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Skagit River Poetry Festival kicks off four-day run today

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‘Godzilla’: The big guy is back, but you’ve seen his act before MOVIES, PAGE 10

Skagit Valley Herald Thursday May 15, 2014

Travel

Reviews

Tuning Up

Check out these Northwest Rails-to-Trails Hall of Famers

Music: Michael Jackson, Rascal Flatts Video Games: “MLB 14: The Show”

The Randy Linder Band plays the Skagit Valley Casino this weekend

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E2 - Thursday, May 15, 2014

NEW ON DVD THIS WEEK “Her”: Emotional loner Theodore (Joaquin Phoenix) falls in love with his newly purchased operating system, which goes by the name Samantha (voiced by Scarlett Johansson). It’s not the person who provides the computer voice, it’s the operating system that steals his heart. Call it “Close Encounters of the Intellectual Kind.” Director Spike Jonze takes a painfully serious look at what actually defines love. It’s often depicted in films — and experienced in real life — as a physical, emotional and intellectual connection between two people. They might have different philosophies, social backgrounds or any of a million other variances, but they are pulled together by a force that’s as intangible as the wind. The world and characters in “Her” come with a certain degree of emptiness created by the loss of spontaneity. It’s the perfect environment for this original look at the meaning of falling in love. “Orange Is the New Black”: The original series from Netflix is based on the memoirs of Piper Kerman. The 13-episode comedy/drama follows a young woman (Taylor Schilling) whose seemingly perfect life is turned upside down when she must serve time in a federal women’s prison — a place where orange jumpsuits are always in fashion. From the writing to standout performances by Schilling and Prepon, this production is entertainment in the first degree. “Barney Miller: Season Five”: This comedy about the off-beat squad of cops who daily face arresting developments showed some real heart in this season that originally aired during the 1978-79 TV season on ABC. Among the 24 episodes is the season finale, “Jack Soo, a Retrospective,” where the cast pay tribute to the late actor who played detective Nick Yemana. Soo’s dry humor was a big part of the series. “Afterlife: Season One”: Andrew Lincoln plays a fierce skeptic who meets a real psychic. “Stalingrad”: Drama set during one of the most important battles of World War II. “Looney Tunes Spotlight Collection Volume 8”: Includes 30 theatrical animated shorts. “Scooby Doo! 13 Spooky Tales: Field of Screams”: Scooby gang faces scary adventures. “Crocodile Dundee & Crocodile Dundee II”: Both films starring Paul Hogan are on one DVD.

YOUR ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION GUIDE TO WHAT’S GOING ON IN SKAGIT COUNTY AND THE SURROUNDING AREAS

Upcoming movie releases Following is a partial schedule of coming movies on DVD. Release dates are subject to change: MAY 20 About Last Night - Sony Grand Piano - Magnolia In Secret - Lionsgate The Monuments Men - Sony Pompeii - Sony 3 Days to Kill - Fox Vampire Academy - Anchor Bay MAY 27 Endless Love - Universal Gambit - Sony Run & Jump - MPI Home Video Trials of Cate McCall - Vertical 24 Exposures - MPI Home Video

This Weekend Page 5

n McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“Theatreland”: Sir Patrick Stewart and Sir Ian McKellen provide a look behind the scenes of a production of “Waiting for Godot.” “Wolverine Weapon X: Tomorrow Dies Today”: Wolverine’s life becomes complicated when cybernetic robots from the future embark on a superhero killing spree. “Martha’s Superhero Adventures”: Based on the children’s book series by Susan Meddaugh. “The Godfather Part III”: Third part of the trilogy is available on Blu-ray. “Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron”: Animated tale is being released as a Blu-ray combo pack. “One Direction: Reaching for the Stars Part 2: The Next Chapter”: Gets up close and personal with the pop group. “Easy Money, Life Deluxe”: This installment in the series has JW (Joel Kinnaman) more determined that ever to find his missing sister. “Generation Iron”: A look at the professional sport of bodybuilding today. “Deadly Code”: Leader of a Siberian criminal clan schools his grandson on the “honest criminal” code of their community. “Dinosaur Big City / Dinosaurs A to Z Double Feature”: Features 17 prehistoric adventures aimed at children. “Perry Mason Movie Collection: Volume 2”: Includes six made-for-TV movies. “French for Kids”: Animated way to teach French. “American Jesus”: Documentary on American religion. n Rick Bentley, The Fresno Bee

The Growing Veterans and Viva Farms Tour will take place Saturday at Viva Farms.

Inside

SUBMISSIONS Email features@skagitpublishing.com, vrichardson@skagitpublishing. com (recreation items) Deadline: 5 p.m. Friday for the following Thursday edition Phone 360-416-2135 Hand-deliver 1215 Anderson Road Mount Vernon, WA 98274 Mailing address P.O. Box 578 Mount Vernon, WA 98273

Travel................................................... 4 Music, Video Game Reviews.............. 6 Get Involved........................................ 7 On Stage, Tuning Up........................8-9 Movie Listings, Reviews..............10-11 Hot Tickets........................................ 12 At the Lincoln.................................... 13 Out & About.................................14-15 ON THE COVER A film image from “Godzilla.” Warner Bros. Pictures via AP

Online events calendar To list your event on our website, visit goskagit.com and look for the Events Calendar on the home page HAVE A STORY IDEA? w For arts and entertainment, contact Features Editor Craig Parrish at 360-416-2135 or features@skagitpublishing.com w For recreation, contact staff writer Vince Richardson at 360-416-2181 or vrichardson@ skagitpublishing.com TO ADVERTISE 360-424-3251


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, May 15, 2014 - E3

COMMUNITY

Elizabeth Austen

Robert Hass

Sherman Alexie

Mark Doty Chase Jarvis photo

Skagit River Poetry Festival begins its four-day run today Skagit Valley Herald staff

The annual Skagit River Poetry Festival begins today and runs through Sunday, May 18, at various locations throughout La Conner. The renowned event will feature poetry readings, panel discussions with top national and international poets, writing workshops and more. The festival will kick off with a Poet’s Table dinner from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. today at Maple Hall. Partici-

National Book Award winner Mark Doty, among many others. The festival also offers workshops pants will share tables with festival artists and enjoy a meal of local foods with poets Jane Alynn, Roberto Ascalon, Oliver de la Paz, Kelly and fine wines. Admission is $100. Davio, Kwame Dawes, Blas Falconer, That will be followed by An EveLorraine Ferra, Matt Gano, Paul ning with Sherman Alexie and Tom Hunter, Evelyn Lau, Tim McNulty, Robbins, two prominent Pacific Susan Rich, Charles Goodrich, Derek Northwest authors, from 8 to 10 p.m. at the La Conner Elementary School Sheffield, Elizabeth Woody and Kevin Craft. gym. Alexie and Robbins will share The cost is $60 for each workshop the stage as they swap wit, wordplay or $100 for two. To register, email and wild wisdom. Admission is $40. Artists scheduled to appear include executive director Molly McNulty at U.S. Poet Laureate Robert Hass and directorsrpp@gmail.com.

Starr Black photo

Skagit River Poetry Festival When: Today through Sunday, May 18 Where: La Conner, various locations Information: 360422-6033, skagit riverpoetry.org, brownpapertickets. com/event/520248


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E4 - Thursday, May 15, 2014

TRAVEL

Northwest Rails to Trails Hall of Fame routes By CAREY J. WILLIAMS Associated Press

WALLACE, Idaho — In many parts of the country, abandoned train tracks have been repurposed into multi-use exercise trails. The best of them — a little more than two dozen routes in all — are in the Rail-to-Trails Conservancy Hall of Fame, and several of those are located in the Northwest region of the United States, in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Some routes are within earshot of an interstate or overrun with tumbleweeds. Others take you outside of city limits, perhaps following a river around a mountain pass, offering an opportunity to see and hear birds in remote marshlands or spot wildlife in an open meadow. And since the original tracks had gradient limits for locomotives, the trails are relatively flat, making for an easy bike ride, hike or run. The Hall of Fame trails, selected between 2007 and 2011, were chosen for reasons of “scenic value, high use, trail and trailside amenities, historical significance, excellence in management and maintenance of facility, community connections and geographic distribution.” The 72-mile Trail of the Coeur d’Alenes features beautiful views of the south end of Lake Coeur d’Alene, the South Fork of the Coeur d’Alene River and the peaks of the Bitterroot Mountains. TOP: The path The track goes from Plummer, of Trail of the Idaho, to Mullan, Idaho. Parts go Coeur d’Alenes through protected marshlands near as it weaves the chain lakes region (east of the around a small lake), giving trail users a chance to lake and see blue heron, swans, bald eagles, hillside in Idaho. moose, elk and other wildlife. In MIDDLE: A the fall, the trail comes alive with moose cools colorful autumn foliage from the off in the Chain aspen and larch trees. History buffs Lakes area can visit Idaho’s oldest standing along the Trail building, the Sacred Heart Mission, of the Coeur which was built in the 1850s, or tour d’Alenes. a silver mine in nearby Kellogg or BOTTOM: Carey Wallace. Williams takes a Lodging is available along the self-portrait on way for multiday trips, from campthe Trail of the Coeur d’Alenes. sites at Heyburn State Park to hotels and motels in towns. Carey J. Williams / AP

Northwest trails Here’s a list of the Northwest

trails in the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy Hall of Fame (railstotrails.org/ourWork/promoting TrailUse/trailRecognition/hallof Fame/index.html): Coeur d’Alenes (Idaho-Montana): friendsofcdatrails.org Burke-Gilman (Seattle area): seattle.gov/parks/burkegilman /bgtrail.htm Springwater (near Portland, Oregon): portlandoregon.gov/ parks/finder/index.cfm?action= ViewPark&PropertyID=679

Some 20 miles from the trailhead for the Coeur d’Alenes trail is the trailhead for the Route of the Hiawatha, located just across the Montana border. The Hiawatha trail, where the Milwaukee Railroad once ran trains, offers 10 tunnels and seven high trestles with views of mountains in Idaho and Montana. The Taft Tunnel is the main starting point for the trail and, for many, the highlight of the trip, but bring a headlamp because the pin-sized hole at the end of the tunnel doesn’t provide enough light for safe riding. The 15-mile track is advertised for bicycle travel and the nonpaved, packed gravel surface can be ridden on hybrid bike tires. Mountain bikes can be rented at Lookout Pass Ski Area, 7 miles from the trailhead. Visitors must purchase a trail pass for $10 ($6 for children) and have the option to pay for a one-way return trip on a bus ($6-$9). Seattle’s Burke-Gilman Trail’s first sections were paved in 1974 after the Burlington Northern Railroad abandoned the line. It goes through the University of Washington, hugs northeastern Lake Washington and is popular for bicycle commuters. The Springwater Corridor, outside of Portland Oregon, runs through industrial and residential areas, agricultural fields, along the Willamette River, and near the Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge, Tideman Johnson Nature Park and Powell Butte Nature Park.

