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MEDICAL MARIJUANA: THE STATE OF THE INDUSTRY AFTER YEAR ONE P. 52

Outdoor Living HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR BACK YARD THIS SUMMER

Linda Vater in her lush garden

AT HOME WITH JESSICA SCHAMBACH AND MARK MYERS BLACK WALNUT’S ENTICING MENU INNOVATIONS


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CONTENTS

52

JULY

The Green Wave ONE YEAR AFTER OKLAHOMANS VOTED TO LEGALIZE THE USE OF MEDICINAL MARIJUANA, A NEW INDUSTRY IS THRIVING – AND EXPANDING INTO AREAS BEYOND THE PLANT.

46

Outdoor Focus GARDENS, GRILLS, LOW-MAINTENANCE LANDSCAPING … WHATEVER YOUR BACKYARD DOES OR DOESN’T HAVE, THERE’S ONE THING IT SHOULD CONTAIN: YOU.

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JULY 2019 | 405 MAGA ZINE

PH OTO BY M AT T PAY N E


W E A LT H M A N A G E M E N T WITH OKLAHOMA ROOTS™

Top right: Senior Vice President Ron Burke, CFP®, CTFA and Senior Vice President Tim Hopkins, CFA; Senior Vice President Joe Ray and Vice President Brooke Holman; Left: Senior Vice President Tim Hopkins and Vice President Emily Crain.

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TrustOk.com | (405) 840-8401 2516 NW Expressway | Oklahoma City Protecting Your Assets. Growing Your Wealth. Advising You For Life.


CONTENTS

24

JULY

IN THE 405

14 FASHION Light, lovely looks for maternity wear 16 RETROPERSPECTIVE Mickey Mantle’s family legacy 18 SPEAKERBOX New avenues in musical merchandising 20 PRIME PICKS What you should be doing this month 21 CONVERSATION Acting, modeling and inspiration with James Austin Kerr 22 ON THE SCENE A look back at local social events

HOME 24 HABITAT Inside the Schambach/ Myers home 28 AT HOME WITH… Bebe MacKellar’s style guidance 30 ENTERTAINING 101 Adding a natural element

TRAVEL 32 INTERNATIONAL Breathtaking wildlife in Uganda 38 ON THE ROAD Oklahoma skies after the storms

DINING 42 LOCAL FLAVOR Black Walnut’s imaginative menu 44 INDUSTRY NEWS OKC’s restaurant staffing situation

HEALTH 64 AWARENESS A fundraising run to fight cancer

66 RESTAURANT GUIDE 3Sixty’s elevated dining options 70 ON THE RADAR The FJJMA presents multidisciplinary beauty 72 LAST LAUGH Praise for the U.S.A.’s unique character

ON THE COVER Gardening guru Linda Vater surrounded by greenery. Photo by Matt Payne

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PH OTO BY R AC H EL M AU C I ER I


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JULY 2019

The Right Step

PUBLISHER | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Heidi Rambo Centrella heidi.centrella@405magazine.com ART DIRECTOR Scotty O’Daniel

scotty.odaniel@405magazine.com

MANAGING EDITOR Steve Gill

Each step along the path to your retirement is important. One of the most critical is selecting an experienced financial advisor to help point the way. Retirement Investment Advisors acts as a fiduciary, required by law to put your best interests above all else. One of our experienced, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professionals can help guide you along the path to a successful, more comfortable retirement.

Brenda Bolander, CFP®, CPA/PFS Executive Vice President

VOLUME 5 • NUMBER 7

The right step is easy. Call Retirement Investment Advisors today for a no obligation consultation.

steve.gill@405magazine.com STYLE EDITOR Sara Gae Waters

saragae.waters@405magazine.com TRAVEL EDITOR Matt Payne

matt.payne@405magazine.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS M.J. Alexander, Mark

Beutler, Jerry Church, Greg Horton, Lauren Roth

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Brian O’Daniel

brian.odaniel@405magazine.com CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS M.J. Alexander,

Fran Kozakowski, Rachel Maucieri, Charlie Neuenschwander, Matt Payne, Don Risi, Shevaun Williams

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405 Magazine Volume 5, Number 7, July 2019. 405 Magazine is published monthly by 405 Magazine, Inc. at 1613 N. Broadway, Oklahoma City, OK 73103, 405.842.2266. © Copyright 2019 405 Magazine, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction of 405 Magazine content, in whole or part by any means, without the express written consent of the publisher is strictly prohibited. 405 Magazine is not responsible for the care of and/or return of unsolicited materials. 405 Magazine reserves the right to refuse advertising deemed detrimental to the community’s best interest or in questionable taste. Opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of ownership or management. Basic annual subscription rate is $14.95. U.S. single-copy price is $4.95. Back issues are $9.50 each

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Stem Cell Therapy THE FUTURE OF MEDICINE IS HAPPENING NOW Do you find yourself, like millions of others wondering if Stem Cell Therapy is just the new hype or if it really is the “real deal?” With so much false information out there about stem cell therapy, many healthcare providers like the ones at Physical Medicine of Oklahoma want you to have the most current information about Stem Cells and Regenerative Cellular Tissue. Michael McMahan, M.D. heads up the medical department at PMO and has been helping patients in their Edmond location using Regenerative Medicine since 2014. Dr McMahan has treated chronic pain in patients’ shoulders, knees, elbows and hips, as well as other joint discomfort and more with great results. STEM CELLS Regenerative cellular tissue and stem cell therapy are terms often used interchangeably. This is not exactly accurate. Let’s look at the differences. The body is a self-healing, self-regulating machine. Your body has within it, an inborn (innate) ability to heal itself, in fact, all living things have the ability to regenerate and heal themselves. Stem cells are naturally produced within the human body and help in healing the body after injury. These cells are undifferentiated, meaning that they can change into other cell types. On the other hand, Regenerative cellular tissue or umbilical allograft therapy gives you the benefits of stem cells along with the added bonus of the growth factors in cytokines. Several of the growth factors found in cytokines help regulate the immune system’s response to inflammation which is critically important in relieving pain and avoiding future health issues.

WHERE DO STEM CELLS COME FROM? Stem cell therapy is a procedure that involves harvesting your own stem cells. This process is very invasive and involves drilling a hole in your hip or femur and extracting bone marrow to process for stem cells. Regenerative tissue contains stem cells derived from umbilical allografts. These are umbilical cords donated after cesarean section. Neither mother nor child experiences any ill effect because of donating this previously disposable tissue. PRP OR PLATELET-RICH PLASMA Platelets are the smallest type of blood cells and are shaped somewhat like dinner plates. When an injury is suffered, the body releases a chemical that alerts and activates the protective and healing processes of the body. When platelets receive this signal, they activate into healing cells. The COMING SOON! more-healthy platelets in an area of injury, the better the healing process for that injuDr. Brant Koenig’s book THE REGENERATIVE ry. PRP derived from your own blood is inMEDICINE BREAK THROUGH jected directly into an injured area, such as How Stem Cell, PRP and Other shoulders, knees, elbows or hips. PRP can Regenerative Tissues are also be injected into tendons and ligaments. Changing How We Fight the Aging Process. PRP has been utilized by many world-class athletes to speed their healing and get them back onto the field, court or track. In many cases, healing is accelerated so much that it’s possible to return to a pain-free life in four to six weeks. BRANT KOENIG, D.C. is the founder of Physical Medicine of Oklahoma and speaks about Stem Cell Therapy and Regenerative Medicine in the OKC-Metro area. Dr. Koenig is currently enrolled and studying to earn his fellowship in Regenerative Medicine. Workshops about Stem Cell Therapy, Chronic Knee/Joint Pain and Neuropathy are held monthly, and you can register for upcoming presentations by calling 405.726.2727.

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FROM THE PUBLISHER

A New and Greener Season

M

any Oklahomans may still be drying out from the past months of torrential downpours, given that May produced record-level rains across the state. But with rain-breaks come the perfect time to start enjoying what Mother Nature left behind: vibrant, colorful lawns and gardens. While I thoroughly enjoy spending quality time inside the sanctuary of my home, there’s nothing better than going outside to play on a beautiful summer day. Despite not having the greenest of thumbs, I can still manage to brighten up my outdoor space with colorful potted plants, an herb garden (not of the medicinal variety) and patio décor, allowing my indoor space to naturally flow into the beautiful outdoor living area that surrounds it. I live in an historic neighborhood within the urban core, not a sprawling suburban area or country estate, but I’ve found no difference in terms of options for enjoying my external environment. For instance, although I may not have space for a full-on vegetable garden, I have plenty of room for raised beds – popular among urban dwellers. And with a rock-garden landscaped yard, this method works perfectly, with much less maintenance. Matt Payne and Greg Horton dive into what it takes to make the most of outdoor living spaces, whether it’s simply for yourself or entertaining with friends and family. Check out some of the expert suggestions they amassed in “Outdoor Focus,” beginning on page 46. And since we’re featuring green living this issue … It has been a full year since the legalization of medicinal marijuana in the state, so we also have included an update on where things stand regarding Oklahoma’s new industry. The numbers of licensed growers, processors, dispensaries and patients are on a fast up-swing – as is evident on just about any daily commute in just about every area of the metro – but there’s more to the marijuana business than merely the plant itself. Learn more in our feature on page 52, “The Green Wave.” We sincerely hope you’ll appreciate and enjoy all things outdoors this season, ideally as much as you’re enjoying the new look of this magazine. And if you’d like to stay in-the-know about what’s happening across the metro area this summer, follow us on Twitter @405Mag, Facebook @405Magazine and Instagram @405mag. Cheers!

HEIDI RAMBO CENTRELLA

Publisher | Editor-in-Chief heidi.centrella@405magazine.com

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PH OTO BY S H E VAU N WI L LI A M S


For those longing to build their own home, poring over piles of paint chips, studying wood finishes and tirelessly developing the perfect floorplan isn’t a chore. It’s a hard-earned dream. It’s equity to build from the ground up. When it’s time to build, the experienced loan professionals at Oklahoma Fidelity Bank are here to guide you through the entire loan process, ensuring you get the right mortgage for your situation. We are committed to providing our fellow Oklahomans with the best lending experience possible. No hassle. No sweat.


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IN THE 405 Feminine Asset​s MARVELS IN MATERNITY WEAR BY SH E VAU N WI LLIAMS

Frill Seeker woven maxi dress by Amuse Society from Mode

405 MAGA ZINE | JULY 2019

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FA S HIO N

(clockwise) Dizzy floral kimono by Millibon and sweater tank in olive by Love Tree from Gil’s Clothing & Denim Bar; Dress by Delfi Collective from Gretta Sloane; Floral knee-length dress in ivory by Alexis from Balliets; Ella dress by Rhode Resort from Balliets

PH OTO G R A PH Y: S H E VAU N WI LLI A M S; M O D E L : C H R I S T I N E WO O D RU FF, B R I N K M O D EL M A N AG EM EN T; H A I R A N D M A K E U P: A S H L E Y TO L M A N B E AU T Y; ST Y LI N G: SA M I A M OS E S H A R ROZ C R E AT I V E; PH OTO A S S I ST: H E AT H ER H A N SO N/L AU R EN ROS EN FELT

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BA L LI E T S , 6 4 47 AVO N DA L E , BA L LI E T S .CO M; G I L’ S C LOT H I N G & D EN I M BA R , 76 4 4 N W E S T ER N , G I L SC LOT H I N G .CO M; G R E T TA S LOA N E , 6 476 AVO N DA L E , G R E T TA S LOA N E .CO M; M O D E , 12 27 N WA L K ER , S H O PM O D E . FA S H I O N

A

s temperatures start to rise, the romance and femininity of a carefree dress keeps you coolly stylish. So effortless, so graceful, so beautiful … it’s a shining choice to live in for dreamy summer days.​


Edgar Degas (French, 1834-1917). Little Dancer Aged Fourteen (Petite danseuse de quatorze ans), model executed ca. 1880; cast in 1922. Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond. State Operating Fund and the Art Lovers’ Society. Photo: Travis Fullerton. Š Virginia Museum of Fine Arts


RETROPERSPECTIVE

The Mantle of Memories

T

his month, my mom turns 87, and one of her greatest goals is to meet Russell Westbrook. “I don’t get much out of life,” she said recently, “but I do love Russell and my Thunder. I would love to shake his hand and tell him, ‘Thank you,’ for bringing happiness to people like me.” Mom has a stuffed teddy bear I gave her for Mother’s Day one year. She named him “Russ.” He sits beside her on the sofa, and every season they cheer on the Thunder. So, I come from a sports-loving family. I tried to be the Russell Westbrook of my generation, but somehow I could never make the ball go through the hoop. I switched to baseball, and somehow the ball would never make contact with the bat. I sucked at sports and I knew it, so I decided to concentrate on writing. It comes a bit more naturally. Through all the trials and errors of my short-lived sports career, I had a great coach. He also came from a sports-loving family. Larry Mantle, or “Coach,” as we called him, was the brother of legendary Yankees superstar Mickey Mantle. And when Larry and his wife Linda moved to my hometown in the early ’70s, it was like Hollywood royalty had come to Cashion. All through the town, from Anglin’s Groceries to Colleen’s Beauty Shop, the whispers were the same: “Did you know the new coach is Mickey Mantle’s brother?” Indeed, he was. Larry was the youngest Mantle sibling, and grew up in Commerce, Oklahoma. In tracking him down for an interview about his famous brother, I called my old babysitter, Carolyn, who was the greatest basketball star to come out of Cashion in the ’70s; the female equivalent of Russell Westbrook. She knew exactly how to contact Coach. When I called, Linda said, “Of course we remember you, Mark. Larry and I remember you and your entire family. In fact, your mom and I used to visit quite a bit. We loved those years living in Cashion.” After a brief conversation, Coach came on the phone. It was the same voice I remembered echoing through the gym, and across the baseball and football fields of my youth. “What do you want to know about Mick?” Coach asked. “Growing up, he was always ornery.” For the next 20 minutes, Coach stepped back in time, recalling memories of arguably the greatest Yankee player of all time.

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Linda and Larry Mantle Author’s Note: This story began as a straight feature on the legendary Mickey Mantle, but changed into a more personal reflection on his brother Larry. During this interview, Linda Mantle talked about her life, meeting and falling in love with Larry when they were in college at UCO. “My mom was a cook at the university,” she said. “She pointed to a table where all the athletes sat, and that’s when I first saw Larry. I fell in love with him instantly, and the next year we were married. We have two beautiful children and have lived a wonderful life. What a blessing to spend 50 years with the love of your life.” Linda died unexpectedly a few weeks later.

“I remember when he signed with the Yankees in ’51,” Coach said. “During my summers out of school, I would go stay with him. He took me to the practice field, and it was my job to retrieve the balls. He kept me running all day.” He was also a built-in babysitter. “Mick has four boys, so when he was on the road in the summers, I stayed with my nephews. We always had a lot of fun together.” Mickey Mantle played for the Yankees until his retirement in 1968. His youngest brother was there through the fame, awards and accolades, and he was with him when he died. “It was August, 1995, when Mick passed away,” Coach said. “I was with him at the end in the hospital. The world knew him as Mickey Mantle. But to me, he was just my big brother.” - MAR K B E UTLE R

PH OTOS: M I C K E Y M A N T L E CO U R T E S Y O K L A H O M A H I S TO R I C A L SO C I E T Y; LI N DA A N D L A R RY M A N T L E CO U R T E S Y K EL LY M A N T L E

IN THE ORBIT OF THE COMMERCE COMET


NEW ARTS CENTER OPENING JANUARY 2020 NW 11th and Broadway

oklahomacontemporary.org | @okcontemporary 3000 General Pershing Blvd. | Oklahoma City | 405 951 0000


SPEAKERBOX

Big Show Quick Hits

Top-flight acts ready to rock the 405

X

July 1, Tower Theatre, towertheatreokc.com One of the upstart bands that helped create the Los Angeles punk scene in the late 1970s is touring to celebrate its monumental career. Still comprised of the original line-up (vocalist Exene Cervenka, bassist John Doe, drummer D.J. Bonebrake and guitarist Billy Zoom), X was a chameleon and proved that you can morph traditional country, folk, blues and punk to create a distinct sound.

Music and the Merch HEY JOE, WHERE YOU GOIN’ WITH THAT ESPRESSO IN YOUR HAND?

