Page 1

               

Theologia Prima Bulletin Inserts From the Office of Liturgy Diocese of Salt Lake City


The following bulletin inserts were originally published in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper between January 2010 and April 2011. The Theologia Prima series was designed to help parishes with basic liturgical catechesis as we prepare for the implementation of the third edition of the Roman Missal. These inserts can be used in small group study, junior/senior high school classrooms, faith formation groups, etc.


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City   

#1

WHY STUDY THE LITURGY? 

I

t’s official: the US Bishops finally approved the new translation of the Roman Missal. Some of you may  have heard rumors that we would never see it and some of you may be wondering what I am talking  about.  The text receives a recognitio or approval from the Vatican on March 26, 2010. As we get closer to  implementing these revised texts, the Bishop’s Committee on Divine Worship has asked that every diocese  begin to catechize priests, deacons, religious, and laity about the forthcoming changes.     This column is an attempt to compliment the diocesan efforts to catechize parish families on the liturgy and  the revised texts. Over the course of the coming year, I will present some general catechesis on liturgy, the  theology of Sunday, the parts of the Mass (i.e. Sprinkling Rite, Eucharistic Prayer, the Lectionary, etc), and the  purpose of the new translations. Hopefully, these articles will inspire and engage the reader to ponder more  deeply the paschal mystery celebrated in our communal gatherings, the liturgy.    So why reflect on the liturgy? I think the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy provides an answer for us. It states,  “The liturgy is the summit toward which the activity of the Church is directed; it is also the fount from which  all her power flows” (§10). Our entire life is directed to God. It is here, in our worship, where we meet God. It  is the place we share our joys and sorrows. It is the place where our personal stories meet the story of the  whole Church, and it challenges us to continue to share the story of Christ’s passion, death, and resurrection.     The liturgy is also the source and summit of the Christian community’s theology. Here we encounter Christ  and he becomes present to us. Because of this, the theological tradition often describes the liturgical action as  theologia prima or primary theology.  It is the principal public work of the Church. All other theology is a  reflection on this central encounter with Christ. It is also in the liturgy that the  community gives expression to its faith in and love for God. Our real and graced  encounter with Christ in worship challenges us and calls us to proclaim the good  news. We study the liturgy (rituals, sacraments, texts, symbols, etc.) to deepen  our awareness and understanding of God’s life in us and our life in God.     I look forward to reflecting with you on the liturgy in the coming months. The  next article will begin our exploration by asking: “What is liturgy and why do we  celebrate?”     For more information regarding the revised Roman Missal please visit  http://www.usccb.org/romanmissal/. Also visit  www.dioslc.org/ministries/liturgical.  

© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper. 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City 

#2

ENTERING THE HEART OF THE PASCHAL MYSTERY 

W

hen I taught high school, my students passionately offered complaints and criticisms about the  Sunday Mass they were “forced to attend.” “Mr. Johnston, it’s so boring.” “But Mr. Johnston, the  music is not good.” “Mr. Johnston, our priest doesn’t engage us.” “Mr. Johnston, why don’t they  try to make it fun?” These may be valid concerns, but I always challenged my students to think a  little deeper. I wanted them to examine their life in Christ as expressed in this communal gathering we call  liturgy. So over the course of a semester, we studied the liturgical life of the Church and in the end, the Spirit  moved some of these young people to a deeper appreciation of the liturgy.     At times, I catch myself making similar statements and I have to step back and reconnect with the purpose of  our communal liturgical gatherings – praise and adoration of God. Obviously, the presider, the assembly’s  attitude, the music, gestures, rituals, and our own histories all affect how we experience the liturgy.     What is your experience or understanding of the liturgy? Is it private time for prayer or a communal gathering  in the Spirit? Is it primarily a duty or do you hunger for this divine encounter? Is it a celebration of our life in  God and God’s life in us or a monotonous routine to finish quickly? Does the way we pray truly express our  profound love for God and God’s infinite and awesome love for us?     We all come to the liturgy with joy in our hearts as well as the reality of our brokenness. The beauty of this  gathering is that we come as a people united in Christ, no matter our race, gender, or social status. United by  the simple, but profound, water‐bath and our sharing at the Eucharistic  Table, we become one Body, the sacrament of Christ to the entire world. We  are nourished at the liturgy and sent forth to proclaim to the good news of  salvation.     The liturgy invites us to participate intensely in the Divine Life. Every time  we gather for Sunday Eucharist, for weddings, funerals, anointings,  reconciliation, and ordinations we enter deeply into the very heart of the  paschal mystery. We are challenged to live differently. We are invited to  love and called to serve. We give thanks for God’s mercy and rejoice in  God’s love. This encounter with Love transforms us.    The liturgy is the basis of our common life in Christ, which we come to  understand more deeply as we journey together to God’s Kingdom.  In the  next article, we will explore the how the fathers of the Second Vatican  Council reflected on this in the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy.     

© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City 

#3

LITURGY: THE CHURCH’S PUBLIC WORK 

T

he liturgical movement that helped pave the way for the Second Vatican Council, was well underway  in late 19th century Europe and took root in the United States in the early 20th century. In many cases,  the liturgy had previously been reduced to rubrics and laws, but the Holy Spirit was leading the  Church to reflect on her gathering and challenged her to enter more deeply into the heart of the paschal  mystery. Liturgical pioneers like Virgil Michel, OSB, and Msgr. Martin Hellriegel helped usher in a renewed  understanding of and interest in the sacred liturgy.     After renewal and experimentation in the 1940s and 1950s the Holy Spirit inspired Pope John XXIII to convene  the Second Vatican Council, which rooted its reforms in the liturgy since it is there that we most intimately  encounter the Risen Lord. The first document issued by the Council was Sacrosanctum Concilium, the  Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy (SC). This document defines the Church’s understanding of its liturgical  celebration and then sets out the agenda for a renewal of the Church’s liturgical rites.    The word liturgy, derived from the Greek word leitourgia, is defined as “public works” or “service in the name  of/on behalf of the people” (CCC 1069). Historically, this could be anything from a great public festival to  building a sewer system or roadways. It was anything produced for the benefit of the general public. Early  Christians adopted this term to describe their “public works” or worship of the Father, through Christ, in the  power of the Holy Spirit. The Church’s worship of the Father is always a corporate act in union with Christ.  It  calls us to bear witness to Christ’s redeeming love to the world in worship and through charitable deeds. The  Church is the sacrament of Christ in the world.       Sacrosanctum Concilium emphasizes that every time we gather to  celebrate the Liturgy of the Hours or the Eucharist, we participate  in Christ’s own prayer to the Father and the ongoing work of  redemption “in, with, and through his Church” (SC §2 and CCC  1069). This worship of the Trinity is our work. We are each called  to this work by our baptism into Christ’s body —especially when  we are gathered— for the Church is the herald of Christ’s saving  love.     From this brief discussion on the riches of the liturgy, I hope you  are invited to reflect on the profundity of our liturgical gatherings  and to continue studying the deep liturgical/theological tradition  of our Church. The liturgy truly is the “source and summit” of our  Christian life (SC §10). In the next article, we will focus specifically  on the importance of Sunday, the day of resurrection. 

© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City 

#4

IT’S NOT REALLY ABOUT OBLIGATION 

T

he last two articles discussed some theological and pastoral aspects of the Church’s liturgical life. This  week, we are briefly going to explore the nucleus of our liturgical cycle – Sunday.    

Sunday is the Lord’s Day, the day the Church gathers to rejoice in God’s infinite love by celebrating  Jesus’ triumph over death and sin. Since the earliest days of Christianity, the community has gathered on  Sunday to “break bread” and share stories. Justin, a second century martyr, writes in his First Apology that the  community gathered on the “day of the sun” to share the stories of the apostles or the prophets, pray for those  in need, and share in Eucharist. Justin’s description of a Sunday gathering is very similar to the current pattern  of our Sunday Eucharist. Justin claims they gathered on Sunday because it is the first day of the new creation.  Through the resurrection of Christ, God has transformed all creation.  

Because of this, many Christians have called Sunday the “eighth day of creation.” The Sabbath was, among  other things, a commemoration of God’s resting on the seventh day when the creation was complete (The  word Sabbath is related to the Hebrew Word for “seventh”). In Jesus, God’s work of creation had been taken  up again:  with his resurrection from the dead, the Kingdom of Heaven was inaugurated, and the remaking of  the world had begun.  Because of this Christians spoke about their Sunday gatherings as taking place on the  eighth day of the week – the new Day of God’s creation, which would be completed with Christ’s return in  glory.    

Whenever we gather to celebrate the paschal mystery, we are always participating in this eighth day of  creation, but our Sunday gatherings are the fullest sign of the coming of Christ’s Reign. Because every Sunday  is a little Easter, it is most appropriate to celebrate sacraments such as baptism, confirmation, and even  marriage in the context of the community’s Sunday Eucharist. We are gathered in this eschatological moment  to be made more fully into the Body of Christ with the other members of our parish, our diocese, and the  whole church across time and space, and indeed all creation.   

