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Kenny Loggins and the Blue Sky Riders come to the Skagit PAGE 3

Skagit Valley Herald Thursday October 10, 2013

Recreation

Reviews

At the Movies

October is prime time for hunters and fishermen around the state

Music: Kenny Rogers, Sting, Haim Video Games: “FIFA 14”

“Captain Phillips” a tight, taut, edge-of-your-seat thriller

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E2 - Thursday, October 10, 2013

NEW ON DVD THIS WEEK “Much Ado About Nothing”: William Shakespeare. The mere mention of the Bard’s name has been known to send shivers up some spines. It conjures up images of exotic landscapes, outlandish costuming and dialogue that bounces off our ears like a drop of morning dew doth slip from a fading leave. That’s why you need to brace yourself. Joss Whedon, the man who made blond high school girls cool as vampire slayers and gave “The Avengers” its might, has opted to adapt Shakespeare’s “Much Ado About Nothing” to the big screen. Whedon dids not chang the dialogue, something you just don’t do when dealing with Shakespeare. The downside is that the devotion to the original text doesn’t allow Whedon to show any of his own word skills. The biggest oddity is that while this is a contemporary version of Shakespeare’s work, the film is shot in blackand-white. The hueless images may end up more off-putting than any concerns about keeping up with the Bard’s words. It’s a minor flaw in what should be an introduction to Shakespeare for those who have feared his work. “After Earth”: M. Night Shyamalan’s sci-fi tale of a teen, Kitai Raige (Jaden Smith), and his military-minded father, Cypher (Will Smith), who get stranded on Earth 1,000 years after all humans have left for higher intergalactic ground. Looks spectacular, but the direction feels like another Ice Age has arrived. And Shyamalan, who wrote the screenplay, has created a story that’s rife with cliches, full of contradictions in its literary allusions and loaded with performances that are a half heartbeat stronger than a coma. “The Hangover Part III”: If there was ever a movie made just to bleed a few dollars more out of loyal fans of the series, it’s this badly written, painfully paced flotsam and jetsam of the film world. “The Best of the Original An Evening at the Improv”: Features Milton Berle, Mort Sahl, Howie Mandel. “Europa Report”: Mission to find water on Europa turns deadly. “Aaahh!!! Real Monsters: The Complete Series”: Includes 52 episodes of the animated series. “Power Rangers Super Samurai: A Christmas Wish”: Rangers are stuck in Megazord’s cockpit on Christmas Eve. “Frat Brothers”: Coming-of-age drama about creating your own legacy.

YOUR ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION GUIDE TO WHAT’S GOING ON IN SKAGIT COUNTY AND THE SURROUNDING AREAS

Upcoming movie releases Following is a partial schedule of coming movies on DVD. Release dates are subject to change: OCT. 15 The Heat - Fox Pacific Rim - Warner

The Weekend / Page 5

OCT. 22 The Conjuring - Warner The Internship - Fox The Way, Way Back - Fox OCT. 29 Monsters University - Disney R.I.P.D. - Universal NOV. 5 Grown Ups 2 - Sony The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey Extended Edition - Warner White House Down - Sony NOV. 12 Man of Steel - Warner n McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“Complicity”: When a party goes horribly awry, a group of teens must decide their fates. “Dancing Ninja”: An orphaned boy discovers his true destiny. “A Day in the Life: Seasons 1 & 2”: Documentary filmmaker Morgan Spurlock’s behind-the-scenes look at life. “The Middle: The Complete Third Season”: ABC comedy starring Patricia Heaton. “Doctor Who: The Terror of the Zygons”: Fourth Doctor (Tom Baker) investigates destruction of oil rigs in the North Sea. “Alpha and Omega 2: A Howl-iday Adventure”: Holiday movie featuring unlikely pair of wolves and their new cubs. “2000 Yankees World Series Collector’s Edition”: A look at the battle between the New York Mets and the Yankees. “Thomas & Friends: Santa’s Little Engine”: DVD includes five frosty episodes. “Shiver”: A serial killer gets more than he bargained for when he attacks a young secretary. “Drawing with Mark”: Teaches children of all ages the fundamentals of drawing. “Bratz Go to Paris: The Movie”: The girls hit the runways of Paris in this spy spectacular. n Rick Bentley, The Fresno Bee

Skagit Opera presents “Rigoletto” on Friday and Sunday at McIntyre Hall in Mount Vernon

Inside

SUBMISSIONS Email features@skagitpublishing.com, vrichardson@skagitpublishing. com (recreation items) Deadline: 5 p.m. Friday for the following Thursday edition Phone 360-416-2135 Hand-deliver 1215 Anderson Road Mount Vernon, WA 98274 Mailing address P.O. Box 578 Mount Vernon, WA 98273

Travel................................................6-7 Music, Game Reviews......................8-9 On Stage, Tuning Up....................10-11 Get Involved...................................... 12 Hot Tickets........................................ 14 Movie Review: “Captain Phillips”.... 16 Movie Listings, At the Lincoln......... 17 Out & About.................................18-19

Online events calendar To list your event on our website, visit goskagit.com and look for the Events Calendar on the home page HAVE A STORY IDEA? w For arts and entertainment, contact Features Editor Craig Parrish at 360-416-2135 or features@skagitpublishing.com w For recreation, contact staff writer Vince Richardson at 360-416-2181 or vrichardson@ skagitpublishing.com TO ADVERTISE 360-424-3251


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

ON STAGE

Thursday, October 10, 2013 - E3

x o b e h t e d i s t u o c i s Mu ing Group featur e Kenny Everett nativ es to Loggins comesort the Skagit R

si photo

Louise Uznank

Kenny Loggins (from left), Georgia Middleman and Gary Burr

Blue Sky Riders

something special. The band released the When: 8 p.m. Fridayalbum “Finally Home” Saturday, Oct. 18-19 The career of Kenny Loggins in January, and begins its Where: Pacific Showroom, is among the most successful and next tour on Oct. 18-19 Skagit Valley Casino Resort, unique in the music business. with two shows in the 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. Tickets: $45-55 His first major splash came as a Pacific Showroom at Information: theskagit.com, member of Loggins and Messina, the Skagit Valley Casino ticketmaster.com/venue/123497 his duo with Jim Messina (forResort. merly of Poco and Buffalo SpringReached last week in a conferfield) that scored big in the 1970s ence call, Loggins was in CaliforLoggins became a veritable with hits like “Your Mama Don’t nia (“driving to L.A. to catch a Dance” and “Danny’s Song.” Log- household name in the ’80s, when plane”), and Middleman and Burr gins and Messina sold more than his voice was heard on the singles were in Nashville. 16 million records and were a key from the movie soundtracks of Loggins is something of an “Caddyshack,” “Footloose” and fixture in the pop-rock field for expatriate Pacific Northwesterner; “Top Gun.” much of the decade. he was born in Everett and spent His current group, Blue Sky Already a highly regarded his early years in Seattle before Riders, incorporates elements songwriter, Loggins teamed up his family moved to California. that have served Loggins well — with Michael McDonald of the Blue Sky Riders are about clever lyrics, hook-laden melodies, five years into their partnership. Doobie Brothers to write “What A Fool Believes,” a No. 1 hit that strong harmonies, and rock and Mutual admiration drew Loggins, roll drive peppered with pop sen- Middleman and Burr together. earned Loggins and McDonald sibility. Throw in the considerable a 1980 Grammy for Song of the “I grew up in Texas, and I grew Year. Another Grammy, for 1981 talents of Georgia Middleman up on country, but I also loved and Gary Burr, with whom he Best Male Pop Vocal Perforrock and roll,” said Middleman, shares the front line of the stage, who has worked with Faith Hill, mance, came Loggins’ way for and it’s clear they’re creating “This Is It.” Martina McBride, Keith Urban By CRAIG PARRISH Entertainment/Lifestyles Editor

each others’ careers and written together, so we were always tuned in to the other person.” Loggins came to Joe T Newberry II photo Nashville about five years ago to “write and numerous others. “The whole with Nashville thing about Kenny: I grew up on songwriters,” Burr said. He and Kenny Loggins’ music, and when Loggins started writing and “saw I was in Nashville, I was a big fan a little bit of a spark happen,” he of Gary Burr. added. “It’s pretty amazing to be The songs on “Finally Home” working with these two guys. Our most definitely have a countryrecord is pretty much every flavor music element, and Loggins, Burr we think of, that we bring to the and Middleman say the material table. That’s what is exciting for can be equally effective in an me; we don’t have to put it in a acoustic-guitar trio setting or with box.” a full band behind them. “Georgia and I have known “We do shows both ways,” each other for about 15 years,” Loggins said. “We sometimes do said Burr, who has been named acoustic shows, and sometimes Songwriter of the Year by numer- we do band shows. I really love ous organizations and has worked working with the band the most, with artists like Wynonna Judd, but that’s because of my own hisJuice Newton and Conway Twitty. tory and where I’ve been from; I “We’ve worked together, watched like that.


E4 - Thursday, October 10, 2013

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

RECREATION

October turns busy for hunters and fishermen tinue to do so this month for coho fishing. The best action for coho, however, Some of Washington’s will likely be in the rivers most popular hunting later in the month. seasons get underway in “Anglers can still find October. coho salmon in the marine Hunters have the opporareas in early October,” tunity to take to the field said Ryan Lothrop, Puget for deer, elk, ducks, geese Sound recreational salmon and other game birds. manager for the WDFW. Tens of thousands of “But fishing in the rivers hunters are expected to will steadily improve as the pursue deer during the month progresses.” modern-firearms season Several rivers are open beginning Saturday in in October for salmon areas throughout the state. fishing, including the Dave Ware, game manNooksack, Skagit, Cascade, ager for the Washington Stillaguamish, Snohomish, Department of Fish and Skykomish, Wallace, SnoWildlife (WDFW), said he qualmie and Green. expects deer season — as The Skagit River allows well as others coming up for an increased bag limit this month — to be a good this year: a total of four one. salmon with no more than “A mild winter followed two wild coho. Because by a favorable spring regulations vary for each benefitted wildlife speriver, anglers should check cies ranging from deer the regulations pamphlet to pheasants,” Ware said. before heading out. “Also, recent storms have Known hot spots for helped to quiet hunters’ coho in North Puget Sound footsteps in the forest and are trained to make sure include Point No Point, doors to be extremely cau- will run from Saturday blow leaves off the trees Jefferson Head, Possession through Jan. 26 without a they have a safe shot, and tious,” Ware said. for better visibility. Those break. Hunting seasons are Bar, Deception Pass and nonhunters can help ensure While deer draw the are all very positive signs also underway in the region Shipwreck. Fishing regulatheir safety by making largest number of hunters for upcoming seasons.” tions for those areas — and themselves visible in the this month, hunting seasons for grouse, quail, bear and other waters of marine field.” also get underway Saturday cougar. Safety first areas 9 (Admiralty Inlet) Snow geese will be makWet weather has eased for ducks and — in many ing their way to the region and 10 (Seattle/Bremerton) All hunters using modcampfire restrictions in parts of the state — geese — change in October. this month; about 80,000 ern firearms — or in areas many areas of the state, as well. Anglers fishing Marine snow geese winter in westopen to hunting with although hunters should The region’s popular ern Washington each year. Area 9 have a daily limit modern firearms — are check for any local regula- waterfowl hunting season of two salmon, but must Most of those birds required to wear hunter tions in planning a hunting starts in mid-October. The release all chinook. Those congregate in the Skagit orange clothing as specitrip, Ware said. duck season will be open fishing Marine Area 10 Valley, and can be found fied by state law. While Campfires are banned Saturday through Oct. 16, have a two-salmon daily here from mid-October that requirement does not through Oct. 15 at WDFW and then re-open Oct. 19. through early May. Once limit, but must release wild apply to nonhunters, Ware wildlife areas in Benton, An exception is the scaup they arrive, a great place to chinook. suggests hikers, mushroom Franklin, Yakima and Kit- season, which is closed Anglers looking to pickers and anyone else in titas counties, and through from Oct. 12 through Nov. view the birds is at the Fir Island Farms Reserve Unit get an early start on the areas open to hunting wear Oct. 31 at the Columbia 1. of WDFW’s Skagit Wildlife region’s blackmouth seabright, colorful clothing to Basin Wildlife Area in Goose hunts will run Area. son might want to head maximize their visibility. Grant and Adams counties. Saturday through Oct. 24 to Marine Area 10, said “Statistics show that “There are areas of the in the region, then restart Lothrop, adding that wild hunting is a very safe sport, state where wildfires still Nov. 2. The snow goose sea- On the water chinook must be released especially compared to pose a real risk, and we are son in Goose Management Anglers still looking to in this area. Another option most other outdoor activi- asking hunters, campers Area 1 (Skagit and Snostretch their lines as well for blackmouth anglers is ties,” Ware said. “Hunters and others heading outhomish counties), however, as their season can conBy VINCE RICHARDSON Staff Writer

