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TIPS FROM OUR PROS  ||  EVENTS  ||  CELEBRATING OUR REGION

O N TA R I O

FUN DAY CELEBRATES BEING CANADIAN THANK YOUR BODY AFTER A DAY ON THE SLOPES HOW WILL WE EVER COMPETE WITH DISNEY WORLD AND IPADS?

ONTARIO RECORDS THE

LARGEST TURNOUT FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE CAMP THIS SEASON


CHAIR’Sletter EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

 AJ Leeming Chair

 Kevin McMillan Vice Chair

 Ed Young

 Lillian Ma

Treasurer

Secretary

DIRECTORS

 Miranda Sorensen Past-Chair/AGM & Awards

 Scott Filman Technical Liaison

 Simon Holden

 Tom Dovey

Level 1 Program

Communication/ Outreach

 Grant Hagerty

 Andrew Hansen IT/Website

Sponsorship

THANK YOU ONTARIO! T

he 2015-2016 season finally arrived. The snow may have arrived late, but Ontario came to life the moment cold weather came to town. Our entire industry, including CSIA members, resorts and staff, has demonstrated great resiliency. CSIA Ontario owes thanks and congratulations to a number of people and all the resorts who got this season going. A very special thanks goes to our own Shelagh Mulveney and Sandy Gardner. Shelagh worked tirelessly in the office keeping course lists organized and Level 1 candidates up to date on constantly changing course dates. Sandy juggled countless candidates, staff, resorts and courses to ensure that our Level 1 Program and regional events could roll out as soon as snow allowed. We have had members, new and returning, travelling incredible distances to complete certifications and training. And resorts have gone beyond accommodating to ensure that winter could be all that it can be. We could not have gotten this season going within our

region without the help and dedication of each and every one of you. This season continues to be a year of growth and change for the board. It is with humble gratitude that I fill the role of chair for CSIA Ontario, previously held by Miranda Sorensen. Miranda has worked persistently over the past three years to shape our board into a collaborative group of talented people who strive to make CSIA Ontario awesome. Thank you Miranda for the guidance you have provided to the board. We look forward to your continued support with a variety of different programs and events. The season may have had a challenging start, but without fail, Ontario will make any winter a great one. I look forward to seeing as many of you as possible on snow in the weeks ahead. ◆ AJ Leeming, Chair chair@csiaontario.com

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WINTER 2016

O N TA R I O EDITORIAL TEAM Allison Sharpe Editor Shelagh Mulveney Administration

CONTENTS Editorial ........................................... 5

Grant Hagerty Advertising

Ontario Events .............................. 6

Tom Dovey, Kevin McMillan and Stuart Teather Proof Reading

CSIA ONTARIO OFFICE 3 Concorde Gate, Suite 209 Toronto Ontario T: 416-426-7261 info@csiaontario.com

PHOTO CONTRIBUTORS

Bursary Winner .............................. 7

Jason Chow

Teaching Tip .............................. 8-9

CONTRIBUTORS

Fitness Tip .............................. 10-11

Rob Butler, Monica Costa, Knute Dohnberg, Anik Gaumond, John Gillies, Peter Hibbard and Michael Weiss

Teens on Edge ............................ 13

csiaontario.com facebook.com/csiaontario

DESIGN & PUBLISHING COVER PHOTO

Ruth Anderson K9 strategy+design k9-sd.com

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Jason Chow Photography Skier: Meredith Youmans

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Photo Gallery ......................... 14-15 Equipment Tip ............................ 16 Our History .................................. 17 Volunteer Opportunity .............. 18 Final Thought .............................. 20


EDITOR'Sthoughts

» FIRST HIGH PERFORMANCE CAMP IN ONTARIO » 82 ONTARIO PROS ATTEND » LARGEST CAMP IN CANADA

WHY IS THIS SO IMPORTANT? A

s I develop my training plan each year I become more and more convinced that the people who train alongside you are just as important, if not more important, than your trainer or coach. Our peers can have many effects on our training. They raise the bar for our own goals when they make it to the next level. They keep us on track when we check in on our progress. They help share travel costs. And they keep training fun - especially when you need some good old fashioned perspective or a personal cheerleader. These peer groups tend to develop very easily with pros who are working towards their next certification level. If you are lucky to be part of a snow school with an active

group of peers, your group might begin there. If you start your journey alone, there are CSIA events where you can connect with other pros. This is why events like High Performance Camp are so important. Not only do they provide access to training from the source but holding the event locally is key as it attracts many of our Level 1 and 2 ski pros who may not otherwise travel a great distance to train. Having access to two days of training with Interski Team members and senior Level 4 Course Conductors was incredible, but having a chance to ski with your peers and develop your training group is easily as important. Your CSIA membership is more than

