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CHALK TALK ELEVATING THE SPORTS BAR

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405 MAGAZINE APRIL 2019


YOU ALWAYS PLANNED ON PUTTING ART ON THE WALLS. (You just didn’t think your kid would beat you to it.) Some expenses in life you know are coming. Others come out of nowhere. That’s why it’s good to have both a checking and savings account, so you can keep cash on hand for the things you want to buy and the things you have to buy. Open an account online in as little as five minutes. And let us help you plan for life.

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We’re even stronger together. Mercy welcomes Orthopedic Associates. We’re glad to announce that Orthopedic Associates has joined Mercy. That means even better care for you. We’re combining our strengths to build on our commitment to exceptional, compassionate care in ways we couldn’t have done alone.

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Call for an appointment, or learn more at mercy.net/OKorthopedic Mercy Clinic Orthopedic Associates 405.947.0911 | 888.947.0911 3301 Northwest 50th Street | Oklahoma City, OK 73112 2017 W I-35 Frontage Road | Edmond, OK 73013 2115 Parkview Drive | El Reno, OK 73036 3735 Legacy | Weatherford, OK 73096

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in this issue

APRIL 2019

Features

30Â

BEST OF THE 405

Our annual showcase of greatness in central Oklahoma is back for a 7th year. Combining new energy and ideas with the staying power of familiar favorites, these are your choices (and ours) for more than 90 highlights of life in the 405.

36

The dull days of winter are finally behind us; time to light up your life by giving your wardrobe a burst of color. Expansive florals, energetic patterns and plenty of joyful hues are waiting to provide a season of fashion satisfaction.

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405 MAGAZINE APRIL 2019

PHOTO BY GETTY IMAGES

SPRING COLOR CHORUS


COME SEE WHY

WE WERE VOTED

WEALTH

MANAGEMENT

Alan J. Webb, CEP®, CMFC®, CRC® LPL REGISTERED REPRESENTATIVE

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Securities ooered through LPL Financial, member FINRA/SIPC. Insurance products ooered through LPL Financial or its licensed aaliates. APRIL 2019 405 MAGAZINE Quail Creek Bank and Quail Creek Investment Center are not registered broker/dealer(s) nor aaliate(s) of LPL Financial. Tracking #1-827836

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in this issue

APRIL 2019

In the 405

19 Rose Clark gives a tour of Chateau Designs; natural self-care for a season of renewal; a tongue-in-cheek taxonomy of fools; exploring the pre-statehood Garland Cemetery

Travel

45 A day trip to Guthrie or a bucket-list jaunt to Wimbledon, sports fans should bear these destinations in mind

Dining

51 Chalk elevates the sports bar; chef Loretta Oden showcases the Three Sisters; technology revolutionizing restaurants; a decade of flavor at Big Truck Tacos; upscale cocktails at The Jones Assembly

Events

63 Kevin Costner heads up the honorees at the 59th annual Western Heritage Awards; the joyous sonic cavalcade that is Norman Music Festival; Sharon Butterfly Ray and the Barebones Film Festival’s success

In Every Issue

14 From the Publisher 58 Food and Drink 66 On Location 68 Speakerbox 70 On the Radar 72 Backstory

Raising the Bar Spacious atmosphere, wide selection of tempting food and drinks, TVs tuned to any game you like found on almost every surface – that’s check, check and check for inviting new sports bar Chalk in Chisholm Creek.

52

ON THE COVER OKC painter Denise Duong – voted Best Artist by our readers – helps celebrate the Best of the 405.

VOLUME 5 / NUMBER 4, 405 MAGAZINE (PERIODICALS 21350) IS PUBLISHED MONTHLY, 12 TIMES A YEAR, BY 405 MAGAZINE, INC., 1613 NORTH BROADWAY AVENUE, OKLAHOMA CITY, OK 73103. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT OKLAHOMA CITY, OK AND ADDITIONAL MAILING OFFICES. POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO 405 MAGAZINE, P.O. BOX 16765, NORTH HOLLYWOOD, CA 91615-6765.

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405.607.4323 | CASADY SQUARE | NORTH PENNSYLVANIA & BRITTON ROAD NAIFEHFINEJEWELRY.COM MON – FRI 10AM – 5:30PM | SAT 10AM – 5PM

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APRIL 2019

The Right Step

Andrew Flinton, CFP® President

Publisher | Editor-in-Chief Heidi Rambo Centrella heidi.centrella@405magazine.com

EDITORIAL Managing Editor Steve Gill steve.gill@405magazine.com

Wherever you are on the path to retirement, talking with an experienced, professional financial advisor is a step in the right direction. Retirement Investment Advisors act as a fiduciary – required by law to put your best interests above all else. One of our CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professionals will work with you to ensure the design of an investment portfolio that is balanced for retirement, while providing asset protection with less volatility. The retirement path can be a long journey. Fortunately, the first step is easy. Visit us online at TheRetirementPath.com or call Retirement Investment Advisors for a no obligation consultation.

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VOLUME 5 • NUMBER 4

405.942.1234 405.246.0404 972.377.2850

Style Editor Sara Gae Waters saragae.waters@405magazine.com Travel Editor Matt Payne matt.payne@405magazine.com Contributing Writers M.J. Alexander, Mark Beutler, Jerry Church, Christine Eddington, Greg Horton, Lance McDaniel, Lauren Roth, Elaine Warner

ART Art Director Scotty O’Daniel scotty.odaniel@405magazine.com Graphic Designer Brian O’Daniel brian.odaniel@405magazine.com Contributing Photographers M.J. Alexander, Rachel Maucieri, Charlie Neuenschwander, Matt Payne, Don Risi, Shevaun Williams

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405 Magazine Volume 5, Number 4, April 2019. 405 Magazine is published monthly by 405 Magazine, Inc. at 1613 N. Broadway, Oklahoma City, OK 73103, 405.842.2266. © Copyright 2019 405 Magazine, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction of 405 Magazine content, in whole or part by any means, without the express written consent of the publisher is strictly prohibited. 405 Magazine is not responsible for the care of and/or return of unsolicited materials. 405 Magazine reserves the right to refuse advertising deemed detrimental to the community’s best interest or in questionable taste. Opinions expressed in this magazine are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of ownership or management. Basic annual subscription rate is $14.95. U.S. single-copy price is $4.95. Back issues are $9.50 each

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FROM THE PUBLISHER

The Best Kind of Fever I N OK L A HOM A , there’s no better time than spring to plan an

HEIDI R A MBO CEN TRELL A Publisher | Editor-in-Chief heidi.centrella@405magazine.com

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405 MAGAZINE APRIL 2019

PHOTO BY SIMON HURST

extended weekend of sampling new and expanded eateries, shopping local retailers for a closet space-lift and, perhaps, hitting the highway for a miniature break – all sans heavy outerwear. Each month, we strive to give you the best ideas for dining, events, shopping and sometimes a little extra editorial value by way of discussions that need to be had. So imagine how giddy we are to bring you the Best of the 405 within this April issue. With 90-plus categories, we’re happy to announce that we received a record number of readers’ votes this year. Your voices have been heard, and we hope you’re thrilled with the results; we even threw in a few of our own selections for good measure as editors’ picks. Turn to page 30 to see who came out on top, and note that Best Artist Denise Duong provided the image that adorns the cover of this month’s issue. Congratulations to you, Denise, and all of the 2019 winners. Even better, we have a two-fold reason to celebrate! While we cheer for the Best of the 405 winners, we’re also finally digging out from, arguably, one of the crummiest winters on record, so it might be a good time to think about switching up your wardrobe. Pack away the boots and coats, and get a peek through Shevaun Williams’ lens to see what’s in style this spring fashion season (pg. 36). The experts tell us it’s all about color – big, bold, splashy color. And I think that’s awesome news after the dull, dreary, gray days we’ve endured for the past several months. If you’ve got color in your closet, flaunt it. If you don’t, you may want to stop at some of our featured retailers for a little extra pop. Either way, it’s a win-win … because winter is over. Of course, for many Oklahomans, April means it’s time to Thunder Up harder than ever for the playoffs; if you have sports on the brain, there’s a cool new place to appreciate them alongside unusually creative and ambitious bar cuisine at Chalk (p. 52), or plan to hit the road and visit sports-centered destinations near or far in the itinerary suggested on page 46. The important thing is to shake off the seasonal doldrums and embrace the spirit of adventure this spring. After all, we live in a city filled with bests.


APRIL 2019 405 MAGAZINE

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I AM NOT SOMEONE THAT YOU WOULD EXPECT TO BE AN AVID CROSSFITTER. I was never athletic, never went out for sports, and never joined a gym before coming to CrossFit 405. One morning as I was getting dressed for work, I struggled to get into my plus-sized jeans. I decided that if was going to buy new pants, they should be smaller, not bigger. I feel better now than I ever have. I’ve done things I never thought I could or would do. The CrossFit 405 coaches and members are always encouraging. They’re like a second family. The bottom line is that I’m a middle-aged woman who is having the time of her life at the gym. If I can do it, you can too! I’ll cheer you on if you cheer me on!

Web Sights What’s online at 405magazine.com

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J O H N N Y WA S | P E N D L E TO N | K L E E N | A L E M B I K A | C U T L O O S E | TA R A G A S PA R I A N

405 MAGAZINE APRIL 2019

M E L A N I A C L A R A | J O H N N Y WA S | P E N D L E TO N | K L E E N | A L E M B I K A | C U T L O O S E | TA R A G A S PA R I A N | M E L A N I A C L A R A

M E L A N I A C L A R A | J O H N N Y WA S | P E N D L E TO N | K L E E N | A L E M B I K A | C U T L O O S E | TA R A G A S PA R I A N | M E L A N I A C L A R A

PHOTO BY ORE ADESINA PHOTOGRAPHY LLC

Sibling Showcase

Citizen Potawatomi member Loretta Oden has made a name for herself in the wide-ranging category of Native cuisine. Get to know the chef as she shares a few details of her life’s journey, from young member of the Van’s Pig Stand family to Santa Fe culinary luminary, on page 54. But if you prefer to eat while you read, you can whip up her Three Sisters and Friends salad ahead of time; visit 405magazine.com/April-2019/Loretta-Oden-Native-Tastes/ to find the recipe. It’s easy and delicious, too, showcasing the classic trinity of beans, corn and squash alongside a zippy cranberry-coriander vinaigrette. Bon appetit!

Plantation Exploration

Structurally beautiful yet tainted by their legacy of slavery, antebellum plantations in Louisiana are working toward coming to terms with their complicated and cruel pasts; preserving the exquisite architecture while acknowledging and discussing the painful histories involved. More than ever, they’re worth an educational visit; check out 405magazine.com/ April-2019/Plantation-Exploration/ for a guided tour of a slice of American history.

A Taste of Spring

With winter in the rearview mirror, it’s the perfect time to say goodbye to cabin fever and get out of the house to explore the varied pleasures of the OKC area. We want to encourage readers to step away from the stove and sample some of our favorite locally owned restaurants, so we’re bringing back the Friday $50 giveaway: Each week in April, we’ll hold a random drawing and give one winner a $50 gift card to one of our favorite eateries. All you have to do is make sure you’re signed up for our free newsletters at 405magazine.com/newsletters/, then click the link inside to enter.

PHOTO BY RACHEL MAUCIERI

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405 MAGAZINE APRIL 2019

join the Negro Leagues. Now,

threat of hunger and millions of more live in isolation. So pop by, drop off a hot meal and say a warm hello. Volunteer for Meals on Wheels at AmericaLetsDoLunch.org

Donations may be mailed to

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He was the first white player to

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405

in the

Rememberance in Stone

PHOTO BY MJ ALEXANDER

Days have given way to decades. Generations have come and gone like the seasons. Nearly 150 years after Sophia Pitchlynn died in what was then Indian Territory, her gravestone still stands silent vigil in Garland Cemetery near Stigler, Oklahoma. See page 26.