Local travel VACATION GO SHOW: Enjoy a presentation about some of the most popular destinations in America at 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 18, at the AAA Travel Store, 1600 E. College Way, Suite A, Mount Vernon. Free. RSVP: 360-8482090. SHORT TRIPS: Mount Vernon Parks and Recreation offers travel opportunities for ages 12 and older (adult supervision required for ages 18 and younger). Trips depart from and return to Hillcrest Park, 1717 S. 13th St., Mount Vernon. For information or to register, call 360-336-6215. Next up: “Wallabies and Waterfalls”: 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturday, June 14. Travel to the town of Snoqualmie to view the 286-foot Snoqualmie Falls and adjoining hydroelectric project, followed by time for a no-host lunch and exploration of the downtown. Next, the group will visit the Fall City Wallaby Ranch for a private tour, including a chance to pet, feed and learn about gray and albino Bennett’s wallabies and red kangaroos, with one final stop at Maltby for an afternoon treat at Snoqualmie Gourmet Ice Cream. $62-$64. Register by June 6. “San Juan Island History, Hiking and Whales”: 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturday, June 28. Travel by van and ferry to Friday Harbor for hiking and great views at American Camp, then on to Lime Kiln Point State Park, considered one of the best locations to see migrating orca whales. After a picnic lunch, head back to Friday Harbor for time on your own to explore shops, cafes and the Whale Museum. Pack a lunch and beverages. $72-$80. Register by June 20. EXTENDED TRIPS: The Oak Harbor Senior Center is these extended trips: New England, Sept. 26-Oct. 3; “Southern Charm,” Dec. 14-19; Panama, February 2015; “Blue Danube,” April 14-28, 2015; and Portugal, fall 2015. Contact Pat Gardner: 360-279-4582 or pgardner@oakharbor.org.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, May 15, 2014 - E5

THIS WEEKEND in the area Veterans & farm tour Leadership Skagit 2014 Team Magic Skagit Superheroes will host the Growing Veterans & Viva Farms Tour from 2 to 5 p.m. Saturday, May 17, at Viva Farms, 15366 Ovenell Road (off Higgins Airport Way), west of Mount Vernon. Enjoy farm walks, tractor rides and popcorn, while learning about a new program to engage military veterans in volunteer and internship experiences at this sustainable farm. 360-395-8727 or leadershipskagit.org.

MULTICULTURAL FAMILY FESTIVAL Skagit Valley College Multicultural Student Services and community partners will present familyfriendly multicultural activities from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, May 17, at the SVC Campus Center and Phillip Tarro Theatre, 2405 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. Enjoy live performances, interactive activities, international cuisine, local vendors, arts and crafts and more. Proceeds will benefit SVC’s Calling All Colors Club Multicultural Scholarships. Free admission. 360-416-7786.

CARNIVAL & AUCTION The Bay View Family Carnival and Auction will be held from 4 to 8 p.m. Saturday, May 17, at Bay View Elementary School, 15241 Josh Wilson Road, Burlington. 360-757-3322, ext. 158.

CAMANO STUDIO TOUR The

MUSEUM FREE DAY, FILM SCREENING The Sedro-Woolley Museum will screen the short, silent video “Tusko” starting at 1 p.m. Saturday, May 17, at the museum, 725 Murdock St., Sedro-Woolley. Tusko the elephant came to Sedro-Woolley with a traveling circus in May 1922, and made national news when he escaped and ran amuck, causing considerable damage around the town. The video shows Tusko pushing a house off of its foundation and at the Woodland Park Zoo in the 1930s. The film will be repeated throughout the afternoon. Attendees will receive a handout of the story of Tusko’s rampage through Sedro-Woolley. Free admission. 360-8552390 or sedrowoolleymuseum.org.

16th annual Camano Island Studio Tour will take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, May 17-18, at numerous locations around Camano Island and Stanwood. Check out artwork in a variety of media offered by 41 juried artists and three galleries. Pick up a self-guided tour map at local merchants or at camanoarts. org. Free. 425-478-0777.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E6 - Thursday, May 15, 2014

REVIEWS: MUSIC

REVIEWS: VIDEO GAMES

Michael Jackson

Rascals Flatts

From the first, there was the voice, and with it Michael Jackson crafted beauty. The sequins and moonwalk came later. Even as a tyke he captivated with tonal purity, and in the intervening four decades and 10 studio solo albums that voice was a unifier, one nestled not just within universal playlists but our very neurons — as anyone who’s ever awakened with the bass line to “Billie Jean” or the chorus to “Rock With You” out-of-the-blue rolling through their heads can attest. Nearly five years after his death, that voice remains, and is at its most powerful on the new album “Xscape.” Eight songs that use Jackson demos as blueprints to construct modern, vibrant tracks, the artist’s second posthumous album of studio recordings feels shockingly vital, as though the producers charged with re-imagining this work had harnessed dance floor defibrillators. Equally alive are the eight demos of these songs included with the deluxe package, resulting in a strong addition to the King of Pop conversation. At nearly every turn, “Xscape” succeeds in its intended goal of “finding new and compelling ways to capture the essence, the excitement and the magic that is Michael Jackson,” as stated in the liner notes. Considering one of those eight is a riff on soft rock band America’s “A Horse With No Name,” that’s no small feat. (The deluxe package’s final track pairs inheritor Justin Timberlake with Jackson for a fake duet of “Love Never Felt So Good.” It’s superfluous.) From the first lines of the first song, the Paul Anka-penned, “Love Never Felt So Good,” “Xscape” confirms that hearing Michael sing “new” material can still be a mystical experience, and throughout the freshly produced recordings the sound of a still-vital spirit rushes into the present with revived energy. You can hear his breath in the slow-burning “Chicago,” about an innocent tryst gone wrong, can nearly touch the quiver in his falsetto during “Loving You.” “Blue Gangsta” is pure funk, with a vocal take that’s toe-curlingly gorgeous and a conceit that ups the “Smooth Criminal” vibe. That crack of emotion, heard in headphones, races to the pleasure center, while the track’s producers, including Dr. Freeze, Timbaland and Jerome “J-Roc” Harmon, build a sonic Robocop to support it.

Rascal Flatts may have named their ninth album “Rewind,” but musically the countrypop trio takes a much-needed step forward. Punching up arrangements with rock energy (“Payback”) and synth-pop flourishes (“Honeysuckle Lazy”), the band undergoes a contemporary country makeover as it celebrate its 15th year. The result makes for a more fun, mature and diverse sound — washing away the stale taste of recent outings. On “Rewind,” lead singer Gary LeVox, bassist-pianist-singer Jay Demarcus and guitarist Joe Don Rooney take a bigger hand in their production, cutting more than half of the album on their own. Led by Demarcus, who has co-produced albums by Jo Dee Messina and the rock band Chicago, the trio moves the needle forward on the engaging “DJ Tonight” and the title cut, a recent country Top 10 hit. The group also brought in pop veteran Howard Benson, who produced five cuts, including the dance floor-ready “Powerful Stuff.” Old hand Dann Huff, who had produced the band since 2006, worked with the group on the catchy “Life’s A Song,” which sounds more like the old Rascal Flatts. But what makes “Rewind” exciting is that Rascal Flatts has fast-forwarded into the future.

“Xscape”

n Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times

“Rewind”

n Michael McCall, Associated Press

Dolly Parton “Blue Smoke”

Dolly Parton, at age 68, creates her best album in more than a dozen years by returning to the bluegrass-flavored sound that worked so well for her at the turn of the century. “Blue Smoke” succeeds partly because the Country Music Hall of Fame member’s songwriting pen remains sharp. “Unlikely Angel” and the family melodrama “”Miss You-Miss Me” join the three-part harmony of the title cut in adding to Parton’s considerable legacy as a songwriter. The emphasis on banjo, fiddle and gospel-style harmony is reminiscent of 1999’s “The Grass Is Blue,” a Parton career highlight. Her update of the traditional murder ballad “Banks Of The Ohio” fits the bill, too. But Parton expands her musical palette with two risky covers. She gives Bob

Dylan’s “Don’t Think Twice” a bluegrass treatment, turning Dylan’s bitter sneer into a melancholy farewell. She also transforms Bon Jovi’s “Lay Your Hands On Me” into a surprisingly effective Baptist rave-up. n Michael McCall, Associated Press

The Black Keys

‘MLB 14: The Show’

Publisher: Sony Playform: Play Station 4 Cost: $59.99 Stars: 3 (out of 4)

It’s been four years and several Grammy wins since the Black Keys’ breakthrough album “Brothers,” and the kings of alternative-rock show no sign of letting their hardearned crown slip. “Turn Blue,” their eighth album and follow-up to 2011’s platinum-selling “El Camino,” is arguably their best yet. Superproducer Brian “Danger Mouse” Burton is at the helm once again, adding layers of complex orchestration to singer-guitarist Dan Auerbach and drummer Patrick Carney’s trademark blues-rock backbeat. The album kicks off with the jaw-dropping “Weight of Love” — a seven-minute odyssey demonstrating the high confidence coursing through the band’s recording studio last summer. Starting with a simple acoustic guitar line, the hushed opening builds into an epic meditation on love and loss, with Auerbach’s intertwining guitar solos dissolving in a haze of reverb. The stunning calling card is followed by three songs that rank among the best in the Keys’ canon, including the menacing title track (“I really don’t think you know, there could be hell below,” croons Auerbach over an echo-soaked piano) and omnipresent lead-off single, “Fever,” which couples a synth riff and bone-crunching bass. Elsewhere, distorted tribal drums and a snaking guitar line mark spacey rocker “It’s Up to You Now” out as a future single — an explosion of Delta blues by way of Saturn. It’s not all smooth sailing. Auerbach’s falsetto vocals on lovelorn ballad “Waiting on Words” lack emotional punch, while the funk bass line repeated throughout “10 Lovers” is stymied by a keyboard riff so high-pitched it will set any dog within a mile radius running for cover. Thankfully, the Keys immediately recover their sure footing, closing the album with two tracks at opposite ends of the band’s musical spectrum. Jimi Hendrix’s spirit comes through in the psychedelic guitar workout “In Our Prime,” while album closer “Gotta Get Away” is an unashamedly pop-y track destined to become a summer anthem.