Clearly, this is a very different concept of Sunday than we get from the idea of a “Sunday Obligation.” If  Sunday is the day of the new creation, where would we want to be except in the midst of Christ’s body?   

The late Pope John Paul II wrote a beautiful  discourse on the theology of Sunday, the Apostolic  Letter Dies Domini (On keeping the Lord’s Day  Holy). During these Lenten days, this letter may  provide some rich and nourishing words for  contemplation, as we prepare to celebrate the  greatest of all Sundays, Easter. 

© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City 

# 5   TIME: NOT ONLY SCARCE, BUT SACRED   

A

ll human societies have ways of marking the passing of time. Our lives are marked by the rising and  setting of the sun and the passing of seasons. While we often pay attention to the passing minutes,  hours and days, how often do you pay attention to sacred time?     Keeping time and celebrating the harvest, seasons, births, etc. is not only important to our secular senses, but  crucial to our sacramental imaginations. The Church marks its time by the liturgical year, by which the Church  provides us with a way to ponder the greatest mysteries of our faith: the Incarnation, the Paschal Mystery, the  outpouring of the Spirit, and the Second Coming of Christ. Along the way we remember the Saints and  commemorate feasts and fasts to celebrate our redemption in Christ.     The Church marks time in the seasons of Advent, Christmas, Lent, Easter, Triduum, and Ordinary Time. The  liturgical year, like a sacrament, mediates or reveals God’s ongoing activity in the world.  Briefly, we will  explore the major seasons.    The year begins with Advent, the season of preparation. We prepare for the light which comes into the world,  both in Christ’s birth, and in his return in glory. Christmas commemorates not only the historical birth of  Christ, but also Christ’s continual birth within us and in the world, which will eventually usher in the fullness  of God’s kingdom.    Lent is the Church’s great retreat, a time to slow down and examine our brokenness, which leads us to accept  God’s free gift of mercy. These 40 days lead us to the greatest of all celebrations: the Easter Vigil. By uniting  our own suffering to Christ, we are transformed and rise anew with Christ. During the 50 days of Easter, the  Church shouts “Alleluia” and rejoices in Christ’s victory over death. This season of feasting ends with  Pentecost, the day the Holy Spirit was poured out on all creation and the Church is commissioned to proclaim  the good news to all peoples. The rest of the year is taken up with this work of the Church, as we tell the  stories and await Christ’s return in glory.  The readings for the end of ordinary time focus us on his return, and  culminate in the feast of Christ the King, when the whole cycle begins again.      Each year we retell the stories, prepare ourselves, and announce the good news of Christ.  The Church’s stories  seem to be mirrored in the world around us: the coming light announced in the darkness, the return of God’s  favor to the land that has been frozen, and the harvest of all things when they have reached their time.  And in  it all, we say: Jesus is Lord.  Lord, come quickly! 

   

© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City   

#6

CHANGE IS A COMIN’ 

I

n the last several articles we have been discussing some basic liturgical theology as a way to renew our  spirit of worship. Beginning with this week’s article we will begin to explore the New Roman Missal and   eventually delve into each part of our Eucharistic liturgy.     Throughout the centuries, the liturgy has changed many times. Once again, change is coming. In 2000, Pope  John Paul II promulgated the third edition of the Roman Missal, which was published in Latin in 2002. In 2002  we also received the New General Instruction of the Roman Missal (or GIRM), which sought to clarify some of the  rules for celebrating Eucharist. Now we are waiting for the official English translation to be approved by the  Vatican.    

What is a Missal?  The Missal is the book that includes all the prayers (e.g. Opening Prayer and  Eucharistic Prayers) and rubrics (directions) for Sundays, feasts, and ritual Masses  (like Confirmation). Many of the prayers come from the earliest centuries in our  Church, so this book of prayers is a treasure of our rich tradition.   

Why are we getting a new Missal?  Since the major revisions at the Second Vatican Council, there have been smaller  revisions to the liturgy and additions to our liturgical calendar (especially the  addition of new saints), which need to be included in the Church’s official liturgical  books. Another reason is that in 2001 the Vatican issued Liturgiam Authenticam. This  document outlined new rules for translating the Latin into the vernacular. One of its goals was to adhere to the  Latin more closely. We’ll talk more about translation in the next article.   

How will this affect me in the pew?  You may notice a more formal structure and sound to many prayers, and some of the things the assembly says  are changing. For example, when the presider greets the community with, “The Lord be with you,” the assembly  will respond, “And with your Spirit.” Some other places in the liturgy you will notice a change are the Gloria  and the Creed.   

When will we start using the new Missal?  November 27, 2011 is the date every parish in the United States will begin using the new translation. Right  now, parishes will offer catechetical opportunities to delve deeper into the translations, choirs are preparing to  learn the new Mass settings, and implementation teams are preparing for a smooth transition. The book will be  published in October 2011.     As we all know, change can be difficult. But the new missal can be a chance to grow in our appreciation for the  liturgy, and to listen more carefully for God’s word in our midst.   

© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City 

#7

LITURGICAL LANGUAGE 

S

ince the Second Vatican Council the Church has had two different Missals. As we prepare to  receive the third edition of the Roman Missal we need to discuss why a good translation is so  vital for our liturgical prayer.   

What is wrong with the current translations?  The prayer‐texts we have been using since 1985 are good prayers that have nourished us and  challenged us to be a Eucharistic community. These texts were translated according to the norms set  down after the Second Vatican Council. As the Church has grown and prayed these texts we have  become aware of ways to enrich and strengthen our liturgical prayer.    Why is having a “good” translation important?  Every day each of us says thousands of words. Some of these words are meaningless, while others  are packed with meaning. Our words may be comforting or alienating, they may be technical or  casual, and they may be hurtful or healing. For example, the simple phrase “I love you” can mean  several things depending on the context. Is the exchange between spouses, parent and child, or two  people reconciling old wounds? In each of these scenarios the love expressed is weighted and  expressed differently.     Think about how language shapes you and its role in your daily activity. While teaching high school,  I observed a phenomenon that affects each of us. Groups of friends that spent a considerable amount  of time together began to speak in similar patterns, using similar phrases. This common speech also  began to shape their viewpoints as they began to describe their experiences. We cannot escape  language, and because it shapes us over time, it is important.      If this is true in secular settings, it is certainly true in sacred settings. We gather as groups who share  similar thoughts and ideas. Our language at worship, though, is not everyday language. It is a  scripted text, which helps us express our deep love for God, but also  enlightens us, challenges us, and builds us into the body of Christ.    Lord,   Liturgical language is a ritual language, which helps us enter into  I am not worthy that  the celebration of the Sacred Mysteries. Ritual language helps  unite us as one body and joins our praise and adoration for God  you should enter  in worship with the church gathered across time and space.  under my roof, but  When we enter into the worship space, in a sense, we enter into  only say the word   the sacred mysteries. It demands something different of us. Our  and my soul shall be  words somehow mean more, and so the Church pays very careful  healed. attention to what words we use. In the next article we will look at some  of the issues at stake in how we translate the language of the liturgy. 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City 

#8

TRANSLATING LITURGICAL TEXTS: TWO PRINCIPLES 

s we have mentioned, we are awaiting a new translation of new edition of the Eucharistic Liturgy. As  we continue to prepare for these changes it will be helpful to understand a little about the principles  used to translate liturgical texts. 

A

Translation is no easy task. My classmate, while I was in the Norbertine novitiate, helped me understand this  difficult process. Jaime loved to read poetry from the great mystics, including St. John of the Cross. Jaime was  also very interested in languages and set out to translate some of St. John’s poetry. Jaime discovered that it was  a rather challenging task to convey the syntax and capture the imagery of the Spanish text in English. If he  translated the text word‐for‐word the English reader would have missed the rhythm and beauty of what St.  John was trying to portray. Every language has certain rules and structures which help the listener understand  the context and meaning of a phrase.  It can be rather difficult to capture this kind of meaning in translation,  because the new language has its own, different rules.    In 1969, Comme le prévoit was issued by the group charged with implementing the reforms of Vatican II. This  document provided rules for translating the newly promulgated Latin texts. The overarching principal in this  document is called “dynamic equivalence.” It is not a word‐for‐word translation, but seeks to express the  original message as if it had been written by a native speaker in the new language.  This is the principal my  classmate was using as he translated poetry so that it brought the sense of the Spanish style into a truly English  structure.    This document governed all liturgical translations until 2001 with the publications  of the instruction Liturgiam authenticam which changed the rules of translation. In  2007, the Vatican clarified this for English in Ratio Translationis for the English  Language. These two documents are guiding the new English translations. The  guiding principle in Liturgiam authenticam is called “formal equivalence.” This  principle tries to adhere to the language of the original text as much as possible,  including phrasing, capitalizations, and gender. It is close to a word‐for‐word  translation.  Each method can bring out different strengths and each has its  difficulties, but for now all translations must follow the principles of formal  equivalence.    The new English text is being translated by ICEL (International Commission on  English in the Liturgy). This group is comprised of English‐speaking Bishops from around the world (i.e.  Australia, Canada, India, South Africa, etc.). When these prayers begin to be used, you will notice a more  formal style in both structure and words, which hopefully will point to our rich history and the Scriptural  roots of the Eucharistic liturgy.  

© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City 

#9

THE LORD BE WITH YOU: AND WITH . . .  WHAT? 

O

n April 30, 2010 the USCCB announced in a press release that the recognitio (approval) for the third  edition of the Roman Missal has been granted by the Vatican. For many in the English speaking world  this is good news. The recognitio does not grant permission for parishes throughout the United States  to start using the texts immediately. The next step is continuing catechesis on the changes. In the  meantime, the USCCB will announce a date of implementation. Stay tuned to see what learning opportunities  the diocese will host and for the date of implementation.    In this article we begin a long stretch of examining the parts of the liturgy. Today we begin with the greeting,  which is part of the introductory rites. We are all familiar with the opening dialogue of the Eucharist. The  priest says, “The Lord be with you” and most of us in our sleep could respond, “And also with you.” Well, this  greeting is slightly changed in the revisions of the Missal. The new translation, which uses the principles we  discussed last time, is: P: The Lord be with you. A: And with your spirit. You will notice that the liturgy does  not begin with common language such as, “Good morning” or “How are you this day.” Instead, the liturgy  uses a formal liturgical greeting, which announces that the Lord is here in this place. It is ritual dialogue that  indicates that what we do here is different than our day to day activity. It affirms that we have gathered in the  name of Christ to offer praise and thanksgiving as his body.  Other added greetings can distract us from the  focus of our gathering, Jesus Christ. Paragraph 50 of the General Instruction of the Roman Missal states:    Then [the priest] signifies the presence of the Lord to the community gathered there by means  of the Greeting. By this Greeting and the people’s response, the mystery of the Church gathered  together is made manifest.    This liturgical greeting has roots in both the Old and New Testaments. Paul uses a similar greeting to conclude  his letters (e.g. Galatians and Philippians). According to Paul Turner, this Pauline greeting “is a way of praying  that the Lord will be your companion, the joy of your heart, and the light of your life.” This new translation  not only regains Scriptural images, but it also unites English speakers to most other language groups who  already use this translation (e.g. Spanish). As we prepare for this change, let us ponder how Christ is present in  our gathering. In the next article we will discuss the Penitential Act and Gloria. 

 Presider: Dominus vobiscum. All: Et cum spiritu tuo.



© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City   

#10 MEA CULPA, MEA CULPA, MEA MAXIMA CULPA:   THE PENITENTIAL ACT REVISED   

T

his week, we will continue examining the “Introductory Rites” from Mass. After the greeting, which we  discussed last time, the presider invites the community to acknowledge their sins and prepare for the  celebration of the Eucharist. This is currently known as the Penitential Rite, but in the revised Roman  Missal it will be known as the Penitential Act. According to the General Instruction of the Roman Missal  (GIRM), this “lacks the efficacy of the Sacrament of Penance” (51), but is a call to conversion of heart and mind  that reminds us to give praise to God for his kindness.     In the current Missal, there are three options for the Penitential Act. The first is the Confiteor (I confess . . .)  followed by the Kyrie (Lord, have mercy). The second option is the least familiar. The presider says, “Lord, we  have sinned against you: Lord, have mercy” and the people respond, “Lord, have mercy” and so on. This too  is followed by the Kyrie. The third option has eight variations and is  probably the most familiar. It is a type of litany. It consists of a call such  as, “You were sent to heal the contrite, Lord have mercy” with its  Penitential Act Form B response “Lord, have mercy”. This pattern continues for the other two  invocations. In the coming weeks, listen to what the priest or deacon  says during this time and then compare it to the new text at  Priest: Have mercy on us, http://www.usccb.org/romanmissal/WhiteBookAnnotated.pdf.   O Lord.   People: For we have sinned In the revised Missal, there are still three options, but some of the texts  against you. have been revised to follow the Latin more closely. The first option, the  Confiteor, for example, reintroduces “through my fault, through my  Priest: Show us, O Lord, fault, through my most grievous fault” with the instruction that each  your mercy. person is to strike his or her breast. You may want to ponder the  relationship between this gesture and the text.   People: And grant us your   salvation. The second option is similar to the current one, but much shorter. The  third option has only one choice, unlike the 1985 Missal. It retains the  pattern of call‐and‐response. You will notice that the prayer of  absolution from this Rite is slightly different as well. Like the current Missal, the first two are always followed  by the Kyrie litany.    The Penitential Act can also be replaced by a sprinkling of baptismal water (GIRM 51). This option can be used  on any Sunday of the year, but is especially encouraged during festal seasons. During the sprinkling rite, we  recall and reflect on the promises made at our baptism and are reminded to faithfully live out the gospel.  When celebrated well, this ritual can be a profound reminder of God’s love. Next time, we will explore the  Gloria and Opening Prayer.  

© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City 

#11 GLORIA IN EXCELSIS DEO!   

W

e all have our favorite hymns that we sing at Mass. I grew up as part of the Glory and Praise  generation, so a lot of my favorite music was composed by the St. Louis Jesuits. I used to wake up  singing “Here I am Lord” by Dan Schutte almost every day. This song had a special place in our  parish life. We sang it for many festive celebrations. I can still hear the sound of the Church’s voice  wafting through that tiny church. This particular song always reminds me of the community that nurtured my  vocation, picked me up when I fell, and rejoiced with me during life passages. As I reflect on these experiences  today, I can honestly say, it’s not really about the song, but the experience of the risen Christ which united my  little parish.     The Eucharist contains a “very ancient and venerable hymn” (GIRM 53), which unites us in praise and thanks.  The assembly sings the Gloria on Sundays outside of Advent and Lent and on all solemnities and feasts. This  hymn of praise for God’s glory was adopted for the Christmas Papal liturgies of the fifth or sixth century and,  by the 11th century, was widely used in parish life. We know that this text has an important place in our  Eucharistic celebrations because the GIRM is insistent that it cannot “be replaced by any other text”(53) and  Sing to the Lord states the Gloria cannot replace another part of the Mass like the entrance chant or the  sprinkling rite (150). The Gloria “is a hymn of praise to the Father, in which he is thanked for his glory, and his  peace is proclaimed to human beings, who are the object of his good will. The hymn also contemplates the Son  as he sits at the Father’s right hand” (Robert Cabié).    The new translation of the Roman Missal seeks to recapture the richness of the Latin text. Right from the  beginning, we will notice some slight changes. Here’s a taste of what’s coming (changes in bold):     Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace to people of  good will. We praise you, we bless you, we adore you, we  glorify you, we give you thanks for your great glory, Lord  God, heavenly King, O God, almighty Father.    The first line of the text, taken from the angels’ announcement to the  shepherds (Lk 2:14), still proclaims for us how the Church, gathered  in celebration and ministry, is an incarnation of Christ in the world  today. As we prepare for the new Missal, let us recapture the beauty  of this hymn. Let the “Gloria” become our communities’ favorite  song.  

© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City 

#12 LET US PRAY: THE ROMAN COLLECT   

I

just returned from a workshop on the Roman Missal and I must admit I am more fired‐up about the new  translation of the Missal and the opportunities we will have to deepen our appreciation of the liturgy and  Scripture in the coming months. Even though we have received the recognitio for the Missal, there are still  minor revisions that are being made, so technically we are still waiting for the final text. The Bishops’  Committee on Divine Worship announced that we are still hoping for an implementation date of November  27, 2011. If that is true, that means every diocese and parish in the country will spend the next year doing  catechesis on liturgy and specifically discussing the new texts.     Last week we briefly examined the Gloria. This week, we explore the Collect (KAHL‐ekt). The Collects or  Opening Prayers of the Roman Missal first appeared in written form around the 7th century. The Roman  Collect is a simple but rich prayer that expresses “the character of the celebration” (GIRM 54). These simple,  elegant prayers uncover in a precise way the theme of a particular liturgy and help focus the assembly’s  attention on a specific aspect of the paschal mystery.     The revision of these prayers is returning to the more formal Collect style. You will quickly notice the more  elevated language and structure, which may take some time to get used to, but we will be rewarded with very  rich and beautiful prayer. In order for this to happen though, the presider must spend time praying these texts  before the liturgy and practicing them so he can effectively and  prayerfully communicate these fine texts. Second, the assembly must be  more alert in its listening.    Quickly, let us explore the structure of the Roman Collect. The assembly  is cued by the presider’s words, “Let us pray.” When he says these  words the entire assembly is silent for a good amount of time (GIRM 45,  54) and each person offers his or her prayers. After this silence, the  presider continues with the prayer, which 1) addresses God, 2) gives  praise to God and 3) petitions God.  The prayer always ends with some  variation of “Through our Lord Jesus Christ”.     The role of the Collect is to collect all the prayers we offer and lift them to  God. You will notice that the prayer is always addressed to God, “through  Christ, in the unity of the Holy Spirit” (GIRM 54). The presider prays this in  the person of Christ on behalf of the assembly, Christ’s body. The conclusion to this prayer is the assembly’s  confident Amen. This Amen “solemnly affirms your belief in God and the unity of the prayers of everyone  present” (Turner). This concludes the introductory rites so we all sit and prepare for the Liturgy of the Word.  

© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City 

#13   THE GOOD NEWS   

I

n the last article, we discussed the Roman Collect, which concludes the Introductory Rites of the  Eucharistic celebration. Our next stop on this journey brings us to the Liturgy of the Word. The Liturgy of  the Word includes the proclamation of the Scriptural texts, the homily, the Profession of Faith (Creed), and  the General Intercessions. In the new Missal, the only changes you will notice will occur in the Profession  of Faith.    

God’s Word is at the heart of our Christian story. From its earliest days, the Church has gathered to share the  story of salvation and break bread together. We continue this tradition every time we gather to celebrate the  resurrection of Christ by reading texts from the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures. The Scriptures are the  community’s story. Pause for a moment and think of your favorite passage or a passage that struck you as  odd. How has this passage invited you into deeper communion with Christ? The Scriptures contain scandals,  erotic poetry, angry prose, adultery, healing, slavery, wisdom, history, and lots of drama. Does this sound  familiar? It should because these are the stories of the human community.    

Before the Second Vatican Council, there was very little Scripture proclaimed over the course of a liturgical  year. The Council reasserted the importance of Scripture in our celebrations and provided the Church with a  three‐year lectionary that shapes our reading to the liturgical season. The homily is a chance to make all of  these connections clear. In the homily, the community is invited to consider the implications for being a  Christian today in this place. We take these words out into the world with us, as we join together in the ancient  faith of the Church (the creed) and hold up our concerns to God (the intercessions).     All of this communicates where we have been and who we are as  God’s chosen people. These stories tell us of God’s infinite love and  mercy, which culminate in the life, death, resurrection, and ascension  of Jesus. And the story continues to unfold today within our  communities. The word is alive and calling us to conversion. Normand  Bonneau states, “Scripture’s home is the liturgy, for in liturgical  proclamation scripture becomes fully what it is, the living word of God  present and active in our midst.” This proclamation is a real encounter  with the Word made Flesh who has called each of us by name to leave  everything behind and follow him. The word proclaimed is  provocative; it challenges us to live radically differently. Each Sunday, as the word of God washes over us and  vibrates in our hearts, we are transformed and once again invited to be lovers, invited to live a life which  proclaims the Good News of salvation.     In the coming weeks, observe how your parish celebrates the Liturgy of the Word and lives the word.  

© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City   

#14 THE GOOD NEWS PART II   

In the last column I introduced the Liturgy of the Word. Since it is a pillar of our Sunday gathering and an  encounter with the risen Lord, I thought it would be good to continue the discussion about the proclamation of  Scriptures in this article.   

What is the Lectionary?  A lectionary is a book that contains the Scripture readings for each day. It is  not a Bible. Our current lectionary consists of a three‐year Sunday cycle and  a two‐year weekday cycle. Before the Second Vatican Council very little  Scripture was proclaimed at Eucharist. The previous lectionary had only a  one‐year cycle.  It only included 1% of the Old Testament, almost all of  which was read at the Easter Vigil.    

What do you mean by three‐year and two‐year cycles?  Each cycle is based on the primary gospel assigned to it. Cycle A is Matthew and Cycle B is Mark.  Currently,  in 2010, we are using Cycle C and you will notice that the gospel proclaimed is Luke.  The Gospel of John is  scattered through all three cycles, often on particularly solemn days. Each of the three Evangelists emphasizes  a different aspect of Jesus’ teaching and revelation of the Father.   The readings for the weekday liturgies are on a two‐year cycle.    

Does the Psalm have to be sung?  The Psalms, attributed to King David, were written to be sung, so each parish should strive to sing the psalm  each week (GIRM 61). The psalm can be led by either cantor or choir. The psalm should be proclaimed from  the ambo, like all of the other readings. The psalm provides a bridge between the first and second a reading  and provides the assembly a moment to meditate on God (GIRM 61).    

Why does the priest or deacon process with the Lectionary?  Actually, the lectionary is never carried in procession: the Book of the Gospels is carried in the entrance  procession. During the Liturgy of the Word, the deacon or priest carries the Book of the Gospels from the altar  to the ambo. This procession is an ancient custom in both eastern and western Christianity. The procession is a  way to show reverence and to honor God’s Word, and draws attention to the central proclamation of the  gospel.   

Does the priest have to preach on the Scriptures?  No. The priest is encouraged to break open the word of God and connect it to the assembly’s lived experience  of the paschal mystery, but the homily is not primarily to teach Biblical Studies, but  to enlighten us and  challenge us to become more faithful disciples. The priest can choose to preach on other parts of the liturgy,  like the Collect or a passage from the Eucharistic Prayer.   

If you have more questions about the Liturgy of the Word, please contact my office. Next time we will explore  the changes in the Profession of Faith (Creed). 

© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City      

#15  I BELIEVE        

E

very Sunday, and on major solemnities of the Church, we profess our faith. The GIRM states, “the  purpose of the Creed is that the    . . . people may respond to the word of God proclaimed in the readings  . . . and explained in the homily and that they may also call to mind and confess the great mysteries of the  faith”(67). When we begin using the revised texts for the Mass, we will notice several changes to the Creed. The  changes presented in the Creed will take some time to get familiar with.        

What is a Creed?    A creed is a statement of belief. There are many Christian creeds that developed over the centuries (e.g.  Anthanasian), but today, the Catholic Church uses the Nicene Creed (Council of Nicaea 325) and the Apostles’  Creed (not from apostolic times) during the celebration of Eucharist.        

When did the Creed enter the Eucharistic liturgy?    The Creed has its roots in the baptismal liturgies of the early Church, not Mass. During the golden age of the  catechumenate (4th‐6th cents.), those preparing for baptism had to learn and memorize the Creed and then  profess it before baptism. Ask your RCIA coordinator about this tradition. This is one reason the Creed begins  in the first person singular (credo). Here’s a short timeline of when the Creed entered the Eucharistic liturgy:     Sixth Century – Spain and Constantinople     Seventh‐Eighth Centuries – France and Germany     1014 – Rome (from there it spread to the rest of the West)      

The Missalette (Mass guide) we use in our parish says we are  supposed to bow during certain words of the Creed. Is this true?    Yes, this is true. At the words and by the Holy Spirit was incarnate of the  Virgin Mary, and became man, all make a profound bow; but on the  solemnities of the Nativity and the Annunciation, all genuflect (GIRM 137).  In doing this we use our bodies to honor God who took on flesh to share in  our humanity.       

What are some of the changes I will notice in the revised text for the  Creed?    We cannot go through each of the changes or the reasons for the changes in this short article, but I can give a  taste of some of the new language. In the new translation you will notice that the community will only say, “I  believe” once during the entire Creed. Currently, we say, “We believe” three times. You will also hear phrases  like:     Of all things visible and invisible     Born of the Father before all ages     Consubstantial (having the same substance)     I look forward to the resurrection       Obviously, there is still a lot to learn about the Creed and its changes. Stay tuned to your parish for more  catechesis on these changes. Next time we will discuss the General Intercessions.   

© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City   

#16 LORD, HEAR OUR PRAYER 

B

efore we begin our discussion on the General Intercessions, I wanted to share that on Friday, August  20 the USCCB announced that they had received the final text of the third edition of the Roman Missal.  The Bishops’ Conference has set an implementation date of November 27, 2011, the first Sunday of  Advent. This is great news! Stay tuned for the many formation opportunities the diocese will host,  including the Southwest Liturgical Conference Study Week February 2nd‐5th.  

In the last several articles we have covered the main components of the Liturgy of the Word. In this article we  arrive at the end of this section of the liturgy. The Prayers of the Faithful or General Intercessions conclude our  reflection on God’s word and lead us to the Eucharistic table.    

The intercessions are among the oldest parts of the Eucharist. In his First Apology, St. Justin, Martyr (2nd cent.)  bears witness to communal prayer after the homily on Sundays. Eventually these prayers were absorbed into  the Kyrie and disappeared, except on Good Friday, until the Second Vatican Council restored them (see the  Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy 53). After hearing the Word of God and being challenged by it, we are invited  to open our hearts and minds to the needs of the whole world. Exercising our baptismal priesthood, we raise  our voices in petition to our loving God through Christ and in the power of the Holy Spirit for the “salvation  of the whole world” (General Instruction of the Roman Missal 69).      General Intercessions can be tricky. These prayers are called general for a  reason; they are the prayers of the whole Body of Christ and are  inclusive of the poor and broken, the sick and the outcast, the lost, and  the rich and powerful. Unfortunately, many of us have heard prayers  that exclude or are politically driven; these are not general and not  rooted in the gospel. The prayers should not be a mini homily or a  “moral appendix” to the homily (Emminghaus).     