Marine Area 7 (San Juan Islands), where anglers can keep one chinook as part of a two-salmon daily limit. Marine area 7 anglers must also release all wild coho in October. Other salmon fishing options include marine areas 8-1 (Deception Pass, Hope Island and Skagit Bay) and 8-2 (Port Susan and Port Gardner). Anglers fishing those areas in October have a daily limit of two salmon but must release chinook. Chum retention is permitted in all marine areas for October, except for portions of Hood Canal. Some major rivers, including the Skagit, Nooksack South Fork, Cascade, Stillaguamish, Snohomish, Skykomish, Wallace, Snoqualmie and Carbon, prohibit chum retention. Meanwhile, most marine areas of Puget Sound reopened for recreational crab seven days a week through Dec. 31. The exceptions are marine areas 10 (Seattle-Bremerton) and 11 (Tacoma-Vashon Island), where annual quotas were reached during the summer fishery. The daily catch limit in Puget Sound is five Dungeness crab, males only, in hard-shell condition with a minimum carapace width of 6 ¼ inches. In addition, fishers may catch six red rock crab of either sex per day, provided those crab measure at least 5 inches across. All crab caught in the late-season fishery should be recorded on winter catch cards, which are valid until Dec. 31. Winter cards are available at license vendors across the state. Those catch reports are due to WDFW by Feb. 1, 2014.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, October 10, 2013 - E5

THIS WEEKENDin the area BOOK READING Author Serge Lecomte will read from his novels “Alicia Maravilla” and “Letters of Dogood Goodman” at 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, at The Tattered Page, 514 S. First St., Mount Vernon. 360-366-8055.

COURTNEY RUCKMAN

MODEL RAILROAD OPEN HOUSE The Whatcom-

‘Rigoletto’ ‘Rigoletto,” presented by Skagit Opera and featuring soprano Courtney Ruckman (a Mount Vernon native), Yuseok Oh and Ryan MacPherson, will play at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11, and 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13, at McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way in Mount Vernon. $15-$59. 360-416-7727 or mcintyrehall.org.

RYAN MacPHERSON

Skagit Model Railroad Club will host an open house from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, at 1469 Silver Run Lane, Alger. The club operates large, permanent HO- and N-scale model railroad layouts. Admission is by donation to help continue building the layouts. whatcom skagitmrc.org.

ARTS FEST Immaculate Conception Regional School will hold its annual Autumn Arts Festival from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, at St. Joseph Center, 215 N. 15th St., Mount Vernon. Enjoy live entertainment, a variety of handcrafted items, jewelry, home décor, kids’ activities, raffles and more. Free admission. Breakfast and lunch available. 360-4283912 or icrsweb.org.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E6 - Thursday, October 10, 2013

TRAVEL

Detroit art museum hosts show devoted to animation By MIKE HOUSEHOLDER Associated Press

ABOVE: Workers put the finishing touches on the Detroit Institute of Arts’ newest exhibition, “Watch Me Move: The Animation Show,” which organizers are calling the “most extensive animation show ever mounted.” The exhibit features both iconic pieces as well as a host of lesser-known works that span the past 100-plus years. Visitors will be able to peruse more than 100 animated film segments — nearly 12 hours’ worth of footage in all. RIGHT: Gabriel Hall of New D Media puts the finishing touches on a projection mapping room. Photos by Carlos Osorio / AP

DETROIT — The 128-year-old Detroit Institute of Arts has gained a reputation as a home for some of the world’s most hallowed masterpieces: paintings by Van Gogh and Picasso, the Diego Rivera industry murals. Things will look a bit different, though, over the next few months. Vincent, Pablo and Diego will have company in the form of Mickey, Bart and Bugs. “Watch Me Move: The Animation Show,” which organizers call the “most extensive animation show ever mounted,” has both iconic clips — featuring the aforementioned Mouse, Simpson and Bunny — as well as lesser-known works that span the past 100-plus years. The show brings together industry pioneers, independent filmmakers and contemporary artists, including William Kentridge and Nathalie Djurberg, alongside commercial studios such as Walt Disney, Aardman and Pixar.

n On the Web: dia.org

The exhibit takes its name from American cartoonist and animator Winsor McCay’s centuryold short film “Little Nemo,” which displays an on-screen message inviting viewers to “Watch Me Move.” Visitors can peruse some 100 animated film segments — nearly 12 hours’ worth of footage. Time-lapse, stop-motion, hand-drawn and computergenerated animation; it’s all there in a six-section configuration designed to attract art lovers and popculture fanboys alike. “Animation is art and is just as worthy as our Van Goghs or our (Pieter) Bruegels to hang inside a museum,” said Jane Dini, one of the show’s curators. “Hang” is the operative word. Plush couches and other seating areas are placed throughout the show, along with headphones and built-in audio sources. It’s designed to allow visitors to take a load off and absorb the animated content at their own pace.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, October 10, 2013 - E7

TRAVEL Local travel CRUISE SHOW: AAA Travel

will host the event from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, at the Skagit Valley Casino Resort, 5984 Darrk Lane, Bow. AAA Travel experts will be joined by industry representatives to discuss cruising trends, tips for travelers and a wide variety of upcoming cruise and tour options. RSVP: 360-848-2090.

Oct. 16. LeMay-America’s Car Museum, Tacoma Waterfront & Brown and Haley Candies: 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 13. Tour LeMay’s 9-acre campus and fourstory museum, which holds one of the world’s largest collections of vintage, custom and classic motor vehicles. Then enjoy lunch and shopping on the Tacoma waterfront and a stop at the Brown and Haley Candy Store, home of Almond Roca and Mountain Bars. $69. Register by Nov. 6. “New Day Northwest,” Bothell’s Country Village and Seattle Times: 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 21. Watch a live taping of King-5’s “New Day Northwest,” a visit to Bothell’s historic Country Village Shops, no-host lunch and a private tour of the Seattle Times North Creek printing facility. $54. Register by Nov. 14. The Blind Boys of Alabama at Benaroya Hall: 3:30 to 11:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 17. $85. Register by Dec. 2.

SENIOR CENTER TRIPS: Skagit County senior centers offer short, escorted trips departing from and returning to local senior centers. For information, call the Anacortes Senior Center at 360-293-7473 or sign up at your local senior center. Next up: Tulalip Trifecto: Hibulb Cultural Center, Tulalip Resort and Seattle Premium Outlets: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 30. Enjoy a private tour of the Hibulb Center’s interactive exhibits, longhouse and research library, followed by a stop at the resort for lunch and gaming, topped off with time for shopping at dozens of outlet stores. $50. Register by SHORT TRIPS: Mount Vernon

“One of the things we tried to think about was how somebody could easily get through the exhibition in a half an hour, 40 minutes and feel that they had been immersed in the history of animation,” Dini said. “And then for those real connoisseurs of animation, that they could sit here and really” take it in. For that latter group, the DIA offers a $75 pass that allows for unlimited visits to the exhibit and to the related movies and lectures. One lecture will be delivered by Leslie Iwerks, an Academy Award-nominated filmmaker whose grandfather, Ub Iwerks, was a pioneering Disney animator. A clip from Ub Iwerks’ “Silly Symphonies” is shown not far from “Little Nemo” in the show’s “Beginnings” section, which kicks off the show and is devoted to the emergence of the animated image. Dini’s brother, Paul, a longtime animation writer, also will give a talk.

Parks and Recreation offers travel opportunities for ages 12 and older (adult supervision required for ages 18 and younger). Trips depart from and return to Hillcrest Park, 1717 S. 13th St., Mount Vernon. For information or to register, call 360-336-6215. Next up: Chihuly Garden and Glass and Pilchuck On Display: 1:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 17. Visit the Chihuly Garden and Glass attraction at Seattle Center, then preview more than 250 artworks to be sold at the annual Pilchuck Glass School Auction. Includes free time to explore shops and restaurants between the two stops. Ages 16 and older. $77-$79. Preregister by Oct. 10. Reifel Bird Sanctuary and Historic Steveston Village: 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 27. Check out one of the top bird-watching sites in the heart of the Fraser River estuary, home to 268 species of birds. Then head over to the historic waterfront town of Steveston, with shops, cafes and a picturesque boardwalk. Passport, enhanced

A construction worker walks by exhibits of the Detroit Institute of Arts newest exhibition, “Watch Me Move: The Animation Show.” Carlos Osorio / AP

“My brother used to say, if he really wanted to get my goat, that more people knew around the world who Batman was than the ‘Mona Lisa,’” Jane Dini said. The exhibition presents more than a lengthy succession of moving images. Visitors are encouraged to try an interactive video game that begins its journey in London’s Underground. The show concludes on a futuristic high note — the projection mapping room. Projection mapping uses software to manipulate projected images and help them to fit on irregularly shaped

surfaces. In the exhibition’s projection mapping room, light splashes across jagged-edge formations that at one point give the appearance that spiders are crawling all around. “The thing that we wanted to do with the show that we thought was really important was to have a unifying introductory experience and a unifying conclusion experience,” said Holly Harmon, an interpretive specialist at the DIA. “This is where the technology is now. When you walk into this room, you really don’t know how it’s done.”

driver’s license or NEXUS card required to cross the border. Ages 12 and older. $67-$69. Preregister by Oct. 21. Bakeries and Spices and Goodies: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16. Visit some of the best rated bakeries in the Northwest, out-of-the-way food and spice stores and a variety of diverse shops specializing in imported delicacies, organic products and more. Ages 12 and older. $55$57. Preregister by Nov. 8. ESCORTED TOURS: The Whatcom County Tour Program offers a variety of day trips and longer tours, with most trips departing from and returning to the Bellingham Senior Activity Center, 315 Halleck St., Bellingham. For information or to register: 360733-4030, press #, ext. 47015, or wccoa.org/index.php/Tours.

Oak Harbor/Mount Vernon. Contact Pat Gardner at pgardner@ oakharbor.org. STANWOOD SENIOR CENTER TRIPS: The Stanwood Senior Center offers occasional trips around the Puget Sound area and beyond, departing from and returning to the center, 7430 276th St. NW, Stanwood. For information or reservations, contact Sandy Kitchens at 360-6297403.

