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APR18 + Action shots + Letters + News + Ski Club news + Snow wear + Gear + Discounts + Resort insider + Web and video news

TIME FOR THE PARALYMPIANS When and where to watch some of Britain’s most successful winter athletes

THE PRICE IS RIGHT

GET ME TO THE SLOPES...NOW

We investigate the pros and cons of independent and package travel

Why a weekend break is the perfect way to get away for a final time this season

Leap into a Paralympic paradise

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DISCOUNT FOR SKI CLUB GB MEMBERS CODE: AF-SKIGB-M5

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CONTENTS

Photo: D Daher

6

EXPOSURE End the season on a high

14

TIME FOR THE PARALYMPIANS

with snaps from athletes

Everything you need to know to watch our top athletes

in nail biting, stomach

compete in the twelth Winter Paralympic Games,

churning moments

including the full schedule

10

YOU SAY How one member got the most skiing from their annual leave, plus your feedback on Ski+board

11

SKI CLUB NEWS The launch of a new award in memoriam and the future of the Ski Club’s library is revealed

12

NEWS

22

An update from Simon

LOOK AFTER THE PENNIES...

Butler, plus which inter

And the pounds can go towards another holiday. In

Olympians are most

the battle between the package and the independently

likely to be injured

booked, we investigate which is cheaper

Photo: Luc Percival

FEATURES


5

THE INSIDE EDGE

36

SNOW WEAR The best way to store clothing throughout the summer months, and how to keep jackets at their best

40

GEAR Come over all Inspector Gadget with the latest gear reviews of gizmos to help enhance your skiing

30

46

GET ME TO THE SLOPES - FAST

RESORT INSIDER

After such a good season of snow in the Alps, one

From students to seniors, toddlers to teenagers, we

writer explores the temptation for a weekend break

cover the resorts that have something for everyone

EDITOR’S NOTE Closing the chapter on one record breaking Olympics, I’m looking ahead to the next Games: the Winter Paralympics in PyeongChang. From March 9-18, some of Britain’s best snow athletes, and a couple of newbies, will be taking to the slopes to compete for Team GB. At Ski+board, we’ve got our fingers and toes crossed for our athletes who are going to compete. On page 14, you can find profiles of the Paralympians, including Kelly Gallagher, the only Brit to win a gold medal on snow, our Editor Harriet Johnston heads snowboarding gang, and Nordic skier Scott off piste in Slovenia to enjoy some cheap thrills (pg 22) Meenagh, plus a schedule of what to watch when. If all this chat about snow is making you want to head back to the mountains, fear not — we’ve got features on both the cheapest way to do this (pitting package and tour operator against one another on pg 22) and speedy getaways to make the most of the final weekends of the season (pg 30). Plus you’ll see many of the usual regulars, including gear, snow wear and resort insider. And don’t forget that all of this season’s Ski+boards are online at skiclub.co.uk/skiandboard.

Cover shot by Marcus Hartmann — to read about Team GBs athletes, head to pg 14

Harriet Johnston Ski+board Online Issue Editor

Ski+board

April 2018

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EDITOR Harriet Johnston EDITOR AT LARGE Colin Nicholson ART DIRECTOR Amanda Barks MEDIA SALES Madison Bell madisonbell.com 020 7389 0859 OVERSEAS MEDIA SALES Martina Diez-Routh martina.diez-routh@skiclub.co.uk +44 (0) 7508 382 781 PUBLISHER Ski Club of Great Britain London SW19 7JY skiclub.co.uk 020 8410 2000 © Ski Club of Great Britain 2018 All material is strictly copyright and all rights are reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part without the prior written permission of the publisher. All prices are correct at time of publication. Opinions expressed in Ski+board are not necessarily those of the Ski Club of Great Britain, nor does the publisher accept responsibility for advertising content.


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LOCATION Engelberg, Switzerland PHOTOGRAPHER

Oskar Enander SKIER

Ralph Welponer Ski+board

Being a travel photographer may seem like the dream job; but there’s no rest for the wicked. After arriving home from Bali, Indonesia, Oskar battled jet lag to shoot April 2017

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this local freestyle session. He journeyed up around 4pm and managed to snap this picture of Ralph Welponer four hours later, as the sun created the watercolour sky.


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Official fuel consumption for the New Volvo XC60 D4 R-Design Manual in MPG (l/100km): Urban 44.8 (6.3), Extra Urban 58.9 (4.8), Combined 52.3 (5.4). CO2 emissions 142g/km. MPG figures are obtained from laboratory testing intended for comparisons between vehicles and may not reflect real driving results. *Finance subject to status. Retail sales only. Subject to availability at participating retailers only on vehicles registered by 31st March 2018 on Personal Contract Purchase. Terms and conditions apply. Applicants must be 18 or over. Guarantee may be required. Volvo Car Financial Services, RH1 1SR. The complementary servicing offer is only available when purchasing on Volvo Advantage Personal Contract Purchase at participating retailers, on vehicles ordered between 01/01/2018 and 31/03/2018. Services must be carried out at a Volvo Authorised Repairer. Retail offer only. Excludes fleet operators and business users. See volvocars.co.uk for full terms and conditions.


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LOCATION Haines, USA PHOTOGRAPHER

Dom Daher SKIER

Eva Walkner Ski+board

While our focus has been fixed on the Olympics, another competition has been testing the nerve of the world’s best athletes. Riders are competing in the finals of The April 2017

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Freeride World Tour in Verbier at the beginning of April. We reveal the secrets behind the tour in the October 2017 issue of Ski+board, online at skiclub.co.uk/ skiandboard.


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YOU SAY

Ski+board online, with hundreds of digital articles

How one couple got 10 days skiing, for three days off work

Every year the Ski+board team send out a survey to a randomly selected group of Ski Club members. Last year, we noticed a real increase in the amount of people who were interested in reading the magazines online or who may not have realised the mass of articles already available digitally. Here are some of the comments:

We took off three days between Christmas and New Year and got 10 days on the slopes. Here’s how: As Friday 22 December was a normal working day, and we were going straight to the airport for an evening flight to Geneva, we needed to be organised. We’d booked on the Freshtracks Christmas week off-piste course, and had sorted our own flights and transfers for extra flexibility. We found a reasonably priced airport hotel, and took a 7am morning transfer to Flaine. The alarm call felt early but the lure of getting my first ski of the season got me up! In Flaine, locating the Ski Club chalet couldn’t have been simpler which meant that by 9.30am we were skiing deserted pistes. Christmas Eve was warm-up day number two for us, with the course starting on Christmas Day. A group ski led us into the Gers Bowl and there our ability was assessed to place us in groups. My husband and I were both placed with Diane, who I called Sainte Diane owing to her patience! When our last day at the chalet arrived we said farewell to the group and relocated for an extra two nights to a B&B. This meant that Saturday and Sunday were spent skiing. We also utilised the Monday which happened to be New Year’s Day. With an afternoon transfer

I currently live and work away from home. An online version would be perfect otherwise I have to wait for my post to arrive if ever. Please make it more digitally friendly. Ski+board writes: Every issue is uploaded to the Ski Club website two weeks after it lands on doorsteps, plus there’s an extra online issue in March. You can read back issues from October 2015 to present day on skiclub. co.uk/skiandboard

Survey respondents shape the future of Ski+board We pay close attention to the feedback received in the survey every year, and endeavour to improve the magazine

based on what readers have to say, good or bad. Here are just a few of the responses, you can look out for changes in next season’s magazines: A well produced and interesting publication. I particularly enjoy the photography. It would be good to see more articles about the resorts, particularly those off the beaten track for UK skiers, with an insider’s view on these. A very classy looking magazine. Well laid out and the adverts are not ‘In Your

booked, we purchased a four hour lift pass. When you know you only have a morning, you ski hard and make the most of every minute! So for the cost of three extra nights accommodation and a transfer we were able to get the same amount of our trip as you would get by taking a week and a long weekend trip. Just make sure you’ve got the fitness levels to handle it though!

Susan Leese Ski+board writes: It’s great to hear how members can get more time on the slopes — on page 30 Ski+board Editorin-Chief Colin Nicholson explores how best to make the most of a weekend.

The Freshtracks chalet in Flaine, where Susan managed to spend 10 days on the slopes

Face’ as in some mags. I have no problem reading with older eyesight — font and colour are good. It would be great to see more resort information. Plus features on travel to and from resorts. I’d like to know about the people who work in the resorts: Lifties, patrollers, piste bashers, seasonnaires etc. Ski+board writes: We welcome feedback on the magazine during the survey — and all year. If you have any ideas or comments you’d like to share, please email colin.nicolson@skiclub.co.uk


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SKI CLUB NEWS

Thousands find help in Ski Club Facebook groups

Members may soon be able to access the Ski Club library from anywhere in the world, as it begins to be digitalised by De Montfort University

Access to the library going global With the Ski Club moving to a new office at the end of last year, a new home had to be found for the library; a room packed with over 100 years of snowsports history. The library was filled with books, documents and artefacts marking not only the history of the Ski Club but also the history of British skiing. The Ski Club will be partnering with De Montfort University to admit the items to Special Collections, where they will be catalogued, curated and made available for public viewing and academic use on request. The University is renowned as a leading international centre of sporting history and already houses Collections from Kodak, Special Olympics, England

Boxing and more. It has advanced chronicling technology, and the hope is the contents will be able to be viewed by anyone globally. Previously members could visit the library, however they had to book an appointment to do so; only one person visited the library within the past year and there were occasional calls. Daniel Loots, PR manager at the Ski Club, says: “We’re delighted that the archive is in the safe hands, and will be preserved for generations to come.” The official collection launch will take place on March 15 at De Montfort University with further details of the partnership to be announced on that date.

New Leaders course award in memory of CEO The Ski Club has announced an award in memory of former CEO Frank McCusker, which will offer a young person the opportunity to train and become a Ski Club Leader. The Young Leader’s Award in memory of Frank McCusker will offer a skier or snowboarder under the age of 25 a place on this year’s Ski Club Leaders Course. The award aims to encompass the values of Frank, who passed away suddenly in summer 2017. He was passionate about bringing younger people into snow sports. The recipient will join the 12-day course in the Alps in

Now in their second season, the Ski Club’s resort Facebook groups are enjoying increasing popularity – with over 4,450 current members across 36 groups. Members use them to share information or to find others to ski with. In addition to all of the Leader and ILG resorts, there are also groups for Alpe d’Huez, Courmayeur, Brenta Dolomites, Morzine and Park City. To find a resort group on Facebook, search for Ski Club of Great Britain, followed by the resort name.

New Chief Executive starts The Ski Club’s new chief executive is due to start in the Wimbledon office this month. Darren Neylon was appointed earlier this year after the tragic death of Frank McCusker, who passed away in June 2017. The Australian’s first day in the office is likely to be on March 13. When Darren spoke to Ski+board a few months ago, he said he was looking forward to sustaining the Ski Club’s ‘marvellous legacy’.

Line-S looks ahead with NUCO Travel

The award is in memory of Frank McCusker, who passed away unexpectedly in June 2017.

