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Music for Sunday Celebrations in the Absence of a Priest

Prepared by the Diocesan Liturgical Music Committee Diocese of Salt Lake City 2010


PURPOSE The Diocesan Liturgical Music Committee offers the following information and suggestions contained in this pamphlet for planning music for Sunday Celebrations in the Absence of a Priest. We sincerely hope that pastors, deacons, music ministers, liturgy planners, and the faithful will find this material helpful in preparing and celebrating the various forms of Sunday Celebrations in the Absence of a Priest. It is our hope that those responsible for liturgical leadership will provide music that expresses the paschal mystery and empowers the full, conscious, and active participation of the assembly. The music should convey the dignity in accord with the sacramental life of the Church.

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The documents listed below have been cited to support the text of the guidelines.

The Constitution of the Sacred Liturgy, 1963 (CSL) General Instruction of the Liturgy of the Hours, 1971, 2002 (GILOH) General Instruction of the Roman Missal, 2002, 2003 (GIRM) Music in Catholic Worship, 1972 (MCW) Sing to the Lord: Music in Divine Worship, 2007 (STL) Sunday Celebrations in the Absence of a Priest (SCAP)

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CSL #2 The liturgy . . . is the outstanding means whereby the faithful may express in their lives and manifest to others this mystery of Christ and the real nature of the true Church. CSL #14 The Church earnestly desires that all the faithful be led to that full, conscious, and active participation in liturgical celebrations called for by the very nature of the liturgy. . . for it is the primary and indispensable source from which the faithful are to derive the true Christian spirit… CSL #26 Liturgical services are not private functions, but are celebrations belonging to the Church, which is the ‚sacrament of unity.‛ MCW #16 Music chosen with care can serve as a bridge to faith as well as an expression of it. GIRM #39 The Christian faithful who gather together as one to await the Lord’s coming are instructed . . . to sing together psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs . . . Singing is the sign of the heart’s joy. GIRM #111 Among all who are involved with regard to the rites, pastoral aspects, and music there should be harmony and diligence in the effective preparation of each liturgical celebration in accord with the Missal and other liturgical books.

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SCAP #112 Music fosters [full] participation [by the assembly+. Its function is ‘ministerial’; it must serve and never dominate. SCAP #114 The role of the musicians as servant of the liturgical action is to facilitate the sung prayer of the gathered community. A full complement of music ministers including cantor, psalmist, instrumentalist, and choir is encouraged for the celebration.

INTRODUCTION The Lord’s Day – as Sunday was called from apostolic times – has always been accorded special attention in the history of the church because of its close connection with the very core of the Christian mystery. Pope John Paul II, Dies Domini, 1 At the very core of the Christian life is the paschal mystery – the passion, death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus Christ. Since the time of the apostles, the community has gathered to celebrate this mystery in the breaking of the bread and in prayer.1 The community’s gatherings, whether in the liturgy of the Eucharist or in the celebration of the Liturgy of the Hours (Morning and

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Acts 2:42.

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Evening Prayer), express and celebrate our love for God and God’s love for us. They are sacred encounters – moments that the community most intimately encounters the very Mystery of our faith. Liturgy, then, provides the community a context to give expression to that love through rituals, gestures, songs, spoken prayers, and silence. Liturgy is the community’s public work of praising the living God. Central to our liturgical life is the celebration of the Eucharist on Sundays. This gathering, presided over by the priest, is ‚the source and summit of our Christian life.‛2 It is the place where the community is nourished and strengthened to proclaim and live the gospel in the world. It is the place where the community is consoled and reconciled in order to bring peace and healing to the world. It is a place of welcoming (baptism) and letting go (funeral rites), a place for celebrating our life in God. Currently here in the Diocese of Salt Lake City, we find ourselves in the sad state of being, at times unable to provide Eucharist – our source of Catholic identity – at some of our missions, stations, and parishes due to our painful shortage of priests. As we continue to fervently pray for increased vocations and other creative solutions, our diocese offers alternative prayer opportunities to those affected communities. Even in these critical times, the Church still 2

Dogmatic Constitution on the Church (Lumen Gentium), 11.