PASSPORT APPLICATIONS: The Anacortes Public Library accepts passport applications from noon to 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Saturdays at 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Passport forms and information on fees and how to apply are available at travel. state.gov, or pick up an application and passport guide at the EXTENDED TRIPS: The Oak library. Harbor Senior Center is organiz The Oak Harbor Senior Center ing several small-group trips for accepts passport applications, 2014: San Antonio in March, by appointment, from 10 a.m. to Scotland in June, Trains of Colo- 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday rado in July and New England in at 51 SE Jerome St., Oak Harbor. September. Trips will depart from 360-279-4580.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E8 - Thursday, October 10, 2013

REVIEWS MUSIC CDS Compiled from news services

Sleigh Bells “Bitter Rivals”

Brooklyn noise pop duo Sleigh Bells’ new album, “Bitter Rivals,” is an unfortunate thing. Perhaps singer Alexis Krauss and guitarist Derek Miller overthought the scope of their art. In an effort to be heavy and edgy, Sleigh Bells have slathered too much production bass and ham-fisted fuzz over their own valuable talents. This is smarty-pants angst drifting in a sea of cliche lyrics and simplistic song structure. The title track is a mess of indecisive pace; “Minnie,” for its aggressive assault, is tempered by a refrain that finds Krauss singing in a small child’s voice. Had the album, the group’s third, channeled the zeitgeist of guitar played by Miller on “Tiger Kit,” easily the best track, Sleigh Bells would have been much better off. Sleigh Bells sounded more pure on last year’s “Reign of Terror.” Their power felt less contrived on tracks from that album such as “Crush” and “Comeback Kid.” But that was then and this is now, and “Bitter Rivals” is much less than their best.

the struggles of a Mexican immigrant on the Spanish-tinged ballad “Dreams Of The San Joaquin;” a jaunty Gulf Coast dance tune on “Don’t Leave Me in the Night Time,” featuring accordionist Buckwheat Zydeco; and a complex narrative about fighting darkness in the modern world on “Turn This World Around,” a duet with young singersongwriter Eric Paslay. He occasionally reaches too far, as in “‘Merica,” certainly the first patriotic tune to reference a spanked child and a drunken uncle. For the most part, though, Rogers proves he can still deliver the romantic ballads and dramatic narratives on which his reputation rests. n Michael McCall, Associated Press

Joe Nichols “Crickets”

After 11 years as one of the most effective traditional country singers of his generation, Joe Nichols crosses over to rocking contemporary songs, most of them about seducing young women and sentimentalizing the rural lifestyle. Nichols’ beefy baritone gives more muscle to these up-tempo celebrations than n Ron Harris, Associated Press most of the younger male artists currently topping the charts. Nichols has always been Kenny Rogers good at injecting personality into novelty “You Can’t Make songs, and he elevates even the corniest of Old Friends” these formulaic tunes (“Yeah,” “Hee Haw”) by giving them a swagger equal to that of Kenny Rogers Tim McGraw and Trace Adkins. Give him enters his 75th year a memorable song like “Gotta Love It” — with an album that reminiscent of Nichols’ 2010 top hit “Gimblends the familiar mie That Girl” — and he stands above most with the challenging, of the new country stars to rise in his wake. seeking new hits and pursuing new ideas Nichols frontloads “Crickets” with his even as he enters the Country Music Hall of aggressive attempt to fit into modern counFame this fall. try conventions. But he reminds everyone of His age occasionally shows in the raggedwhat an outstanding, old-fashioned country ness at the edges of his vocal tone. But Rogsinger he can be when he uses the tail end of ers always made the huskiness of his voice the 16-song collection to present the philowork for him, and that holds true through sophical “Old School Country Song,” about most of these 11 new songs. Impressively, how chat rooms and cellphones don’t soften he hits high, forceful notes when required, the pain of heartbreak, and a fine cover of matching longtime duet partner Dolly ParMerle Haggard’s classic “Footlights.” ton on the soaring passages of the wistfully Here’s hoping Nichols’ contemporary sentimental title tune, which would have move helps keep this traditionalist relevant fit on any of his solo albums from decades and on the charts. past. On the progressive side, Rogers tackles n Michael McCall, Associated Press

Haim

“Days Are Gone” Siblings Este, Danielle and Alana Haim have been steadily gaining momentum with tour support slots for Mumford & Sons, Rihanna and Florence + the Machine. Their audience is mostly young girls who just want to rock out without giving up on their pop just yet. “Days Are Gone,” the trio’s debut album, is slick and radio-friendly, thanks to producers Ariel Rechtshaid (Vampire Weekend, Usher) and James Ford (Florence + the Machine, Arctic Monkeys). The tracks are delivered with energy and confidence and catchy hooks are easy to come by. This album is instantly likable. “Forever,” “Falling” and “Don’t Save Me” are upbeat jams laced with 1980s synth guitars, while “My Song 5” is gritty with its Muse-esque dark guitar licks and R&B vibe. “Let Me Go” is full of attitude, with the group showing off its perfect harmonies. n Reetu Rupal, Associated Press

Dr. Dog

Joan Jett and the Blackhearts “Unvarnished”

One of Joan Jett’s targets in the track “TMI” from her new CD, the aptly titled “Unvarnished,” are those who “make a fashion of passion.” The contempt is not surprising: For the pioneering female rocker, passion has never been an ordinary word (to paraphrase Graham Parker). When it comes to music, at least, Jett has always come across as someone for whom “I Love Rock ‘n’ Roll” is more than just a hit song lyric — it’s a statement of purpose. So it goes on this, her first album in seven years. Jett’s fire remains undiminished as she continues to make no concessions to fashion. Sure, strings turn up on two numbers, but otherwise it’s Jett doing what she has always done so well — crunchy riffs, catchy choruses and attitudes that run the gamut from snarling to reflective. n Nick Cristiano, The Philadelphia Inquirer

“B-Room”

Sting

Seven albums in, pop-rock sextet Dr. Dog are in no hurry to reinvent themselves. The group, fronted by Scott McMicken and Toby Leaman, is dabbling in more collaborative songwriting, and a theremin, for goodness’ sake, is heard on the shimmery “Twilight,” one of the sparer standout tracks here. But if it has overhauled its methods, the band (currently on tour with the Lumineers) hasn’t made over its sound. Its comfortable yet sharply executed songs are as dependably catchy as ever, drawing on late ’60s influences like the Beatles and the Band and early ’70s singersongwriter rock. “B-Room” doesn’t concern itself with upending expectations, concentrating instead on delivering the goods, from the fuzz-rock of the McMicken-sung “Long Way Down” to the soul rasp of Leaman’s vocal on “Distant Light.”

Ambitious but unalluring, Sting’s first collection of new music in a decade is in fact the score to a musical of the same name slated to open on Broadway in 2014. It tells the story of a seafaring man who returns to his homeport, Wallsend in northern England, just as its storied shipyard is closing. Sting, born Gordon Sumner in that same Tyneside town, pours on the local flavor, often singing in a pronounced Geordie accent. But “Dead Man’s Boots,” “The Night the Pugilist Learned How to Dance” and other numbers work better as stories than as songs. The tone is largely somber, with only “What Have We Got?” naturally suitable to song-and-dance. At times evocative, “The Last Ship” is marked by musical intelligence. But it resists easy boarding.

n Dan DeLuca, The Philadelphia Inquirer

n David Hiltbrand, The Philadelphia Inquirer

“The Last Ship”


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, October 10, 2013 - E9

REVIEWS VIDEO GAMES Compiled from news services

‘FIFA 14’

Platforms: PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 Genre: Sports Publisher: EA Sports ESRB Rating: E, for Everyone Grade: 3.5 stars (out of 5) I’ve used this space to lampoon EA for not making substantive changes to its NFL- and NHL-related properties. Now I get to celebrate EA for not making any real alterations to one of its core sports franchises. “FIFA 14” only makes the slightest of tweaks to an already fantastic brand. Most of the dramatic improvements to “FIFA” occurred in the 2012 edition, from the 360-degree ball-handling to improved body positioning and tackling. “FIFA 14” doesn’t rest necessarily on those laurels, instead taking a more measured approach to refine and improve what already stands out as stellar. The way you shield the ball, engage in contact with defenders and better direct passes to streaking players combine to make the game fluid — and insert a sense of pace into the matches. You can’t just dribble willy-nilly through a maze of midfielders and defenders and slam the ball into the net. Building up your attack from the middle, stringing passes together and finding your wingers and strikers in the best positions possible, now becomes absolutely critical. Sure, people who knock soccer for being a low-scoring sport will laugh at this game for making scoring even harder. But for soccer fans, “FIFA 14” now feels like the game they love so much. Some updates to the menus make getting onto the pitch faster and remove a lot of the clutter, which in 2013 makes you a successful game alone just for that. The online modes continue to shine, and while diverse in the offerings, it would behoove EA to invest resources into improving the singleplayer modes for those times when you just want a unique experience without having to wait to meet up with others. The drop in quality for “Pro Evolution” means EA has a stranglehold on the soccer genre. I hope the company doesn’t get lackadaisical, but instead continues refining and improving what is now the best video-game representation of the beautiful sport.

‘Pro Evolution Soccer 2014’

Platforms: PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 Genre: Sports Publisher: Konami ESRB Rating: E, for Everyone Grade: 2 stars (out of 5) I haven’t settled on what disappoints me most about “PES 2014” — the seemingly overt desire to look and play just like the alternative soccer franchise from EA Sports, or the way in which the implementation was so shoddily done that it ruins a once-great soccer property. I can understand the desire to move your franchise toward the likes of EA’s. The arcade-style swiftness of previous “PES” games feels dated as more sports properties look to provide as realistic an experience as possible. But in doing so, “PES” becomes less of an alternative option to the EA juggernaut and more like a halfhearted wannabe. “PES” always felt like it had a stronger following outside of the U.S. market, and I hate to see it just trying to be too similar to a competitor for the sake of perhaps selling more units. This edition falls flat on the most important part of the game: the action on the pitch. Sure, snappier passing and more strategic buildup help the game’s realism, but your AI teammates often overrun their position (or don’t run at all), leaving your strategy often stuck. The new gaming engine allows for more impressive graphics, so at least the game you are playing looks like it took place within the last three years. Then again, with recycled commentary like the stuff spewed here, you may just want to opt for listening to the radio rather than hear the same in-game opinions nonstop. Longtime fans who have stuck with “PES” don’t have to jump ship right away. This may merely be a year of transition for the franchise as it finds new legs, but steadier footing must be found because nothing breeds better gaming than healthy competition. n Follow Chris Campbell on Twitter @camp bler or email him at game_on_games@mac. com.


E10 Thursday, October 10, 2013

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area October 10-20

Thursday.10 THEATER

“Little Shop of Horrors”: comedy/horror/musical, 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or act theatre.com.

Friday.11 OPERA

FRIDAY.18

SATURDAY.12 “QUE SERA! CELEBRATING DORIS DAY,” WITH KRISTI KING 7 p.m., Mount Baker/Walton Theatre, 104 Commercial St., Bellingham. $28. 360-734-6080 or mountbakertheatre.com.

Jim Dorothy photo

THEATER

“Little Shop of Horrors”: comedy/horror/musical, 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre. com.

VARIETY

“Que Sera! Celebrating Doris Day,” with Kristi King: 7 p.m., Mount Baker/Walton Theatre, 104 Commercial St., Bellingham. $28. 360-734-6080 or mountbakertheatre.com.

THEATER

Jazz At The Library: Bossa 31, 2 to 3 p.m., Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Free. 360-293-1910, ext. 21, or jazzatthelibrary. com.

MUSIC & MARIONETTES

“Peter & The Wolf”: 10 a.m., Jansen Art Center Chamber Hall, 321 Front St., Lynden. Presented by Welcome Marionettes, the show features a traditional marionette stage with special shadow puppet effects, performed to Sergei Prokofiev’s symphonic masterpiece. $10 adults, $5 ages 12 and younger. $10. 360-354-3600 or jansenartcenter.org.

“Little Shop of Horrors”: comedy/ horror/musical, 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com. Comedy Nite: Big Sean Larkins, Sweeng-One and Randall Ragsdale, 8 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. $10 at the door. 360-7553956. “Rigoletto”: Skagit Opera, 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15-$59. 360 416-7727 or mcintyrehall.org.

THURSDAY.10

THURSDAY.17

THURSDAY.10

David’s Drinking Band: 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $3. 360-445-3000.

CHERYL HODGE 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. $5. 360-445-3000.

