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STEVEN GUERRISI ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO


CURRICULUM VITAE STEVEN GUERRISI CONTACT INFORMATION 328 brookwoood drive Palmyra, Pa 17078 email: steven.guerrisi@gmail.com mobile: + 717. 202.5593 website: sjguerrisiportfolio.com

PROFILE An Analytical Thinker, acknowledged in academic and professional training for a capacity to absorb information, develop inventive and imaginative solutions and to communicate strategies and concepts clearly. Focused, well organized and systematic in approach to architectural problem solving.

EDUCATION 2009-2012 Fall Semester 2011 2003-2007

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA Master of Architecture ARCHITECTURAL ASSOCIATION SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE Semester Abroad - London, United Kingdom UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH Bachelor of Arts in Architectural Studies Minor in Studio Arts Certificate in Civil Engineering Certificate in Historical Preservation

SKILLS DIGITAL

MANUAL WEBSITE DESIGN

AutoCAD Revit Architecture Rhinoceros 4.0 Autodesk Maya Grasshopper Generative Modeling Maxwell V-Ray Adobe Creative Suite [Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign, After Effects, Dreamweaver] Ecotect SAP2000 Architectural drafting, physical modeling, sketching Html, CSS, Javascript, Jquery, PHP


WORK EXPERIENCE September 2007June 2009

LUBETZ ARCHITECTS, Pittsburgh, PA FULL-TIME ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER General Contributions included the preparation of working drawings, revising construction drawings and construction documents, participating in the design and development of projects, creating artistic renderings, accompanying the project manager to site visits and addressing general client requests. 23RD STREET APARTMENTS—51-unit apartment building on riverfront property—Worked with the Principal Architect to complete a project proposal for real estate developers. Created building and apartment unit plans and 5 artistic renderings for a 2-week deadline. CRUCIBLE STEEL—Renovation of a 100 year old, 130,000 SF steel mill for office and retail space— Assisted in the design of exterior renovations, prepared working drawings, and completed seven artistic renderings and a brochure to market to prospective tenants. SUPERBOWL RESTAURANT—A renovation of a downtown Pittsburgh restaurant in proximity to new sports stadium—Worked with restaurant consultants to develop Participated in the development of various conceptual schemes, and created artistic renderings for the client. THE GLASS LOFTS—low-income housing units, artist studio spaces and a café, which together form a gathering space for a diverse community—Assisted in writing specification documentation, and revising construction drawings. Accompanied project manager to site visits.

May 2006August 2006

LUBETZ ARCHITECTS, Pittsburgh, PA INTERN ARCHITECTURAL DESIGNER Constructed study models and participated in the design and development of the following projects: CITY OF ASYLUM—housing units inserted in the alleyway of a Pittsburgh historic district that were intended for political exiles. OAKLAND HOTEL—an attempt to redefine the typical hotel experience, the concept of this hotel contained a pool in the lobby and an automated concierge. NORTH SIDE CHRISTIAN HEALTH SERVICE—free clinic in Pittsburgh’s North Side, designed to uplift the health system-weary, underserved populations in the area. LIBERTY AVENUE MEDICAL OFFICE BUILDING—office and medical space, with architectural features that relate to the building’s historic surroundings.

AWARDS + LEADERSHIP June 2012 January 2011 September 2007May 2008

CINEMA OF THE FUTURE, BMW Guggenheim Lab, Berlin, Germany Exhibition exploring the role of the independent cinema in a society enamored with online streaming SCHENK WOODMAN 2010 COMPETITION, 4TH PLACE University of Pennsylvania Competition APPROACHES TO THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT, Curriculum for new HA&A students STUDENT ASSISTANT TO DR. DREW ARMSTRONG, UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH, DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY OF ART & ARCHITECTURE Contributed in the creation of a new class, Approaches to the Built Environment. Assisted in the development of class projects, compiled reading material for class units. Taught an hour and fifteen minute lecture on Commercial Architecture and Victor Gruen.


CONTENTS

PART I: DESIGN WORK BIOFEEDBACK HEADQUARTERS

Berlin, Germany

LONDON UNDERGROUND

London, UK

NORTHERN PHILADELPHIA COMMUNITY CENTER

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

4

PART II: COMPETITIONS

2012

CRYSTAL TRANSFORMATION PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

2011

TRIBECA LINKSPACE HOTEL

2012

2011

2010

New York City, New York, USA

NETWORKED INDEPENDENTS

Berlin, Germany

2012


PART III: RESEARCH + ELECTIVES DIGITAL FABRICATION

2009

THE GLASS LOFTS, LIBERTY MEDICAL CENTER

MODULAR PERFORMANCE FACADE SYSTEM

2009

Pittsburgh, PA

2011

PLASTIC TRACTION ROBOT

PART VI: PROFESSIONAL WORK

THE CRUCIBLE, CITY OF ASYLUM, 23RD STREET APARTMENTS

2009

Pittsburgh, PA

2011

North Pacific Ocean Gyre

5


ACTIVE ARCHITECTURE THAT RESPONDS TO ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS

BIOTIC FEEDBACK HEADQUARTERS Berlin, Germany Third Year Studio, Spring 2012 Partner: Sarah Wan Critics: Winka Dubbeldam This third year research studio focused on the development of intelligent building systems, in which building components operate as individual agents; actively reacting to environmental conditions autonomously, in order to produce global effects and complex patterns that actively respond to environmental changes. The culmination of the research studio is the bio-solar petal building component and the Biotic Feedback Headquarters. The bio-solar petal building component has two functions: collect solar energy to power building systems, and filter pollutants to improve air quality. A photosensitive organic motor allows each petal component to react to changes in sunlight autonomously by pivoting the petal component to collect maximum energy. Localized movements of petals lead to global changes as petal components push on adjacent members. The Biotic Feedback Headquarters features the solar petal product and includes research laboratories for the further development of the building component. In order to promote the bio-solar petal product, the corporate headquarter is located in Alexanderplatz, a commercial hub of Berlin. The headquarters also contains public retail space and a restaurant to encourage the active engagement of the public with the bio-solar building component

6


7


BIO-SOLAR PEDAL COMPONENT The primary functions of the bio-solar petal component are to

Solar Cells

collect solar energy and remove pollutants from the air. Solar cells imbedded in the component collect solar energy to power building systems. Each petal component is able to collect maximum solar energy by using an organic motor of photosensitive mycoplasma bacteria, to sense changes in light and reposition the petal.

Mycoplasma Organic Motor

POLLUTION COLLECTION Gold particles in the plastic fibers of the petal component attract and remove harmful pollutants from the air. Mechanical systems in the labs of the building extract pollutants from the petals and deposit harmful particulates into soil at the base of the building.

Hydroponic Plastic Fiber

SITE CONTEXT In order to promote the capabilities of the bio-solar panel, the Biofeedback Headquarter is located in Alexanderplatz, which is both a commercial hub and one of the most polluted areas of Berlin.

8


BERLIN POLLUTION DENSITY

OPEN CONFIGURATION [Bottom] CLOSED [Left]

POLLUTION COLLECTION

The bio-solar petals on the building skin open and close autonomously in order to collect maximum solar energy

Mechanical systems in the laboratories of the building extract pollutants from the petals and deposit harmful particulates into soil at the base of the building.

9


10


FACADE SYSTEM: Photosensitive organic motors autonomously reposition each petal component to collect maximum solar energy. Localized movements of petals lead to global changes as petal components push on adjacent members.

COMPONENT STUDY [3D print]

LONG ELEVATION | FRONT

LONG ELEVATION | BACK

11


STUFF SERVICE PLAN SERVICES SKIN STRUCTURE SITE

INTERIOR STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS The exterior diagrid structure and interior structure can be removed and replaced without compromising the overall structural integrity of the building. The interchangeability of the building systems facilitates technological upgrades, improvements in the petal component system, and alternative interior configurations.

STUDY MODEL

12


INTERIOR ATRIUM

13


bio-tech labs level 7

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

bio-tech labs public entrance corporate entrance interior gallery plaza gallery atrium retail restaurant soil

retail & restaurant

retail level 4

retail level 3

retail level 2

CROSS SECTION | A

SECTION PERSPECTIVE | A

Bio-tech Labs

Projection Screen

Gallery

Soil [for pollution retention] Public Entrance

Plaza Gallery

14


top level 7

bio-tech labs level 7

bio-tech labs level 6

bio-tech labs level 5

bio-tech labs level 4

bio-tech labs level 3

retail level 2

public entrance

LONG SECTION | B

ground entrance

A

ground entrance

FLOOR PLAN | LEVEL 4 bio-tech labs level 6

bio-tech labs level 5

bio-tech labs level 4

retail level 2

B

ground entrance

15


SUBTERRANEAN URBAN ECOLOGY THAT ENCOURAGES EXPLORATION AND DISCOVERY

LONDON UNDERGROUND London, United Kingdom Architectural Association School of Architecture Partner: Sudipto Sengupta Critics: Homa Farjadi A wetland intervention that cuts through the Greenwich Peninsula to create a unique urban ecology. Proposed during the 2012 London Summer Olympics, the wetland provides a retreat from the busy hub of events and activities during the Olympics while capitalizing on the Olympics as an opportunity to introduce a piece of infrastructure that cleans and manages water in the form of public space. This urban ecology manifests itself as a living, breathing, public oasis-like-canyon within the vast concrete flatness of the peninsula. The canyon cuts into the site, connecting the two sides of the peninsula to reveal a cultural landscape that takes advantage of existing, unearthed infrastructures such as the Thames River, the North Greenwich tube station and the Blackwall tunnels; creating dynamic interactions between flora, fauna, water, light, sound and vibration.