B

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KHALID

July 19, Chesapeake Energy Arena, ticketmaster.com

former guitarist for Ozzy Osbourne and founder of Black Label Society, helped craft Valhalla Java Odinforce Blend, a dark coffee made by Death Wish Coffee (deathwishcoffee.com) – an appropriate endorsement since Wylde no longer drinks alcohol. Meanwhile, Willie Nelson has his name on Willie’s Remedy, cannabis- and hemp-infused coffee, and also offers a hemp oil tincture you can drop in your own cup of java (williesremedy.com). The potential for liquid branding is ripe. Teas, extracts, fruit drinks, Kombuchas are all available. Snoop Dogg’s Gin, anyone? As artists try to stay visible and relevant, branding opportunities will become even more inventive. Just keep an eye on your local spirit shop. - J E R RY C H U RC H

I love classic R&B and soulful singing, and Khalid is one of the best new talents in recent years. The singer, originally from Georgia, is a young old soul, and his sweet vocals are reminiscent of old-schoolers such as Sam Cooke and Marvin Gaye, with a blend of 1990s romantic hip-hop. He’s touring in support of his sophomore record “Free Spirit,” with special guest Clairo.

THE ALARM

July 21, Tower Theatre, towertheatreokc.com The first time I saw The Alarm was when the Welsh band opened for U2 in June 1983 at the Lloyd Noble Center. While lead singer Mike Peters has been back to the 405 a few times since then, the new version of The Alarm has not. I have no doubt they won’t disappoint. Peters is one of the most sincere, passionate performers I’ve ever seen. They will be joined by Modern English (“I Melt with You” is a masterpiece) and the Michael Aston-fronted Gene Loves Jezebel.

PH OTOS: X BY FR A N K GA RGA N I; K H A LI D BY G R AC E PI C K ER I N G; T H E A L A R M BY S T UA R T LI N G

y 1983, British heavy metal rock band Iron Maiden had the best-selling T-shirt in rock and roll. Rumor was that the band made more money selling T-shirts than records. Music merch has come a long way since then, including more creativity at matching a performer’s personality and vibe to the product. Sammy Hagar kind of started this in 1999, when he created Cabo Wabo tequila (he later sold the brand for millions). Maiden transitioned from T-shirts to beer: Trooper, a traditional British ale, was the first of several brews named after their songs. Earlier this year, Metallica’s Enter Night pilsner appeared on liquor store shelves, after they earlier endorsed a fruit-infused whiskey named Blackened. While members of Maiden and Metallica have worked closely with brewers and distillers to craft their branded pints, other acts, such as The Rolling Stones, KISS and The Police, have lent their images and album art to collector wine bottles. Essentially, fans are buying a bottle of wine just for the label (winesthatrock.com). The latest twist on music-branded product leans toward sobriety. Zakk Wylde,


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Dogwood Canyon Nature Park is a 10,000 acre paradise that has been largely left untouched since its earliest settlers. Here, conservation and education have become the cornerstones for developing this authentic wilderness experience. Natural beauty abounds in the towering bluffs, cascading waterfalls, crystal clear streams, hand-crafted bridges and wildlife ranging from bison, elk and deer to humming birds, owls and eagles. The park offers guests miles of hiking and biking paths, Segway tours, group tram or private guided tours, horseback riding, and trout fishing for the novice and experienced fly-fisherman alike. You’ll also find an active gristmill, the full-service Canyon Grill, one-of-a-kind nature center and a treehouse built by Animal Planet’s Treehouse Masters. Visit our website today and begin planning your trip to the Canyon!

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PRIME PICKS

Hero, scholar, ten-dollar founding father … you knew about Alex H. before Lin-Manuel Miranda’s musical became a worldwide smash, but there’s a reason audiences went bonkers for seats and it won a whopping 11 Tonys: “Hamilton” is an utter bop. OKC Broadway is all set to dazzle with a lavish traveling production; rise up and get tickets before the opportunity is history. July 30-Aug 9, OKC Civic Center

STAR-SPANGLED STUNNER

When in the course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to celebrate the occasion of their nation’s independence, you can count on the OKC Philharmonic to make it an evening to remember. Bring the family and lawn chairs for an evening of crowd-pleasing musical mastery topped off with a sensational fireworks display – all free – at Red, White and Boom! July 2, State Fairgrounds

THIS JAM WAS MADE FOR YOU AND ME

A bit more than a century ago, on July 14, Woody Guthrie joined the world. To celebrate, dozens of top-tier folk artists gather each year in his birthplace of Okemah and share a tribute to his ongoing legacy. Carter Sampson, Ellis Paul, John Fullbright, Cassie Latshaw, the Red Dirt Rangers and many, many more – including Arlo Guthrie – are ready and raring to fire up Woodyfest, the Woody Guthrie Folk Festival, and raise a musical ruckus. July 10-14, Okemah

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DOUBLE DOSE Lyric Theatre’s summer season is in full swing – so much so that fans are in for two sets of opportunities to take in a performance filled with musical magic at the OKC Civic Center. A ragtag bunch of young orphans and castoffs band together to create a better future in “Newsies” July 9-14, then the maiden voyage of the world’s greatest luxury liner hits a bit of a snag in “Titanic” July 23-28.

Find more events in our Event Guide on page 70 and online at 405magazine.com

PIECE BY PIECE

A brick-brick here and a brick-brick there – given enough imagination and tens of thousands of options for building, pretty soon they add up to a genuinely enthralling experience. Lego’s BrickUniverse returns to OKC, showcasing the incredible potential for versatile creations in the medium of plastic bricks, and including plenty of workspaces for visitors to try out their own flights of creative fancy. July 20-21, Cox Center

PH OTOS: R ED, W H I T E A N D BO O M CO U R T E S Y O KC PH I L H A R M O N I C; WO O DY GU T H R I E BY A L AU M U L L ER ; “ H A M I LTO N ” BY J OA N M A RCUS

YOUR SHOT


C O N V E R S AT I O N

– “NCIS,” “Criminal Minds,” “Scandal,” “Bones” and “The Mentalist” – as well as a few movies with some decent-sized names attached. When I first moved to L.A., I stumbled into modeling and managed to land some print jobs for notable companies like Pac Sun, K-Swiss, T.J. Maxx, Hot Topic and Starbucks. It all sort of snowballed from there. I’m always working some type of gig, whether it’s acting, filmmaking, modeling, voiceover, commercials … whatever keeps me busy. That’s when I’m the happiest, just staying busy doing something I enjoy. When did you become interested in acting? My dad would often take my brother and me to Kickingbird Cinema in Edmond, and funny enough, it was there that I fell in love with film. It may be just a small, local theater, but I am forever grateful to it for kickstarting my passion. It wasn’t until my late teens that I decided to pursue acting – mainly to gain confidence, because I was extremely shy.

California Dreamer

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JAMES AUSTIN KERR’S ROAD TO SUCCESS ove over, Bill Hader; step aside, Kristin Chenoweth – Oklahoma has a rising new star. His name? James Austin Kerr. He’s young, he’s talented and he’s beginning to make waves in Hollywood. 405 Magazine caught up with the actor when he was home accepting Creative Oklahoma’s “Young Creativity Ambassador” award. You followed your dreams all the way from Edmond to the bright lights of Hollywood; tell the folks back home about some of your successes. I’m fortunate enough to have appeared on a fair amount of popular television shows

PH OTO BY OV E T H M A R T I N E Z

You were shy? What was it like performing for an audience the first time? Oh boy, I think the first time I ever performed was in a 5th grade play of “Oklahoma,” and all I can remember was how much my knees were shaking. To be honest, I often still get nervous, but have learned to channel it in ways that can help my performance.

THE VITALS Full Name:James Austin Kerr Age: 29 Hometown: Edmond Current City: Westwood, Los Angeles Marital Status: Single Hair: Light Brown Eyes: Blue Siblings: One brother, Wilson

You were recently named Oklahoma’s “Young Creativity Ambassador.” How did that make you feel? It’s truly an honor. I tell people all the time: The values I’ve gained from Oklahoma, I wouldn’t trade for the world. In so many ways, they’ve gotten me where I am today. I am very humbled my home state sees me [as] worthy enough for the title. It fuels me to work even harder, and to always remember where I came from. For more of our conversation, including what Kerr misses most about Oklahoma and where to see his work onscreen, check out the extended article at 405magazine.com/ July-2019/JAKerrQA/. - MAR K B E UTLE R

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ON THE SCENE

Lt. Gov. Matt Pinnell, Tom and Brenda McDaniel, Lance McDaniel, Kelsey and Stephen Tyler Audrey Anderson, Njeri Haygood, Trey Watts

Matt Youngker, Irene Lam Bud Elder, Dr. Joe Fallin

Jessica Ferrell, Avery Hay, J.T. Bray, Evin Luton

deadCenter Kickoff With the deadCenter Film Festival on the horizon, supporters set a course for the Governor’s Mansion and a preview party with a “yacht rock” theme.

Laron Chapman, Lauden Baker

Henry Browne, Annie Bohanon, Meg Salyer

Nick and Leigh Bentley, Gena Timberman, Mark Beutler Becky and David McCubbin, Lori Burson, Kim Bruno

Palm Springs Cocktail Party It was an evening of Palm Springs chic as Lori Burson hosted a small early-summer cocktail party for friends in her newly renovated Oklahoma City home.

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Joe Phillips, Shellie Holt, Kyle Muse

PH OTOS: D E A D C EN T ER BY FR A N KOZ A KOWS K I; PA L M S PR I N GS CO C K TA I L PA R T Y BY H E AT H ER H A N SO N

John Williams, Tiffany Talton, Kathy Williams, David Leader


HOME A Private Little Hideaway WITH MARK MYERS AND JESSICA SCHAMBACH BY MARK BEU TLER / PHOTOS BY R ACH EL MAUCI ERI

“Stanley adds fun to our household,” says Jessica Schambach. “We tied a string to our back door, and it has a bell on the end. When Stanley needs to go outside, he runs over and rings the bell. He’s a good boy!”

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HOME

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ark Myers and Jessica Schambach met in the newsroom at KOCO-TV back in 2002. They were both reporters for Oklahoma City’s ABC affiliate, and their desks were side by side. “It’s pretty common for relationships to start in newsrooms, because you spend so much time together,” Schambach says. “One night we went out as friends, and ended up dancing in Bricktown. We tried to keep it quiet in the newsroom at first, but eventually people started seeing us out together. We’ve been together ever since!” The couple were married in the Bahamas, and this June they celebrated their 14th wedding anniversary. They have one daughter, Mia, and the family pet, Stanley. They invited 405 Magazine into their Northwest OKC home for a look at their family life outside the glare of the media spotlight. “The older I get, the more of a homebody I become,” Myers says. “We have been able to build a house I want to come home to, and when it comes time to unwind, I love lying on the couch in the den and activating full-on chill mode.” “We are both homebodies,” Schambach adds. “I love being home. There’s nothing better than curling up on the couch with a good book, watching a show or playing games together. It’s my sanctuary. During the week, I don’t get much time to unwind after work; I get home around 11, and Mark and Mia are usually asleep. So it makes me happy to have a weekend at home where we can all be together. And my mom just moved to Oklahoma last year and lives about five minutes away, so I love having her come over.” Schambach’s schedule as KOCO’s prime-time anchor keeps her busy during

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“Comfy and cozy” is how Myers and Schambach describe their den. A coffee table with big drawers holds games and arts and crafts. “We spend most of our time as a family in the den,” says Mark. Carefully chosen accents add character to the space.


I LOVE BEING HOME. THERE’S NOTHING BETTER THAN CURLING UP ON THE COUCH WITH A GOOD BOOK, WATCHING A SHOW OR PLAYING GAMES TOGETHER. IT’S MY SANCTUARY.

the evening hours, while Myers’ position as spokesman for the Oklahoma County Sheriff’s office keeps him jumping, as well. They bought their house soon after they were married. It was new construction, and through the years (14 of them), they have changed almost everything. “It looked good back then, but we wanted to make it more modern,” Schambach says. “We started with the paint and woodwork: gray walls, white cabinets. It freshened things up, but looked a bit mismatched. That’s when we decided to change it all, and we had to move out to do it.” The couple stayed with a friend for a month while the professionals worked their magic. “They touched every floor in our house: ripped up carpet in the bedrooms and put in hardwood,” Myers says. “They refinished the existing wood floors, swapped out the taupe tiles in the bathrooms for gray and installed black/white/ gray wood-look tiles in the kitchen.” From there, they installed new quartz countertops throughout the house, and changed the kitchen backsplash and all three showers to white subway tiles.

“I was afraid the tiles would make me dizzy, but Mark’s idea for the floor was a good one,” says Jessica of the remodeled kitchen. “They’re interesting and uniquely us, and they’re easy to keep clean, which is a definite plus.” Mark says, “My favorite design element is definitely the master bath. I wanted to keep the natural light, so we came up with the idea to get rid of the tub, extend the shower and put a huge frameless glass in there.”

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HOME

“I’m glad we have a formal dining room,” says Mark. “We use it during the holidays or when we have parties. It’s like a piece of art – great to look at, but we don’t use it that often.” The mix of neutral shades and predominance of wood textures is carried throughout the home, and allows decorative elements to stand out.

“We want to be present and involved with Mia,” says Jessica. She’s going into the 3rd grade and has a busier social calendar than we do! We want to be the house where she and her friends come over and hang out.”

“We even got new toilets,” Schambach says, laughing. “I mean at that point, why not? We updated some of our appliances and changed light fixtures, hardware, fans and the faucets to stainless or chrome. We also had the master bathtub taken out and replaced with a larger, walk-in shower. Recently, my mom and I decided to re-paint the formal living and dining rooms. Those rooms don’t have as much natural light, so we wanted to brighten them up with white paint. It was work, but totally worth it.” The couple have created a happy life together, whether it’s grilling outside or relaxing with friends on the weekends. Their home has become their private oasis, and next on the agenda may be a pool. But for now, they enjoy the sleek, clean designs that surround them … and cherish their alone time. “We both come from humble upbringings,” Schambach says, “and have learned that what we have does not define us. We feel blessed to have a nice home. It’s not huge, and it’s far from perfection, but it’s just what we need right now – minus a pool!”

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BOUTIQUE

/

GIFTS

/

PATIO

/

HOME

Back to School VINTAGE HAVANA PASSION CALF HAIR

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FULL-SERVICE RETIREMENT COMMUNITY EDMOND, OK • 405-562-9155 • TOUCHMARKEDMOND.COM 1920053 © Touchmark, LLC, all rights reserved

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DESIGN

What designer, artist, icon has inspired you the most in relation to your work and why? “My mom, Fanny Bolen, always made our home so lovely; she is my mentor, and her designs are always a source of inspiration. Growing up, Warren Ramsey was our interior decorator and he has greatly influenced my career. He loved Fortuny, and often trimmed out curtains, chairs and sofas with Fortuny tapes. He placed gorgeous artwork in his projects, which I find so appealing. His style was similar to the late designer Billy Baldwin. I constantly refer to him in my design process. Sister Parish is another inspiration – she added feminine and comfortable twists to interiors. Currently, I am loving the work of Todd Romano, Meg Braff, Ashley Whittaker and Miles Redd.” If you could pick one time period to live in, in relation to design or lifestyle, what would it be? “Probably the 1980s. I love chintz and collecting, both of which were prevalent in that time period. Mario Buatta mastered the look. I was lucky to meet him several times, and once he visited mom’s design studio. He was a real hoot.” What space in your home do you love? “I have a small morning room that is my refuge. Initially, I created it as a special spot for me – but where Mom is, so is everyone else. Now, we all enjoy it. I also love our outdoor room; it is the place where we gather with family and friends. I love to cook and entertain, and really enjoy using the space for that.” What is a go-to paint color you find yourself drawn to currently or consistently? “Benjamin Moore White Dove is a go-to for mouldings, and I use Pale Smoke and Baby Fawn from Benjamin Moore a lot for walls.”

At Home With Bebe MacKellar

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EXPERT REFLECTIONS ON DOMESTIC STYLE

f you want to learn about the elements that make a home’s decor sing, ask a designer. This month, we sit down to talk with OKC expert Bebe MacKellar of Fanny Bolen Interiors about inspirations, go-to colors and a home’s most important piece of furniture.

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COLORFUL LEGACY A lifelong proponent of incorporating patterns and embracing color, American designer Mario Buatta became known as “The Prince of Chintz.”