The first edition of a sports game on a new console is like the first game in a new stadium: The place looks great, but management may not yet have worked out the kinks at the ticket lines or the concession stands. “MLB 14: The Show” is no exception. In the latest upgrade of the stellar baseball franchise, the players look more realistic than ever, and their individualized animations bring them ever closer to the athletes you see at the ballpark. Sony’s San Diego Studio has also refurbished every major league stadium. The most notable flaws are some excruciating loading times, especially when starting a new game or switching between different play modes. And there are a few graphical stutters that destroy the generally well-crafted illusion of watching a TV broadcast. Otherwise, most of the new features in the PS4 version of “MLB 14” are the same as those introduced a few months ago on the PS3 edition. The most radical revision is “Quick Counts,” in which each at-bat begins a few pitches in. It’s a bit of a gamble, since your batter can just as likely come to the plate with a 3-0 edge or a 0-2 disadvantage. Purists will grumble, but it’s useful if you have just 30 minutes or so to squeeze in a game. The highlight, as always with this series, is the absorbing “Road to the Show.” You create a player from scratch, but this year you can model your guy on a reallife major leaguer. My doppelganger, the scrappy second baseman Louie Kesten, is based on young Washington Nationals infielder Anthony Rendon. Unfortunately, I’m still struggling to make an impression on the Philadelphia Phillies’ AA farm team, the Reading Fightin’ Phils. “MLB 14” doesn’t radically reinvent the series for the PS4, and if you’ve already bought the PS3 version, you aren’t missing much if you don’t upgrade. It still has so much packed into it that it should satisfy anyone, from casual players looking for a quick contest to fantasy geeks who want to assemble entire leagues from scratch. It remains one of the finest sports games on the market, and an essential purchase for baseball fans.

n Matthew Kemp, Associated Press

n Lou Kesten, Associated Press

“Turn Blue”


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, May 15, 2014 - E7

GET INVOLVED AUDITIONS

SCOTTISH DANCING: Bellingham Scottish CounSHELTER BAY CHORUS: try Dancers meet from 7 to Practices are held from 2:45 9:30 p.m. Wednesdays at the to 4:45 p.m. every Thursday Fairhaven Library auditoriat the Shelter Bay Clubum (upstairs), 1117 12th St., house in La Conner. New Bellingham. Wear comfortmembers welcome. No need able clothes and soft-soled to be a Shelter Bay resident. shoes without heels. $8 per 360-466-3805. class. For information, call Mary Anderson at 360-933WOMEN SING FOUR1779 or visit bellinghamscd. PART HARMONY: Join org. the women of Harmony Northwest Chorus from 7 THURSDAY DANCE: to 9:30 p.m. every Monday Enjoy dancing to the Skipat the Mount Vernon Senior pers from 1 to 3:30 p.m. Center, 1401 Cleveland Ave. Thursdays at Hillcrest All a cappella skill levels Lodge, 1717 S. 13th St., welcome. Mount Vernon. For information, contact Doris at 360BRASS CHOIR: The Basi- 588-8239. cally Brass Choir seeks a French horn player to join ON STAGE a group of about 12 musiANACORTES OPEN MIC: cians, playing a variety of 9:30 p.m. Thursdays, Brown styles. Rehearsals are the Lantern Ale House, 412 first and third Mondays in Commercial Ave., AnaBurlington, with regular cortes. 360-293-2544. performances. Contact: David Soiseth, 360-757-0351 OPEN MIC: Jam Night, or dsois@comcast.net. 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Thurs-

30. To learn more or sign up your child, stop by your local club, visit SkagitRaisesGreatKids.org/summer or call the club director listed below: Anacortes: Cory Oppel, 360-588-9045. La Conner: Kendrick Davis-Pittmon, 360-4663672. Mount Vernon: Vesta Anderson, 360-428-6995. Sedro-Woolley: John Garman, 360-856-1830.

SUMMER DAY CAMP: Kids in grades K-6 can enjoy a variety of activities centered on each week’s theme from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays at Hillcrest Park, 1717 S. 13th St., Mount Vernon. Two days: $75. Four days: $115. Preregistration required: 360-336-6215 or mountvernonwa.gov/parks. Here is a listing of the first few weeks: July 7-10: Adventures Abound: Hike Little Mountain’s trails, climb on the days, Conway Pub & Eatery, Eagle Rock Challenge CALL FOR YOUNG MUSI- 18611 Main St., Conway. Course, go on a treasure CIANS: The Mount Vernon- 360-445-4733. hunt at Hillcrest Park and based Fidalgo Youth Symlearn the basics of geophony offers opportunities caching. for ages 5 to 21 to study and RECREATION July 14-17: Art EscaBOYS & GIRLS CLUB perform orchestral music. pades: Learn how to use a SUMMER PROGRAMS: For information, including variety of mediums to creRegistration is open for tuition costs and rehearsal schedules, contact Sara Fish- summer programs at Skagit ate works of art to display at the Children’s Art Festival Valley Boys & Girls clubs. er, 360-682-6949 or Anita on July 19. Includes a tour Children can participate Tatum, 360-969-1681, or visit and art lesson at the Musein educational programs fysmusic.org. um of Northwest Art in La from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. MonConner. days through Fridays, June DANCE July 21-24: Sports 23-Aug. 15. FOLK DANCING: SkagitExtravaganza: Spend time Programs that encourAnacortes Folkdancers age academic success, good outdoors playing group meet at 7 p.m. most Tuesgames, including basketball, character and citizenship, days at Bayview Civic Hall, and healthy lifestyles are soccer, Frisbee, capture the 12615 C St., Mount Vernon. designed around different flag and more. Finish the Learn to folk-dance to a themes each week. The cost week with roller skating at variety of international Skagit Skate. for Day Camp and regular music. Instruction begins at Club hours is $100 per week July 28-31: Barnyard 7 p.m. followed by review Palooza: Enjoy animalplus the monthly memberand request dances until ship fee, which starts at $25. themed crafts and games, 9:30. The first session is free, A reduced rate is available line dancing and a visit to $3 thereafter. No partners Sky Harvest Produce at if your family qualifies for needed. For information, Youngquist Farms to take the free or reduced school contact Gary or Ginny at lunch program. Registration a tour, help with a chore or 360-766-6866. is limited and closes May two, pick berries and stop

for ice cream on the way back. TRAIL TALES: Friends of Skagit Beaches will lead a series of informative walks along the Tommy Thompson Trail in Anacortes. For information, visit skagitbeaches. org. Next up: “Native and Introduced Plants along Fidalgo Bay & Their Animal Companions”: Join Trail Tales docents at 2 p.m. Sunday, May 18, at Fidalgo Bay Resort, 4701 Fidalgo Bay Road, Anacortes. Learn about the flora and fauna along the shore of the Tommy Thompson Trail, including plant identification and facts about the animals that use the plants, some of which are native and others that were introduced by the Coast Salish people and Europeans. Suitable for children. Free.

FRIENDS OF THE FOREST HIKES: Join the Friends of the Forest for scenic hikes in the forest lands around Anacortes. Free. For information, call 360-2933725 or visit friendsoftheacfl.org. Next up: Spring Adult Fitness Hike: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, May 17. For the very fit. Meet at the Little Cranberry Lake parking lot. Take Georgia south off of Oakes and follow up to the ACFL road, then take a right and follow to the parking lot. Prepare to cover 8 miles of trail on this three-hour tour of Little Cranberry terrain. Bring water and a snack.

GOLF TOURNAMENT: The Burlington-Edison Kiwanis 26th annual “Golfers Against Hunger and Domestic Violence” golf tournament will take place Friday, May 16, at Skagit Golf and Country Club, TRAIL WORK: The Skagit, 16701 Country Club Drive, Burlington. Registration for Whatcom, Island Trail the 18-hole scramble tourMaintaining Organization nament will begin at 10:30 (SWITMO) seeks voluna.m. with a shotgun start at teers for trail work from April through October. The noon and buffet dinner and next work party will be held awards around 5:30 p.m. Registration: $100, $80 for Saturday, May 17. 360-4240407 or jdmelcher@comcast. Skagit Golf & Country Club members. Dinner only: $25. net. Proceeds go toward feeding SPRING PLANT WALKS: the hungry and preventing domestic violence in Skagit The Washington Native County; 25 percent will Plant Society hosts plant walks from 10 a.m. to noon benefit 530 Slide Disaster Tuesdays at area parks. For Relief efforts. For information, contact Jess Carkner information, call Ann at at 360-770-5117 or Brian 360-293-3044 or Susan at Clark, 360-336-1000. 360-659-8792. Next up: May 20: Kettleholes on WALK & RUN: The 32nd Whidbey Island and Fort annual Bay View Walk Ebey Bluff. Meet at 9 a.m. & Run to benefit Skagit at the Skagit Transit Park Domestic Violence and and Ride off Highway 20 Sexual Assault Services and at March Point Road to carpool, or at 10 a.m. at the Women’s Health Issues will trail head at the entrance to begin at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 17, at Bay View State Fort Ebey State Park. This Park at Padilla Bay. Alleasy hike should include a age event includes a 2-mile spectacular show of native walk, 2-mile fun run and a rhododendrons. Limited 10K run. Teams can show parking. Bring lunch to enjoy on the bluff. their colors or wear cos-

tumes. Entry fees $20-$45. Kids under 12 run free. Dayof registration: 8 to 9:30 a.m. at the park’s beach picnic shelter. 360-757-4815 or bvwomensk@gmail.com. BICYCLE MAINTENANCE: “Fix a Flat and Beyond,” 10 a.m. Saturday, May 17, Anacortes Depot, 611 R Ave., Anacortes. Nick Stowe of Bikespot will demonstrate how to patch and replace a tube, as well as other basic bicycle maintenance such as lubrication, tire pressure, brakes and shifting safely. Free. No registration required. transitionfidalgo. org.