The GIRM (70) provides four themes for the intercessions: “a). For the  needs of the Church; b). For the public authorities and the salvation of  the whole world; c). For those burdened by any kind of difficulty; [and]  d). For the local community.” For special occasions, such as Marriages or  Funerals, intentions particular to the circumstances may be incorporated.  The minister(s) charged with preparing the intercessions should take  great care to reflect on the Scriptures for the celebration and also be  attentive to the needs of the local parish family.     After each intention is announced, and before the assembly responds, there is supposed to be a moment of  silence for individual prayer. After all the prayers have been announced, the presider collects the prayers we  offered in the silence and lifts them to God. I invite you to listen more attentively to these prayers and allow  the Holy Spirit to pray in and through you. The next article will begin a section on the Liturgy of the Eucharist  and highlight the coming changes.    

© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City 

# 17  THE PREPARATION OF THE GIFTS   

W

e have completed our discussion on the Liturgy of the Word and this week we begin our discussion  on the Liturgy of the Eucharist. This part of the Mass begins with the Preparation of the Gifts.     As a young boy, I remember very clearly, what an honor it was for my family to be the gift‐bearers. It  did not happen often, but when it did, we dressed in our Sunday best, and as a family, we all walked up the  center aisle to hand the priest and servers the bread and the wine. What has been your experience of gift  bearing, whether at Mass or in general?    In the early Church, members of the community would bring the food for the celebration, but also an offering  to share with those less fortunate in the community. Gifts shared during this offertory (from the Latin to  “bring forth”) were a sign of an individual’s or a family’s self‐donation. Items that people shared with the  community might have been beeswax, flowers, or part of a crop. In any case, everyone participated to help  care for the poor, but also to have a beautiful and fruitful celebration. Today, most of us give a monetary  donation. For many of us, this gift is a sacrifice we make to show our care for the parish family. Our gifts today  still help feed the poor and much more.    As the gifts are prepared, we too prepare our hearts and minds to celebrate and share in the Great  Thanksgiving. Once the priest has received the gifts of bread and wine, he  places them on the altar. He may incense the gifts, especially on solemn  occasions (General Instruction of the Roman Missal 75). The presider  continues, “Blessed are you, Lord, God of all creation. . .” This prayer,  prayed over the gifts of bread and wine, comes from the Jewish table  prayers or berakoth. In the new missal, you will notice some slight changes  in the priest’s part, but our response remains, “Blessed be God forever.” In  many parishes, these particular prayers are said silently because the  assembly is either singing or listening to organ/choral music.     The priest then offers a silent prayer and washes his hands as he silently prays, “Wash me, O Lord, from my  iniquity and cleanse me from my sin.” You will notice the changes in bold. Then audibly, the priest says,  “Pray, brethren (brothers and sisters), that my sacrifice and yours may be acceptable to God, the almighty  Father.” Our response, as we stand, has only a small change. We will say, “May the Lord accept the sacrifice . .  . good of all his holy Church.” This section of the Liturgy of the Eucharist concludes with the Prayer over the  Offerings to which we respond “Amen.”    Each of these succinct prayers is rich in imagery and theology. I invite you to listen more closely to the spoken  prayers and use them in your private prayer as a way to reflect on the Eucharist. In religious formation  sessions, these texts can be unpacked in a process of mystagogical reflection. Next time, we begin to analyze  the Eucharistic Prayer. 

© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City 

#18 THE GREAT PRAYER OF THANKSGIVING: EUCHARISTIC PRAYING   

E

very time we gather to celebrate the Eucharist, we lift our hearts in song and prayer to give praise and  thanks to God for his infinite love and mercy. At the core of our celebration is the great prayer of  thanksgiving: the Eucharistic Prayer. Many of us can probably recite parts of this prayer from memory.  Sometimes we hear this prayer prayed with great solemnity, and sometimes listen to a presider’s  hurried tone. What is so important about this prayer? In the next several articles, I am going to break‐open  parts of the Eucharistic Prayer and highlight some of the coming changes to its language.    The Eucharistic Prayer is a rather lengthy prayer that begins with an opening dialogue (“The Lord be with you  . . .” and ends with the Great Amen. It is a particular literary genre unique to liturgical celebrations.    Many of us use the word “Eucharist” as a synonym for Mass or Holy Communion, but the word is itself points  to a deeper reality. Eucharist comes from the Greek word eucharistein, which means, “to give thanks”. The  prayer of thanksgiving is at the heart of our liturgical life, giving voice to the Church’s gratitude for God’s gift  of salvation through Christ in the power of the Holy Spirit.    The entire prayer is the prayer of Christ to the Father. Since the Church is the sacrament of Christ in the world,  we, the Body of Christ, are united with Christ, who offers prayer to the Father through the presider’s action.     One major misconception is that the priest alone prays the Eucharistic Prayer, but that is not true. The presider  invites the assembly to join their hearts and minds to the prayer during the opening dialogue. The General  Instruction of the Roman Missal says,     [T]he meaning of the Prayer is that the entire congregation  . . . should join itself with Christ in  confessing the great deeds of God . . . The Eucharistic Prayer demands that all listen to it with  reverence and in silence (78).    The earliest forms of this prayer were extemporaneous, but ordered. The presider  had to be so skilled and familiar with the structure of the prayer, that he could offer  the thanksgiving over the bread and the wine with elegance and ease. By the third  century, prayers began to be memorized and then written down and shared. Our  current Missal has ten different Eucharistic Prayers, but most of us hear two or three  most often.     Richard McCarron, in The Eucharistic Prayer at Sunday Mass says, “Praying the  eucharistic prayer well transforms our lives and molds our vision in such a way that  we witness God’s action here and now and taste and see how good God is in our  communion” (6). How have you or your parish been transformed in its prayer of  thanksgiving?    

Next time we will begin looking at the structure in more depth.  

© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City 

#19 LIFT UP YOUR HEARTS: THE DIALOGUE AND PREFACE   

I

n the last article, we briefly reflected on the word Eucharist to help frame our study of the Eucharistic  Prayer. In this article, we begin our discussion on the structure of this prayer, and point out some of the  changed text. As we proceed, let us keep in mind the profundity of this prayer as it unites us to God  through Christ in the power of the Holy Spirit. May this, our prayer of great thanksgiving, always draw us  closer to the heart of Christ.    According to number 79 of the General Instruction of the Roman Missal, the Eucharistic Prayer is comprised of  eight sections: 1). Thanksgiving or Preface, 2). Acclamation or Sanctus, 3). Epiclesis, 4). Institution narrative, 5).  Anamnesis, 6). Offering, 7). Intercessions, and 8). Final doxology. Our current Missal has several different  Eucharistic Prayers, which have either been revised from older texts (like the third century Apostolic Tradition)  or newly composed (like the prayers from the Swiss Synod: Eucharistic Prayers for Masses for Various Needs  and Occasions).    The Eucharistic Prayer begins with a dialogue between the celebrant and the assembly. The celebrant says,  “The Lord be with you” and the people respond, “And with your Spirit.” We have discussed this change in  previous articles. This formal exchange “affirms the unity of the Body of Christ rooted in the Spirit”  (McCarron). The exchange will continue:     

     

P:   A:  P:  A: 

Lift up your hearts.  We lift them up to the Lord.  Let us give thanks to the Lord our God.  It is right and just. 

This simple ritual exchange makes visible the relationship between celebrant and assembly. Our response is an  affirmation for the presider to continue the prayer on our behalf.     The prayer continues with the preface. These proper texts have been retranslated and will sound new to our  ears. It will take some time to get used to the more formal style, but in the end, these prayers will still invite us  into the mysteries we are celebrating. The preface “has preserved the character of the eucharistia most  perfectly” (Emminghaus). In this part of the prayer, we glorify God and “give thanks for the whole work of  salvation” through Christ (GIRM 79a). It gives voice to our gratitude for God’s saving deeds. I encourage you  to listen assiduously to these prayers, especially as we approach the seasons of Advent and Christmas. There is  an abundance of rich images, which can be used in your private prayer or for reflection during faith formation.  The preface concludes by inviting us to join all the angels and the saints in their ecstatic hymn of praise: Holy,  Holy, Holy!     Next time, we will begin with the changes to the Holy, Holy, Holy and continue the discussion of the Sanctus  and Epiclesis. 

© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City 

   

Holy, Holy, Holy

# 20   

THE UNENDING HYMN OF PRAISE 

I

n the last article, we briefly outlined the parts of the Eucharistic Prayer and discussed the Preface. This  week we continue our conversation by examining the Sanctus and the Epiclesis.    