Is there an accent piece you are most interested in right now, or one that you find is crucial in getting right when you are finishing out a home? “My list of things a home needs is long. Topping it are special lamps and lampshades, great collections reflective of the homeowners’ tastes and original artwork and photographs.” What do you think is the most important piece – or pieces – of furniture in the home? “There are certain elements all homes need – great and comfortable upholstery and well-made case goods top the list. I also love layered window treatments. Any Parsons-style piece can help set the tone in a room.” - SAR A GAE WATE R S

PH OTO BY R AC H EL M AU C I ER I


Discover Big Cedar’s newest overnight experience, Camp Long Creek, combining camping and comfort. Situated on Table Rock Lake, enjoy a serene backdrop while relaxing in one of the unique accommodations: shepherds huts, camp cabins or glamping tents. This new addition is specially designed for the whole family and features petfriendly units and a full-service marina, all just minutes from the Big Cedar activities and attractions you love. Make your reservations today!

855.494.1077 CAMPLONGCREEK.COM


E N T E R TA I N I N G 101

Pesto Presto

Harness your herb garden’s magic with this quick, simple recipe

Garden Variety

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GIVING YOUR ENTERTAINMENT A NATURAL FLAVOR

et’s face it: Entertaining or hosting a party can be overwhelming. Should it be inside or outside? Sit-down or buffet style? Finding the right plates that go with the right glasses, obtaining a few appropriate but not overdone flower arrangements, not to mention devising the menu … it’s a lot to come up with. Entertaining 101 is about taking the mystery out of what makes a successful get-together. The one overarching thing to remember is that taking care of your guests, be it friends, family or colleagues, is paramount to it all. However, a party doesn’t come together by itself – so this is my take on a magic wand: a few hints here and there to help you make it all come together. Looking to your own garden or yard is one way to achieve a beautiful affair, and is this month’s inspiration for your entertaining whims. Potted plants brought inside or to the outdoor table make the perfect arrangements – flowering plants and potted herbs are my personal favorite. Even cut herbs in vases make for beautiful centerpieces, and if you have to actually buy flowers, stick to one variety for a bigger impression. The greatest part about using herbs for table arrangements is that you can use them for your menu, as well. Parsley, basil and spinach can become part of a delicious pesto to put on your favorite pasta … and just like that, you’ve got a garden theme in full swing. Adding in some extra touches – maybe your favorite pottery or short glasses in a beautiful rose color, along with zinc highlights in containers or name tags, plus antique flatware and soft linens – will complete the look. With all these elements in place, the overwhelming part of the evening need only be the beauty of it. - SAR A GAE WATE R S

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Combine 1 cup basil, ½ cup parsley and 1 cup spinach with ¼ cup toasted pine nuts, 2 cloves of garlic and ½ tsp. salt in food processor and puree. Add ½ cup olive oil and blend. Add 3 tbsp. butter (room temperature) and ¾ cup parmesan cheese and pulse briefly. Serve over pasta.

PH OTOS BY R AC H EL M AU C I ER I


TRAVEL

A female mountain gorilla gives new meaning to getting “up close and personal” with nature.

African Dreams UGANDA’S LUSH, THRIVING LIFE BY MAT T PAYN E

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T R AV E L

Tea fields surround Bwindi Impenetrable Forest National Park.

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Kwikiiriza Gordon guide extraordinaire and them some

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he sun is just starting to rise over the electric green tea fields that surround Uganda’s Bwindi National Park, home to more than half of the world’s endangered mountain gorillas. Gordon, my driver, has grown up on the outskirts of the park – and he’s passionate about not just mountain gorillas, but Uganda tourism in general. He leads tours across the country, but Gordon is much more than a guide. He also owns a gift shop, where he sells crafts made by local artisans. He, too, is a carver, and prides himself on his own ape carvings. On a nearby hillside, he is also building Gorilla Hill Resort Chimpanzee in Kalinzu Forest Reserve near Queen Elizabeth National Park Guest Lodge, where he envisions guests coming to stay with him from all over the world. Uganda is a country of Gordons: people eager to share their country’s riches with the world and passionate about a better life. To many countries, tourism is a staple. To Uganda – and not just its people, but its highly threatened ecosystems and wildlife – tourism is everything. The return of the once critically endangered mountain gorilla is due entirely to tourism, and that tale is one that extends across the nation. Our desire to see some of the world’s most tremendous wildlife is, in many ways, the only thing keeping it thriving. Uganda, a landlocked country located in eastern Africa, is perhaps the continent’s most biologically diverse. The mountain

WHERE TO GO Bwindi Impenetrable Forest National Park Where to stay: Mahogany Springs Lodge What you’ll see: mountain gorillas, other primates Murchison Falls National Park Where to stay: Chobe Safari Lodge What you’ll see: Murchison Falls on a Nile River safari with elephants, hippos and crocodiles. On a game drive in the park, you’ll see lions and leopards. Queen Elizabeth National Park Where to stay: Kyambura Gorge Lodge What you’ll see: chimpanzees, treeclimbing lions, elephants Nile River Whitewater Rafting Where to stay: Lemala Wildwaters Lodge What you’ll see: the sunset over the roaring Nile from your balcony (top to bottom) A pensive vervet monkey; An unamused hippo in the Nile; Bronze sunbird; Vulture landing on the remainder of a lion’s kill

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T R AV E L

(clockwise from above) Female tree climbing lion; Blue-headed tree agama; Elephant cooling off in the Nile; An acrobatic mousebird

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gorilla treks are the primary draw, but Uganda boasts 10 national parks, which range from vast savannahs teeming with lions and elephants to forests that are home to primates and other wildlife. Queen Elizabeth National Park is a rare combination of elephant-covered rolling hills, avian-rich gorges and chimpanzee forests. If close contact with gorillas and lions aren’t enough to get the heart pounding, spending a day or two whitewater rafting the Nile River offers a high-octane reprieve from wildlife immersion. Or, if you’re seeking an experience on the Nile but don’t want to deal with rapids, Murchison Falls National Park, home of the country’s largest waterfall, is the best place to do a safari by riverboat. We hope these images inspire you to visit Uganda and the people dedicated to keeping it alive. (clockwise from left) Murchison Falls at Murchison Falls National Park; Saidi, one of the Nile’s, and Uganda’s, best river guides; Sunrise at Lemala Wildwaters Lodge outside Jinja, Uganda’s adventure capital; Sunbirds are nectar-feeding birds similar to hummingbirds; Guests can visit schoolchildren outside Bwindi Impenetrable Forest National Park

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HORSE.

Play.

DALL AS IS A CIT Y WITH M ANY SIDES. That’s what makes it such a great place for family adventure. Feed stingrays at the Children’s Aquarium at Fair Park or giraffes at the Dallas Zoo. Then see towering dinosaurs or race a virtual cheetah at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science. Enjoy resort-style pools and amusement parks, zip through the canopy at Trinity Forest Adventure Park or take in lakeside views at the Dallas Arboretum’s Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden. From the jawdropping to the hair-raising, exciting family memories are just waiting to be made in Dallas .

Get the most from your getaway at VisitDallas.com.

LOCATION: JADEWATERS RESORT POOL AT THE HILTON ANATOLE


COME SEE THE Many Sides of Dallas Dinos at the Dallas Zoo Bring the family, and discover over two dozen dinosaurs roaming the grounds of the Dallas Zoo, including Triceratops, Brachiosaurus, Tyrannosaurus rex and the Quetzalcoatlus, a giant flying reptile discovered right here in Texas. Hunt for fossils in the Dino Dig Zone, enjoy the interactive DinoSOAR wildlife show or challenge a Dilophosaurus to an old-fashioned spitting contest.

WHEN?

WHERE?

Through September 2

Dallas Zoo

dallaszoo.com/exhibits-experiences/dinos-at-the-dallas-zoo

RIVERFRONT JAZZ FEST Soothe your soul with three nights of the finest in jazz presented by VisitDallas and the Black Academy of Arts and Letters. Performers include Cassandra Wilson, Jonathan Butler, Hiroshima, Tito Puente Jr., Roy Ayers and more—as well as an opening-night set from Dallas’s own Queen of Neo-Soul, Erykah Badu.

WHEN?

WHERE?

August 30 through September 1

Dallas Convention Center

tbaalriverfrontjazzfestival.org

Bastille on Bishop Francophiles unite at the biggest French celebration in Texas. Play pètanque in the street, dance to swinging live music, plus enjoy crepes, mimes and, of course, lots of wine.

WHEN?

WHERE?

Saturday, July 14

Bishop Arts District

bastilleonbishop.com


ON THE ROAD

Wet and Wild

Under Sooner Skies

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THE BEAUTY AFTER THE STORM

klahoma is a vast land with no shortage of beauty, and with stretches of highways such as Route 66 or the panhandle’s 412, travelers could spend a week visiting landmarks and historical sites. Our primary natural gem, however, is not of the land … but of the heavens. Oklahoma’s sky has a way of augmenting – or upstaging – just about anything you put in front of it. Be it an old barn and a windmill or a dynamic cityscape, when the sky starts doing its thing come dusk or dawn, our state sites become national treasures. I spent the month of May chasing storms with Oklahoma-owned Channel 9 in conjunction with a project I am doing – covering sometimes up to 900 miles a day – and I saw every kind of sky imaginable. There is nothing quite like driving into a barrage of hailstones, which the pros call “punching the core,” to get ahead of a churning supercell. Or catching glimpses of a funnel between cracks of lightning and pops of power flashes as the twister tears through electric lines. There is a richness to the deep blue that surrounds the gray clouds as you look up into the underside of a rotating wall cloud. And while this kind of imagery can be daunting, there is perhaps nothing more beautiful than the moments after a storm has passed; the air thick with moisture and electricity. Thunder still rumbles in the distance, but the threat of the storm has passed, and the sky, wherever you are, is all yours. Listen, California … I see your Yosemite, and I raise you a post-tornadic-supercell Oklahoma sunset. - MAT T PAY N E

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Even in a state known for its weather, May was an unusually active month

As of June 4, the National Weather Service in Norman reported at least 61 tornadoes in Oklahoma during May 2019 (that number might rise on investigation). Over the previous 10 years, Oklahoma averaged 40 tornadoes during May.

The Oklahoma Mesonet reported 11.13 inches of rainfall in OKC during May 2019. May 2018’s rainfall was 4.64 inches; the normal amount during the period 1981-2010 was 4.93 inches.


Daily STOMP DANCE demonstrations captivate visitors with traditional song and camaraderie.

SUMMER STOMP DANCE LIVING HISTORY UNFOLDS Summer isn’t for staying still. It’s for following butterflies, dining outdoors and creating timeless memories. Do more than learn our history this summer. Come dance and sing with us, explore fine art exhibits, tour gardens and share in our traditions. ChickasawCulturalCenter.com • Sulphur, OK • 580-622-7130

Menu items at the AAIMPA' CAFÉ feature fresh produce from our gardens. Encounter summer’s thriving wildlife at our WATER PAVILION or BUTTERFLY GARDEN.


HAPP HOURY WE D-SUN 3-7

IO PATOW N ! OPEN

ART FUSION CLASSES MONTHLY

WED-THU 11-10 FRI 11-MIDNIGHT SAT 10-MIDNIGHT SUN 10-9

DEEP DEUCE 322 NE 2ND 673-7944

WHISKEYBISCUITOKC.COM

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DINING The menu at Black Walnut in Deep Deuce is arranged by what type of flavor you might be in the mood to enjoy – such as this Strip steak with heavenly mushroom gravy from the Smoky and Satisfying section. Fortunately for visitors, all options fall under the heading of “Something Delicious.”

Shades of Amazement BLACK WALNUT IS IN THE MOOD TO IMPRESS

BY S TE VE GI LL / PHOTOS BY SCOT T Y O’ DAN I EL

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LO C A L FL AVO R

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t’s a wonderful feeling to be pleasantly surprised. I have met chef Andrew Black several times, and spoken with him at some length about his enthusiasm for the three new restaurant concepts he’s adding to the Maywood apartment building in OKC’s Deep Deuce neighborhood. I have fond memories of his previous eatery The Meatball House in Norman’s Campus Corner, and have made several trips to La Baguette Deep Deuce, the first of that aforementioned trio. I was expecting good things from the second location, Black Walnut … and I’m pleased to say my expectations were not high enough. On the south end of the building, La Baguette serves breakfast plates, sandwiches Olives, peppers, garlic and bacon elevate and pastries, mostly inspired the baked chevre. by French cuisine (although its Reuben with chipotle mayo is marvelous). On the north side, Grey Sweater promises a multi-course tasting menu for long, luxurious feasts. The dinner- and brunch-focused Black Walnut lies between, and is somewhat less easily categorized. Our host, Sandy Wasswa, told us, “It’s a new American restaurant aiming to capture flavors from across the globe, and capture an experience. It’s not too serious; you’re here to enjoy yourself but still be surprised by the food.” Before that, though, I was surprised by the menu, which is categorized not by appetizers and salads and entrees, but by what type of flavor you might be in the mood to try. Each of the individual sections – Sweet and Savory, Fresh and Light, Smoky and Satisfying, Casual and Comforting – includes multiple possibilities that are intended to give anyone’s palate some tempting choices and emphasize sharing among the table. “The way we do things is all about your mood,” says Wasswa. “The recommendations will vary based on how you’re feeling.” In practice, that means you could stick to Fresh and Light for the spinach pappardelle with crispy anchovies, plus an order of the exquisitely creamy burrata and fried green tomatoes; or elect to pair the baked chevre (fans Specialty of the Meatball House will recognize cocktails include the the French for Goat Cheese appetizer) Fantastic from the Sweet and Savory section with Beets the Smoky and Satisfying strip steak with mushroom gravy, fried Brussels sprouts and Peruvian potatoes topped with parmesan and honey. The touch of

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BLACK WALNUT 100 NE 4th, OKC 405.455.6273

RECOMMENDED

Opt for seafood, because the barramundi (Asian sea bass) with a feather-light pumpkin gnocchi and rich tomato-cinnamon sauce we tried was an absolute gem of a dish.

ACCESS GRANTED

You might get lucky and find street parking along NW 4th, but why chance it? Use the underground garage off Oklahoma (on the west side of the building), bear left as you enter and you can park for free – just remember to get the gate code from the staff before you leave.

sweetness is unexpected and wonderful. This unusual approach to menu design seems like a good way to get people to consider the full range of options, and give real thought to what sounds most satisfying in the moment – it also feels ideal for groups to plan one big communal sampling. The same categories are also present on the stacked weekend brunch menu: My toasted coconut pancakes were both fresh and light, and the generous coating of salted mango syrup just sweet enough without going overboard. Plus, I already want to go back for the fried chicken “bonuts.” In atmosphere, presentation, flavor and imagination, Black Walnut has proven well worth the wait. Color me impressed.


Barramundi fillets, gnocchi and peas tied together with an amazing sauce

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INDUSTRY NEWS

MAKING A SPLASH

Now Hiring

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AMID RESTAURANT GROWTH, OKC SEARCHES FOR STAFF

klahoma City is in the middle of a perfect storm composed of three waves that will continue to affect the hospitality industry. The first is the opening of more and more new restaurants, a trend which seems not to have reached its zenith – surely at some point there will be a decline. (We said that in 2017, too, and no sign of it yet.) By the time this issue hits the streets, Gun Izakaya, an 84 Hospitality concept in the Paseo, and New State Burgers in the Plaza District will be open for business. July brings even more openings. Humankind Hospitality’s Frida in the Paseo, Jimmy Mays’ concept The Hamilton (with Stephanie Miller, Chris Kana and Michael Paske) in The Shoppes at Northpark and A Good Egg’s Mexican Radio are all scheduled to open in July. There is a strong possibility that Andrew Black’s third Deep Deuce restaurant Grey Sweater will open the same month. Dates are still tentative. The surge of openings has led to the second wave, a dearth of trained hospitality professionals. Restaurant owners and managers around the city are now regularly admitting that the lack of trained servers, bartenders and cooks is creating service issues. Many concepts are short-staffed, and in many more, it’s apparent that the level of service has declined. This situation will likely get worse, even as some hospitality companies have turned to counter-service concepts to reduce the need for trained staff. Finally, the growth of legal marijuana has created a demand for trained hospitality professionals, as well, which is increasing the problem. That might come as a surprise, but the spheres aren’t dissimilar in some ways: As Ford Austin, CEO of Apco Med, put it, “When we started hiring in Oklahoma City, we looked for hospitality veterans. Dispensaries are basically service industry concepts.” - G R EG H O R TO N

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Kevin Lee

FLAVOR VOYAGE

The 17th annual Odyssey de Culinaire’s OKC feast will be July 25 at the Skirvin Hilton. The Oklahoma Restaurant Association’s event raises funds to support culinary education, and features a good-natured contest between Tulsa and OKC chefs. This year, local chefs Kevin Lee, Josh Valentine, Theron Jessop, Michael Paske and Dominic Trapanese hope to enjoy the taste of victory.