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calls the local community to gather and offer their praise and adoration to God in Christ, through the power of the Holy Spirit. Sunday Celebrations in the Absence of a Priest is not a perfect ritual nor does it provide the fullness of the Liturgy of the Eucharist, but it does provide models of prayer the community can use and still gather in prayer to offer their praise and adoration to God, through Christ, in the power of the Holy Spirit. Sunday Celebrations in the Absence of a Priest contains a number of choices to best serve our people, including Liturgy of the Hours (Morning/Evening Prayer) with or without reception of Holy Communion from previously consecrated hosts, or a Liturgy of the Word, with or without Holy Communion. While these are certainly not adequate replacements for the celebration of Eucharist, the faithful can at least gather together in prayer in the name of Christ on the Lord’s Day. Since sacred music is always integral to our Catholic celebrations, drawing us into spiritual unity and worship in a unique way, the Diocesan Music Committee offers the following suggestions, examples, and guidance for those communities faced with using SCAP.

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1. What day and time should a SCAP be celebrated?

SCAP may be celebrated on a Saturday evening or Sunday morning, but there are restrictions to its celebration. These celebrations are held within communities that await a priest and these solutions must be considered merely temporary. There should normally be only one liturgical assembly of this kind in each place on any given Sunday. One of these services may never be held in a location where Mass has been celebrated that weekend. SCAP #15

2. What music is appropriate for the celebration of SCAP? A good place to begin choosing appropriate music is the regular parish repertoire for Sunday. Music used during a celebration of the Liturgy of the Word or for Morning/Evening Prayer should express the paschal mystery. A unique thing about the SCAP ritual book is that it encourages the celebration of Morning and Evening Prayer. This text is set so musicians would need to find music/Psalm settings that support the liturgical prayer. 7


The full active participation by all the faithful is the aim to be considered before all else (CSL #14). The music should also meet the standards of the three judgments explained in Sing to the Lord: Music in Divine Worship 126-136 (liturgical judgment, pastoral judgment, and musical judgment). When preparing music for the celebration, a deacon and/or a lay leader of prayer, and music planner should reflect on the Scriptures that will be proclaimed during the service. The Scriptures are a guidepost. The ministers preparing Morning/Evening Prayer or a Liturgy of the Word should keep in mind that this is not a celebration of the Eucharist and therefore, as a general rule, Eucharistic texts should be avoided (i.e. Jesus Wine of Peace, Eat This Bread, Take and Eat). ‚Nonetheless, a song for the Communion Rite would ideally reflect the Eucharistic mystery of Christ’s presence in the holy sacrament‛ (SCAP #116).

3. Explain the “three music judgments”. As explained in Sing to the Lord 126 - 136, the threefold judgment (liturgical, pastoral, and musical) should be used to determine the value of a given musical element in a liturgical celebration.

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The liturgical judgment is made by taking into consideration the nature of the liturgy itself. Consideration needs to be given to choosing music that is properly suited to the meaning and the structure of the ritual, that it is textually sound, and that it contributes to the overall rhythm of the liturgical action. Pastoral judgment is also needed to choose music that will enable the people of a particular worshiping community to meaningfully express their faith in the concrete circumstances of the time and place. The liturgical minister must be pastoral in his or her approach. To be pastoral means to choose dignified liturgical music, while catechizing the parish family about the ritual structure of a SCAP service. Pastoral does not equal the use of secular music, poetry, etc. Reverent, dignified, well-planned, and well-executed liturgy is pastoral by its very nature. “The pastoral judgment takes into consideration the actual community gathered to celebrate in a particular place at a particular time. Does a musical composition promote the sanctification of the members of the liturgical assembly by drawing them closer to the holy mysteries being celebrated? Does it strengthen their formation in faith by opening their hearts to the mystery being celebrated on this occasion or in this season? Is it capable of expressing the faith that God has planted in their hearts and summoned them to celebrate?� STL #130 9


To make the musical judgment, one needs to take into consideration the quality of the piece. Is it technically, aesthetically, and expressively good? Music chosen for each rite should be simple, beautiful, and accessible to the congregation. Music that is not artistically sound is not appropriate for use in the liturgy. Secular music is never allowed in liturgy.