December 2018. The course normally costs almost £3,000, and topics covered include; leadership skills, performance on piste and off piste, navigation, avalanche safety, and snow craft. Applications will open this spring via the Ski Club website. For more information, email events@skiclub.co.uk Ski+board

April 2018

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NUCO Travel, the UK’s largest student specific snowsports tour operator, will offer complimentary Line-S membership to all future students groups. With a Line-S membership, students get selected Ski Club benefits, including access to the Leader service and Ski Club discounts. Students can also purchase membership to Line-S individually for £20. For more information on Line-S, head to line-s.co.uk


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N EWS

NEWS

Warren Miller, pioneer of ski films, dies aged 93

The director Warren Miller died in January, aged 93. Often recognised as the pioneer of ski films, he was the founder of Warren Miller Entertainment, and is credited on over 750 films. He produced a ski film every year between 1950-2004, including ‘Escape to Ski’(1988), which featured a new type of snowsport — snowboarding — when it was barred across many resorts.

Most popular place to buy revealed Chamonix has emerged as the popular resort for those looking for property in the Alps, according to a survey conducted by Knight Frank, with the aid of the Ski Club. Possible reasons point to Swiss restrictions on buying and the strength of the franc dissuaded British buyers. Two main types of buyers were found: those seeking a dual-season resort to maximise rentals and those targeting high altitude snowsure resorts.

Scottish skiing on for record season Scottish resorts could be on for a record breaking season this year. By the end of January, all five resorts had surpassed the number of skier days during the whole previous winter. It is estimated that the ski resorts have generated £180 million for Scotland’s economy since 2009. However a recent report from Climate Coalition suggested the Scottish ski industry could collapse within as little as 50 years due to climate change.

Photo: Press Association

Harriet Johnston

Katie Ormerod, one of Britain’s best medal hopes, was injured in PyeongChang before competing

Slopestyle snowboarders at greatest risk of injury in Olympics Alf Alderson The Winter Olympics may offer the chance for glory, but they can also be a risky business — research has shown that during the Vancouver and Sochi Olympics, 11 per cent of athletes experienced at least one injury, including broken limbs and brain trauma. The most dangerous sport was shown to be snowboard cross, with 34 per cent of competitors injured in Sochi; figures for PyeongChang are yet to be released, but slopestyle snowboard looks set to come out as even more dangerous, with almost 40 per cent of competitors hurt. At the other end of the spectrum the least dangerous sport is Nordic

combined, with under five per cent of participants suffering injury. Perhaps surprisingly, ski jumping has a lower rate of injuries (around six per cent) than curling (around eight per cent; curling injuries included strains of the arms, back and thigh). Events which combine high speed and jumps are the most dangerous, with freestyle and slopestyle skiing also seeing more than one-in-three competitors suffering injury. Two of Britain’s top medal hopes, snowboarder Katie Ormerod and speed skater Elise Christie were both injured in this year’s competition.

New lift pass on the block covers Ikonic North American resorts Colin Nicholson

North America will get a new multiresort pass next season. Alterra Mountain Company, which is behind resorts such as Squaw Valley in the US and Tremblant in Canada, is launching the Ikon pass, covering its own 12 operations, plus others including Aspen Snowmass and Jackson Hole.

Prices in North America are typically higher than in Europe, so the savings for skiers going for longer trips and visiting several resorts are substantial. It will be competing against the Mountain Collective pass, and Vail Resort’s Epic pass. Vail announced six new additions earlier this month to the Epic pass, including Kicking Horse and Fernie, taking the total number of resorts covered to 61. In the October 2017 issue of Ski+board we covered the logistics of skiing around the continent cheaply, including using passes. Read it here.


N EWS

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Gadget for soles brings walk mode to any ski boot Harriet Johnston

Simon Butler continues to fight for Britons’ right to teach skiing in France after years of court cases

British instructor in France loses appeal against £40,000 fine Colin Nicholson Simon Butler, the instructor fighting for the rights of Britons to teach skiing in France, last month lost an appeal in Chambéry against his conviction for teaching without due qualifications. The ruling is a surprise reversal in his fortunes. In November 2016, a technical court in Lyons found the authorities had not proved there was a substantial difference between the Britons’ qualifications and those of French instructors. Under a European Union directive this must be shown if the authorities are to refuse to issue the Carte Professionnelle that lets instructors practise in France. Butler told Ski+board: “The French colleagues with whom I’m bringing this case have been left embarrassed by the state of the French legal system.” The 55-year-old returned to work last season, after a series of arrests in Megève, where he has run instructional skiing holidays for several decades. Since 2000, the assumption in France was that the onus of proof was on British instructors to prove their qualifications were equivalent to their French peers. Only those who had reached Basi (British Association of Snowsport Instructors) Level 4 and had passed the Eurotest speed test had been accepted by authorities, because that was said to be the equivalent of French instructors. But this last assumption is in question because a huge number of French instructors have not met the criterion of this exacting race, which is that they

complete a giant slalom no more than 18 per cent slower than the reigning world champion. Many are allowed to teach children nonetheless, as they are long-term trainees or have ‘grandfather rights’, having completed their training before the Eurotest was introduced. During an April trial in 2014, Butler’s lawyer Philippe Planes presented the court with a dossier showing there were 17 different diplomas that allow people to teach skiing in France and not just the Diplome d’Etat,which the Administration used to compare British instructors’ qualifications. Butler is also supported in his case by Jean-Yves Lapeyrère, secretary of the European Confederation of Outdoor Employers, who was also present at last month’s hearing in Chambéry, one of a long series of court cases. During the process, Butler and the Basi Level 2 and 3 instructors he employed were told by the appeal judge that he was waiting for the decision of the Administrative Court before reaching a verdict on the criminal conviction of Butler and his instructors. But the process has taken so long that the judge retired, with a new judge upholding a fine of €42,000 and a six-month suspended jail term for Butler. Butler is contesting the most recent verdict, with the case expected to go before the Supreme Court in Paris in a year. Meanwhile, the French authorities are also appealing the decision of the Administrative Court. Ski+board

April 2018

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A Kickstarter campaign has been launched to raise money for Zuke, a sole piece which creates a walk mode on ski boots for just £40. Once installed, the device stays on the boot. It can be slid forward for comfort when walking, and pulled back into the middle when boots are in ski bindings. Since launching the Kickstarter campaign, Zuke has raised over £3,000 of it’s £10,000 goal.

Skiers missing vital sunscreen areas People are not taking adequate care of their face whilst on the slopes, with potentially devastating results. University of Liverpool research showed that people missed almost 10% of their face while applying sunscreen, with the most commonly missed areas around the eyes. More than 90% of basal cell carcinomas occur on the head or neck, and 5-10% of all skin cancers occur on the eyelids.

March offers best value for skiing Holidu, a search engine for holiday lettings, has revealed the average price per person per day of staying in popular ski resorts, by analysing accommodation providers. It found that March was a value month for Austria and Switzerland, with some prices between 20-30 per cent cheaper than earlier in the season. In France, skiers could spend £86 a day in the Three Valleys — £30 of which goes on accommodation.


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Essentials you’ve always wanted to know about the Paralympics

B

ritain has stood on the gold medal podium just once for an on snow sport, and one half of the team will return to defend her win in PyeongChang. Kelly Gallagher and guide Charlotte Evans made history when they came first in the visually impaired Super-G competition in Sochi’s 2014 Paralympics. It’s a feat which has yet to be rivalled in the able-bodied Winter Olympics from the British team. As of March 9, all attention will be turned to the Paralympics; and with a diverse team of experienced and newbies

to join Team GB, the UK could be looking at a record medal haul once again. For two weeks, athletes will be donning their skin suits and orange bibs, grabbing sitskis and snowboards and competing on a world stage. This year, the team hope to win seven medals, one up from the total in Sochi 2014. Here, we talk you through some of the essential topics that you’ve always wanted to know about, including classification, and how visually impaired skiers follow their guides down the mountainside.

Why cool classification is such a hot topic “Fair and equal competition”. That’s how the Paralympic site describes the process of classification by which athletes are sorted into separate sport groups, akin to age, gender or weight in other forms of sport. Described by some as the soul of the Paralympics, it’s classification that ensures competition stays fit and equal. In para-sport, athletes are grouped by how disability affects performance. Athletes must fall into one of the ten eligible impairment types identified by the Paralympic Movement association. In order to classify them, it's considered

whether an athlete’s impairment meets the minimum disability criteria for the sport e.g. the level of amputation for athletes with limb deficiency. From there, it’s considered which sport class would most fit the athlete's disability. In the Winter Paralympics, classifications are divided into three general groups; standing, sitting and blind. Skiers, such as James Whitley, are classified on a medical assessment and their body position when they ski. Blind skiers, like Kelly Gallagher, are classified purely on medical assessment.

Why the fastest skier down the hill may not be the winner Crossing the line first in para-sport may not always determine the winner, thanks to a complicated factoring system. It provides a number for each class based on ability, with final results

determined by multiplying the finish line with the factored number. This allows for one medal event to be held for each group, even though there's a range of functional mobility and medical differences.

Why blind skiers compete in silence Ever skied in total white out conditions? This is just a small taster of what it’s like to ski as a visually impaired athlete. With the focus on fluorescent orange bibs and words, the two athletes, skier and guide, pelt down the hillside, communicating via Bluetooth helmets. Guides communicate direction of

travel, changes in terrain, light and snow conditions, the rhythm of the course and the correct pace for athletes to ski. This requires a silent audience, to allow for athletes to hear one another clearly. The @seelikemenna Instagram gives some kind of idea about what it's like to ski with Menna's vision (3 per cent).

Who to watch With 17 athletes, the British team is made up of a handful of record breakers and newbies. Who are these athletes, and how can you best follow their story? Their profiles are opposite, along with their social media links.

How best to follow the Paralympics Pair your Paralympic Channel 4 viewing with the digital offerings below for behind the scenes snaps and titbits. Disability Snowsport UK: @disabilitysnowsportuk, @dsuksnowsport Channel 4 Paralympics: @c4paralympics, Paralympics GB: @paralympicsgb, @paralympicsgb_official World Para Alpine skiing: @paraalpine, Amanda Pirie: GB Para Alpine ski team coach: @amandapirie


All Photos: On Edition

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An Evie Pinching medal winner, Menna Fitzpatrick was the first British athlete to win a visually impaired World Cup in 2016. The 19 year old Alpine skier has competed with her guide Jennifer Kehoe since 2015. They have repeatedly won gold in a variety of alpine events. @mennaandjen

Scott Meenagh was injured and lost both legs while on active duty in Afghanistan. He's the first British athlete to compete in Para-Nordic skiing in over 20 years, meaning he’ll have a total of 6 races across biathlon and cross-country events. @SMeenagh89

@SMeenagh

Ben Moore is one of the first British athletes to compete in Paralympian snowboarding. His arm was paralysed after a motorcycle accident in 2004. It’s the 32 year old’s first Paralympic Games, though he’s won 3 World Championship medals already. @benmooresnow

Kelly Gallagher made history in Sochi 2014 when she, with her guide Charlotte Evans, became the first and only British athletes to win a gold medal on snow. The 28 year old and her guide Gary Smith have been racing in alpine skiing for two years. @kellygallagher17

@kellygallagher

Millie Knight and her guide Brett Wild nabbed 11 medals on the World Cup circuit last year, including a gold. Millie was flag bearer at the opening ceremony in Sochi, aged just 15. The duo have been working together for two years and excel in races like Downhill and Super-G. @knight_millie

Two time British Para Alpine Champion James Whitley was born without hands. The 21 year old doesn't carry poles, making the push off the start gate in downhill races exceptionally difficult. He specialises in GS and Slalom races, but competes in all alpine events. @james_whitley97 @jameswhitley97

In 2011, Chris Lloyd was left paralyzed from the neck down after a rally car crash broke his back and damaged his spinal cord. The 42 year old's remarkable recovery has allowed him to drive, walk and ski again. This is his first Olympics competing in alpine skiing.