a license to teach or access to training; it connects you to inspiring people who challenge you to be a better skier, teacher and mentor. Your peers who train alongside you are the secret to your success. Each of them brings a unique quality that you can benefit from. I would encourage any aspiring ski pro to find your pack and not go it alone. So as you get ready for spring skiing check out the HP Camp photos throughout magazine and consider the fun that these smiles represent when you train with others. We also have upcoming Ontario events where there’s still time to find your training buddies. ◆ Allison Sharpe, Editor

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ONTARIOevents

COME OUT AND CELEBRATE ALL THINGS CANADA AT THIS YEAR’S …

RED & WHITE

CSIA ONTARIO FUN DAY SATURDAY APRIL 2

DEVIL’S GLEN

ACTIVITIES INCLUDE: Loonie Going Downhill Fast Synchro Contest, OOT and ABOOT Backwards Slalom Race, BBQ Lunch on the Deck with Canadian delicacies and refreshing beverages and prizes for winners including best Canuck costume. All ski instructors, snowboard instructors, coaches, patrollers, friends and family are welcome.

ANNUAL AWARDS DINNER & GENERAL MEETING THURSDAY MAY 26 EDWARD VILLAGE MARKHAM 50 EAST VALHALLA DRIVE JOIN US TO CELEBRATE THE END OF ANOTHER SUCCESSFUL SEASON AND OUR AWARD WINNERS OF 2016.

Know an individual who deserves recognition in The CSIA Ontario Hall of Fame? Consider making a nomination that honours this individual’s achievements of extraordinary leadership, commitment, dedication, and contribution to the CSIA, sport and industry. Submit your nomination at csiaontario.com/about/awards For more information and to register for Ontario events please visit csiaontario.com/events/


BURSARYwinner

CONGRATULATIONS

CHRISTIAN BILODEAU 2015 CSIA ONTARIO BURSARY RECIPIENT

Christian Bilodeau is this year’s winner of the CSIA Ontario Bursary offered to Georgian College’s Snow Resort Operations Program students. Christian is in his second year of the program where he has been demonstrating academic merit, leadership skills and a strong commitment to the ski industry. Christian has always been a lover of the outdoors. Most of his time is spent skiing but when not on snow, he enjoys fly fishing, camping, canoeing and kayaking. ◆

TRAIN WITH ROOKIE ACADEMY & ACHIEVE YOUR GOALS !

Ski & Snowboard

SENIOR TRAINERS Jf Beaulieu : CSIA level 4, CSIA level 4 examiner, CSCF level 3, French National Ski Instructor and CSIA Interski Demo Team Member. Dan Renauld : CSIA level 4, CSIA level 4 examiner, CSCF level 3, and CSIA Interski Demo Team Member.

• Blister-free technology • Moisture & temperature management • Colour retention • Increase energy & circulation • Decrease lactic acid build up • Decrease muscle soreness

WE OFFER High Performance Training for preparation toward Level 1, 2, 3 and 4 Canadian Ski Instructors’ Alliance or Canadian Association of Snowboard Instructors. Custom programs available.

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Mont-Sainte-Anne, Québec, Canada

ROOKIEACADEMY.COM

Hiking, Skating, Running and Cycling socks also available

www.vebasocks.com

SKI AND SNOWBOARD TRAINING

•  WINTER 2016  • 

QUÉBEC / CANADA

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TEACHINGtip

COMPETING WITH IPADS AND DISNEY WORLD T

he easy rhythm of cruising your favorite run, the power of a performance turn, the thrill of a steep run in the mountains; these are some of the favorite sensations that have us hooked on skiing. We earn this addiction through time and practice. Now consider the uncertainty of not knowing what to expect; having the fear of losing control or the worry of not being good enough. This is not that appealing and hence the chance of getting hooked is pretty slim. Sliding sports can be a tough sell. We have to improve skiing's attraction by making it "cool" and help our students to enjoy it quickly so they'll want to continue and not give up. Think of the most thrilling ride at the amusement park. With zero skills you get all the thrills after just getting strapped in. Think of a new game on your iPad. After just 5 minutes it has appealed to your senses without any learned technique or previous experience. Compare this

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to skiing where the rewards are only realized if you survive the initial learning curve. This is where instructors have the biggest power to influence the future of our sport. We need to give the new skier quick access to some of the high level sensations that experts are hooked on. This year the CSIA has overhauled the teaching approach for beginner skiers. This new approach is called “The Gliding Experience”. It puts the focus on four tactical objectives:

