning, 59, still has a day job as the communications director for the Oklahoma Public Employees Association – but he’s a more familiar sight to many at UCO sporting events and at music festivals, flanked by cameras and lenses. Among the festivals he has photographed are Queen of the Prairie (Guthrie), G-Fest (Muskogee), Claremore Bluegrass Festival and the International Bluegrass Festival in Guthrie. How did you get interested in photography? “I’ve loved photography since I was a kid. Right out of school, I went to work for a couple of newspapers. I then went into social work and state government. After I retired from DHS, I got more into photography as a hobby and an art form. It gives me a creative outlet.” What inspires you about shooting live music? “I’m always trying to look for something different. For the genres that I follow, which is acoustic music, bluegrass, roots music, folk, it’s hard to make someone sitting there with a guitar and a microphone look different. I try to capture if they are having fun or interacting with other musicians or the audience. The best photos are made when the musicians are really interacting with each other on stage. As much as the music, how does the band play off each other?” You shoot a lot of festivals; what’s the appeal? “Festivals are just fun to be at! If you’re at a festival, it’s really difficult not to have a good time. I’ve been fortunate to shoot Old Settler’s (Festival) in Austin a couple of times, and it’s always been a pleasure. The vibe down there is really great, and the talent on stage is incredible. One thing that’s cool about festivals is that there’s also so much going on off the stage. It’s always a fun experience to see new musicians playing in tents off stage.” What are some of the best moments for you behind the camera? “Being able to photograph Los Lobos was a memorable experience. They’ve been around forever, and their music is fantastic. I have a good time shooting Heard on Hurd (in downtown Edmond). That’s a fun event; the musicians are younger and there are tons of kids around, bouncing up and down.”

! e or M ’s re e h T ! it a W Bu t Because of printing deadlines, several festival dates for 2019 had yet to be determined when we went to press on this issue. So consider this article a means of whetting your appetite for the vast number of festivals with live music that will be available in the state this year – including several in and around Tulsa, which is a bit outside our namesake coverage area. Make sure to keep an eye out for these closer to home:

34

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

Oklahoma City Jazz Festival: This event has occurred in Deep Deuce and Bricktown in the past few years. Banjo Fest: Sponsored by the American Banjo Museum in Bricktown, last year’s event was headlined by Bela Fleck. Bricktown Blues Festival: Last year’s two-night event happened in June and was highlighted by axe man Ian Moore. ACM@UCO Metro Music Fest/Series: A great event that highlights the burgeoning talent that comes from

the city’s “School of Rock.” Last year’s event was headlined by The Revolution, the late Prince’s fantastic band from “1999” and “Purple Rain.” Charlie Christian Jazz Festival: Oklahoma City’s guitar pioneer has been honored with this namesake festival for many years. Asian Night Market Festival: This event features live music and highlights the enormous economic impact and cultural impact of Oklahoma City’s Asian District.


ROCKLAHOMA PHOTOS: TOM DUNNING BY CHARLIE NEUENSCHWANDER; JOYOUS WOLF AND CHEAP TRICK BY STEVE THRASHER; BUTCHER BABIES, HALESTORM AND CROWD BY JAZMIN MONET

MAY 24-26, 2019 | PRYOR | ROCKLAHOMA.COM

With a theme of “Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Rock,” how can you not know what this festival is all about? Do yourself a favor: Go to YouTube and search for “Heavy Metal Parking Lot.” This 16-minute video was taken by two amateur filmmakers before a Judas Priest concert in Maryland in 1986. Imagine the teenagers from this video 33 years later, and that’s your primary audience that will comprise Rocklahoma. The very first Rocklahoma was actually central Oklahoma’s version of the Texxas Jam, and took place at Memorial Stadium in Norman in 1980. On that day, a bill of The Doobie Brothers, Van Halen, Sammy Hagar and Pat Benatar rocked the field. The brand was resurrected in 2008, and over the past decade, Rocklahoma has established itself as Oklahoma’s gold standard for hard rock and heavy metal music. Each day averages about 20 acts. Each night, a premier act serves as headliner. Rocklahoma consistently draws big names. This year’s lineup includes headliners Ozzy Osbourne, Disturbed, Shinedown, Bush, Jackyl, Ace Frehley, Lita Ford and many other hard rock and rap acts. MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

35


n o i t a r b e Cel A S TAYC AT I O N

OVER THE LAST SIX MONTHS, YOU’VE PLANNED EVERY DETAIL OF YOUR UPCOMING AND MUCH-NEEDED GETAWAY TO SOME FAR-FLUNG CITY.

Indulgent meals at award-winning restaurants. Wandering among timeless relics and priceless works of art. A morning stroll through a storybook park under a sunrise akin to a Monet, followed by a day of casual outdoor adventure. Since you’re away from the kids, you might even have a night on the town, pulsing with live music and excess, knowing full well that you can kick the next day’s hangover down the road another 24 hours with bottomless mimosas and yet another world-class meal, toasting that dream destination that you’re finally checking off your bucket list. Suddenly – as you zip your suitcase, turn off the lights and call an Uber to the airport – your Tuesday meeting moves to Monday and Thursday’s site visit shifts to Friday. Before you know it, that 12-course tasting menu of seared this and locally sourced that yields to yet another depressing Postmates delivery, and rather than a morning saunter amid exotic flora and fauna, you’re stubbing your toe on office furniture, wondering whether you’ll ever get away. But hold on; last-minute changes of plans aside, this scenario isn’t actually dire. While it might not include art at the Louvre or street food hot off the curbs of Bangkok, with a little bit of imagination, a staycation in Oklahoma City can be a terrific placeholder for that once-in-a-lifetime that just got kicked to 2021. OKC has evolved from the “place where we live” to a “place that people want to go.” New hotels and restorations of historic properties have generated stylish lodging opportunities, visionary chefs have brought about an explosive food scene and with a new contemporary museum on the horizon, the city’s museums continue to develop as tourism opportunities. More and more, Oklahomans are walking out their doors and heading downtown to experience Oklahoma City as if they were tourists in their own metro. This sentiment is exactly why, when looking for a getaway, taking a weekend to look at our city through the lens of a visitor could be as restorative as a weekend at the beach. “I think locals often overlook what’s in their own backyard. And sometimes we get stuck in a rut; going to our favorite restaurants and not trying something new,” says Tabbi Burwell of Visit OKC. “Our food scene is making headlines. Our attractions are bringing in renowned traveling exhibits, and developers are wanting to build in OKC.” 21c’s Melanie Briley echoes that sentiment. “The wonderful thing about making the decision to book a staycation in your hometown is that you get

36

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

to explore your city with new eyes – as if it was for the first time,” says Briley. “I think we all take for granted that we live in a culturally and historically significant city and state. Rather than merely driving through downtown on the way to work without really taking time to notice the change around us, a staycation allows for an appreciation and sense of pride for new attractions, restaurants, exhibits, even completed construction.” There is no time like the present to book a staycation, and Burwell assures us that, in terms of being a world-class destination, there’s no stopping Oklahoma City. “I can say – there’s so much new coming to OKC that it’s really hard to keep up with all of the offerings, and that’s a great feeling,” she says. “Oklahoma City is about to be an entirely new city. From the Convention Center to Scissortail Park to the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum, and the connectivity the streetcar provides to get to many of our downtown major attractions, there’s a buzz and excitement already around.”

T H E IT IN E R A R

IE S

At 405 Magazine, we know that it is our interests that drive our travel choices. Whether you’re looking for art, food, history, sport and adventure, nightlife or a smattering of all of the above, we’ve put together four perfect itineraries for your Oklahoma City staycation.

PHOTOS: 21C MUSEUM HOTEL COURTESY 21C MUSEUM HOTEL; CHIHULY AND WILEY PIECES COURTESY OKLAHOMA CITY MUSEUM OF ART; PASEO GRILL BY MATT PAYNE

T H E J OY S O

RIST U O T A E K I L C BY MATT PAYNE F SEEING OK


Art

FOR AGES, MENTION “OKLAHOMA” AND “ART” IN THE SAME SENTENCE AND, TO MOST OKLAHOMANS, LITTLE CAME TO MIND. Perhaps a smattering of western art and bronzes at the Cowboy Hall of Fame or a stroll through the Paseo District. Now though, as the Oklahoma Museum of Art continues to grow, 21c Museum Hotel thrives and Oklahoma Contemporary’s immense new facility goes up on Broadway, Oklahoma City’s art scene is changing the soul of the city. One could easily spend a weekend exploring the city’s museums and neighborhood art scenes. WHERE TO STAY No brainer: 21c. Most have now been to 21c. We’ve eaten and drunk at Mary Eddy’s, pondered mind-bending art installations and probably spun in the chairs in the theater room. But who from OKC has stayed in one of 21c’s rooms to experience the hotel in its entirety? It’s difficult to imagine a Ford automotive plant being converted into a world-class hotel, but that’s exactly what happened at 21c. Natural light spills through enormous windows, filling the hotel’s varied and well-appointed rooms and suites. Each room’s industrial frame is brought to life with contemporary décor and original artwork, but don’t stay in the room too long … This is only the starting place. WHAT TO DO Many of us go to events or touring exhibits at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art, but how often does anyone take their time enjoying the many pieces that are there permanently? On this staycation, take your time moving through the museum’s remarkable permanent collection, and when you’re done, stop and see what might be playing in the theater later in the evening. Grab a beautiful lunch at the Museum Café. Nature is an unparalleled artist, so consider a promenade through the Myriad Gardens, and don’t forget to swing over to Deep Deuce to take in the latest display of creativity from captivating gallery Artspace

(clockwise from above) The avant-garde, art-filled 21c Museum Hotel; the OKC Museum of Art’s Chihuly tower and new acquisition “Jacob de Graeff” by Kehinde Wiley; grilled Atlantic salmon at Paseo Grill.

at Untitled. Next, move to the world of street art: Hop in an Uber and make your way to the Plaza District and check out Plaza Walls. Managed by the Oklahoma Mural Syndicate, Plaza Walls is a rotating project featuring murals by some of the city’s top artists, and the project has been so successful that it’s getting a dedicated gallery, opening March 8 during LIVE on the Plaza. Plan your staycation on the first Friday of the month and you can venture to First Fridays on Paseo. On First Fridays, artists all along Oklahoma’s first art district open their doors to the public. Spend an evening not just looking at art but visiting with the artists – and since you’re there, head over to Paseo Grill, where the salmon is among the best in Oklahoma. From there, if there isn’t a film of interest playing at the Museum of Art, check out a live performance, be it theater, ballet, music or otherwise, at the Civic Center before heading back to 21c for a nightcap at Mary Eddy’s Lounge and another pass through the hotel’s incredible art museum.

MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

37


y r o t s i H

colorful and varied story, but has done an amazing job of preserving that history – and one easily could spend a weekend learning about just how our city and state have come to be what they are. WHERE TO STAY If history is the theme of your staycation weekend, then you must stay at the most historic hotel – and that is, without a doubt, the Skirvin Hilton Hotel in downtown. Besides being thoroughly stylish, the eight-story, 525-room hotel is the city’s oldest and is noted as one of the Historic Hotels of America. WHAT TO DO Since history is what you’re indulging, begin your day at historic Cattlemen’s Steakhouse in Stockyard City. While known for steak dinners, a chicken fried steak breakfast at Cattleman’s is the perfect way to pack calories for a busy

38

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

day. Next, head to the Oklahoma History Center. This remarkably curated museum takes visitors into multiple aspects of the state’s history, covering topics from the oil industry to aviation; television icons to the Oklahoma City Thunder. “The Oklahoma History Center is a great place to begin the exploration of our state’s historic treasures,” says Director Bob Blackburn. “There, a visitor can see, hear and experience the (clockwise from left) The Skirvin Hilton has watched over downtown for more than a big picture, from century; TV’s past on display at the Oklahoma History Center; the delectable Honey American Indians & Heat fried chicken special at Florence’s Restaurant. and land runs to popular culture and free enterprise. The response, chronicled in the Oklakey to appreciating the historic places of homa City National Memorial & Muthe state is understanding how it all fits seum. Often, we pass this stunning together. The exhibits at the History Cenedifice without thought, and those ter provide the glue that binds the story of us who live here can sometimes into a narrative that makes sense.” You forget how April 19, 1995, affected walk out of the History Center prouder to our city. A walk through the musebe an Oklahoman. um and memorial grounds not only Cruise down 23rd Street for a fried reminds visitors about that horrific chicken lunch at Florence’s Restaurant day but is a testament to how far before visiting the National Cowboy and we’ve come as a city. For dinner, Western Heritage Museum. And – unforenjoy a steak at Broadway 10, the tunately – you can’t begin to talk about cornerstone of Automobile Alley, Oklahoma’s history without mentioning and end your night with a cocktail the OKC bombing, and the community at the Skirvin’s Red Piano bar.