Another ex-serviceman, Owen Pick lost his leg aged 18 during a tour in Afghanistan. Within 18 months of trying para-snowboarding, he’s ranked 7th in the world having had top ten results at the Winter X-Games and a bronze medal at World Cup level. He's GB's flagbearer.

Ranked 4th in the world in 2017 for parasnowboarding, James Barnes-Miller was born without his right hand. In October, he faced the challenge of raising £10,000 to buy new kit, after his equipment was stolen from his van, including his custom made snowboards.

@OwenPick Ski+board

@OwenjamesPick

April 2018

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@chrislloydskier

@stubbergram

@stubber89


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Top events at the Paralympics and the Brits to watch Alpine skiing Introduced in the first ever Winter Paralympics, back in 1976 in Sweden. athletes competing in Alpine skiing can use outrigger sis, sit-skis and monoskis, as well as cut down ski poles, orthopaedic aids and prosthetics. There are 11 groups in the standing

class, 5 in the sitting class and 3 in the visually impaired classes, who use guide skiers. Some of Britain's best Paralympians compete in this category, including Millie Knight, Menna Fitzpatrick and Kelly Gallagher. It's Menna and her

guide Jennifer Kehoe's first Paralympics, as well as the first time Kelly and Millie have competed with their guides, Gary Smith and Brett Wild respectively. They'll each compete in all 5 events, with many potentials for a medal, with high hopes on Millie in the downhill race.

ALPINE SKI 10-18th March

M DOWNHILL

Saturday 10th at 12:30am

W DOWNHILL

Saturday 10th at 12:30am EVENT RULES One run, skiers navigate between gates on a steep slope containing turns and jumps.

M SUPER-G

Sunday 11th at 12:30am

W SUPER-G

Sunday 11th at 12:30am EVENT RULES Less technical than other Alpine events, although known for speed, men clear 35 gates, women clear 30.

M GIANT SLALOM W GIANT SLALOM

M SLALOM W SLALOM

Saturday 17th at 12:30am 05:00am Sunday 18th at 12:30am 03:30am EVENT RULES More technical with two runs and one combined time. 30 gates to clear. Wednesday 14th at 12:30am 05:00am Thursday 15th at 12:30am 03:30am EVENT RULES Most technical of races, shortest, with intentionally iced course. Between 4075 gates. Two runs.

M SUPER COMBINED W SUPER COMBINED

Tuesday 13th at SG 12:30am SL 06:00am Tuesday 13th at SG 12:30am SG 06:00am EVENT RULES Times from two events combined.

Nordic skiing Consisting of biathlon and crosscountry skiing, Paralympic Nordic skiing consists of events for standing, sitting and visually impaired athletes. Blind skiers use headsets and sound

location boxes to communicate with a guide, and those competing in biathlon use a rifle equipped with electro-acoustic glasses which allows aiming by hearing. The closer the rifle points to the centre

of the target, the higher the tone is. Scott Meenagh, a former solider, is a double amputee who’s the first Brit to compete in Para Nordic skiing since Nagano 1998.


17

NORDIC 11-18th March

M SPRINT

Wednesday 14th Qualifier at 01:00am Semi & Final at 03:30am Wednesday 14th Qualifier at 01:00am Semi & Final at 03:30am

VISUALLY IMPAIRED

W SPRINT

VISUALLY IMPAIRED

M MIDDLE (10KM)

STANDING/VIS IMPAIRED W MIDDLE (5KM) STANDING/VIS IMPAIRED

Saturday 17th at 01:00am Saturday 17th at 03:30am

M LONG (20KM)

Monday 12th at 01:00am

W LONG (15KM)

Monday 12th at 01:00am

STANDING/VIS IMPAIRED STANDING/VIS IMPAIRED

M

W MIXED RELAY (4X2.5KM) Sunday 18th at 01:00am

M

W OPEN RELAY (4X2.5KM)

Sunday 18th at 03:00am

M MIDDLE (7.5KM)

Saturday 17th at 03:30am

W MIDDLE (5KM)

Saturday 17th at 03:30am

M LONG (15KM)

Sunday 11th at 01:00am

SITTING SITTING

SITTING W LONG (12KM) SITTING

Sunday 11th at 03:30am

M LONG (20KM)

Monday 12th at 01:00am

W LONG (15KM)

Monday 12th at 01:00am

M SHORT (7.5KM)

Saturday 10th at 01:00am

W SHORT (6KM)

Saturday 10th at 01:00am

M SHORT (7.5KM)

Saturday 10th at 03:00am

W SHORT (6KM)

Saturday 10th at 03:00am

M MEDIUM (12.5KM)

Tuesday 13th at 01:00am

W MEDIUM (10KM)

Tuesday 13th at 01:00am

M MEDIUM (12.5KM)

Tuesday 13th at 04:00am

W MEDIUM (12.5KM)

Tuesday 13th at 04:00am

M LONG (12.5KM)

Friday 16th at 01:00am

W LONG (12.5KM)

Friday 16th at 03:30am

M LONG (12.5KM)

Friday 16th at 01:00am

STANDING/VIS IMPAIRED STANDING/VIS IMPAIRED

BIATHLON 10-16th March

SITTING SITTING

STANDING/VIS IMPAIRED STANDING/VIS IMPAIRED

SITTING SITTING

STANDING/VIS IMPAIRED STANDING/VIS IMPAIRED

SITTING SITTING

STANDING/VIS IMPAIRED W LONG (12.5KM) STANDING/VIS IMPAIRED Ski+board

April 2018

Friday 16th at 03:30am

skiclub.co.uk


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Para snowboarding Para snowboarding is composed of three sport classes, two for athletes with leg impairments and one for athletes with

arm impairments. Competitions include snowboard cross and banked slalom. Owen Pick, Ben Moore and James

Barnes-Miller will become the first to represent Great Britain in both events, as it builds on its debut in Sochi.

SNOWBOARDING 12-16th March

M SNOWBOARD CROSS

Monday 12th at 03:00am

W SNOWBOARD CROSS

Monday 12th at 03:30am EVENT RULES

M Vertical drop 100-200m, Course length 500-1,000m. Average gradient 2-25%. Slope width 40m. Qualifiers are individually timed, two runs. Finals are 16 athletes, two per heat.

W Finals are eight athletes, two per heat. M BANKED SLALOM

Friday 16th at 03:00am

W BANKED SLALOM

Friday 16th at 03:00am EVENT RULES Vertical drop 100-200m, Course length 400-1,000m. Average gradient 20-30%. Slope width 25m minimum. Best of 3 timed runs.

15% OFF for Ski Club Members

THE COVER

Choosing Ski Club Travel Insurance means getting the specialist cover you need, with policies designed by experts for skiers and snowboarders.

Photo: Ross Woodhall

Key Features • • • •

Off piste skiing and snowboarding without a guide covered by all policies All annual multi-trip policies include Fogg Medicard as standard Single trip cover up to the age of 85 (75 for multi-trip) Children FREE up to the age of 18 on all family policies (or under 24 if you have Ski Club Platinum membership)

For a quote, visit skiclubinsurance.co.uk or call 0300 303 2610


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stores nationwide | ellis-brigham.com


SKI CLUB PROMOTION

ELLIOT ROSE Marketing Communications Manager at The Ski Club “I realised very quickly that I needn’t have worried about not doing enough skiing. The instructor let us ski, stopping every now and then to have a quick chat about something, a bit of demonstration, and then a lot of practice. In fact, we skied so much, the occasional stops to discuss technique came as a relief and a chance to let the legs recover. “The conditions lent themselves perfectly to carving, and that was what the group were keen to practice, so we spent much of our time with the instructor really getting to grips with it. It was immense fun. I ended the week highly aware of the things I need to work on to continue improving. Whereas I already knew that I needed to improve my skiing in some vague way, this trip left me with a very specific plan of action for areas to focus on next time I’m in the mountains.”


All photos opposite: Jonny Cass

The Freshtracks Experience For intermediate skiers who reach a plateau in their skiing, trips like Freshtracks’ Season Start Up can be a great help. Take Elliot Rose, Marketing Communications Manager at The Ski Club, who had never been away on this kind of holiday before. Family holidays had settled him into a routine of skiing on mainly red runs, and the occasional black. He was facing a crossroads with his skiing. The 48 year old said; “I was a little reluctant to put myself entirely in the hands of instructors who might curtail my enjoyment in favour of tuition. Would it be a never ending course of ski school, with more standing around and talking than actual skiing?” Along with 21 other members, Elliot headed over to Tignes in December to enjoy some of the best early season snow the Alps has seen in years. Upon arrival, he was greeted by the three instructors for his trip, who would also eat and socialise with the guests each night. “It meant that by the time we were heading out onto the piste on the first morning, we’d already shared a meal and a few

glasses of wine with the instructors.” Elliot skied with them over a course of six days, developing his skiing while building up a rapport with his fellow holidaymakers and instructors. It covered almost every aspect of skiing; from carving and high speed tight turns to tackling moguls. The final two days focused on body position, balance and weight distribution, with some video feedback sessions. “The super slow motion video that Darren took showed very clearly my issues; keeping my hands and weight too far back. Although we were all skiing together as a group, it felt like individual personalised lessons.” The Season Start Up holiday is just one of many that Freshtracks organises for people like Elliot, who may want to improve their technique after becoming complacent with their skiing. It means that for the rest of the season – family trips or weekends away – they can enjoy the slopes with a new focus and better skiing than ever.