4. Who should plan the music for SCAP?

Parishes usually have pastoral musicians and liturgy preparation teams in place that will work with the pastor, deacon, and/or lay leader of prayer to provide appropriate music for the various rituals outlined in the SCAP ritual book. Those who have the responsibility of preparing SCAP must be very familiar with the ritual and all the options included in the ritual book. The diocesan Office of Liturgy is also available to help answer questions.

5. What should we sing?

Singing is a[n] . . . integral part of the liturgical celebration. Sung prayer is another dimension of our faith expression. Singing by the ministers 10


and people should always be a part of the Sunday celebration and holy days of obligation. The singing of the acclamations, responses, psalmody, antiphons, songs, and hymnody are normative for the full, conscious, and active participation when the Church gathers for ritual prayer. SCAP #109 For Sunday Celebrations in the absence of a priest, hymns and acclamations accompany the ritual action. They include, in order of importance: 1. the acclamation before the Gospel 2. A hymn 3. responsorial psalm 4. communion processional chant 5. Lord’s Prayer and 6. Act of Thanksgiving. Other possibilities might include the response to the intercessions and a closing song or choral anthem of the day. SCAP #110 When the Liturgy of the Hours is celebrated the following are usually sung: 1. the psalms and canticles with their antiphons 2. the hymn 3. the intercessions 4. and the Lord’s Prayer.

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Furthermore, the selection of liturgical music is guided by the liturgical year and the Lectionary. Attention should be given to the numerous music settings for the hymns, psalms, and canticles that are available. SCAP #111

6. May recorded music be used during the celebration of SCAP? In STL #93 the United States bishops remind us that, “Recorded music lacks the authenticity provided by a living liturgical assembly gathered for the Sacred Liturgy. While recorded music might be used advantageously outside the Liturgy as an aid in the teaching of new music, it should not, as a general norm, be used within the Liturgy.� The voices and instruments of the gathered assembly are never to be replaced by recorded music. Again, the aim of fostering full, active and conscious participation by all the people is to be considered before all else.

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7. Who should be in the procession? Is a gathering song necessary? First, there is no liturgical procession at the beginning of a SCAP service. The deacon or lay leader of prayer is seated in his or her chair/place prior to the beginning of the celebration. The minister then continues with a brief introduction, which explains that Mass will not be celebrated. After this instruction, the assembly stands and joins in the gathering hymn/antiphon. The SCAP ritual does not explicitly suggest a gathering hymn, but in the Diocese of Salt Lake City, we recommend that the SCAP service begins with a gathering hymn/antiphon. The gathering hymn/antiphon, ‚ensure*s+ that the faithful who come together as one establish[es] communion and dispose[s] themselves to listen properly to God’s word‛ and possibly share in Holy Communion (STL #140).

8. Should we have worship aids?

Since the celebration of [SCAP] is a communal celebration, participation aids should be 13


provided to the congregation so that they might follow the ritual with understanding. This, in turn, allows them to have full and active participation in the celebration. Participation aids should include especially those elements of the Liturgy unique to the [SCAP ritual]. Such participation aids should also include proper copyright notices for permission to use copyrighted music in the program (STL #224). Those charged with the preparation of a SCAP service should be familiar with the ritual outline and prepare music that is appropriate for the various options (i.e. Morning or Evening Prayer, with or without Holy Communion, or Liturgy of the Word with our without Holy Communion). Since this celebration is so unique and, in some cases, rarely celebrated, it is essential that the assembly have participation aids to facilitate their full participation. This is especially true if a community celebrates either Morning or Evening Prayer.

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9. There are several options in the SCAP ritual, which option should our parish choose? In the diocese of Salt Lake City, the preferred option for celebrating the Lord’s Day in the absence of a priest is to celebrate Morning or Evening Prayer, especially when there are not enough reserved hosts to distribute Holy Communion. The SCAP ritual allows for the readings from the Sunday Lectionary to be included in an extended Liturgy of the Word (SCAP 124-129; 158-163). The witness of the early Church teaches us that individual Christians devoted themselves to prayer at fixed times. Then, in different places, it soon became the established practice to assign special times for common prayer, for example, the last hour of the day . . . or the first hour . . . with the rising of the sun. GILOH #1 The Liturgy of the Hours has since ancient times been the Church’s way of ‚praying without ceasing‛.3 In union with Christ, the Church offers her prayers of praise and petition to God the Father for the salvation of the world (GILOH #2). ‚The purpose of the liturgy of the hours is to sanctify the day and the whole range of human activity‛ (GILOH #11). The liturgy of the hours ‚is the prayer of the Church with Christ and to Christ‛ (GILOH #2). 3