APRIL 2019 405 MAGAZINE

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in the 405 FAVORITE THINGS

Chateau of Style Rose Clark’s home of design A ON E - STOP SHOP in the realm of home decor

that was a favorite destination for shoppers from OKC and beyond – for 14 years, that described charming boutique Red Chateau. The same, happily, is also true of Rose Clark’s new store, Chateau Design & Interiors, 9209 N Penn in Casady Square. While smaller in floor space, the beautiful inventory more than compensates, not to mention the custom furniture that owner Clark expertly sources for her clients. Client-centric and design focused, Chateau Design & Interiors is as bright and welcoming as its owner (and Rosie the shop dog, as well). Clark says that the goal of her business is to “make my clients feel so good about their homes,” and with a glowing personality, talent to match and the clients’ needs and expectations paramount, it’s no wonder Chateau Design & Interiors is a beacon of tasteful and well-done design. - SAR A GAE WATERS

Rose Clark and her dog Rosie

Dream Flower porcelain diffuser with gold base, $95 “This diffuser is sure to brighten up any room with its wonderful floral fragrance and beautiful design. It’s such a beauty, and it smells amazing.”

Freeform gold coral tray, $99 What can you say about an accent piece this stunning? Ask Clark: “So gorgeous.”

37-inch leopard ottoman, $1,079 An ideal companion for the chair to make your decor even more wild, Clark calls it “a great accent for any room.”

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405 MAGAZINE APRIL 2019

Leopard chair with gold armrests and nailhead accents, $2,870 “Comfort and style all in one,” Clark says of this eye-catching seat.

Floating agate votive holder with crystal base, $249 Don’t be surprised when this beauty draws comments – it’s “form and function perfection,” according to Clark.

Throw pillow, $169 “Beautiful blush lace on the front, velvet on the back – it’s so versatile. The perfect accent for any sofa, chair or bed.”

PHOTOS BY DON RISI

Matte gray round glass lamp with gold base and white shade, $229 “It is a very current style with a classic vibe.”


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Best of the 405 Art Gallery

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APRIL 2019 405 MAGAZINE

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in the 405 TRENDS

From Salt & Water Still Mist essential oil blend by Noto, $27; Venus Amber body oil by Shiva Rose, $90; Palo Santo skin potion by Monk Oil, $25; Sandalwood, cedarwood and ylangylang body lotion by Frama, $75

The Natural Touch Conscientious choices in self-care

W I T H SPR I NG A N D the

natural world blooming around us, April is the perfect time to get an upgrade on your repertoire of personal skin treatments. Whether it be a new body lotion, botanical perfume, oil or spray, going “natural” is more than a trend; it’s a wonderfully refreshing type of self-care. Rather than dousing yourself in harmful concoctions, why not give these conscientious products a try? Once you’ve discovered your ideal regimen, you’ll likely feel as though everything is coming up roses. - SAR A GAE WATERS

From Solare Solare healing hand cream, $26; Everyday Oil, 2oz $22, 8oz $48; Rose quartz and jade facial rollers, $32 and $24

Salt & Water, 629 W Sheridan Ave, Ste. 101, OKC, saltandwaterco.com; Florescent, OKC, florescent.co; Solare, 1757 NW 16th, OKC, solare-shop.com

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405 MAGAZINE APRIL 2019

PHOTOS BY SCOTTY O’DANIEL

From Florescent “Sundays,” “Pretty Bird” and “Gâteaux” botanical perfumes, $79 each


Thanks for the

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LAUGH LINES

Pity the Fool What kind of dimwit are you dealing with? F I NA L LY, M Y MOST revered holiday

has arrived: April Fools Day. I love that we have one day in 365 to play the fool, but lately, I fear this blessed day is becoming marginalized by an entire population who just can’t wait for April 1 to get their fool on. “Fool” is a garden-variety term; the genus, if you will. You’re bound to encounter any number of species that you’ll want to strangle, or at least talk about at parties. To tell them apart, you’ll need this fool-proof (couldn’t resist) decoder that will identify them with a more specific label and description. With any luck – usually bad – you’ll spot each one before April 1 is done.

ASS You’ll spot the Ass when s/he is riding yours in traffic. In oncoming traffic, you’ll spot the Ass by his or her high beams, which are always on because the Ass likes it that way. Sharing many traits with his or her close relatives, the Dumbass and the Jackass, the Ass can also be seen barreling down an ice-coated highway at 80 mph, or berating his or her children or spouse in public. BOOB The Boob has arrived late to the movie theater and must now bustle in, laden with popcorn, a gallon of soda and cellophane wrappers that s/he plans to wrestle with for the duration of the movie. No matter the availability of other seats in the theater, the Boob (and/or the Boob’s croupy offspring) will sit next to, or behind, you. Bank on it. The Boob, an Olympic-caliber ice chomper, insists on talking at full volume, but will become indignant upon being told that you came to hear the movie instead. BUFFOON The Buffoon struggles with math even more than a liberal arts major, an inconvenient shortcoming that reliably emerges when everyone else contributes a certain donation to the table’s

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405 MAGAZINE APRIL 2019

H H Onk!

! k n H O On H k!

H Onk !

lunch bill, the coworker’s baby shower gift or the office potluck.

CLOD The Clod lives in your neighborhood and owns a large dog. The Clod faithfully walks the dog. (Good for you, Clod!) With equal predictability, the Clod’s dog adheres to a (daily) unburdening during his walk, for which the Clod is (daily) unprepared. CLOWN Not so much a comedian or merry maker, this Pagliacci is usually spotted multitasking, as in telling a story with an overstuffed mouthful of food, or talking while yawning, as if no one could wait another second to hear what the Clown has to say. Odds are, you’ve got a Clown in the family and, while your fervent prayer may be that he doesn’t revolt his audience in public, he does. JERK Ubiquitous to the office environment, the Jerk uses the last of the paper in the copier tray, pours himself or herself the last cup of coffee and leaves trash on the table and dirty dishes in the office kitchen for someone else to deal with. Toilet paper roll empty? Guess who!

! k n HO

HO nk H Onk! !

H Onk!

PINHEAD The Pinhead will walk through the door you’re holding open without a nod or a word of thanks. The Pinhead’s legions are strong in traffic, too. The Pinhead always expects to cut in front of you without making eye contact or waving to thank you. JUGHEAD Despite the name, this fool isn’t the good-humored nitwit you loved from Archie comics. The Jughead, whose domains are Internet comment sections, staff meetings and “reply all” emails, operates on an opinion-to-fact ratio of 99:1. CRETIN The crown jewel of fools, the Cretin has but one devotion, and that is to communicate digitally. And nowhere does the Cretin do it more prolifically than behind the wheel, spasmodically weaving through traffic with a laser-like focus … on his or her screen. With exceptional consistency, the Cretin will be the driver of the first car in the left turn lane, looking up just in time to clear the intersection, oblivious to the others left behind. Should karma intervene, may the Clod’s dog visit the Cretin’s yard soon. - LAUREN ROTH

ILLUSTRATION BY SCOTTY O’DANIEL

in the 405

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territory ahead

STORIES IN STONE: GARLAND CEMETERY Inside an early Oklahoma resting place

BY M.J. ALEX ANDER

In this land of ancient tombs at Spiro Mounds and prehistoric dinosaur fossil beds, of old-timers who talk still of mummified bodies being found tucked away in caves in the western Panhandle, it seems odd to talk of Oklahoma burials from the 1800s as significantly old. But few graves on the old frontier were marked with lasting memorials.

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The first Oklahoma cemetery with evidence of Christian-style burials is Union Mission, established in 1820 in hopes of converting the Osage with education and evangelizations. Its first burials were recorded in 1822. The gravestone of the Rev. Ephaphras Chapman, who died Jan. 7, 1825, is preserved on the old mission grounds. (NOTE: We’ll explore his story next month.) But one of the grandest burial grounds of the old Indian Territory was the Garland Cemetery in the far southeast corner of Oklahoma, tucked into a forest off a dirt road and surrounded by an ornate wrought-iron fence and giant yuccas. Established just over the border from Arkansas on land selected by one future Choctaw chief for another, its elaborate Victorian-era wrought-iron fence protects modest gravestones and a dozen marble tributes, some topped by obelisks as tall as three men. The elegant monuments were designed as a lasting tribute to the Garlands and Pitchlynns, leading families of the Choctaw Nation. Sophia Folsom Pitchlynn’s plan for a memorial was conceived years before she died. The mother of Choctaw Chief Peter Pitchlynn and mother-in-law of Chief Samuel Garland, she was a woman of means who hoped to perpetuate her legacy. She was born two days after Christmas 1773 to Ebenezer Folsom, a trader and interpreter whose ancestors emigrated from England in the 1630s, and his Choctaw wife. Her father’s brother, Nathanial Folsom, married two Choctaw sisters – nieces of Miko Puskush, chief of the tribe’s Northeastern District – with whom he fathered 24 children. Each of them was a first cousin to Sophia and, like her, half-Choctaw. One of the cousins, Rhoda Folsom, married John Pitchlynn. He arrived in the Choctaw Nation in present-day Mississippi

with his father at the age of 10, becoming fluent in the language and staying with the tribe after his father’s death. He would go on to work as an interpreter and mediator for the U.S. government for nearly half a century. Major John Pitchlynn fathered three sons in 10 years of marriage to his first wife. After her death, he wed Sophia Folsom and fathered another three sons, plus five daughters. His influence increased over the years. His holdings grew to include livestock, 50 slaves, 200 acres of corn and cotton under cultivation and part-ownership of a stage line, making him one of the wealthiest men in the Choctaw Nation prior to Removal. The family’s political strength also expanded. John and Sophia Pitchlynn’s eldest daughter, Mary, would marry Samuel Garland, chief of the Choctaws from 1862-64. Their eldest son, Peter Perkins Pitchlynn, succeeded Garland as chief for a twoyear term. John Pitchlynn signed the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek in 1830. According to the Mississippi Encyclopedia, he and his sons Peter, John Jr., Silas and Thomas received 5,120 acres reserved in the Indian Territory. After liquidating most of their assets in anticipation of Removal, John and Sophia Pitchlynn opted to remain in the Old Choctaw Nation, where he died May 20, 1835. Sophia migrated west to Indian Territory two years later. A house was built for her next to the two-story home of her daughter and son-in-law, the Garlands, who established a sawmill and cotton plantation. Her last will and testament, dated April 23, 1859, contained instructions for her burial and dispersed her property – including nine slaves – among family members.

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territory ahead

Preserved among the family papers of her son Peter Pitchlynn, in the Western History Collection at University of Oklahoma Libraries, the document states: I commend my immortal being to Him who gave it and my body to the earth, to be buried with little expense or ostentation by my executors herein after named ‌ It is furthermore my wish that a suitable monument be erected at my grave, so that my children, grandchildren and other friends may never forget my last resting place‌ After her death in 1871, nine days before her 98th birthday, Sophia Folsom Pitchlynn became the 11th internment in the family cemetery. Samuel Garland had been buried there the previous year. Mary would be laid to rest beside him in 1886. Her tombstone is embellished with a carving of a hand emerging from a pleated cuff, index finger pointing to the heavens, above the inscription: SOPHIA Wife of Major John Pitchlynn Born Dec. 27, 1773 Died Dec. 18, 1871 Our dear Mother’s Grave The cemetery is all that remains of the oncevast Garland holdings. Over the decades, the plantation buildings were destroyed and the forest encroached on the graves. The wrought-iron fence fell apart. Headstones began sinking into the earth. In the mid-20th century, Garland Cemetery came under the care of the Oklahoma Historical Society. The property was restored: toppled markers repaired and reset, the fence stabilized. In order that her children, grandchildren and other friends might never forget, the gravestone of Sophia Folsom Pitchlynn was cleaned and laid to rest on its back, embedded in concrete ... its ancient finger pointing east toward the land where she was born.