TRISH HATLEY 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Trish Hatley: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360588-1720. Cave, Zach and Labotz: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $7. 360778-1067.

SATURDAY.19

Sunday.13

Saturday.12

TUNING UP Playing at area venues October 10-17 LOOKING AHEAD

“Rigoletto”: Skagit Opera, 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15$59. 360-416-7727 or mcintyrehall.org. “Little Shop of Horrors”: comedy/horror/musical, 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre. com.

Thursday, October 10, 2013 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

MUSIC

OPERA

“Rigoletto”: Skagit Opera, 3 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15$59. 360-416-7727 or mcintyrehall.org.

THEATER

“Little Shop of Horrors”: comedy/horror/musical, 2 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre. com.

Tuesday.15 MUSIC

Jazz at the Center: Saltwater Octet, with Cheryl Jewell, 7 p.m., Camano Center, 606 Arrowhead Road, Camano Island. $20, $10 students. 360-387-0222.

Thursday.17 THEATER

“Little Shop of Horrors”: comedy/horror/ musical, 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com.

“Little Shop of Horrors”: comedy/ horror/musical, 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com. Kiwanis Original Comedy Night: Mitch Burrow, Drew Barth and Tammy Pescatelli, 8 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $16. Proceeds will benefit local Kiwanis programs. 360-3368955 or lincoln theatre.org. Whidbey Improv Team: 8 p.m., Click Music, 1130 NE Seventh Ave., Oak Harbor. $5. whidbeyimprov team@gmail.com.

SUNDAY.20

“Little Shop of Horrors”: comedy/ horror/musical, 2 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com.

FRIDAY.11 Jammin’ Jeff: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

SATURDAY.12 Blueberry Hill (bluegrass): 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $7. 360-445-3000.

Nik Turner’s Hawkwind: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $8-$10. 360-7781067.

Jukebox Duo: 7 to 10 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks, 2120 Market St., Mount Vernon. Open to the public. 360-848-8882.

Jammin’ Jeff: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

El Colonel and Doubleshot, with Mary De La Fuente: 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $7. 360-445-3000.

SUNDAY.13 Knut Bell & The Blue Collars: 5 to 9 p.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. $3 cover. 360-445-4733.

Fictions, The Shows, Porch Cat and The Fairweather Family: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. No cover. 360-7781067.

MONDAY.14 Gary B’s Church of the Blues (blues, classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley. 360-855-2263.

WEDNESDAY.16 Little Joe Argo: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

A-Town Big Band: 7:30 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956.

Kodiak, Crag Dweller, Sons of Huns: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

Ray Charles Boogaloo Dance Party, with Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe and Zach Deputy: 9 p.m., Wild Buffalo House of Music, 208 W. Holly St., Bellingham. $18-$20. 360-746-8733.

Misty Flowers Trio: 9:30 p.m., Brown Lantern Ale House, 412 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-293-2544.

John Dennis (acoustic guitar): 6:30 to 8 p.m., Jansen Art Center Firehall Cafe, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-3543600.

TUESDAY.15 Jazz at the Center: Saltwater Octet, with Cheryl Jewell, 7 p.m., Camano Center, 606 Arrowhead Road, Camano Island. $20, $10 students. 360-387-0222 or camano center.org.

THURSDAY.17 Austin Lucas, Lee Bains III & The Glory Fires: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

Sera Cahoone, Jake Hemming and Cheryl Hodge: 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. Kat Bula: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-445-3000. $8-$10. 360-778-1067.

Paul Klein (blues, rock): 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.


E10 Thursday, October 10, 2013

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area October 10-20

Thursday.10 THEATER

“Little Shop of Horrors”: comedy/horror/musical, 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or act theatre.com.

Friday.11 OPERA

FRIDAY.18

SATURDAY.12 “QUE SERA! CELEBRATING DORIS DAY,” WITH KRISTI KING 7 p.m., Mount Baker/Walton Theatre, 104 Commercial St., Bellingham. $28. 360-734-6080 or mountbakertheatre.com.

Jim Dorothy photo

THEATER

“Little Shop of Horrors”: comedy/horror/musical, 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre. com.

VARIETY

“Que Sera! Celebrating Doris Day,” with Kristi King: 7 p.m., Mount Baker/Walton Theatre, 104 Commercial St., Bellingham. $28. 360-734-6080 or mountbakertheatre.com.

THEATER

Jazz At The Library: Bossa 31, 2 to 3 p.m., Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Free. 360-293-1910, ext. 21, or jazzatthelibrary. com.

MUSIC & MARIONETTES

“Peter & The Wolf”: 10 a.m., Jansen Art Center Chamber Hall, 321 Front St., Lynden. Presented by Welcome Marionettes, the show features a traditional marionette stage with special shadow puppet effects, performed to Sergei Prokofiev’s symphonic masterpiece. $10 adults, $5 ages 12 and younger. $10. 360-354-3600 or jansenartcenter.org.

“Little Shop of Horrors”: comedy/ horror/musical, 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com. Comedy Nite: Big Sean Larkins, Sweeng-One and Randall Ragsdale, 8 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. $10 at the door. 360-7553956. “Rigoletto”: Skagit Opera, 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15-$59. 360 416-7727 or mcintyrehall.org.

THURSDAY.10

THURSDAY.17

THURSDAY.10

David’s Drinking Band: 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $3. 360-445-3000.

CHERYL HODGE 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. $5. 360-445-3000.

TRISH HATLEY 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Trish Hatley: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360588-1720. Cave, Zach and Labotz: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $7. 360778-1067.

SATURDAY.19

Sunday.13

Saturday.12

TUNING UP Playing at area venues October 10-17 LOOKING AHEAD

“Rigoletto”: Skagit Opera, 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15$59. 360-416-7727 or mcintyrehall.org. “Little Shop of Horrors”: comedy/horror/musical, 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre. com.

Thursday, October 10, 2013 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

MUSIC

OPERA

“Rigoletto”: Skagit Opera, 3 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15$59. 360-416-7727 or mcintyrehall.org.

THEATER

“Little Shop of Horrors”: comedy/horror/musical, 2 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre. com.

Tuesday.15 MUSIC

Jazz at the Center: Saltwater Octet, with Cheryl Jewell, 7 p.m., Camano Center, 606 Arrowhead Road, Camano Island. $20, $10 students. 360-387-0222.

Thursday.17 THEATER

“Little Shop of Horrors”: comedy/horror/ musical, 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com.

“Little Shop of Horrors”: comedy/ horror/musical, 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com. Kiwanis Original Comedy Night: Mitch Burrow, Drew Barth and Tammy Pescatelli, 8 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $16. Proceeds will benefit local Kiwanis programs. 360-3368955 or lincoln theatre.org. Whidbey Improv Team: 8 p.m., Click Music, 1130 NE Seventh Ave., Oak Harbor. $5. whidbeyimprov team@gmail.com.

SUNDAY.20

“Little Shop of Horrors”: comedy/ horror/musical, 2 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com.

FRIDAY.11 Jammin’ Jeff: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

SATURDAY.12 Blueberry Hill (bluegrass): 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $7. 360-445-3000.

Nik Turner’s Hawkwind: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $8-$10. 360-7781067.

Jukebox Duo: 7 to 10 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks, 2120 Market St., Mount Vernon. Open to the public. 360-848-8882.

Jammin’ Jeff: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

El Colonel and Doubleshot, with Mary De La Fuente: 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $7. 360-445-3000.

SUNDAY.13 Knut Bell & The Blue Collars: 5 to 9 p.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. $3 cover. 360-445-4733.

Fictions, The Shows, Porch Cat and The Fairweather Family: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. No cover. 360-7781067.

MONDAY.14 Gary B’s Church of the Blues (blues, classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley. 360-855-2263.

WEDNESDAY.16 Little Joe Argo: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

A-Town Big Band: 7:30 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956.

Kodiak, Crag Dweller, Sons of Huns: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

Ray Charles Boogaloo Dance Party, with Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe and Zach Deputy: 9 p.m., Wild Buffalo House of Music, 208 W. Holly St., Bellingham. $18-$20. 360-746-8733.

Misty Flowers Trio: 9:30 p.m., Brown Lantern Ale House, 412 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-293-2544.

John Dennis (acoustic guitar): 6:30 to 8 p.m., Jansen Art Center Firehall Cafe, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-3543600.

TUESDAY.15 Jazz at the Center: Saltwater Octet, with Cheryl Jewell, 7 p.m., Camano Center, 606 Arrowhead Road, Camano Island. $20, $10 students. 360-387-0222 or camano center.org.

THURSDAY.17 Austin Lucas, Lee Bains III & The Glory Fires: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

Sera Cahoone, Jake Hemming and Cheryl Hodge: 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. Kat Bula: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-445-3000. $8-$10. 360-778-1067.

Paul Klein (blues, rock): 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E12 - Thursday, October 10, 2013

GET INVOLVED ART CALL FOR ARTISTS: The La Conner Art’s Alive! Fine Art Show seeks artists who live or work within the La Conner School District (includes Fir Island) to participate in the Open Show on Nov. 1-3 at Maple Hall in La Conner. Also needed are volunteers to help during the event, as well as artists to demonstrate their craft. Contact the Chamber of Commerce by today, Oct. 10, at 360-466-5778 or email laconnerartshows@gmail. com.

Center offers a variety of art classes and workshops at 17873 Highway 536, Mount Vernon. 360-416-6556, ext. 5, or dakotaartcenter.com.

Oct. 14-15, at the Whidbey Playhouse Star Studio, 730 SE Midway Blvd, Oak Harbor. Auditions for children in first through eighth grades will take place from DRAWING FUNDA4 to 6 p.m., followed by MENTALS: 4:30 to 6 p.m. auditions from ninth grade Wednesdays, through Oct. to senior adult from 7 to 30, at Burlington Parks and 9 p.m. Come prepared to Recreation Center, 900 E. sing a Christmas song and Fairhaven Ave., Burlington. learn a dance routine. Bring For ages 7-13. Learn drawa wallet-sized photo of ing basics using line and yourself. Performances will form, depth and perspective take place Dec. 12-21. For to draw animal studies and information, contact show people, places or things with director Sarah Russell at pencil, pen and charcoal. 360-929-4845, the Whidbey $50, plus $20 supply fee Playhouse at 360-679-2237 payable to instructor. or visit whidbeyplayhouse. 360-755-9649. com.

Oct. 28, Hillcrest Park Skylight Room, 1717 S. 13th St., Mount Vernon. This ballet-based class will focus on coordination, skipping, leaping and jumping with continual change of music rhythms. $40-$42. Register with Mount Vernon Parks and Recreation, 360-3366215.