IN THE CLUB

Non-alcoholic cocktails are one of the fastest-growing trends in the hospitality industry, but bartenders no longer need be troubled to make virgin versions of popular drinks – not when excellent lines such as Casamara Club sodas are arriving in the market. Available at Barkeep Supply in Midtown, they put high-quality botanicals into low-sugar leisure sodas that will allow you to keep drinking with your friends when you’ve hit your limit.

PH OTOS: T H E D R A K E BY C A R LI ECO N O M Y; C A N N O N BA L L BY M AT T PAY N E; K E V I N L EE BY S H A N N O N CO R N M A N; C A SA M A R A C LU B D R I N K S CO U R T E S Y C A SA M A R A C LU B

Rachel Cope’s favorite “move” (as she calls it) off the diving board is the cannonball, so this heat-beating frozen drink at Revolucion takes its name from summer play. “Credit where credit is due,” Cope says, “I saw a drink like this at Gracias Madre in L.A., and it was delicious. We top our house margarita with sangria syrup to riff on a swirl.”


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Outdoor Focus Loving the back yard life BY M AT T PAY N E A N D GR EG HORT ON

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“I try to be an evangelist for a garden-centric, outdoor focused lifestyle in Oklahoma,” says Oklahoma garden guru Linda Vater. As the verdigris dreamscape that is her Crown Heights backyard unravels before me like chapter one of a fairytale, one thing is certain: When it comes to being “garden-centric,” Linda Vater doesn’t just try. She breaks the mold. Vater humbly identifies as a garden writer and designer, but she is far more than that. Using various media –from news spots on KFOR and spreads in Southern Living to her website lindavater.com and Instagram feed (@potagerblog), where she reaches more than 60,000 followers daily with helpful and inspiring videos and photography – Vater is a pioneer when it comes to backyard beautification. When Vater bought her Crown Heights home, the backyard consisted of little more than scruffy grass and a redbud tree that could have benefited from a handful of “Peanuts” characters surrounding it and singing a tune. Where most would have seen sparsity, Vater saw potential. “Landscapes are now expected to be productive as well as ornamental,” she says. “Experiential, not just visual. Lower maintenance. More personal and about outdoor living, not just gardening.” Personal outdoor living sounds good to us – and whether or not you have a green thumb, the space behind your home should be ground central for enjoying yourself this summer. So we put together a few suggestions, from gardening to grilling, for making the most out of your own little section of the great outdoors.

Linda Vater in her backyard eden

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Spending time in a well-tended outdoor space is good for the soul.

The Vater Land

Vater’s backyard is, as she said, about living. She blurs the lines between indoor and outdoor living spaces and rather than just an open “yard” plan, each section of her yard feels like its own secret garden. “I want my yard to feel like it has multiple rooms,” says Vater, and this yard does. A dining area, multiple seating areas and an edible garden are all worthy spots to sit down with your favorite book or to simply take a load off and smell the … everything. Vater believes that outdoor entertaining is best enhanced by embellishments such as string lighting, fire pits, water features, cut flower gardens and outdoor kitchens. Not only does she have an eye for gardening, Vater sees the value and importance in making sure that you have a back yard that speaks to you. “As we become more and more tech dependent, interfacing and experiencing and communicating with the outdoors is more important than ever,” she says. “For our mental health, for leaving a legacy for future generations, for educating ourselves about how nature works and how we influence it, for enhancing our daily lives and creating beauty in our worlds.”

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Good to Grow Linda Vater’s tips for keeping plants alive

Use extra care, TLC and watering as plants get established. To the extent possible, plant before the heat arrives (take note for next year). Water at root zone, not overhead, when possible. Mulch and deadhead (clip and remove dead flowers). Carefully select plants that are curated to handle our heat, clay soil and high wind.


The Flame Game A shortcut to grilling greatness Grilling should probably be an American sport … although given the way some people boast of their skills and recipes, it already sort of is. We asked Jimmy Mays, whose new restaurant The Hamilton will open in July, for an easy backyard grilling recipe for the less competitively inclined, grill-wise. “I typically recommend flank steak, because it’s affordable and forgiving,” Mays says. “Even if you overcook it a bit, you can just add sauce and cut it against the grain, and it still tastes good. Char some baby broccolini with that, and you’ve got an easy meal.” Season the steak with salt, pepper, granulated garlic and paprika. Place on hot grill for six minutes per side. Remove from heat, add board sauce (see below) and allow it to rest for 10 minutes. It’s really that easy. For the broccolini, place the florets on the hottest part of the grill after turning the steak. Once the florets are nicely charred, remove and spritz with lemon or lime juice. The board sauce is whatever fresh herbs you have around, plus olive oil, salt, pepper and any briny bits (olives, capers) you want to add. The texture should be midway between oily and pasty. Run the steak through after it comes off the grill, and set aside to rest.

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Watered Down

Echelawn are experimenting with better ways to address yards, including with grassless yards and indigenous plants. Vater also puts an emphasis on organic, sustainable, earth-friend“We have combination gardens and beds at our house,” Lloyd ly gardening that reuses, recycles and repurposes in order to says. “We mix ornamental with edible, and the plants work togethminimize waste. “Small space gardening leaves a smaller carbon er. Since they’re mostly indigenous, they require less water than footprint overall,” says Vater. She said that one way to do this is many ornamental plants.” using turf and gravel instead of grass – a That includes popular trees such as the sentiment with which Brendan and Carrie Chinese maple, which are notorious waParker of Oklahoma City’s Always Greenter hogs. Instead, Lloyd recommended er agree. The Parkers started installing native redbuds, which are also beautiful, turf backyards in 2011, and were lucky and he plants fruit trees that grow well in to do a backyard a month when they Oklahoma: peach, apple, plum and apristarted. Since then, though, turf as an cot. He’s even planted fig trees, which alternative to grass has exploded in poparen’t indigenous but are hardy. ularity. In 2018, Always Greener did 64 “The trick in Oklahoma is getting the yards and large spaces, including playnon-indigenous varieties to survive the grounds, putting clocks and common first two to three years,” he says. “If they areas – and their business continues to get through that, they have a chance.” thrive. And while “turf” is their business, As for the mixed gardens, there is it’s what people do around the turf that one caveat: “Be careful about your plant really gets exciting. “It’s becoming very mix. You don’t want your kids foraging common practice to keep things a bit next to poisonous plants.” more minimal when it comes to gardenLloyd said the company is seeing an ing and backyards,” says Brendan Parker. increased interest in grassless lawns, “For example, alongside our work we’ve too. Mowing in the Oklahoma heat is seen some incredible implementation of miserable, and with water conservation gravel, rock, cactus and succulents that growing in importance, Oklahomans are create a very appealing aesthetic.” looking at stone, rocks, crushed granite According to the EPA, the average and other options for creating yards. At Artificial turf keeps its luster year-round. American family used 320 gallons of waher SoSA home, Lea Morgan dedicated ter daily, with a third of that going to “outdoor usage.” Of that perhalf the yard to replicating an outdoor landscape from her childcentage, more than half is used to water lawns and plants. Basically, hood home near Black Mesa: rocks, sand plum bushes, wildflowers Americans use 50 gallons of water a day on lawns and ornamental and prairie grasses have a wild, British garden feel, if British gardens plants. Landscape and yard design companies such as Tim Lloyd’s were designed in the Panhandle.

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Alternatives to traditional green grass lawns require less water, and are growing in popularity.

Rise Up

Using raised beds in a backyard can make gardening accessible to more people. Echelawn makes “starter kits” for raised beds, and Lloyd said the advantages include accessibility for people with age-related issues or back problems who still love gardening. “You can basically raise the beds high enough that no one needs to bend over or kneel to tend the beds,” Lloyd says. “There is, of course, more cost incurred with more soil, but it’s very doable for people who love to garden.” Echelawn sells cedar beds in a range of sizes, and Lloyd said the wood is an excellent choice because it’s naturally rot-resistant and it looks beautiful. “The most important consideration is not using treated wood,” he says. “Those chemicals can leach into the soil, and you don’t want your family exposed to some of the chemicals they use for treating wood.” In addition to physical benefits, raised beds also make it possible to simply place a tarp over the box seasonally, or even to take a break from gardening for a while. Ground-based weeds and grasses such as Bermuda don’t thrive in boxes, either, and boxes can help prevent plant damage due to snails and slugs, as well. “Moles will find a way in, though,” Lloyd says ruefully. “You can use chicken wire at the base of the soil, but they still seem to get in.” Lloyd recommended buying rich mix compost from Fertile Grounds or rich mix soil from Murphy Products in Stockyards City. Buying good soil from one of these companies, he says, highlights the other benefit to raised beds: “You don’t have to till the ground, ever.”

Cheers to July For a delicious, easy beverage to serve guests in the summer heat, we asked Colby Poulin and Chris Barrett of Clockwork Pour to give us a recipe. PINA COLADA PUNCH Peel two lemons and two limes, and place the peel in the punch bowl. Set fruit aside. Add three ounces of sugar to the peel, toss and let stand for a minimum of 45-90 minutes. The sugar will extract the oil from the peels over time. This creates oleo saccharum, and the longer it sits, the better the flavor. Remove the peels, leaving a sugary oil in the bowl. To that mix, add 500 ml of white rum, 250 ml of a favorite brandy, 3 ounces of pineapple juice, and 3 cups of coconut water. Add whole allspice to taste, and allow it to infuse for one hour. Stir the mixture after an hour, pour over ice and serve with a lime wheel. Colby and Chris recommend slicing the fruit you peeled, and adding the lime slices to the punch right before guests arrive. Use the lemon juice for cocktails or cooking.

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Th e G r een Wav e

Ta k ing s t oc k of t he s tat e of me dic a l m a ri ju a n a , one y e a r l at e r B y G r e g H o r t o n / P h o t o s b y M at t P ay n e

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Walking into Apco Med’s main room, you’ll find a clear indication that the cultural conversation around marijuana is shifting quickly: A pleasant woman greets you at the door and points you to a counter at the back of the main room, where two women are waiting to assist you. “That’s my mother at the door,” says founder and CEO Ford Austin. “She kicked me out of the house at 16 because I was selling marijuana. Now, she’s the greeter here on Fridays.” Once a hair salon, Apco’s facility has been renovated to be open, bright and welcoming. Comfortable seating is to the left of the door; apparel, glassware and CBD products are to the right. An armed security guard stands at a lectern at the back of the main room, a metal door behind him marking the entrance to the dispensary proper. “We hired people from the service industry to work the front of the building,” Austin says. “In some ways, I think that’s what’s missing from healthcare, so we designed an experience that’s more consistent with cannabis culture. Most dispensaries are utilitarian; they’re counterintuitive to cannabis culture, so we created more of a community center model.” Austin was born at St. Anthony Hospital, but a good part of his life has been lived in California, where he’s been working as an actor since he was 15. Along the way, he’s directed films and television, and since 2010, he’s held the CEO title at Apco Oil, a company his grandfather founded decades ago. “I don’t want to be tied to one single industry,” Austin says. “We diversified so we weren’t slaves to oil.” The transition from CEO of an oil company and entertainment industry professional to dispensary owner is not as surprising as you might think. One year after the state legalized medical marijuana, it’s clear that Oklahomans are finding ways – especially if they have the money – to create services and products targeted at the cannabis industry. Growing and selling are only two features of this exploding industry, and much like its near cousin alcohol, the industry is so much more than distillers and liquor store owners. There has long been a series of micro-cultures built up around marijuana – stoners, athletes, celebrities, healthcare patients, chronic pain sufferers, artists looking for inspiration – but now the industry is trying to recreate itself as a respectable cultural expression. We’re also witnessing medical marijuana offered up with a bit of a wink, as it’s a near-universal observation that at some level the industry growing up around medical marijuana looks a great deal like an industry preparing for recreational marijuana. After all, where are the community centers and yoga studios built around Xanax culture or Zoloft culture? Most Oklahomans seem to be OK with the wink, as if we’ve finally arrived at a population landmark such that the majority of people who buy, vote, build businesses and raise families aren’t outraged by the idea of recreational usage. Even if medical marijuana is the proverbial camel’s nose in the tent flap, the industry is reshaping the state in profound and profitable ways, so we offer here a survey of what Oklahoma looks like a year later … and without the predicted end of the world arriving with the passage of legal marijuana.

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The Law Aside from dedicated stoners and drug dealers discussing kind and quantity, the only conversations we used to have about marijuana were of the legal versus illegal variety. While those legal conversations are likely to define the subject of medical (and recreational) marijuana to an increasingly lesser degree over time, for now it is still a strictly regulated industry, and law enforcement in the state is adjusting to the new reality. “Misdemeanor possession charges are way up since the law passed,” says J.P. Hill, “but felonies are way down.” Hill is one half of Duncan & Hill Law Firm, a criminal defense firm located in the Plaza District. A veteran of drug trials, Hill has worked for a large criminal defense firm and the Public Defender’s Office. “I’ve been pleasantly surprised at the way much of law enforcement is buying in,” Hill says. “I was afraid they’d find bulls*** ways to turn misdemeanors into felonies, but they haven’t. And we’ve seen no prosecutions of anyone with a marijuana card.” Even with uncertain areas, such as probation and parole, there are signs that law enforcement is adjusting well. “The issues have varied county to county,” Hill says, “but some counties don’t care about the failed urinalysis tests, as long as the person has their card.” On the business side of the law, Oklahoma has definitely turned a very important corner. Apco is, according to Austin, the first dispensary in Oklahoma City to be using only Oklahoma-grown marijuana. “We had a gray market for a while,” he explains. “Everyone knew that when the dispensaries opened, the marijuana on the shelves didn’t come from Oklahoma,”– it’s illegal to transport across state lines – “but everyone went along with it.” As of June 1, the number of licensed growers in the state was approaching 3,000. Factor in dispensaries, processors and patients, and the number of residents and businesses affected by marijuana laws is close to 200,000. Elizabeth Dalton, attorney and partner at McAfee & Taft, said over the past year she’s been focusing more on business law related to the cannabis industry – primarily, that means keeping her clients in compliance with state laws. Federal laws are another issue, and the key component of that is how marijuana businesses can do their banking when they are in violation of federal laws. “Banking is still a problem issue,” Dalton says. “There are banks that are taking on marijuana customers. There is one in Arkansas, and at least one Savings and Loan in Tulsa. For now, it’s still very expensive, and the banks have a heavy burden of diligence. I expect it will get better as people get more comfortable with legal marijuana.” Dalton said the cannabis-based businesses are carefully watching the Secure and Fair Enforcement (SAFE) Act, a piece of federal legislation that has the sup-

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High-Class Cloth i n g Daniel Boyington was at a marijuana conference when he noticed that aside from tees related to a specific business – the kind of stuff-in-a-drawer tees that everyone gets at trade shows – no one was offering nice apparel. “I didn’t have the money to open a processing or growing operation,” Boyington says, “but I could do apparel.” Boyington and his business partner Brent Baxter knocked out three custom designs, and Boyington put the shirts on his neighborhood Facebook page. He lives in an upper middle-class suburban neighborhood, so when he sold 33 shirts almost immediately, he thought, “If people in this neighborhood will buy these shirts, people in the cannabis industry will buy a lot of them.” Sure enough, less than a year later, Tokie Tees is on track to sell more than 100,000 shirts a year. Their shirts are in approximately 40 dispensaries, and Boyington and Baxter have partnered with a local screenprinter to offer custom shirts for growers, processors and other cannabis businesses. “I just realized that there is money to be made serving the cannabis industry, even if I couldn’t afford to be part of the production chain,” Boyington says. That’s a philosophy that’s likely to affect business models around the state, including businesses that already have an established market. To borrow a perhaps-overused business term, cannabis is creating opportunities to pivot.

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“I think there are so many m edical b en efits to marijuana , an d I wanted to offer people a quality, trustworthy lin e of produ cts as a way of helpin g them. I’ve n ever b een a fan of pharmaceutical approaches to welln ess; I like th e m ore natu ral approach.” A l l i s o n D a k e port of attorneys general from 33 states and five territories. The SAFE Act is the first major standalone piece of federal legislation related to cannabis, and it could revolutionize the industry by protecting banks that service the cannabis industry. As of press time, Congress has not voted on the bill.