“Though we were skiing together, it felt like individual lessons”

Holiday details can be found online at skiclub.co.uk/freshtracks, in your Freshtracks brochure or call 020 8410 2022


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Modern package holidays are shaking off a stuffy reputation and removing (almost all) of the faff Words by Harriet Johnston

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2.50 for a coffee? Ridiculous!” My guide Veta tuts, “In Slovenia you can normally buy two coffees for that price.” I laugh, remembering bills from Switzerland or the French Alps when coffee in a mountainside café would set me back double that. But Veta is right — I wouldn’t pay more than €2.50 for a coffee my entire trip. I’m visiting the ski resorts of Slovenia, a country which offers cheap prices and short transfer times from the capital, Ljubljana. Tucked away between Austria, Italy, Croatia and Hungary, the two hour flights cost me little more than £90 return. The rest of the holiday was a package; organised by a start up called Much Better Adventures, who promise a private tour of four resorts in four days for £425, including accommodation, private guided transfers and a lift pass for four days. Ski rental and lessons can be organised for an extra fee. I arrive a day early, and am picked up at Ljubljana’s airport and dropped off at some local accommodation by a guide from the company. The candy coloured city of Ljubljana couldn’t be further from the alpine villages I’m used to. Every street has a huge colourful mural painted across walls, ranging from artistic creations to child—like daubs. The old town is compact, with the major sites within walking distance — and it’s fully pedestrianised. Perched on the hill, Ljubljana’s castle looks out over the

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orange and turquoise roofs of the city and, in the distance, the mountains have chairlift pinpricks etched onto them. When I wake up on the first morning it’s blizzarding and snow lays heavy on the ground. Veta picks me up from my accommodation and explains to me that though we could visit the resorts in any order, she suggests we start with Kranjska Gora, 45 minutes away. As we drive along motorways, we get to know one another. She’s an experienced snowboarder, with impeccable English, thanks to three seasons working in Les Deux Alpes. She’s fun and chatty; it’s not long before we’re both singing along to the British pop songs blasting out the radio. The downside of the package is that I’ve missed the opportunity to see my kit before we reach the slopes and when Veta hands me my rental equipment, I spot an immediate problem. It’s a case of the three bears. My boots are too big, and my skis are too small. This makes skiing feel a little unstable, and I appreciate the short slopes which run across the ski hill. Kranjska Gora is a resort best suited to beginners; a €40 ski pass for the day won’t provide much value to an expert, but it’s a good warm up for those testing their nerve on a red slope. Slopes in Slovenia are numbered rather than named, and often lack clear signs — luckily Kranjska Gora is small enough that it’s hard to get lost, with most of the 18 runs flowing down to the Ski+board

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base, where there are plenty of ski schools. Heading back to Ljubljana that night, with Veta’s promises of new rental boots ringing in my ears, I check into the Hotel Emonec, which is just a minute’s walk from the infamous pink Church of the Annunciation on Prešeren square. It’s part of the package, but I could have stayed here for €70 a night (€210 in total independently). From there, I stroll through the city, the twinkling lights lighting my way along the river banks as I hunt for dinner. Veta recommends Gostilnica 5-6 KG and it’s there that I tuck into one of the best pizzas I’ve ever had. It also happens to be a bargain; I leave €10, which is more than enough for the food and a tip. The following morning it’s an even shorter journey to the slopes — just 20 minutes drive to Krvavec. After my earlier battle with the boots, Veta unloads three pairs from the car. “We will find your perfect fit,” she says determinedly, as I pull on pair after pair, feeling like Cinderella. I settle on a pair and though I can’t say they’re the perfect fit, she’s certainly endeavoured to find me something which is a little more fit for purpose. Where Kranjska Gora feels amateur, Krvavec is far from it. Veta and I hop off piste, picking lines from the chairlift and floating through the powder. The resort is quiet, and when we split lunch it costs less than €6 each, including a local beer.

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The views from each of the resorts visited are some of the best in the country; as long as there isn’t a white out, like Harriet and Veta faced on the third day of their adventure

renting a private resort; there are so few skiers around. When we’ve raced down the nine wide, albeit short, trails a few times, we hop back in the car and it’s a 90 minute drive to the airport where Veta drops me off. Arguably a tour package works best here; it’s the only way the four resort pass is available, which allows you to explore not just the resorts but also some of the best sites in the country. Organising these individually for each day (€40) would only have meant more

It has it’s problems though — mainly the rental kit which, although a great idea on paper, took several attempts to get right for me. If you have your own kit it’s worth taking it — ski baggage with Easyjet is only an extra £45. Barring that, it’s the convenience and price which is appealing; it removed the faff, and meant I could be on the slopes within an hour of the plane touching down, with lift pass and kit ready to go. When I’m on holiday I want to be on holiday; not glued to my phone, constantly searching for where to go and what to see next, or lost on a Slovenian road trying to find the Alps. Package holidays just may have found a new convert; I’m just waking up to smell

time queuing for passes and less time on the slopes. There’s also no way I could have done this trip without a car and, though a rental car would have cost around €100, Veta’s guide skills and occasional singing? Priceless.

the coffee.

almost feels like I’m renting a private resort there are so few skiers around.”

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That evening, I decide to loosen my purse strings and treat myself to a meal in the city’s oldest hotel, The Grand Union. As I tuck into a meal at the newly renovated Atelje restaurant, it’s not like the sticky gnocci I had for lunch. It’s the nicest meal I’ve had in months, with artisan style dining; the artichoke custard and kale chips would fit in at a high—end suave London restaurant. It’s expensive by Slovenian standards at €45 — but for a three course meal with a glass of local sparkling wine, you’d be hard pressed to find anything this cheap elsewhere. I can’t help but think of the 40 Francs I’d shell out for a bowl of pasta in Switzerland and weep. The next day, still stuffed from my extravagant meal, we drive to our third resort; Vogel. Set within the Triglav national park, Veta drives me past Lake Bohinj en route and we stop at the famous Lake Bled for a photo op. It’s our final chance to see the sights, however, as our arrival in Vogel is cloaked in a thick fog. It’s impossible to see three feet in front of you, let alone the 13 blue and red runs or the beautiful views Veta had promised me. To my surprise, I hear other English accents exclaiming “We can’t see anything!” through the mist; turns out it’s one of the most popular Slovenian resort with Brits. We chat to a couple on a chairlift, who are staying locally, and tell us it has been like this for days. Unlike Veta and I, they don’t have a car, so aren’t able to swap between resorts when the bad weather comes in. They’re also restricted by their lift pass; the Slovenian Alps lift pass I have which covers all of the resorts is only available through a package deal. When we finally manage to escape the weather, we hole up in a café and, while Veta protests the coffee price, I order sauerkraut, for just €6.50. The poor weather only heightens my excitement for the last day. It’s a long, windy journey to Cerkno and when we do get there it almost feels like I’m

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Harriet was a guest of Much Better Adventures (muchbetteradventures.com) which offers three nights at Hotel Emonec from £425, including guided tour and ski pass. Private trips depart throughout the season.

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love going it alone. In many ways the best part of a great adventure is the planning. Spending time poring over maps, researching flights and sorting logistics. Ski trips are particularly exciting and if, like me, you are someone who likes exploring multiple resorts on a trip, going solo is virtually always the best option. It’s not for everyone. Some skiers love the security going with a tour operator brings — from the coach transfers to social hours and the in-resort rep. But not me. I’d rather hop in a hire car and ask a local (rather than some plucky seasonnaire) where the best bars are. And not being tied to a week’s package means far greater flexibility. And so here I am in the small resort of St Lary in the French Pyrenees munching on the most delicious paella, served from a street food stall, that set me back less than a fiver. It beats the usual chalet stodge, I think, as I pile on the succulent prawns. I’d made the dash south, partly because I’d heard the snow conditions were good but I’d also managed to bag a Ryanair flight to nearby Lourdes for less than £40 return. Add to that a hire car (about £100 for a five-night break) and you’re set. It’s a spectacularly good-value region. At St Lary, where I managed to be on the slopes by midday, a two-day pass costs €84 (£75) — only a fraction more than you pay for a day-pass in some big-name French resorts. This is family-ski territory; don’t expect serious steeps, but lots of cruisy blues and fairly unthreatening reds. The other skiers, mostly Toulousains and Bordelais, with the occasional Spaniard from San Sebastian, look less practised than the tribes you find in the Alps and you’ll be unlucky if you hear another British voice in the lift queue. We spend the afternoon cruising in the sunshine, skiing the longer slopes in the Espiaube sector, and higher in the Le Vallon area. A dusting of overnight snow has freshened the runs and there are some good pockets of powder within spitting distance of the pistes. There are two options for where to stay: up the hill at the purpose built base, which is very quiet after the sun sets, or down in the village — connected to the ski area with a gondola. The latter is the best for evening exploring with a smattering of bars and restaurants.

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In town the Spanish influences are strong, the little bars serving up plates of tapas and that street vendor with the huge bubbling pot of fresh paella. We call into Balthazar, a cool tapas joint, where they serve scrumptious plates of noir de bigorre ham. It’s made using the region’s native pig, which having almost reached extinction is now having a revival with the ham tipped to rival that of iberico in the next few years. We munch through a great spread of the charcuterie, washed down with plenty of local red. Next it’s on to La Mongie, a 1970s purpose built resort at the centre of the Grand Tourmalet ski area — the region’s biggest. It’s a great base (even if you loathe the architecture) sitting surrounded by a range of lofty peaks that culminate in the 2,877-metre Pic du Midi de Bigorre, with its iconic observatory that wouldn’t look at all out of place in a James Bond film. Skiers with cash to splash can spend the night here, marvelling at the 360-degree views all the way to the Mediterranean as the sun sets, before gaping at the constellations after dinner. At €399 a night for two, we eschew a stay, but nonetheless catch the cable car to the observatory with a different plan. Powder. We drink in the views, but the real treat is the ski down. The routes from the top have been designated among the world’s best for freeride, and our timing is perfect after a night of snowfall. We make great arching turns in the fresh powder, whooping as we go and stopping to admire our fresh tracks. The slopes at La Mongie are the kind that suit average one-week-a-year skiers to a tee; wide open, un-threatening and great for cruising (the long Bergers blue is a classic). Those in the know can dive off the sides and find some great freeride routes, but a guide is essential, as is the case for a descent from the observatory. Again, it’s the prices that stand out. A two-day pass this winter costs €86 for the whole area, and in the lively Le Schuss bar in the centre of town a small après ski beer costs about €2.50. You might not get the same extent as in the Alps, but there’s some great terrain to be had if you know where to look. That freeride run down from the observatory turned out to be the best of my season — I’d call that the making of a pretty great trip (without a coach transfer in sight). Ski+board

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Ben Clatworthy was a guest of France Montagnes (france-montagnes.com) and Hautes Pyrenees Tourism (pyrenees-holiday. com). In St Lary, two nights’ self-catering in a studio at the three-star Les Rives de L’Aure costs from €103 for up to four people. In La Mongie, three nights’ self-catering in a studio at the Residence Le Montana costs from €324 for up to four people (0870 0267 145, pierreetvacances.co.uk). Car hire price from avis.com. Total price for five nights: £311pp, based on four travelling, excluding food.