CLOG DANCING FOR BEGINNERS: Free lesson from 10 to 11 a.m., followed by regular clog dancing from 11 a.m. to noon Thursdays, at the Mount Vernon Senior Center, 1401 Cleveland St., Mount Vernon. No fee, no POETRY CONTEST: partner needed. First three The Skagit River Poetry lessons are free. Wear comFoundation invites poets BRASS CHOIR: The fortable shoes. For informaAUDITIONS from Washington, Oregon, Basically Brass Choir seeks tion, call Rosie at 360-424Alaska, Idaho, Montana and SHELTER BAY CHORUS: trumpet and trombone play4608. British Columbia to submit Practices are held from 2:45 ers to join a group of about up to three poems for its to 4:45 p.m. every Thursday 12 musicians, playing a variEAST COAST SWING: The first-ever Phyllis L. Ennes at the Shelter Bay Clubety of styles. Rehearsals are four-week class with Kim Poetry contest, established house in La Conner. New the first and third Mondays Hargrove from Happy Valin honor of the longtime members welcome. No need in Burlington, with reguley Dance will meet at 7 p.m. Anacortes arts advocate, to be a Shelter Bay resident. lar performances. Contact Tuesdays, Nov. 12-26 and who died earlier this year. 360-466-3805. David Soiseth at 360-757Dec. 10, at the Anacortes Entries, including a $15 0351 or dsois@comcast.net. Center for Happiness, 619 reading fee for each poem, WOMEN SING FOURCommercial Ave., Anashould be submitted by Oct. PART HARMONY: Join CALL FOR YOUNG cortes. $38, $70 couple. 15 to SRPF, P.O. Box 238, the women of Harmony MUSICIANS: The Mount 360-464-2229 or anacortes La Conner, WA, 98257. Northwest Chorus from 7 Vernon-based Fidalgo centerforhappiness.org. The winner will be invited to 9:30 p.m. every Monday Youth Symphony offers to read his or her work at at the Mount Vernon Senior the Skagit River Poetry Fes- Center, 1401 Cleveland Ave. opportunities for musicians MUSIC tival, set for May 2014 in La Seeking women who like to ages 5 to 21 to study and CALL FOR MUSICIANS: perform orchestral music. Conner. The winning poem sing a cappella music. All Allied Arts of Whatcom For information, including will also be published in the skill levels welcome. County seeks musicians for tuition costs and rehearsal festival’s anthology. Comthe 34th annual Holiday schedules, contact Sara plete contest rules are availFestival of the Arts, set for CALL FOR MALE SINGFisher at 360-682-6949 or able at skagitriverpoetry.org. ERS: The An-O-Chords Anita Tatum, 360-969-1681, Nov. 15-Dec. 24 in Bellingham. Music will be schedGuest Night will be held at or visit fysmusic.org. CALL TO ARTISTS: uled every weekend during 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 17, at United General Hospital’s the festival and musicians the Northwest Education Fine Art Committee seeks DANCE may sell their CDs and merService District Building, uplifting, healing art by local THURSDAY DANCE: chandise as well as collect 1601 R Ave., Anacortes. artists for display in the hosCome and see what the An- Enjoy dancing to the music tips, with no commission pital’s “Gallery Hall.” Arttaken. A piano and sound O-Chords are all about. No of the Skippers from 1 to work, in any medium, can 3:30 p.m. Thursdays at Hill- system will be provided. need to read music; it’s not be for sale, with a portion of an audition. For information, crest Lodge, 1717 S. 13th St., Application deadline: Nov. the proceeds going toward contact Richard at 360-391- Mount Vernon. For informa- 1. Pick up an application at the purchase of a permanent tion, contact Doris at 360the Allied Arts Gallery, 1418 8020. art collection. Contact Patsy 588-8239. Cornwall Ave., Bellingham, Prutzman by email: patsy or apply at alliedarts.org. For “CHRISTMAS SNAPprutzman@gmail.com. information, contact Katy CREATIVE RHYTHM SHOTS”: Auditions will be Borden at 360-676-8548, ext. & MOVEMENT DANCE held for the annual ChristART CLASSES 5, or email katy@alliedarts. mas Holiday Musical Revue CLASS: Ages 3 to 6, 4 to CLASSES: Dakota Art on Monday and Tuesday, 4:50 p.m. Mondays through org.

ON STAGE NORTH COVE OPEN MIC: Daniel Burnson hosts an open mic from 7 to 10 p.m. Saturdays at North Cove Coffee, 1130 S. Burlington Blvd., Burlington. All genres welcome — rock, blues, funk, folk, ukulele, poetry or performance. 360-707-2683 or northcovecoffee.com. CONWAY PUB OPEN MIC: Jam Night, 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Thursdays, Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. 360-445-4733. 1ST STREET OPEN MIC: 9 p.m. to midnight, Wednesdays, 1st Street Cabaret & Speakeasy, 612 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Ages 21 and older. No cover. 360-3363012 or riverbelledinner theatre.com.

skagitcleanwater.org. SEEKING MODEL TRAIN ENTHUSIASTS: The Whatcom Skagit Model Railroad Club seeks new members for its On30 narrow gauge group in Bellingham. The club has constructed a modular layout with 14 modules, each 5 feet by 30 inches, designed to be set up in a variety of configurations. The modules still need some work and refinement, and the club is looking for new members interested in completing the work and showing the layout at area train shows. Contact Karl Kleeman at trainswas@ gmail.com or Mike O’Brien at sales@xtrains.com.

MV “BAND AID” FUN RUN: The Mount Vernon District Band Program’s third annual Fun Run will RECREATION start at 10 a.m. Saturday, FARM FOR PEOPLE: A Oct. 12, in the parking lot group is forming to design at Skagit Valley College, and implement a nonprofit, 2405 E. College Way, Mount working ranch for people Vernon. Choose from the of need, including homeless, 10K run or 5K run/walk. limited abilities and mental $25, free for ages 10 and illness. younger. Day-of-event regTwo meetings will be istration opens at 8:30 a.m. held Saturday, Oct. 12, at Register at mvbands.org. the Skagit Valley Food For information, contact Co-op, 202 S. First St., Jacob Scherr at 360-428Mount Vernon: 10:30 a.m. 6100, ext. 41217. (children and families) and 6 p.m. (adults only). Drop in, or contact Kelly, 970-507- WORKSHOPS BUILD YOUR OWN 0396 or iamharvest@yahoo. WEBSITE: 10 a.m. to 3 com. p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, Anacortes Chamber of TRAIL CELEBRATION: Commerce boardroom, The series will culminate upstairs at 819 Commercial with the “Illuminating the Skagit Watershed Trail Cel- Ave., Anacortes. The class will cover choosing a temebration” from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12. Enjoy plate, choosing a domain name, planning and page a walk-through experience of bioluminescence, aquari- layout, advanced designing, keywords/meta data, ums, exhibits and glowing linking, media and blogs. luminaria created in the No experience necessary. shapes of watershed crea$50. To register, call Karla tures. Free. Locke, Alternative Focus, For information or to at 360-588-6968 or email at register, call SCEA at 360428-1054 or email info@ kklocke1@mac.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, October 10, 2013 - E13

POP CULTURE Q&A

‘Unforgettable’ to return for third season in summer 2014 six seasons, as well as DVD releases of episodes, I often found its stories of compulsive savers and the horrors of their homes to be Q: I understand “Unforgettable” with fascinating to the point that I could not turn Poppy Montgomery is a summer-only away from a marathon of telecasts. At the show. I have really enjoyed it and wonder same time, there came a point where the if there’s a chance we’ll see more. I didn’t tales were sadly redundant, and where A&E even realize there was a first season. I loved likely saw better ways to fill its TV time. Poppy in “Without a Trace” and it’s good to have her back. Q: Why are there cameras filming the A: CBS has ordered a third, 13-episode folks on “The Office”? season of the drama for telecast in summer A: In a conceit carried over from the 2014. In addition, there are half a dozen epi- original British version of the series, a docusodes still unaired from the second season mentary crew is chronicling the events at that the network will show at some point. the company, although that proved to be a For more about summer series, see the next very long chronicle. In the final season of answer. the series, the documentary makers tell Jim and Pam that they have stayed around for Q: Will “Mistresses” be returning? nine years to see how the people turn out. A: Yes. ABC plans to give it another Near the end of the series, the documentary summer run in 2014. Summer series are — titled “The Office: An American Workbecoming increasingly useful tools for the place” — is finally finished and airs on PBS. networks trying to keep audiences around In the series finale, most of the Dunder Mifduring a period that used to be filled with flin staff gathers at the Scranton Cultural reruns, or more recently with a mix of Center for a screening and panel discussion reruns and reality TV. about the documentary. Summer reruns were for a long time beneficial to networks because they filled air time Q: Why did the producers of “Everybody without networks paying for new shows. But Loves Raymond” change the names of the as cable and online have offered more and twins from Gregory and Matthew to Jeffrey more original programming during the sum- and Michael? mer, the reruns did not draw as well, So we A: The names used in the pilot of the now get more scripted series in summer, And series are also the names of star Ray several from 2013 — including “Mistresses,” Romano’s two sons (and he has a daughter, the previously mentioned “Unforgettable” Ally, as does the television Raymond). In a and the big hit “Under the Dome” — were DVD commentary on the show’s pilot epirenewed after their summer success. sode, Romano said he later felt weird about the names and so changed the boys’. (Ally Q: I am surprised that neither “Hoardremained.) In the commentary, Romano also ers” on A&E or “Hoarding: Buried Alive” says that the parallels between his TV life on TLC seem to be returning. Weren’t these and his real life were sometimes uncomfortmuch-watched series? able — that the portrayal of his TV brother, A: You are half right. “Hoarding: Buried for one thing, did not sit well with his real Alive” will be back in spring 2014. “Hoard- brother. So he may have wanted to create ers” has ended its run on A&E. It did have more separation between the two lives. By RICH HELDENFELS Akron Beacon Journal

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Video game releases

Station 3; rated M) n Capcom Essentials (PlayStation 3, Xbox The following games are among those sched- 360; rated M) uled for release this week, according to Game n Just Dance 2014 (Nintendo Wii, Nintendo stop.com: Wii U, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360; rated E) n Borderlands 2: Game of the Year Edition n Dishonored: Game of the Year Edition (PC, (PC, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360; rated M) PlayStation 3, Xbox 360; rated M) n Disgaea D2: A Brighter Darkness (PlayStan Pokemon X and Pokemon Y (Nintendo 3DS; tion 3; rated M) rated E) n F1 2013 (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360; rated E) n Beyond: Two Souls — Special Edition (Playn Lexington Herald-Leader (Lexington, Ky.)

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E14 - Thursday, October 10, 2013

HOT TICKETS RINGLING BROS. AND BARNUM & BAILEY’S “FULLY CHARGED”: Oct. 10-13, Comcast Arena at Everett. 866-332-8499 or comcastarenaeverett.com. GWAR: Oct. 11, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or show boxonline.com. ADAM CAROLLA: Live Podcast Taping: Oct. 12, Neptune, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or livenation.com. RICKY NELSON REMEMBERED: featuring Matthew and Gunnar Nelson: Oct. 11, Northshore Performing Arts Center, Bothell. 425984-2471 or NPACF.org. SLEIGH BELLS: Oct. 12, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. JACK JOHNSON: Oct. 15, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-7844849 or livenation.com. PARAMORE, METRIC, HELLOGOODBYE: Oct. 15, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or live nation.com. PHANTOGRAM: Oct. 17, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. GRIZ: Oct. 18, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. TIMEFLIES: Oct. 18, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. MOODY BLUES: Oct. 19, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-7844849 or livenation.com. KANYE WEST: Oct. 19, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or live nation.com. BOYCE AVENUE: Oct. 19, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. ZEDS DEAD: Oct. 19, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. PINK: Oct. 20, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation. com. THE NAKED AND FAMOUS: Oct. 21, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. HANK 3: Oct. 22, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. DAVID NAIL: Oct. 23, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. WALK THE MOON: Oct. 23, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. BONOBO: Oct. 24, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME: Oct. 24, El Corazon, Seattle. 800-514-3849 or elcorazon seattle.com. OKKERVIL RIVER: Oct. 25,