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Thank you 405 Magazine readers for voting us

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est B

405 ofthe

OUR 7TH ANNUAL BEST OF THE 405 SURVEY IS A REFLECTION OF WHAT REALLY STANDS OUT TO OUR READERS, but more than that, this annual opportunity to consider the metro's many high points helps us all appreciate the community where we live and the people who have helped make it thrive. We’re delighted to share with you this summary of readers’ top picks for the highlights of life in OKC, Edmond, Norman and surroundings … and we added a few of our own Editors’ Choice selections, as well. These are the places, people, taste sensations and overall examples of greatness that you (and we) love best about the 405. Enjoy! 30

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Favorite Community Bridge Builder E DITOR S’ C HOIC E

PHOTO BY CHARLIE NEUENSCHWANDER

Jabee Williams

TO THE LIST OF RAPPER, ACTOR, WRITER AND ENTREPRENEUR, WE WOULD LIKE TO ADD THAT JABEE IS ONE OF OUR STATE’S MOST IMPORTANT CONNECTORS. Reading through the list of Jabee’s community-centered roles, it’s difficult to imagine when he finds time for making music. An overview: He’s a board member of the OKC Philharmonic and NE Oklahoma City Renaissance; was appointed to the Oklahoma City Arts Commission by then-Mayor Mick Cornett; is a legacy committee member for Clara Luper Sit-Ins, a position to which he was appointed by Luper’s daughter; a board member for Cut It Forward, a youth services organization for African American children in foster care; and Community Space Coordinator of newly renovated community space The Auditorium at The Douglass, located at Page Woodson. Mayor David Holt’s Chief of Staff Steve Hill says of Jabee that, “You’d be hard pressed to find a more humble, hard-working person. “Jabee brings a unique perspective to our city’s overall vision,” Hill says. “It’s one that I think is underutilized and often untapped. His work with the hip-hop community gives the city a perspective that people rarely see on municipal boards and committees, and Jabee’s ability to communicate in so many diverse contexts makes him the perfect person to bring different communities together.”

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Favorite Community Advocate E DITOR S’ C HOIC E

JoBeth Hamon

READING THE BIOGRAPHY OF JOBETH HAMON, NEWLY ELECTED CITY COUNCILWOMAN FOR WARD 6, IS AN EXERCISE IN “SO WHAT HAVE I DONE WITH MY LIFE?” Beginning in college at Oklahoma Baptist, where she started in community advocacy, through Chicago, where she worked with the homeless, back to Oklahoma City, where she works in mental health awareness and education, Hamon’s CV is a study in care for the marginalized. Oklahoma State Rep. Forrest Bennett (D-Oklahoma City) is a friend and fan of Hamon, and he speaks highly of her potential impact on our city. “I think she bring a whole different conversation to City Council,” Bennett says. “She advocates for the people who are likely to get left behind when the conversation is only about development and expansion. The city has done great with that, and I think we’re going to continue to draw visitors and expansion, but the people in shadows of life need someone to advocate for them, too.” Hamon made homelessness, mental health issues and even walkability central to her campaign – a bold move for a city council election – and she’s walked the talk since she was a teenager. Her time on the city council, and possibly beyond, should be good for the 405.

PEOPLE READERS’ CHOICE Elected Official David Holt

Nonprofit Organization Infant Crisis Services Celebrity Russell Westbrook Musician Kyle Dillingham Bar Band Super Freak

Author/Writer Lou Berney

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Meteorologist David Payne

News Journalist Abigail Ogle

Investigative Journalist Scott Hines Sports Journalist Berry Tramel

Radio Personality Jack And Ron

Ambassador That Makes You Proud To Be An Okie Kyle Dillingham

READERS SELECTED DENISE DUONG AS BEST ARTIST, and we’re happy to agree – her layered aesthetic is full of life and visual interest, whether it’s seen in gallery paintings, a giant Film Row collage … or on our front cover.


Favorite Dining Dirction E DITOR S’ C HOIC E

Vegetarian/Vegan Tacos FOR THE RECORD, BARBACOA, POLLO AND CHORIZO ARE DELICIOUS. On the other hand, some people can’t eat meat, others choose not to and the rest of us could probably stand to consume a little less. That’s why we’re glad to see more local establishments offering some less-traditional alternatives: Portobellos and peppers at Hacienda, tofu scramble and chickpea fritters at Cultivar, Beyond Meat at Revolucion, nopales or sweet potatoes at Oso … OKC diners don’t have to sacrifice flavor for health, and even carnivores can skip carne asada once in a while.

DINING READERS’ CHOICE

Desserts La Baguette

Steak Mahogany

Food Truck Big Truck Tacos

Sushi Sushi Neko

Breakfast Neighborhood JAM

Out-Of-Business Restaurant You Wish Would Come Back Irma’s Burger Shack

Vegetarian The Loaded Bowl

Brunch Neighborhood JAM

Burger The Garage

Casual Dining The Press

Barbecue Earls Rib Palace

Fine Dining Mahogany

Pizza Empire Slice House

Coffee Shop Elemental Coffee

PHOTOS: JOBETH HAMON AND CHEF CHANCHALEUNE BY CHARLIE NEUENSCHWANDER; DENISE DUONG BY MATT PAYNE; TACOS BY SCOTTY O’DANIEL

Craft Brewer Stonecloud

Ethnic Restaurant (Not Italian, Mexican Or Asian) Sheesh Mahal Chef Kevin Lee The Jones Assembly

Italian Stella Modern Italian Cuisine

Bartender Jason Nguyen The Jones Assembly

Asian Gogi Go

Cocktail Bar The O Bar

Mexican Ted’s Cafe Escondido

Place To Take Visiting Friends/Relatives Cattlemen’s

Favorite Versatile Chef E DITOR S’ C HOIC E

Jeff Chanchaleune

RACHEL COPE, FOUNDER OF 84 HOSPITALITY GROUP, SAID SHE WATCHED CHEF JEFF CHANCHALEUNE’S CAREER DEVELOP FOR YEARS BEFORE SHE PARTNERED WITH HIM IN GORO RAMEN. “He and my sister were friends in college, and he used to smuggle home bottles of (Sushi) Neko’s ginger dressing for us,” Cope says. “Watching him develop Kaiteki Ramen (his food truck), I realized he wasn’t just talented; he’s a hard worker. Trucks are hard.” The chef-partner of Goro Ramen also developed the menu at Ponyboy, and the food is outstanding, especially the bologna sandwich. That a chef can excel at an Okie dish such as a fancy bologna sandwich, and deliver an entire menu of delicious ramen with equal skill, qualifies him to be our favorite versatile chef in the 405.

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Favorite E DITOR S’ C HOIC E

Transportation Trend

Lime Scooters

CALL THEM A FAD OR A TOY FOR OVERGROWN KIDS IF YOU MUST; THE ELECTRIC SCOOTERS ARE STILL AWFULLY CONVENIENT (AND FUN) FOR ZIPPING FROM A TO B WITHOUT HAVING TO PARK. Coupled with the new OKC Streetcar, they also seem part of a trend to allow more drivers to leave their cars at home now and then. And with a recent grant approval for developing a Bus Rapid Transit line from downtown to the NW Expressway, and formation of a Regional Transit Authority to bring faster, more complete public transportation to the metro overall – Edmond to Norman to Midwest City – the future seems brimming with possibilities outside the car.

READERS’ CHOICE

DIVERSIONS Art Gallery (Not Art Museum) The Howell Gallery

Outdoor Festival Festival of the Arts

Sporting Event OKC Thunder Basketball

Museum (Not Art Gallery) Oklahoma City Museum of Art

Charity Event Red Tie Night

Cultural Event deadCenter Film Festival

Live Music Venue The Jones Assembly

Tourist Attraction Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum

Performing Arts Venue Civic Center Music Hall

Casino Riverwind Casino

Event Season Tickets (Nonsports) Lyric Theatre

Movie Theater Warren Theatre

Hotel 21c Museum Hotel Wedding Venue Cole’s Garden

Family Excursion OKC Zoo

Favorite Offseason Decision Paul George Stays in OKC

WHEN THE SEASON ENDED, OPINION SEEMED UNANIMOUS THAT PG WOULD BE JOINING HIS HOMETOWN LAKERS OVER THE SUMMER. IT DIDN’T QUITE HAPPEN THAT WAY. George decided to stay on the Thunder alongside fellow Cali transplant Russell Westbrook, and this year, he’s building an MVP case by racking up career highs in points, rebounds and assists while playing stellar defense. Meanwhile, Russ is yielding more of the spotlight but still averaging a third straight triple-double season – and we are loving this team-up of the titans.

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PHOTOS: LIME SCOOTER AND TRADER JOE’S BY MATT PAYNE; PAUL GEORGE BY GETTY IMAGES

E DITOR S’ C HOIC E

S


S

Favorite Retail Facelift E DITOR S’ C HOIC E

Nichols Hills Plaza CHANGE IS A PART OF LIFE, AND ESPECIALLY OF RETAIL. While we’ll miss Pops and Provision Kitchen, it’s nice to have Osteria and the trifecta of En Croute, St. Mark’s Chop Room and Merret Champagne Bar in Nichols Hills Plaza, isn’t it? Long-loved metro names Naifeh Fine Jewelry and Balliets are working on moving in, too. Mamasita’s (and the office space across the patio that was formerly home to a little magazine called Nichols Hills News) is now gone, but if the larger replacement building is anything like the new home of Hopdoddy and Slapfish, it’ll bring more sleek new style to a shopping enclave that’s still a true pleasure to visit.

READERS’ CHOICE Jewelry Store Diamonds Direct

Gift Boutique Plenty Mercantile

Family Dentist Ashley Hancock DDS

Spa Udånder

Shoe Store Betsy King Shoes

Cosmetic Dentist Dr. Corbyn Rhodes

Veterinarian Nichols Hills Veterinary Clinic

Vintage Store Bad Granny’s Bazaar

Cosmetic Surgeon Dr. Tim Love

Bank Great Plains National Bank

District Shopping Plaza District

Medical Marijuana Dispensary Gaia’s Favor

Wealth Management Firm Quail Creek Bank

SHOPPING Luxury Auto Dealership Bob Moore Cadillac

Furniture Store Mathis Brothers Furniture

Interior Design Company Mister Robert Fine Furniture and Design

Eyewear Source Physicians Optical

Home Accessories Store Henry Home Interiors

Health Club YMCA

Florist New Leaf Florist

Crossfit Box Crossfit 405

Women’s Clothing Store Balliets

Yoga/Pilates/Barre Studio 405Yoga

Men’s Clothing Store Blue Seven

Family Doctor Robert Stepp MD

CBD Store CBD Plus

Hair Stylist Tonya McLing of Bella Strada Salon Barber Midtown Barbers

Salon 36 Studio West Salon

Home Builder Homes By Taber

Real Estate Firm Keller Williams Law Firm McAfee and Taft Hospital Mercy

Landscape Design Company Modern Environment APRIL 2019 405 MAGAZINE

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SPRING COLOR

Chorus WELCOME THE SE ASON BY MAKING YOUR WARDROBE SING BY SHE VAUN WILLIAMS

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This spring, fashion bring s a delight fully dynamic palet te of expansive florals and energetic pat terns that inspire wild abandon. These joy ful hues will need plent y of room in your closet – shrinking violets need not apply.