1 Thess 5:15-18

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SCAP is always to be celebrated with one of the chief offices: Morning or Evening prayer. The liturgy of the hours belongs to the ‚whole Body of the Church‛ and is never a private affair (GILOH #20). It is the daily prayer of the Church in which all people – priests, deacons, religious, and the laity – gather in one heart and mind to give praise to God. The fact that the ritual book for SCAP places the Liturgy of the Hours first in the order of permitted forms of celebration suggests it is the preferred form of celebration for SCAP services with the Sunday assembly. Nevertheless, those preparing for a SCAP service must be very familiar with the ritual texts since it presents several variations or choices in each of the outlined services.

10. What is the Act of Thanksgiving and does it need to be sung?

The Act of Thanksgiving is the community’s hymn of praise and thanksgiving for God’s great gift of love and mercy. It is a way for the community to respond to God’s invitation into relationship. If Holy Communion is distributed, this psalm/hymn follows a moment of silence. Everyone stands to sing or recite one of the psalms that are provided (see appendix 16


II of the ritual book for more options). In Morning or Evening Prayer the Act of Thanksgiving is always the proper Canticle (see outline included in this booklet). Since this response is normally a psalm, it is proper to sing it. If the parish family is unfamiliar with a psalm setting, the liturgical musicians, deacon, and/or lay leader of prayer are encouraged to choose a hymn of praise and thanksgiving from the music resource used by the parish family.

Contact the Diocesan Office of Liturgy for a list of suggested music or for information regarding the celebration of SCAP. The Office of Liturgy also provides training/formation for deacons, lay leaders of prayer, and liturgical musicians. 17


Resources U.S. Bishops’ Committee on the Liturgy, Sing to the Lord: Music In Divine Worship, 2007. United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. Sunday Celebrations in the Absence of a Priest. Washington D.C.: USCCB, 2007. Vatican II Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy (Sacrosanctum Concilium), 1963. Zimmerman, Joyce Ann. Morning and Evening A Parish Celebration. Chicago: Liturgy Training Publications, 1996. Zimmerman, Joyce Ann, and Jean-Pierre Prevost, Delphine Kolker Kathleen Harmon. Pray Without Ceasing Prayer for Morning and Evening. Collegeville: Liturgical Press, 1993.

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Appendix I This appendix includes the outline of the various services included in the SCAP ritual book.

SUNDAY CELEBRATION IN THE ABSENCE OF A PRIEST MORNING PRAYER [WITH HOLY COMMUNION]

INTRODUCTORY RITES:  Introduction  Hymn PSALMODY:  Antiphon  Psalm  [Antiphon 2—O.T. Canticle  Antiphon 3—Psalm] LITURGY OF THE WORD:  First Reading  Responsorial Psalm  Second Reading  Gospel Acclamation  Gospel  Homily or Reflection of the Reading  Period of Silence  [Dismissal of Catechumens]  Profession of Faith  General Intercessions (concluded by the Prayer of the Day) [COMMUNION RITE]  *Lord’s Prayer+

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   

[Invitation to Communion] [Communion] [Act of Thanksgiving—Canticle of Zechariah]

The Lord’s Prayer Act of Thanksgiving—Canticle of Zechariah

CONCLUDING RITE:  Brief Announcements  Collection of the monetary offerings of the assembly  Invitation to Pray for Vocations  Blessing  Sign of Peace

SUNDAY CELEBRATION IN THE ABSENCE OF A PRIEST EVENING PRAYER [WITH HOLY COMMUNION]

INTRODUCTORY RITES:  Introduction  Hymn PSALMODY:  Antiphon  Psalm  [Antiphon 2—Psalm  Antiphon 3—N.T. Canticle] LITURGY OF THE WORD:  First Reading  Responsorial Psalm  Second Reading  Gospel Acclamation  Gospel

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    

Homily or Reflection of the Reading Period of Silence [Dismissal of Catechumens] Profession of Faith General Intercessions (concluded by the Prayer of the Day) [COMMUNION RITE]  *Lord’s Prayer+  [Invitation to Communion]  [Communion]  [Act of Thanksgiving—Canticle of Mary]