PHOTOS: SKIRVIN HILTON BY MATT PAYNE; OKLAHOMA HISTORY CENTER EXHIBIT COURTESY OKLAHOMA HISTORY CENTER; FLORENCE’S BY SCOTTY O’DANIEL

IF YOU’RE EAGER TO DIVE DEEPLY INTO YOUR CITY’S HISTORIC NARRATIVES, YOU CHOSE A GOOD PLACE TO LIVE. OKC not only has a


PHOTOS: WAFFLE CHAMPION, CAFÉ CUVÉE, TAMASHII AND CAPITALS BY SCOTTY O’DANIEL; PATRONO, KITCHEN AT COMMONPLACE, CAFÉ DO BRASIL BY MATT PAYNE; AMBASSADOR COURTESY AMBASSADOR HOTEL: LUDIVINE COURTESY LUDIVINE

Food

A CULINARY ADVENTURE ACROSS OKLAHOMA CITY IS FAR FROM LIMITED TO ONE PARTICULAR AREA OF THE METRO, but if you had to designate one spot the premier food neighborhood, Midtown would certainly make a case for the title. In fact, with everything from Nonesuch to Kitchen at Commonplace, one’s staycation in Midtown could last a week without eating at the same place twice. WHERE TO STAY At the center of the food mecca that is Midtown is the Ambassador Hotel. The historic art deco boutique hotel first went up in 1928, and 90 years later, it is still one of the city’s most impressive. Inside the hotel is elegant-but-welcoming French bistro Café Cuvee, and on the top floor is O Bar, whose rooftop patio boasts an incredible view of Midtown and beyond. Launch your staycation here as you take in the bird’s-eye view of the restaurants you’ll visit as you eat your way across OKC’s most exciting dining scene. WHAT TO DO Saunter out of your hotel and make your way down the street to Waffle Champion for a casual late breakfast or get some healthy fare and drink in the local atmosphere at Elemental Coffee, then meander to Bleu Garten. Although at Bleu Garten beer is king, this outdoor area hums with all kinds of casual games, from Giant Jenga to Cornhole, to pass time between meals. There is always a food truck in case you need a snack. For lunch, be internationally inspired. If Asian sounds good, grab noo-

(clockwise from left) Sweet and savory temptations from Waffle Champion; Patrono Italian Restaurant; Ludivine; Café Cuvée; Tamashii Ramen; Capitals Ice Cream; Café do Brasil and Kitchen at Commonplace; Midtown’s stylish Ambassador Hotel.

dles and savory broth at Tamashii Ramen House or incredible Korean barbeque bowls at Gogi Go. If it’s more a Latin American theme that’s calling to you, try 1492 New World Latin Cuisine, Café do Brasil or Barrios Fine Mexican Dishes. Next, try Fassler Hall for some (more) beer and bowling – and perhaps a sausage – before heading back to the Ambassador to polish up. Internationally acclaimed restaurants Nonesuch (make reservations well in advance), and Ludivine are just a short walk away. For some of the best Italian in Oklahoma City, hop on a scooter and proceed a little closer to Film Row for dinner at Patrono, where the sweet potato gnocchi and the carbonara slug it out for best pasta in the metro. Capitals Ice Cream is the stop for a custom dessert, and top it off with a nightcap on the rooftop at O Bar – looking out over the neighborhood whose food scene you just conquered.

MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

39


MODES OF IO N T R A N S P O R TAT

IT IS HARD TO IMAGINE HOW ADVENTURE MIGHT BECOME A CENTRAL THEME TO A (FLAT) URBAN AREA, but in

the last decade, Oklahoma City has managed to do just that. From our Adventure District (Science Museum Oklahoma, the OKC Zoo, Softball Hall of Fame and Remington Park) to the Boathouse District and the Oklahoma River, one can now have a high-octane adventure without having to leave the 405. WHERE TO STAY Bricktown is just a stone’s throw from the Boathouse District, and the understated yet sophisticated AC Hotel by Marriott, in the heart of Bricktown, is the ideal spot to launch your adventure staycation. WHAT TO DO Begin your day with a walk through the Oklahoma City Zoo. Sanctuary Asia, the zoo’s newest exhibition, features a variety of wildlife from all parts of Asia including a Komodo dragon, a cassowary (think colorful ostrich) and delightful red pandas, as well as a new rhino exhibition. Next, you’ll want to go back toward Deep Deuce for lunch at the new La Baguette, then take a trip through the Bricktown Canal on the Water Taxi. And speaking of water, visit Riversport – which opens for the season on the weekend of March 16 with a St. Patrick’s Day surprise – for an afternoon of rafting, kayaking or climbing on the ropes course, followed by a scenic spin on the huge Wheeler Ferris Wheel. Grab dinner in Deep Deuce at The Wedge Pizzeria, or, if you’re wanting something more substantial, try Mickey Mantle’s Steakhouse. If you’re craving some night adventure, mix things up at Michael Murphy’s Dueling Piano Bar – because while it’s weird to go to a dueling piano bar in your hometown, you’re on staycation, so piano bars are now a must. And since drinking is an adventure of its own, be sure to stop at

40

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

OKC STREETCAR The streetcar is one of the city’s most exciting new features, and it’s a terrific way to combine a little walking and public transportation to get around the heart of the core. The streetcar features two loops with a total of 22 stops in and around downtown, Bricktown and Midtown. For routes, stops and fare information, visit okcstreetcar.com.

SCOOTERS Like them or hate them, electric scooters have become a part of the Oklahoma landscape – and if you’re trying to get from the Colcord to Bricktown for a baseball game, there are worse ways to go. These scooters require a smartphone, an app and a sense of adventure. For a couple of dollars, you can zip around the city, leave the scooter at your destination and pull up the app to find one nearby when you’re ready to go again. (clockwise from left) Make a splash at Riversport’s artificial rapids course; red pandas rule the roost at the OKC Zoo; Bricktown’s comfortable new AC Hotel by Marriott; Deep Deuce deliciousness at The Wedge.

The Jones Assembly (on Film Row) or hit up Whiskey Chicks for some live music. Oh, and if you’re a sports fan, take your pick: The OKC Dodgers return to a newly upgraded baseball diamond at Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark April 4, the OKC Thunder are making a playoff positioning push inside Chesapeake Energy Arena, and a new season kicks off for OKC Energy FC soccer club on March 16. All three boast outstanding atmospheres.

SPOKIES Spokies is a bike share program with eight stations across the metro, including Deep Deuce, Bricktown Ballpark, OKC Memorial and Myriad Gardens. The bikes can be rented in 30-minute intervals, or up to 60 minutes with a purchased pass; visit spokiesokc.com for info.

PHOTOS: RAPIDS COURTESY OF RIVERSPORT; RED PANDA COURTESY OKC ZOO; AC HOTEL MARRIOTT COURTESY AC HOTEL MARRIOTT; WEDGE PIZZA BY SCOTTY O’DANIEL

e r u t n e Adv

Oklahoma City is a driver’s town, and because we get about largely behind the wheel, we miss some of our bustling metro’s local flavor. On your staycation, ditch the car and explore the city as a visitor would – in a manner that allows you to take in not just the city’s sights, but the scents and sounds and spirit, as well.


JazzMONDAYS in mi town

1200 N. Walker Avenue | 405.898.8170 @OBarOKC

Approachable French Fare in Midtown

@CafeCuveeOKC

1200 N. Walker Avenue 405.898.8120 CafeCuvee.com


E N G A G I N G - E N R I C H I N G - C A P T I VA T I N G

405 MAGAZINE’S

Museum & Gallery Guide Coming May 2019

Share upcoming events, exhibitions and must-see experiences with more than 130,000 affluent readers

RESERVE YOUR SPACE NOW!

405.842.2266 | info@405magazine.com


travel

PHOTO BY ELAINE WARNER

All Kinds of Blue The National Blues Museum in St. Louis is dedicated to preserving and celebrating the genre that it considers the foundation of all American music. If you have wanderlust in your heart and music on your mind, it’s one of a handful of must-see destinations.

MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

43


travel

WANDERLUST

SOUNDS OF ADVENTURE

Marvelous musical getaways BY ELAINE WARNER

44

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

THE WEEKEND TRIP: ST. LOU-EY BLUES The blues were born in the South – songs from the souls of slaves – as African roots combined with folk music, vaudeville and music hall influences. As the blues spread from rural areas to the cities, the music adopted different characteristics. The National Blues Museum in St. Louis offers great background from earliest expressions through modern musicians,

PHOTOS BY ELAINE WARNER

WA N DER LUST is a magnificent word for a powerful feeling – a strong longing or impulse to travel. But don’t think of “travel” as a synonym for simply moving from point A to point B, because it’s more personal than that. People travel to new or familiar destinations for health, curiosity, work, adventure, sport and to indulge. People travel to grieve, to forget and to remember. They travel to satisfy, excel and to celebrate. Be it a bucket-list trip to Botswana’s Okavango Delta or an overnight trip to the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, when we travel, we come back transformed. We’re sharing suggestions on how to experience a particular travel theme close to home and on the other side of the world, so let us ignite your sense of wanderlust and help you define what travel means to you. This month’s theme: MUSIC.


SPRING TRADITIONS

WELCOME THE PLANTING SEASON Our campus tells the story of the resilient Chickasaw people. Share in the discovery of our traditions and join us in celebrating Spring’s vitality with daily cultural activities! ChickasawCulturalCenter.com • Sulphur, OK • 580-622-7130

Sights and sounds of Spring have emerged all over campus. OUR SKY PAVILION offers a

bird’s-eye view of our Traditional Village and the Chickasaw National Recreation Area.

Tour lush gardens where the “THREE SISTERS,” beans, corn and squash, have taken root.


travel

WANDERLUST

and traces its influence on rhythm and blues, rock and roll, soul and hip-hop. Plus, it offers live performances twice a week on Howlin’ Fridays and Soulful Sundays. Two of the best blues venues in town are the Broadway Oyster Bar and B.B.’s Jazz and Blues. Both are in historic buildings – which, not so coincidentally, both served at one time as bawdy houses. The menu at the Oyster Bar is more extensive and includes lots of Cajun favorites. So, depending on whether you are guided by your stomach or your ear, check the menus for both and see which artists are appearing. Or stop in at both; they’re quite close to one another. One of the city’s signature festivals is the Big Muddy Blues Festival over Labor Day weekend. More than two dozen area artists – many nationally known – will perform on seven different stages in LaClede’s Landing by the river. Find info at explorestlouis.com and bigmuddybluesfestival.com.

Jones draw fans. And tours of the mothership of country – the Ryman Auditorium – are always popular. The Grand Ole Opry, once a staple of the Ryman, is now part of the Opryland Resort, a megaplex of hotel, convention center, water park, shopping and golf. One of my favorite stops was the Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum, showcasing the often-unrecognized musicians and technicians who make the stars’ music even more magical. Festivals, concerts and other special events happen yearround. Nashville’s signature event is the CMA Fest – a four-day celebration featuring hundreds of artists and over 1,000 musicians on a dozen stages. The biggest concerts at Nissan Stadium require a four-day pass and lots of bucks, but almost everything else is free. CMA Fest is June 6-9 in 2019, its 47th year. Music City really does have a song in its heart. And the beat goes on. For more information, check out visitmusiccity.com and cmafest.com.

THE ANNUAL GETAWAY: GRAND OLE NASHVILLE If you have a country-lovin’ bone in your body, a trek to Nashville is a must. And while country is king here, you’ll also find plenty of other genres: rock, blues, jazz and classical music from the Grammy-winning Nashville Symphony. The first stop has to be the Country Music Hall of Fame. Explore decades of musical history from Appalachian roots to the glitter and glamour of today’s biggest stars. Check out the plaques in the Hall of Fame – including Oklahoma notables – and enjoy the color and sinuous figures in Thomas Hart Benton’s painting, “The Source of Country Music.” Take the Historic RCA Studio B tour. If you’re lucky, George will be your guide; he lives and breathes music and knows all the inside stories of the stars and recordings that made this place famous. The tour also does a drive-by of other important music landmarks. The Downtown/SoBro area is alive with music day and night. Honky tonks, eateries and souvenir shops line South Broadway, and sidewalks are crowded with visitors enjoying the strum and twang spilling out of open doors. Museums honoring favorites such as Johnny Cash, Patsy Cline, Merle Haggard and George

For romantics who dream big – and have the bucks to make their dream come true – consider a trip to Tuscany to hear the spectacular Andrea Bocelli in his hometown of Lajatico. Once a year, he appears at the Teatro del Silenzio, an outdoor amphitheater outside the small Tuscan village. This year’s concerts are July 25 and 27. The first date was sold out by mid-January, so chances of getting tickets for this year are slim – maybe plan now for next year. Chat with Victor Neal at Prime Time Travel in Edmond – he put together a great Italy trip for me. He can do it all for you, from connecting with an organized tour to arranging a custom tour complete with private driver. Or go to the source - Bocelli Farmhouse/Great Italy Tour offers all-inclusive luxury vacation packages and exclusive tours including private wine tastings with the Bocelli family at the Officine Bocelli Restaurant, and visits to the Bocelli family vineyards and Alpemare Beach Club. For more info, visit greatitalytour.com.

46

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

PHOTOS: NASHVILLE BY ELAINE WARNER; TUSCANY COURTESY BOCELLI FARMHOUSE

THE BUCKET LIST: TI AMO, TUSCANY


MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

47


Meet Me Women’s Contemporary Apparel & Accessories

OKC’S BEST ROOFTOP BAR!

Nhu Avenue is a women’s contemporary apparel and accessories store that offers quality classic style at an affordable price. We offer brands such as Blank Denim, Adelyn Rae, Spanx, Le Specs, Rayban, and Kendra Scott.

Drinks with a stunning view.

1111 N Walker Ave 405.778.8387 nhuavenue.com Nhu Avenue @nhuavenue nhuavenue

7th Floor of Ambassador Hotel | OBarOKC.com |

The Perfect Place for Planners, Pens, Cards and Stationery

TRADE Men’s Wares was founded on the idea of bringing a store to OKC that specialized in products blending style with rugged masculinity. We’re a quality retailer for apparel, grooming, gifts, and accessories.

Chirps & Cheers was created celebrating life’s everyday chirps & extraordinary cheers.