Top tips for a cheap deal: If you know where you want to go and when then an pre season deal can be cheaper, especially if you are a large party booking. Don’t rely on comparison sites to show you the cheapest deal; search the chalet name. The price can often be cheaper on the company’s own website. Chalets often work out cheaper once you factor in the cost of eating out or buying food in resort super markets, especially if you’re not a big party. Give independent companies a call as they may be willing to do you a deal. ‘Accommodation only’ can end up being more expensive, once you factor in transfers (especially if it’s not a major resort), flights and ski carriage, plus if something goes wrong with your travel you won’t be protected by ATOL/ ABTA. Off the beaten track resorts can offer really good value, especially if luxury is more important than the ski area. Andorra, Bulgaria and even Norway often have premium accommodation at a price that would only get you a bed in a dorm in a well known resort. Daniel Loots

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01 CLIMB If you’ve ever wanted to climb some of the most majestic mountains in the world, then this set of Mountain Tracks trips are for you. Offering the chance to scramble, clamber and climb up the Matterhorn or the Eiger is something many would love to tick off their bucket list.

CHOOSE YOUR CHALLENGE Far from the crowd, groups of British adventurers are taking to the mountains to explore with some of the most established guides in the industry. Welcome to Mountain Tracks trips, which can take you from more traditional ski holidays to hiking, climbing and touring expeditions across some of the most famous mountain ranges in the world. Many of the trips are open to complete beginners, which makes them ideal for those who want to challenge themselves. For hardy explorers, who’ve spent more time in the mountains before, there are trips that will put yourmore advanced mountain skills to the test. Every holiday can be a tick off your bucket list, no matter how big or small.

To take on a challenge like the Matterhorn, you have to be dedicated; previous experience in alpine mountaineering is essential. It’s also well worth travelling with a company with over 20 years of experience on the route; like Mountain Tracks. Climbers must be very sure-footed on steep terrain and have lots of endurance. It’s a serious financial and personal commitment – but the sense of achievement makes it all worth it. Trip essentials: Price: £2895 per person, Dates: July-September Trips like this are demanding; particularly for those who haven’t experienced anything like this before. The Mountain Tracks training weekend provides a good opportunity to prepare for this kind of trip. Snowdonia offers the ideal backdrop to hone the necessary skills in order to climb the Matterhorn. Trip essentials: Price: £345. Dates: Weekends throughout May and June.


SKI CLUB PROMOTION

02TREK

03 SKI

It’s easy to overlook the Alps in the summer; we often associate the mountains with skiing in snowy landscapes. And yet, hiking can be a beautiful way to see things with a different perspective.

Meanwhile, over the winter months, Mountain Tracks run a variety of ski touring holidays for everyone from beginners to more experienced skiers. Trips like the Eastern Vanoise 4 day holiday are opportunities for those who haven’t tried touring before to give it a go, while the Jotunheimen Haute Route Tour is one of the best opportunities to ski in Scandinavia. The Tour de Soleil is a special itinerary that follows an old smuggler's route through the Swiss Alps.

Our hiking trips include the Classic Haute Route trek, which is ideal for those looking to take in a world famous route in the summer months. Linking Chamonix in France with Zermatt in Switzerland, the summer Haute Route trail is one of the world’s great multiday treks. With unique vistas and breathtaking alpine scenery this is an ideal challenge for those wanting to explore the mountains in the summer, or take in one of the world’s most iconic treks. Though the route follows a well defined trail, with a fairly relaxed pace, days can be challenging at a high altitude.

Ski touring trips run all season from November to May

Trip essentials: Price £1595. Dates: June-September

Look at what's on offer at mountaintracks.co.uk, or give Mountain Tracks a call on 020 8123 2978


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A new, short-break tour operator aims to get skiers on to the slopes in record quick time Words by Colin Nicholson

s there anything more frustrating than getting up at the crack of dawn for a flight only to spend the rest of the day waiting for bus transfers, then traipsing between lift pass kiosks and rental shops? While other skiers finish their day cheerfully gliding down slopes, you must settle for tales of epic waits for coach drivers and vistas of gleaming tarmac. Never is the ‘lost’ day spent travelling to the Alps more painful than when you have limited time on the slopes. So a new short-break tour operator is offering to get you on to the slopes in record quick time with the promise that you’ll be skiing by lunch. I was sceptical, as no matter how many times I’ve been asked in advance to fill in my vital statistics, it is clear that the rental shop does not

lift pass, which I did. At last! A photo of myself that made me look like someone you might trust your children to. “Were you put off by the 6.10am departure too?” I guiltily asked the other couple waiting for the transfer that evening at Geneva. “No,” they answered even more guiltily, “we just thought it’s bad enough that we’re leaving the children at home for three days.” In the event, with the ‘Beast from the East’ still affecting airports, we were lucky to get to the Hotel Montana at all that day, as the arrivals board was a sea of red cancelled or delayed flights. We had to wait a couple of hours for a delayed flight to arrive with another couple of passengers who were booked on our transfer, and only got to the hotel after 1am. But the next morning our ski passes were indeed

know me from Adam. And of course the ski pass would have been at the chalet in advance, but the ticket office needed a two euro deposit and a dodgy shot that made me look like a Moors murderer. However, the new outfit, IGoSki, claims to be “pretty unique” in catering exclusively for short breaks and ski weekends, and it has the backing of one of the biggest independent tour operators, Alpine Elements. So I gave it a try in La Tania. Sadly, no chain is stronger than its weakest link. While the concept of skiing on travel days is great in theory, the tour operator had failed to count on the flakiness of one element — me. Much as I love skiing, that flight from Gatwick at 6.10am on Sunday was going to be too much for me, especially as it came the morning after a 40th birthday party. “So you mean you need hangover time?” asked the IGoSki girl on the phone brightly as she rebooked me on an afternoon flight. Quite. Nonetheless, we still wanted a quick turnaround the following morning. I was assured there was no need to send my height, weight, etc. But I was asked to forward a picture of myself for the

waiting. And since the rental shop was ten metres from the hotel, we were with our instructor Barney from New Generation by 10.15am, which, under the circumstances, was a quick turnaround. We wanted to get to fresh powder fast, and a few pistes took us to St Martin de Belleville, where Barney knew the perfect bowl to try out our powder skills. Is it just me, or have our off-piste skills been getting a bit rusty after a few lean snow years? I’m sure powder used to be easier. It wasn’t long before we were searching for skis lost in deep snow. Barney told us to forget our our piste technique and instead find our balance as if we were “skiing on eggshells”. “And keep bouncing,” he added. “If you let yourself become static you’ll end up leaning backwards.” With Barney’s teaching skills, we found our rhythm and on the second try kept bouncing along, even where the powder had a wind-blown crust. Barney had suggested a longer offpiste itinerary to the Vallée des Avals, but with the weather closing in that seemed uncertain. We begged him to let us try this legendary loop off to the left of the piste map, with no lifts and no

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Airports Verona 1h Venice 1.45 h Bergamo 2 h Malpensa 3 h

THE B The trip promises to get skiers as much slope time as possible; even with hangover time

pistes. When the sun put in a reappearance, he said he was willing to give it a go. So, setting off from the Col de Chanrossa, we traversed, dropping into a valley that felt far from the Three Valleys. It looked like something from The Lord of the Rings, and I was glad to have Barney guiding us; at times we were on narrow ridges, with gullies to the side, at other times in the trees. Finally, we joined a walking trail that led us back to civilisation in the form of Courchevel 1650. And all this time we hadn’t seen a single other skier! Barney armed us with tips for other places to find powder for the next two days. And two days it was, as the transfer for our 9.35pm flight back to Gatwick very nearly allowed us to catch the last lift on the day we flew home. When you’re planning a short break to the Alps, it’s hard not to wonder if it’s all worth it, when you’re at the airport or waiting for your transfer. Well, I just have to think of those epic off-piste moments, the remarkably good dinners at the ski-in, ski-out Hotel Montana as well as the spa time to help my aching muscles and the answer is clear. So was it worth it? Hell, yes!

Only 4 hours away from any London Airport

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SNO Colin travelled as a guest of IGoSki (igoski.co.uk; 020 3949 8364), which offers three- and four-night breaks in The Three Valleys, Portes du Soleil, Chamonix and the Grand Massif from £378 per person, halfboard based on two sharing including wine, transfers and flights.

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Find out the offers: www.alpecimbra.it


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Photo: Ross Woodhall

Ski with the Club As we head toward the later stages of the season, our Leader and Instructor-led Guiding services are still going strong, and it’s not too late to get yourself booked in for some fantastic social skiing. But don’t take our word for it – here’s what our members have been saying so far this season.

Ski Club Leaders

Instructor-led Guiding

“They made the difference from the holiday being just great to: Oh my goodness - fabulous, amazing, memorable, I’m still smiling!”

“It was the first time I had used this service and it was amazing. The instructor gave me so much confidence and I can’t wait to ski off piste again.”

Kenneth, Zell am See

Paula, La Plagne

“Alan was a superb Leader and a great evening host. He managed the dynamics of the group well and went above and beyond to ensure all had a good day with great skiing. First class in every way.”

“Really brilliant service - love it. I keep recommending it to all my friends.”

John, Kitzbühel

“Alistair’s enthusiasm, support and encouragement were boundless, and his knowledge of the mountain was excellent.” Peter, Zell am See

Nikki, Val Thorens

“It’s a great way to meet Club members, expand off piste horizons and be taught at the same time.” Mike, Tignes For more information on Leaders and Instructor-led Guiding, visit skiclub.co.uk/ski-with-the-club


33

THE INSIDE EDGE

36

SNOW WEAR Don’t just stash your ski stuff at the bottom of the wardrobe for the summer — our advice on how best to treat it, store it or wear it throughout the next six months

40

GEAR From GPS tracking to webcam websites — a mobile phone can act like a modern Swiss Army pen-knife. Using it the right way can unlock the mountain for you

46

RESORT INSIDER We’ve located the perfect resorts where you can have a “wholiday” — a trip which will give every member of the family the whole package

Ski+board

April 2018

skiclub.co.uk


36

SNOW WEAR

Keep jackets springing all year From slope to street, don't just stash your ski kit at the back of your wardrobe Words by Harriet Johnston and Alf Alderson With the end of the ski season approaching, now is the time to ask — how best to store kit until next season? Before stashing it away at the bottom of the wardrobe for the year, it’s sensible to give everything a wash. Plenty of ski clothing can be washed, including shells and ski pants. In fact it can be better for the longevity of your clothing if it is cleaned properly as accumulated dirt can affect the shell’s ability to both repel water and vent moisture. In previous years, Ski+board has covered different types of soaps available to wash garments to keep them in their best nick, including Nikwax soap, which is designed specifically for ski jackets. Meanwhile, treat your inner liner puffer jacket like a sleeping bag, by letting it hang freely when stored to avoid compressing down material unnecessarily. That being said, brands are increasingly creating jackets which can transition from slope to street and back again, meaning customers can get their money's worth, from shell style technical jackets which can be worn on country walks to three layered combination coats to keep you warm in UK snow. You can read up on snow wear news online at skiclub.co.uk/skiandboard.