The Lord’s Prayer Act of Thanksgiving—Canticle of Mary

CONCLUDING RITE:  Brief Announcements  Collection of the monetary offerings of the assembly  Invitation to Pray for Vocations  Blessing  Sign of Peace

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SUNDAY CELEBRATION IN THE ABSENCE OF A PRIEST LITURGY OF THE WORD WITH HOLY COMMUNION INTRODUCTORY RITES:  Introduction  Sign of Cross  Greeting  Opening Prayer (specific to SCAP) LITURGY OF THE WORD:  First Reading  Responsorial Psalm  Second Reading  Gospel Acclamation  Gospel  Homily or Reflection of the Reading  Period of Silence  [Dismissal of Catechumens]  Profession of Faith  General Intercessions (concluded by the Prayer of the Day) COMMUNION RITE  The Lord’s Prayer  Invitation to Communion  Communion  Act of Thanksgiving CONCLUDING RITE:  Announcements  Collection of the monetary offerings of the assembly  Invitation to Pray for Vocations  Blessing  Sign of Peace

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SUNDAY CELEBRATION IN THE ABSENCE OF A PRIEST LITURGY OF THE WORD WITHOUT HOLY COMMUNION INTRODUCTORY RITES:  Introduction  Sign of Cross  Greeting  Opening Prayer (specific to SCAP) LITURGY OF THE WORD:  First Reading  Responsorial Psalm  Second Reading  Gospel Acclamation  Gospel  Homily or Reflection of the Reading  Period of Silence  [Dismissal of Catechumens]  Profession of Faith  General Intercessions (concluded by the Prayer of the Day)  The Lord’s Prayer  Act of Thanksgiving CONCLUDING RITE:  Announcements  Collection of the monetary offerings of the assembly  Invitation to Pray for Vocations  Blessing Sign of Peace 

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Appendix II This appendix includes some general music suggestions. Please refer to your music planning resource for more options or contact the Diocesan Office of Liturgy.

Advent Gathering O Come, O Come Emanuel / O Ven, Oh Ven, Emmanuel The King Shall Come Prepare the Way of the Lord Responsorial Psalms 25, 85 Communion Psalms 25, 85 Act of Thanksgiving Psalms 148, 149, 150 Magnificat Benedictus / Cántico de Zacarías In The Lord I’ll Be Ever Thankful (Taize) Sending Forth People Look East Wait for the Lord (Taize) Soon and Very Soon 24


Christmas Gathering O Come All Ye Faithful / Adeste Fideles Angels We Have Heard on High/テ]geles Cantando Estテ。n O Little Town of Bethlehem / Pequeテアo Pueblo de Belテゥn Responsorial Psalm 98 / Salmo 98 Communion Psalm 42 / Salmo 42 Silent Night, Holy Night / Noche de Paz, Noche de Amor What Child is This Act of Thanksgiving Jubilate Deo Sing to the Mountains Joyful Joyful We Adore Thee / Jubilosos Te Adoramos Sending Forth Go Tell It on the Mountain Joy To the World

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Lent Gathering O Christ, Bright Sun of Justice I Heard the Voice of Jesus Hosea Responsorial Psalms 51, 91, 30 Communion On Eagles Wings/En Sus Alas What Wondrous Love Is This Open My Eyes/Abre Mis Ojos Act of Thanksgiving Ashes Blest Be The Lord Psalm 41/42; Like a Deer / Como Busca la Cierva Sending Forth Jesus Remember Me Lord Throughout These Forty Days No Music—leave in silence

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Easter Gathering All Creatures of our God and King / Oh, Criaturas del Señor Joyful Joyful We Adore Thee / Jubilosos Te Adoramos Jesus Christ is Risen Today/El Señor Resucito Responsorial Psalms 66, 118 Communion Psalms 66, 118 What Wondrous Love Is This Alleluis! Sing to Jesus Act of Thanksgiving Alabaré Jubilate Deo Alleluia #1 Now The Green Blade Rises Sending Forth Sing a New Song Joyful Joyful We Adore Thee Resucito/He is Risen