1112 N Walker Ave #102 | 405.595.5018 trademenswares.com

1112 N Walker Ave #101 | 405.509.6336 | chirpsandcheers.com


in Midtown The Black Scintilla is a lifestyle boutique that not only carries sizes xs to 5x, but also offers personal one on one styling sessions. We specialize in making every woman feel beautiful inside and out and also offer complimentary hemming alterations, gift wrapping, affordable prices, and we are dog friendly. And with our carefully selected variety of giftable items, you're sure to find the perfect gift for anyone on your list.

1112 N Walker Ave #104 405. 824.7599 blackscintilla.com BlackScintilla @blackscintilla

Meet Stella...

Chef Melissa Aust, General Manager Todd Davis and owner Lori Burson are helping to introduce OKC diners to the mouthwatering flavors of modern Italian cuisine, and to the Italian philosophy of treating every meal like a celebration with friends and family. Stella is celebrating 9 years of providing savory dishes that change with the seasons and an atmosphere that’s always warm and welcoming – and with their Sunday night service and lovely patio in the heart of Midtown, it’s the perfect time to pay Stella a visit.

Julia McLish, owner

Chef Melissa Aust, General Manager Todd Davis and Lori Burson, owner Tuesday-Thursday 11am-10pm Friday 11am-11pm Saturday Brunch 10:30am-2:30pm, Dinner 5pm-11pm Sunday Brunch 10:30am-2:30pm, Dinner 5pm-9pm Monday Closed

stellaokc.com | 405.235.2200 | 1201 N Walker Ave

Barkeep in Midtown is a supply shop and full bar that offers a wide range of cocktail ingredients, tools, and drinkware. We also have a variety of learning and interactive experiences such as cocktail classes, tastings, bar takeovers and more. Come #drinkandshop!

1121 N Walker Ave | 405.613.5672 barkeepokc.com

Midtown offers: 28 restaurants • 6 spots for a cup of Joe • 1 dog park • 4 streetcar stops 2 locations to grab a Spokies bike • 13 local retail shops • 2 places to lay your head


Exclusively

EDMOND The city motto of “A Great Place to Grow” isn’t merely wishful thinking - Edmond continues to expand and develop at an impressive rate, adding beautiful homes and neighborhoods, exciting new restaurants and merchants alongside longestablished (and still beloved) classics, public art and plenty of things to see and do. For shopping, dining and exploring all the pleasures it has to offer, there’s no time like the present to visit again and again.

50

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019


MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

51


EXCLUSIVELY EDMOND

 

New Markdowns!

Carousel Consignment Furniture Just as Nice the Second Time Around

Schedule your personal tour today!

We offer a continuum of care. Our memory care programming is designed around each resident, from our individualized culinary program, to our Cherished Connections that focuses on recognition, negotiation, collaboration, stimulation, and relaxation. We celebrate old memories and foster beautiful new ones here at The Veraden. Speak with one of our memory care experts and learn more today!

405.359.1230 | VeradenLife.com

AL 5545-5545

52

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

10 am.-7pm. Mon-Fri 10 am.-5 pm. Sat

2201 W. Edmond Rd. (405) 285-1250


YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN OUTDOORS! ®

Event and Monthly Yard Sprays

Permanent Mosquito Misting Systems An Oklahoma-based company with 13 years in business, an A+ rating with the Central Oklahoma Better Business Bureau and exceptional customer reviews, SWAT believes that “You have the right to remain outdoors!” Protect your yard and family from mosquitos – Call SWAT today!

405.610.7928 | SWATOKC.COM

If You Have A System, We Can Service It


EXCLUSIVELY EDMOND

A SHORT DRIVE WELL WORTH YOUR TIME

www.swansonsfireplaceandpatio.com


home Let It Shine

PHOTO BY DON RISI

“The older I get, the more color I want in my life,� says Lisa Powell, so the north Norman home she shares with husband Dick is filled with vibrant hues and vitality. The couple are avid art collectors, including several pieces portraying landscapes in and around western New Mexico.

MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

55


home HABITAT

FLEXIBILITY FOR THE FAMILY The Pryors’ Norman compound

BY CHRISTINE EDDINGTON PHOTOS BY DON RISI

56

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

Lisa and Dick entertain friends by the dozens, often for OU-Texas weekend, the 4th of July and, in years past, with a Thanksgiving turkey fry. Colorful coral, teal and lime paired with neutral flooring and cabinetry make for a clever funky-meets-classic feeling in the spacious kitchen, breakfast area and reading nook.

W HE N L ISA A N D DICK PRYOR bought their north Norman home five years ago, they needed a property with a flexible floorplan, able to accommodate up to three generations of their family – including six children, nine grandchildren and Dick’s late mother Nell. They would rarely be in residence all at once, but at holidays, the Pryor house is filled to the brim, and at any other time of year, children and grandchildren are in and out, ebbing and flowing with various celebrations and birthdays. Theirs is a blended family, the result of a romance that began the moment Dick laid eyes on Lisa when they were underclassmen at the University of Oklahoma in the mid-1970s and came full circle some 20 years later when the pair reconnected. Dick keeps a photo of Lisa from college on a shelf in his office, and it’s clear that the couple was meant to be together. Both are political junkies, whose lives could easily be the fodder for an Oklahoma adaptation of “The West Wing.”


Many will recognize Dick from his decades in broadcasting on the radio and television in north Texas, Tulsa and Oklahoma City. He was the anchor of OETA’s news report for 25 years. These days, he’s the general manager at KGOU, the University of Oklahoma’s public radio station – a position he’s held for a couple of years now, and one which brings his career full circle. “My very first gig on the radio was at KGOU in 1974,” he says. “It was September, and a friend of mine and I had heard that KGOU would let students on the air. We went in and watched some guys do a scoreboard show, and the producer said, ‘Can you guys do that?’ Of course we said, ‘Sure,’ and he said, ‘Great, you can do it The Pryors have recently resolved to add more color to their lives, and have begun a wellnext week.’” curated collection of art. Many of their pieces are bold landscapes of vistas in and around The trouble was that Pry- the Santa Fe and Taos areas of New Mexico, a part of the country they both love. or had never done a radio show, but he had an ace in the hole. “As a kid, I would listen to it was an information transfer. After I left the classroom, I baseball games on the radio when I was supposed to be asleep, worked at the state level to impact other teachers.” for hours and hours,” he says, and that early immersion in The Oklahoma Educators Association (OEA) asked her sportscasting enabled him to launch his career. “Those listening to work with them, and soon Lisa became avidly involved in skills have also served him well as a spouse,” Lisa says, laughing. politics, which became a passion for her, as it did for Dick. “I He soon scored airtime on KNOR radio, one of the stations he served a two-year term as the chairman of the democratic party surreptitiously listened to as a kid, and on KAFG, which is now in Oklahoma, and during my time in that role, eight out of nine KJYO, doing play-by-play for El Reno’s high school basketball state officials were reelected,” she says. teams. “I was a full-time student at OU, and was working for three radio stations at the same time,” he says. The kid had gumption. From there, a slew of TV and radio jobs ensued, which have garnered him three Emmys. He also found time to attend law school, and opened a practice with a fellow lawyer and childhood friend for a few years before returning to television. “In 2016, I was asked to begin teaching at OU’s journalism school,” he says. “I taught mass communications law as an adjunct, and while I was doing that, the opportunity to take on the position of general manager of KGOU came along … and here I am. I love it.” Lisa’s career has also come full circle, and like Dick, she’s come back to OU, happily. “I met Dick when he was at KGOU and I was a work-study. My ‘job’ as a student was with the Oklahoma Center for Continuing Education,” she says. After graduating, she and Dick went their separate ways. Fast forward to 1994, when Lisa returned to Norman to teach at Central Mid High, where she created an award-winning Dick and Lisa Pryor, one of Oklahoma’s best-known power couples, share a smile social studies program. “I got into teaching late. I was 37 when I in front of part of a bold acrylic painting of a stand of aspens by Norman artist entered the classroom and once I did, it just felt natural, because Tim Kenney. MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

57


home HABITAT

(Above) The Pryors’ formal dining room could easily double as a library. Both are avid readers and share a natural curiosity and love of the written word. The home’s previous owner, Tom Bevel, used the room as a boardroom for his business, which operated from the home. Bevel is one of the foremost bloodspatter experts in the nation, and he and son Cody built a “splatter lab” in the home’s garage apartment, one which is now simply extra room for guests.

Turns out Dick is not the only journalist in the family. Lisa did a stint as editor of the Hobart Daily Democrat before focusing her career on education. “My passion is information,” she says. “I love to connect people, to write, tell stories and to transfer knowledge. I am a connector of facts and figures, and audiences.” She spent five and a half years hop-scotching across the country for the National Center on Time and Learning, which she found exhilarating but ultimately exhausting. Her current position, serving as the director for program development and innovation for the vice president of outreach at OU, allows her to do what she loves: research and information share. They’re a bit of a power couple, avid travelers, art collectors and the gracious hosts of several annual gatherings for dozens of friends. “Dick has fostered and encouraged my love of color,” Lisa says. “When he and I married, our love of collecting art just started. Some of our collection is local, some is from New Mexico, and much of it is about color. The older I get, the more color I want in my life.”

58

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

Upstairs, the Pryors retreat from the stresses of the day in this cozy, memorabilia-filled hideout. There is a nine-foot projection television on the wall, a well-stocked fridge and plenty of spots to settle in, including a roomy, pillow-filed window seat beloved by grandchildren and Lisa alike. Both Pryors are Sooner born and Sooner bred, and their collection of football, baseball and hockey ephemera covers nearly every available surface. Letter sweaters belonging to Lisa’s father Cecil Morris, co-captain of OU’s 1955 national champion team, hangs next to Dick’s grandfather’s letter sweater. The senior Dick Pryor attended Southeastern Oklahoma State University in the 1920s.


RESIDENTIAL MOVING

Your belongings are what make your home… home. We specialize in home moves – any size, any distance.

COMMERCIAL MOVING

Business moves can be complex, difficult-to- manage affairs. We’ll handle the move so you can focus on everything else.

CORPORATE RELOCATION

Our packing, moving and storage services make us the perfect partner in relocating your valued employees.

LONG-DISTANCE MOVING

Across the state, the country or even the globe, our packers and movers help you in these challenging moves.

1700 S EASTERN AVE, OKC | 405.672.4425 | ACEATLAS.COM

www.fannyboleninteriors.com

REMODEL | BUILD | CUSTOM LENDING FOR EVERY TYPE OF HOME

OKLAHOMA CITY | NORMAN | VBANK.COM

MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

59


home DÉCOR

From Mister Robert: Hand-loomed, organic abstract pattern rug, $2,955; Double gourd ceramic silhouette lamp with coral reef glaze on gold leaf mount, $395; Lulu table ottoman, $595

Living in Coral A vital, vibrant shade for 2019 From Henry Home Interiors: Kyra quilted chair, starting at $1,965; Original artwork by Carol Hu, $2,495; Coral accent boxes, $445

PA N TON E’S COL OR of the year most definitely livens things up for 2019. A beachy hue that evokes visions of sunsets and sandy shorelines, Living Coral is a color to live in. As with every annual pick, it’s not necessarily the exact color that starts to permeate the design world – different variations are soon to appear in everything from dining ware to furniture, not to mention other trends (see page 20). We’ve run the gamut here with everything from seating to art. Living Coral, or any shade from the lighter or darker shades of the family, is a great accent to add into your decor to freshen things up and kickstart spring living. - SAR A GAE WATERS

Henry Home Interiors, 3720 W Robinson, Norman, henryinteriors.com; Mister Robert, 109 E Main, Norman, misterrobert.com; Fanny Bolen Interiors, 2761 W Country Club, OKC, fannyboleninteriors.com

60

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

PHOTOS: FANNY BOLEN INTERIORS BY DON RISI; MISTER ROBERT AND HENRY HOME INTERIORS SUPPLIED

From Fanny Bolen Interiors: Fabric prices on request – China Seas Aga reverse watermelon on tinted linen; Alan Campbell Mojave corals on tinted linen; Quadrille Henriot floral pinks on ecru linen; Framed acrylic dots on paper by Stephanie Henderson, $500 each; SkLO drinking glasses, set of 4, $242


dining Having a Ball

PHOTO BY SCOTTY O’DANIEL

If you’re planning a visit to the new Ned’s Starlite Lounge on N May, expect to enjoy yourself … especially if these arancini – creamy risotto wrapped around a core of mozzarella cheese and then breaded, fried and served with a spectacular roasted tomato reduction – are at the top of your list.

MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

61


dining

LOCAL FLAVOR

GOLD AND OLDIES Good tastes shine at Ned’s Starlite Lounge

BY STEVE GILL PHOTOS BY SCOT T Y O’DANIEL

SH A K E SPE A R E W ROT E that “what’s past is prologue,” meaning that the situations and circumstances we find ourselves in today are the result of decisions made previously. Granted, the Bard was referring to matters of life and death … but consider that without the confluence of a landmark OKC restaurant closing, a decades-long catering career and an appreciation for deliberately, distinctively, dazzlingly out-ofdate decor, diners of today wouldn’t have the chance to choose Ned’s Starlite Lounge.