MORE REVIEWS CAN BE FOUND ON THE SKI CLUB SITE

Tom wears Planks Feel Good jacket (£190) and Good Times trousers (£170) with Dragon NFX Split goggles (£110)


SNO W W EA R

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Annie wears 686 Ceremony Insulated jacket (£250), Bern helmet (£50) and Atomic Revent goggles (£145)

Will wears Trespass Icon DLX Jacket (£250) with Provision pants (£160) and Dragon NFX2 goggles (£185). Will wears Trespass Icon DLX Jacket (£250) with Provision pants (£160) and Dragon NFX2 goggles (£185). Ski+board

April 2018

skiclub.co.uk


38

SNO W W EA R

O'NEILL JONES POWDER SHELL £170 A good range of pockets, air vents and lightweight ‘Firewall Magma’ lining ensure this jacket has all the key features; add to that good waterproofing vs breathability balance and there’s all the fundamentals of a good ski jacket. All the key features at a good price Fabric pattern won’t have universal appeal

Tom wears O’Neill Jones Powder Shell (£170) and Picture Welcome Bib Pants (£240)


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Red wears Picture Ridingo Shirt and Crispin Gilet (£200) with O’Neill Jeremy Jones pants (£220), Dragon NFX black goggles (£110)

PICTURE RIDINGO SHIRT AND CRISPIN GILET £200 Offers three outfits in one; each piece can be worn individually or together as a cool combination. Durable outer fabrics are pretty breathable and water resistant, there’s a good selection of zipped pockets and it all looks funky. Great looks, very versatile Definitely not a style for everyone

MAJOR BRITISH RETAILERS Snow+Rock: snowandrock.com Cotswold Outdoor: cotswoldoutdoor.com Ellis Brigham: ellis-brigham. com Surfdome: surfdome.com TSA: snowboard-asylum.com The retailers above offer Ski Club members ten per cent off full-priced products, apart from Snow+Rock and Cotswold Outdoor, which offer 15 per cent

CONTACTS 686: 686.com Anon: anonoptics.com Arc’teryx: arcteryx.com Atomic: atomic.com Barts: barts.eu Bawbags: bawbags.com Bern: bernunlimited.com Burton: burton.com Coal: coalheadwear.com Dragon: dragonalliance.com Mammut: mammut.com Oakley: oakley.com

Ski+board

O’Neill: oneill.com Ortovox: ortovox.com Patagonia: patagonia.com Picture: ellis-brigham.com Planks: planksclothing.com Scott: ellis-brigham.com Smith: smithoptics.com Fashion editor Harriet Johnston Photoshoot director and illustrator Amanda Barks

April 2018

skiclub.co.uk

Assistants Rebeca Gonzalez Jonny Cass Photography Steven Haddock Hair and make-up Naomi Serene Models Red Rainey Rosie Nelson Annie Tanton Tom Ashton


Photo: Scott

40

GEAR

Lou Hall is an adventure travel writer who has won various industry awards for her writing.

Alf Alderson is gear editor for Ski+board and an award-winning adventure travel writer. He divides his time between the Alps and Pembrokeshire. He is co-author of the Rough Guide to the Rocky Mountains and other ski guides.

Learn how to be left to your own devices Gadgets and gizmos a-plenty, with more on offer than ever With an avalanche of apps, gadgets and gizmos to pick from, it can feel overwhelming to select the very best. But they can make our time on the slopes more fun, possibly more rewarding and, in some cases, safer. Take the apps which we covered in the last issue. Fatmap aims to make your off-piste adventures safer by providing you with routes and information on

avalanche safety, weather etc., whilst the award-winning Ski Tracks app lets you compare your days on the slopes with your friends, whatever your ability. If you’d rather not carry your phone whilst skiing, there are still plenty of gadgets that may appeal. The Feiyutech camera gimbal assists anyone with an action camera to record top-quality footage of the action on the slopes, whilst the Garmin Vivofit GPS keep a record of just how hard you’re pushing that action.

READ MORE REVIEWS HERE

£299.99

$9.99 available on Apple Store

£169.99

FeiyuTech WG2 Waterproof Camera Gimbal With Tripod

Ullr Mobile Avalanche Safety Guide App

Garmin Vivosport GPS Activity Tracker

One of the most irritating features of ‘amateur’ filming is camera shake, which is hard to avoid when skiing. FeiyuTech’s WG2 camera gimbal overcomes this to provide shake-free, pro-quality filming and is fairly waterproof, so you can safely use it in bad weather. It can be mounted on a helmet, your chest or a backpack and is compatible with a wide range of action cameras including GoPro Hero 5 and Hero 4. It has the advantage of being hands-free as well as offering 360-degree auto-rotation. It supports slow motion shooting and the associated app and Bluetooth connections allow you to control the gimbal from your phone. The built-in battery lasts 2.5 hours, which isn’t great, but the charge time is just two hours.

This iPhone app provides detailed avalanche forecasts from the regional centre closest to where you’re skiing, as well as recording field observations whilst you ski, including location, aspect and slope angle. The best bit? No mobile or wi-fi coverage is required. It uses features on your phone to provide real-time information on avalanche conditions, and this can be transmitted to the nearest regional avalanche centre to enhance their reports and share the data with other users. The app can be used to record weather, terrain conditions and signs of instability and can also create snow pit profiles and enter stability test results. The latter is probably more than most skiers will want from the app, but snow geeks will love it.

The Vivosport GPS is a slim alternative to a sports watch, which comes with built-in GPS so you can track distance. It comes with a heart rate and stress monitor, plus various fitness apps, so there’s a good range of features. It isn’t that hard to read though swiping between features can be haphazard. The Vivosport is compatible with Android, iOS and Windows devices, onto which you’ll need to download data to break it down. It acts as a watch, and in normal use you should get around seven-days of battery life, reduced to eight-hours when in GPS mode, which is comparable with other similar devices. The only problem? It doesn’t have a ski mode so may not work for more hardcore riders.

Makes camera shake a thing of the past Battery life is quite short

Access and share avalanche information A lot of the features are probably overkill

Small, neat and lots of features Lacks ‘ski specific’ features


G EA R

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Free weekly trial Monthly pass £4.49 £395

Free

Yearly pass £25.39

Satmap Active 20 Solo GPS Unit

Snoweye.com

Snowcru

The Active 20 Solo is a sports mapping GPS, which displays highly detailed topographic mapping. It’s not designed specifically for skiing, though it will be a boon for backcountry adventures. The touchscreen is big enough for the clumsiest of fingers, and it has a good range of tech for all levels. It’s built to withstand the worst mountain weather, being water- and impact-proof and fitted with impact-resistant Gorilla Glass. It connects to GPS, Glonass and Galileo, ensuring coverage anywhere, and has wireless connectivity through both wi-fi and Bluetooth. In addition, the package also includes a 10 per cent off map voucher and one-year free access to Satmap Xpedition Premium online mapping and planning tool.

When it comes to snowcam websites, Snoweye.com is up there. Literally. The webcam website features 5,522 ski resort cameras in 48 countries, including over 4,000 in Europe. The site doesn’t operate any of the cameras, just features them. It is a straightforward concept, fun and informative; seeing that there’s night skiing in Bohemia (Czech Republic) was news to me. While some are live-feed webcams, others feature images from over two weeks ago which can be a little confusing. It’s the first site to be pulling together all the countries’ webcams though, so it’s well worth visiting. Finally if you find a webcam that works on the resort’s site but not on Snoweye, just let them know and they’ll add it. LH

Snowcru records where, how fast and how many vertical feet you’ve skied that day through phone GPS, all in a battery friendly way. The “DAYCRU” feature enables you to link up with ski buddies to compare and share information, and “NEAR ME” shows who’s close by. Clear, concise and easy to use, you choose how often you would like your tracking to be updated — generally three seconds is enough. At the end of the day, you get a virtual map of your route, which you can share on social networks, along with your stats to satisfy any competitive geek. The best bit? The leadership boards can be viewed for a day, a week or a season so it’s perfect for competitive families or groups of friends. LH

Can pinpoint you exactly A big investment

Big collection of webcam feeds in one place Unclear dates on some of the images

SKI INTO NEXT SEASON Already dreaming of next year’s snow? Get ahead of the game and book your Winter 18/19 ski holiday today.

Get more winter at crystalski.co.uk ATOL protected. For more information please see our booking conditions.

Clear, concise and simple to use Not for everyone


SKI CLUB BENEFITS

MEMBERS DISCOUNTS The Ski Club offers its members a host of discounts at a variety of organisations to help save money both before and on your holiday. To claim your discount visit skiclub.co.uk/discounts where you will also find full terms and conditions.

ACCOMMODATION WORLDWIDE PowderBeds.com 5% FRANCE Alpe d’Huez Chalets 5% Alpe d’Huez Alps Accommodation 5% Samoëns and Morillon Auberge & Chalets sur la Montagne 10% Sainte Foy

Serviced Apartments Worldwide 12% SAW specialise in providing over 350 furnished apartments for short-term or long-term stays across USA, Europe, Australia and Asia Clarian Chalets 10% Portes du Soleil Fresh Tracks Oz En Oisans 10% Oz-en-Oisans Le Chateau d’Oz 10% Oz-en-Oisans Méribel Ski Chalets 11% Méribel Nomadic Ski Holidays 5% Chamonix Ski Cuisine 5% Méribel Ski France 20% Various locations Ski Talini 5% St Martin de Belleville Snow Retreat 5% La Tania SnowChateaux 10% Various locations Snow Trippin 10% St Martin de Belleville Méribel The Tasty Ski Company 10%

Morzine Le Grand Massif Valloire Reservations 12% Valloire SWITZERLAND Chalet Apartment Rentals 15% Verbier Design Hotel Matterhorn Focus 7% Zermatt Ferienart Resort & Spa 10% Saas-Fee Fun & Spa Hotel Strass 5% Mayrhofen Hotel Beau Site 10% Adelboden Hotel Belvedere 10% Wengen Hotel Bristol 5% Saas-Fee Hotel Schweizerhof 12% Pontresina Hotel Silberhorn 10% Lauterbrunnen Hotel Wengener Hof 10% Wengen Hotel Alpenroyal 10% Zermatt Silvretta Parkhotel 10% Arosa Sunstar Hotels Group 10% to 15% Arosa, Davos, Flims, Lenzerheide, Grindelwald, Wengen, Zermatt, Klosters, Saas-Fee Swiss Quality Hotels 10% Resorts in Switzerland and Garmisch-Partenkirchen in Germany Verbier Rentals 10% Verbier Grindelwald GriwaRent 5% Hotel Kreuz & Post 20% Hotel Glacier Various discounts AUSTRIA Fun & Spa Hotel Strass 5% Mayrhofen ITALY Alpen Hotel Eghel Folgaria 10% Folgaria Hotel Triolet 10% Courmayer Livigno Ski Holidays 10% Livigno Maison la saxe 10% Courmayer Muu Village 10% to 20% Folgaria NORTH AMERICA Holiday Whistler 10% Whistler Leavetown 6% Alberta, British Columbia, Québec Summit Vacations 20% Breckenridge

uk and ireland Britannia Hotels 10% Caledonia House Ireland 15%

TOUR OPERATORS AND TRAVEL AGENTS Absolutely Snow 15% Absolutely Villas 15% Alpine Action 5% Alpine Elements 11% Balkan Holidays 15% Club Med 10% Different Snow 5% Esprit Ski 5% Frontier Ski 5% Headwater 5%