The Preface, which recalls the events of salvation, moves the assembly to give thanks and praise to God.  The final words of the Preface invite us to join the angels and the saints in “their unending hymn of praise”:  the Sanctus or three‐fold Holy. This hymn of praise is an ancient and bold prayer in which we unite our song  to the jubilant song of the angels who surround the throne of God and perpetually sing of God’s holiness. This  is the unending song of all creation; “[a]ll things seen and unseen . . . becomes caught up in thanksgiving”  (McCarron). Stop for a moment and think of the last time you sang the Holy. What was your experience? Did  you sense that the community was truly lifting its heart up in passionate praise to God? This segment of the  Eucharistic Prayer is a very profound moment, in which we unite our voices to the ecstatic song of all creation  and sing our song of praise from the depths and core of our being.   

There is evidence that this hymn of praise was used in the liturgy as early as the end of the fourth century. The  first line of the text is based on Isaiah 6:3. In the beginning of this chapter, the prophet Isaiah sees the “Lord  seated on a high and lofty throne” and hears the hosts of angels crying out, “Holy, holy, holy is the LORD of  hosts! All the earth is filled with his glory!ʺ (New American Bible).      In the new translation, the Holy has one minor revision. Currently, we sing  Holy. . . God of power and might. In the new translation, we will sing, Holy . . .  Lord God of hosts, which is more faithful to the Latin text and the passage  from Isaiah. This first line is a statement that testifies to God’s rule or  command over all creation. “It proclaims the power of God” (Turner) and the  “hosts,” are the angels who surround the throne in incessant adoration.   

After the Sanctus, the Eucharistic Prayer “moves from thanksgiving to  supplication that God act once more” (McCarron). After the brief transition,  the celebrant continues with the epiclesis or prayer that asks God to send  down the Holy Spirit on the community’s gifts of bread and wine and make them the body and blood of  Christ. All of the Eucharistic Prayers, except the Roman Canon (Prayer I), mention the Holy Spirit. In any case,  it is through divine intervention that our gifts are sanctified and become the “bread of life” and “our spiritual  drink.” We are also transformed by sharing in the Eucharistic meal, with the hopes that we will carry forth the  gospel of salvation “from the rising of the sun to its setting.”    

Next time we will continue by examining the Supper Narrative, Anamnesis, and Offering.  

© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City 

#21  

I

DO THIS IN MEMORY OF ME 

n the last article, we examined the Sanctus and the Epiclesis. This week we continue our discussion of the  Eucharistic Prayer by looking at the Last Supper Narrative and the Memorial Acclamation. We will employ  Eucharistic Prayer II as we analyze these sections, keeping in mind that the text varies in the different  prayers. 

The Last Supper Narrative follows the epiclesis. Currently, in Eucharistic Prayer II this section begins with,  “Before he was given up to death . . .” In the new translation, we will hear, “At the time  he was betrayed and entered willingly into his Passion . . .” This narrative, which  recounts the Last Supper, is an essential part of the entire Eucharistic Prayer because it  “proclaims the very center of our memorial thanksgiving,” the passover of Jesus  (McCarron). The words, “Take this, all of you, and eat/drink of it . . .” are not a  dramatization of the Last Supper, but a prayer in which we proclaim and remember the  event. The particular text we use during this liturgical prayer is not any particular  Scriptural account, but is rooted in tradition. We will also use the word chalice instead  of cup, and hear, “which will be poured out for you and for many” instead of “it will be  shed for you and for all.” At the end of this section, we pray Jesus’ command, “Do this  in memory of me.”After each gift is offered, the priest shows the host or chalice and then genuflects. If the  assembly is standing at this time, it is to bow as the priest genuflects (General Instruction of the Roman Missal 43).     After recalling the Last Supper, the priest announces, “The mystery of faith.” This text, in place of, “Let us  proclaim the mystery of faith,” is a simple transition, which invites the assembly to acclaim Christ. According  to the rubric in the Missal, the priest does not join in this acclamation. The acclamation is the assembly’s  response to the entire prayer of the presider, specifically the Last Supper Narrative. Richard McCarron states  in The Eucharistic Prayer at Sunday Mass, that “these acclamations emphasize the thanksgiving character of the  prayer and give a summation to the memorial of the pasch (Passover).” Although the rest of the Eucharistic  Prayer is addressed to the Father, these acclamations are addressed to Christ in thanks.    Currently, there are four acclamations given in the Sacramentary. The most familiar acclamation, “Christ has  died, Christ is risen, Christ will come again” will not be included in the new Missal. Fr. Paul Turner states in  Understanding the Revised Mass Texts, “It is a strong acclamation, but its weakness in this context is that it makes  a statement of faith about Christ, rather than a prayer to him.” There are several changes in the three  remaining acclamations. Here is one example: “We proclaim your death, O Lord, and profess your  Resurrection until you come again.”    The memorial prayer follows this acclamation; this will be the subject of the next article. 

© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City 

#22  

THAT WE MAY BE GATHERED INTO ONE BODY  

L

ast time we reflected on the Last Supper Narrative and Memorial Acclamation using the text of  Eucharistic Prayer II. This week we continue our journey through the Eucharistic Prayer by briefly  considering the next three parts of the prayer: the Memorial Prayer or Anamnesis, the Offering, and the  Intercessions. Again, we will mostly employ Eucharistic Prayer II for this quick overview.   

The Memorial Prayer follows the Memorial Acclamation. In the new translation of the Roman Missal it will  begin, “Therefore, as we celebrate the memorial of his Death and Resurrection.” In this prayer, the assembly  affirms what it is doing in the Eucharist; by our gathering and celebrating the Eucharist, we declare that we are  following Jesus’ command to remember him, specifically his death and resurrection. The new text from  Eucharistic Prayer IV might help make this more apparent:  Therefore, O Lord, as we now celebrate the memorial of our redemption, we remember Christ’s  death and his descent to the realm of the dead, we proclaim his Resurrection and his Ascension  to your right hand; and as we await his coming in glory.  This text declares that we have gathered to celebrate, to remember, and to proclaim Christ’s paschal mystery.   

The Offering follows the Memorial Prayer. In the second Eucharistic Prayer, the  new text will be,   “We offer you, Lord, the Bread of life and the Chalice of salvation, giving  thanks that you have held us worthy to be in your presence and minister  to you. Humbly we pray that, partaking of the Body and Blood of Christ,  we may be gathered into one by the Holy Spirit.”   The General Instruction of the Roman Missal explains that in this offering, the  Church, in the power of the Holy Spirit, offers “the spotless Victim to the  Father,” but also that all the baptized are to “learn to offer themselves” (79.f).  The last line of this section is very enlightening – in our offering, we are asking  to be transformed and perfected by eating and drinking of the body and blood  of our Lord Jesus Christ. By celebrating this sacrificial meal and sharing in the  sacred food, we say yes to God’s invitation to share in the kingdom of Heaven  and in the unity of his Body. In binding us to Christ, the Eucharist necessarily binds us to each other as his  Body. This is a piece of the mystery that we often neglect. Many who gather at the Eucharistic still do not  understand this radical and unifying aspect of the Eucharist.    

The next part of the prayer is the intercessions. You will recognize this part as the time we pray for the pope,  the local bishop, the clergy, and all those who have died. This particular prayer concludes by naming Mary,  the apostles , and the all the saints. Because the Eucharistic unites us as Christ’s Body, each Eucharist is  celebrated in union with the entire Church, “living and dead, who have been called to participate in the  redemption and the salvation purchased by Christ’s Body and Blood” (GIRM 79.g).     Next time we conclude our overview of the Eucharistic Prayer by examining the doxology and amen. 

© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City 

#23 ALL GLORY AND HONOR IS YOURS   

H

ow often do you praise God? This question kept creeping into my thoughts as I prepared to write  this article. This week, we conclude our analysis of the Eucharistic Prayer by examining the  doxology and Great Amen.    As I thought about the proposed question, my initial thought was, “not very much.” In my hectic life, I  sometimes forgot to consciously give praise to God. But then, I thought more about it and realized that my  actions and ministry, even though not perfect, are united to all creation in giving praise to God. If you recall  our discussion over the last several weeks, you will remember that when we gather to celebrate Eucharist, we  unite with all of creation in the great song of praise and thanksgiving, culminating in the Eucharistic Prayer.  Our celebration, our listening to God’s word and sharing at the table, forms us to be a people of praise so that  when we are dismissed from the gathering, we can continue the work begun in our worship of God. We do not  always have to explicitly say words of praise, but we do need to let out lives be transformed by the celebration  of the Eucharist so that we become a people who praise God in everything that we do and say.     The Eucharistic Prayer concludes with a prayer of praise called the doxology.  Lifting the chalice and paten, the presider sings, “Through him, and with him,  and in him, O God, almighty Father, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, all glory and  honor is yours, for ever and ever.” This short Trinitarian prayer sums up the  entire prayer that we offer to the Father, through and with Christ, in the power  of the Holy Spirit. The doxology is a prayer of praise. Here, we praise God once  more for the profound gift of love and mercy shared with us in Christ whom we  will soon receive in sacramental form. In this prayer, we are also reminded to  live a life of praise, a life that gives glory to God with all of creation (for more on  this, you might refer back to my article on the Holy).     The people’s “Amen” concludes the doxology. This amen is often called the  Great Amen because it concludes the Eucharistic Prayer, which is at the center of our celebration. At the  beginning of her poem titled “Amen”, Barbara Schmich Searle says, “Be careful of simple words said often.”  This amen affirms everything the presider has said and done during the Eucharistic Prayer. By exclaiming the  Great Amen, each person in the assembly boldly declares that he or she affirms the action of our Eucharist and  is willing to say yes to God’s invitation to feed the poor, clothe the naked, visit the imprisoned, and live the  Christian life. This coming week, listen attentively to these words at the Eucharist and reflect how you might  live your “Amen” in your life.    Next time, we will discuss the sign of peace and fraction rite. 

© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City 

#24 WE ARE MANY PARTS, BUT ALL ONE BODY   

A

s a catechist, I have encountered some very interesting questions from students. As I prepared to write  this article, I remembered a young girl from my first grade CCD class in Quincy, Illinois who was  intrigued by everything. Each Monday evening, she came to class with a new question about some  ritual or action the priest did at Mass on Sunday. Out of all the first graders I have taught, she was the  most perceptive. I can recall one evening, before class began, when she urgently waved her hand in the air  with a question. She said, “Mr. Tim, I saw the priest put a host in the cup, why did he do that?” I chuckled  because even the slightest action, that many miss, could not escape her keen eye. As we continue to discuss the  Communion Rite, we begin by addressing the young girl’s question.    After the Sign of Peace, the presider begins to break the large host and the assembly begins to sing (or recite)  the Lamb of God. This section of the Communion Rite is called the Fraction or Breaking of the Bread, which was  the name the early Christians used for their Sunday gathering. Today, this part  of the ritual seems unnecessary, but in earlier centuries, this was a necessary  and practical part of the celebration. Unlike today, the early Christians used one  loaf of bread and one cup for the celebration of the Eucharist. Like Jesus at the  Last Supper, the presider had to tear the bread into enough pieces in order for  those assembled to commune. Even though many parishes use small wafers  today, we still keep in mind, “we who are many are one body, for we all partake  of the one bread” (see 1 Cor. 10:17).    Once the presider has broken the bread, he “places a small piece in the chalice”        (Roman Missal 129). This action is called the commingling and is a remnant of an  ancient Roman practice called fermentum. The fermentum was a small piece of  Eucharistic bread from a Sunday papal Mass that was sent to all the Roman  parishes as a sign of ecclesial unity. This gesture today can help remind each of  us of our unity in Christ through the Church.    These two actions are accompanied by the singing of the Lamb of God. Pope Sergius I added this litany from  the Christian community in Syria to the liturgy in the late seventh century. Fortunately, this text is not  changing in the new Missal. As we pray the words of the Lamb of God, we are invited to reflect upon God’s  immense love for us. It is Christ, the Passover Lamb, who suffered and died to break us free from the chains of  sin and death. It is Christ, the Passover Lamb, who we still plead to for healing and mercy. It is Christ, who  rose from the dead, who we ask to grant us peace and lead us peacefully into the kingdom on that final day.    Next time, we will continue looking at the Communion Rite by exploring some of the new texts. 

© 2010  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City   

#25 LORD, I AM NOT WORTHY THAT YOU SHOULD ENTER UNDER MY ROOF   

O

ur discussion of the Communion Rite continues with preparation for and reception of Holy  Communion.   

After the Lamb of God finishes, the priest quietly says a prayer addressed to Jesus. Immediately  following this prayer, he genuflects, takes the host, slightly raises it, and says, “Behold the Lamb of God . . .  Blessed are those called to the supper of the Lamb.” You will notice that several of the words here are  different. The opening phrase is taken from John 1:29 “where John the Baptist points out Jesus to his followers”  (Turner). The final phrase alludes to the wedding banquet of the Lamb in Revelation 19:9. The new translation  helps depict the reality of our gathering: every time we gather to celebrate Eucharist, we gather at the table of  the heavenly banquet. It is Christ, the bridegroom, who continues to invite us to eat and drink at his table. Our  Eucharistic sharing is a sharing in the very life of God, a gift we call grace. How seriously do we take this  invitation to eat at Christ’s table?  

Both priest and assembly respond to this invitation by saying, “Lord, I  am not worthy that you should enter under my roof, but only say the  word and my soul shall be healed.” While these are changes in the  English translation, this is how the Latin and most other languages  have always been. This text refers to both Matthew 8:8 and Luke 7:6  where a centurion asks Jesus to heal his servant, but feels unworthy to  have Jesus enter his home. Ultimately, Jesus heals the servant because  of the centurion’s faith and humility. Our prayer is similar: as we  confront our own sinfulness, we may feel unworthy to have Christ  enter our body. As we come to the table, we must be honest, admit to our sins, and be open to God’s healing  love. As we place our sins upon the altar and humble ourselves before the Lord, we are transformed and  invited into deeper communion with God.    

The very act of processing to receive the Eucharist is a statement of faith in the risen Christ, so the procession  to receive communion is reserved for those who are in communion with the Church and who have professed  faith in the midst of the assembly. This is why we dismiss the catechumens before the baptized profess the  Creed. The catechumens’ sole responsibility is to hear and study God’s word; the baptized are also called to  pray for the world, profess the creed, and take part in the Eucharist.    

As we walk to receive the body and blood of the Lord, we ritualize our pilgrimage here on earth. While each  celebration of the Eucharist is a celebration in union with the heavenly liturgy, we must also remember that we  go from the celebration to continue proclaiming the Good News and the reality is that our journey is hard. We  all have many crosses to carry, but each time we gather we grow as the Body of Christ and are strengthened  for the road ahead. In each Eucharist, we long for that final day when our pilgrimage is complete and we sing  in endless praise at the Supper of the Lamb.    

We will continue our discussion next time by exploring the words and postures for receiving Holy  Communion. 

© 2011  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City   

# 26  MAKE YOUR HAND A THRONE TO RECEIVE THE KING   

T

his week we complete our discussion about the Communion Rite. When I offer formation opportunities  for Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion, I am often asked many questions about this part of  the celebration, including the proper way to receive Holy Communion. I would like to address some of  these questions below. 

How should one properly receive Holy Communion?  In my experience, there can be a lot of emotion around the “proper” way to receive Holy Communion. The  General Instruction to the Roman Missal (GIRM) and our tradition offer us insight into this question. The GIRM  states that the “norm for reception of Holy Communion in . . . the United States is standing,” but that no one  should be denied Communion “if they kneel” (160). Standing is the posture of resurrection and, though we are  sinners, we come to the table as a people of the resurrection. The GIRM goes on to explain that the  communicant should bow his or her head as a sign of reverence before receiving the body and the blood of  Christ.    

The other debate is whether one should receive Communion in the hand or on the tongue. The GIRM states  that either gesture is acceptable (160), but I want to point out that the more ancient  gesture is to receive on the hand. Saint Cyril of Jerusalem attest to this noble  practice. Around 400. St. Cyril writes:  When you approach, do not extend your hands with palms upward and  fingers apart, but make your left hand a throne for your right hand, since  the latter is to receive the King.  Receiving Communion on the tongue developed in the Middle Ages out of fear  that the sacred species would be desecrated in some way. However one chooses to  receive Holy Communion, it must be done with great reverence. Such reverence is  something which we can all agree to seek more fully, no matter our posture.   

Should we receive under both kinds?  The GIRM says that Holy Communion distributed under both forms is a fuller sign of the Heavenly banquet  (281). No one is required to receive under both species, but the Church does encourage it. If one only partakes  in the host or only in the cup, they must remember they are receiving the fullness of Christ – body, soul, and  divinity.    

Why does the priest, deacon, or lay minister remove hosts from the tabernacle before  Communion?  The primary reason hosts are reserved in the tabernacle is for the sick/homebound, but in some cases there are  extra remaining after Mass that cannot be consumed. The norm is “that the faithful . . . receive the Lord’s Body  from hosts consecrated at the same Mass (GIRM 85), and so the use of pre‐consecrated hosts at mass should be  minimal.    

We will continue this discussion in the next article. 

© 2011  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City   

# 27   

MADE INTO CHRIST’S BODY 

I

n the last article, I answered some common questions I have received regarding Holy Communion. We  continue this week exploring these questions.      