GLIDING – with ease and balance MOBILITY – in the skiing environment DIRECTION CHANGE – for control and rhythm SPEED MANAGEMENT – control, maintain or accelerate as desired These four objectives require instructors to react to their students' performance during a series of changing situations. Both a little technical background and imaginative use of terrain and tactics can

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help instructors to simplify the teaching process. Help people learn how to ski with a fun, activity based approach. Share the thrill of sliding and help new skiers discover the Gliding Experience! ◆ John Gillies, Manager of Educational Development - East

CONSIDER THESE POINTS: • You can’t move like an athlete if you are scared – put new skiers at ease with the right terrain • It’s ok if it’s not perfect – focus on achievement, not perfection • Focus on gliding – skiing is supposed to be slippery • Experts don’t have the monopoly on fun – a beginner can have a bigger smile than the instructor training for their next level


THE GLIDING EXPERIENCE • ENTRY LEVEL With comfort and balance

In the skiing environment

For control and rhythm

Control, maintain, or increase

TERRAIN ASSISTED DEVELOPMENT • NEW SKIERS Skating on flats

Use of mini-pipe/concave terrain for confidence

Climbing walls of mini-pipe

Berms of fall-away skis on edge

Pushing with poles flats and mini-pipe

Berms and fall-away skis slipping sideways

Banked turns help with direction change

Mini-pipe creates acceleration and stopping

Convex terrain/berms aid turning of skis

Rollers create natural speed control Varied terrain features to play with angle of skis on slope

Rollers develop rhythm  

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FITNESStip

S

o who has gone straight from the hill, to the bar, car or home without stretching? Have your legs, back, or calves ever screamed at you “hey, what about me?” Be honest. There have been a few times you have thought “I should really stretch after skiing … maybe next time” and next time never comes. There is always something that needs to be done or somewhere to go. I have found a few stretches that have helped me to get some relief from various aches after a day on the slopes right from the comfort of my bench at the locker in the ski lodge. So the next time you’re sitting down taking off your ski boots give these stretches a try. Hold each one for 3-5 breathes. Listen to your body as it knows best to how much or little pressure you need to get the best results possible. Monica Costa, CSIA Level 2

SEATED FORWARD FOLD Forearms on knees, chest on thighs, hands on floor between your feet, select whichever suits you best. Keep your neck neutral and relaxed and lean forward like a ragdoll and breathe. This helps release some of the tension you may feel in your lower back. You can modify and lean one side to the other with the support of your legs to get a nice side body stretch. An option is to twist; opposite hand to opposite foot while keeping your neck neutral.

CALVES Help stretch out calf muscles and quads with the help of a locker or wall. Standing, with toes facing the object, keep your left heel on the ground, lift the front of your right foot off the ground and press the ball of your foot against the object. Keep your hands in front of you for support. As you inhale stand up and as you step in, exhale.

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STANDING LUNGE, HIP OPENER, HAMSTRING, ALL AROUND GREAT STRETCH Hand on knee, then hands on bench, then forearms on bench, walk hands forward on the bench, flip your foot on edge and open up your knee to the side.

SEATED HALF PIGEON Left foot flat on the ground, knee 90 degrees over your ankle, cross you right foot over your left thigh with your ankle bone resting on your thigh. Keep your right foot flexed; this will help with the stretch. Sit tall with a straight spine and breathe. Then use your left hand to lift your thigh. Also place your right hand on your right knee to give yourself a little assist by pressing gently to open up your hip. Feel the stretch from along your IT band and butt muscles. Repeat on the other side. For modifications, you can fold at the hips, rest your forearms on your thigh/knee, put your hands on either side of you on the bench/chair, breath in and exhale as you fold forward. Then twist while sitting tall with your opposite hand holding your knee. As you rise up to sit tall, breathe in to fill up your lungs and then exhale as you twist.

SEATED SINGLE LEG EXTENSION One foot on the ground, knee over ankle, extend your right leg out on the bench, flex your foot and feel the stretch in your calf. Increase the intensity by hinging at the hips and folding over your extended leg with your hands on either side of your leg. Then with your palms down on bench, walk your hands forward and try to reach your foot. ◆

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SKIpro

PHOTOGRAPHER: JASON CHOW SKIER: KURT KNEIDINGER


PHOTO CREDIT: Anthony Kunkel

TEENSonedge

CHANGING LIVES ON SNOW L

ife is about sharing your passion with those around you. Encouraging people to be the best they can be and helping them to achieve their dreams; or at the very least making a positive difference in their lives. Too many times, ideas are not followed up by actions and they remain what ifs. With a conviction of helping teens in the OrilliaBarrie area, Denis Masson acted on his idea by founding Teens on Edge. Teens on Edge is more than a brilliant play on words, it is a program that, through skiing, makes a real difference in the lives of many young people.