745-3000 or livenation.com. JOHN LEGEND: with Tamar Braxton: Nov. 25, Paramount Theater, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or live nation.com. LESS THAN JAKE: Nov. 26, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. SOL & FRIENDS: Nov. 27, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. DECK THE HALL BALL: with Vampire Weekend, Phoenix, The Head and The Heart, Alt J, Arctic Monkeys, Lorde, Foals, Tame Impala: Dec. 3, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. ADVENTURE CLUB: Dec. 4, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. DRAKE: with special guest DRAKE Miguel, Dec. 4, Tacoma Dome, Dec. 4, Tacoma Dome, Tacoma. Tacoma. 800-745-3000 or live 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. nation.com. AP PEARL JAM: Dec. 6, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or live nation.com. Showbox at the Market, Seattle. THE JONAS BROTHERS: Nov. 6, at the Market, Seattle. 800-745BLACK CROWES: Dec. 7, Para800-745-3000 or showboxonline. Paramount Theater, Seattle. 800- 3000 or showboxonline.com. mount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784com. 745-3000 or livenation.com. MORGAN PAGE: Nov. 15, Show- 4849 or livenation.com. ENDUROCROSS EXTREME NADA SURF: Nov. 7, Showbox box SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 MACKLEMORE & RYAN LEWIS: MOTORCYCLE RACING: Oct. 26, at the Market, Seattle. 800-745or showboxonline.com. Dec. 10, KeyArena, Seattle. 800Comcast Arena at Everett. 8663000 or showboxonline.com. MARGARET CHO: Nov. 16, 745-3000 or livenation.com. 332-8499 or comcastarena MINUS THE BEAR: Nov. 8, Moore Theatre, Seattle. 877-784CHRIS HARDWICK: Dec. 13, everett.com. Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 4849 or livenation.com. Showbox at the Market, Seattle. SARAH BRIGHTMAN: Oct. 26, 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. SLEEPING WITH SIRENS: Nov. 800-745-3000, showboxonline. Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877- com. 16, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800- com. 784-4849 or livenation.com. GRETA METASSA, MILES 745-3000 or showboxonline.com. FLORIDA GEORGIA LINE: with RISQUE HALLOWEEN PARTY: BLACK TRIO, JOVON MILLER: KMFDM: Nov. 16, Showbox at Colt Ford and Dallas Smith: Dec. Oct. 26, Showbox at the Market, Nov. 9, Sudden Valley Dance the Market, Seattle. 800-74514, ShoWare Center, Kent. 866Seattle. 800-745-3000 or show Barn, Bellingham. 360-671-1709 3000 or showboxonline.com. 973-9613 or ShoWareCenter.com. boxonline.com. or suddenvalleylibrary.org. THOMAS DOLBY: Nov. 18, ShowSUPER DIAMOND: THE NEIL J. COLE: Oct. 30, Paramount RED FANG: Nov. 9, Showbox box at the Market, Seattle. 800DIAMOND TRIBUTE: Dec. 31, Theatre, Seattle. 206-224-5481 at the Market, Seattle. 800-745745-3000 or showboxonline.com. Showbox at the Market, Seattle. or aeglive.com. 3000 or showboxonline.com. THE GREEN: Nov. 19, Showbox 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. JANELLE MONAE: Oct. 30, UNASHAMED TOUR V: Nov. 9, at the Market, Seattle. 800-745com. Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745- Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745- 3000 or showboxonline.com. JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE: Jan. 17, 3000 or showboxonline.com. 3000 or showboxonline.com. JAMES BLAKE: Nov. 20, Show- 2014, KeyArena, Seattle. 800HOODIE ALLEN: Oct. 31, ShowLAMB OF GOD, KILLSWITCH box SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 745-3000 or livenation.com. box SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 ENGAGE: Nov. 11, ShoWare Cenor showboxonline.com. LORD HURON: Jan. 24, Showbox or showboxonline.com. ter, Kent. 866-973-961 or sho 3OH!3: Nov. 20, Showbox at the at the Market, Seattle. 800-745HELL’S BELLES (AC/DC Tribwarecenter.com. Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or 3000 or showboxonline.com. ute), HALLOQUEEN (The music of KREATOR, OVERKILL, showboxonline.com. KYARY PAMYU PAMYU: Feb. Queen): Oct. 31, Showbox at the WARBRINGER: Nov. 12, El CoraDIR EN GREY: Nov. 21, Show13, 2014, Showbox at the Market, Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or zon, Seattle. 800-514-3849 or box at the Market, Seattle. 800Seattle. 800-745-3000 or show showboxonline.com. elcorazonseattle.com. 745-3000 or showboxonline.com. boxonline.com. SLAYER: Nov. 1, WaMu Theater, SELENA GOMEZ: Nov. 12, NINE INCH NAILS: Nov. 22, ROBIN THICKE: March 26, 2014, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or live KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 WaMu Theater, Seattle. 800-745nation.com. or livenation.com. or livenation.com. 3000 or ticketmaster.com. AFI: Nov. 1, Showbox at the TORO Y MOI: Nov. 12, Showbox PANTyRAID: Nov. 22, Showbox GUNGOR: March 26, Showbox Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or at the Market, Seattle. 800-745at the Market, Seattle. 800-745at the Market, Seattle. 800-745showboxonline.com. 3000 or showboxonline.com. 3000 or showboxonline.com. 3000 or showboxonline.com. WINDOWPANE, MECHANISM: ALESSO: Nov. 14, Showbox PRETTY LIGHTS: Nov. 22, Sho SUDDEN VALLEY JAZZ SERIES: Nov. 2, Showbox at the Market, SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or Ware Center, Kent. 866-973-961 April 26/Nov. 15, 2014, Sudden Seattle. 800-745-3000 or show showboxonline.com. or showarecenter.com. Valley Dance Barn, Bellingham. boxonline.com. STEPHEN “RAGGA” MARLEY: POLICA: Nov. 23, Showbox at 360-671-1709 or suddenvalley TRIVIUM, DEVILDRIVER: Nov. Nov. 13, Showbox at the Market, the Market, Seattle. 800-745library.org. 5, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 206-224-5481 or aeglive. 3000 or showboxonline.com. CHER: June 28, 2014, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or show com. TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA: Seattle. 800-745-3000 or live boxonline.com. GRAMATIK: Nov. 15, Showbox Nov. 23, KeyArena, Seattle. 800nation.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, October 10, 2013 - E15

Ted Nugent AP file

LOCAL FOOD • LOCAL BEER • MADE HERE

DETROIT — Ted Nugent scheduled interviews this week to talk about his new live CD and DVD set, but politics naturally entered the discussion as a partial government shutdown moves through a second week. The 65-year-old Michigan rocker and staunch firearms and hunting advocate characteristically made no secret about where he stands, citing a recent piece he wrote for a conservative website entitled “Make my Day, Shut it Down.” “The government is so out of control. It is so bloated and infested with fraud and deceit and corruption and abuse of power,” he said Monday. “The American government today will go down and the American people, it breaks my heart to say ... will go down as the dumbest, most unappreciative society in the history of humankind.” Nugent said government overreach and incompetence goes back decades, but it’s at its worst under President Barack Obama. He described Obama as a “monster in the White House” who “wouldn’t qualify to drive my tour bus.”

Nugent drew the attention of the Secret Service last year when he said he would be “dead or in jail” if Obama was re-elected. He said this week that he wasn’t making threats — he was merely afraid for his life and others because law-abiding farmers, ranchers and smallbusiness owners have been targeted by what he considers overzealous government agents. The case was closed. Nugent said he’s “blessed with just unbelievable energy.” He had one of the top20 concert tours during various weeks this year while on the road with Styx and REO Speedwagon. The new collection, a hard-rocking romp recorded in 2011, is a reflection of that live show and includes best-known songs “Wango Tango,” “Cat Scratch Fever” and “Stranglehold.” With a U.S. flag as a backdrop, the camo-clad Nugent tells the crowd between songs, “We’re gonna groove you to death. ... We are the last of ‘em.” “When I’m onstage, it really is out of body — it really is untouchable,” he said. “That Motor City throttle is purely driven and conveyed via the music. ... Time stands still — just at extreme velocity.”

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E16 - Thursday, October 10, 2013

MOVIES

Hanks serves up real-life heroics as ‘Captain Phillips’ By ROGER MOORE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

It wasn’t that long ago and we remember how it turned out. So there’s no way that “Captain Phillips,” the movie about the 2009 pirate attack on the M.V. Maersk Alabama, should be as surprising and entertaining a sea tale as it is. What happened was more heroic than you’d expect. The resistance of the crew, the resilience and craftiness of the pirates and the guile, level-headedness and bravery of the title character are so Hollywood that you half expect Bruce Willis heroics and an exchange of pithy trash-talk catch-phrases. But this thrilling retelling was directed by Paul (“United 93”) Greengrass, an unfussy director with a talent for tension. And it was adapted from the real Capt. Richard Phillips’ book by Billy (“Breach”/ “Shattered Glass”) Ray. They’ve cooked up an engrossing, sober-minded, fact-centered account, telling the story from parallel points of view of the two hard-case captains here. There’s Phillips, a veteran no-nonsense sailor, and a Somali pirate named Muse. Phillips has his job, his pushy bosses, his ways of dealing with an attack “by the book.” But so does Muse, a smart thug who has to answer to a murderous warlord if he doesn’t seize a ship and ransom it and its crew. “No al-Qaida here,” Muse grins, pointing his battered AK-47 at Phillips. “Just business.” Tom Hanks has built his career on mastering the details that signal “competence” in any character, and he disappears into Capt. Phillips. Even in the informality of a cargo ship hauling relief supplies up and down the African coast, his captain is all business, demanding professionalism from the crew he’s just met. Barkhad Abdi is Muse, a gaunt figure with expressive eyes who lets us see the wheels turning,

Tom Hanks (center) stars in “Captain Phillips.” Columbia Pictures via AP

ings in a shoreside fishing village whose fishing dried up thanks to the Asian factory trawlers that HHH1⁄2 Cast: Tom Hanks, Barkhad vacuumed up Somalia’s coast. Abdi, Catherine Keener Then comes the nerve-wrack Running time: 2:14 ing chase. It starts with radar MPAA rating: PG-13 for blips, a “security drill” that is not sustained intense sequences a drill. of menace, some violence Music makes its first appearwith bloody images, and for substance use ance beneath the action as the big bulk carrier turns to and fro, blasts geysers of water off all sides to repel boarders, and the pirates just as Hanks does. Their perbicker as they crash through the formances never let us forget, huge ship’s wake in a battered as entertaining as their cat-andmouse game becomes, that these skiff with a balky boat motor. Then the boarding, a crew in men knew life and death were hiding and the gamesmanship the stakes. Greengrass and Ray sketch in that kicks in even as one captain the shore side life of both men — fears for his life and the other, Phillips splitting his time between wild-eyed on the mild narcotic khat, fears failure. Before you sailing assignments and a Verknow it, the Navy’s involved and mont home with his wife (Caththings turn even messier. erine Keener) and kids; Muse, Last summer’s Danish film sleeping one off between hijack-

‘CAPTAIN PHILLIPS’

“A Hijacking” did a great job of breaking down what happens when a ship is taken by a captain and crew ill-prepared to resist. Hanks is terrific at showing the ways this captain had the presence of mind to tip his crew to his every move, to counter the badly outnumbered pirates, keeping his head even as he lied, time and again. Greengrass fills his cast with so many unemotional, professional military folks that “Captain Phillips” can seem like a recruiting ad for Navy SEAL Team 6. There’s a sense of people knowing what they’re doing, with Max Martini, as the SEAL negotiator, embodying the physique and the calm, firm jock baritone of a soldier who has a procedure for how this will go down and the confidence to stick to that plan. Abdi, Faysal Ahmed, Mahat M.