Why should the faithful receive Eucharist from the Mass they are celebrating and not from the  tabernacle?  In the last article, I mentioned that hosts reserved in the tabernacle should rarely be used to communicate the  faithful at Mass. The General Instruction of the Roman Missal (85) clearly refers to the Constitution on the Sacred  Liturgy (55) and On the Worship of Eucharist (31, 32), which all state that the faithful should receive from hosts  consecrated at the Mass they are attending.    The Eucharist we celebrate is an action that takes place in the present moment; it is our communal act of  thanksgiving. By celebrating Eucharist – singing together, sharing silence, doing  ritual, uniting in prayer, sharing the sacrificial meal – we become one with our  Lord Jesus Christ as his people and his body. The liturgy is an event, a banquet of  love. Eucharist is not just about each person receiving our Lord in a host. It is also  about the real presence of Christ in the people who gather, the word proclaimed,  the minister, and especially the sacred species. The liturgy is our public work, our  work of praising God in community to build up the Body of Christ, which  proclaims the salvation of Christ to all of creation. Every Sunday (or daily Mass)  we unite with all creation to sing, “Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God of hosts.”  The  Church has made the rule that the faithful should receive from the hosts from the  Mass in which they participate to help us live this reality to the fullest.   

Our parish sings a song after communion is finished, is that okay?  Yes. The GIRM states that a “psalm, or other canticle of praise or hymn may be sung by the  . . .  congregation” (88). This song of praise or thanksgiving takes place after receiving Holy Communion to allow  for the people – the Church – offer a gesture of profound thanks and praise for the gift of Christ celebrated in  this liturgy, especially in Holy Communion. Musicians need to take care when choosing texts for this song to  ensure that the text expresses a communal sentiment of praise or thanks. It is not a time for solo singing or  meditation songs because by sharing in Eucharist, we have become one body in Christ and a song at this time  is the community’s response to God’s awesome gift of love. If there is not a song of praise, the GIRM says the  people gathered should spend some time in prayer (88). After this silent time or song follows the Prayer After  Communion.     We have come to the close of our section on the Liturgy of the Eucharist. Next, time we will look at the  concluding rites. 

© 2011  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City   

#28 GO IN PEACE: A SUMMARY OF THE CONCLUDING RITES   

T

his week we conclude our discussion on the Eucharistic liturgy by briefly examining the Concluding  Rites.     The Concluding Rites begin immediately after the Prayer After Communion. This part of the liturgy is  very simple and succinct. The General Instruction of the Roman Missal §90 provides the structure of the  Concluding Rites. First, brief announcements may be made if they are necessary (Order of Mass 140). The two  key words here are brief and necessary. After sharing in Eucharist, the high point of our life together, the ritual  should not be delayed by lengthy announcements. As we prepare for the new Missal, parishes may need to  assess their current practice of delivering announcements, and also the content of the announcements.  

Next, the priest greets the community as in the beginning of the Mass and we respond, “And with your  Spirit.” Immediately after the liturgical greeting, the priest continues with the blessing. This blessing can be in  the simple form, “May almighty God bless you . . .,” or on certain occasions a more formal blessing may be  given from the Prayers over the People or a Solemn Blessing. All of these texts have been retranslated so you  will notice the more formal language. One thing to be attentive to is  the peoples’ response in the Solemn Blessings. Many communities  are caught off‐guard during Advent and Christmas, for example,  when it is their turn to say “Amen” at the conclusion of the three  parts. Before these more formal blessings, the priest or deacon will  invite you to bow your heads in prayer. During this blessing, the  priest will make the Sign of the Cross over the assembly as a gesture  to signify God’s blessing. At pontifical Masses, where the Bishop  presides, this blessing is a little different and I encourage you to  learn this form of blessing and its unique responses.   

After the blessing, the deacon or priest offers the dismissal. The new translation offers us some new options  here. Here are two examples: 1). Go in peace, glorifying the Lord by your life, 2). Go and announce the Gospel  of the Lord. The dismissal is the conclusion of the Eucharistic Liturgy. It is a statement that sends the  community, who have been nourished by word and sacrament, to live out what they have become. It calls us  to task and sends us into the world with the mission to share light of Christ, which we received in baptism. It  demands that we “do good works, praising and blessing God” (GIRM 90c). Our response to this command is,  “Thanks be to God.”   

Finally, the priest venerates the altar with a kiss, just like in the beginning of Mass, and exits. The closing song  is optional since Mass has already concluded.   

Next time, we will discuss the role of music in the liturgy. 

© 2011  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City   

#29 SINGING IS FOR THE ONE WHO LOVES   

I

love to sing! Music has been part of the Church’s story from the very beginning (e.g. Ex 15:20‐21) and 

continues to be a vital part of our worship. So, why are so many people afraid to sing out in the Eucharistic  assembly?     Examining my own experience, I ponder the various opportunities I have encountered, which helped break‐ open and deepen my relationship with Christ. Music, I think, is the first place I can actually recall  encountering Christ. Music was important at home and certainly in the parish, where I eventually joined the  choir and learned to be a music minister. In the midst of the singing assembly at St. Joachim, I learned what it  meant to praise God no matter the circumstances. Today, when I encounter young or old alike who resist  singing in the liturgical assembly, I often wonder why and I am often saddened by the responses I hear,  because people have been made to feel that they do not have something to offer the assembly.      St. Augustine  says, “Singing  is for the one  who loves,”  and when we gather at Eucharist, we gather as a people united in God’s love to offer God praise and thanks. In  a sense, the Eucharist is our love note to God and singing is one way we express our love for God (Sing to the  Lord 2). Singing is a crucial way we engage and actively participate in the liturgical prayer. Music in the  liturgical assembly is not the role of specialists, but of all the people – a sign of unity as the Body of Christ  offers its prayers to the Father.     One hope the Bishops’ conference has for the revised texts is that assemblies will sing more of the liturgy more  often. The changes give us an opportunity to re‐energize our sung prayer  and to better prepare all our musicians in this very crucial ministry. The  liturgy is meant to be sung, especially on Sundays and Solemnities (see STL  111). With the new translation, each parish will have to learn new Mass  settings (e.g. music for the Gloria and Holy) so be prepared to work a little  before Mass in the coming months. Some changes that won’t be so obvious  are the slight changes in the chant tones for the presidential prayers. Two  changes that are strongly encouraged are the singing of the opening  dialogue (i.e. The Lord be with you.) and the Gospel on major feasts.     I am sure you have seen people who stand blank‐faced as the assembly sings the Gloria or Sanctus. We must  think of ways to gently invite and encourage everyone to participate in the sung parts of the Mass. It will not  be an easy task and will take some creative measures to form the entire assembly and catechize them on the  importance of sung prayer. I believe I love to sing today because both of my parents sang and encouraged me  to sing with them. Each of us in the assembly can be a role model.     The music excerpts are taken from http://icelweb.org/musicfolder/openmusic.php. © 2010, ICEL. All rights reserved. 

© 2011  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 


THEOLOGIA PRIMA  by Timothy Johnston, Director of the Office of Liturgy, Diocese of Salt Lake City   

# 30  THE TIME IS NOW: CATECHESIS AND THE ROMAN MISSAL   

O

ver the last year, we have had the opportunity to discuss some basic history and provide some  mystagogical reflection on the various elements of the Eucharistic Liturgy. I hope that this series  began to break open some of the rich aspects of our Sunday worship and strengthen your relationship  with Christ. As part of our rumination, we addressed many of the major changes in the third edition  of the Roman Missal. This final piece in the series will discuss the process of catechesis and implementation for  the third edition of the Roman Missal.     As we prepare for the date of implementation (November 27, 2011), we need to turn our focus to the formation  of the faithful. “The time is now,” has been the mantra at various workshops across the country and I would  agree – the time is now! It is time to begin concrete and pastoral catechesis in each parish. As of the writing of  this article, we are about 230 days away from implementation and it is time to focus on concrete ways to  catechize the faithful about the changes.    The changes to the Roman Missal affect everyone, so the process of implementation needs to concern every  Catholic. The process of implementation and catechesis is not just about learning or memorizing the new texts,  but it is ultimately about reflecting on the liturgy and deepening our relationship with Christ through the  prayer of the Church. Our preparation must lead us to a fuller and more active celebration of the liturgy.     Each parish will be providing various formation opportunities to 1)  share a little history about the Missal. 2) Do catechesis on the new text  (e.g. words like dewfall and consubstantial) and the various elements of  the liturgy. 3) Music ministers will invite you to learn and sing new Mass  settings. 4) Parish religious formation teams will invite everyone to  participate in opportunities for mystagogy and theological reflection. 5)  Schools will take a lead in forming our young members. The goal is that  each parish becomes an assembly that can celebrate fully, actively, and  consciously at both the Table of the Word and the Eucharistic Table.    Please talk with your pastor, deacon, or parish implementation  coordinator to see how you can help or to learn about upcoming  formation opportunities. Finally, the best online resource to visit for  more information is http://www.usccb.org/romanmissal/.     This time of preparation provides us with a wonderful opportunity to renew our faith and the tremendous  responsibility to respond to our commitment to proclaim the good news of salvation. The time is now to come to  the liturgy with an open heart and open mind. The time in now to be challenged by the word proclaimed and  the meal shared to live the gospel. The time is now to invite each other to fall more deeply in love with Christ! 

© 2011  This article originally appeared in the Intermountain Catholic newspaper 

Theologia Prima Bulletin Insers  

Created by the Diocesan Office of Liturgy, these bulletin inserts are designed to help with the implementation of the third edition of the R...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you