The Teens on Edge program introduces young people to the sport of skiing. By providing ski equipment, lift passes and instruction by volunteer CSIA instructors, these young people are given an opportunity to ski. The real success of this program is that the teens gain personal confidence and increase their self esteem as they develop team work, communication and leadership skills through the experience. Many of the participants will become assistant ski pros as they work towards their CSIA Level 1 certification and

volunteer to help new participants. Thanks to sponsors, fundraising events and Denis Masson’s continuous determination to help as many young people as possible, the program now reaches 20 participants a season. Many in the ski industry have been on board from the start. This great idea was made possible because of friends like Horseshoe Resort which has become the home base of Teens on Edge, providing lift passes and work experience for the participants. Many of the private clubs on the escarpment have also provided day passes and gifts-inkind to help fundraising efforts. And ski manufacturers and retailers have donated much needed equipment. It truly has taken an industry effort to make an impact on these young lives. We have witnessed what the program has achieved. These young people are driven, kind and incredibly funny. They are growing up to be amazing young adults and good skiers as well. Teens on Edge is a Ski Club like no other. It truly changes lives. ◆ www.teensonedge.ca Anik Gaumond, CSIA Level 4

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PHOTOgallery

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EQUIPMENTtip

TUNING FOR

TEACHING PRO’S A

s a Teaching Pro it is essential that your equipment is in good working order. If your equipment is not properly tuned and in good gliding order you won’t be able to do your best demo. Ski and Snowboard tuning is fun and easy to learn. You may even be able to set up a tuning area in your Pro Room, making it easy to touch up your skis before meeting your students. All you need is an old table and a good vice that works well for both ski and snowboards. If everyone pitches in the tools and supplies are inexpensive.

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Here are some simple ways to keep your skis in top condition: • Always dry your edges and base off after skiing and riding for the day. Heat in the pro room can rust your edges overnight. • You can never over wax your base, but if you let your base go five full days without waxing the polyethylene base it will dry out and you won’t be able to glide properly. Waxing creates a ball bearing effect on your base enabling you to glide effortlessly over any type of snow. • The best tool to buy is a course diamond stone. You can dip it in the snow and remove any burs you get on your edges without needing a file guide after a day on the slopes. • All skis and snowboards come with a factory base and side edge bevel. Simply maintain that bevel for best results and enjoyable skiing and riding. Skis have a one degree base bevel and a two degree side edge bevel. Beveling increases the glide ability and edge bite of your skis. Purchase

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a quality file guide and file to maintain the degree of bevel on your skis.   • Every time you drop your skis off at a shop for machine grinding some of the base and edges are ground off. That is why you should only take your equipment into the shop once a year in the fall to bring your skis base and edges down. Then it will be easy for you to tune during the season. • When getting started, practise on an old set of skies or snowboard. • In the spring, just before you store your equipment for the summer, take a flat head screw driver and adjust the tension of your bindings to zero and smother your base and edges with a universal wax without scraping the excess wax off. • Store your equipment in a nice dry place; not a damp basement or a garage that can overheat. Your bedroom closet is your best option to prevent excessive rust build up. ◆ Peter Hibbard, Coach Turbo


OURhistory

CHEDOKE WINTER SPORTS PARK L

ocated west of downtown Hamilton overlooking what is now Hwy 403 Chedoke Winter Sports Park (CWSP) started its operation with a 900 foot T-Bar, night skiing, snow making and a small ski school. In 1964, a student lift ticket was $1.50, kids’ learn-to-ski lessons on Saturdays were free and there was no-cost instruction for housewives on Wednesday afternoons. The Winter Sports Park also attracted many tobogganing and cross country skiing families to its gentle golf course slopes. In addition to these family attractions, situated below the bold face of the Niagara Escarpment, was one of Ontario’s steepest black diamond runs, Chedoke’s Senior Hill. Originally labeled The Elevator Shaft, this slope had an intimidating entry to a steep field of bumps that produced an array of skilled would-be Wayne Wong mogul skiers. Chedoke resourcefully produced a family focused facility with a beginner tow, four T-Bars and a double chairlift that serviced nine varied ski trails consisting of expert