Ali and Barkhad Abdirahman are utterly convincing as hardened pirates, wide-eyed with macho rage and just stoned enough to have the courage to take on this deadly work. Abdi plays no lipsmacking villain or doltish thug, but he lets us see Muse smirk as he tells Phillips “Look at me. I’M the captain now.” And Hanks lets himself get so deep into this ordeal that you believe the beatings, the horrific stress, the numb terror of that indentation on his forehead where the pistol barrel was pressed. The performances and Greengrass’ way with action immerse us and make “Captain Phillips” a tight, taut, edge-of-your-seat thriller even if you remember the ending. With a film longer than two hours, that’s high praise indeed.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, October 10, 2013 - E17

MOVIES MINI-REVIEWS Compiled from news services. Ratings are one to four stars. “A.C.O.D.” — Despite an excellent ensemble cast including Adam Scott, Richard Jenkins, Catherine O’Hara and Amy Poehler, “A.C.O.D” delivers only a few sporadic chuckles amidst clunky scenes in which various members of an extended dysfunctional family behave rudely and say mean things to one another. Comedy, R, 87 minutes. HH “Afternoon Delight” — Star Kathryn Hahn seems to be trying too hard as a stay-at-home mom deep in the throes of a 30-something life crisis. Just about everyone in this edgy yet predictable film — including the people we’re supposed to like or at least want to spend time with — is self-absorbed, whiny and depressed. Comedy drama, R, 99 minutes. HH “Blue Jasmine” — Cate Blanchett dives into a showcase role and knocks it out of the park. In Woody Allen’s latest, the upper-crust world of an investment guru’s wife falls apart, and she moves in with her working-class sister. With Alec Baldwin and Sally Hawkins. Drama, PG-13, 98 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Don Jon” — Joseph GordonLevitt delivers as the writer, director and star of this offbeat, frank and often surprising gem about a preening, narcissistic meathead who prefers online porn to his weekly one-night stands. Some great laugh lines and a couple of nifty plot pivots. With Scarlett Johansson, Julianne Moore and Tony Danza. Romantic comedy, R, 90 minutes. HHH “Enough Said” — The late James Gandolfini delivers one of the richest performances of his career as a middle-aged man who falls in love with a middle-aged woman (Julia Louis-Dreyfus). Writer-director Nicole Holofcener (“Friends With Money”) again gives us mature, sometimes sardonic, authentic people moving about in a world we recognize. Romantic comedy, PG-13, 93 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Gravity” — An accident sets two astronauts, a veteran (George Clooney) and a rookie (Sandra Bullock), adrift in space. Both a stunning visual treat and an unforgettable thrill ride, director Alfonso Cuaron’s amazing space adventure evokes “Alien” and “2001: A Space Odyssey.” During some harrowing sequences, you’ll have to remind yourself to

AT THE LINCOLN THEATRE AT AREA THEATERS ANACORTES CINEMAS Oct. 11-17 Gravity (PG-13): Friday-Saturday: 1:20, 3:25, 6:35, 8:40; Sunday-Thursday: 1:20, 3:25, 6:35 Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG): Friday-Saturday: 1:15, 3:20, 6:30, 8:35; Sunday-Tuesday: 1:15, 3:20, 6:30; Wednesday: 1:15, 3:20; Thursday: 1:15, 3:20, 6:30 Don Jon (R): Friday-Saturday: 1:25, 3:30, 6:40, 8:45; Sunday-Thursday: 1:25, 3:30, 6:40 360-293-6620 BLUE FOX DRIVE-IN Oak Harbor 360-675-5667 CONCRETE THEATRE Oct. 10-13 Genetic Roulette (documentary): Thursday: 6:30 p.m., free. The Family (R): Friday: 7:30 p.m.; Saturday: 4 and 7:30 p.m.; Sunday: 4 p.m. 360-941-0403

breathe. Thriller, PG-13, 91 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Prisoners” — When his daughter and her friend go missing, Keller Dover (Hugh Jackman, more impressive than ever) becomes a man possessed. The masterful script takes us through a maze of plot complications and possible suspects. “Prisoners” is a white-knuckle, near-masterpiece of a thriller, falling short of greatness only because it goes on too long. Thriller, R, 153 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Runner Runner” — After an intriguing setup about a young poker whiz (Justin Timberlake) entering the inner circle of an online gambling mogul (Ben Affleck) in Costa Rica, “Runner Runner” devolves into a by-thebook thriller. Timberlake’s OK, but lacks movie-star punch. Thriller, R, 91 minutes. HH “Rush” — “Rush” ranks among the best movies about auto racing ever made, featuring great performances from Daniel Bruhl as detailobsessed Formula One driver Niki Lauda and Chris Hemsworth as his cocky rival, James Hunt. Even if you don’t know Formula One from the Soap Box Derby, Ron Howard’s “Rush,” like all great sports movies, is foremost about getting to know and understand the characters. This is one of his most impressive efforts. Sports action, R, 123 minutes. HHHH “Salinger” — One can understand why the reclusive author J.D. Salinger (and

CASCADE MALL THEATRES Burlington For listings: 888-AMC-4FUN (888-2624386). OAK HARBOR CINEMAS Oct. 11-17 Captain Phillips (PG-13): Friday-Saturday: 1:00, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15; Sunday-Thursday: 1:00, 3:45, 6:30 Gravity (PG-13): Friday-Saturday: 1:10, 3:35, 6:50, 8:55; Sunday-Thursday: 1:10, 3:35, 6:50 Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG): Friday-Saturday: 1:20, 3:25, 6:40, 8:45; Sunday-Thursday: 1:20, 3:25, 6:40 360-279-2226 STANWOOD CINEMAS Oct. 11-17 Captain Phillips (PG-13): Thursday: 8:00; Friday-Thursday: 1:00, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 Gravity (PG-13): 1:15, 3:35, 6:40, 8:55 Runner Runner (R): 1:20, 3:25, 6:50, 9:00 Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2 (PG): Friday-Tuesday: 1:10, 3:40, 6:35, 8:45; Wednesday: 1:10, 3:40; Thursday: 1:10, 3:40, 6:35, 8:45 Rush (R): 1:05, 3:30, 6:45, 9:10 360-629-0514

the critics of this film) would cringe at many of the suppositions and stylistic flourishes in this documentary. But despite its considerable flaws, “Salinger” is a valuable and engrossing biography of the author of arguably the most beloved American novel of the 20th century. Documentary, PG-13, 129 minutes. HHH “Short Term 12” — Brie Larson gives one of the most natural performances of the year as Grace, a 20-something basically in charge of a facility for at-risk teens who have nowhere else to go. There are some deeply intense passages, but “Short Term 12” is also slyly funny, graceful, tender and peppered with moments of small joy. John Gallagher Jr. is excellent as Mason, who will not let Grace not love him. One of the best movies of the year and one of the truest portrayals I’ve ever seen about troubled teens and the people who dedicate their lives to trying to help them. Drama, R, 96 minutes. HHHH “Thanks for Sharing” — Though containing some dramatic moments, “Thanks for Sharing” is mostly a romantic comedy asking us to sympathize with sex addicts, including Adam (Mark Ruffalo), a handsome consultant fighting the temptation of selfdestructive encounters. We care about these people, we believe their problems are real and we want them to get the help they so desperately need. Tim Robbins, Gwyneth Paltrow

and Josh Gad co-star. Comedy drama, R, 112 minutes. HHH “The Family” — A mobster turned informant (Robert De Niro) enters the Witness Protection Program with his equally hot-tempered wife (Michelle Pfeiffer) and kids. Tommy Lee Jones is deadpan perfection as the agent in charge of the family’s protection. There are just enough moments of inspiration in this cheerfully violent comedy to warrant a recommendation -- especially if you know what you’re getting into. It’s weird. It’s different. It’s effective more often than not. Crime comedy, R, 111 minutes. HHH “The To Do List” — Aubrey Plaza is too mature to play a high school valedictorian suddenly determined to fulfill a bucket list of sexual adventures. Genuinely funny moments are few in a comedy that wastes the talents of TV stars including Connie Britton, Donald Glover and Bill Hader. Comedy, R, 104 minutes. H “This Is the End” — Here’s one of the most tasteless, ridiculous and funniest comedies of the 21st century. In its own sloppy, raunchy, sophomoric, occasionally selfpleased and consistently energetic way, “This Is the End” is just about perfect at executing its mission, which is to poke fun at its stars, exhaust every R-rated possibility to get a laugh, and even sneak in a few insights into Hollywood, the celebrity culture and the nature of faith. (Comedy, R, 107 minutes. HHHH

712 S. First St., Mount Vernon 360-336-8955 n www.lincolntheatre.org

‘Blue Jasmine’

Mariusz Kwiecien star as the lovestruck Tatiana 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, and the imperious Onegin Oct. 11-12 in Tchaikovsky’s fateful 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13 7:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 14 romance. Deborah Warner’s new production, set After everything in in the late 19th century, her life falls to pieces, moves episodically from including her marriage to wealthy businessman Hal, farmhouse to ballroom, elegant New York socialite with a powerful snowJasmine moves into her sis- storm providing the drater Ginger’s modest apart- matic setting for the finale. Piotr Beczala is Lenski, ment in San Francisco to Onegin’s friend turned try to pull herself back rival. Valery Gergiev contogether again. Directed ducts. by Woody Allen, starring $23 adults; $19 seniors; Cate Blanchett, Alec Bald$16 students with $2 off win, Bobby Cannavale, Louis C.K., Michael Stuhl- for Lincoln Theatre barg, Peter Sarsgaard and members. Sally Hawkins. Rated PG-13. $10 gen‘Girl Rising’ eral; $9 seniors, students 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15 and active military; $8 “Girl Rising” is a powmembers; $7 children erful and innovative film 12 and under. Bargain by Academy Award-nommatinee prices (all shows before 6 p.m.): $8 general, inated director Richard E. Robbins. $6 members, $5 children It spotlights the stories 12 and under. of nine girls born into unforgiving circumstances; Gretchens Food girls like Sokha, an orphan who rises from a life in & Film Series: the garbage dump in ‘Mostly Martha’ Phnom Penh, Cambodia 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12 to become a star student As part of the monthly and an accomplished Film and Food Series, see dancer; Suma, who writes a food-focused film at songs that help her endure the Lincoln,then head to forced servitude in Nepal Gretchens Kitchenware and today crusades to free store afterwards to eat and others; and Ruksana, an learn how to make food Indian “pavement-dwellfrom the film er” whose father sacrifices In “Mostly Martha,” his own basic needs for his when a headstrong chef daughter’s dreams. takes charge of her equally These stories are narstubborn 8-year-old niece, rated by celebrated the tensions between them actresses: Cate Blanchett mount, until an Italian (Haiti), Priyanka Chopra sous-chef arrives to lighten (India), Selena Gomez the mood. (Sierra Leone), Anne Rated PG. $10 to attend Hathaway (Afghanistan), the film, $40 to the attend Salma Hayek (Peru), the film and class. Alicia Keys (Cambodia), Chloë Moretz (Egypt), ‘Eugene Onegin’ Freida Pinto, Meryl Streep 9:55 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 13 (Ethiopia), and Kerry Anna Netrebko and Washington (Nepal). $10.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E18 - Thursday, October 10, 2013

OUT & ABOUT ART IN THE ART BAR: Artworks by Deirdre Czoberek are on display through October 31 at the Lincoln Theatre Art Bar, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Czoberek was the set artist for “PAN the Musical,” which recently completed a successful run at the Lincoln. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org. S-W ART WALK: The Arts Council of SedroWoolley will host the “Fall Into Art” Art Walk through Oct. 15 in downtown Sedro-Woolley. Check out a variety of fall-themed artworks in the windows of downtown businesses. Free maps for the self-guided tour are available at the Sedro-Woolley Chamber of Commerce, Simply Silver & More and the S-W Public Library. For information, call 360-588-4384.

‘THE WARMTH OF AUTUMN’

“FOCUS ON FIBER”: Fiber artists Mary Burks, Linda LaMay, Joyce Noordmans and Martha Tottenham are featured in a show that continues through Oct. 31 at Anne Martin McCool Gallery, 711 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. The gallery will showcase hand-woven and hand-spun fiber art, including wearables and tapestries. Anne Martin McCool paintings and works by other gallery artists will also be shown. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday and noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. 360-293-3577 or mccoolart.com.