62

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019


The restaurant is a passion project for expert caterer Ned Shadid and family, one that was in the works longer than they expected – “We thought we’d be able to do it in three months, and it took us six,” Shadid says of renovating the space – but was in his mind for a good deal longer than that. “I had this concept in my pocket for 20 years,” he says, but he and his wife Stacy got caught up touring with and catering for Bon Jovi, Kelly Clarkson, Luke Bryant and other musical stars. One of the primary factors that made Shadid decide to pull the trigger on his plan was the recent availability of this space, which had previously been home to the Nomad II Italian-American Grill. It was part of legendary OKC restaurateur Jack Sussy’s legacy, and held special signifigance for Shadid: “My parents ran the first Sussy’s years ago, and I ate at the Nomad for years,” he says. If you, like him, frequented Nomad back in the day, you wouldn’t recognize it now; it hardly feels like the same space. Gone are the low lighting and black-centric color scheme, replaced by a more spacious feeling and joyfully retro decor – shiny gold-patterned and textured wallpaper, velvet curtains, gold chairs with tufted patterns on the back, eye-catching corner booths done in gold by Plugge’s Upholstery, poured concrete floors, striated wallpaper and vintage tile in the bathrooms, a huge, broad wooden bar that seats 16 and is actually upholstered along the front with carpet even shaggier than my grandparents’ in my earliest memories of their house … even the door is on the east side of the building now rather than the north (much to the confusion of some old regulars, said Shadid). Several of his clientele are former regulars, but not all – on my visits to the Starlite Lounge, I’ve been struck by its cross-demographic appeal. The parking lot held a shiny Mercedes beside a slightly battered pickup, and behind me a group of millennials sat chatting about podcasts near a white-mustached gent placidly mowing through an enormous chicken-fried steak. Good food NED’S STARLITE LOUNGE brings people together, apparently. Speaking of which, the food is quite 7301 N May, OKC good, with a menu that’s a culmination of 405.242.6100

all the decades of Shadid’s catering experience and covers a lot of bases – chicken wings to a sampler plate of Mediterranean appetizers, and a salmon filet to a house salad topped with seared tenderloin. Beef is the prime mover in two of the menu’s brightest stars, in fact. The Nomad burger’s sautéed peppers and onions and melted mozzarella are nice, but it’s the fried pepperoni (a delicious nod to one of the former restaurant’s house specialties) and heavenly garlic tomato sauce that immediately make it one of the city’s best burger options. Messy, but spectacular. If you want to opt for a more Southwestern flavor profile, get the massive serving of tender, crispy-coated chicken fried steak doused in a nicely balanced poblano-cream reduction. “It is our best seller,” says Shadid. “That and the Nomad burger. And the arancini.” Specificity aside, he continues, “I’m a chicken fry fan” – and it shows. The doors to this longtime dream finally opened in late September, and he said it’s going well so far. “We’re doing a lot of birthday parties, a lot of happy hour groups; it’s been kind of fun.” I’m looking forward to trying out some of the ample cocktail list, myself. The Shadids’ restaurant is a nice nod to the past, and an acknowledgement that, for all the city’s marvelous growth and development over the century so far, the OKC dining scene wasn’t invented whole cloth in 2000. Whether you remember the olden days or simply enjoy classic, old-school flavors, the Starlite Lounge is a great place to raise a glass to the best of good times. MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

63


dining

CHEF’S TABLE

In Search of Complexity Sean Cummings’s drive for culinary nuance

64

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

For Chef Cummings’s vegetarian lasagna recipe, go to 405magazine.com/Eat-Drink

uncanny ability to read a recipe and taste it in his mind – that means fewer mistakes and more flexibility. He follows the recipe the first time, and then alters it a bit each time after to get the result he prefers. Plus, good quality beef and chicken stock are integral to his cooking. “One teaspoon of either solves lack of salt and creates a fuller mouthfeel,” he says. “A burger that is grilled on each side, and then put in beef stock with a touch of garlic and onion while waiting to be served, is probably the best burger you will ever eat.” Cummings has also spent some time as a professional actor, but these days he prefers to be behind the camera. He does quite a bit of video work, and he and his wife Cathy Cummings – who owns and operates Italian bistro Vito’s Ristorante – are both very politically active. Refreshingly, he is well known around the city for trying to create respectful, informed dialogues between differing sides about political issues. For his recipe, Cummings chose vegetarian lasagna, describing it as “light and airy” and one of his favorite things to cook at home. “At the end of the meal, I don’t feel like I need a nap.” - GREG HORTON

PHOTOS BY RACHEL MAUCIERI

HOW DOE S A N Irish Catholic guy get his start in a Mediterranean kitchen? While it might sound like the set-up for a joke, Sean Cummings, who resurrected his eponymous Irish pub last year, got his first restaurant gig at Al-Roubaie Mediterranean Cuisine in his hometown of Kansas City. “I was 14, working as a busboy,” he says. “One day, a cook didn’t show up, and the owner, Kassim Al-Roubaie, put me in the kitchen when I asked to fill in for the cook. I found out that I had natural talent – and that ADD works well in the kitchen.” Most of Cummings’s training came from Al-Roubaie. The chef was a stickler for details, and didn’t like to repeat himself. “He would tell you once how to do something, and you were expected to remember it,” Cummings says. “If you didn’t remember, the chef said he’d fire you. For the first time in my life, I paid attention.” The chef was also a stickler for freshness, so food was made from scratch daily. “The guy was a master,” Cummings says, “and his was the best restaurant in KC.” Foods with complex flavors and complicated techniques are still his favorites to cook and eat, such as the eggplant Parmesan of his childhood. Things such as beef tenderloin are too simple, according to Cummings. “It’s always “I found out that I great and requires almost no talent to be wonderhad natural talent – ful. It’s boring.” and that ADD works The natural talents well in the kitchen.” Cummings bring to the kitchen include an SE A N CU M MI NGS


HAPPY HOUR ay E ve r y D 11:30 -4

BRING IN THIS AD TO GET A

FREE YAKINIKU SAMPLE

hello spring!

OKLAHOMA’S FIRST TAPAS STYLE YAKINIKU RESTAURANT ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT EVERYDAY 11:30-4

To schedule a private tasting, text or call Russell at:

405.206.4885

3000 W Memorial Rd #105, OKC (405)-285-9796 | WagyuJapaneseBBQokc.com SUN-THUR: 11:30-10:00 | FRI-SAT: 11:30-11:00

Chef Inspired. Wood Fired. We host

Wine Dinners every month.

To receive information by email, sign up on our list by visiting us at

unionwoodfiredgrill.com

2920 NW 63, OKC / 405.608.8866 unionwoodfiredgrill.com MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

65


food drink Symbols

$ most entrees under $10 $$ most entrees $10 to $25 $$$ most entrees over $25 outdoor dining reservations accepted valet parking new or updated entry

American AURORA Its warmly comfortable atmosphere makes a perfect backdrop for a quick cup of Hoboken coffee or hearty breakfast or lunch assembled from superb ingredients – just be certain not to miss the beautiful secluded backyard area. 1704 NW 16th, OKC, 609.8854 $ BLACK WALNUT Casual atmosphere meets cuisine that takes inspiration from the rich history of the restaurant’s Deep Deuce roots and cocktail temptations from around the world for a great place to relax. 101 NE 4th, OKC, 684.0851 $$ BLOCK 23 The Sheraton’s house restaurant has received an extensive makeover into a more casual, contemporary, convenient spot for breakfast, lunch or drinks and snacks on the patio. 1 N Broadway, OKC, 235.2780 $$ BUTTERMILK Get a fresh, hot start to the day at the Paseo’s brick-andmortar version of a beloved OKC food truck, specializing in a wide range of deliciousness served between biscuits. 605 NW 28th, OKC, 605.6660 $ CAFÉ 501 Rustic stone oven pizzas, fresh salads and specialty sandwiches on house-made artisan breads. Add welcoming atmosphere and enjoy. 501 S Boulevard, Edmond, 359.1501; 5825 NW Grand, OKC, 844.1501 $$ THE DRUM ROOM March your own drumsticks in for a heap of crispy, juicy fried chicken (among the city’s best) starring alongside fried okra, waffles and a fully loaded bar. 4300 N Western, OKC, 604.0990 $$ EDDIE’S BAR & GRILL This stylish spot not far from UCO is equally ideal for a casual drink, appetizers while watching the game or a dinner date. And bear in mind that the wings are outstanding. 930 E 2, Edmond, 285.7725 $$ FLINT Approachably casual style, plus the kitchen’s impeccably serious attention to detail in the outstanding

66

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

contemporary cuisine, winningly combined in the Colcord Hotel. 15 N Robinson, OKC, 601.4300 $$

GREY SWEATER Chef Andrew Black offers guests an imaginative culinary journey via a three-tiered tasting menu drawing on flavors from around the world – unpredictable, but always outstanding. 102 NE 4th, OKC, 455.6274 $$$ HATCH They call it “early mood food,” and if you find yourself in the mood for a sumptuous made-from-scratch breakfast (or lunch), it should be right up your Automobile Alley. 1101 N Broadway, OKC, 232.3949 $$ HUNNY BUNNY Bringing the allure of fresh, hot breakfast treats to Uptown 23rd, this purveyor of made-from-scratch biscuit sandwiches located in the Tower Theatre is a must for comfort food lovers. 429 NW 23rd, OKC $ THE HUTCH ON AVONDALE The all-time classic Coach House receives an update with a more modern menu sprinkled with experimental twists, and a full suite of tempting cocktails, wines and spirits. 6437 Avondale, OKC, 842.1000 $$ THE JONES ASSEMBLY It’s noteworthy as a spectacular concert venue, but don’t overlook the kitchen’s output the rest of the time. The bar (try a Frosé) and main menu (try everything) are sufficient to make memories even on non-special occasions. 901 W Sheridan, OKC, 212.2378 $$

chicken-fried steaks and more. 7301 N May, OKC, 242.6100 $$

NEIGHBORHOOD JAM Serving tasty takes on classic American dishes and more specialized options such as pineapple bourbon pancakes, this breakfast-centric spot aims to become a community favorite through outstanding execution. 15124 Lleytons Court, Edmond, 242.4161 $ NIC’S PLACE Already justly renowned for his skill at the grill, burger master Justin Nicholas offers breakfast, dinner, drinks and late night treats served in outstanding style at this Midtown diner and lounge. 1116 N Robinson, OKC, 601. 9234 $$ PACKARD’S NEW AMERICAN KITCHEN They’re not kidding about the “new” – the entire lunch and dinner menus are filled with innovative tastes for a distinctive dining experience. 201 NW 10th, OKC, 605.3771 $$ PICASSO CAFÉ Their neighbors in the Paseo are painters, potters and sculptors, so it’s apt that creativity abounds in these zippy sandwiches, salads, pizza and surprises, including plentiful selections for vegetarians. 3009 Paseo, OKC, 602.2002 $ THE R&J LOUNGE AND SUPPER CLUB A sentimental dining experience

with vintage recipes and atmosphere. Seating is limited but the patio is a year-round treat, and the drinks menu is a thing of beauty. 320 NW 10th, OKC, 602.5066 $$

KITCHEN NO. 324 A seasonally inspired café and craft bakery serving spectacular rustic American cuisine. Open for lunch and dinner, and a thorough treat for breakfast or brunch. 324 N Robinson, OKC, 763.5911 $

THE PRESS Built in a former printing facility and garage, this concept from The Mule’s team adds Oklahoma-inspired comfort food to the Plaza District – the chicken-fried steak comes recommended. 1610 N Gatewood, OKC, 982.1010 $$

KITCHEN AT COMMONPLACE Few bookstores offer more than coffee and pastries, but then Commonplace Books isn’t exactly ordinary. This full restaurant is a small but savory treat. 1325 N Walker, OKC, 534.4540 $$

REDROCK CANYON GRILL Rotisserie chicken, enchiladas, pork chops and steak by the lake in a casual, energetic, hacienda-style atmosphere of stone walls and mahogany beams around an open kitchen. 9221 E Lake Hefner Pkwy, OKC, 749.1995; 1820 Legacy Park, Norman, 701.5501 $$

MARY EDDY’S Inside the inviting environs of Film Row anchor 21c Museum Hotel, this showplace of a restaurant turns out a seasonally driven menu of expertly tuned flavors and dishes meant to be shared. 900 W Main, OKC, 982.6900 $$ NASHBIRD Make tracks to this 9th Street spot serving Nashville-style “Hot Dang!” chicken, with whatever spice level you like. Speedy service, whiskey cocktails and beer and a spectacular patio add extra savor. 1 NW 9th, OKC, 388.0033 $ NED’S STARLITE LOUNGE A successful family catering business grew into a lavishly retro-decorated restaurant and bar dishing up delectable burgers,

SATURN GRILL A star of the lunchtime stage in Nichols Hills Plaza, its rotation of daily specials and tasty twists on pizza, sandwiches and salads keep it crowded on weekdays. Calling ahead is recommended. 6432 Avondale, OKC, 843.7114 $ SCOTTIE’S DELI Soups, salads and especially sandwiches, all made from scratch and featuring meats that are cured, smoked and cooked in-house. Start with the pastrami and get ready to fall in love. 427 NW 23rd, OKC, 698.3696 $ SCRATCH Isn’t that the best place for food to come from? Top-of -the-line ingredients are combined into entrees and sides that are carefully concocted

in-house, as are the bevy of wondrous craft cocktails. 132 W Main, Norman, 801.2900; 607 NW 28th, OKC $$ SEVEN47 A Campus Corner hotspot boasting sleek, swank décor, an appealingly broad menu including a tantalizing brunch and a consistently celebratory vibe - in toto that makes this a winner. 747 Asp, Norman, 701.8622 $$ SOCIAL Steak frites to teriyaki salmon to corned beef hash, the menu at this gathering spot is packed with American classics – and brunch is served every day of the week. 1933 NW 23rd, OKC, 602.8705 $$ SUNNYSIDE DINER A new day dawns for breakfast and lunch on the west side of downtown as a former service station becomes a no-pretense, made-fromscratch diner. Order up! 916 NW 6th, OKC, 778.8861 $ SYRUP The most important meal of the day is also the most enticing at this unique breakfast boutique serving a heaping helping of signature dishes (the crunchy French toast is something special) and Stumptown coffee. 123 E Main, Norman; 1501 NW 23rd, OKC, 701.1143 $ UNION WOOD FIRED GRILL Ribeyes to cedar plank sea bass to vermicelli bowls, chef Jonas Favela brings disparate influences together for a more perfect whole in this casual, but memorable, dining environment. 2920 NW 63rd, OKC, 608.8866 $$ VAST Keeping your attention on the steaks, seafood and other temptations might be difficult; the view from atop the Devon Tower is truly unparalleled in Oklahoma, making this a fantastic date spot. 280 W Sheridan, 49th floor, OKC, 702.7262 $$$ WHISKEY CAKE High-quality locally sourced ingredients, prepared using slow cooking techniques that’s a prime recipe for outstanding dining. Enjoy – and don’t forget the namesake dessert. 1845 NW Expressway, OKC, 582.2253 $$