WORKSHOPS EKPHRASTIC POETRY WORKSHOP: 9 a.m. to noon Sunday, May 18, Museum of Northwest Art, 121 S. First St., La Conner. Ekphrasis, a verbal response to the visual or sculptural arts, will provide the spark for good seeing and good poetry. Participants will discuss examples of ekphrastic poems and do in-class writing in response to artworks in the museum. $60. Register with the Skagit River Poetry Festival at directorsrpp@gmail.com. PHOTOGRAPHY: Professional photographer Andy Porter will each “Point and Shoot” from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, May 17, at the Burlington Parks and Recreation Center, 900 E. Fairhaven Ave. Learn how to compose an interesting picture, whether you’re photographing people, pets or landscapes. The class will cover how to use lines, reflections and framing, and use of the various shooting modes — landscape, portrait and sports — to capture the best images. Bring your camera and user manual. $40. To register, call 360-755-9649 or email recre ation@burlingtonwa.gov.


E8 Thursday, May 15, 2014

Thursday, May 15, 2014 E9

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area May 15-22

TUNING UP Playing at area venues May 15-22 LOOKING AHEAD

FRIDAY-SATURDAY.16-17 RANDY LINDER BAND 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877-275-2448.

MONDAY.19

“A Night at the Movies”: Mount Vernon High School Band and Orchestra, 7 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $4-$8. 416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall.org.

FRIDAYSUNDAY.16-18 “SHREK THE MUSICAL” Skagit Valley College drama department, McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15$20. 416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall. org. Check individual listings for time.

TUESDAY.20

The Mount Baker Toppers (men’s a cappella chorus): 7 p.m., Jansen Art Center, 321 Front St., Lynden. $5. 360-354-3600 or jansenartcenter.org.

Thursday.15

THURSDAY-SAURDAY.15-17

THEATER

“THE OUTSIDERS”: META Performing Arts, 7:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $16. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org.

“The Outsiders”: META Performing Arts, 7:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $16. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org.

Friday.16

Jazz at the Center: Adriana Giordano and the EntreMundos Quarteto, 7 p.m., Camano Center, 606 Arrowhead Road, Camano Island. $20, free for students with ID. 360-387-0222 or camanocenter.org.

THURSDAY.22

MUSIC

“In the Arms of the Sea”: Angeli (vocal quartet), 7 p.m., Oak Harbor Lutheran Church, 1253 NW Second Ave., Oak Harbor. Freewill offering will benefit Whidbey Animals’ Improvement Foundation. 360-679-1561.

Saturday.17

Sunday.18

THEATER

THEATER

MUSIC

“The Outsiders”: META Performing Arts, 7:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $16. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org.

“The Outsiders”: META Performing Arts, 7:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $16. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org.

“Shrek The Musical”: Skagit Valley College drama department, 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15-$20. 416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall.org.

“Shrek The Musical”: Skagit Valley College drama department, 2 and 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15-$20. 416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall.org.

“Good People” (drama): Outcast Productions, 7:30 p.m., Black Box Theater, 819 Camano Ave., Langley. $14-$18. brownpapertick ets.com or outcastproductions.net.

“Good People” (drama): Outcast Productions, 7:30 p.m., Black Box Theater, 819 Camano Ave., Langley. $14-$18. brownpapertick ets.com or outcastproductions.net.

“Sousa Salutes”: North Cascades Concert Band, featuring Sgt. Brian Turnmire, trumpet soloist with “The President’s Own” Washington, D.C., Marine Corps Concert Band; 3 p.m., Brodniak Hall, Anacortes High School, 1600 20th St., Anacortes. Donations accepted. 360-676-9905 or nccband.org. “Sunday@3 Youth Concert”: 3 p.m., Jansen Art Center, 321 Front St., Lynden. $5, free for ages 11 and younger. 360-354-3600 or jansenartcenter.org.

THEATER

“Shrek The Musical”: Skagit Valley College drama department, 2 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15-$20. 416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall.org. “Good People” (drama): Outcast Productions, 2 p.m., Black Box Theater, 819 Camano Ave., Langley. $14-$18. brownpaper tickets.com or outcastproductions. net.

SATURDAY.17

WEDNESDAY.21

“Good People” (drama): Outcast Productions, 7:30 p.m., Black Box Theater, 819 Camano Ave., Langley. $14-$18. brown papertickets.com or outcastproductions. net. “Corktown”: Western Washington University’s College of Fine and Performing Arts, 7:30 and 10:30 p.m., WWU Performing Arts Center, Bellingham. The audience will move with the performers from space to space on Western’s campus. $4-$12. 360-6506146 or tickets. wwu.edu.

MUDFLAT WALKERS 8:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

THURSDAY.15 Paul Klein (blues, rock): 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360354-3600.

FRIDAY.16 The Fenderbenders: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4226411.

Science Duo: 6 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $5. 360-445-3000.

Randy Linder Band (classic rock): 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877-275-2448.

Kevin Sutton and Jim McLaughlin: 8 to 11 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Learning Team, The Horde & The Harem, Sisters: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $6. 360-778-1067.

Jim Cull: 7 to 10 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks, 2120 Market St., Mount Vernon. 360-848-8882.

Mudflat Walkers: 8:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

Randy Linder Band (classic rock): 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877-275-2448.

CD Woodbury Band: 7:30 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956.

Beyond The Trenches, Ashes of Existence, Portals Align, The Ludivico Treatment: 9:30 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

Darla Bradshaw Lobb and Guest: 6:30 to 8 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.

Sea Notes: 7 to 10 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks, 2120 Market St., Mount Vernon. $5, open to the public. 360-848-8882.

SATURDAY.17 The Fenderbenders: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4226411.

SUNDAY.18 David Lee Howard: 6 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

WEDNESDAY.21 Gary B’s Church of Blues: Jam Night, 6 to 10 p.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. 360-445-4733.

Desperate Measures (classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., SedroWoolley. No cover. 360-855-2263.

Ron W. Bailey: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-766-6266.

Blues/rock jam with CC Adams and Friends: 4 to 9 p.m., La Conner Pantry & Pub, 315 Morris St., La Conner. 360-466-4488.

Jake Navarro: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

THURSDAY.22 Major Sturm: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.


E8 Thursday, May 15, 2014

Thursday, May 15, 2014 E9

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area May 15-22

TUNING UP Playing at area venues May 15-22 LOOKING AHEAD

FRIDAY-SATURDAY.16-17 RANDY LINDER BAND 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877-275-2448.

MONDAY.19

“A Night at the Movies”: Mount Vernon High School Band and Orchestra, 7 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $4-$8. 416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall.org.

FRIDAYSUNDAY.16-18 “SHREK THE MUSICAL” Skagit Valley College drama department, McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15$20. 416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall. org. Check individual listings for time.

TUESDAY.20

The Mount Baker Toppers (men’s a cappella chorus): 7 p.m., Jansen Art Center, 321 Front St., Lynden. $5. 360-354-3600 or jansenartcenter.org.

Thursday.15

THURSDAY-SAURDAY.15-17

THEATER

“THE OUTSIDERS”: META Performing Arts, 7:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $16. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org.

“The Outsiders”: META Performing Arts, 7:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $16. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org.

Friday.16

Jazz at the Center: Adriana Giordano and the EntreMundos Quarteto, 7 p.m., Camano Center, 606 Arrowhead Road, Camano Island. $20, free for students with ID. 360-387-0222 or camanocenter.org.

THURSDAY.22

MUSIC

“In the Arms of the Sea”: Angeli (vocal quartet), 7 p.m., Oak Harbor Lutheran Church, 1253 NW Second Ave., Oak Harbor. Freewill offering will benefit Whidbey Animals’ Improvement Foundation. 360-679-1561.

Saturday.17

Sunday.18

THEATER

THEATER

MUSIC

“The Outsiders”: META Performing Arts, 7:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $16. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org.

“The Outsiders”: META Performing Arts, 7:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $16. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org.

“Shrek The Musical”: Skagit Valley College drama department, 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15-$20. 416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall.org.

“Shrek The Musical”: Skagit Valley College drama department, 2 and 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15-$20. 416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall.org.

“Good People” (drama): Outcast Productions, 7:30 p.m., Black Box Theater, 819 Camano Ave., Langley. $14-$18. brownpapertick ets.com or outcastproductions.net.

“Good People” (drama): Outcast Productions, 7:30 p.m., Black Box Theater, 819 Camano Ave., Langley. $14-$18. brownpapertick ets.com or outcastproductions.net.

“Sousa Salutes”: North Cascades Concert Band, featuring Sgt. Brian Turnmire, trumpet soloist with “The President’s Own” Washington, D.C., Marine Corps Concert Band; 3 p.m., Brodniak Hall, Anacortes High School, 1600 20th St., Anacortes. Donations accepted. 360-676-9905 or nccband.org. “Sunday@3 Youth Concert”: 3 p.m., Jansen Art Center, 321 Front St., Lynden. $5, free for ages 11 and younger. 360-354-3600 or jansenartcenter.org.

THEATER

“Shrek The Musical”: Skagit Valley College drama department, 2 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15-$20. 416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall.org. “Good People” (drama): Outcast Productions, 2 p.m., Black Box Theater, 819 Camano Ave., Langley. $14-$18. brownpaper tickets.com or outcastproductions. net.

SATURDAY.17

WEDNESDAY.21

“Good People” (drama): Outcast Productions, 7:30 p.m., Black Box Theater, 819 Camano Ave., Langley. $14-$18. brown papertickets.com or outcastproductions. net. “Corktown”: Western Washington University’s College of Fine and Performing Arts, 7:30 and 10:30 p.m., WWU Performing Arts Center, Bellingham. The audience will move with the performers from space to space on Western’s campus. $4-$12. 360-6506146 or tickets. wwu.edu.

MUDFLAT WALKERS 8:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

THURSDAY.15 Paul Klein (blues, rock): 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360354-3600.

FRIDAY.16 The Fenderbenders: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4226411.

Science Duo: 6 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $5. 360-445-3000.

Randy Linder Band (classic rock): 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877-275-2448.