RocketSki 15% SB Ski 10% Ski Amis 10% Ski Independence 5% SkiLine 5% Ski Peak 5% Ski Solutions 5%

Iglu.com 5% Award-winning ski travel agency, working with over 60 tour operators in over 200 resorts. Choose from group deals, ski chalets, or accommodation-only

Crystal Ski Holidays 5% Since 1981, Crystal have been finding the best places to ski and snowboard. With deals across the Europe and the USA, they have something on offer for everyone Jasna Adventures 10% Lagrange Holidays 5% Mark Warner 10% Mountain Heaven 10% Mountain Paradise 5% Neilson Up to 7.5% Nonstop 5% Premiere Neige 10%

Erna Low 6% An independent ski specialist offering the widest range of selfcatered and hotel accommodation across Europe and North America

Ski Total 5% Ski-Val 5% SkiIceland 5% SkiLapland 5% SkiNorway 5% SkiSweden 5% Skiworld 10% Ski Weekends Various discounts

Inghams 5% With over 80 years’ experience, offering holidays in 91 resorts in 8 countries, Inghams offer a wide range of accommodation options SNO ski Holidays 5% Snow-wise 10% Snowcoach 5% Snowscape 5% SnowTrex Various discounts Stanford Skiing 10% Sunweb 10% The Oxford Ski Company 5% Travel Club Elite 6% VIP Ski 10%


LIFT PASSES Cairngorm Mountain 10% Folgaria, Italy Up to 20% Glenshee Mountain Up to 20% Lecht 10%

SKI SCHOOLS AND GUIDES EUROPE Ongosa 10% SkiBro Up to €30 off AUSTRIA A-Z Ski School 10% Piste to Powder 5% FRANCE British Alpine Ski School Les Deux Alpes 10% British master class 5% Alpe d’Huez ESI First Tracks Ski Coaching Up to 10% Evolution 2 10% iSki Val d’Isère 15% Magic In Motion Courchevel, Méribel 10%

Davos 10% Stoked Snowsports 10% Summit Ski & Snowboard School 10% Swiss Ski and Snowboard School 10% Vivid Snowboarding Verbier 10% ITALY Echo Travel 10% Scuola Sci Sauze Sportinia 10% Scuola di Sci del Cervino Various Discounts Ski School Cristallo-Cortina 10%

SNOWSPORTS INSTRUCTOR COURSES ABC Safety Training 20% Alltracks Academy Various discounts Altitude Futures Various discounts Basecamp £250 off 11-week courses Basi (British Association of Snowsport Instructors) 10% off Level 1 courses EA Ski and Snowboard Training 25% We are Sno £400 off

TECHNIQUE COURSES AND CAMPS New Generation Ski and Snowboard School 10% Ski coaching with 19 years of experience, New Generation offer group and private lessons in 17 resorts Momentum Snowsports 10% Oxygène Ski School Up to 10% La Plagne, Val d’Isère Ski Progression Up to 15% Skimckay.com Up to 20% Val d’Isère Skispeziali.com 10% Snow d’Light 10% Supreme Ski & Snowboard School 10% TDC Val d’Isère 10% The Snow School 15% Ultimate Snowsports Tignes 10% SWITZERLAND Adrenaline Ski and Snowboard School Verbier £10 discount Alpinemojo Ski School 15% to 20% Element Ski School 10% European Snowsport 10% Schweizer Schneesportschule

Core Ski & Snowboard Camps 10% Inside Out Skiing £50 off Marmalade Ski School 10% Nonstop Ski & Snowboard Various discounts Powder Extreme Various discounts Pro Ride Snowboard Camps Various discounts

TRANSPORT Jet2.com 5% Snow Express 10%

SWISS £25 off flights Fly on one of 180 weekly direct flights to Switzerland from the UK, with complimentary food and drink. Flying with SWISS also gives you free ski carriage

AIRPORT PARKING, HOTELS AND LOUNGES

CAR HIRE

APH Airport Parking & Hotels Up to 27% Cophall Parking Gatwick 26% FHR Airport Parking and hotels Up to 25% Holiday Extras Up to 15% Looking4parking Up to 20% Skyparksecure Up to 16% Stress free parking Up to 22%

RESORT SHOPS, RESTAURANTS AND ACTIVITIES

Rhino Car Hire 15% Zest Car Rental 5%

WORLDWIDE Skadi 20%

FINANCIAL Caxton Fx £10 balance on registration WeSwap £10 Free travel money Eurochange Various discounts

SKI LUGGAGE BagSOLO 10% Loqski 10% Piste of Mind 10%

TRANSFERS AlpyBus 10% Ben’s Bus 5% off Grenoble transfers Cham Van 10% Holiday Taxi Innsbruck Airport 5%

Ski Lifts 10% Transferring over 60,000 passengers to over 200 ski resorts in Europe and North America, Ski-lifts provide a flawless door-todoor service Le Taxi Savoyard 10% Looking4Transfers Up to 15% Mountain Rescue 10% on Saturday transfers PowderCab Airport Transfers 10% Sea-Lifts 10% Whiterides Airport Transfers 10%

FOR CARS Volvo Various discounts Polar snowchains 15% Sanef Tolling France Free registration The Roof Box Company 10%

Skiset Up to 60% From ski hire to buying a new pair of goggles, there are over 800 SKISET shops located at the heart of many resorts ANDORRA Restaurant Parador Canaro Soldeu 10% AUSTRIA Horny B St Anton 10% Alpine Angels Childcare 10% Various locations FRANCE Arc 1950 Freeride Up to 55% Bananas Various discounts Val d’Isère Farenheit Seven Restaurant 10% Courchevel & Val Thorens Huski 10% Various resorts Le Vallon Blanc Up to 30% Tignes Massage Me 10% Various resorts Polaire Star Up to 25% Bourg St Maurice

Snowrental up to 60% When it comes to hiring skis, Snowrental offers great value for money- enjoy top quality equipment and cheap rates in hundreds of selected shops


SKI CLUB BENEFITS

Prosneige rental various resorts Various discounts Ski Chics Free Hydroflask White Storm Up to 55% Various locations Chamonix Bighorn Bistro Various discounts La Moraine Various discounts Le Basilic 10% Yogamala 10% Courchevel Aquamotion10% La Boite Pizzeria 10% ITALY Courmayeur Rifugio Maison Vieille 10% 4810 Sport Various discounts Cervinia Al Solito Posto 10% Cervinia 2001 15% Heliski Cervinia 5% Lino Bar Cervinia Various discounts Les Skieurs D’Antan 10% Maison Jean Bich di Pers 10% Morange Sport 15% Yeti Bar Happy hour all day SWITZERLAND Azzura Sport Up to 15% Various locations Andrist Sport 15% Various locations Iglu-Dorf 15% off cheese fondue various resorts Snowline Sport Shop Up to 25% Portes du Soleil Mürren Craniosacral Therapy Up to 20% Stäger Sport 15% Zermatt Bayard Sports 10% Bar z’alt Hischi Up to 25% Edwards Bar 10% Glacier Sport 15% Matterhorn Glacier Paradise 20% Matterhorn Sports 10% Schweizerhof Kamin Bar 10% Silvana Mountain Spa 10% Whymper Stube Various discounts NORTH AMERICA Alpenhof Lodge and Bistro Jackson Hole 20%

SHOPPING Absolute-Snow 15% Aquapac International 20% Banana Moon Clothing 10% Bawbags 20% BBCO Headwear 15% Blacks 20% Burnt Custard 20% Cotswold Outdoor 15% Craigdon Mountain Sports 15%

Cycle Surgery Up to 15% Drift Innovation Action Cameras 20%

Ski Bartlett 10% Slope Angel 21% Snowfit 10% Surefoot 10% Surfdome 10% Sunglasses Shop 20% Techniblock Sunscreen10% Thirsty Various discounts Trixski 20% Ultimate Outdoors 20% Yoodo Movie Maker 20%

Firpark Ski Centre 20% Folkstone Ski Centre 10% Glasgow Ski Centre 10% Gloucester Ski and Snowboard Centre 10%

Ellis Brigham 10% The ultimate range of men’s and women’s outdoor clothing, footwear and equipment to beat all weather extremes Elliot Brown watches 10% Ember 15% Finches Emporium 10% Freetime Mountain Sports Various discounts Freeze Pro Shop 10% Friski Wear 15% Futureproof.Life 15% Glisshop 10% GO Outdoors 10% Hardnutz 20% Kora 10% Lifesystems 15% Little Skiers Up to 15% Lockwoods Up to 25% Mountain Warehouse 15% Nature Shop 5% Nevisport 10% Off Courses.net 10% Panda Optics 15% Paul James Knitwear 15% PIQ 20%

Chel-Ski 20%

Wolffepack 20% Wolffepack is a radical concept in backpack design from an awardwinning start-up. It swings your gear round to your front whilst still strapped to your back

GYM, FITNESS AND LEISURE Arthur Beale: London’s Yacht Chandler 10% Alpine French School £25 off Focus Study Tours £100 off H2-Fitness 15% discount and no joining fee JK Physiotherapy 15% M D Physio 15% RYA 50% Serena Stubbs Orthotist 10% SkiA Ski Trainer 15% Skifitness 20% Ski-Mojo 10% Step-Inside Yoga for skiers 15% Train 2 Ski 50%

ARTIFICIAL SLOPES Snow+Rock 15% Established in 1982 by a small team of dedicated enthusiasts, Snow+Rock made its name by challenging the norm and has fantastic ranges instore and online Planks 15% PlayBrave Sports Apparel 20% Runners Need 15% Ryft Goggles 15% RxSport 10% Sail and Ski 10%

Ackers Outdoor Activity Centre 10% Alpine Snowsports Aldershot 10% Bassingbourn Snowsports Centre Up to 25% Bearsden Ski & Board 10% Bowles Snowsports Centre 10% Bracknell Ski Centre 20% Brentwood Ski & Snowboard Centre Various discounts Bromley Ski Centre 10% Carlisle Snowsports 10% Chill Factore Up to 30% Dorset Snowsport Centre 50% Exeter & District Ski Club 20%

Chel-Ski is London’s largest indoor ski centre offering the very best hi-tech slopes. A fun, safe and controlled environment where you can learn to ski or snowboard Gosling Ski & Board Centre 10% Llandudno Ski and Snowboard Centre 10% Mendip Snowsport Centre 10% Newmilns Dry Ski Slope 10% Norfolk Snowsports Club 25% Plymouth Ski Centre 10% Runcorn Ski Centre Junior rate for adults Sandown Ski Centre 10% Ski and Snowboard Centre Cardiff 20% Ski Rossendale 10% SkiEasy Chiswick 20% Snowtrax — Outdoor Activity Centre 10% Snozone Castleford and Milton Keynes 10% Southampton Alpine Centre 10% Suffolk Ski Centre 15% Sunderland Snowsports Centre 20% Swadlincote Ski & Snowboard Centre 10% Tamworth Snowdome £15 discount The Snow Centre Hemel Hempstead 10% Torquay Alpine Ski Club 10%

All discounts are based on information available at the time of going to press. All are subject to partners’ terms and conditions and are subject to change without prior warning. See skiclub.co.uk/discounts for further information or call Member Services on 020 8410 2015


£

Save over £500 on your ski holiday with Ski Club Discounts

£

There are so many parts to a ski holiday from flights, ski pass and maybe even a massage to ease those aching muscles. The Ski Club has partnered with hundreds of different companies to save you money on your favourite holiday of the year. We’ve put together a guide of just how much money it’s possible to save with your discounts.