Asian CAFÉ ICON Tempting sushi, Japanese specialties and delicious spectacles like steak cooked at the table on a sizzling stone fill the menu to bursting with visually splendid and palate-pleasing treats. 311 S Blackwelder, Edmond, 340.8956 $$ CHICK N BEER Wings and brews are food for the soul; these freshly fried beauties are done Korean-style, and with serious flavor. Grab some kimchi fries and a local beer and enjoy. 715 NW 23rd, OKC, 604.6995 $


CHIGAMA Think of it as Asian-slashMexican; influences of both cuisines are in ready supply in this from-scratch kitchen featuring creative tacos, rice bowls and other wide-ranging treats. 3000 W Memorial, OKC, 513.5999 $ EL TORO CHINO Big, bold flavors from disparate cuisines are blended in this self-described “Latin + Asian Kitchen” - creating results that are as excitingly distinctive as they are delicious. 2801 NW 36th, Norman, 708.9472 $$ GOGI GO Fast-casual Korean barbecue comes to Midtown thanks to chef Kevin Lee’s dream of making the traditional cuisine approachable for OKC diners. Pick your protein, grab it as it comes off the grill and get ready to come back again and again. 1325 N Walker, OKC, 778.8524 $ GORO An “izakaya” is a Japanese pub; visitors to the Plaza District will quickly come to associate the term with expertly crafted deliciousness thanks to this cheerful spot for ramen, yakitori, bar snacks and more. 1634 Blackwelder, OKC, 606.2539 $ KWAN’S KITCHEN Cantonese classics and French-Chinese cuisine in truly sumptuous surroundings? The roomy, regal Kwan’s has you covered. And try the lunch menu’s array of $8 selections for a quick, savory bite. 3031 W Memorial, OKC, 607.8838 $$ MAGASIN TABLE Midtown’s home for a modern take on Vietnamese cuisine – think pork buns, vermicelli bowls, savory pho and especially the exceptional banh mi sandwiches. 3 NE 8th, OKC, 212.2751 $ MUSASHI’S Exquisitely flavorful Japanese cuisine prepared with genuine artistry, thanks to the skilled chefs executing culinary performance art at tableside hibachi grills. It’s a great spot for a special occasion. 4315 N Western, OKC, 602.5623 $$ NOODEE / OKIE POKIE Rice or salad or noodles, grilled meats or fresh seafood, topped and sauced with a rainbow of options – whatever you pick from this pair of concepts under one roof, the resulting bowl will be just what you want, and also delicious. 2411 N Guernsey, OKC, 605.5272 $$ O ASIAN FUSION Sublime quality in a wide span of culinary influences – freshly rolled sushi to fiery curry – in cool, vibrant digs. Call ahead for dinner, because it becomes a packed house in a hurry. 105 SE 12th, Norman, 701.8899 $$ SALA THAI Pineapple curry, basil squid, fried rice with crab, cinnamon beef ... the variety is exceptional, making this Midtown diner a popular midday option. 1614 NW 23rd, OKC, 528.8424 $ SAII With a dark, rich ambiance that elevates it over its surroundings, the captivating Saii serves expertly done Japanese, Thai and Chinese fare plus an extensive and adventurous sushi menu. 6900 N May, OKC, 702.7244 $$ SUSHI NEKO An established OKC favorite combining style with substance

(in the form of an especially wideranging and creative sushi menu). 4318 N Western, OKC, 528.8862 $$ SWEET BASIL The enormous aquarium adds to the cozy ambiance; with its outstanding curries and specialty dishes, it makes a great venue for a dinner date. 211 W Main, Norman, 217.8424 $$

100 NE 4TH STREET OKLAHOMA CITY 405.445.6273

Downtown Oklahoma City's Newest Flavor

FREE PARKING

TANA THAI There’s a lot to like about the food in this little spot, from red snapper filet to pad thai. Pay special mind to the varied soups, and do not play chicken with the spice level. 10700 N May, OKC, 749.5590 $$ TOKYO It’s neither huge nor lavishly appointed, and the menu focuses on tradition rather than creativity; but it’s palpably fresh and routinely cited as among the metro’s best sushi. 7516 N Western, OKC, 848.6733 $$

NEW AMERICAN WITH BOLD FLAVORS

TSUBAKI SZECHUAN Bold flavors are a hallmark of Szechuan cuisine, so tell your taste buds to buckle up; spice is always present but never overpowering in this mouthwatering collection of staples and authentically executed dishes. 1117 NW 25th, OKC, 609.6606 $$ WAGYU BBQ Extremely high-quality meats, including the namesake top-shelf beef, brought to you so you can cook them yourself on the grill set into the table. As a group experience, it’s a meal like no other in OKC. 3000 W Memorial, OKC, 285.9796 $$$

eclectic and vibrant menu

HE'S BACK

Chef Andrew Black is back with a bang

INTERNATIONAL COCKTAILS flavors from across the globe

YOKOZUNA The noodles, entrees and snappy drinks menu beckon, but it’s the rolls that stand out in this heavyweight contender for local sushi supremacy – personally, we’re partial to the 405 Roll. 13230 Pawnee, OKC, 500.1020 $$ YUZO Variety is the word in this sushi tapas bar, boasting a tempting swirl of Colombian, Brazilian and Japanese culinary influences. 808 N Broadway, OKC, 702.9808 $$

Bakery BELLE KITCHEN Doughnuts, macarons, pastries and ice cream created from scratch, in small batches – making treats like these with care and passion makes a difference that’s easy, and a pleasure, to taste. 7509 N May, OKC, 430.5484; 30 NE 2nd, OKC, 541.5858 $ GANACHE They serve les sandwiches, but this patisserie is most enthusiastically celebrated for its mouthwatering croissants, macarons, tarts and other baked treats inspired by the owners’ studies in Europe. 13230 Pawnee, OKC, 267.912.5536 $ PIE JUNKIE A Plaza District haven for serious pie aficionados. Call ahead to order a whole pie or quiche or walk in and choose from what’s on hand; either way the flavors are incredible, and you may never find a better Key lime. 1711 NW 16th, OKC, 605.8767 $

Bar & Pub Food ANCHOR DOWN Sip a beer or specialty cocktail and munch on a selection of

MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

67


GOOD TASTE

BANQUET CINEMA PUB An elevated take on familiar pub standards – wings, pizza, plenty of beer choices – in a retro-stylish venue that hosts a pair of movie screens for dinner and a show. 810 NW 4th, OKC $ BAR ARBOLADA OKC residents near Film Row have a neighborhood bar to call their own – but visitors from farther away also are welcome to sample the local beers, well-executed cocktails and seasonal menu of small plates. 637 W Main, OKC $$ BLU FINE WINE & FOOD Just south of Main Street, this sleek bar stands out due to quick, courteous service and a menu with gourmet range from mojitos to barbeque chicken pizza to fresh hummus. 201 S Crawford, Norman, 360.4258 $$

The Black Raven’s beef and Guinness stew

Choctaw Go Bragh Black Raven channels the Emerald Isle STATISTICALLY S PE AK I NG , you probably aren’t in Choctaw

right now. Its population is only somewhere around 12,500, less than 1 percent of the metro overall, and it’s far enough east of OKC proper that you’re unlikely to be passing by unless you have a special reason. Here’s my proposal, though: You should be in Choctaw, preferably soon, and repeatedly. The special reason is at 14471 NE 23rd, and it’s called The Black Raven. Picture a traditional Irish pub and you’ll have the ambiance almost exact: a dark wood bar gleaming with polish, slightly mismatched chairs, live-edge wood tables … I don’t know whether pubs in Belfast have electric clocks counting down the days/ hours/minutes/seconds until St. Patrick’s Day, but it’s a nice visual. The Black Raven plays host to live music on Fridays and Saturdays – only Irish and Celtic musicians for authenticity – and with tap handles representing Smithwick’s, Guinness classic and blonde, Harp, Belhaven Black and Strongbow Cider, you’ll have plenty of excellent options for a pint of refreshment. The beer also comes in handy as accompaniment to the excellent food, and in multiple cases as ingredients. The delightfully rich beef stew is braised in Guinness, there’s Harp in the breading for the fish and chips and I don’t know what might be in the gravy on the bangers and mash, but I want more of it in my life. Ash Hall and Scott Wallace have a gem out here in Choctaw, and they run it well. “Everything we make is from scratch,” says Wallace. “There’s a wait sometimes, but it’s authentic, and you’re here for the atmosphere and the result.” To them, and you, I say: “Slainte.” - STEVE GILL

68

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

THE MANHATTAN A stylish neighborhood bar in the heart of downtown, its cocktail menu is packed with variations on its namesake classic, and don’t overlook the selections of sandwiches, salads and tasty treats from chef Bruce Rinehart. 210 Park Suite 150, OKC, 605.5300 $ THE MONT While the food should tempt palates inclined toward a Southwestern zing, it’s beverages like the beloved Sooner Swirl and the primo patio (with misters) for which this landmark is justly renowned. 1300 Classen Blvd, Norman, 329.3330 $ OAK & ORE A Plaza District port of call built with repurposed rustic materials, it offers more than a handful of creative sandwiches that practically require a knife and fork, as well as a tantalizing selection of lovingly chosen craft beers. 1732 NW 16th, OKC, 606.2030 $ O’CONNELL’S IRISH PUB & GRILLE Beloved by students, alumni and townies alike, it’s served up killer burgers, beer and festive atmosphere since 1968. A St. Patrick’s Day must. 769 Asp, Norman, 217.8454 $ PUB W Multiple sections provide a choice of atmosphere, but the menu filled with choice beer and “new classic” fare from barbeque wings to pork chops is a constant pleasure. 3720 W Robinson, Norman, 701.5844; 3121 W Memorial, OKC, 608.2200 $$ REPUBLIC GASTROPUB Part beer bar and part upscale eatery, this noisy, amply attended locale pairs a vast selection of quality brews with tasty menu items, including a great burger selection. 5830 N Classen Blvd, OKC, 286.4577; 13230 Pawnee, OKC, 907.5900 $$

bars and a surprisingly forward-thinking menu. 616 NW 5th, OKC, 6012857 $$ THE WINSTON A menu packed with intriguing possibilities among “elevated pub food” balances out an impressive selection of beer, wine and whiskies. Cheers. 106 W Main, Norman, 561.7616 $$

Barbeque THE BUTCHER BBQ STAND It’s open three days a week and is a good distance from the heart of the metro – but it doesn’t matter, because this is absolutely some of the best barbeque you’ll find anywhere. Go early and prepare to be dazzled. 3402 W Hwy 66, Wellston, 240.3437 $$ DECKLE SMOKEHOUSE BBQ Offering true Texas-style pit barbeque (nothing but oak for their smoke), its brisket, ribs and house-made German sausage are set off by imaginative sides. 324 W Edmond, Edmond, 657.2992 $ EARL’S RIB PALACE A popular choice among locals in a genre that’s hardly lacking in options, the local chain pounds out hit ribs and turkey as well as a top-tier burger. 6 metro locations, earlsribpalace.com $ IRON STAR URBAN BARBEQUE Iron Star specializes in “a unique and tasty spin on comfort food.” While its entrees are excellent, the sides here are equal players as well. 3700 N Shartel, OKC, 524.5925 $$ LEO’S BAR-B-Q Dense, rich flavor and tender texture, delivered in genuine unpolished style for commendable value – no wonder its ribs and brisket are favorites among Oklahoma connoisseurs. 3631 N Kelley, OKC 424.5367 $ MAPLES A one-time mobile operation that’s moved on up to star in the Plaza District, it’s home to serious Central Texas-style BBQ; try the moist brisket. 1800 NW 16th, OKC, 604.3344 $$ SWADLEY’S Expertly prepared meats – the honey-rubbed ribs are especially succulent – star at this Oklahoma family-owned favorite. And if a special occasion is approaching, they’re also award-winning caterers. 6 metro locations, swadleys.com $$ TEXLAHOMA BBQ Family owned and fabulously flavorful, its meats (especially the beef ribs) are eye-rolling good. Don’t forget the espresso barbeque sauce! 121 E Waterloo, Edmond, 513.7631 $$

Burgers & Sandwiches

SEAN CUMMINGS IRISH RESTAURANT The namesake chef brings the food, drinks, music and atmosphere of an Emerald Isle public house back to the metro – go raise a glass. 7628 N May, OKC $$

COW CALF-HAY This burger spot offers ample flavor combinations, and the delicious never-frozen patties are massive. Don’t forget the onion rings. 3409 Wynn, Edmond, 509.2333; 212 N Harvey, OKC, 601.6180 $

THE UNION A good sign for the future of the South of St. Anthony mini-district, this neighborhood hangout spot has three

THE FIXX Massive, monstrous burgers and hot dogs, put together with thought and care. Don’t forget to get a shake