Marella Debutto wide leg floral trouser and A .L.C. Jules top in blush from Balliets; MIA Easily Woven mule, woven circle and wooden circle earrings from mode; Nach flamingo ring from Gretta Sloane; Oliver Peoples Rassine sunglasses from TSO Optical

S H E VA U N W I L L I A M S , P H OTO G R A P H Y; S M C , FA S H I O N S T Y L I S T; S H A R O N TA B B , H A I R A N D M A K E U P; H A I L E Y V I V L E M O R E / P R I M M A N AG E M E N T, TA L E N T; H E AT H E R H A N S O N , S T Y L E A N D P H OTO A S S I S T; TO N Y F O S S F LO W E R S , F LO R A L S

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On The Road resor t floral dress from rosegold; Turquoise cuf f from The Black Scintilla; Nach giraf fe cuf f from Gretta Sloane

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Hesperus rainbow sequin striped shir t and Reset by Jane Best Bodysuit Ever in ivor y from The Black Scintilla; KLD wide leg ged striped pant with belt and scrunchie ribbon in mustard from Siempre Viva; Attilio Giusti Leombruni sneakers in flower milk from Balliets; Anne & Valentin O Feel glasses from TSO Optical

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Pleated dress in yellow from UNIQLO; Cr ystal ball earrings and scrunchie ribbon in mustard from Siempre Viva; Salvatore Ferragamo mini scar f in yellow from Balliets; The Composite 1961 sunglasses from TSO Optical

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Just Female Rok san trouser jeans and dRA Esmeralda top from rosegold; Reset by Jane faux suede trench coat in mustard and beaded necklace from The Black Scintilla; Via Spiga Por ter in straw and sun orange from Betsy King a Shoe Boutique

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Saloni Olivia dress in multi and Salvatore Ferragamo Sannio jasmine shoes from Balliets; Purse and wood and resin necklace from The Black Scintilla

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Veronica Beard Saf fron dress in black multi and Nach cheetah ring from Gretta Sloane; Marie Saint Pierre Jacket in ruby from Balliets; Vixen earrings from Siempre Viva; Mykita Decades Alessia sunglasses from TSO Optical

ROSEGOLD, 7302 N WESTERN, OKC, SHOPROSEGOLD.COM THE BL ACK SCINTILL A , 1112 N WALKER, OKC, BL ACKSCINTILL A .COM BETSY KING, 3001 PASEO, OKC, BETSYKINGSHOES.COM BALLIETS, 5801 NW GR AND, OKC, BALLIETS.COM MODE , 1227 N WALKER, OKC, SHOPMODE .FASHION GRET TA SLOANE , 6476 AVONDALE , OKC, GRET TASLOANE .COM TSO OPTIC AL, 3840 S BOULEVARD, EDMOND, TSOOPTIC AL .COM SIEMPRE VIVA , 3 NW 9TH, OKC, SIEMPREVIVACLOTHING.COM UNIQLO, UNIQLO.COM

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2018

AMERICA’S BEST AQUARIUM VOTED BY

USA TODAY READERS

2017

BEST NEW ATTRACTION VOTED BY

USA TODAY READERS

EXPLORER BECOME THE

Johnny Morris’ Wonders of Wildlife National Museum and Aquarium consists of an all-new 1.5-million-gallon Aquarium Adventure showcasing 35,000 live fish, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and birds, and immersive Wildlife Galleries that bring visitors eye-to-eye with the greatest collection of record-setting game animals ever assembled. Created by noted conservationist and Bass Pro Shops founder/CEO Johnny Morris, the 350,000-square-foot experience celebrates those who hunt, fish, and act as stewards of the land and water. Located next to Bass Pro Shops National Headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, the campus is a centerpiece of America’s Conservation Capital in Missouri’s Ozark Mountains. Wonders of Wildlife has been voted “Best New Attraction in America” and “America’s Best Aquarium” by the readers of USA TODAY.

W WW.WON D ERSOFW IL DL IFE.ORG @wondersofwildlife 44

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@ W O Wa q u a r i u m

@wondersofwildlife


PHOTO COURTESY HENRY COUNTY CVB

travel

Lofty Goals A Treetop Excursion in Panola Mountain State Park is an excellent way to get high on nature; along with the College Football Hall of Fame and the Atlanta Motor Speedway, it’s one of several reasons for visiting that make the Georgia capital an ideal weekend destination for sports fans. APRIL 2019 405 MAGAZINE

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travel

WANDERLUST

SPORTING SOJOURNS

Where the play’s the thing

WA N DER LUST is a magnificent word for a powerful feeling

– a strong longing or impulse to travel. But don’t think of “travel” as a synonym for simply moving from point A to point B, because it’s more personal than that. People travel to new or familiar destinations for health, curiosity, work, adventure and to indulge. People travel to grieve, to forget and to remember. They travel to satisfy, excel and to celebrate. Be it a bucket-list trip to Botswana’s Okavango Delta or an overnight visit to the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, when we travel, we come back transformed. We’re sharing suggestions on how to experience a particular travel theme close to home and on the other side of the world, so let us ignite your sense of wanderlust and help you define what travel means to you. With the Thunder gearing up for the playoffs, Oklahomans have sports on the brain, so that’s this month’s theme.

As we’ve learned since grade school, Guthrie hums with state history – and at the far end of W Oklahoma (the avenue) on the edge of downtown is perhaps Guthrie’s finest homage to Oklahoma (the state). The Territorial Capital Sports Museum is 13,000 square feet of priceless memorabilia, game-worn jerseys and other collectibles from famed athletes ranging from Mickey Mantle and Allie Reynolds to Desmond Mason and Russell Westbrook.

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PHOTOS: MATT PAYNE

The Day Trip: Guthrie’s Blast From the Past


' SPRING S

STOMP DANCE leaders

carry a rattle made from turtle shells, horns, gourds or cans.

ARRIVAL

S E A S O N THE "THREE SISTERS",

beans, corn and squash, are planted in early Spring.

O F

R E N E W A L

Join us as the sights and sounds of Spring blossom on our celebrated campus.Tour lush gardens, sample traditional Chickasaw cuisine and witness nature’s harmony as you explore our rich history and culture. ChickasawCulturalCenter.com • Sulphur, OK • 580-622-7130

OUR TRADITIONAL VILLAGE hosts

cultural activities, stickball games, stomp dance demonstrations and more!

THE BUTTERFLY GARDEN

is planted with milkweed to nourish Monarchs on migration.


travel STATESIDE

The vision of former coach Richard Hendricks, Ferguson Jenkins and Hubert “Geese” Ausbie, it also houses exhibits featuring Olympic athletes, Negro League Baseball, golf, rodeo and women in sports. To have an item featured in the museum, the athlete must either be from Oklahoma or have played for an Oklahoma professional sports team. High school baseball coaches, women in Oklahoma golf and 45 outstanding Native athletes from the Sooner State are among the many honorees. - MATT PAYNE

Look for the giant football at the College Football Hall of Fame.

A short Tube ride from the bustle of London sits the charming village of Wimbledon, the epicenter of tennis for two weeks every summer. Obsessed with tradition, the tournament preserves a strict dress code for players, on-court ads are prohibited and contestants bow to the Queen. While the Fortnight (this year, July 1-14) serves as a monument to the past, it is chiefly dedicated to showcasing the modern game at the highest level. Case in point: The 2008 final featuring the sport-as-art fluidity of Roger Federer versus the indomitable will and genuinely violent ball striking of Rafael Nadal has been lauded by many commentators as the greatest match ever played. Interested? It’s not easy to get a seat. Wimbledon uses a lottery system, and if you’re an American, you need to fill out an Overseas Ballot many months in advance. Scalpers’ tickets to last year’s Men’s Singles Final soared to almost $3,500 a seat. But don’t be discouraged! Tickets to the early rounds are much more reasonable, or you can visit the practice courts to watch the top players hit – perhaps even camp out overnight and queue up at 6 a.m. for one of the last remaining spots. It’s worth it; Wimbledon is a worthy bucket list item for any global adventurer. Visit wimbledon.com. - CALVIN H. WARNER

The Weekend Getaway: Down in Hotlanta The Super Bowl in Atlanta was a big deal – but Atlanta is no one-night stand. It’s a big sports town with multiple major league teams: the MLB Braves, the NBA Hawks, the NFL Falcons, the Atlanta United soccer team, the WNBA Dream, the Atlanta Blaze of Major League Lacrosse and soon a Major League Rugby franchise all provide great spectator opportunities. But visitors to Atlanta can get active, too. NASCAR fans, not content to see their favorite drivers speed around the track, can experience the thrill at Atlanta Motor Speedway south of the city. Taking the tour in a van doesn’t cost much, but three laps as a passenger in a racecar is way more fun. By the last lap, we were going over 170 mph, and I had visions of my mortality on the curves. For a lot more cash, you can drive one of the cars

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The Atlanta Motor Speedway hosts Friday Night Drags, one of the largest organized street-style drag racing series in the nation.

NASCAR racers have an open-window policy for getting in.

yourself. I would have done it, but I probably wouldn’t have looked half as cool at 60 mph. Visit atlantamotorspeedway.com or nascarracingexperience.com/atlanta-motor-speedway-2. While you’re down south, be sure to visit the Treetop Excursions in Panola Mountain State Park (gastateparks.org/PanolaMountain) and College Football Hall of Fame (cfbhall.com) for nature-loving or gridiron adventures. There’s a lot to explore in the Peach State. - ELAINE WARNER

PHOTOS: GIANT FOOTBALL COURTESY CFHOF; FRIDAY NIGHT DRAGS COURTESY ATLANTA MOTOR SPEEDWAY; NASCAR WINDOW BY ELAINE WARNER

The Bucket List: The One and Only Wimbledon


Discover Big Cedar’s newest overnight experience, Camp Long Creek, combining camping and comfort. Situated on Table Rock Lake, enjoy a serene backdrop while relaxing in one of the unique accommodations: shepherds huts, camp cabins or glamping tents. This new addition is specially designed for the whole family and features petfriendly units and a full-service marina, all just minutes from the Big Cedar activities and attractions you love. Opening summer 2019. Make your reservations today!

855.494.1077 CAMPLONGCREEK.COM APRIL 2019 405 MAGAZINE

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dining

Big-Play Flavor

PHOTO BY RACHEL MAUCIERI

How many sports bars offer crab nicoise salads, or an enormous helping of pork osso bucco? Part of the appeal at Chalk in Chisholm Creek is the menu’s more ambitious offerings, but it also has plenty of classic favorites – these lasagna bites and fried deviled eggs are somewhere in between – and more TVs than you can shake a cheese fry at.

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LOCAL FLAVOR

Xs and Os Chalk works to elevate the sports bar BY STEVE GILL PHOTOS BY R ACHEL MAUCIERI

T ECH N ICA L LY SPE A K I NG, it doesn’t

Chef Adam Schiller creates flavors including lasagna bites and the varied Chalkboard platter.