Save over £100 on your holiday accomodation Members can get £50 off Crystal’s Hotel New Solarium in Courchevel. If you’d like to ski in Zermatt, discounts can get you £69 off Hotel Mirabeau when you holiday with Inghams and £300 discount at Club Med Cervinia. Travel experts at SNO can do the leg work for you and give 5% off as well. If you’re looking for a self-catered break in France? SKI France offer up to 25% off their own managed properties All prices are per person, based on a booking for two adults, for 10th – 17th March.

Use your travel discount and save £50 You can claim £25 off each flight with Swiss (and free ski carriage) or 5% discount with Jet2.com. Getting from the airport can be cheaper too, with 11 different partnerships and discounts of up to 15%. You can also hop on Snow Express’ coach and save 10%

Save hundreds of pounds on ski gear Hunting for a new jacket or skis? Cotswolds Outdoor and Snow+Rock offer 15% off and Blacks give 20%. Ellis Brigham give 10% off, as do Go Outdoors

Ski Lessons could be up to £30 cheaper Always dreamed of skiing in La Grave? BASS offer 10% off trips. If freeriding isn’t for you, New Generation offer 10% off ski and snowboard lessons

RE NTAL SHOP

Partners offer up to £55 discount on equipment

If you don’t have your own skis, save money on equipment rental with SkiSet or booking rental online with Snowrental. Combined with their existing discounts, this could get you up to 65% off

Save hundreds on meals, drinks and shops We partner with restaurants and bars, including 10% off drinks in Bananas in Val d’Isère, 10% off meals at d’Alpage in Cervinia and 10% off at Arlberg1800 in St Anton

Save up to £50 on post-holiday relaxation Stretch out aches and pains with a physiotherapist, including 20% off at MD Physio and 15% off at JK Physiotherapy or join a gym; H2 Fitness in London offer a 15% discount and no joining fee

Look after the pennies on gadgets You can get discount off accessories, such as 20% off Wolffepack bags, 20% off the trixski ski carrier

Total savings, up to £500 with your Ski Club discounts We’re continually adding in-resort partners to our portfolio so stay updated on the discounts page online. Additionally, if you’re visiting a resort and would love a Ski Club discount at your favourite restaurant, or we currently don’t have a discount at your favourite retailer, send an email to james.connor@skiclub.co.uk All individual T&C’s apply.


46

RESORT INSIDER

Don’t resort to anything less Words by Harriet Johnston, Chris Madoc-Jones When the whole family head off skiing, it can be difficult to balance up a resort which offers something for everyone. With the majority of skiers travelling with their partner or family, resorts need to offer more than just one form of holiday. And unfavourable snow conditions in previous years has prompted resorts to invest in a range of off-mountain activities, from zip lines to ice diving or walking trails. Resorts which have options for everyone are seemingly easy to come by, but may have a flaw — be it a long flight time, uncertain surrounding snow or cost being just a few. The resorts we’ve chosen to cover in this final issue of Resort Insider are heavenly resorts for down to earth skiers. Skiing holidays have become as much as a chance to relax in the mountains, as they are to enjoy the sport. From mass freeride areas to enormous snowy adventure grounds, these two resorts offer playgrounds to both adults and children alike. Both have everything you might want; from families who are looking for options for children who want to play in the park, adults who want to explore on piste and off, and grandparents who’d like the option of grabbing lunch with the family before heading down to the base for a snooze. In every issue of Ski+board this season we’ve focused on resorts which have new lift developments over the winter. You can read our full feature which covers

these in more detail in the November issue, and look out next season for a similar article in the November 2018 issue of Ski+board which will cover the future ski lifts being developed in time for the 2018-2019 season.

FIND REVIEWS OF RESORTS WORLDWIDE

HOW OUR GUIDE WORKS CHALLENGE Our infographic shows how resorts

grade pistes according to difficulty, showing what percentage, are black, red, blue or green. However, note that Austrian, Swiss and some Italian areas don’t have green runs. We list the percentage by kilometre. PISTES We list the combined length of all the resort’s

pistes, as claimed by the tourist office. We include linked areas that are also covered by the lift pass. LIFT PASS Prices are for a peak season six-day pass. SKI CLUB Ski with other Ski Club members where there

are Freshtracks holidays ‘F’, Leaders ‘L’, or Instructor-led Guiding ‘ILG’.


R ESORT I N SI DER

47

Méribel

Photo: SSophie Drake

Piste height 1260m - 3230m / Lift pass £265 / Lifts 200 / Pistes 650km

Why there? With it’s quaint chalet style architecture and enviable location in the centre of the Three Valleys, Méribel may seem like a dream like ski resort. It lacks in true ski in, ski out options — yet the village is picturesque, partly in thanks to the resort’s ability to avoid clunky high rise developments. It may be this which makes it exceptionally attractive to British customers — it has been known as the ‘little England upon the Alps’, with almost half the total visitors coming from the UK. Some of the facilities are a little dated but on the whole, there’s a lot going on — from a strong selection of shops and bars, to a booming (albeit sometimes boisterous) nightlife. The varied terrain of the Three Valleys means there is nearly always quite literally something for everyone; and it’s constantly expanding in almost every direction. All three of the main resorts have seen a major lift built this summer, further improving one of the world’s best lift systems. In Méribel the Roc de Tougne six-seater chair has replaced two ageing drag lifts, drastically improving access to the Belleville Valley from the old Combes chairlift, taking pressure off the busy Tougnète and 3 Marches links. Can’t ski, won’t ski: Head up in the cable car for lunch with the skiers or take a swim or sauna at the Aquamotion water park below Courchevel 1650. Yeti Point, a snowy adventure playground, has been improved with a zipwire, toboggans and igloos. It is the largest play and sledging area for children in the Alps.

37%

40% Great position to access the huge Three Valleys

9%

14%

Quaint village without clunky architecture Constantly expanding thanks to lift developments

Snow Lifts Queue-free

Limited and expensive ski in, ski out options

Food Charisma

It can feel a little Brits Abroad

Ski schools Low budget

Some facilities are a little dated

Off-piste

Hemavan Tärnaby Piste height 439m - 1119m / Lift pass £173 / Lifts 14 / Pistes 50km

Why there? Skiing in Lapland might sound like a bit of a dream, but Hemavan Tänarby has plenty of reasonable options for any down to earth skier. Located in the North West of Sweden, the ski area has plenty on offer for every one. Though they are two separate resorts, driving the 18km between each is simple and ski passes can be brought to cover either one or both. Tärnaby is a training ground for Sweden’s alpine professionals, offering access to some of the country’s most popular ski slopes Meanwhile Hemavan offers wide and gentle slopes for those who love the piste, as well as fantastic off piste skiing in an incredible mountain setting. The villages are small scale, but the ski area is large with one of the best freestyle areas in Sweden, Kobåset, on the doorstep. The only major lift project in Sweden this season is here. The brand new hybrid six-seat chair and eight-seat gondola lift runs from the town to mid-mountain and looks set to transform the ski experience. It forms the first part of the “Hemavan — Vision 2025” project to revamp the entire resort. A terrain expansion, two new fast six-seater chairlifts, a new draglift and a ski lodge are part of the plans – so look out for even more developments in the next few years and greater interest from UK tour operators as a result. Can’t ski, won’t ski: For those who are more inclined to try crosscountry, there are 40km of prepared floodlit tracks. There are also snowmobile trips and tours.

Ski+board

April 2018

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Snow

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Lift developments should revolutionise area Quaint and quiet ski experience Plenty of options for different types of skiing

Lifts Queue-free Food Charisma Ski schools Low budget Off-piste

skiclub.co.uk

Separate resorts which are not linked, so requires a car Currently not hugely accessible with UK tour ops Location may mean it’s cold and dark


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Keep up with the Club’s coverage of the Olympics

SKI + BOARD’S SUMMER SISTER MAGAZINE IS BACK

IN YOUR NEXT ISSUE

Features A view of the Alps from above, a hike over Mont Blanc and gravel biking close to home

News The latest from the mountains you know and love, plus all the news from the Ski Club

Discover The gear to use in summer and winter, adventures to look forward to and people to inspire

Photo: Oliver Kraus

We’re midway through the biggest snowsports competitions on the planet — Olympic season is here. Following the success of British athletes like Lizzy Yarnold and Billy Morgan in the Olympics, our sights now turn to the Paralympics and stars like Kelly Gallagher and Scott Menaagh. The Ski Club website is here to guide you through the entirety of the Games, with extensive information including a timetable of events, detailed run throughs on athletes and explanations of what each discipline involves. The site will be updated regularly to include news and results from the Games as the action unfolds. In addition, the club has put together features on Olympic history, and our favourites resorts to have staged the Games. It’s all at skiclub.co.uk/pyeongchang2018.

Scott Meenagh will compete in biathlon and cross country sports

Snap up tips from our favourite photographer Ski magazines are full of eye-catching photos, but if you’ve ever tried to capture an action shot yourself you’ll know how difficult it is. So the Ski Club asked Ross Woodhall, whose pictures feature in every issue of Ski+board, to show us his tips and trips of the trade. Nowadays YouTube is the place to find out how everything is done, from changing a fuse to learning a new language. So the Ski Club’s video team has posted a film of him talking would be photographers though the process. Dust off that camera and turn your sights on youtube.com/ thesnowcast to get those shots that your holiday deserves.

To find out more visit

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76% of young people believe that a lack of positive opportunities put young people at an increased risk of falling into crime and antisocial behaviour.

Ski Club of Great Britain’s Charity Partner

(Snow-Camp and YouGov research)

Giving young people positive opportunities can turn their lives around. Snow-Camp have been successfully changing the direction of young people’s lives since 2003 through skiing, snowboarding, qualifications and work experience.

But we need your help. Please support Snow-Camp and our #Switch180 campaign.

snow-camp.org.uk/switch180 01273 241383 Ski+board

February/March 2018

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Let’s go Somewhere 15% discount for Ski Club GB members using the code AF-SKIGB-M5 in-store and online.

You can also use your discount with: Proud to support

snowandrock.com | runnersneed.com | cyclesurgery.com Full T&Cs apply. Not to be used in conjunction with any other offer or discount. Selected lines are exempt. 10% discount only on bikes. Only valid upon production of your Ski Club GB membership identification in-store or use of valid discount code online. Offer expires 31.12.18.

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Stores nationwide | cotswoldoutdoor.com

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