PHOTO BY SCOTTY O’DANIEL

gourmet corndogs in this fresh Deep Deuce concept housed within repurposed shipping containers. 30 NE 2nd, OKC, 605.8070 $


or something from the full bar. 644 W Edmond, Edmond, 285.2311 $

breakfast options and other treats. 815 N Hudson, OKC, 633.1703 $

THE GARAGE BURGERS & BEER It can get noisy in the sports-bar atmosphere, but even so your focus will likely be on savoring the many tempting flavor possibilities of huge, juicy burgers and fries. 8 metro locations, eatatthegarage.com $

RED CUP Comfortably ramshackle surroundings encourage curling up for conversation over great coffee, baked treats, vegetarian-friendly breakfast and lunch specials, and live music. It’s highly recommended. 3122 N Classen Blvd, OKC, 525.3430 $

LIP SMACKERS Don’t sweat the surroundings; this gas station-adjacent grill dishes up big, beefy burgers in an unusually broad spectrum of deliciousness. 4200 N Penn, OKC, 604.9770 $

Continental

THE MULE Solid beer and beverage selection plus a delectable array of gourmet grilled cheeses and melts fill the menu at this relaxation destination in the Plaza District. 1630 N Blackwelder, OKC, 601.1400 $ NIC’S GRILL It’s small, it’s crowded … and it’s incredible. It’s only open for lunch and the lines are often long, but the colossal burgers are easily among the metro’s best. Don’t forget some money, since it’s cash-only. 1202 N Penn, OKC, 524.0999 $ S&B’S BURGER JOINT Good news: these burgers’ exquisite flavors including such ingredients as peanut butter or a coffee crust - come as sliders too, all the better to sample more kinds. 5 metro locations, sandbburgers.com $ TUCKER’S ONION BURGERS With one burger, one side (fries) and one salad, the menu is easy to remember - and the execution makes the meal unforgettable. Add a shake and enjoy. 4 metro locations, tuckersonionburgers.com $

Coffeehouse ALL ABOUT CHA Universal standards and unusual concoctions (the sweet potato latte is a wonder) in a cheerful atmosphere; the food options are worth investigating, as well. 5 metro locations, allaboutcha.net $ CLARITY COFFEE The vibe is crisp, clean and cool while remaining welcoming and comfortable – including seating for sipping or getting some work done – and the brewers have their beverages down to a science. As the sign says, “Drink the Coffee.” 431 W Main, OKC, 252.0155 $ COFFEE SLINGERS Rocking a brisk, urban vibe on Automobile Alley, it has become a gathering place for genuine java enthusiasts, especially during its periodic educational sampling seminars. 1015 N Broadway, OKC, 606.2763 $ CUPPIES & JOE The name is only part of the story: the Uptown nook holds cupcakes and coffee as well as pie, live music, a cozy, trendy vibe and more. Park around back and take a peek. 727 NW 23rd, OKC, 528.2122 $ ELEMENTAL COFFEE Seriously spectacular coffee roasted in-house - the passionate staff is always eager to share knowledge about the process augmented with locally sourced salads,

BISTRO 22 Restaurant: noticeably small. Flavors: big, bold and beautiful. The Kickingbird Square concept is from star chef Clay Falkner, so the steaks, seafood and more are outstanding. 1417 E Danforth, Edmond, 562.4884 $$$ BLACKBIRD A Campus Corner gastropub pairing succulently creative dishes like pot roast nachos with a broad beer, wine and whiskey list. There’s little on the menu that won’t tempt palates. 575 S University, Norman, 928.5555 $$

Special Cakes for that Special Occasion

CHEEVER’S Southwestern-influenced recipes (the chicken-fried steak is a house specialty) and love of seafood drive the contemporary comfort food in one of the city’s finest dining destinations. 2409 N Hudson, OKC, 525.7007 $$ EN CROUTE A warmly welcoming, comfortable café in Nichols Plaza offers treats all day long, from fresh pastries to select spirits and beer, with special emphasis on artisanal cheese and charcuterie. 6460 Avondale, OKC, 607.6100 $ LUDIVINE The menu adjusts constantly to reflect availability of elite-quality, locally sourced ingredients - but every dish is the result of genuine culinary artistry. 805 N Hudson, OKC, 778.6800 $$$

breakfast, lunch & dinner.

THE MANTEL Marvelous steaks, seafood and other specialties combine with a refined atmosphere and outstanding service to set the stage for a truly memorable meal, especially if you have a date to impress. 201 E Sheridan, OKC, 236.8040 $$$

E

0N

10

h 4t

St

r

t ee

a om

ty

Ci

lah

Ok

THE METRO A perennial favorite that feels comfortably upscale without exerting pressure to impress on its clientele, the far-reaching menu covers culinary high points from vichyssoise to crème brulée. 6418 N Western, OKC, 840.9463 $$ MICHAEL’S GRILL Thoroughly urbane dining in an intimate setting: the steaks, chops, seafood and pastas are all reliably excellent, and the Caesar salad prepared tableside is the stuff of legends. 2824 W Country Club, OKC, 810.9000 $$$ THE MUSEUM CAFÉ A setting as inspiring as the OKC Museum of Art warrants something special in cuisine: delicately light or delectably robust, its European-inspired menu delights for lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch. 415 Couch, OKC, 235.6262 $$ PASEO GRILL Quiet and intimate inside, cheerful and comfortable out on the patio, with an award-winning menu filled with distinctive flavors inspired by

BRUNCH EVERYDAY

FREE PARKING GARAGE

MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

69


AT THE BAR

THE PRITCHARD WINE BAR Tempted by tempranillo? Musing about muscat? This Plaza District stop is amply stocked with an extensive list of exceptional wines, and sampling the varied dishes is a pleasure in itself. 1749 NW 16th, OKC, 601.4067 $ ROCOCO An “East Coast-style” restaurant with a diverse menu of international dishes, all set off by carefully selected wines to create the perfect dinner pairing. 12252 N May, OKC, 212.4577; 2824 N Penn, OKC, 528.2824 $$ SIGNATURE GRILL Unassuming locale; magnificent culinary rewards. The expertly considered menu mixes French and Italian flavors to present a wide spectrum of amazing flavors in a few select dishes. 1317 E Danforth, Edmond, 330.4548 $$$

French CAFÉ CUVEE Located in Midtown’s magnificent Ambassador Hotel, this paean to the flavors of la belle France is the result of a collaboration between star chefs and elite ingredients. 1200 N Walker, OKC, 898.8120 $$

A wide-ranging Irish flight

Irish Spirits, Okie Style Take flight at Whiskey Cake WH I LE BO U R BON IS DE LIC IO US , and a finely aged Scotch is a thing of beauty, the very word whiskey is Irish in origin, from the Gaelic “uisce beatha,” or “water of life.” March is a great time to explore the joys of Irish whiskey – but what about Oklahomans who might like to try a drop o’ the pure, but still prefer pulled pork to corned beef and cabbage, or would rather hear Stevie Ray Vaughan than The Chieftains? Drinking Irish doesn’t have to mean you have to find an Irish pub; not when Whiskey Cake can elevate your palate with an Irish Flight. While the farm-to-table restaurant at 1845 NW Expressway does locally sourced cuisine very well – I wasn’t kidding about the pulled pork; the Three Little Pigs sliders are outstanding – it also has a substantial supply of liquid imports. They’re best explored by the whiskey flights: strategically portioned pours of a quartet of spirits. Our Irish sampler included the rich, smooth Jameson Black Barrel; Knappogue Castle; the venerable Powers (founded in 1791), the lightest on the palate, and a right good ’un; and my favorite, the fragrant Tullamore D.E.W. The best part is that’s merely the tip of the alcoholic iceberg. With a double-digit selection of Irish whiskies, you can let them pick or choose your own custom flight. Either way, it’s worth raising a glass – well, four glasses – to the experience. - STEVE GILL

70

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

LA BAGUETTE BISTRO Les Freres Buthion have deep roots in the city’s culinary landscape, and this flagship combines fine dining with a great bakery, deli and butcher on site. 7408 N May, OKC, 840.3047 $$ FAIT MAISON Foie gras to Brandy Alexander, this classical French restaurant delivers exceptional cuisine made with exacting care – the name translates to homemade – for exquisite, if pricy, event dining. 152 E 5th, Edmond, 509.2555 $$$

German DAS BOOT CAMP Longtime fixture for Deutsch festivities Royal Bavaria has brewed up a second round of exceptional cuisine and magnificent beer in a less expensive, faster-paced location in downtown Norman. 229 E Main, Norman, 701.3748 $ FASSLER HALL Bringing German flavor to Midtown via house-made sausages, warm soft pretzels with cheese sauce, duck fries and a heftig beer menu, plus a weekend brunch – what’s not to love? 421 NW 10th, OKC, 609.3300 $ ROYAL BAVARIA Superb takes on traditional dishes like Weinerschnitzel, Jagerbraten and sausages, plus fantastisch house-brewed beers. The time spent is a worthy investment in this family-style dining hall. 3401 S Sooner, Moore, 799.7666 $$$

lunch buffet. 4559 NW 23rd, OKC, 948.7373 $$ MISAL OF INDIA A Norman institution for over 30 years, specializing in tandoori-cooked delicacies and boasting healthy, natural, delicious cuisine served amid splendid ambiance. 580 Ed Noble Pkwy, Norman, 579.5600 $$ TAJ A tremendous set of Indian staples and delicacies - the menu has sections for vegetarian, tandoori, South Indian and Indo-Chinese specialties - plus full lunch and dinner buffets. 1500 NW 23rd, OKC, 601.1888 $$

Italian & Pizza BELLINI’S Tasteful in décor and Italian offerings alike, this romantic nightspot quietly, confidently exudes elegance. It’s worth a visit even if only for a couple of the namesake beverages on the shady patio. 6305 Waterford, OKC, 848.1065 $$ BENVENUTI’S Subtly flavored minestrone to rich, hearty ragouts, the splendid menu keeps the booths full and diners planning return trips to this vintage building by the railroad tracks; don’t overlook Sunday brunch. 105 W Main, Norman, 310.5271 $$ EMPIRE SLICE HOUSE Reigning over the Plaza District in New York style (that means thin, flexible crust with a lot of surface area to cover in cheese and tasty toppings), it offers whole pizzas or slices, a full bar and a primo patio. 1734 NW 16th, OKC $ FLIP’S WINE BAR & TRATTORIA Managing to feel rustic despite its location in a busy corridor of OKC, this cozy Italian joint keeps extended hours, and tends to get busier and louder as the hour gets later. 5801 N Western, OKC, 843.1527 $$ THE HEAT There’s really no need to be humble about this true Chicago-style pizza, boasting perhaps the best crust known to man. It’s one of our favorites; choose your toppings and think deep thoughts. 1319 S Broadway, Edmond, 715.1818 $ HIDEAWAY PIZZA If you’ve been serving a devoted following for over half a century, you’re doing something right. In this case, that’s incredible pizza in jovial surroundings. 8 metro locations, hideawaypizza.com $$ MONI’S Handmade, New Jersey-style brick oven pizza and authentic pasta recipes from Southern Italy in a casual, comfy ambience (ideal for dates). 17200 N May, Edmond, 285.5991 $$

Indian

OSTERIA Casual, welcoming and unforgettable, thanks to a knockout menu of Italian inspiration and expert interpretations from star chefs Fabio Viviani and Jonathon Stranger. 6430 Avondale, OKC, 254.5058 $$$

GOPURAM - TASTE OF INDIA A full-service restaurant whose richly appointed interior and attentive staff accord patrons the feel of fine dining, even during the plentifully stocked

OTHELLO’S Garlic bread and warm mussels to tiramisu and coffee – all you could want in a romantic Italian café. 1 S Broadway, Edmond, 330.9045; 434 Buchanan, Norman, 701.4900 $$

PHOTO BY SCOTTY O’DANIEL

the cuisines of Europe in both areas – try the duck salad. 2909 Paseo, OKC, 601.1079 $$$


PATRONO The space is small and casually intimate – reservations are a good idea – and the flavors huge, carefully considered and thoroughly authentic. It’s Italian cuisine, elevated. 305 N Walker, OKC, 702.7660 $$ PIZZA 23 The tempting selection of specialty pies on especially buttery, flaky crusts is available for takeout, but dining in is recommended; the Uptown joint’s good beer selection and crisp, urban décor add savor to the flavor. 600-B NW 23rd, OKC, 601.6161 $$ PIZZERIA GUSTO Neapolitan-style pizza (which harnesses an extremely hot fire to quickly cook superfine flour crusts and quality ingredients) stars alongside Italy-inspired salads, pastas and appetizers. 2415 N Walker, OKC, 437.4992 $$ STELLA MODERN ITALIAN CUISINE A luscious spate of legitimately Italian tastes for a casual lunch, or romantic dinner, amid stylish scenery. The weekend brunch offerings are especially superb. 1201 N Walker, OKC, 235.2200 $$ TOMMY’S ITALIAN-AMERICAN GRILL Stylish and welcoming, this northside neighborhood Italian bar and grill offers up a full selection of beautifully done classic dishes, in addition to more imaginative creations, weekend brunch and some truly excellent brick oven pizza. 5516 W Memorial, OKC, 470.5577 $$ UPPER CRUST A chic, contemporary pizzeria and wine bar specializing in wood-fired, thin-crust New York-style pies complemented by a full menu and wine list. 5860 N Classen Blvd, OKC, 842.7743; 1205 NW 178th, Edmond, 285.8887 $$ VICTORIA’S A comfortable atmosphere, with local art on its walls and the art of pasta on its plates – the chicken lasagna and linguine with snow crab are especially excellent. 327 White, Norman, 329.0377; 3000 SW 104th, OKC, 759.3580 $ VITO’S RISTORANTE Homestyle Italian cuisine in an intimate setting where the staff and management treat customers like guests in their home. It’s a small space, so calling ahead is recommended. 7521 N May, OKC, 848.4867 $$ VOLARE A flavor-filled variety of Neapolitan-style pizzas, produced with haste from a specially imported oven, fill this stylish Campus Corner space boasting a serious rooftop patio. 315 White, Norman, 310.3615 $$ THE WEDGE Wood-fired pies crafted from fresh ingredients (the possibilities range from pepperoni all the way to figs or truffle oil) and made-from-scratch sauces. 230 NE 1st, OKC, 270.0660; 4709 N Western, OKC, 602.3477 $$

of the warm, patient namesake owner – this gem rewards the adventurous with Ethiopian and Kenyan specialties to explore and share. 308 W Edmond Road, Edmond, 509.6441 $$

at reasonable prices - a treat from the house-made salsas to the handcrafted cocktails, and all the tastes between. 9 NW 9th, OKC, 606.7172 $$

restaurants finds a comfortable home in a backwoods fishing lodge atmosphere. Don’t forget the bountifully stocked bar, either. 4300 W Reno, OKC, 943.9111 $$