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take much to open a bar – basically just some drinks to serve and some people to drink them. You don’t even have to provide seating, and I’ve been to more than one that didn’t bother serving food. From that basic start, though, there’s a lot of room to refine and improve the concept. Imagine a typical sports-themed hangout spot, then add more space, more TVs with more channels and more dining options from a thoughtful, refined menu, and you’re getting close to the lofty aspirations that Chalk meets with stylish execution. Chalk is in Chisholm Creek, but unlike many of its neighbors in the massive development and along Memorial in general, it’s a local operation – the four owning partners are graduates of OU, OSU and SNU, and reside in the Edmond and NW OKC area. GM Ben Mason says that when they were planning their new joint venture, “The last piece was finding the right spot, and we were blown away (with Chisholm Creek). This is the spot we wanted; we love this location.” CHALK They made the most of it; 1324 W Memorial, OKC the two-story 242.2112, chalkokc.com


space fills 7,500 sunlit square feet, and the decor is part minimalist, part maximum exposure to the 100 – yes, really – TV screens that cover every wall and even rest between booths. If there’s a sporting event happening, ask your server; they can probably put it right in front of you. “We’re trying to reinvent what people expect from a sports bar. We’re not trying to run away from the concept,” says Mason, adding that if you want a beer and a basketball game and that’s it, you’ve come to the right place. It just also happens to be the right place for unusually ambitious, and palate-pleasing, cuisine. Where do you even start? The lasagna bites are delicious, especially with an extra splash of the accompanying red sauce, and the existence of an item named “pastrami fries” makes the world a little better, but the fried deviled eggs might be best of all. They’re lightly fried in cornmeal batter for some extra texture, and the lingering spice at the end is a perfect grace note – when I commented on it, chef Adam Schiller beamed and said, “I love harissa, and deviled eggs are one of my favorite things.” On the other hand, if you want a variety of tastes, the Chalkboard shows off the chef’s charcuterie skills and love for Oklahoma flavors at the same time: Ours had three cheeses from Lovera’s, including “Thunder Up Blue” gorgonzola and the Krebs market’s specialty caciocavera, plus Lovera’s sausage, lamb prosciutto, house-made pastrami that’s the result of a 10-day process, bread from La Baguette and Seikel’s mustard … they relish the ability to use local products. You’ll also find walnuts candied in-house and dried apricot with a hot honey glaze, to add some extra dimension and breadth to the plate’s flavor profiles. Speaking of breadth, one of the menu’s highlights is the Chalkers section – they’re sized between regular sliders and full-size sandwiches, the better to allow for a la carte grazing during sporting events, and to encourage sampling a variety of flavors rather than confining yourself to the one dish you ordered. (First quarter: beer and a pimento burger. Third quarter: Portobello sandwich with another beer.) With a dozen options, you should have no trouble finding tempting tastes, but I can recommend the meatball sub and especially the spicy shrimp taco.

Savory pork osso bucco

Of course, the entrees shouldn’t be overlooked, either. For the record, the pork osso bucco – served with apricot gremolata, an array of colorful carrots and fried grits – is both spectacular and more than enough for two people. The question for Chalk overall seems to be: Why not go big? “We wanted to do it the right way, for it to feel luxurious and modern and not stuffy,” says Mason. “There’s all kinds of sports fans, and we don’t want it to feel elitist.” He smiled at the ideal of two people

seated next to each other at the bar, one eating mushroom risotto and one with a huge plate of cheese fries, both thoroughly engrossed in the action onscreen. “That’s what makes sports cool: It brings so many kinds of people together for the same thing. We’re wanting to capture that.” There’s a brunch menu on weekends, the NBA playoffs and The Masters are almost here, the view from the upstairs patio is excellent during breaks … now’s a great time to draw up plans that’ll get you to Chalk. APRIL 2019 405 MAGAZINE

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CHEF’S TABLE

Native Tastes Loretta Oden’s “sister” act restaurant after she was 50 years old. The Shawnee native and member of Citizen Potawatomi Nation opened the first Corn Dance Café in Santa Fe, New Mexico, with her oldest son Chef Clay Oden. “The timing was serendipitous,” Oden says. “Mark Miller and Coyote Café had just taken off and Geronimo’s was rolling, so I just took things a step further, and instead of focusing on Southwestern cuisine, I focused on Native American cuisine.” The Corn Dance Café would lead to press in major publications like Food & Wine and appearances on “Good Morning America” and “The Today Show,” and many other opportunities, including teaching, consulting, working with Robert Mondavi and Francis Ford Coppola and a PBS miniseries called “Seasoned with Spirit: A Native Cook’s Journey” that won an Emmy. “Santa Fe was definitely a launching pad for me,” she says. “I moved back to Oklahoma in 2003, and I do a lot of work on both coasts: consulting, wine dinners, teaching, etc. I also do some work with reservations with health issues and the bad food that hangs around the rez.” Oden’s food background started in the family kitchen, where she said she was blessed to have two living sets of great-grandparents and two sets of grandparents. Her first food gig was in the family of her first husband. “I married into the Van’s Pig Stand family,” she says. “I was very young, and the marriage didn’t last. I flipped burgers, worked as a soda jerk, stuffed cherries for Jell-O salad, pretty much everything on the Van’s menu. Mother Van was an amazing cook, and I loved the camaraderie and energy of a kitchen. Always have.” A second marriage after she moved to OKC at the age of 20 would lead to a decades-long hiatus from commercial kitchens while she raised two sons and two step-daughters. The second divorce led to

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her move to Santa Fe. “I moved there to figure out who I wanted to be when I grew up,” she says, once again segueing into her easy laugh. “The environment there was very receptive to Native cuisine. There’s something weirdly For Chef Oden’s Three Sisters and Friends salad political about trying to do recipe, go to 405magazine.com/Eat-Drink ‘Indian’ things in Oklahoma, but Santa Fe wasn’t like that.” After opening the café, Oden dove into broad category. The tribes ate what the ethno-botany. She wanted to learn where environment provided, so the cuisine is all the foods came from, what was indigseasonal and regional: shrimp in Louienous, what originated in the Americas siana, bison on the Plains, salmon in the and then went somewhere else only to Northwest, etc. Woven throughout the return to the Americas in another form: cuisine, though, were the “three sisters.” potatoes from Ireland, chocolate from “All tribes have a story about the Switzerland, tomato sauce from Italy. three sisters – beans, corn and squash,” “Those foods originated here,” she says. Oden says. “Along with the other indigShe has no patience for talk of cultural enous foods, they changed the cuisine appropriation when it comes to food, of the world.” though. “Food is food. The ingredients For her recipe, Oden is featuring the trio have been around the world and back, and in a Three Sisters and Friends Salad with a everyone uses them.” cranberry-coriander vinaigrette. The salad What emerged from her study of the showcases the ingredients and flavors of North American tribes was the realization spring and summer with a recipe that is that Native American cuisine is a very remarkably easy and flexible. - GREG HORTON

PHOTOS BY RACHEL MAUCIERI

L OR ET TA ODE N OPE N ED her first


salad is what you make it customize yours at salata.com

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TECHNOLOGY

Appetite for Disruption Restaurants consider the digital future A PP-BA SED T ECH NOL OGY has been

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MARKET SHARE OF U.S. 3RD-PARTY DELIVERY SERVICES, AS OF 2018 GRUBHUB 34% UBEREATS 28% DOORDASH 18% POSTMATES 12% OTHER 8%

SOURCE: EDISON TRENDS

Chef Jeff Chanchaleune and I agree that we won’t use it for Goro, though, because to-go ramen is not ideal. We want to control quality and the guest experience.” Delivery apps aren’t the only disruptive technology in food service. One of the most competitive areas is point-of-sale technology, the program and hardware that servers use to enter your order. Dunham has elected to use an Android-based system called Toast. The interface is very intuitive and the flexibility of the system allows for a variety of devices. “The cloud-based apps are the future,” Dunham says. “I’m pretty sure all [point-of-sale] systems are headed that way. If the Internet service crashes, Toast still captures transactions, much like Square, but it also integrates with back of house, accounting, customer service and customer reward programs.” As customers come to expect a more tailored experience, restaurants will need to find ways to integrate technology that makes sense for the business and the customer, and that’s a difficult balance to strike. - GREG HORTON

PHOTO BY SCOTTY O’DANIEL

increasingly disruptive to the food service industry in good and bad ways since Yelp, Urbanspoon and even online menus first arrived on the scene. Now, restaurants are trying to keep up with or regulate the ways in which tech can affect their business models. Jimmy Mays, operating partner in two OKC and two Tulsa restaurants, said their company is using ChowNow. “The service integrated seamlessly into our website, and they designed an app specifically for us,” Mays says. The catch? It’s pick-up only. Like many Nashbird’s Marc restaurateurs, Mays and his partners are esDunham prepares a take-out order. chewing third-party delivery apps for two very important reasons: customer service and food quality, and Mays said the latter is an important part of the former. “We didn’t pay the fee to be listed on Postmates, so people had to write it in,” Mays says. “That meant a call had to go from the app to Las Vegas, and then someone in Las Vegas would send the order to a driver and finally to us. It’s a really bad version of the telephone game. We ended up with irritated customers, for things over which we had no control.” Marc Dunham, chef-owner of Nashbird and Iguana Mexican Grill, said that nearly 25 percent of Nashbird’s sales come via takeout apps or delivery apps. He, too, made a decision to use a single app, and he chose Postmates. “Working exclusively with them drives down the percentage we pay to Postmates,” Dunham says. “The increased prominence of our brand on the app because of the exclusivity has led to a noticeable increase in the past three months.” According to Morgan Stanley Research, 11 percent of restaurant sales are expected to come from delivery services by 2022, so Nashbird is already way ahead of the curve. Still, the percentage third-party apps charge can be prohibitive for businesses – partnering with Postmates can cost 30 percent of the entire transaction. “I’d have to triple my sales to make that worthwhile,” Mays says. “It’s not financially viable for restaurants running on narrow margins.” We spoke to Rachel Cope, founder of 84 Hospitality (Empire Slice House, Goro, etc.), just as she was preparing to leave for a pizza expo in Las Vegas, where she will lead a panel discussion on third-party delivery services. “Easy E (Slice Shop) gets about 25 percent of their sales from Postmates and DoorDash,” Cope says. “It makes sense for pizza.


Coming in November

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food drink Symbols

$ most entrees under $10 $$ most entrees $10 to $25 $$$ most entrees over $25 outdoor dining reservations accepted valet parking new or updated entry

American AURORA Its warmly comfortable atmosphere makes a perfect backdrop for a quick cup of Hoboken coffee or hearty breakfast or lunch assembled from superb ingredients – just be certain not to miss the beautiful secluded backyard area. 1704 NW 16th, OKC, 609.8854 $ BLACK WALNUT Casual atmosphere meets cuisine that takes inspiration from the rich history of the restaurant’s Deep Deuce roots and cocktail temptations from around the world for a great place to relax. 101 NE 4th, OKC, 684.0851 $$ THE DRUM ROOM March your own drumsticks in for a heap of crispy, juicy fried chicken (among the city’s best) starring alongside fried okra, waffles and a fully loaded bar. 4300 N Western, OKC, 604.0990 $$ EDDIE’S BAR & GRILL This stylish spot not far from UCO is equally ideal for a casual drink, appetizers while watching the game or a dinner date. And bear in mind that the wings are outstanding. 930 E 2, Edmond, 285.7725 $$ THE JONES ASSEMBLY It’s noteworthy as a spectacular concert venue, but don’t overlook the kitchen’s output the rest of the time. The bar (try a Frosé) and main menu (try everything) are sufficient to make memories even on non-special occasions. 901 W Sheridan, OKC, 212.2378 $$ MARY EDDY’S Inside the inviting environs of Film Row anchor 21c Museum Hotel, this showplace of a restaurant turns out a seasonally driven menu of expertly tuned flavors and dishes meant to be shared. 900 W Main, OKC, 982.6900 $$ NASHBIRD Make tracks to this 9th Street spot serving Nashville-style “Hot Dang!” chicken, with whatever spice level you like. Speedy service, whiskey cocktails and beer and a spectacular patio add extra savor. 1 NW 9th, OKC, 388.0033 $