Kevin Sutton and Jim McLaughlin: 8 to 11 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Learning Team, The Horde & The Harem, Sisters: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $6. 360-778-1067.

Jim Cull: 7 to 10 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks, 2120 Market St., Mount Vernon. 360-848-8882.

Mudflat Walkers: 8:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

Randy Linder Band (classic rock): 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877-275-2448.

CD Woodbury Band: 7:30 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956.

Beyond The Trenches, Ashes of Existence, Portals Align, The Ludivico Treatment: 9:30 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

Darla Bradshaw Lobb and Guest: 6:30 to 8 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.

Sea Notes: 7 to 10 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks, 2120 Market St., Mount Vernon. $5, open to the public. 360-848-8882.

SATURDAY.17 The Fenderbenders: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4226411.

SUNDAY.18 David Lee Howard: 6 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

WEDNESDAY.21 Gary B’s Church of Blues: Jam Night, 6 to 10 p.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. 360-445-4733.

Desperate Measures (classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., SedroWoolley. No cover. 360-855-2263.

Ron W. Bailey: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-766-6266.

Blues/rock jam with CC Adams and Friends: 4 to 9 p.m., La Conner Pantry & Pub, 315 Morris St., La Conner. 360-466-4488.

Jake Navarro: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

THURSDAY.22 Major Sturm: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E10 - Thursday, May 15, 2014

MOVIES

New version of ‘Godzilla’ is the same old thing By ROGER MOORE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Let’s see if we remember how this goes. “With a purposeful grimace and a terrible scowl, he pulls the spitting hightension wires down.” And “Oh no, there goes Tokyo.” Well, not this time. It’s “Oh no, there goes (San) Francisco.” “Godzilla” belches back to life in a new Warner Bros. film that harks back to the kid-friendlier versions of these Japanese “Kaiju” (big monster) movies. In an increasingly radioactive world menaced by radiation-eating beasties, the return of the almost cuddly “King of the Monsters” may be the least of our troubles. The opening credits cleverly revisit the 1940s and ’50s atomic testing that awakened Godzilla once. Gareth Edwards’ film then jumps to the late ’90s, where mysterious goingson in mining operations in

lywood with his low-budget version of this sort of story, HH ⁄ “Monsters.” Given a huge Cast: Aaron Taylorbudget and hours to tell the Johnson, Ken Watatale, he delivers a lumbernabe, Elizabeth Olsen, ing movie that’s as bloated Sally Hawkins, Bryan as this new roly-poly verCranston, Juliette sion of the Big Guy, whom Binoche, David we only see in all his glory Strathairn Running time: 2:03 in the later acts. MPAA rating: PG-13 Cranston blubbers with for intense sequences emotion — “Something of destruction, mayhem KILLED my wife, and I and creature violence have a RIGHT to know!” Taylor-Johnson doesn’t to get to the bottom of break a sweat as beasts try a cover-up. Something is to keep him from making awakening. Call it a MUTO it home to his wife (ElizaPhotos by Warner Bros. Pictures via AP (Massive Unidentified Ter- beth Olsen) and child in Aaron Taylor-Johnson and Elizabeth Olsen are shown restrial Organism). And San Francisco. Watanabe in a scene from “Godzilla.” call in the military. runs through a panoply of Dr. Ichiro Serizawa “stricken” looks as he sees the Philippines and near boy Ford will grow up with- (Ken Watanabe) has been the menace, understands following developments nuclear plants in Japan hint out a mom. it and fails to convince the that something bad is about Years later, Ford (Aaron all these years. He knows admiral (David Strathairn) what’s up. He’s seen the to go down. Taylor-Johnson of “Kickin charge that the natural Bryan Cranston is an Ass”) is a Navy bomb dis- Toho movies. He’s heard world needs “order” and American engineer workposal expert, and Dad’s still the Blue Oyster Cult song. perhaps the giant lizard Visual-effects-mastering with his wife (Juliette hanging around the ruins “will restore it.” Binoche) when a tragic of that Japanese reactor, a turned-director Gareth Sally Hawkins was accident means their little wild-eyed loon determined Edwards impressed Holwastefully cast to simply

‘GODZILLA’ 1 2

stand behind Watanabe as Dr. Serizawa makes another “What fresh hell is this?” face. The effects are decent — warships tossed about like bathtub toys, trains trashed and torched, nuclear missiles munched. The movie’s never less than competent. But the fatigue of overfamiliarity curses this franchise like few others. We’ve seen Japanese men in monster suits. We’ve seen digital kaiju, and gigantic robotarmored soldiers fighting them (“Pacific Rim”). So in a tale this timeworn and a film this devoid of humor, with only a few moments of humanity, with tension frittered away by the tedious repetition of the fights, anybody who has ever seen “Godzilla” in any incarnation can be forgiven for asking the obvious: “What else have you got?”


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, May 15, 2014 - E11

MOVIES MINI-REVIEWS Compiled from news services. Ratings are one to four stars. “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” — The more screen time Chris Evans accrues as Captain America, the more engaging the performance. He’s terrific in this adventure, more complex and more compelling than in his 2011 debut. Amid well-choreographed action sequences and a couple of nifty twists and turns, we get another rock-solid chapter in the big-screen story of Marvel. Scarlett Johansson, Samuel L. Jackson and Robert Redford co-star. Sci-fi action, PG-13, 136 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Devil’s Knot” — Atom Egoyan’s “Devil’s Knot” is a respectful and well-intentioned fictionalization of the West Memphis Three case of three teenagers convicted of killing little boys but eventually let free. Lacking in any real new insight, it recounts twists and turns already better explained in a number of documentaries. Colin Firth and Reese Witherspoon star. Crime drama, not rated, 115 minutes. HH “Draft Day” — The general manager of the hapless Cleveland Browns (Kevin Costner) tries to coax some star power during the NFL draft in this sentimental, predictable and thoroughly entertaining movie. I would have liked to see less soapopera subplot (a pregnant girlfriend, an egotistical team owner) and more inside football machinations. Jennifer Garner, Denis Leary, Frank Langella and Chadwick Boseman co-star. Sports drama, PG-13, 110 minutes). HHH “Fading Gigolo” — Writerdirector John Turturro casts himself as the lead in this offbeat and sometimes just plain nutso story about a florist who takes money to service beautiful women, including Sharon Stone and Sofia Vergara, and gives a cut to his pimp (Woody Allen). This improbable film is all over the map, veering from pathos to absurdist comedy to romance to weirdness for the sake of weirdness. Comedy, R, 90 minutes. HH “Frozen” — When a queen

AT AREA THEATERS ANACORTES CINEMAS May 16-22 Million Dollar Arm (PG): Friday-Saturday: 12:55, 3:35, 6:35, 9:20; Sunday-Wednesday: 12:55, 3:35, 6:35; Thursday: 12:55, 3:35, 6:35, 9:20 The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (PG-13): Friday-Saturday: 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9:40; Sunday-Wednesday: 12:45, 3:45, 6:45; Thursday: 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9:40 The Lunchbox (Dabba) (PG): Friday-Saturday: 1:05, 3:25, 6:25, 9:10; Sunday-Wednesday: 1:05, 3:25, 6:25; Thursday: 1:05, 3:25 Blended (PG-13): Thursday: 7:00 X-Men: Days of Future Past (PG-13): Thursday: 10:00 360-293-6620 BLUE FOX DRIVE-IN Oak Harbor May 16-18 Godzilla (PG-13) and The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (PG-13). First movie starts at approximately 8:30 p.m. 360-675-5667 CONCRETE THEATRE May 16-18 The Other Woman (PG-13): Friday: 7:30 p.m.; Saturday: 7:30 p.m.; Sunday: 6:30 p.m. DisneyNature’s Bears (G): Saturday: 5 p.m.; Sunday: 4 p.m. 360-941-0403 CASCADE MALL THEATRES Burlington For listings: 888-AMC-4FUN (888-262-4386). OAK HARBOR CINEMAS May 16-22 Godzilla (PG-13): Friday: 1:00, 3:40, 6:30, 9:10; Saturday: 10:10, 1:00, 3:40, 6:30, 9:10; Sunday: 10:10, 1:00, 3:40, 6:30; Monday-Thursday: 1:00, 3:40, 6:30 The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (PG-13): Friday: 12:50, 3:50, 6:40, 9:30; Saturday: 10:00, 12:50, 3:50, 6:40, 9:30; Sunday: 10:00, 12:50, 3:50, 6:40; Monday-Thursday: 12:50, 3:50, 6:40 God’s Not Dead (PG): Friday: 1:10, 4:00, 6:50, 9:20; Saturday: 10:20, 1:10, 4:00, 6:50, 9:20; Sunday: 10:20, 1:10, 4:00, 6:50; Monday-Wednesday: 1:10, 4:00, 6:50; Thursday: 1:10, 4:00 360-279-2226 STANWOOD CINEMAS May 16-22 Godzilla (PG-13): 1:10, 3:50, 6:35, 9:15 Million Dollar Arm (PG): 12:50, 3:30, 6:30, 9:10 Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return (PG): Friday-Wednesday: 4:00, 6:50; Thursday: 4:00 Neighbors (R): 1:00, 3:20, 6:45, 9:00 The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (PG-13): 12:40, 3:40, 6:40, 9:40 The Other Woman (PG-13): Friday-Wednesday: 1:20, 9:20; Thursday: 1:20 Blended (PG-13): Thursday: 7:00 X-Men: Days of Future Past (PG-13): Thursday: 10:00 360-629-0514 with icy powers (voice of Idina Menzel) accidentally freezes her kingdom, she runs away and her intrepid sister (Kristen Bell) goes to find her. Sure to delight

kids and captivate adults, Disney’s musical “Frozen” is the instant favorite for the animated feature Oscar. Animated musical, PG, 102 minutes. HHH1⁄2