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The Pivots When bakers start adding THC to their batters, it’s clear we have reached a tipping point. No other cooking-related activity is as sure to garner pleasant memories across all demographics: cookies, cakes, pies, bread … the smells of childhood, and a practice that’s more ubiquitous in Americana iconography than any other kitchen scenes. Allison Dake started Brown Egg Bakery nearly 10 years ago, after a long career in fine dining in California, Oregon and Oklahoma. Her Deep Deuce office is open by appointment only, and her birthday and wedding cakes have a loyal and vocal fan base. She announced in May that she was starting Buddha Belly Edibles, a second company that would focus on adding THC to Dake’s products. “I think there are so many medical benefits to marijuana, and I wanted to offer people Stats from the a quality, trustworthy line of Oklahoma Medical products as a way of helping Marijuana Authority, them,” Dake says. “I’ve never as of June 3, 2019: been a fan of pharmaceutical approaches to wellness; I like the more natural approach.” PATIENT CARDS Dake and her partners started off with a modest goal: target 15 percent of existing CAREGIVER LICENSES dispensaries with caramel popcorn, cookies – including macarons – and a line of Little GROWER LICENSES Debbie-esque snacks approximating Star Crunches, Zingers and Twinkies. Eventually, she DISPENSARY LICENSES hopes to add a line of frozen and take-and-bake products. We asked her if she was PROCESSOR LICENSES worried about more traditional

The Numbers 129,085 818

3,026 1,479 811

Brown Egg clients responding negatively to Buddha Belly. “I admit that it’s a balancing act,” she says. “Some people are never going to be okay with marijuana, but the main question I’ve had is, ‘Do you have separate kitchens?’ And the answer is, ‘Yes, absolutely.’” Her initial batch of salted caramel macarons had 10mg of THC, an amount that Dake said would create a “pleasant high.” That’s as much as you’d get in a single THC gummy bear at most dispensaries, and is generally considered a standard dose for edibles – however, it’s certainly worth verifying the dosage of any edible beforehand. They require more time to take effect than smoking (so caution is indicated to keep from taking too much), but they also last longer, often between 4-8 hours. “It’s a dosage that allows you to keep working, and because it’s in the batter, it distributes evenly throughout the cookie. Every bite and every product is consistent.”

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Sativa vs. Indica One of the most prevalent topics of conversation surrounding marijuana – and practically everyone who gets smoking-related social anxiety has heard it – is that there is a difference between the psychoactive effects of the two varieties of the plant, Cannabis Sativa (which purportedly keeps users more energetic) and Cannabis Indica (said to be the more stupor-inducing strain). But more recent research indicates that might be an exaggerated distinction: In an Survey says: charting patient interview with the National Institute symptoms and satisfaction of Health, board-certified neurologist and psychopharmacology researcher Dr. Ethan Russo avoided technical jargon when commenting on the alleged divide. “There are biochemically distinct strains of cannabis, but the sativa/indica distinction as commonly applied in the lay literature is total nonsense and an exercise in futility,” Russo said. Russo attributed primary difference in reaction to the individuals themselves and the presence of another chemical family, terpenoids, in marijuana. Unfortunately, the effects of terpenoids on marijuana users is a grossly understudied field. Russo concludes with, “ … I would strongly encourage the scientific community, the press and the public to abandon the sativa/ indica nomenclature.”

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The Real Dirt on Oklahoma By Chip Baker

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ot since the land rush have people flocked to Oklahoma like they’re flocking now. Oklahoma has surprised the country by passing some of the most progressive laws allowing residents to open and operate medical cannabis businesses easily. People from all walks of life are taking this opportunity to get their piece of the American dream. But how long will Oklahoma‘s newest cash cow survive? “I’ve been involved in modern legal cannabis markets throughout the United States since 1997. During that time I’ve seen many states pass medical cannabis laws, and a few states actually implement them effectively.” We’ve seen the boom and bust that has come to almost every single state that has legalized cannabis. But will it boom and bust in Oklahoma just the same? For ease of operation, ease of licensing and state revenue, Oklahoma did it right. The state got the government out of the way of the licensing process, which has sped up legal cannabis in Oklahoma faster than any other state. It’s so easy to get a license here, if you’re zoned correctly, have $2500, some spare time to fill out an application and a couple of dollars more for some random licensing fees, you too can get a medical cannabis license to do business in Oklahoma. This has led to over 3000 business licenses being issued in the state. These new license holders and business start-ups are going to bring an economic boom to Oklahoma. However, contrary to popular belief, the cannabis industry is not easy money. Weed definitely grows on trees, but the cost of production, taxation by the federal and local governments, and the competing market place makes it difficult to make a buck. The biggest myth that people new to cannabis and growing fall for is thinking that cannabis is just like any other garden plant that anybody could grow.

“It’s easy to get into the cannabis business in Oklahoma, but it isn’t easy money.” Cannabis is a complex plant. In order to grow high-quality product without mold, mildew or pesticides it takes a considerable amount of effort and knowledge. Almost anyone can grow in their backyard for their own personal consumption, or in the closet without too much issues. However as you increase production to a commercial scale, it gets much more difficult to manage. Remember, just because you grow top-quality cannabis, does not necessarily make you successful. I have personally seen some of the best growers in the world fail. Why? Because they’re farmers and gardeners, not business people. And business is difficult.

Chip Baker checking out the flower room at a local dispensary Taxes, regulations, profit margins, and competition all impact your business. The margins might not be so tight right now but they will be as the industry matures. In short, in order to have a profitable and successful cannabis farm, you must detail every aspect of your business. There’s a common school of thought that Oklahoma is going to be a great place for people to grow outdoor cannabis. People will grow large scale gardens in Oklahoma, however it’s not going to be like California and Oregon production. Most if not all of the big, luscious farms you see on Instagram are West Coast farms. But compared to Oklahoma, the difference is that it might not rain for 5 to 6 months in California, Oregon, Washington, Nevada. This is a perfect environment for growing cannabis. In environments that receive more rain year round and have higher humidity like Oklahoma, plants won’t thrive like dry climate cultivation. Almost all the popular strains of today have been developed in a dry climate. Oklahoma will have to come up with their own strains that thrive and grow here. This may take three years or more. Oklahoma is the first state to have large scale medical legalization that’s unrestricted. It also has never had any sort of cannabis culture or community before now. This will be one of the biggest hurdles for Oklahoma to overcome. This is new for almost everyone. Of course there are some historic operators here, But for most people this is a brand new business, a brand new industry, and a brand new medicine. It will take some time, but I believe that Oklahoma has the potential to be a new hot bed for cannabis production. Chip Baker is the host of a weekly industry podcast, The Real Dirt Podcast. Subscribe on iTunes or download at therealdirt.com


The Real Dirt on Building a Grow Room

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ultivate has helped thousands of people set up their first grow room. From small, cost-effective operations to top tier commercial grows with all the latest technology, there’s a million different ways to do it. However with some conventional knowledge and a little creativity, you can build the perfect grow room. The key is to start with a great plan and get your advice from professionals. A lot of grow rooms are built on “bro science”. For those new to the term, these are techniques developed and advice given from people who did something in the grow that worked once, and now preach it as gospel without any real data to back it up. Avoid your brother-in-law’s opinion and come talk to a professional at Cultivate OKC. If you keep an open mind, you can build an environmentally controllable structure that can light and feed your plants in a modern and efficient way. Anyone who has ever smoked a joint has had the thought, “I can make $1 million growing this.” This might be true, however cannabis lends a certain psychedelic dream factor that can be hard to overcome. Listen to your peers, build conventionally and grow conventionally. Here are some common cannabis myths to avoid. The myth that you must hand water for the best results is exactly that, a myth. The number one way to save money and time and increase your quality is to build out a simple and inexpensive irrigation system.

“Anyone who has ever smoked a joint has had the thought, ‘I can make $1 million growing this.’” - CHIP BAKER, OWNER OF CULTIVATE GARDEN SUPPLY

Simple automation such as solenoids, timers and drippers is responsible for so much of the food grown across the world. Cannabis is no different. Irrigation requires some simple math, but if you do the math and get the right parts, it is one of the easiest and most cost-effective features you can implement in your grow. Be wary of consultants. If you do need to hire a consultant, make sure you get their full history. Many people enter the consulting field because they failed in the cannabis business. And why would you hire someone that isn’t successful? Before you hire anyone to advise you and your business, be sure to ask: how many years they have been in legal cannabis, how many grow rooms they have built, and ask to speak with previous clients about their experience. Look for people that have been in the business for 20 and 30 years. Be a good neighbor. Neighbors can be the best and worst part of cultivation. More grows than most can count have been shut down because of a disgruntled neighbor.

Overhead view of Cultivate Garden Supply in Denver, CO. An OKC location has recently opened. Just because it’s legal doesn’t mean you can stink out the neighborhood. Be mindful of your environmental impact, including your water drainage, noise and especially odor. Use conventional technology that has been long-established in the industry. Stay away from the latest and the greatest. Whether it’s seeds, clones, nutrients or lights, be sure that the strains or equipment establish themselves as successful before you use them. One of the most common conversations we have with people at Cultivate, both with those not in the cannabis industry or new to the industry relates to LEDs. Many people love these lights, but when you break down the math — and business is math — they don’t make the most sense. In general they are not more efficient. Watt for Watt, LEDs produce the same amount of heat as other conventional lights. Also due to their limited use in the cannabis industry as it stands now, the options are either too cheap to trust, or too expensive to commit to. Per Watt, per square foot, the most efficient light to use is a double ended fixture. Phantom and Gavita are two popular brands. The equipment cost for these are about $15 a square foot. And they illuminate at about 40 watts a square foot. LEDs may have a future in the cannabis and in agriculture, but we suggest you stay away from those right now and let the market develop. In a few more years, LEDs will become more affordable, and the snake oil salesman will be weeded out. The best way to grow the most cost-effective cannabis starting out, is using 5 gallon pots with soil as your medium and high-quality, synthetic fertilizers. This is one of the best ways to learn the ropes and eventually build out large-scale facilities. No matter what growing system or equipment you use, from hydroponics and aeroponics, to soilless growing and other techniques, when you have questions on any of it, Cultivate OKC will be ready to help. Stop by Cultivate Garden Supply or check us out at CultivateOKC.com


The Real Dirt on Soilless

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here’s more to growing than just grabbing a bag of potting soil and watering regularly. In fact, you can grow quality cannabis in a medium that doesn’t contain any soil at all. Soilless mediums can be a great option for new and experienced growers. Soilless means that less than 10% of the makeup of the medium comes from the soil or ground. That 10% may be made up of topsoil, compost, and earthworm castings. This makes soilless mediums mostly inert, but some will come with trace amounts of nutrition. One of the biggest benefits of soilless mediums is the lack of bugs, weeds and seeds. The ability to easily maintain a cleaner grow is why soilless mediums are so popular with nurseries and greenhouse growers throughout the country.

“Properly balanced for pH and inert, a soilless medium allows the user to maintain precise control with their chosen fertilizer.” - DARREN ERASMUS, COO OF GROWERS SOIL

Common ingredients you would find in a soilless mix usually consist of coco fiber, peat moss and perlite. Growers soilless High Porosity is the perfect example of this type of medium. Containing all the soilless ingredients mentioned, the soilless High Porosity blend from Growers has excellent aeration from its perlite, water retention from the peat and extra porosity from the coco. This along with the ability to maintain precise fertilizer control, makes Growers soilless High Porosity the perfect mix for any grower considering making the switch to soilless. Soilless mediums make it much easier to control your own fertilizer programs. It allows you to use whatever fertilizer you wish. It is up to you to supply the plant with all of its nutrition, whether it is high-performance hydroponic fertilizers or dry organic soil amendments. Soil is the exact opposite. A closer look at a soilless blend containing a While soil may use mix of Coco Fiber, Peat Moss, and Perlite at the Growers facility in Deer Trail, CO. similar components

to soilless mediums, they often use cheap filler such as compost and sawdust. Soil usually has fertilizer in it that can last for weeks or even months. This means you have to trust that the formulation of the manufacturer’s nutrition aligns with what you’re growing. You may also have to supplement fertilizers with your potting soil, since most modern potting soil has nutrition content that lasts 30 to 90 days. With that said, potting soil is traditionally the easiest way for people to grow. Grab a bag, dump the contents into a container, transplant your plant, add water and voila, you have a rooted, healthy plant. On the downside, potting soil often yields less than soilless mediums and is much more likely to have bug problems in comparison. With soilbased mediums like potting soil, you can encounter fungus gnats, root aphids and other bugs from the very beginning of your grow cycle. Regardless of whether or not you choose to grow in a soil or soilless medium, the quality of ingredients is the most important. The more expensive, high-quality products will almost always perform better than the cheap option. Just remember, the cheapest products are cheap for a reason. For more information about GROWERS High Porosity, visit Growerssoil.com


The Real Dirt on Clones

N

ow that Oklahoma has legalized medical cannabis, a lot of people are considering growing their own medicine outdoors after they get their license. But cannabis isn’t like other plants you grow in the garden, and needs extra care and patience to produce quality flowers. For new growers, one of the easiest ways to give yourself a good start in your first cannabis grow is to buy some clones. But it isn’t so simple as just planting a clone in the ground and watering it to harvest. In fact, there’s a science to planting clones outdoors that you need to understand first. WHAT ARE CLONES? When selecting cannabis, cannabis growers will always look for their top performing plants. Plants that have the best growth structure, vigorous growth and best buds end up becoming what are called mother plants. By simply cutting branches off the mother plant and “cloning” it, you can grow an exact replica of the mother plant. Clones ensure a uniform grow, where all plants will have similar growth patterns. They will also produce the same flowers, so you can be confident that your plants will grow healthy and produce quality medicine. While clones are the easiest option for any grower to produce quality cannabis, transplanting clones outside can be difficult. PLANTING CLONES OUTDOORS In the US, the most light any place gets is about fourteen and a half hours of sunlight during the summer solstice in June. So while clones traditionally may be used to twelve hours of light daily, they can be tricked when outdoors into flowering early when the day-light time gets slightly longer. Clones are much more photosensitive compared to cannabis plants grown from seed. When they are planted outside, they often go directly into flower unless care is taken. Jason Miller of Kiskanu Farms in Humboldt County, California, has been growing from clones for years, and knows the struggle of moving clones from an indoor environment to outdoors.

“It’s a difficult thing when you’re moving clones from a comfortable, controlled environment, out into nature. The key is to just keep your plants happy.” - JASON MILLER, KISKANU FARMS If you planted clones outdoors at the beginning of June, there’s a strong chance that near the end of June your plants will have started flowering. If you’re new to growing, you might think this is a blessing, but you’ll soon find out it can be a curse. Jessica Baker, owner of Baker’s Medical in Oklahoma City, sees a lot of new growers make that mistake.