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NED’S STARLITE LOUNGE A successful family catering business grew into a lavishly retro-decorated restaurant and bar dishing up delectable burgers, chicken-fried steaks and more. 7301 N May, OKC, 242.6100 $$ NEIGHBORHOOD JAM Serving tasty takes on classic American dishes and more specialized options such as pineapple bourbon pancakes, this breakfast-centric spot aims to become a community favorite through outstanding execution. 15124 Lleytons Court, Edmond, 242.4161 $ PICASSO CAFÉ Their neighbors in the Paseo are painters, potters and sculptors, so it’s apt that creativity abounds in these zippy sandwiches, salads, pizza and surprises, including plentiful selections for vegetarians. 3009 Paseo, OKC, 602.2002 $ THE PRESS Built in a former printing facility and garage, this concept from The Mule’s team adds Oklahomainspired comfort food to the Plaza District – the chicken-fried steak comes recommended. 1610 N Gatewood, OKC, 982.1010 $$ SOCIAL Steak frites to teriyaki salmon to corned beef hash, the menu at this gathering spot is packed with American classics – and brunch is served every day of the week. 1933 NW 23rd, OKC, 602.8705 $$ UNION WOOD FIRED GRILL Ribeyes to cedar plank sea bass to vermicelli bowls, chef Jonas Favela brings disparate influences together for a more perfect whole in this casual, but memorable, dining environment. 2920 NW 63rd, OKC, 608.8866 $$ VAST Keeping your attention on the steaks, seafood and other temptations might be difficult; the view from atop the Devon Tower is truly unparalleled in Oklahoma, making this a fantastic date spot. 280 W Sheridan, 49th floor, OKC, 702.7262 $$$

Asian CAFÉ ICON Tempting sushi, Japanese specialties and delicious spectacles like steak cooked at the table on a sizzling stone fill the menu to bursting with visually splendid and palate-pleasing treats. 311 S Blackwelder, Edmond, 340.8956 $$ GOGI GO Fast-casual Korean barbecue comes to Midtown thanks to chef Kevin Lee’s dream of making the traditional cuisine approachable for OKC diners. Pick your protein, grab it as it comes off the grill and get ready to come back again and again. 1325 N Walker, OKC, 778.8524 $ GORO An “izakaya” is a Japanese pub; visitors to the Plaza District will quickly

come to associate the term with expertly crafted deliciousness thanks to this cheerful spot for ramen, yakitori, bar snacks and more. 1634 Blackwelder, OKC, 606.2539 $ O ASIAN FUSION Sublime quality in a wide span of culinary influences – freshly rolled sushi to fiery curry – in cool, vibrant digs. Call ahead for dinner, because it becomes a packed house in a hurry. 105 SE 12th, Norman, 701.8899 $$ SUSHI NEKO An established OKC favorite combining style with substance (in the form of an especially wideranging and creative sushi menu). 4318 N Western, OKC, 528.8862 $$

WAGYU BBQ Extremely high-quality meats, including the namesake top-shelf beef, brought to you so you can cook them yourself on the grill set into the table. As a group experience, it’s a meal like no other in OKC. 3000 W Memorial, OKC, 285.9796 $$$ YUZO Variety is the word in this sushi tapas bar, boasting a tempting swirl of Colombian, Brazilian and Japanese culinary influences. 808 N Broadway, OKC, 702.9808 $$

Bar & Pub Food BANQUET CINEMA PUB An elevated take on familiar pub standards – wings, pizza, plenty of beer choices – in a retrostylish venue that hosts a pair of movie screens for dinner and a show. 810 NW 4th, OKC $ BAR ARBOLADA OKC residents near Film Row have a neighborhood bar to call their own – but visitors from farther away also are welcome to sample the local beers, well-executed cocktails and seasonal menu of small plates. 637 W Main, OKC $$ SEAN CUMMINGS IRISH RESTAURANT The namesake chef brings the food, drinks, music and atmosphere of an Emerald Isle public house back to the metro – go raise a glass. 7628 N May, OKC $$ THE WINSTON A menu packed with intriguing possibilities among “elevated pub food” balances out an impressive selection of beer, wine and whiskies. Cheers. 106 W Main, Norman, 561.7616 $$

Barbeque THE BUTCHER BBQ STAND It’s open three days a week and is a good distance from the heart of the metro – but it doesn’t matter, because this is absolutely some of the best barbeque you’ll find anywhere. Go early and prepare to be dazzled. 3402 W Hwy 66, Wellston, 240.3437 $$

DECKLE SMOKEHOUSE BBQ Offering true Texas-style pit barbeque (nothing but oak for their smoke), its brisket, ribs and house-made German sausage are set off by imaginative sides. 324 W Edmond, Edmond, 657.2992 $ EARL’S RIB PALACE A popular choice among locals in a genre that’s hardly lacking in options, the local chain pounds out hit ribs and turkey as well as a top-tier burger. 6 metro locations, earlsribpalace.com $ LEO’S BAR-B-Q Dense, rich flavor and tender texture, delivered in genuine unpolished style for commendable value – no wonder its ribs and brisket are favorites among Oklahoma connoisseurs. 3631 N Kelley, OKC 424.5367 $ SWADLEY’S Expertly prepared meats – the honey-rubbed ribs are especially succulent – star at this Oklahoma family-owned favorite. And if a special occasion is approaching, they’re also award-winning caterers. 6 metro locations, swadleys.com $$ TEXLAHOMA BBQ Family owned and fabulously flavorful, its meats (especially the beef ribs) are eye-rolling good. Don’t forget the espresso barbeque sauce! 121 E Waterloo, Edmond, 513.7631 $$

Burgers & Sandwiches THE GARAGE BURGERS & BEER It can get noisy in the sports-bar atmosphere, but even so your focus will likely be on savoring the many tempting flavor possibilities of huge, juicy burgers and fries. 8 metro locations, eatatthegarage.com $ THE MULE Solid beer and beverage selection plus a delectable array of gourmet grilled cheeses and melts fill the menu at this relaxation destination in the Plaza District. 1630 N Blackwelder, OKC, 601.1400 $ NIC’S GRILL It’s small, it’s crowded … and it’s incredible. It’s only open for lunch and the lines are often long, but the colossal burgers are easily among the metro’s best. Don’t forget some money, since it’s cash-only. 1202 N Penn, OKC, 524.0999 $ S&B’S BURGER JOINT Good news: these burgers’ exquisite flavors including such ingredients as peanut butter or a coffee crust - come as sliders too, all the better to sample more kinds. 5 metro locations, sandbburgers.com $ TUCKER’S ONION BURGERS With one burger, one side (fries) and one salad, the menu is easy to remember - and the execution makes the meal unforgettable.


GOOD TASTE

hello spring!

To schedule a private tasting, text or call Russell at:

405.206.4885 A Big Truck Taco trio

The Tao of Tacos Big Truck’s delicious decade AN O KC TR E ASU R E , and one of the prime movers of the NW 23rd renaissance, is about to mark its 10th anniversary; the ideal way to celebrate seems like it should be to give yourself the gift of tacos. (Note: That’s also the ideal gift to celebrate an 11th anniversary, 2.7-year anniversary, Flag Day, the Ides of April, any given Thursday, etc.) A decade after opening its doors at 530 NW 23rd, it’s still wildly popular – it’s rare to find a parking place anywhere close during peak hours – and Big Truck Tacos remains as much a must-try as ever. Credit the reliable execution and inventive imagination of the varied menu; from the Rancher’s braised brisket and potatoes to the zippy marinated tilapia of the Okie Wahoo, seemingly every option is tempting. They also have a pretty impressive vegetarian selection – I’m a dedicated carnivore, and I’m still partial to the texture and taste of the Crispy’cado’s breaded and fried avocado nuggets. And even if you’re dedicated enough to work through the whole menu, there are always more surprises in store. Big Truck has a menu option I’ve never encountered elsewhere: The 5th Amendment is a chance for chef/owner Kathryn Mathis to show off her range via daily mystery. They won’t tell you what’s in it, even after you order, but it’ll be filled with creative, well-balanced flavors … the sort that have kept taco-loving fans coming back for a decade now, time after tasty time. - STEVE GILL

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AT THE BAR

Continental BLACKBIRD A Campus Corner gastropub pairing succulently creative dishes like pot roast nachos with a broad beer, wine and whiskey list. There’s little on the menu that won’t tempt palates. 575 S University, Norman, 928.5555 $$ EN CROUTE A warmly welcoming, comfortable café in Nichols Plaza offers treats all day long, from fresh pastries to select spirits and beer, with special emphasis on artisanal cheese and charcuterie. 6460 Avondale, OKC, 607.6100 $ LUDIVINE The menu adjusts constantly to reflect availability of elite-quality, locally sourced ingredients - but every dish is the result of genuine culinary artistry. 320 NW 10th, OKC, 778.6800 $$$ THE MANTEL Marvelous steaks, seafood and other specialties combine with a refined atmosphere and outstanding service to set the stage for a truly memorable meal, especially if you have a date to impress. 201 E Sheridan, OKC, 236.8040 $$$

A Sacre Bleu in the T Room

T Marks the Spot The Jones Assembly’s top-shelf concoctions I F YO U ’VE B E E N to The Jones Assembly at 901 W Sheridan – which, by now, you should’ve – you know that it’s a thoroughly impressive space. But among the spacious covered patio, the gleaming bar and the grand main dining hall, the best spot of all might be the T Room upstairs. Stylish, comfortable and more intimate than the other areas, it’s ideally situated for taking in a concert (see page 68). It even has its own bar menu, with classy concoctions you won’t find downstairs. For example, consider the Sacre Bleu – it’s based around armagnac (classy brandy), and before it’s served, the cocktail is bathed in applewood smoke for a beguiling flavor on the verge of sweetness. If you’d like something more colorful, the Mesta Park Swizzle is built around Prairie Wolf Distillery’s Loyal gin, mixed with lime juice, pineapple and passionfruit syrups and fresh The Mesta Park Swizzle mint leaves. Sometimes simple is fine – but if it’s a special occasion and you want to try an elevated beverage, it might be time to go down to Film Row and head upstairs. - STEVE GILL

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THE METRO A perennial favorite that feels comfortably upscale without exerting pressure to impress on its clientele, the far-reaching menu covers culinary high points from vichyssoise to crème brulée. 6418 N Western, OKC, 840.9463 $$ THE PRITCHARD WINE BAR Tempted by tempranillo? Musing about muscat? This Plaza District stop is amply stocked with an extensive list of exceptional wines, and sampling the varied dishes is a pleasure in itself. 1749 NW 16th, OKC, 601.4067 $ SIGNATURE GRILL Unassuming locale; magnificent culinary rewards. The expertly considered menu mixes French and Italian flavors to present a wide spectrum of amazing flavors in a few select dishes. 1317 E Danforth, Edmond, 330.4548 $$$

French CAFÉ CUVEE Located in Midtown’s magnificent Ambassador Hotel, this paean to the flavors of la belle France is the result of a collaboration between star chefs and elite ingredients. 1200 N Walker, OKC, 898.8120 $$ LA BAGUETTE BISTRO Les Freres Buthion have deep roots in the city’s culinary landscape, and this flagship combines fine dining with a great bakery, deli and butcher on site. 7408 N May, OKC, 840.3047 $$ FAIT MAISON Foie gras to Brandy Alexander, this classical French restaurant delivers exceptional cuisine made with exacting care – the name translates to homemade – for exquisite, if pricy, event dining. 152 E 5th, Edmond, 509.2555 $$$

German DAS BOOT CAMP Longtime fixture for Deutsch festivities Royal Bavaria has brewed up a second round of exceptional cuisine and magnificent beer in a less expensive, faster-paced location in downtown Norman. 229 E Main, Norman, 701.3748 $ FASSLER HALL Bringing German flavor to Midtown via house-made sausages, warm soft pretzels with cheese sauce, duck fries and a heftig beer menu, plus a weekend brunch – what’s not to love? 421 NW 10th, OKC, 609.3300 $ ROYAL BAVARIA Superb takes on traditional dishes like Weinerschnitzel, Jagerbraten and sausages, plus fantastisch house-brewed beers. The time spent is a worthy investment in this familystyle dining hall. 3401 S Sooner, Moore, 799.7666 $$$