pitches, glade runs and some wide open, undulating novice and intermediate terrain. Offering skiing in the winter and golf in the summer made Chedoke a natural yearround operation. During the winter skiers and non-skiers could make use of the golf clubhouse facilities. It also helped that local city bus routes serviced the location which attracted McMaster University and Mohawk College ski club programs. The success of Chedoke’s ski operation was largely due to a passion and the dogged persistence of many of its members and notable ski school directors like Bob Kirk, Bill McCaughey, Jim Andersen and committed coaches like Peter Purins and Dave Cummings. They developed a number of champion athletes, including two-time Olympian snowboarder Brad Taylor. CWPS’s Hamilton location was plagued by its banana-belt location and subpar snow making system. A typical ski season started the first week in January and finished the second week in March. An occasional Christmas Week or March

Break was an unexpected bonus. Short ski seasons resulted in an ongoing burden of balancing limited income with the higher labour rates paid to the unionized city parks lift operators, snow makers, groomers and facility service personnel. A passionate group, Friends of Chedoke, diligently argued with Hamilton city council for the community of the facility. They recommended operational enhancements, including snow tubing and terrain parks to attract a larger and broader based clientele. However all these schemes demanded an expansion of the existing facilities and new equipment which meant a greater financial investment. The FOC subsequently lobbied for the privatization of the operation, striking up a valiant campaign, but they were not successful. Chedoke, as with many others before it, eventually passed away as yet another defunct Ontario ski centre in 2003. ◆ Michael Weiss, CSIA Level 3

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VOLUNTEERopportunity Currently we are seeking BOARD OF DIRECTOR CANDIDATES who will manage these portfolios:

WE’RE LOOKING FOR LEADERS IF YOU LOVE SKI TEACHING, HERE’S AN OPPORTUNITY TO IMPACT ITS FUTURE.

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• Magazine/Newsletters • Sponsorship • Event Planning Please contact Shelagh Mulveney with any questions: info@csiaontario.com

The CSIA Ontario Board of Directors is inviting Letters of Intent, for review by our Nominating Committee, from members interested in joining the CSIA Ontario Board of Directors. Please email Letters of Intent in confidence no later than 9:00 AM, Monday March 14, 2016 to the CSIA Ontario office: info@csiaontario.com Please include the skills and attributes that you will bring to the Board and describe how your involvement will make the Board stronger.


SKIpro

PHOTOGRAPHER: JASON CHOW SKIER: CATHY GENGE


FINALthought

TALKING AIN’T TEACHING. LISTENING AIN’T LEARNING.

L

ots of us ski pros are big talkers right? We are a gregarious bunch. I found myself talking a lot in a lesson recently. Not sure why. It seemed to make sense at the time. Then I remembered the title line above. My friend Martin Olson may have coined that phrase. Talking ain’t Teaching. Listening ain’t Learning. Do I like to stand and listen when I’m in a ski lesson? Nope. I like to ski. Especially when there’s fresh snow! What do we remember more: What we hear; or what we feel? Talk less, ski more: this is better, no? ◆

Rob Butler, CSIA Level 4

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PHOTO CREDIT: AndersSellin iSTOCK ID: 5736812

PRO OF THE WEEK Weekly winners will receive a $50 GIFT CARD to Sporting Life SNOW SCHOOL DIRECTORS SUBMITTED THEIR PRO OF THE WEEK FOR WEEKLY DRAWS - ARE YOU A PRO OF THE WEEK?

QUALIFICATIONS: • Pros of the Week will be CSIA members in good standing • Demonstrate and encourage safety during lessons and around your resort • Provide a positive experience for your students and guests • Act as a positive role model for your peers • Have gone above and beyond in your role during the week


As a ski instructor, you strongly influence the conduct of those hitting the slopes. Positive guidance is especially critical for beginners to ensure they learn safe skiing behaviour right from day one. In partnership with CSIA, the Technical Standards and Safety Authority (TSSA) produced a training video that focuses on the safety role that ski instructors play and highlights the RideSmart Ski Lift Safety Program. To view the video, visit csiaontario.com/tssa. As an organization whose goal is to enhance public safety, TSSA appreciates your efforts to help us reach this goal. Collectively, let’s continue to work together to improve our record and stress the importance of hill and lift safety for all.

tssa.org

| safetyinfo.ca

Ski Pro Ontario Winter 2016  

Winter 2016 Edition of Ski Pro Ontario

Ski Pro Ontario Winter 2016  

Winter 2016 Edition of Ski Pro Ontario

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