Jessica Baker working with a new batch of clones at Bakers Medical Dispensary in OKC “Our primary business is selling cuttings and seeds,” Baker says about her nursery/dispensary, Bakers Medical. She continues, “People consider planting season to be early spring, but it’s really late spring and early summer. Cannabis plants often flower when you plant them outdoors before mid June, which is why a lot of growers won’t put their plants outside until after the solstice.” When talking about her own customer trends Baker said, “We have a lot of customers that place orders for clones and seeds between June and August for outdoor planting. As a matter of fact the busiest week of the year is typically the last week in June.” It’s safe to say that your best bet is waiting to take your clones outside until after the solstice, if not later to ensure they don’t flower early. JUST DON’T RUSH Clones are more sensitive to transplant shock and more sensitive to light compared to traditional cannabis plants grown from seed. This means when you try to plant them outside, there’s a greater risk of developing problems, unless you prepare your clones properly. Jeff runs Little Hill Cultivators based in Northern California, and has a specific technique for keeping their clones in their vegetative stage before they transplant outside. “If you have 24 hours of light and switch to 15 hours of light, your clones will most likely flower. If you have 17 hours of light and switch to 15, you can avoid that problem.” With a little extra patience and care, your clones will have no issues adjusting to outdoor conditions, and then you’re off to the races. Keep up with current inventory at Bakersmedical.com


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CBD AND HEALTH At Optimal Health Associates, we have been utilizing Cannabidiol (CBD) tincture oil, capsules and lotion over the last several months – as a primary intervention or secondary alternative for conditions including menopausal, psychiatric and neurological issues, bowel dysfunctions or rheumatologic and chronic pain difficulties. CBD is the major non-psychoactive component of Cannabis Sativa L. (hemp). To find out more, go to: https://www.optimalhealthassociates.com/cbd-and-health/

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H E A LT H

More Runs for Good Causes Lace up your running shoes and add these health-conscious races to your calendar

2019 Run Like Health 5K Friday, July 12 Wheeler Ferris Wheel 1701 S Western Ave, OKC Caleb’s Cause Foundation’s 8th Annual 5k & 1 Mile Fun Run Friday, Aug. 23 – Saturday, Aug. 24 Lake Hefner 9101 Lake Hefner Pkwy, OKC

The Good Fight

L

LYNN KNIPPERS AND THE ACS RUN FOR HOPE

ynn Knippers never thought of herself as a sun worshiper. She had friends who spent a lot of time in the sun, and some who even used tanning beds. It was just daily life, and an admitted lack of sunscreen, that led to her melanoma diagnosis. “I had a headache that would not go away,” Knippers says. “Then I began having problems walking straight, along with nausea and vomiting. My wife Barb took me to the emergency room, and we Lynn Knippers thought it was a migraine.” It was a lot more serious than that. Doctors performed a CT scan, and found two tumors in her brain and two more near her lung and heart. Knippers says, “Barb started crying, but I went into a ‘taking care of business’ mode – or in my exact words, ‘I’m going to beat this s**t.’ I must admit I asked the doctor for some valium, but I had a determination about me that I was going to win this fight.” So the treatments began, and there soon were signs of improvement. It was a very long road, but today Knippers says she has been tumor-free since 2015. Later this month she is leading a group of “Ambassadors” for the Oklahoma American Cancer Society’s Second Annual “Run For Hope,” beginning at 7 a.m. July 20 at the OU Health Sciences Center, 1100 N Lindsay. “We plan to start early before it gets too hot,” says Alicia Jackson, community development manager for OKACS. “This fun run, 5K and 10K gives supporters a chance to walk or run in honor or memory of a loved one who has battled any form of cancer. It’s a family-friendly event, and we hope everyone will come out and join us. At OKACS we are attacking cancer every day, but we need the public’s support to continue the good fight.” For additional information on “Run For Hope” or to register, go to RunForHopeOKC.org.

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OKC Brain Tumor Walk/5K Run Believing for a Cure Saturday, Sept. 14 Stars and Stripes Park 3701 S Lake Hefner Drive, OKC

k More than

1.7 million

new cancer cases are expected to be diagnosed in 2019 In the US, approximately

39 out of 100 men and 38 out of 100 women

will develop cancer during their lifetime The 5-year relative survival rate for all cancers combined has increased substantially since the early 1960s, from

39% to 70%

among whites and

27% to 63% among blacks.

Save Your Skin 5K Friday, Sept. 20 – Saturday, Sept. 21 Wheeler Ferris Wheel 1701 S Western Ave, OKC St. Jude Walk/Run Saturday, Sept. 28 Myriad Botanical Gardens 301 W Reno Ave, OKC Outpace Cancer Race Friday, Oct. 4 – Saturday, Oct. 5 Stephenson Cancer Center 800 NE 10th St, OKC 2019 ZERO Prostate Cancer Run/Walk Sunday, Oct. 6 Stars and Stripes Park Lake Hefner 3701 S Lake Hefner Drive, OKC


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FOOD & DRINK

RESTAURANT GUIDE T hese lis tings are not related to adver tising in 4 05 Magazine. If you f ind that a res t aurant dif fer s signif icantly from the information in it s lis ting or your favorite res t aurant is missing from the list, please let us know. Email steve.gill@405maga zine.com

SYMBOLS

most entrees under $10 most entrees $10 to $25 most entrees over $25 outdoor dining reservations accepted valet parking new or updated entry

AMERICAN ANCHOR DOWN Beer, specialty cocktails and gourmet corndogs in a Deep Deuce concept housed in repurposed shipping containers. 30 NE 2nd, OKC, 605.8070 AURORA Its comfortable atmosphere makes a perfect backdrop for a cup of coffee or hearty breakfast or lunch assembled from superb ingredients. 1704 NW 16th, OKC, 609.8854 BLACK WALNUT Blending American cuisine with the neighborhood’s rich cultural history, with an eclectic, vibrant menu, thoughtful food and an unbuttoned atmosphere. 100 NE 4th, OKC, 455.6273 BLOCK 23 The Sheraton’s house restaurant is a casual, contemporary, convenient spot for breakfast, lunch or drinks and snacks on the patio. 1 N Broadway, OKC, 455.6273 BUTTERMILK Get a fresh, hot start to the day at the Paseo’s brick-andmortar version of a beloved OKC food truck, specializing in a wide range of deliciousness served between biscuits. 605 NW 28th, OKC, 605.6660 CAFÉ 501 Stone oven pizzas, fresh salads and specialty sandwiches on house-made breads. Add welcoming atmosphere and enjoy. 501 S Boulevard, Edmond, 359.1501; 5825 NW Grand, OKC, 844.1501 THE DRUM ROOM March your own drumsticks in for a heap of crispy, juicy fried chicken (among the city’s best) starring alongside fried okra, waffles and a fully loaded bar. 4300 N Western, OKC, 604.0990 EDDIE’S BAR & GRILL This stylish spot is equally ideal for a casual drink, appetizers while watching the game or a dinner date. And the wings are outstanding. 930 E 2, Edmond, 285.7725

FLINT Approachably casual style, plus the kitchen’s attention to detail in the

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outstanding contemporary cuisine, winningly combined in the Colcord Hotel. 15 N Robinson, OKC, 601.4300 HATCH They call it “early mood food,” and if you find yourself in the mood for a sumptuous breakfast (or lunch), it should be right up your alley. 1101 N Broadway, OKC, 232.3949; 13230 Pawnee, OKC

a restaurant turns out a stellar menu of expertly tuned flavors and dishes meant to be shared. 900 W Main, OKC, 982.6900 NASHBIRD Make tracks to this Nashvillestyle “Hot Dang!” chicken, with adjustable spice level. Speedy service, cocktails and a spectacular patio add extra savor. 1 NW 9th, OKC, 388.0033

THE HUTCH ON AVONDALE The all-time classic Coach House receives an update with a more modern menu and a full suite of tempting cocktails, wines and spirits. 6437 Avondale, OKC, 842.1000

NED’S STARLITE LOUNGE A successful family catering business grew into a lavishly retro-decorated bar serving burgers, chicken-fried steaks and more. 7301 N May, OKC, 242.6100

HEFNER GRILL Upscale fare of steaks and seafood plus a tempting brunch, enhanced by a live piano and a spectacular view overlooking Lake Hefner. 9201 Lake Hefner Pkwy, OKC, 748.6113

NEIGHBORHOOD JAM Serving tasty takes on classic American dishes and more specialized options, this breakfast-centric spot aims to become a community favorite. 15124 Lleytons Court, Edmond, 242.4161; 102 W Main, Norman, 310.2127

HUNNY BUNNY Bringing the allure of fresh, hot breakfast treats to Uptown 23rd, this purveyor of biscuit sandwiches is a must for comfort food lovers. 429 NW 23rd, OKC THE JONES ASSEMBLY It’s a spectacular concert venue, but the bar and main menu are sufficient to make memories on any occasion. 901 W Sheridan, OKC, 212.2378 KITCHEN AT COMMONPLACE Few bookstores offer more than coffee and pastries, but Commonplace Books’ full restaurant is a small but savory treat. 1325 N Walker, OKC, 534.4540 KITCHEN NO. 324 A seasonally inspired café and craft bakery serving rustic American cuisine for lunch and dinner, it’s a thorough treat for breakfast or brunch. 324 N Robinson, OKC, 763.5911 MARY EDDY’S Inside Film Row anchor 21c Museum Hotel, this showplace of

NIC’S PLACE Justly renowned for his skill at the grill, burger master Justin Nicholas offers dinner and drinks served in outstanding style at this Midtown diner and lounge. 1116 N Robinson, OKC, 601. 9234 PACKARD’S NEW AMERICAN KITCHEN They’re not kidding about the “new” – the lunch and dinner menus are filled with innovative tastes. 201 NW 10th, OKC, 605.3771 PICASSO CAFÉ Their neighbors in the Paseo are painters and sculptors, so it’s apt that creativity abounds in this laidback spot’s menu, including plentiful selections for vegetarians. 3009 Paseo, OKC, 602.2002 THE R&J LOUNGE A sentimental dining experience with vintage recipes and atmosphere. Seating is limited but the patio is a year-round treat, and the drinks menu is a thing of beauty. 320 NW 10th, OKC, 602.5066

THE PRESS Oklahoma-inspired comfort food in a former printing facility and garage in the Plaza District – the chicken-fried steak comes recommended. 1610 N Gatewood, OKC, 982.1010 REDROCK CANYON GRILL Rotisserie chicken, enchiladas and steak in a casually energetic, hacienda-style atmosphere. 9221 E Lake Hefner Pkwy, OKC, 749.1995; 1820 Legacy Park, Norman, 701.5501 SATURN GRILL A star of the lunchtime stage in Nichols Hills Plaza, its tasty twists on pizza, sandwiches and salads keep it crowded on weekdays. Calling ahead is recommended. 6432 Avondale, OKC, 843.7114 SCOTTIE’S DELI Soups, salads and especially sandwiches, all made from scratch and featuring meats that are cured, smoked and cooked in-house. Start with the pastrami and get ready to fall in love. 427 NW 23rd, OKC, 698.3696 SCRATCH Isn’t that the best place for food to come from? Top-of -the-line ingredients are combined into carefully concocted entrees, sides and wondrous craft cocktails. 132 W Main, Norman, 801.2900; 607 NW 28th, OKC SOCIAL The menu at this gathering spot is packed with American classics – and brunch is served every day of the week. 1933 NW 23rd, OKC, 602.8705 SUNNYSIDE DINER A new day dawns for breakfast and lunch in a classic approach to a no-pretense, made-fromscratch diner. Order up! 4 locations, eatatsunnyside.com SYRUP The most important meal of the day is also the most enticing at this breakfast boutique; the crunchy French toast is something special. 123 E Main, Norman; 1501 NW 23rd, OKC, 701.1143

Elevated Dining GREAT FOOD AND A VIEW IN FOUNDERS TOWER

I

f you’ve been near the west side of OKC recently, you’ve probably seen 3Sixty Restaurant & Bar – it’s hard to miss, being atop Founder’s Tower – but if you haven’t gone upstairs to visit in a while, now’s a perfect time. The restaurant recently marked its anniversary by introducing an augmented menu featuring contributions from consulting chef Beth Lyon, with impressively tempting results such as the turmeric-crusted mahi-mahi on a bed of Mediterranean orzo. Alternately, we have two words for you: boar burger.

PH OTO BY SCOT T Y O’ DA N I EL


VAST Keeping your attention on the elegant cuisine might be difficult; the view from atop the Devon Tower is truly unparalleled in Oklahoma, making this a fantastic date spot. 280 W Sheridan, 49th floor, OKC, 702.7262

O ASIAN FUSION Quality in a wide span of culinary influences – freshly rolled sushi to fiery curry. Call ahead for dinner, because it becomes a packed house in a hurry. 105 SE 12th, Norman, 701.8899

WHISKEY CAKE High-quality locally sourced ingredients, prepared using slow cooking techniques for outstanding dining. Enjoy – and don’t forget the namesake dessert. 1845 NW Expressway, OKC, 582.2253

SAII With a dark, rich ambiance, the captivating Saii serves expertly done Japanese, Thai and Chinese fare plus an extensive and adventurous sushi menu. 6900 N May, OKC, 702.7244

ASIAN CAFÉ ICON Tempting sushi, Japanese specialties and delicious spectacles like steak cooked at the table on a sizzling stone fill the menu to bursting. 311 S Blackwelder, Edmond, 340.8956 CHICK N BEER Wings and brews are food for the soul; these freshly fried beauties are done Korean-style, and with serious flavor. Grab some kimchi fries and a local beer and enjoy. 715 NW 23rd, OKC, 604.6995 CHIGAMA Think of it as Asian-slashMexican; influences of both cuisines are ample in this kitchen’s creative tacos, rice bowls and other wideranging treats. 3000 W Memorial, OKC, 513.5999 EL TORO CHINO Big, bold flavors from disparate cuisines are blended in this “Latin + Asian Kitchen” - creating results that are as distinctive as they are delicious. 2801 NW 36th, Norman, 708.9472 GOGI GO Fast-casual Korean barbecue in Midtown; pick your protein and customize the ingredients to a delicious bowl or wrap and get ready to come back again and again. 1325 N Walker, OKC, 778.8524 GORO An “izakaya” is a Japanese pub, like this cheerful Plaza District spot for expertly crafted ramen, yakitori, bar snacks and more. 1634 Blackwelder, OKC, 606.2539 GUN It’s not about firearms; think Japanese street food like sizzling yakitori, plus super-fresh seafood, shareable plates and a bar loaded with serious sake. 3000 Paseo, OKC MAGASIN TABLE Midtown’s home for a modern take on Vietnamese cuisine – think pork buns, savory pho and especially the exceptional banh mi sandwiches. 3 NE 8th, OKC, 212.2751 MUSASHI’S Exquisitely flavorful Japanese cuisine prepared with genuine artistry, thanks to the skilled chefs executing culinary performance art at hibachi grills. 4315 N Western, OKC, 602.5623 NOODEE / OKIE POKIE Rice or salad or noodles, grilled meats or fresh seafood, whatever you pick from this pair of concepts under one roof, it’ll be delicious. 2411 N Guernsey, OKC, 605.5272

SALA THAI Pineapple curry, basil squid, fried rice with crab, cinnamon beef ... the variety is exceptional, making this Midtown diner a popular midday option. 1614 NW 23rd, OKC, 528.8424 SUSHI NEKO An established OKC favorite combining style with substance (in the form of an especially wideranging and creative sushi menu). 4318 N Western, OKC, 528.8862 SWEET BASIL The enormous aquarium adds to the cozy ambiance; with its outstanding curries and specialty dishes, it makes a great venue for a dinner date. 211 W Main, Norman, 217.8424 TANA THAI There’s a lot to like about the food in this little spot, from red snapper filet to pad thai. Pay special mind to the varied soups, and do not play chicken with the spice level. 10700 N May, OKC, 749.5590

and exquisite baking make a tres chic destination for brunch and beyond. 1130 Rambling Oaks, Norman, 329.1101; 2100 W Main, Norman, 329.5822 PIE JUNKIE A Plaza District haven for serious pie aficionados. Call ahead to order a whole pie or quiche or walk in and choose from what’s on hand; either way, the flavors are incredible. 1711 NW 16th, OKC, 605.8767

BAR & PUB FOOD BANQUET CINEMA PUB An elevated take on familiar pub standards in a retro-stylish venue that hosts a pair of movie screens for dinner and a show. 810 NW 4th, OKC BAR ARBOLADA Film Row residents have a neighborhood bar – but anyone can and should sample the local beers, craft cocktails and seasonal menu of small plates. 637 W Main, OKC BLU Just south of Main Street, this sleek bar stands out due to quick, courteous service and a menu with gourmet range. 201 S Crawford, Norman, 360.4258 THE MANHATTAN A stylish bar in the heart of downtown, its cocktail menu is packed, and don’t overlook the selections of sandwiches, salads and tasty treats. 210 Park Suite 150, OKC, 605.5300

TOKYO It’s neither huge nor lavishly appointed, and the menu focuses on tradition rather than creativity; but it’s palpably fresh and routinely cited as among the metro’s best sushi. 7516 N Western, OKC, 848.6733

THE MONT The food has a Southwestern zing, but beverages like the beloved Sooner Swirl and the primo patio (with misters) are why this landmark is justly renowned. 1300 Classen Blvd, Norman, 329.3330

YOKOZUNA The noodles, entrees and snappy drinks menu beckon, but it’s the rolls that stand out in this heavyweight contender for local sushi supremacy. 13230 Pawnee, OKC, 500.1020

OAK & ORE A Plaza District port of call, it’s best known for a carefully curated rotating selection of craft beers, although the menu (especially the fried chicken) is amply rewarding. 1732 NW 16th, OKC, 606.2030

YUZO Variety is the word in this sushi tapas bar, boasting a tempting swirl of Colombian, Brazilian and Japanese culinary influences. 808 N Broadway, OKC, 702.9808