Indian GOPURAM - TASTE OF INDIA A fullservice restaurant whose richly appointed interior and attentive staff accord patrons the feel of fine dining, even during the plentifully stocked lunch buffet. 4559 NW 23rd, OKC, 948.7373 $$ MISAL OF INDIA A Norman institution for over 30 years, specializing in tandoori-cooked delicacies and boasting healthy, natural, delicious cuisine served amid splendid ambiance. 580 Ed Noble Pkwy, Norman, 579.5600 $$ TAJ A tremendous set of Indian staples and delicacies - the menu has sections for vegetarian, tandoori, South Indian and Indo-Chinese specialties - plus full lunch and dinner buffets. 1500 NW 23rd, OKC, 601.1888 $$

Italian & Pizza BIRRA BIRRA Sit down by the water in Chisholm Creek for some fresh, hot pizza from a wood-fired brick oven and some ice-cold (genuinely, thanks to the frosted rail bar) craft beer. 1316 W Memorial, OKC $$ EMPIRE SLICE HOUSE Reigning over the Plaza District in New York style (that means thin, flexible crust with a lot of surface area to cover in cheese and tasty toppings), it offers whole pizzas or slices, a full bar and a primo patio. 1734 NW 16th, OKC $ FLIP’S WINE BAR & TRATTORIA Managing to feel rustic despite its location in a busy corridor of OKC, this cozy Italian joint keeps extended hours, and tends to get busier and louder as the hour gets later. 5801 N Western, OKC, 843.1527 $$ THE HEAT There’s really no need to be humble about this true Chicago-style pizza, boasting perhaps the best crust known to man. It’s one of our favorites; choose your toppings and think deep thoughts. 1319 S Broadway, Edmond, 715.1818 $ MONI’S Handmade, New Jersey-style brick oven pizza and authentic pasta

PHOTOS BY SCOTTY O’DANIEL

Add a shake and enjoy. 4 metro locations, tuckersonionburgers.com $


recipes from Southern Italy in a casual, comfy ambience (ideal for dates). 17200 N May, Edmond, 285.5991 $$ OSTERIA Casual, welcoming and unforgettable, thanks to a knockout menu of Italian inspiration and expert interpretations from star chefs Fabio Viviani and Jonathon Stranger. 6430 Avondale, OKC, 254.5058 $$$ PATRONO The space is small and casually intimate – reservations are a good idea – and the f lavors huge, carefully considered and thoroughly authentic. It’s Italian cuisine, elevated. 305 N Walker, OKC, 702.7660 $$ PIZZERIA GUSTO Neapolitan-style pizza (which harnesses an extremely hot fire to quickly cook superfine f lour crusts and quality ingredients) stars alongside Italy-inspired salads, pastas and appetizers. 2415 N Walker, OKC, 437.4992 $$ STELLA MODERN ITALIAN CUISINE A luscious spate of legitimately Italian tastes for a casual lunch, or romantic dinner, amid stylish scenery. The weekend brunch offerings are especially superb. 1201 N Walker, OKC, 235.2200 $$ UPPER CRUST A chic, contemporary pizzeria and wine bar specializing in wood-fired, thin-crust New York-style pies complemented by a full menu and wine list. 5860 N Classen Blvd, OKC, 842.7743; 1205 NW 178th, Edmond, 285.8887 $$ VICTORIA’S A comfortable atmosphere, with local art on its walls and the art of pasta on its plates – the chicken lasagna and linguine with snow crab are especially excellent. 327 White, Norman, 329.0377; 3000 SW 104th, OKC, 759.3580 $ VITO’S RISTORANTE Homestyle Italian cuisine in an intimate setting where the staff and management treat customers like guests in their home. It’s a small space, so calling ahead is recommended. 7521 N May, OKC, 848.4867 $$ THE WEDGE Wood-fired pies crafted from fresh ingredients (the possibilities range from pepperoni all the way to figs or truff le oil) and made-from-scratch sauces. 230 NE 1st, OKC, 270.0660; 4709 N Western, OKC, 602.3477 $$

Mexican & Latin American BIG TRUCK TACOS It’s nearly always standing-room-only at lunch, but don’t let that deter you; spend a few minutes in line and get an ample reward in the form of fast, fresh, imaginative taco creations. 530 NW 23rd, OKC, 525.8226 $ CULTIVAR A farm-to-fire Mexican kitchen that stresses sustainability, local sourcing and fresh, fast, f lavorful food. Gluten-free options, chefcrafted tacos, a substantial bar and plenty more are on the menu. 714 N Broadway, OKC $$

HACIENDA TACOS Quality, of both ingredients and execution, and variety make this restaurant in the Shoppes at Northpark a pleasure to visit, and to explore the menu again and again. 12086 N May, OKC, 254.3140 $ OSO ON PASEO Make sure your appetite is loaded for bear when you visit this patio-centric spot in the Paseo Arts District – their mantra is Tacos & Cocktails, and they produce both with expertise and enthusiasm. 603 NW 28th, OKC, 309.8226 $

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Seafood CRABTOWN A huge Bricktown warehouse where the Cajun Crab Boil is a favorite, guests are encouraged to “leave the silverware at home and dig in” and taste is king. 303 E Sheridan, OKC, 232.7227 $$ THE DRAKE The Good Egg Group’s flagship and a standard-bearer for diners who crave excellent seafood, it serves chef’s creations featuring the sea’s finest, plus an oyster bar and tempting cocktails. 519 NW 23rd, OKC $$$

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Steakhouse BOULEVARD STEAKHOUSE Perfectly soigné ambiance down to the last detail and cuisine easily in the metro’s elite – a sumptuous, if pricy, masterpiece. 505 S Boulevard, Edmond, 715.2333 $$$ CATTLEMEN’S Almost as old as the state itself, this Oklahoma institution’s immense corn-fed steaks and matchless atmosphere are history served anew every day. 1309 S Agnew, OKC, 236.0416 $$

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JAMIL’S STEAKHOUSE Saving room for your steak, lobster or prime rib is difficult when your gratis appetizers arrive in the form of a Lebanese bounty, but make the effort. Jamil’s has been feeding Oklahoma exceptionally well since 1964. 4910 N Lincoln, OKC, 525.8352 $$$ MICKEY MANTLE’S This lushly atmospheric social spot in Bricktown serves powerhouse entrées and sides with a full complement of amenities destined to impress. 7 S Mickey Mantle, OKC, 272.0777 $$$ RANCH STEAKHOUSE Customaged hand-cut USDA Certified Prime tenderloins and ribeyes, served amid warm Southern hospitality. 3000 W Britton, OKC, 755.3501 $$$

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events Tall in the Saddle

PHOTO COURTESY PARAMOUNT NETWORK

To celebrate the West, it helps to look to the best – Kevin Costner, currently starring in the Paramount Network series “Yellowstone,” is among the honorees at the 59th annual Western Heritage Awards coming April 12-13 to the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. See page 70.

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events PRIME PICKS

Rock Around the Block April 25-27, Downtown Norman

Beach Fossils, Black Milk with Nat Turner, The Garden, Soccer Mommy, Omar Apollo and dozens and dozens and dozens more. No matter what sound is your jam, odds are excellent you’ll find it at the three-day sonic eruption par excellence that is the 11th Norman Music Festival. Plus, attendance is free, which should be music to everyone’s ears.

Skating Polly

April 12, Science Museum Oklahoma

Diamond Jubilee

A massive silent auction of pieces by exceptional local artists should pique your interest, especially since it aids the community-enhancing work of Allied Arts, but just in case: this event is also the city’s foremost craft cocktail competition. Raise a glass or two to creativity at the luscious Artini.

April 4-8, Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark When the gates of the Brick open, it won’t just mark the start of a new season for the OKC Dodgers – their opponents for the first series, the San Antonio Missions, are a new AAA franchise, and they’re playing in what feels like a whole new facility, thanks to a $2.5 million renovation including nearly 100,000 square feet of new turf. Sounds like cause for celebration … play ball!

Racing Stripes April 6-7, Waterford Complex The countdown is underway for the 37th annual Redbud Classic, still a top-tier reason to stretch your legs, have a blast and help others at the same time. This year’s 5k and 10k runs, 10-, 33- and 50-mile bike tours, 5k wheelchair race and 2k walk all benefit Teach for America OKC.

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View Master April 4-20, Howell Gallery No need to pack a suitcase for this transcontinental trip; artist Nick Berry is using his firsthand experiences and a lifetime of polished skills to bring views of the world to OKC. His new exhibition “Travel With the Artist” is filled with engrossing “Tile Roof Tops (Dubrovnik, Croatia)” interpretations of sights he saw on trips to Canada, California, Croatia and beyond. Ready to go exploring?

PHOTOS: SKATING POLLY COURTESY NMF; CHICKASAW BRICKTOWN BALLPARK COURTESY OKC DODGERS; PAINTING COURTESY HOWELL GALLERY

Drinking Creatively


Mou n t Wi l l i am s on , S i er ra Neva da , f rom M a nz a na r, Ca l i forni a , 19 44. P h o to graph by A n sel Adams Col l ecti on Cen ter for Creati ve P h o to graphy ©Th e An s el Adams P u bl i s h i n g Ri gh ts Tru st

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events ON LOCATION

Success Built on Bare Bones Sharon Butterfly Ray’s Muskogee marvel T HE BA R E BON E S Film Festival is

celebrating its 20th anniversary this month in Muskogee. It’s Oklahoma’s longest-running film festival, with a national reputation as one of the friendliest. Its ongoing success, and its outsize influence on low-budget filmmakers, can be attributed to one key ingredient: Co-founder and Executive Director Sharon Butterfly Ray. Ray was born in Little Rock, Arkansas, and grew up out in the country amid plantations filled with sharecroppers. In 1959, she moved with her mother to Compton, California – which was as country as Arkansas at the time – since the freeway did not extend that far out from Los Angeles. But Ray spent her childhood summers, as well as her high school years, living with family in Muskogee. Ray excelled, academically and otherwise, at Manual Training High School, the segregated school for African Americans, who were not allowed to attend Muskogee High School at the time. She was headed to Northeastern University in Tahlequah on a scholarship when she found out that her mother was sick, so she moved back to California. “I started working in the schools and teaching as soon as I got to California to pay my way through college,” Ray says. “I

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There will never be enough time, money or people. GET IT DONE anyway. Sometimes it is up to you to CREATE SOMETHING AMAZING . Make it happen. SH A RON BU T T ER F LY R AY

“Soon after we met, the movie Tuskegee Airmen came to Oklahoma looking for extras,” Ray continues. “Both Oscar and I were hired to work on set. That one experience changed our whole life direction. We knew we could make those stories in Oklahoma; he was a storyteller, and I could sell anything. We gathered all the books we could find on filmmaking, and we started making films. We learned along the way. If we needed actors, we trained the people in town to be actors – same with crew members. Everything

Sharon Butterfly Ray

we learned, we turned around and taught the people around us.” With some hard-won expertise under their belts, “We started the film festival in 1999 to show people that Oklahomans were making movies, and to attract out-of-town filmmakers so we could learn from them,” Ray says. “We called it ‘Bare Bones’ because we wanted to shine a light on low-budget filmmakers who were doing everything themselves outside the system.” Twenty years later, the formula has proven to be a massive success. Filmmakers from across Oklahoma and around the world descend on Muskogee every April to share their work and celebrate the art of independent filmmaking. “We approach running Bare Bones just like we approach our filmmaking: by any means necessary,” Ray says. “There will never be enough time, money or people. Get it done anyway. Sometimes it is up to you to create something amazing. Make it happen.” Come and meet Sharon Butterfly Ray and this year’s group of outstanding filmmakers at the 20th annual Bare Bones Film Festival April 23-28 at the Roxy Theater in beautiful Muskogee. For more details, visit barebonesfilmfestival.org.