QUILTS, FIBER ARTS: Three new shows open today, Oct. 10, at the La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum, 703 S. Second St., La Conner. “Best of the Festival 2013”: Featuring the top B&W PHOTOS: Thaddeus award-winning quilts from Hink is showing a selection the museum’s annual Quilt of black and white photoFestival, the show will graphic prints, by appointcontinue through Nov. 24. ment, at Think Studios, The exhibit will include “The Warmth of Autumn” show continues through 1010 Fifth St., Suite 320, the Best of Show winner Oct. 31 at Raven Rocks Gallery, 765 Wonn Road, Anacortes. 360-770-4528. as well as the top entries Greenbank. New tapestry purses and wall hangings in Traditional Pieced, from Windwalker Taibi will be joined by his handspun NEW PAINTINGS: A Non-Traditional Pieced, yarns, bear fetish necklaces, paintings and raven note Wearable Arts, Best Use show of new paintings by Edison artist Todd Horton cards. Mary Jo Oxrieder will show knitted caps, of Recycled Materials and Scrumble dolls, small watercolors and inspiration continues through Oct. 27 plaques. Also on display will be Lynne Adams’ jewelry, Best Use of Embellishment at Smith & Vallee Gallery, Tim Potter’s “meticulous whimsy” creations, Roger categories. The People’s 5742 Gilkey Ave., Edison. Choice award-winner also White’s unique driftwood feathers, Bob and Lorena Horton challenges tradiwill be on display. Higbee’s turned wood vases, Northwest note cards tional concepts of painting by Sharon Stapleton and stained glass mosaics by “Abstracted”: The exhiand pushes the physicality Sandy and Carl Bryant. For information, including bition by the Fiber Art Netof the media. His work work from Western Canada gallery hours and directions, call 360-222-0102 or involves landscape, wildlife, visit ravenrocksgallery.com. Pictured: Pink Bunch by explores the concept of mystery and chance — Mary Jo Oxrieder realistic and abstract art. sometimes all in the same Pairs of artists will illuscomposition. Gallery hours trate their subject — one are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tueslery, 420 Commercial Ave., The gallery is also showing in a representative fiber day through Sunday. 360Anacortes. The exhibition oils by Matt Dollahite, pho- art piece and one in an 766-6230 or smithand abstract/non-representative will feature a collection of tographs by Lewis Jones, vallee.com. Friday Harbor artist BJ oils by Ramona Hammerly piece. Vivian Kapusta is the Dollahite’s mixed media and pastels by Steve Hill. show’s guest curator. The BJ DOLLAHITE: MIXED landscapes, seascapes and Gallery hours are 10:30 show continues through MEDIA COLLAGE: The florals, created by layering a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday Dec. 29. show continues through handmade papers in a vari- through Saturday. 360-293“Inspired to Design: Oct. 25 at Scott Milo Galety of colors and textures. 6938 or scottmilo.com. Art Quilts by Elizabeth

Barton”: Barton paints or dyes all of the fabric she uses in her nontraditional quilts, which she describes as “contemporary,” “art quilts” or “fiber collages.” Her work is focused on a few particular themes: buildings and cityscapes, industrial landscapes, black and white curves and landscapes. The show continues through Dec. 29. A reception for the artists will take place from 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, at the museum. Free with museum admission. Museum hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. $7, $5 students and military, free for members and ages 11 and younger. 360-466-4288 or laconnerquilts.com.

relationship to place in her paintings, and a concept she calls “Yondering,” a human mental activity somewhere between wondering and wandering. 360-708-4787 or gallerycygnus.com.

FIBER SHOW, SALE: The Whatcom Weavers Guild will present the annual Fibers & Beyond Show and Sale from 5 to 9 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 11-12, at Fox Hall, 3985 Bennett Drive, Bellingham. whatcomweavers guild.org.

MUSLIM/CHRISTIAN DIALOGUE: Free weekly discussions featuring Pakistani-American Jafar (Jeff) Siddiqui and moderated by Rev. George Lockwood will take place from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Thursdays at La Conner United Methodist Church, 601 S. Second St., La Conner. 206-228-5732. Next up: Today: Understanding Conflicts in the Middle East Today (Israel, Syria, Lebanon, Iran, Afghanistan and Iraq). Oct. 17: Understanding Conflicts Elsewhere in the Muslim World Today (Egypt, Nigeria, Turkey, Sudan/South Sudan). Oct. 24: Summary and review.

MEET THE ARTIST: Meet Andy Friedlander at an exhibition of his new paintings from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, at 1st Street Cabaret, 612 S. First St., Mount Vernon. 360-336-3012. LA CONNER QUILT WALK: Check out a wide variety of hand-crafted quilts from the EverGreen Quilters Guild of Bellingham on display through Oct. 15 in shops around La Conner. 360-466-4288 or lacon nerquilts.com. MAGGIE WILDER’S MAGIC MUD SHOW: The show runs through Oct. 20 at Gallery Cygnus, 109 Commercial St., La Conner. Wilder explores

RIVER GALLERY: The annual Fall Art Show continues through Nov. 3 at 19313 Landing Road, near La Conner. The show features more than 200 small works by 32 local artists, including paintings, sculptures, glass and jewelry. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday. 360-4664524 or rivergallerywa. com.

LECTURE AND TALKS

TRAIL TALES: A free screening of the documentary “Ocean Frontiers: The Dawn of a New Era in Ocean Stewardship,” followed by a brief discussion, will take place at 6 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11, at the Northwest Educational Services District building, 1601 R Ave., Anacortes. Free. skagitbeaches.org.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, October 10, 2013 - E19

OUT & ABOUT WORLD ISSUES FORUM: Western Washington University’s Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies holds its annual World Issues Forum from noon to 1:30 p.m. Wednesdays in the Fairhaven College auditorium on the campus in Bellingham. 360-650-2309 or edu/fairhaven/news/world issuesforum. Next up: Oct. 16: “Economic Adaptation, Identity Preservation: A Lahu na Shehleh Case”: Documentary filmmaker Jakatae Jayo will discuss the conflict between traditional practices of the Lahu Shehleh peoples of Southeast Asia and the political and economic policies trying to restrict them. FREE FILM SCREENING: “Genetic Roulette: The Gamble of Our Lives”: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. today, Concrete Theatre, 45920 Main St., Concrete. The film raises questions about GMOs, the biotech industry’s genetically engineered food experiment. Followed by a question and answer period. 360-941-0403 or concretetheatre.com. The film also will be screened at 3:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, at the Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Heather Burke will lead a discussion following the film. Free. 360293-1910, ext. 21, or library. cityofanacortes.org. GMO DISCUSSION: “I-522: GMOs in Your Food?” will be the topic at the next Fidalgo Democrats meeting at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15, at the Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. A joint presentation will be given by Steve Crider, regional co-leader of the Yes on 522 Campaign, the state initiative calling for labeling of food for sale containing genetically modified organisms, and fisheries consultant Anne Mosness, who will speak on the effects

of genetically engineered salmon on conventional fisheries. A moderated period of questions and comments will follow the speakers. Bring a nonperishable food bank donation. For information, contact Corinne Salcedo at 360-293-7114. “THE FUTURE OF WEATHER FORECASTING: 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15, Bellingham High School Theater, 2020 Cornwall Ave., Bellingham. Dr. Cliff Mass, University of Washington atmospheric scientist, weather blogger and author of “The Weather of the Pacific Northwest,” will offer a glimpse of changes in forecasting over the coming decades, including new products available soon for smartphones and other media. $12 in advance, $15 at the door, $5 students. boat ingcenter.org.

MUSIC JAZZ AT THE LIBRARY: BOSSA 31: 2 to 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13, Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Free. 360-2931910, ext. 21, or jazzatthe library.com.

place from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12, at the Breazeale Interpretive Center at Padilla Bay Reserve, 10441 Bayview-Edison Road, Bayview. Enjoy a walk-through experience of bioluminescence, aquariums, exhibits and glowing luminaria created in the shapes of watershed creatures. Free. For information, call SCEA at 360-428-1054 or email info@skagitcleanwater.org.

Friends TimeBank at the Autumn Social from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16, at the Anacortes Senior Activity Center, 1701 22nd St., Anacortes. Learn how the TimeBank service exchange can help you save money, share skills and connect with other residents. No need to sign up or bring food; just bring your place setting. 360-293-4048.

“LOBSTA’ MANIA”: The SPAGHETTI FEED: The annual lobster feast will Skagit, Whatcom, Island take place from 4 to 7 p.m. Trail Maintaining OrgaSaturday, Oct. 12, at the nization Spaghetti Feed Camano Center, 606 ArrowFundraiser and Bake Sale head Road, Camano Island. The Fall Film Series at the Anacortes Library, 1220 will be held from 4 to 7 p.m. Enjoy music by Swingnuts 10th St., Anacortes, continues with the showing Saturday, Oct. 12, at the Jazz while dining on a whole of “Twelve O’Clock High” at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11. Sedro-Woolley Community Maine lobster, corn on the Movie man Nick Alphin will introduce the film and Center, 703 Pacific St. A cob, cole slaw, garlic bread provide interesting background information. Gregory program by Ronan Ellis will and dessert. $25. BeverPeck stars as a World War II general who takes com- feature travels to the Gala- ages will be available for mand of a hard-luck bomber group flying perilous day- pagos islands and Machu purchase. Only 400 tickets light missions against Nazi Germany. The movie won Picchu. Tickets: $10 adults, will be sold. 360-387-0222 or two Oscars. Free. 360-293-1910, ext. 21, or library. $5 ages 12 and younger, at camanocenter.org. cityofanacortes.org. Joy’s Bakery, 823 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley, or call RAPTOR PRESENTATION: 360-424-0407. switmo.org. Sarvey Wildlife Care Center 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, organ workshop at 2 p.m. will offer a live raptor preOct. 12, at St. Joseph CenSaturday. All organists are FALL MUSHROOM sentation at 7 p.m. Wednester, 215 N. 15th St., Mount invited to attend. A light SHOW: The Snohomish day, Oct. 16, at the Camano Vernon. Enjoy live entersupper will be served to Multipurpose Center, 141 tainment, a variety of hand- County Mycological Sociworkshop participants. RSVP for supper to Donna crafted items, jewelry, home ety’s annual Fall Mushroom E.Camano Drive, Camano décor, kids’ activities, raffles Show will take place from 10 Island. Education Director at 360-428-0290. a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. Kestrel SkyHawk and her and more. Free admis13, at Floral Hall at Forest team will share informasion. Breakfast and lunch MORE FUN Park, 802 E. Mukilteo Blvd., tion about the center’s available. 360-428-3912 or CONCRETE GHOST Everett. Free admission; efforts to rescue, rehabilitate icrsweb.org. WALK: The eighth annual donations welcome. scmsand release area wildlife. Concrete Ghost Walk will Free. For information, visit WATERSHED TRAIL CEL- fungi.org. take place at 6 p.m. every camanowildlifehabitat.org EBRATION: The “IlluminatSaturday in October, depart- ing the Skagit Watershed TIMEBANK INFO: Learn or email camanowildlife ing from the historic ConTrail Celebration” will take more about Fidalgo & habitat@gmail.com. crete Theatre, 45920 Main St., Concrete. The walk features stories and legends of the town’s past, a tour of historic landmarks and tales told by local residents. Dress In for walking in the weather. Ages 13 and older; minors 3 professional comedians! must be accompanied by an $16/seat Festival Seating adult. $10. Advance reservawww.lincolntheatre.org -or- 336-8955 tions required: 360-941-0403 Presented by the or concrete-theatre.com. Come laugh, giggle, guffaw,

FALL FILM SERIES

ORGAN CONCERT, WORKSHOP: Renowned organist Dan Miller will present a concert at 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19, at Trinity Lutheran Church, 301 S. 18th St., Mount Vernon. Miller will be the featured organist as the church dedicates the new Rodgers 588 organ recently installed in its sanctuary. A church organist since age 15, Miller majored in organ performance at the American Conservatory of Music and holds a Church Music diploma from Moody Bible Institute, a BFA from Florida Atlantic University and a Master of Music degree in organ ARTS FEST: Immacuperformance from Winthrop late Conception Regional University. School will hold its annual Miller will conduct an Autumn Arts Festival from

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