BAKERY BELLE KITCHEN Doughnuts, macarons, pastries and ice cream created from scratch, in small batches, with care and passion. 7509 N May, OKC, 430.5484; 30 NE 2nd, OKC, 541.5858 CUPPIES & JOE The name is only part of the story: the Uptown nook holds cupcakes and coffee as well as pie, live music, a cozy, trendy vibe and more. Park around back and take a peek. 727 NW 23rd, OKC, 528.2122 GANACHE They serve les sandwiches, but this patisserie excels at mouthwatering croissants, macarons, tarts and other baked treats inspired by the owners’ studies in Europe. 13230 Pawnee, OKC, 267.912.5536 LA BAGUETTE Comfortable ambience

O’CONNELL’S IRISH PUB & GRILLE Beloved by students, alumni and townies alike, it’s served up killer burgers, beer and festive atmosphere since 1968. A St. Patrick’s Day must. 769 Asp, Norman, 217.8454 PUB W Multiple sections provide a choice of atmosphere, but the menu filled with choice beer and “new classic” fare is a constant pleasure. 4 metro locations, pubdub.com REPUBLIC GASTROPUB Part beer bar and part upscale eatery, these noisy, amply attended locales pair a vast selection of brews with tasty menu items. 5830 N Classen Blvd, OKC, 286.4577; 13230 Pawnee, OKC, 907.5900 SEAN CUMMINGS IRISH RESTAURANT The namesake chef brings the food, drinks, music and atmosphere of an Emerald Isle public house back to the metro – go raise a glass. 7628 N May, OKC THE UNION A good sign for the future of the South of St. Anthony mini-district,

this neighborhood hangout spot has three bars and a forward-thinking menu. 616 NW 5th, OKC, 601.2857 WHISKEY BISCUIT Serving “Southern cuisine with a modern twist” – think oyster sliders, biscuits and gravy with fried crawfish, steak po’ boys and brunch all day. 322 NE 2nd, OKC, 673.7944 THE WINSTON A menu packed with intriguing possibilities among “elevated pub food” balances out an impressive selection of beer, wine and whiskies. Cheers. 106 W Main, Norman, 561.7616

BARBEQUE DECKLE SMOKEHOUSE Offering true Texas-style pit barbeque (nothing but oak for their smoke), its brisket, ribs and house-made German sausage are excellent. 324 W Edmond, Edmond, 657.2992 EARL’S RIB PALACE A popular choice among locals in a genre that’s hardly lacking in options, the local chain pounds out hit ribs and turkey and a fine burger. 6 metro locations, earlsribpalace.com IRON STAR Specializing in “a unique and tasty spin on comfort food,” its entrees are excellent, and the sides here are equal players as well. 3700 N Shartel, OKC, 524.5925 KLEMM’S SMOKE HAUS There’s a definite German flair in some of the family recipes that fill their menu, but what really stands out about this fromscratch establishment is the high levels of care and quality. 2000 S Broadway, Edmond, 757.7412 LEO’S BAR-B-Q Rich flavor and tender texture, delivered with authenticity for commendable value – no wonder its ribs and brisket are favorites among Oklahoma connoisseurs. 3631 N Kelley, OKC 424.5367 MAPLES A one-time mobile operation that’s moved on up to star in the Plaza District, it’s home to serious Central Texas-style BBQ; try the moist brisket. 1800 NW 16th, OKC, 604.3344 SWADLEY’S Expertly prepared meats star in this Oklahoma chain’s crowd-pleasing menu. And if there’s a special occasion approaching, they’re also award-winning caterers. 6 metro locations, swadleys.com TEXLAHOMA BBQ Family owned and fabulously flavorful, its meats (especially the beef ribs) are eyerolling good. Don’t forget the espresso barbeque sauce! 121 E Waterloo, Edmond, 513.7631

BURGERS & SANDWICHES COW CALF-HAY This tempting burger spot offers ample flavor combinations, and the delicious never-frozen patties are mmmmmassive. Don’t forget the

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onion rings. 3409 Wynn, Edmond, 509.2333; 212 N Harvey, OKC, 601.6180

friendly treats. 815 N Hudson, OKC, 633.1703

THE FIXX Massive, monstrous burgers and hot dogs, put together with thought and care. Don’t forget to get a shake or something from the full bar. 644 W Edmond, Edmond, 285.2311

ELLIS ISLAND Their brews use Eote Coffee, and local beers, a selection of wines, treats from La Baguette and Epic Pops and more are also waiting to be enjoyed. 130 N Broadway, Edmond, 726.8831

THE GARAGE BURGERS & BEER A noisy sports-bar atmosphere houses many tempting flavor possibilities of huge, juicy burgers and fries. 8 metro locations, eatatthegarage.com

RED CUP Curl up for conversation over great coffee, baked treats, vegetarian breakfast and lunch specials, and live music. It’s highly recommended. 3122 N Classen Blvd, OKC, 525.3430

KAISER’S GRATEFUL BEAN Located in the heart of Midtown, OKC’s authentic ice cream parlor and soda fountain serves up homemade ice cream, burgers and vegetarian meals. 1039 N Walker, OKC, 236.3503

T, AN URBAN TEAHOUSE Proving that an establishment’s focus can be at once narrow and broad, these retreats offer over 100 varieties and expert counsel to explore a world of possibili-teas. 519 NW 23rd, OKC

LIP SMACKERS Don’t sweat the surroundings; this gas station-adjacent grill dishes up beefy burgers in a broad spectrum of deliciousness. 4200 N Penn, OKC, 604.9770 THE MULE Solid beer and beverage selection plus a delectable array of gourmet grilled cheeses and melts; this relaxation destination in the Plaza District stays popular. 1630 N Blackwelder, OKC, 601.1400 NIC’S GRILL It’s small, it’s cash-only and the lines are often long, but the colossal onion burgers are easily among the metro’s best. Cheese and everything? 1202 N Penn, OKC, 524.0999 S&B’S BURGER JOINT Good news: these burgers’ exquisite flavors come as sliders too, all the better to sample more kinds. 5 metro locations, sandbburgers.com TUCKER’S ONION BURGERS With one burger, one side (fries) and one salad, the menu is easy to remember - and the execution makes the meal unforgettable. Add a shake and enjoy. 4 metro locations, tuckersonionburgers.com

COFFEEHOUSE & TEA ROOM ALL ABOUT CHA Universal standards and unusual concoctions (the sweet potato latte is a wonder) in a cheerful atmosphere; the food options are worth investigating, as well. 5 metro locations, allaboutcha.net CLARITY COFFEE The space is crisp, cool and comfortable – including seating for sipping or getting some work done – and the brewers have their beverages down to a science. 431 W Main, OKC, 252.0155 COFFEE SLINGERS Rocking a brisk, urban vibe on Automobile Alley, it has become a gathering place for genuine java enthusiasts. 1015 N Broadway, OKC, 606.2763 ELEMENTAL COFFEE Seriously spectacular coffee roasted in-house, augmented with locally sourced salads, breakfast options and other vegetarian-

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CONTINENTAL BISTRO 22 Small restaurant; big bold flavors. The concept is from star chef Clay Falkner, so the steaks, seafood and more are outstanding. 1417 E Danforth, Edmond, 562.4884 BLACKBIRD A Campus Corner gastropub pairing creative dishes like pot roast nachos with a broad beer, wine and whiskey list. There’s little on the menu that’s not tempting. 575 S University, Norman, 928.5555 CHEEVER’S Southwestern-influenced recipes (the chicken-fried steak is a house specialty) and love of seafood drive the contemporary comfort food in one of the city’s finest dining destinations. 2409 N Hudson, OKC, 525.7007 EN CROUTE A warmly welcoming café in Nichols Plaza offers treats all day long, from fresh pastries to select spirits and beer, with special emphasis on artisanal cheese and charcuterie. 6460 Avondale, OKC, 607.6100 LUDIVINE The menu adjusts constantly to reflect availability of elite-quality, locally sourced ingredients - but every dish is the result of genuine culinary artistry. 320 NW 10th, OKC, 778.6800 THE MANTEL Steaks, seafood and other specialties combine with a refined atmosphere and outstanding service for a truly memorable meal, especially if you have a date to impress. 201 E Sheridan, OKC, 236.8040 THE METRO A perennial favorite that feels comfortably upscale, the far-reaching menu covers culinary high points from vichyssoise to crème brulée. 6418 N Western, OKC, 840.9463 MICHAEL’S GRILL Thoroughly urbane dining in an intimate setting: the steaks, chops and seafood are all reliably excellent, and the Caesar salad prepared tableside is the stuff of legends. 2824 W Country Club, OKC, 810.9000 THE MUSEUM CAFÉ A setting as inspiring as the OKC Museum of Art

warrants something special in cuisine: its menu delights for lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch. 415 Couch, OKC, 235.6262 PASEO GRILL Quiet and intimate inside, cheerful and comfortable out on the patio, with an award-winning menu inspired by the cuisines of Europe– try the duck salad. 2909 Paseo, OKC, 601.1079 THE PRITCHARD WINE BAR Tempted by tempranillo? Musing about muscat? This Plaza District stop is amply stocked with exceptional wines, and sampling the varied dishes is a pleasure in itself. 1749 NW 16th, OKC, 601.4067 ROCOCO An “East Coast-style” restaurant with a diverse menu of international dishes, all set off by carefully selected wines to create the perfect dinner pairing. 12252 N May, OKC, 212.4577 SEVEN47 A Campus Corner hotspot boasting sleek, swank décor, an appealingly broad menu including a tantalizing brunch and a consistently celebratory vibe - in toto that makes this a winner. 747 Asp, Norman, 701.8622 SIGNATURE GRILL Unassuming locale; magnificent culinary rewards. The expertly considered menu mixes French and Italian flavors to present a few select dishes. 1317 E Danforth, Edmond, 330.4548 WEST Expert staff and stylish décor augment a menu filled with treats from beef pad thai to roasted airline chicken. Don’t forget the zuccha chips! 6714 N Western, OKC, 607.4072

FRENCH CAFÉ CUVEE Located in Midtown’s magnificent Ambassador Hotel, this paean to the flavors of la belle France is a collaboration between star chefs and elite ingredients. 1200 N Walker, OKC, 898.8120

warm soft pretzels with cheese sauce, duck fries and a heftig beer menu. 421 NW 10th, OKC, 609.3300 ROYAL BAVARIA Superb takes on traditional dishes like Weinerschnitzel, Jagerbraten and sausages, plus fantastisch house-brewed beers. The time spent is a worthy investment. 3401 S Sooner, Moore, 799.7666

INDIAN GOPURAM - TASTE OF INDIA A full-service restaurant whose richly appointed interior and attentive staff accord patrons the feel of fine dining, even during the plentifully stocked lunch buffet. 4559 NW 23rd, OKC, 948.7373 MISAL OF INDIA A Norman institution for over 30 years, specializing in tandoori-cooked delicacies and boasting healthy, natural, delicious cuisine served. 580 Ed Noble Pkwy, Norman, 579.5600 TAJ A set of Indian staples and delicacies - the menu has sections for vegetarian, tandoori, South Indian and Indo-Chinese specialties - plus full lunch and dinner buffets. 1500 NW 23rd, OKC, 601.1888

ITALIAN & PIZZA BENVENUTI’S Subtly flavored minestrone to rich, hearty ragouts, the splendid menu keeps the booths full and diners planning return trips; don’t overlook Sunday brunch. 105 W Main, Norman, 310.5271 BIRRA BIRRA Wood-fired brick oven pizza and ice-cold (genuinely, thanks to the frosted rail bar) beer by the water in Chisholm Creek. 1316 W Memorial, OKC, EMPIRE SLICE HOUSE Reigning over the Plaza District in New York style, it offers whole pizzas or slices, a full bar and a primo patio. 1804 NW 16th, OKC

FAIT MAISON This classical French restaurant delivers exceptional cuisine made with exacting care – the name translates to homemade – for exquisite, if pricy, event dining. 152 E 5th, Edmond, 509.2555

FLIP’S WINE BAR & TRATTORIA Managing to feel rustic despite its location in a busy corridor of OKC, this cozy Italian joint keeps extended hours, and serves up great taste. 5801 N Western, OKC, 843.1527

LA BAGUETTE BISTRO Les Freres Buthion have deep roots in the city’s culinary landscape, and this flagship combines fine dining with a great bakery, deli and butcher on site. 7408 N May, OKC, 840.3047

THE HEAT Deep-dish doesn’t get any deeper in the metro than this Chicagostyle paradise, boasting perhaps the best crust known to man. It’s one of our favorites. 1319 S Broadway, Edmond, 715.1818

GERMAN DAS BOOT CAMP Longtime Deutsch fixture Royal Bavaria brews up exceptional cuisine and magnificent beer in a less expensive, faster-paced location in downtown Norman. 229 E Main, Norman, 701.3748 FASSLER HALL Bringing German flavor to Midtown via house-made sausages,

HIDEAWAY PIZZA If you’ve been serving a devoted following for over half a century, you’re doing something right. In this case, that’s incredible pizza in jovial surroundings. 8 metro locations, hideawaypizza.com MONI’S Handmade, New Jersey-style brick oven pizza and authentic pasta recipes from Southern Italy in a casual, comfy ambience (ideal for dates). 17200 N May, Edmond, 285.5991


OSTERIA Casual and unforgettable, thanks to a knockout menu of Italian inspiration and expertise from chefs Fabio Viviani and Jonathon Stranger. 6430 Avondale, OKC, 254.5058 OTHELLO’S Garlic bread and warm mussels to tiramisu and coffee – all you could want in a romantic Italian café. 434 Buchanan, Norman, 701.4900; 1 S Broadway, Edmond, 330.9045 PIZZA 23 The specialty pies on especially buttery, flaky crusts are available for takeout, but dining in is recommended; the beer selection adds savor to the flavor. 600-B NW 23rd, OKC, 601.6161 PIZZERIA GUSTO Neapolitan-style pizza (which uses an extremely hot fire to quickly cook superfine flour crusts) stars alongside Italy-inspired entrees, pastas and appetizers. 2415 N Walker, OKC, 437.4992 STELLA A luscious spate of legitimately Italian tastes for a casual lunch, or romantic dinner, amid stylish scenery. The weekend brunch offerings are especially superb. 1201 N Walker, OKC, 235.2200 UPPER CRUST A chic, contemporary pizzeria and wine bar specializing in wood-fired, thin-crust New York-style pies. 5860 N Classen Blvd, OKC, 842.7743; 1205 NW 178th, Edmond, 285.8887 VICTORIA’S A relaxed atmosphere for enjoying superb pasta – the chicken lasagna and linguine with snow crab are especially excellent. 215 E Main, Norman, 329.0377; 3000 SW 104th, OKC, 759.3580 VITO’S RISTORANTE Homestyle Italian cuisine in an intimate setting where the staff and management treat customers like guests in their home. Calling ahead is recommended. 7628 N May, OKC, 848.4867 VOLARE A flavor-filled variety of Neapolitan-style pizzas, produced with haste from a specially imported oven, fill this stylish Campus Corner space boasting a serious rooftop patio. 315 White, Norman, 310.3615 THE WEDGE Wood-fired pies crafted from fresh ingredients (including figs or truffle oil) and made-from-scratch sauces. 230 NE 1st, OKC, 270.0660; 4709 N Western, OKC, 602.3477

MEDITERRANEAN & AFRICAN MEDITERRANEAN IMPORTS & DELI The menu is stocked with authentic, quick and savory options, and there’s even a mini-grocery stocked with select staples. 5620 N May, OKC, 810.9494 QUEEN OF SHEBA Practically the definitive example of a hidden treasure, the spicy, vegan-friendly menu of Ethiopian delights awaits the bold. Bring friends and be prepared to linger. 2308 N MacArthur, OKC, 606.8616

ZORBA’S For well over 20 years, Zorba’s has satisfied appetites and pleased palates with family recipes and flavors of Cyprus, Spain, Greece and Morocco. 6014 N May, OKC, 947.7788

MEXICAN & LATIN AMERICAN 1492 Authentic Mexican cuisine in an elegant atmosphere, combining its caliente flavors with fusion decor to make an ideal spot for a romantic evening. 1207 N Walker, OKC, 236.1492