ILLUSTRATION BY BRIAN O’DANIEL; PHOTO COURTESY PBS

with Lance McDaniel

put myself through Compton Community College, Long Beach State, Cal State University and ultimately Pepperdine for my master’s, all while raising three kids. My degree was in early childhood development, because that matched my job and my life. Ultimately, I ran seven childhood development centers across Los Angeles.” In 1980, Sharon Ray knew it was time to try something new. She dove into sales, selling insurance, real estate and anything that offered training. But the more she trained, the more she realized that she should be the trainer. She began leading training classes, which led to speaking gigs, which led to motivational albums and video tapes, which led to a rebranding as Sharon Butterfly Ray. The majorette from Muskogee was now running a motivational speaking agency. “When I first came back to Muskogee, I opened a speaking agency,” Ray says. “Then I met the love of my life, Oscar Ray. He was a screenwriter and filmmaker. He was the one that opened my eyes to the world of film.


Tatyana Fazlalizadeh: Oklahoma is Black Now through 05/19 Gallery talks | 6 p.m. April 9, 23 Second Saturday | 1-4 p.m. April 13 See all free programs at okcontemp.org.

Exhibitions at Oklahoma Contemporary are always free. APRIL 2019 405 MAGAZINE

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oklahomacontemporary.org | @okcontemporary | 3000 General Pershing Blvd. | Oklahoma City | 405 951 0000


events SPEAKERBOX

STILL WAILING AFTER ALL THESE YEARS I’ve said this many times in this publication, but the Tower Theatre consistently wows me with their dedication to bringing diverse, rare shows to the 405. On April 17, The Wailers – the legacy reggae, blues and ska collective famous as Bob Marley’s backing band – will play the venue at 425 NW 23rd. Marley died too soon in 1981, after establishing himself as the voice and most iconic figure of contemporary reggae. Bassist Aston Barrett continued to tour under The Wailers name, and is currently the leader of this incredible collection of musicians that includes Barrett’s son, as well as singer and guitarist Junior Martin and guitarist Donald Kinsey. Don’t miss this show. Tickets are available at towertheatreokc.com. - JC

Jenny Lewis Plays With Fire Sharp wit, bright voice, can’t lose J E N N Y L EW IS IS a very confident woman – with good reason. Having racked

up numerous acting credits in commercials and television shows in her youth, Lewis changed gears in 1998 to focus on music. She wanted to sing, and formed a band with her then-boyfriend: Rilo Kiley was low-fi indie rock with an old country jukebox sound, courtesy of Lewis’ expressive voice. Rilo Kiley was, like Lewis, a changeling; with each new record, they tried a different sound and different production techniques. After “Under the Blacklight,” Lewis went solo, and with the release of “On the Line” in March, she’s produced four solo records that sound completely unlike each other. For her new record, “On the Line,” Lewis visited Capitol Records’ legendary Studio B and surrounded herself with renowned West Coast studio musicians – including Jim Keltner on drums, Benmont Tench (Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers) on keyboards – and friends thrown in the mix. It is Keltner’s familiar-sounding drums that kick off “Red Bull and Hennessy,” and frames the driving power of Lewis’ bright, still twangy vocals. She’s funny, clever and a gifted singer and songwriter empowered with a great band; Jenny Lewis performs an all-ages show April 4 at The Jones Assembly, 901 W Sheridan. This will be a special treat. While they last, tickets are available at thejonesassembly.com. - JERRY CHURCH

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My favorite story about Bon Iver, the Wisconsin-based, folk indie act fronted by Justin Vernon, happened after the group won the Grammy for “Best New Artist” in 2012. Despite releasing several records as early as 2006, the group was still relatively unknown. When they announced the band’s name, presenters did it so fast that the next day on Twitter, people were asking, “Who in the hell is Bonnie Bear?” “Bon Iver” – which sounds like the French phrase for “good winter” – began as essentially a solo project, as Vernon recorded inaugural record “For Emma, Forever Ago” independently while suffering from cabin fever in a cabin in the Badger State during one brutal winter. Over the next few years, Bon Iver, now a five-piece touring act, released two more studio records to critical and fan acclaim. Eau Claire, Wisconsin, became not only Vernon’s home base, but an artist community that spawned economic development in music and the arts. It’s been seen as a great model for artists building their communities in the new streaming digital music economy. The band is currently on tour and will play The Criterion, 500 E Sheridan, April 3. I would suspect that new music is forthcoming. Tickets are available at criterionokc.com. - JC

JENNY LEWIS PHOTO BY AUTUMN DE WILDE

A GOOD WINTER, A WELCOME SPRING


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APRIL 2019 405 MAGAZINE

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events SPOTLIGHT

Links in a Legacy

Honoring icons at the Western Heritage Awards I N A M ER ICA , the West isn’t just a

compass direction; it’s a culture, a legacy, practically a mythos all its own. The people who helped establish its place in the American consciousness, whether by portraying its icons onscreen or adding to its presence with their actual lives, have been the stars of the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum’s annual Western Heritage Awards for six decades, and a new chapter is being written April 12-13. “As the preeminent recognition of quality in Western-themed works for nearly 60 years, the Western Heritage Awards celebrates and encourages the creation of Western literature, music and film with true merit,” says Museum President & CEO Natalie Shirley. “We are excited to once again honor a group of creative individuals who hold steadfast to Western ideals while creating new and groundbreaking works.” This year, that group is led by Kevin Costner, star of Dances With Wolves and Open Range and currently starring in “Yellowstone” on the Paramount Network, and includes, among others,

DANCE APR 19-20 Visionaries Three shorter works never before danced by the OKC Ballet corps - this season-ending showcase of grace and strength is not to be missed. OKC Civic Center, 201 N Walker, OKC, 843.9898, okcballet.org

EVENTS APR 4 Cork and Canvas A tempting wine tasting and art auction with live performance, tasty treats and more, it aids the homelessness-fighting work of Positive Tomorrows. Coles Garden, 1415 NE 63rd, OKC, 556.5082, positivetomorrows.org APR 11 Uptown Uncorked The sixth annual fete toasts a district that’s

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troubadour Michael Martin Murphey, world champion steer roper Clark McEntire (you might know his daughter Reba), entertainer and musician Dave Stamey and George McJunkin, a cowboy and former slave who discovered the first Folsom archaeological site.

Varied as their lives and careers have been, they all helped make the West a more interesting place and concept; if celebrating their contributions sounds tempting, visit nationalcowboymuseum. org for reservations and join this honorary roundup. - STEVE GILL

WANT TO SEE MORE? VISIT OUR ONLINE CALENDAR AT 405MAGAZINE.COM still on the rise; enjoy the flavors and rub elbows with Uptown 23rd’s luminaries. Tower Theatre, 425 NW 23rd, OKC, uptown23rd.com APR 23-28 Festival of the Arts Six days packed full of wonders in the visual, culinary and performing arts in the great outdoors; it’s one of the city’s finest must-see events. Bicentennial Park, 500 Couch, OKC, 270.4848, artscouncilokc.com APR 27 Steamroller Fest Creativity can be an irresistible force; this fun community event uses an actual steamroller to produce large-scale art prints. Untitled Artspace, 1 NE 3rd, OKC, 815.9995, 1ne3.org APR 27 Eat Drink Art This seasonally splendid fundraiser for the Fine Arts Institute of Edmond

combines food, music, auctions and art appreciation for a joyous evening. Oak Tree Country Club, 700 W Country Club, Edmond, 340.4481, edmondfinearts.com

201 N Walker, OKC, 232.7464, canterburyokc.com

APR 28 OKC Memorial Marathon More than 20,000 people are gearing up for the Run to Remember; the routes have changed for 2019 but the life-affirming mission remains. OKC National Memorial, 620 N Harvey, OKC, okcmarathon.com

APR 3-28 Bright Star You’ll find plenty of heart and plenty of hope in this throwback southern-set musical suffused with the wit, warmth and music of writers Steve Martin and Edie Brickell. Lyric’s Plaza Theatre, 1727 NW 16th, OKC, 524.9312, lyrictheatreokc.com

MUSIC APR 13 Carmina Burana Canterbury Voices celebrates its 50th anniversary with a sweeping, sensational rendition of an all-time choral classic that will test even their golden throats. OKC Civic Center,

THEATER

APR 4-7 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time A private detective investigates a murder … sort of: He’s 15 and the victim is a dog. But CityRep’s stage show of the awardwinning novel is a rich, moving treat. OKC Civic Center, 201 N Walker, OKC, 848.3761, cityrep.com

PHOTO COURTESY PARAMOUNT NETWORK

ON THE RADAR

Kevin Costner in the Paramount Network’s “Yellowstone”


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backstory

CREATION CELEBRATION The Festival of the Arts’ growth to greatness BY MARK BEUTLER

Festival of the Arts. What began as a small event more than 50 years ago has grown into one of the top outdoor festivals in the country. It was early 1967 when a group of civic leaders formed the Arts Council of Oklahoma City. The general manager of the Oklahoma City Symphony, Frank Ratka, suggested an annual arts festival for attracting publicity. “That would accomplish two goals,” says Peter Dolese, Arts Council executive director. “The festival would include a sales outlet for artists, as well as a new free venue for the public to enjoy visual and performing arts. It would also make money to help support additional art projects and services.” The first festival took place in March 1967, and every board member scrambled to help put it together. “One board member asked the Symphony to lend the Arts Council $7,500 to pay for initial expenses,” Dolese says. “Other members begged artists to participate, and some of them thought it was a crazy idea to have their work hung outside, but they agreed to try it out.” The food that first year was a far cry from what visitors see today. “One group of board members was in charge of making sandwiches to sell,” Dolese says. “That was before they found out about the state Health Department’s rules. Another group put on a very entertaining melodrama in the Pink Pony tent, and others sold soft drinks and collected money. The five-day event was just the beginning.” Through the years, the festival has changed and grown. In its early days, it was held at the Civic Center, then in the mid-1980s it moved to “Festival Plaza” near the Myriad Gardens. Today, it is back at Bicentennial Park near the Civic Center, where it will run April 23-28 in 2019. More than 150 visual artists are chosen from over 500 applicants, Dolese said. Last year, artists came from 28 states and stayed in Oklahoma City hotels an average of six days, resulting in about $76,000 in hotel bookings. “In addition to the visual artists, hundreds more performers provide dance, music, mime, theater and other offerings,” says Dolese. “Thousands of children are offered special arts experiences. Besides being the Arts Council’s primary funding source, 30 other non profit cultural agencies earn funds through participation in the food area.” And the food is an attraction itself; from the ever-popular Strawberries Newport to international treats, a variety of Oklahoma City’s finest restaurants have booths at the festival. “Around 750,000 people attend each year,” Dolese says. “It takes 5,000 volunteers with 144 artists, 228 performances and 30 food vendors. Since 1967, the Festival of the Arts has been Oklahoma City’s annual rite of spring.”

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PHOTOS COURTESY ARTS COUNCIL OKC

ON E OF OK L A HOM A CI T Y ’S finest spring traditions is the annual


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Profile for 405 Magazine

405 Magazine April 2019  

405 Magazine is the definitive city and lifestyle magazine of central Oklahoma, featuring people, places, events, dining and culture.

405 Magazine April 2019  

405 Magazine is the definitive city and lifestyle magazine of central Oklahoma, featuring people, places, events, dining and culture.

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