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Ordinary Time Gathering Morning Has Broken This Day God Gives Me Christ Be Beside Me I Heard the Voice of Jesus Responsorial Psalms 19, 27, 34, 63, 95, 100, 103, 145 Communion Psalms 19, 27, 34, 63, 95 Prayer of St. Francis/Oraci贸n de San Francisco Pescadores De Hombres/ Lord, You Have Come Ubi Caritas (Chant) Act of Thanksgiving Glory and Praise to our God For the Beauty of the Earth I Sing the Mighty Power of God Sending Forth We Walk in Faith We Are One in the Spirit Id Y Ense帽ad/ Go and Teach

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Appendix III What is a hymn tune and hymn meter? A hymn may be chosen whose text is appropriate for a given liturgy, but the parish may not be familiar with the hymn tune that is printed with that text. The new text may be sung to a hymn tune that the singers already know - as long as the hymn tune has a suitable meter. A hymn meter is an indicator of the number of syllables for the lines in each verse of a hymn. The hymn meter may be found near the hymn title. The Metrical Index, which is included in accompaniment books and some hymnals, offers other suitable hymn tunes for various hymn meters. For example, the meter listed for a hymn is 87 87 D. In the Metrical Index of a hymnal/Missalette under meter 87 87 D, several hymn tunes are listed. Among the hymn tunes provided is Beach Spring, which many parishes know well. The musicians use the Beach Spring melody with the new text to encourage "full and active participation in the celebration". This also provides a variety of choices when planning liturgical celebrations.

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Hymn Tunes Abbot’s Leigh (8 7 8 7 D) 1) Lord, You Give the great Commission 2) God is Here! As We His People 3) God is Love, Let Heaven Adore Him Ash Grove (66 11 66 11 D) 1) Sent Forth By God’s Blessings 2) Let All Things Now Living 3) The Master Has Come and He Calls Us to Follow Beach Spring (8 7 8 7 D) 1) God of Day and God of Darkness 2) As a Fire is Meant for Burning 3) Come, All Christians, Be Committed Bunessan (5 5 8 D) 1) Morning Has Broken 2) Christ, Be Beside Me 3) This Day God Gives Me Hyfrydol (8 7 8 7 D) 1) Alleluia, Sing to Jesus 2) Praise the Lord, Ye Heavens Adore Him 3) Love Divine All Loves Excelling Finlandia (11 10 11 10 11 10) 1) Stewards of the Earth 30


Hymn of Joy (8 7 8 7 D) 1) Joyful, Joyful, We Adore You 2) Sing with All the Saints in Glory 3) God, Our God of Distant Ages Kingsfold (Common Meter Double) 1) I Heard the Voice of Jesus 2) Led By the Spirit 3) O Sing a Song of Bethlehem Lasst Uns Erfreuen (Long Meter) 1) All Creatures of Our God and King 2) Ye Watchers and Ye Holy Ones 3) A Hymn of Glory Let Us Sing Nettleton (87 87 87 87) 1) Come, Thou Font of Every Blessing 2) Summoned By the God Who Made Us 3) Christ, Your Love is Overwhelming O Waly Waly (8 8 8 8) 1) When Love is Found 2) Though I May Speak with Bravest Fire (Gift of Love) 3) Take Up Your Cross

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Old Hundredth (Long Meter) 1) All Hail Adored Trinity 2) All People That On Earth Do Dwell 3) The Glory of These 40 Days St. Elizabeth (Irregular) 1) Beautiful Savior 2) O God of Loveliness 3) God’s Blessings Sends Us Forth Slane (10 11 11 12) 1) Lord of All Hopefulness 2) God in the Planning and Purpose of Life 3) Be Thou My Vision, O Lord of My Heart

Here’s a selection of What not to sing: Table of Plenty One Bread, One Body / Un Pan, Un Cuerpo Panda Vida Eat this Bread Ven Al Banquete/Come to the Feast Taste and See Bread of Life Amén. El Cuerpo de Cristo Our Blessing Cup Bread for the World Let Us Break Bread Together

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Notes

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Diocese of Salt Lake City Office of Liturgy 27 C Street Salt Lake City, UT 84103 Telephone (801) 328-8641, ext. 321 2010

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Music for Sunday Celebrations in the Abscense of a Priest 2010