QUEEN OF SHEBA Practically the definitive example of a hidden treasure, the spicy, vegan-friendly menu of Ethiopian delights awaits the bold. Bring friends and be prepared to linger. 2308 N MacArthur, OKC, 606.8616 $$

OSO ON PASEO Make sure your appetite is loaded for bear when you visit this patio-centric spot in the Paseo Arts District – their mantra is Tacos & Cocktails, and they produce both with expertise and enthusiasm. 603 NW 28th, OKC, 309.8226 $

Steakhouse

ZORBA’S For well over 20 years, Zorba’s has satisfied appetites and pleased palates. Serving dishes from recipes passed down through generations, they proudly share flavors of Cyprus, Spain, Greece and Morocco. 6014 N May, OKC, 947.7788 $

REVOLUCION You say you want a Revolucion? You easily might once you try this spicy taco-centric haven – start with the queso fundido and don’t stop until you reach the delectable arroz tres leche dessert. 916 NW 6th, OKC, 606.6184 $$

Mexican & Latin American

TARAHUMARA’S Beloved by locals (there’s usually a line but it moves quickly), this airy ristorante serves huge, tasty Tex-Mex classics plus less ubiquitous fare like carnitas de puerco and mole poblano. 702 N Porter, Norman, 360.8070 $$

1492 Authentic Mexican cuisine in an elegant atmosphere, combining its caliente flavors with fusion decor to make an ideal spot for a romantic evening ... including perhaps the world’s best mojitos. 1207 N Walker, OKC, 236.1492 $$ BARRIOS A serious collection of Latin-flavored deliciousness, including a brunch that’s maravilloso, in a cool Midtown space with a back patio that’s pure paradise. 1000 N Hudson, OKC, 702.6922 $ BIG TRUCK TACOS It’s nearly always standing-room-only at lunch, but don’t let that deter you; spend a few minutes in line and get an ample reward in the form of fast, fresh, imaginative taco creations. 530 NW 23rd, OKC, 525.8226 $ CAFÉ ANTIGUA Visitors can enjoy lunch options from beef stew to a club sandwich, but once they sample the luscious variety of Guatemalan breakfast options – served anytime – they may be perfectly happy to never order anything else. 1903 N Classen, OKC, 602.8984 $ CAFÉ DO BRASIL It’s a long way from OKC to Rio, but the savory menu in this Midtown hot spot covers the distance in a mouthful. Even brunch is a spicy, inimitable treat. 440 NW 11th, OKC, 525.9779 $$ CAFÉ KACAO A sunlit space filled with bright, vibrant flavors from the zesty traditions of Guatemala. Lunch possibilities beckon, but it’s the breakfast specialties that truly dazzle. 3325 N Classen, OKC, 602.2883 $ CULTIVAR A farm-to-fire Mexican kitchen that stresses sustainability, local sourcing and fresh, fast, flavorful food. Gluten-free options, chef-crafted tacos, a substantial bar and plenty more are on the menu. 714 N Broadway, OKC $$

ZARATE’S In addition to the familiar joys of enchiladas and the like, the chef’s Peruvian heritage shines in dishes featuring plantains, yuca and imported spices. Try something different; find something tasty. 706 S Broadway, Edmond, 330.6400 $$

Seafood BRENT’S CAJUN Sit down to a massive platter of jambalaya, crawfish etoufee, Pasta Orleans or any of the well-seasoned temptations on the weekend brunch menu – and spice up your life. 3005 S Broadway, Edmond, 285.0911 $$ C’EST SI BON Crawfish etouffee, frogs’ legs, fried chicken and shrimp po-boys are among the highlights, but the award-winning catfish is a must-try. 101 N Douglas, Midwest City, 610.2555 $ CRABTOWN A huge Bricktown warehouse where the Cajun Crab Boil is a favorite, guests are encouraged to “leave the silverware at home and dig in” and taste is king. 303 E Sheridan, OKC, 232.7227 $$ THE DRAKE The Good Egg Group’s flagship and a standard-bearer for diners who crave excellent seafood, it serves chef’s creations featuring the sea’s finest, plus an oyster bar and tempting cocktails. 519 NW 23rd, OKC $$$ OFF THE HOOK It’s a choice destination for po’ boys, fried or grilled baskets and specialty items such as the smothered seafood fries. Go get hooked. 125 S Britton, OKC, 840.3474; 1920 S Meridian, OKC, 606.6040 $

Mediterranean & African

HACIENDA TACOS Quality, of both ingredients and execution, and variety make this restaurant in the Shoppes at Northpark a pleasure to visit, and to explore the menu again and again. 12086 N May, OKC, 254.3140 $

PEARL’S OYSTER BAR A perennial OKC favorite for its flavorful seafood and spicy Creole-inspired dishes: Shrimp Diablo, Tabasco-infused Caesar salads, Andouille omelets at Sunday brunch and more. 5641 N Classen, OKC, 848.8008 $$

HAIGET’S Vegan-friendly – and friendly in general, due to the influence

IGUANA MEXICAN GRILL Unique Mexican flavor in a fun atmosphere

TRAPPER’S FISHCAMP Zesty, widely varied flavor from the Pearl’s family of

BOULEVARD STEAKHOUSE Perfectly soigné ambiance down to the last detail and cuisine easily in the metro’s elite – a sumptuous, if pricy, masterpiece. 505 S Boulevard, Edmond, 715.2333 $$$ BROADWAY 10 Cruise into the Buick building in Automobile Alley to savor steak supremacy or seafood selections (even sushi) in a cozy enclave amid urban bustle. 1101 N Broadway, OKC, 212.3949 $$$ CATTLEMEN’S Almost as old as the state itself, this Oklahoma institution’s immense corn-fed steaks and matchless atmosphere are history served anew every day. 1309 S Agnew, OKC, 236.0416 $$ JAMIL’S STEAKHOUSE Saving room for your steak, lobster or prime rib is difficult when your gratis appetizers arrive in the form of a Lebanese bounty, but make the effort. Jamil’s has been feeding Oklahoma exceptionally well since 1964. 4910 N Lincoln, OKC, 525.8352 $$$ JUNIOR’S The classic restaurant’s decor sets the perfect stage for hand-cut Angus steaks and lobster to fight for attention with knockout fried chicken. 2601 NW Expressway, OKC, 848.5597 $$$ MAHOGANY PRIME STEAKHOUSE The ambiance and service are sublime, but fine aged steak broiled to perfection is the star. 3241 W Memorial, OKC, 748.5959; 100 W Main, OKC, 208.8800 $$$ MCCLINTOCK Where better to find a saloon than in Stockyards City? There’s plenty of room at the massive, 50-foot oak bar, and plenty of cocktails and whiskies behind it, but the main draw may be the massive, excellent steaks and chops. 2227 Exchange, OKC, 232.0151 $$$ MICKEY MANTLE’S This lushly atmospheric social spot in Bricktown serves powerhouse entrées and sides with a full complement of amenities destined to impress. 7 S Mickey Mantle, OKC, 272.0777 $$$ OPUS PRIME STEAKHOUSE It aspires to the ultimate in upscale dining via hand-cut USDA Prime Black Angus steaks, a vast wine selection and intimate ambiance. 800 W Memorial, OKC, 607.6787 $$$ RANCH STEAKHOUSE Customaged hand-cut USDA Certified Prime tenderloins and ribeyes, served amid warm Southern hospitality. 3000 W Britton, OKC, 755.3501 $$$ RED PRIMESTEAK Visionary design and atmosphere house super-premium steaks, vibrant, imaginative flavors and amenities to make some of the state’s best dining. 504 N Broadway, OKC, 232.2626 $$$

MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

71


We do brunch every weekend on Saturdays from 11-2 and Sundays 10:30-3 along with our full menu. We also do infused tequila bloody Maria’s with your choice of gazpacho (mild), green Chile bacon (medium) and habanero (hot). We also have $2 brunch mimosas!

SIZES 2-16

12100 N. May | 405.748.7227 | ShopNancys.com

Shoppes at Northpark • 12086 N. May, OKC order online > haciendatacos.com

ten Brigh with t a d e & Up walk! Nor entary lim Comp or Design i Inter rvice Se

Exclusive Cosmetics

Interior Design for Every Aspect of Your Home

405.748.5774 • norwalkfurnitureokc.com

405.306.2060 sooolilly.com


events

Going With the Wind

TODD WOLFSON

With the equinox coming up this month, the Norman Depot is preparing for a change in the weather; they’re ready to bid goodbye to the Winter Wind concert series. After the Grammynominated roots artist Eliza Gilkyson makes an appearance at the Santa Fe Depot March 3, the season ends with a lively set from string-slinging siblings the Brother Brothers March 10. But don’t get caught up in spring cleaning – dazzling dobro player Abbie Gardner is set to roll through town for a Whistle Stop concert March 22.

MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

73


events PRIME PICKS

High Voltage March 16, Taft Stadium

A new season is about to kick off in OKC’s ongoing soccer success story – and after a road opener in El Paso, the Energy FC will be ready to give Taft crowds a show by aiming to shoot out the Las Vegas Lights in their home debut. With devastating strikers Alexy Bosetti, Deshorn Brown and Cordell Cato ready to provide a scoring spark and bearded barricade Cody Laurendi returning to man the net, hopes are high and the anticipation is electric.

Triple Play March 1-30, OKC Civic Center It’s a busy month for the masterful musicians of the OKC Philharmonic, and the sonic spate is brought to you by the letter S: the orchestra puts a concert spin on The Sounds of Simon and Garfunkel with guest conductor Michael Krajewski March 1-2, turns its attention to Schubert and Rachmaninoff for a Classics showcase March 16, then looks to space by performing the soundtrack in sync to a special screening of E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial March 29-30.

Ready to Speak The Junior League of OKC is tickled pink to invite you to a special fundraiser for its community improvement projects: Molly Ringwald is the latest guest in its Speaker in the City series. The moderated conversation will allow her to talk about her life and achievements, and will cover her career during the ’80s, but don’t expect it to focus entirely on Sixteen Candles, as she’s an accomplished actress, author, jazz singer and storyteller. (Pro tip: VIP tickets include one of her books, with a signing afterward.)

Molly Ringwald

Happily Ever Omelette March 8, Bricktown Events Center

Cordell Cato

74

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

Once upon a time – by which we mean now – you had the chance to join the OKC Museum of Art for a special fundraiser. Are we egging you on to participate? No, but they are: The 35th annual Omelette Party, “An Egg-chanted Fairy Tale,” features gourmet egg-based treats from a dozen-plus top restaurants, plus live music, a spectacular art raffle and plenty of celebratory vibes.

PHOTOS: CORDELL CATO COURTESY OKC ENERGY FC; “E.T.” COURTESY OKC PHILHARMONIC; MOLLY RINGWALD COURTESY JLOC

March 24, OKC Farmer’s Market


Mou n t Wi l l i am s on , S i er ra Neva da , f rom M a nz a na r, Ca l i forni a , 19 44. P h o to graph by A n sel Adams Col l ecti on Cen ter for Creati ve P h o to graphy ŠTh e An s el Adams P u bl i s h i n g Ri gh ts Tru st


events ON LOCATION

with Lance McDaniel

Kiowa Connection Behind Jeffrey Palmer’s first feature film years of studying and teaching college courses on filmmaking and Native American representation in cinema, Palmer is entering the conversation with his own major film. Scott Momaday (left) and Jeffrey Palmer (right), on set. Words from a Bear, Palmer’s first feature film, will make its public premiere this fall on PBS as part of its Masters in Native American Studies. I was on an academic path, award-winning Independent Lens series. The film debuted in Janbut I wanted to make films, not keep writing papers.” uary at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival, and is scheduled to make So, after earning his Masters, Palmer started making films. its Oklahoma debut at OKC’s deadCenter Film Festival in June. He worked with his father to help write scripts that he would Words from a Bear tells the story of Kiowa author and poet N. film and edit, then used the results to apply to film grad schools. Scott Momaday, who was born in Lawton, earned a doctorate A full-ride scholarship led him to the University of Iowa. from Stanford and became the first Native American to win the Upon graduation, Palmer was eager to start making films – Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for his 1969 novel House Made of Dawn. but he knew there was more that he could learn by staying in an “I grew up in a Kiowa family that spent almost every weekend academic environment. The decision took him to Cornell, them at powwows,” Palmer says. “My grandfather, grandmother, back home to UCO. aunts, uncles, cousins, father and mother were “As my academic career progressed, I realized all competition dancers … I was always in the that there was a voice missing that I could propresence of Kiowa elders, and listened closely to “I was always in the vide,” Palmer says. “Once I understood the power the stories they told. presence of KIOWA of providing that voice, and how powerful a tool “Telling the profoundly important story of N. ELDERS, and that could be to present ideas and change the way Scott Momaday in Words from a Bear is more listened closely to people look at history, that became my mission.” than a job for me,” Palmer continues. “It feels For his next project, Palmer reached back to like an important obligation that I owe to my the stories they told.” his Kiowa upbringing to create a film about the family and my people.” J E F F R E Y PA L M E R importance of community. In Isabelle’s Garden, Palmer’s deep tribal connection goes back a young girl helps to combat poverty and food to a childhood in Carnegie, where the Kiowa insecurity through community gardening. tribe has its headquarters. In middle school, his family moved to Isabelle’s Garden premiered at Sundance, travelled to major Norman, where his father was finishing up his PhD and working festivals around the world, and ended up on PBS. The attention led at OU – but the move did not diminish Palmer’s desire to learn to Palmer getting the call to direct a film about Momaday. more about his culture. “Much like Scott, I was a young Kiowa artist growing up in the “I majored in anthropology at the University of Oklahoma and shadows of the Wichita Mountains, dealing with issues of poverty, spent a lot of time watching ethnographic films,” he says. “I did not racism and marginalization,” Palmer says. “I also experienced the like how the films portrayed Native Americans. I started thinking triumphs of using art to maintain the stories of my people, a feeling about how those films would be if they were made by someone inof respect and honor that I will always present in my work.” side the culture. The urge was even stronger when I started on my

76

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

ILLUSTRATION BY BRIAN O’DANIEL; PHOTO COURTESY PBS

J E F F R E Y PA L M ER is about to take flight. After


This is Y Our purpose is deeper than any pool and wider than any fitness center. We are changing lives through feeding programs, enrichment activities, social groups, volunteer opportunities, young adult programs, senior activities and community partnerships.