“Hateship Loveship” — Kristen Wiig’s performance as a caretaker duped into believing she’s being courted is so beautifully muted it takes a while to appreciate the loveliness of the notes she’s hitting. She’s playing someone a bit, well, crazy, but her quiet resolve is kind of heroic. She’s pretty awesome. With Guy Pearce, Hailee Steinfeld, Nick Nolte. Drama, R, 101 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Locke” — In writer-director Steven Knight’s mesmerizing jewel of a film, Tom Hardy is so brilliant we readily watch him drive a car and talk on the hands-free phone for virtually the entirety of the movie. It’s a beautiful film to watch, as the headlights seem animated in the rain-filtered colors of the night while a man drives and drives and makes life-changing phone calls. Drama, R, 85 minutes. HHHH “Mr. Peabody & Sherman” — The old TV cartoon about a genius dog, his adopted son and their time-traveling adventures becomes a whipsmart, consistently funny and good-natured film with terrific voice performances led by Ty Burrell as Peabody. Lots of sight gags and goofy puns, with some clever one-liners intended for the parents in the audience. Animated adventure, PG, 90 minutes. HHH “Neighbors” — New parents (Seth Rogen and Rose Byrne) go to war against the party-all-night fraternity next door. About 40 percent of “Neighbors” falls flat. About 60 percent made me laugh hard, even when I knew I should have known better. Comedy, R, 97 minutes. HHH “Noah” — One of the most dazzling and unforgettable biblical epics ever put on film. Director Darren Aronofsky has delivered an emotionally involving and sometimes loony interpretation of the tale of a God-loving man (Russell Crowe, ferocious and razor-sharp) and his ark. Jennifer Connelly, Ray Winstone, Emma Watson and Anthony Hopkins round out a stellar cast. Biblical epic, PG-13, 131 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Oculus” — Here is a horror movie that will reach out and grab that spot on your

spine that produces all the chills. Thanks to the wonderfully twisted style of director Mike Flanagan and four terrific young actors playing brother and sister as children and adults, “Oculus” is one of the more elegant scary movies in recent memory. Horror, R, 105 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “RoboCop” — The 2014 version of “RoboCop” takes advantage of the superior technology available now, but doesn’t match up to the original when it comes to story and cast. As Alex Murphy, the wounded officer converted into RoboCop, Joel Kinnaman comes across as a wooden human being AND a wooden robot. Sci-fi action, PG-13, 118 minutes. HH “The Amazing Spider-Man 2” — It’s difficult to imagine how “The Amazing SpiderMan 2” could have been any worse. Long gone are the elements that made the Tobey Maguire/Kirsten Dunst “Spider-Man” series so effective: genuine charm and humor, breathtaking action, and the correct amount of darkness and menace. In its place is a wildly connected cacophony, alternately chaotic and would-be serene, baffling in its lack of originality and its reliance on worn cliches. Andrew Garfield, Emma Stone, Jamie Foxx, Dan DeHaan, Sally Field. Actionadventure, PG-13, 140 minutes. H “The Bag Man” — One can’t help but wonder what Robert De Niro and John Cusack saw in the script for “The Bag Man” that made two of our most interesting actors sign up for this irritating mess of a movie. It’s warmed-over Tarantino mixed with a third-rate tribute to the Coen brothers with a dose of David Lynch-ian madness. Thriller, R, 108 minutes. H “The Other Woman” — This would-be comedy is so tone-deaf, so excruciatingly awful, it’s a minor miracle the studio didn’t confiscate the original print and lock it up. None of the stars — Cameron Diaz, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau or especially the big and broad Leslie Mann — escapes this mess with a shred of dignity. Comedy, PG-13, 109 minutes. H

“The Railway Man” — Based on the true story of a British Army officer (Colin Firth) in World War II and the Japanese Imperial Army officer who tortured him. This is another prestige film that sometimes feels more like a history assignment than entertainment. Sometimes it’s hard to watch. It’s also hard to imagine anyone watching it and not being deeply moved. Drama, R, 108 minutes. HHH “3 Days to Kill” — The term “guilty pleasure” was invented for this kind of movie. Nearly every other scene is so audaciously terrible, you don’t know whether to cringe or chortle. But the star power of Kevin Costner as an aging CIA hit man turns schlock into pure entertainment. Action, PG-13, 117 minutes. HHH “Transcendence” — In a bold, beautiful, sometimes confounding flight of futuristic speculation, Johnny Depp plays a scientific visionary whose thoughts and personality are uploaded before he dies. He uses his everincreasing intelligence to cure the sick and heal the planet, but fears arise that he will accumulate so much power and intelligence he’ll become the greatest threat to freedom the world has ever known. What a stunning piece of work. Sci-fi thriller, PG-13, 119 minutes. HHHH “Under the Skin” — An alien on Earth (Scarlett Johannson) cruises Scotland in a van, hitting on young lads, in a stark mood piece that drills into your psyche and will stay there forever. It’s weird, polarizing work, but I found it the most memorable movie of the first few months of 2014. Scifi drama, R, 108 minutes. HHHH “Walking With the Enemy” — In a plodding and clunky drama based on an amazing true-life story, a Hungarian Jew wears a stolen Nazi uniform and assumes the identity of the enemy to save lives during World War II. As earnest and heartfelt as a movie can be, “Walking With the Enemy” never misses an opportunity to embrace a cliche. War drama, PG-13, 123 minutes. HH


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E12 - Thursday, May 15, 2014

HOT TICKETS MICKEY AVALON: May 15, The Crocodile, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. KARLA BONOFF & JIMMY WEBB: May 15, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or mount bakertheatre.com. LIL JON - DJ SET: May 16, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. FLIGHT TO MARS: featuring Mike McCready of Pearl Jam: May 16, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. NICKEL CREEK: May 17, Moore Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or livenation.com. KYLE GASS BAND: May 18, The Crocodile, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. FAILURE: May 18, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showbox online.com. KISHI BASHI: May 20, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. LINDSEY STIRLING: May 21, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. BACKSTREET BOYS, AVRIL LAVIGNE: May 22, WaMu Theater, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. ASIAN MUSIC FESTIVAL: May 23, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. TECH N9NE: May 23-24, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. THE NYLONS: May 24, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877-2752448 or theskagit.com. LANA DEL REY: May 27, WaMu Theater, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. BLACK FLAG: May 27, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. HOODIE ALLEN: May 27, The Crocodile, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. LADY GAGA’S artRAVE: The ARTPOP Ball: May 28, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. LIONEL RITCHIE: with CeeLo Green: May 30, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. WILD REEDS: May 30, Showbox SoDo Lounge, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. “IN MY LIFE”: A Musical Tribute to the Beatles: June 5, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or mountbakertheatre.com. MICHAEL IAN BLACK: June 6, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. KUBE 93 SUMMER JAM: June 6-7, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800745-3000 or livenation.com. GRIEVES: June 7, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showbox online.com. BRIT FLOYD: June 9, McCaw Hall,

SARAH McLACHLAN June 20-21, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com.

Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation. com. THE MOUNTAIN GOATS: June 10, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. ONEREPUBLIC: June 12, Comcast Arena at Everett. 866-332-8499 or comcastarenaeverett.com. ALLEN STONE: June 13, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-7453000 or ticketmaster.com. THE FRAY: with Barcelona and Oh Honey: June 17, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. DIGITOUR: June 20, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showbox online.com. STEVE EARLE & THE DUKES: June 20-21, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877-275-2448 or theskagit. com. SARAH McLACHLAN: June 20-21, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. RODRIGO AMARANTE: June 21, The Barboza, Seattle. 206-709-9442 or thebarboza.com. MERLE HAGGARD, EMMYLOU HARRIS: June 22, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. GAVIN DEGRAW AND MATT NATHANSON: with Mary Lambert: June 24, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. YNGWIE MALMSTEEN: June 26, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. ROBYN + RÖYKSOPP: Do It Again Tour: June 26, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. EARSHOT JAZZ CONCERTS: June 26-28, Seattle Art Museum, Seattle. 800-838-3006 or brownpapertickets. com. FITZ & THE TANTRUMS: June 27, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. MINUS THE BEAR: June 27, Columbia City Theater, Seattle. 800-8383006 or columbiacitytheater.com. THE SOULSHINE TOUR: featuring Michael Franti & Spearhead, with SOJA, Brett Dennen and Trevor Hall:

June 27, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. AN EVENING WITH JOHN LEGEND: June 27, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or mountbakertheatre.com. PARADISO FESTIVAL: with Bassnectar, Above & Beyond, Zedd, Krewella and more: June 27-28, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800745-3000 or livenation.com. CHER: June 28, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. JOHN LEGEND: June 28, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-7453000 or ticketmaster.com. PETER MURPHY: June 28, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. STEVE WINWOOD: June 29, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. KISS, DEF LEPPARD: June 29, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. HEART: July 1, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS. com. KRAFTWERK 3-D: July 1, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-7844849 or tickets.com. NICK CAVE & THE BAD SEEDS: July 2, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or tickets.com. MARK LANEGAN: July 3, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. CHEVELLE: July 5, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showbox online.com. STEELY DAN: July 5-6, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. NEW ORDER: July 6, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or livenation.com. ROCKSTAR ENERGY DRINK MAYHEM FESTIVAL: with Avenged Sevenfold, Korn, Asking Alexandria, Trivium, Cannibal Corpse, Body Count featuring Ice T, Suicide Silence, Emmure, Miss May I, Mushroomhead and more: July 8, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or

livenation.com. JURASSIC 5: July 9, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. SLIGHTLY STOOPID: with Stephen “Ragga” Marley: July 10, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. BLIND BOYS OF ALABAMA: July 11, Lincoln Theatre, Mount Vernon. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org. RINGO STARR & HIS ALL-STARR BAND: July 16, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. THE GO-GOs, PATTY SMYTH & SCANDAL, MARTHA DAVIS & THE MOTELS, CUTTING CREW, NAKED EYES featuring PETE BYRNE: July 17, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster. com. TEDESCHI TRUCKS BAND: with The Wood Brothers: July 17, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. THE AQUABATS: July 17, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. LYLE LOVETT & HIS LARGE BAND: July 18, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticket master.com. THE JOHN CONLEE SHOW (classic country): July 18-19, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877-275-2448 or theskagit.com. ANACORTES UNKNOWN MUSIC SERIES, Vol. IV: July 18-20, Anacortes Unknown. anacortesunknown. com. WINTHROP RHYTHM & BLUES FESTIVAL: July 18-20, Blues Ranch, Winthrop. 800-422-3048 or winthrop tickets.com. GOO GOO DOLLS & DAUGHTRY: July 19, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticket master.com. JOURNEY, STEVE MILLER BAND: July 19, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or livenation. com. CHEECH & CHONG, WAR: “Up in Smoke 2014”: July 19, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. SAY ANYTHING: July 19, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. JOAN BAEZ: July 20, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or mountbakertheatre.com. CHATEAU STE. MICHELLE FESTIVAL OF JAZZ: The Manhattan Transfer, Spyro Gyra, Lee Ritenour & Dave Grusin, Jessy J: July 26, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. MÖTLEY CRÜE: July 27, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800745-3000 or livenation.com. CHRIS ISAAK: July 27, Chateau

Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-7453000 or ticketmaster.com. BEYONCÉ, JAY Z: “On The Run Tour”: July 30, Safeco Field, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. FOREIGNER, STYX: Aug. 1, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. SANTANA: Aug. 1, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. NICKEL CREEK: Aug. 1, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-7453000 or ticketmaster.com. THE VOICE TOUR: Aug. 2, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. AUSTIN MAHONE: Aug. 4, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. SARA BAREILLES: Aug. 5, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. ECHO & THE BUNNYMEN: Aug. 6, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. ARCADE FIRE: Aug. 8, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-7453000 or livenation.com. BRUNO MARS: Aug. 9, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-7453000 or livenation.com. ZZ TOP, JEFF BECK: Aug. 9, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. MAC KING (magic): Aug. 9, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877-2752448 or theskagit.com. 107.7 THE END’S SUMMER CAMP: Aug. 9, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. BROKEN BELLS: Aug. 10, Moore Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or livenation.com. COUNTING CROWS: with special guest Toad the Wet Sprocket: Aug. 12, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888929-7849 or AXS.com. RAY LAMONTAGNE: Aug. 13, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. AEROSMITH: with special guest Slash, featuring Myles Kennedy and the Conspirators: Aug. 16, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-7453000 or livenation.com. DIRTY HEADS & PEPPER: Aug. 17, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-9297849 or AXS.com. REBELUTION: with Iration, The Green, Stick Figure, DJ Mackle: Aug. 19, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888929-7849 or AXS.com. GIPSY KINGS: Aug. 22, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-7453000 or ticketmaster.com. JACK JOHNSON: with Amos Lee and Michael Kiwanuka: Aug. 23, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800745-3000 or livenation.com. EARTH, WIND & FIRE: Aug. 23, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, May 15, 2014 - E13

AT THE LINCOLN THEATRE

DINING GUIDE

712 S. First St., Mount Vernon 360-336-8955 n www.lincolntheatre.org

‘La Cenerentola’

This drama, presented by META, is based on the story written by S.E. Hinton. The story unfolds in 1967 Oklahoma, where two sets of kids, the Greasers and the Socs, fight out their differences and learn from one another along the way. Characters such as Ponyboy, Soda Pop, Darry, Dallas, Two Bit and Johnny Directed by local actress Lindsey Bowen. $16.

Two Rossini virtuosos join forces in “La Cenerentola”: mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato, singing her first Met performance in the Cinderella title role, and tenor Juan Diego Flórez, as her Prince Charming. Alessandro Corbelli and Luca Pisaroni complete the cast, and Met principal conductor Fabio Luisi leads the score. $23 adults; $19 seniors; $16 students with $2 off for Lincoln members.

1 p.m. Sunday, May 18

7:30 p.m. ThursdaySaturday, May 15-17

CD WooDbury banD Sat. May 17th, 7:30pM

NEW YORK — A thunderous standing ovation congratulated Norm Lewis as he became the first black actor to take on the title role in Broadway’s “The Phantom of the Opera.” The Tony Award nominee, who brought his deep and rich voice as Porgy to the recent “Porgy and Bess” revival, made his “Phantom” debut Monday night opposite a returning Sierra Boggess as Christine. Lewis played John in

“Miss Saigon” on Broadway, Javert on Broadway in “Les Miserables” in 2006 and was in the shows “Side Show,” “The Little Mermaid,” “Chicago” and “Sondheim on Sondheim.” Lewis is the first black Phantom on Broadway, although Robert Guillaume played the role in the Los Angeles production in 1990. Lewis’ debut in the musical makes him Broadway’s 13th Phantom. — The Associated Press

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Norm Lewis (left) and Sierra Boggess acknowledge applause on the pair’s opening night with the Broadway production of “The Phantom of the Opera” at The Majestic Theatre in New York.

Kids 12 & Under FREE

• Old Favorites • Obscure Gems • Original Songs

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E14 - Thursday, May 15, 2014

OUT & ABOUT ART

show includes Houston’s brilliantly colored oils as IN THE ART BAR: Artwell as a selection of softer work by Cherie Donovan- pastel landscapes. Also Smith is on display through showing: oils by Seattle May 31 in the Lincoln artist Brooke BorcherdTheatre’s Art Bar, 712 S. ing, black and white phoFirst St., Mount Vernon. tography by David Lucas, Donovan-Smith, co-creator pastels by Pat Meras, of the newly founded oils by Donna Trent and Artisan Craft Cooperative mixed media by Renate in Sedro-Woolley, paints Trapkowski. Gallery hours vibrant, celebratory images are 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. of women and creates Monday through Saturday. whimsical felted objects 360-293-6938 or scottmilo. and “characters” for her com. own line of cards. 360-3368955 or lincolntheatre.org. “LANDSCAPE/MIND“MEMOIRS OF A BIRD”: Check out Northwest artist Anne Schreivogl’s new exhibition, showing through May 30 at La Conner Seaside Gallery, 101 First St., La Conner. The show features Schreivogl’s upbeat, colorful paintings, delighting in the reader’s and writer’s world, with images of typewriters, books, and letter-writing. The gallery is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. 360202-2956 or laconnersea sidegallery.com. ALLIED ARTS OF WHATCOM COUNTY PRESENTS: The work of photographer Ken Osthimer and metalworker Graham Schodda is on display during May in the lobby, hallway and Lighthouse Bar & Grill at the Hotel Bellwether, 1 Bellwether Way, Bellingham. Osthimer creates still-lifes, landscapes and portraits using the centuryold technique of platinum printing. Schodda etches the likenesses of salmon and wildlife onto discarded stainless steel. 360-676-8548 or alliedarts.org.

SCAPE”: A show featuring artists Mike Adams, Susanna Bluhm, Jennifer Campbell and Jennifer Zwick continues through June 1 at Anchor Art Space, 216 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Using landscape as a metaphor for a place within the mind, regional artists use sculpture, installation, video and mixed media works to create landscapes that suggest memory, humor and fear. Curated by Ann Chadwick Reid. Gallery hours are noon to 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday. 360-755-3140 or anchor artspace.org. FABRIC ART: A show of quilts by fabric artist Louise Harris continues through May 31 at McCool Gallery, 711 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. The show will also feature paintings by Anne Martin McCool, jewelry by Carole Cunningham and Debbie Aldrich, wood by George Way and Art Learmonth, sculptures by Tracy Powell, ceramics by Patsy Chamberlain and Barbara Hathaway, handwoven scarves by Martha Tottenham and gourd art by Vicki Hampel. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. 360-2933577 or mccoolart.com.

PAINTINGS AND PASTELS: “Amanda Houston: Oils and Pastels” continues through June 3 at Scott Milo Gallery, 420 CommerCHILDREN’S ART WALK: cial Ave., Anacortes. The Allied Arts Gallery, 1418

SPRING FILM SERIES

Lavelle, Ries Niemi, James Reisen, John Robbins, Toni Ann Rust, Doris Thomas, Mandy Turner and Christine Wardenburg-Skinner. Gallery hours are noon to 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday or by appointment. 360-766-6276.

brochures for the free selfguided tour are available at Friday Harbor businesses or at sanjuanislandartists. com.

CAR SHOWS

ALL AMERICAN CAR SHOW: The Humane Society of Skagit Valley will “PHOTOGRAPHIC PREShost the All American Car ENCE AND CONTEMPOShow from 10 a.m. to 4 RARY INDIANS: MATIKA p.m. Saturday, May 31, at WILBUR’S PROJECT 562”: the HSSV Adoption CenThe exhibition opens Satter, 18841 Kelleher Road, urday, May 17, and continBurlington. Any Americanues through Oct. 5 at the make car from any year Movie man Nick Alphin hosts the Spring Film Tacoma Art Museum, 1701 can be entered. Trophies Series at 7 p.m. Fridays at the Anacortes Public Pacific Ave., Tacoma. will be awarded in 12 catLibrary, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Free. 360-293Photographer Matika egories. $10 entry fee. Free 1910, ext. 21, or library.cityofanacortes.org. Next up: Wilbur, a member of the for spectators. Proceeds May 16: “Bullitt” (pictured), starring Steve Swinomish and Tulalip will benefit the Humane McQueen, Jacqueline Bisset and Robert Vaughn. tribes, has taken on the task Society of Skagit Valley. An all-guts, no-glory, San Francisco cop becomes of photographing every For information, contact determined to find the underworld kingpin who federally recognized indigKandi at 360-853-3373 or killed the witness in his protection. The film features enous nation in the United skagithumane.com. a hectic car chase through the streets of San FranStates — numbering some cisco — arguably one of the best car chases ever 562 tribes when her project filmed. (PG, 1968). LECTURES began in 2012. Project 562 May 23: “A Man for All Seasons,” starring Paul is one of the few contemAND TALKS Scofield, Wendy Hiller and Robert Shaw. The story porary photographic projWORLD ISSUES of Thomas More, who stood up to King Henry VIII ects of this magnitude to be FORUM: Western Washingwhen the king rejected the Roman Catholic Church completed exclusively by a ton University’s Fairhaven to obtain a divorce and remarry. Won the Oscar for Native photographer, and College of Interdisciplinary Best Picture. (unrated, 1966). the only large-scale effort Studies holds its annual to capture the vibrancy World Issues Forum from of contemporary Native noon to 1:20 p.m. WednesCornwall Ave., Bellingham, ceramics are fired in either culture through interviews days in the Fairhaven and the collection of stois featuring professional a wood-burning kiln or College auditorium on ries. work by Allied Arts Teach- in clay containers known the WWU campus in BellMuseum hours are 10 ing Artists in Whatcom as saggers, which infuses ingham. Presentations are a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday County through May 31 the surface with random free and open to the public. through Sunday. $10 adults, 360-650-2309 or wwu.edu/ in honor of the statewide flashes from the flame Arts Education Month strike. Gallery hours are 11 $8 students, military and fairhaven/news/world seniors, $25 family, free for issuesforum. and ArtsEd WA, a new a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday members and ages 5 and program exploring issues through Sunday. 360-766Next up: younger. 253-272-4258 or in arts and education. For 6230 or smithandvallee. May 21: “The Three tacomaartmuseum.org. information, contact Allied com. U.S.-Mexico Border Arts at 360-676-8548 or Wars: An Update”: with SAN JUAN ART TOUR: visit alliedarts.org. “AROUND THE CORNER Tony Payan, professor of AND UP THE STREET”: A The 23rd anniversary San Political Science at the Juan Island Artists’ Studio University of Texas at El PAINTINGS & CERAMshow of artwork by local Tour will take place from ICS: An exhibition of new artists will open with a Paso. Twenty years after 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday paintings by Becky Fletch- reception from 5 to 8 p.m. NAFTA, the three counand Sunday, May 31-June er and ceramics by Jeffrey Saturday, May 17, and tries of North America 1, at 15 artists’ studios. Hanks continues through continue through June 1 have failed to take advanJune 1 at Smith & Vallee at the Edison Eye Gallery, Check out a variety of tage of a unique historioriginal artworks by more Gallery, 5742 Gilkey Ave., 5800 Cains Court, Edison. cal opportunity to move than 40 artists on display Edison. Fletcher’s new Artists include Charles the borders from lines of body of work, “ReiteraAtkinson, David Blakesley, and offered for sale from defense and opposition tions,” explores the repeat- Jessica Bonin, Barry Chris- the source, with a chance to lines of encounter and ed lines and shapes offered tensen, F.L. Decker, David to enter a drawing for art cooperation, according to a visually by nature. Hanks’ Hall, Sheila Klein, Margy at each location. Maps and news release.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, May 15, 2014 - E15