BARRIOS A serious collection of Latinflavored deliciousness, including a brunch that’s maravilloso, in a cool Midtown space with a back patio that’s pure paradise. 1000 N Hudson, OKC, 702.6922 BIG TRUCK TACOS It’s nearly always standing-room-only at lunch, but spend a few minutes in line and get an ample reward in the form of fast, fresh, imaginative taco creations. 530 NW 23rd, OKC, 525.8226 CAFÉ DO BRASIL It’s a long way from OKC to Rio, but the savory menu in this Midtown hot spot covers the distance in a mouthful. Even brunch is a spicy, inimitable treat. 440 NW 11th, OKC, 525.9779 CAFÉ KACAO A sunlit space filled with bright, vibrant flavors from the zesty traditions of Guatemala. Lunch possibilities beckon, but it’s the breakfast specialties that truly dazzle. 3325 N Classen, OKC, 602.2883 CULTIVAR A farm-to-fire Mexican kitchen that stresses sustainability, local sourcing and fresh, fast, flavorful food. Gluten-free options, chef-crafted tacos, a substantial bar and plenty more. 714 N Broadway, OKC HACIENDA TACOS Quality, of both ingredients and execution, and variety make this restaurant in Northpark a pleasure to visit, and to explore the menu again and again. 12086 N May, OKC, 254.3140 IGUANA MEXICAN GRILL Unique Mexican flavor in a fun atmosphere at reasonable prices – a treat from the house-made salsas to the handcrafted cocktails, and all the tastes between. 9 NW 9th, OKC, 606.7172 MEXICAN RADIO Adding savor to the Plaza with a “laid-back taco shop” and more that favors flavor innovations over traditionalism, and good tastes for all. 1734 NW 16th, OKC, 900.5608

OSO ON PASEO Make sure your appetite is loaded for bear when you visit this patio-centric spot in the Paseo Arts District – delicious, creative tacos and cocktails. 603 NW 28th, OKC, 309.8226 REVOLUCION You say you want a Revolucion? You easily might once you

try this spicy taco-centric haven with plenty of healthy options. 916 NW 6th, OKC, 606.6184 TARAHUMARA’S Beloved by locals (there’s usually a line but it moves quickly), this airy ristorante serves huge, tasty Tex-Mex classics plus less ubiquitous fare like mole poblano. 702 N Porter, Norman, 360.8070 YUCATAN TACO STAND A Bricktown haven for feisty Latin fusion cuisine plus signature nachos and combos … and a selection of over 75 top-shelf tequilas. 100 E California, OKC, 886.0413 ZARATE’S The chef ’s Peruvian heritage shines in dishes featuring plantains, yuca and imported spices. Try something different; find something tasty. 706 S Broadway, Edmond, 330.6400

SEAFOOD BRENT’S CAJUN Sit down to a massive platter of jambalaya, crawfish etoufee or any of the well-seasoned temptations on the weekend brunch menu – and spice up your life. 3005 S Broadway, Edmond, 285.0911 C’EST SI BON The name is accurate: it is impressively good for lovers of Cajunstyle po-boys and crawfish etouffee, and the award-winning catfish is a must-try. 101 N Douglas, Midwest City, 610.2555 CRABTOWN A huge Bricktown warehouse where the Cajun Crab Boil is a favorite, guests are encouraged to “leave the silverware at home and dig in,” and taste is king. 303 E Sheridan, OKC, 232.7227 THE DRAKE The Good Egg Group’s flagship and a standard-bearer for diners who crave excellent seafood, it features the sea’s finest, plus an oyster bar and tempting cocktails. 519 NW 23rd, OKC OFF THE HOOK A food truck expanded into two restaurants, it’s a prizewinning spot for po’ boys, fried or grilled baskets and specialty items. Go get hooked. 125 S Britton, OKC, 840.3474; 1920 S Meridian, OKC, 606.6040 PEARL’S OYSTER BAR Flavorful seafood and spicy Creole-inspired dishes: Shrimp Diablo, Tabasco-infused Caesar salads, Andouille omelets at Sunday brunch and more. 5641 N Classen, OKC, 848.8008

STEAKHOUSE BOULEVARD STEAKHOUSE Perfectly soigné ambiance down to the last detail and cuisine easily in the metro’s elite – a sumptuous, if pricy, masterpiece. 505 S Boulevard, Edmond, 715.2333 BROADWAY 10 Cruise into the Buick building in Automobile Alley to savor steak supremacy or seafood selections (even sushi) in a cozy enclave amid urban bustle. 1101 N Broadway, OKC, 212.3949 CATTLEMEN’S Almost as old as the state itself, this Oklahoma institution’s immense corn-fed steaks and matchless atmosphere are history served anew every day. 1309 S Agnew, OKC, 236.0416 JAMIL’S STEAKHOUSE Steak, lobster or prime rib with a Lebanese bounty of gratis appetizers; Jamil’s has been feeding Oklahoma exceptionally well since 1964. 4910 N Lincoln, OKC, 525.8352 JUNIOR’S The classic restaurant’s decor sets the perfect stage for hand-cut Angus steaks and lobster to fight for attention with knockout fried chicken. 2601 NW Expressway, OKC, 848.5597 MAHOGANY PRIME STEAKHOUSE The ambiance and service are sublime, but fine aged steak broiled to perfection is the star. 3241 W Memorial, OKC, 748.5959; 100 W Main, OKC, 208.8800

MCCLINTOCK Where better to find a saloon than in Stockyards City? Get a drink at the massive, 50-foot oak bar, and stick around for massive steaks and chops. 2227 Exchange, OKC, 232.0151 MICKEY MANTLE’S This lushly atmospheric social spot in Bricktown serves powerhouse entrées and sides with a full complement of amenities destined to impress. 7 S Mickey Mantle, OKC, 272.0777 OPUS PRIME STEAKHOUSE It aspires to the ultimate in upscale dining via hand-cut USDA Prime Black Angus steaks, a vast wine selection and intimate ambiance. 800 W Memorial, OKC, 607.6787 RANCH STEAKHOUSE Custom-aged hand-cut USDA Certified Prime tenderloins and ribeyes, served amid warm Southern hospitality. 3000 W Britton, OKC, 755.3501

TRAPPER’S FISHCAMP Zesty, widely varied flavor from the Pearl’s family of restaurants finds a comfortable home in a backwoods fishing lodge atmosphere with a full bar. 4300 W Reno, OKC, 943.9111

RED PRIMESTEAK Visionary design and atmosphere house super-premium steaks, vibrant, imaginative flavors and amenities to make some of the state’s best dining. 504 N Broadway, OKC, 232.2626

THE SHACK A massive selection of nicely spiced Cajun and Creole cooking, plus fried and grilled seafood, in an atmosphere that’s not shy about being as casual as it can be. 3 metro locations, theshackok.com

TEXAS DE BRAZIL Inspired by Brazilian churrascarias, it offers diners cuts from their choice of skewers laden with beef, pork, chicken and sausage, plus a massive salad bar. 1901 NW Expressway, OKC, 362.9200

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ON THE R ADAR

EVENTS GUIDE

Both Sides Now FJJMA LOOKS BETWEEN THE -ISMS

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or its summer exhibit, the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art on the OU campus is hooked on a feeling. Lovers of beauty that’s more concerned with capturing an effect of light and color – or sharing and evoking an emotional response – than with stringent accuracy of form should come together for “Between the Isms,” collecting works from the Oklahoma Society of Impressionists and selected Oklahoma expressionists, on display through Sept. 8. “We are pleased for the opportunity to showcase some of the engaging work being produced by some of the state’s most prominent artists,” says FJJMA Director Mark White. “Many of the artists included in ‘Between the Isms’ also studied at the University of Oklahoma, so it is fitting that the museum host this exhibition.” Whether those artists are inspired by Renoir and Monet or Oklahomans working in the vein of Munch and Kandinsky, this collection of work is a showcase of the state’s creative diversity … which should look good to everyone.

These listings are not related to adver tising in 405 Magazine. To submit an event for potential inclusion (at least six weeks in advance), please email events@405magazine.com.

EVENTS THROUGH JUL 4 LIBERTYFEST Edmond’s massive, weeklong Independence Day celebration comes to a head with a huge parade, an outdoor festival packed with snacks and activities and a supremely colossal fireworks display. Downtown Edmond, 19 N Broadway, Edmond, libertyfest.org JUL 7-12 INT’L FINALS YOUTH RODEO They don’t get any more skilled - the wranglers and riders in this top-flight competition are the greatest high school rodeo athletes in the world, and their efforts make for outstanding viewing. Heart of OK Expo Center, 1700 W Independence, Shawnee, ifyr.com JUL 18 REDS, WHITES & BREWS Shine up your boots and get ready for a night of raffles, auction excitement and beer and wine tasting, all to benefit Catholic Charities’ homeless services. Cattleman’s Event Center, 1325 S Agnew, OKC, 523.3009, redswhitesbrews.com JUL 20 HEARD ON HURD The music, food, shopping and fun are all local at these family-friendly street festivals; head for where the action is and join the Hurd. Downtown Edmond, 32 N Broadway, Edmond, 341.6650 JUL 26 FIESTA FRIDAY Summer means celebrations in these monthly block parties thrown by the vendors of Capitol Hill - enjoy food trucks, authentic Latino culture and lots of fun. Calle dos Cinco, 2512 S Harvey, OKC, historiccapitolhill.com JUL 27 DAY OF THE COWBOY It’s a family affair at the NCWHM, as young cowpokes and their kin spend a day exploring the museum’s exhibits and the legendary figure of the Old West cowboy. Nat’l Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, 1700 NE 63rd, OKC, 478.2250, nationalcowboymuseum.org JUL 27 DEALING FOR DREAMS Bet big on being a force for good in this annual Make-AWish Oklahoma fundraiser - an evening filled with music, food and more than 40 casino gaming tables pays off to help make sick kids’ dreams come true. Cox Convention Center, 1 Myriad Gardens, OKC, 286.4000, dealingfordreams.org

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“Frontal” by Beth Hammack

EXHIBITIONS JUL 1-OCT 31 STANDING THEIR GROUND Bricktown gallery Exhibit C presents a collection of paintings and sculptures by Enoch Kelly Haney, Monty Little and Harvey Pratt, all Native artists who have served in the U.S. military. Exhibit C, 1 E Sheridan, OKC, 767.8900, exhibitcgallery.com THROUGH AUG 9 PATRICK RILEY Twice a recipient of the Governor’s Arts Award, Riley has had a golden career in drawing, sculpting and mask-making; this exhibition highlights his work and his legacy as an arts instructor. OK HOF Museum, 1400 Classen, OKC, oklahomahof.com

State Band Jul 28. Enjoy! Myriad Gardens, 301 E Reno, OKC, 270.4848, artscouncilokc.org JUL 12 WYNONNA AND THE BIG NOISE The younger half of powerhouse country duo The Judds, Wynonna formed this new band a couple of years ago and already sounds right at home. Riverwind Casino, 1544 W Hwy 9, Norman, 322.6000, riverwind.com

MUSIC

JUL 14-28 SUMMER BREEZE The Norman Depot’s warm-weather concert series is as free as the sky under which it’s performed; catch Seth Glier’s thoughtful folk-pop Jul 14 and a roots-soul blast from Kyshona Armstrong Jul 28. Lions Park, 450 S Flood, Norman, 307.9320, pasnorman.org

JUL 2 OKC SYMPHONIC BAND The nearly 100 members of this all-volunteer concert ensemble are hitting the road to lend some musical might to an Independence Day celebration for the metro’s southwestern side. 987 W Veterans Memorial, Blanchard, okcband.org

JUL 28 ALICE COOPER A hard rock force for 50 years and counting, Cooper still puts on a … well, a hell of a show. Ol’ Black Eyes is back and ready to make some noise at the Zoo Amphitheatre. Zoo Amphitheatre, 2101 NE 50th, OKC, 602.0683, thezooamphitheatre.com

JUL 7-28 TWILIGHT CONCERT SERIES Arts Council OKC ends the week on a free note with live performances from Equilibrium Jul 7, Steelwind Jul 14, Son d’Cuba Jul 21 and the Empire

SPORTS JUL 4-28 OKC DODGERS The AAA baseball season is in full swing, and the Dodgers are

eager to pack the Brick for matchups with Round Rock Jul 4-7, San Antonio Jul 19-21 and Memphis Jul 26-28. Play ball! Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark, 2 S Mickey Mantle, OKC, 218.1000, okcdodgers.com JUL 6-17 OKC ENERGY FC OKC’s soccer squad is in position to make a strong playoff run in the back half of their season, and they’re hoping for a full six points from hosting El Paso Locomotive FC Jul 6 and Reno 1868 FC Jul 17. Taft Stadium, 2501 N May, OKC, 234.5425, energyfc.com JUL 13 NORMAN CONQUEST The heat is on, but that’s part of the challenge - and multiple tour lengths accommodate all cyclists - in this annual ride organized by the Bicycle League of Norman to benefit the J.D. McCarty Center. JD McCarty Center, 2002 E Robinson, Norman, bicycleleagueofnorman.com

THEATER THROUGH JUL 20 CLEVER LITTLE LIES A small family drama turns hugely hilarious and loaded with real sentiment as the aftermath of a tennis match becomes a referendum on happily ever after. Carpenter Square Theatre, 806 W Main, OKC, 232.6500, carpentersquare.com


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L AST L AUGH

’Merica for the Win IN PRAISE OF THE U.S.A. WAY

B

BY L AU REN ROTH

eing an American abroad is how you learn what’s really important to your very existence – not only can I say, “Crank up the a/c!” in six languages, but I can also double your monthly water bill in a week – and a great way to subject your Americanism to the magnifying glass that other world citizens keep at the ready. It doesn’t take long for them, and you, to discover some uniquely American quirks. I once lived in France with a French family, and as an All-American girl, I was the dark side of the moon to them. Soon after my arrival, my French hosts took me to dinner at an Italian restaurant. I couldn’t finish my enormous pizza, so I asked the waiter for a doggie bag. Even though my French was fine, something was getting lost in the translation; the waiter looked at me as if I’d just asked for a goat and a pair of sequined clogs. Why would I need such a bag, he wanted to know. “For the dog? Was something wrong with your meal?” The French family scrambled to patch up this flagrant insult to the chef. “She’s an American,” they pleaded. “She doesn’t know what she’s saying.” “Sure I do,” I insisted. “I’m going to take this food home and eat it later. It’s just an expression.” The waiter stormed off. Minutes later, the chef stomped up to the table to ask what in God’s name I planned to do with his food and a filthy dog. “You people don’t do this?” I asked. “Take the food home?” “Mais non!” they cried out in unison. “You’re not poor! You leave the uneaten food on your plate.” “Whaaaaat? And miss out on cold pizza for breakfast?” I countered. “We’re so sorry! We’re so sorry! She’s American!” the family told the chef, as if I couldn’t help myself. In a snit, our waiter hastily wrapped my leftover pizza in a piece of aluminum foil before unceremoniously showing us to the back door. I love everything about being American – doggie bags and all. So this 4th of July, I’m going to cue the Lee Greenwood, fire up a sparkler or two and swell with American pride as I contemplate what makes this country great. Ice. Whyyyyyyy is this such an unreasonable request? Because in the rest of the world, there are only about 12 ice cubes to go around. Free public restrooms. Keep it off the streets, people. Quality toilet paper. No country has nicer toilet paper than ours; that has to affect tourism in our favor. Cereal aisles that are a mile long. Daily showers. Deodorant. Undershirts. Febreeze. Nothing wrong with that. Free shopping carts and baggers at the grocery store. Smiling at strangers. Smiling’s our favorite. And it creeps people out globally, so keep smiling. Baby showers. Also, a general desire to celebrate everything. First day of menopause? I’ll order balloons! Big Gulps! Costco! Mall of America! Super-sized everything (to match our super-sized backsides)! Drive-thru everything so we can eat in our cars.

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Orthodontia. So much smiling to do. Metric-shmetric. You’ll never hear us say, “Give ’em 2.54 centimeters and they’ll take a kilometer!” Personal space, which is another way to say “open carry.” Stay out of our bubble. Court TV. When one of us is bad, the rest of us want to watch. 24-hour stores and restaurants. Because you might need a can of paint or some french fries at 2 a.m. Tailgating. Have 60-inch flat screen, will travel. A TV in every room of the house. A TV over the bathtub. A TV in the car. TVs in every corner of a restaurant. Bye-bye. Sure, there are other Anglophones out there who might stumble across “bye-bye” upon departing, but Americans own this valediction.

I L LUS T R AT I O N BY B R I A N O’ DA N I EL


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CELEBRATING

60 YEARS

O F AWA R D -W I N N I N G I N T E R I O R D E S I G N

Est. 1958 • 109 East Main • Norman • 405.321.1818 • MisterRobert.com •

Profile for 405 Magazine

405 Magazine July 2019  

405 Magazine is the definitive city and lifestyle magazine of central Oklahoma, featuring people, places, events, dining and culture.

405 Magazine July 2019  

405 Magazine is the definitive city and lifestyle magazine of central Oklahoma, featuring people, places, events, dining and culture.

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