Lawton March 23

Tulsa April 6

Oklahoma City March 30

Enid May 11

REGISTER TODAY!

walkMS.org | text WALKMS to 68686* or 1-855-372-1331 WALK MS IS A NATIONAL MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS SOCIETY EVENT

Thank you to our Premier National Sponsors:

Thank you to our National Sponsors:

*Msg. and data rates may apply. Max. 15msgs/mo. Terms and conditions and privacy policy at nationalmssociety.org. Text STOP to 68686 to stop. Text HELP to 68686 for help.

YMCAOKC.ORG

BRIDAL FASHION EVENT BOUDOIR

w w w. a s h l e y t o l m a n . c o m 323-333-3342

JEFF TWEEDY 3/1 SUPPER CLUB 3/3 BEN RECTOR 3/8 AND 3/9 JENNY LEWIS 4/4 BRONZE RADIO RETURN 4/5 BROTHERS OSBORNE 4/9 ST. PAUL AND THE BROKEN BONES 5/7 OLD 97’S + BOB SCHNEIDER 5/9 JOHNNYSWIM 5/30 SON VOLT 6/18 O.A.R. 8/6 TICKETS & INFORMATION AT THEJONESASSEMBLY.COM

MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

77


events SPEAKERBOX

CLEAR THE FLOOR! TIME TO DANCE! Better get on Etsy and find some acid-washed jeans – or hope you haven’t cleaned out your closets in 25 years. Whatever you can dig up from the 1990s is going to be fresh at the ’90s House Party: Vanilla Ice, Montell Jordan, Kid ’N Play and C+C Music Factory are coming March 29 to the Criterion. Everything “old” is new again, and people are crying out for nostalgia. The 1990s, which were largely an unremarkable decade as far as music goes, are all the rage now, as young people during that time are now reaching the mid-life crisis zone. This roster is hip-hop and danceheavy and features some of the most incessantly played artists during the time when people still listened to the radio. The Criterion is located at 500 E Sheridan in Bricktown; tickets are available at criterionokc.com. - JC

Pink at the ’Peake Finding beauty in the “Trauma”

T I M E F L IE S when you are so consistently good at your craft that people forget you’ve been at it for two decades – ask pop icon Pink. The singer, born Alecia Moore, made her debut with a splash in 2000 with the release of “Can’t Take Me Home.” Seven albums later, with 90 million records sold, she’s a dynamic presence on radio and onstage, and beloved worldwide. Pink (self-nicknamed after a character in Reservoir Dogs) became a superstar with her sophomore record Missundaztood, which featured the breakout party anthem “Get the Party Started” and went on to sell five million copies. Most significantly, the record cemented her trademark vocal style – a raspy range that can handle rock songs to power ballads. Fans find her passion and honesty empowering and therapeutic, and have been thrilled by shows incorporating an incredibly daring Cirque du Soleil-style aerial act. Expect high-wire excitement when she brings her “Beautiful Trauma” tour to the Chesapeake Energy Arena March 23 – Julia Michaels will open the show, and tickets are available at ticketmaster.com. - JERRY CHURCH

78

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

If I had to describe musician Dave Mason in one word? Legend. The 72-year-old singer-songwriter has had a successful solo career, Top 20 hits and stints in Fleetwood Mac and Traffic. He’s also in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, when he was inducted as a founding member of Traffic. British band Traffic – which included fellow legend Steve Winwood – was one of the first “prog rock” bands, incorporating non-traditional rock instruments and jazz structures in their music. The band broke up after one album and Mason started doing session work, even playing rhythm guitar on his friend Jimi Hendrix’s version of “All Along the Watchtower.” Mason’s current “Feelin’ Alright Tour” is more than just a regular concert: While playing with his band, Mason will reflect on his entire career and share intimate stories about his friendships with Hendrix and even Michael Jackson, and how his songs came to be. Catch it March 3 at the Tower Theatre, 425 NW 23rd. Tickets are available at towertheatreokc.com. - JC

PHOTOS: PINK BY RYAN AYLSWORTH; DAVE MASON BY CHRIS JENSEN

DAVE MASON IS FEELIN’ ALRIGHT


events SPOTLIGHT

A rendering of Anna Thomas’s Spotlight project, to be brought to fruition at Momentum

Moving Days OVAC gives young artists a Momentum boost

ON THE RADAR DANCE MAR 29-31 Kaleidoscope UCO’s resident dance company is 43 years old with a new viewing experience every time, as students combine elements of ballet, jazz, tap and modern dance. UCO Mitchell Hall Theater, 100 N University, Edmond, 974.5234, dance.uco.edu

PHOTO COURTESY OVAC

EVENTS MAR 1 Chefs’ Feast Oustanding cuisine is on the menu in this Mardi Gras-themed event that helps the Regional Food Bank fight childhood hunger. National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, 1700 NE 63rd, OKC, 600.3193, regionalfoodbank.org

T HE L AWS OF SCIE NCE can be a harsh mistress. Newton knew that more than three centuries ago, when he explicated the law of inertia: Whether something is in motion or stationary, it tends to stay that way without an external force. That is to say, once you’re already moving, you’re in good shape to keep going, but getting started often requires a push. If

you apply the same principle to careers, the external force is the Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition, and the push that helps young creators get their portfolios underway is the annual Momentum event. More energetic than most exhibitions, the Momentum event is only open to Oklahoma artists under 30, and is set for March 22-23 at the Womb, 25 NW 9th in OKC. Expect a flood of live music to accompany the fresh creative viewpoints expressed in paint, sculpture, video, performance and other media – and pay special attention to installations, given that this year’s event is held in partnership with artist collective Factory Obscura. “We are thrilled at the opportunity to partner with our friends at Factory Obscura and to have Momentum in the Womb,” says OVAC’s Executive Director Krystle Brewer. “This combination perfectly captures the essence of Momentum: playfulness, curiosity and exploration.” Curators Zoe Larkins and Samantha Rhodes selected works from a pool of submissions by more than 120 artists, and also chose three Spotlight artists – Emily Chase, Cecilia Otero and Anna Thomas – to receive a $1,000 honorarium and three months of guidance to create new artistic projects just for this show. The future of Oklahoma art is on its way; come see young artists who are picking up steam. - STEVE GILL

WANT TO SEE MORE? VISIT OUR ONLINE CALENDAR AT 405MAGAZINE.COM MAR 5 Wish Luncheon Live and silent auctions of handbags, jewelry and designer accessories star in this Make-A-Wish event, along with a tasty lunch and side of inspiration. OKC Golf & Country Club, 7000 NW Grand, OKC, 286.4000, oklahoma.wish.org MAR 9 Red Tie Night One of the state’s largest and most elegant fundraisers returns, with proceeds helping to benefit Oklahomans living with AIDS and to prevent the disease’s spread. National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, 1700 NE 63rd, OKC, 348.6600, okaidscarefund.com MAR 16 Riversport Opening Day A season of aquatic adventure gets underway with a splash, as OKC’s riverside entertainment complex dyes the rapids shamrock green to kick off a fun weekend. Riversport

Adventure Park, 800 Riversport, OKC, 552.4040, riversportokc.org MAR 16 Heard on Hurd A monthly block party that’s filled with treats for all ages from food trucks to live music, and free to attend? Better get to Edmond and drink it all in. Downtown Edmond, 32 N Broadway, Edmond, 341.6650, facebook.com/ heardonhurd MAR 21 Town Hall Lecture A veteran of Christie’s and appraiser for “Antiques Roadshow,” Meredith Meuwly’s guest appearance will be packed with value. Going once … Church of the Servant, 14343 N MacArthur, OKC, okctownhall.com MAR 30 ONE Event Get ready to roar at a ‘20s-themed shindig filled with food and entertainment;

your good time helps Norman Arts Council improve the community’s quality of life. MAINSITE Contemporary Art, 122 E Main, Norman, 360.1162, normanarts.org MAR 30 Walk MS OKC Helping to end multiple sclerosis should sound well worth stretching your legs for a one- or three-mile walk; join in and make a difference. Route 66 Park, 9901 NW 23rd, Yukon, 918.488.0882, nationalmssociety.org

MUSIC MAR 19 Brightmusic The music of Saint-Saens, Glinka and more classical masters stars in the stellar chamber ensemble’s woodwind-heavy concert “Reeds A-Plenty.” St. Paul’s Cathedral, 127 NW 7th, brightmusic.org MARCH 2019 405 MAGAZINE

79


THE ROAD TO COOPERVILLE An Oklahoma dealership’s American legacy BY MARK BEUTLER

W HE N I T COM E S to buying a new car, generations of Oklahomans have turned to the name Cooper. What began as a single Oldsmobile dealership in Yukon has grown into one of the most trusted brands in the state automotive industry. It was 1954 when Claude Cooper began searching for a buyer for his Oldsmobile franchise. His health was failing, so his son Jackie decided to leave college and run his father’s business. At age 21, he purchased his dad’s company, making him the youngest dealer in the United States to hold an Oldsmobile franchise. The company grew, eventually moving to a new state-ofthe-art complex covering 15 acres on Route 66 east of Yukon. In 1967, “Cooperville” opened with much fanfare – one of the celebrated guests at the grand opening was Oklahoma’s own Miss America, Jane Jayroe.

80

405 MAGAZINE MARCH 2019

“I have some special memories of that place, and Jackie’s generosity and support of the Miss America system,” says Jayroe. “Nationally, Oldsmobile supplied every state winner with the use of a car. But some dealerships were more enthusiastic about it than others. I was so blessed to work with Jackie; as Miss Oklahoma, Jackie would ‘loan’ me a brand-new car every 3,000 miles. The only car I had ever owned was a used Falcon with a lot of miles and really bad shape. The passenger door wouldn’t even open, so everyone had to climb in from another door. It was thrilling to be driving a new Oldsmobile!” Jayroe said she enjoyed the full spectrum of models – a convertible, a luxury sedan, a sports car – all emblazoned with a decal on the side identifying “Miss Oklahoma” and the Miss America pageant. The original Cooperville dealership grew to include other businesses and dealerships, eventually expanding into Tulsa with Jackie Cooper Imports. A family tragedy in 1990 prompted the Cooper family to enter the non-profit world, as Barbara Cooper founded the Oklahoma AIDS Care Fund, along with her husband Jackie and a small group of volunteers. Its annual Red Tie Night fundraiser will be held March 9 at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum. Today, the Cooper family legacy continues serving Oklahoma, with son Joe at the helm. The original Cooperville may be long gone, but the memories remain. “Jackie was so generous,” Jayroe says. “As Miss America, I felt like a queen driving those cars. He was one of those people who was bigger than life. I adored his wife, Barbara, and thought they were the greatest. Jackie Cooper blessed a lot of people. I was one.”

PHOTOS COURTESY BARBARA COOPER AND JANE JAYROE

backstory


WHILE THIS MAY HAVE BEEN A GREAT WAY TO START YOUR BUSINESS, IT’S NOT A VERY GOOD WAY TO PLAN FOR YOUR RETIREMENT.

TRUST YOUR WEALTH TO TRUST. Starting a business is risky. But risking your lifetime savings is foolish. We can help you prepare for retirement so you can relax with financial peace of mind. Let’s talk!

(405) 840-8401 | TRUSTOK.COM PROTECTING YOUR ASSETS. GROWING YOUR WEALTH. ADVISING YOU FOR LIFE.


CELEBRATING

60 YEARS

O F AWA R D -W I N N I N G I N T E R I O R D E S I G N

Est. 1958 • 109 East Main • Norman • 405.321.1818 • MisterRobert.com •

Profile for 405 Magazine

405 Magazine March 2019  

405 Magazine is the definitive city and lifestyle magazine of central Oklahoma, featuring people, places, events, dining and culture.

405 Magazine March 2019  

405 Magazine is the definitive city and lifestyle magazine of central Oklahoma, featuring people, places, events, dining and culture.

Profile for sliceok
Advertisement