OUT & ABOUT Overlooked are the lives of tens of millions of people who have had their economic prosperity curtailed, mobility truncated, and sense of security upset by deployment of technology and force, which are channeled into controlling rather than efficiently managing our borders, according to the release. May 28: “Adventures in Hospital Land: The Semiotics and Sadism of the U.S. Medical Industrial Complex”: with Wendy Susan Simonds, professor of sociology at Georgia State University. This talk centers on the visual culture of medical institutions — what Simonds calls “Hospital Land” — through a discussion of photographs she began taking during the chemotherapy treatment of her friend and former colleague in 2007, and continued to take thereafter. Simonds will describe how her perceptions of and strategies for coping with Hospital Land have changed as she has aged, and as she became increasingly (personally and professionally) attentive to the contradictions and complexities of medicalization. CLIMATE CHANGE: Bill McKibben, one of America’s best-known environmentalists, will present “350: The Most Important Number in the World” at 3 p.m. Saturday, May 17, at the Western Washington University Performing Arts Center Mainstage in Bellingham. “WONDERS OF BATS”: Friday Creek Habitat Stewards, Skagit Conservation District and Bats Northwest will present “Wonders of Bats” from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday, May 22, at Alger Community Hall, 18735 Parkview Lane, Alger. Bats are vital to the survival of

many ecosystems, provide many benefits to the home garden and are essential to the survival of many flowering plants. Kathleen Bander of Bats Northwest will present facts on bats, including the many kinds, their lifestyles, myths and benefits, as well as information on what is being done to conserve bats worldwide. Free. Register by May 20: Contact Kristi Carpenter at 360-428-4313 or email kristi@skagitcd.org.

Museum, 501 Fourth St., La Conner. Learn how World War II affected the residents of Skagit County, including those who were relocated to internment camps. Museum hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. Admission: $5 adults, $4 seniors and children ages 6 to 12, $10 families, free for members and children ages 5 and younger. 360-4663365 or skagitcounty.net/ museum.

annual celebration marks the beginning of the fishing season as the tribe honors and protects its fishing fleet. The blessing will follow a luncheon in the gym. 360-466-7337.

THE MIGHTY SKAGIT: A WONDROUS WATERSHED EXHIBIT: Come to an “adults only” event from 5 to 7 p.m. today at the Children’s Museum of Skagit County, 550 Cascade Mall Drive, Burlington. Learn about the major “MORE ANACORTES overhaul Skagit Fisheries “DEAR MOTHER”: A HISTORY & MYSTERIES”: special exhibit celebratEnhancement Group and 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 28, ing the mothers of Skagit the Children’s Museum are Anacortes Public Library, County continues through giving the museum’s River 1220 10th St., Anacortes. June 1 at the Skagit County Exhibit, which will become Museum educator Bret a Skagit River Watershed Historical Museum, 501 Lunsford offers little3-D “Mountains to Sound” S. Fourth St., La Conknown, sometimes surpris- ner. The exhibit features display. The interactive ing stories and photos from photos, flowers and china. exhibit will educate chilAnacortes history. Free. The museum is open from dren, parents and others on 360-293-1910, ext. 21, or how they can help preserve 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday library.cityofanacortes.org. through Sunday. $5 adults, and improve the watershed as a source of clean water $4 seniors and ages 6 to for fish habitat, recreation 12, $10 families, free for MORE FUN and a renewable source members and ages 5 and STERNWHEELER of power. RSVP: cate@ REOPENS: The sternwheel- younger. 360-466-3365 or skagitcm.org. skagitcounty.net/museum. er W.T. Preston and the Anacortes Maritime HeriSPRING FARM TOUR: TRAWLER FEST: The tage Center, 713 R Ave., Skagitonians to Preserve Anacortes, have reopened annual event for powerFarmland will host its boat cruising enthusiasts for the summer. The W.T. Spring Farm Tour from will take place through Preston is designated as a 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, Saturday, May 17, at Cap National Historic LandSante Marina, 1019 Q Ave., May 16, starting at Dike mark, and the Heritage District 3 headquarters, Anacortes. Check out an Center currently features 20800 Dike Road, Conway, extensive in-water selec“BMW Oracle: Buildthen to Mesman Dairy, tion of new and pre-owned ing a World Champion in powerboats, daily seminars Farm Power NW to see the Anacortes.” The exhibit methane digester, lunch at and activities, and dozens includes a large model of Washington Bulb Co., then the craft and a rudder, and of exhibitors offering a variety of boating products, to Sakata Seed Co. $20offers a look into the cre$30, through PayPal (no services and accessories. ation of the prize-winning vessel. Hours are 10 a.m. to $15 daily. Seminars, evening account needed). skagitonians.org or 360-336-3974. 4 p.m. Saturdays and 1 to 4 programs and pre-Fest p.m. Sundays. Admission to “Trawler University” classWHATCOM WATER es require additional fees. the Preston is $1-$3. HeriFEST: The family-friendly Trawlerfest.com. tage Center admission event will take place from is free. 360-293-1916 or noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, FLEET BLESSING: The museum.cityofanacotes.org. May 17, at Maritime HeriSwinomish Indian Tribal tage Park, 500 W. Holly St., Community invites the “RELOCATION: THE public to the annual Bless- Bellingham. Concentrating IMPACT OF WORLD WAR on protecting and enhancII ON SKAGIT COUNTY”: ing of the Fleet and First The exhibit continues Salmon Ceremony at noon ing the streams, rivers, lakes, wetlands and other through June 29 at the today at 17275 ReservaSkagit County Historical tion Road, La Conner. The waterways that flow into

Puget Sound, the event will feature kids’ activities, walking tours, hands-on demonstrations, music, food and more. Free. 360647-7093, ext. 107, or sustainableconnections.org.

$15. Proceeds will benefit Meerkerk Gardens. Reservations requested: 360-6781912, 360-222-0121 or email meerkerk@whidbey.net.

TANKFEST NORTHWEST: Check out restored FOSSILS & MORE: The tanks, military vehicles, Mt. Baker Rock & Gem artillery weapons and more Club will feature fossils, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mongems and other rock treaday, May 26, at the Flying sures at its next meeting Heritage Collection, Paine at 7 p.m. Monday, May 19, Field, 3407 109th St. SW, at the Bloedel Donovan Everett. See driving and Community Center Build- firing demonstrations and a ing, 2214 Electric Ave., Puget Sound Military VehiBellingham. The evening cle Collectors Club parade. will include door prizes, The International Plastic refreshments, a silent aucModelers Society will be tion and brief business on hand to show off their meeting. Visitors welcome. intricate military vehicle For information, contact models and help you refine Lori at 360-961-7873, email your own modeling techlorinhardy@yahoo.com or niques. Admission: $10-$14, visit mtbakerrockclub.org. free for ages 5 and younger. 877-342-3404 or flying EMERGENCY RESPOND- heritage.com. ERS’ DINNER: The Skagit County EMS CommisNEW MOON CELEBRAsion invites all emergency TION: The event will take responders to attend a place at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, spaghetti dinner from 5 May 29, at the Anacortes to 8 p.m. Wednesday, May Center for Happiness, 21, at the Burlington Fire 619 Commercial Ave., Department, 350 E. ShaAnacortes. Join Rev. Elke ron Ave. The event will Macartney to let go of honor all firefighters, first thoughts and feelings and responders, EMTs and set your intentions for the paramedics for their dedicoming month. Bring your cation to providing day-to- own hand drums and ratday lifesaving services. tles or borrow hers. $5-$10 During the event, Skagit suggested donation. 360County EMS will recognize 464-2229 or anacortes several paramedics, EMTs centerforhappiness.org. and citizens for their acts of service and heroism, as part PADDLESPORTS: Padof National Emergency dle4Ever and Washington Medical Services Week, Water Trails Association May 18-24. RSVP: 360-428- will present “Blazing 3230. Paddles,” a paddling film festival at 7 p.m. Friday, WINE & RHODIES: May 30, at the Lincoln TheMeerkerk Gardens will atre, 712 S. First St., Mount host the “Wine & Rhodies” Vernon. The featured fundraiser from 4 to 6 p.m. films will cover a range of Saturday, May 24, at 3531 paddlesports including sea Meerkerk Lane, Greenkayaking, whitewater kayabank. Enjoy wine and king, surf skiing, canoeing, appetizers while strolling rafting, stand-up paddle through acres of bloomboarding and more. $15 at ing rhododendrons in a the door. 360-336-8955 or peaceful woodland setting. lincolntheatre.org.


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360 May 15 2014