16


17


ed mu

SITE CONTEXT

nd ha

The wetland intervention connects the east and west shores of the Greenwich penin-

lle yw ay

sula. The deepest area of the subterranean wetland is the Greenwich Peninsula Train station. The curved footprint and sloped wall of the wetland are angled such to permit the most amount of sunlight to reach subterranean levels. Because the flow of the Thames River alternates daily, the water filtration systems of the wetland are mirrored.

cu tte

2

rl an e

8

4

2

GREENWICH PENINSULA, LONDON

CENTRAL LONDON

4

Canary Warf

Thames River South London

1

18

river intake

2

reservoir [dirty]

3

reservoir [clean]

4

wetlands

5

subway station

6

subway tunnel

7

blackwall tunnel

8

intervention

9

irrigated wall system

lon

1

don

sub

way

Greenwich Peninsula

1

4

4

8

2


5

lond

on s ub

way

4 1

7 Greenwich Tube Station

8

7 4

2

mi lle nn ium wa y

b la c k

bl ac kw al l tu nn el

4

8

w a ll tunn el tunn

el av enue

millenium dome

5

2

7

8

7

4

4

8

4

19


A | WEST RESERVOIR & WETLANDS 1

4

4

B

8

3

C

Cutter Lane

5

Edmund Halley Way

A

B | WEST INTERVENTION

C | GREENWICH TUBE STATION 62’-6”

100’-4”

46’-0” 56’-6” 65’-0”

132’-3”

3’-6” 45’-3” 41-6”

3’-6”

20

60’-0”

3’-6”

52’-9”

160’-0”

8’


E | BLACKWALL TUNNEL INTERVENTION & WETLANDS 3

Millennium Way

D

7

7

Tunnel Avenue

4

F

4

8

4

4

E

D | EAST RESERVOIR

F | EAST INTERVENTION 90’-6”

61’-0”

17’-6”

27’-0”

2’

70’-0”

22’-0”

69’-6”

2’ 35’-6”

3’-0”

3’-6”

7’-6” 69’-6”

52’-6”

6’

1

river intake

4

wetlands

7

blackwall tunnel

2

reservoir [dirty]

5

subway station

8

intervention

reservoir [clean]

6

subway tunnel

9

irrigated wall system

3

21


WETLAND FILTRATION SYSTEMS [right]

THAMES RIVER

RESERVOIR [dirty]

The wetland filters water from London’s Thames river for the grey water needs of Greenwich Peninsula residential and office complexes. The mirrored wetland system accommodates the alternating flow of the Thames River. As wetland reservoirs drain and fill with water, alternative pathways and event areas are revealed and obscured by the ascending and receding water levels.

00:00

04:00

08:00

12:00

16:00

20:00

WALL SYSTEM [below] Irrigation in the wall system creates differentiated plant and moss growth patterns. The varied growth patterns indicate pathways (light green) and moments of interest (purple)

WALL SYSTEM ELEVATION

WATER IRRIGATION DIAGRAM

PLANT GROWTH DIAGRAM

22

Water Intake

Water Settling & Precipitation


WETLANDS

RESERVOIR [clean]

PUMP

RESERVOIR [clean]

WETLANDS

RESERVOIR [dirty]

THAMES RIVER

00:00

04:00

08:00

12:00

16:00

20:00

Subsurface Filtration

Water Quality Stabilization

Clean Water Removal

Water Quality Stabilization

Subsurface Filtration

Water Settling & Precipitation

Water Intake

Water Concentration

-

+

Plant Growth Density

-

+

23


INTERVENTION PAVILIONS The unearthed infrastructure of the Greenwich Peninsula creates dynamic interactions between flora, fauna, water, light, sound and vibration. TUNNEL INTERSECTION PAVILION

[-25’ - 3”]

[-60’ - 0”]

[-95’ - 0”]

6

1

river intake

2

reservoir [dirty]

3

reservoir [clean]

4

wetlands

5

subway station

6

subway tunnel

7

blackwall tunnel

8

intervention pavilion

9

soil

3

[0’ - 0”] 6

[-30’ - 6”]

WEST INTERVENTION PAVILION The irrigated wall system allows fauna to propagate to the depth of the pavilion intervention. 4

2

1

24


1

EAST INTERSECTION PAVILION

1

Automobile traffic in the Blackwall tunnels create sound vibration in the adjacent London Underground infrastructure. A viewing platform above the blackwall tunnel provides a simultaneous view of traffic below and in the distance, the Canary Warf skyline. 3 4

4

GREENWICH TUBE STATION A viewing platform from the surface leads down into the interior of the London Underground, providing an aerial view of the Greenwich Peninsula Tube Station.

4

EAST INTERSECTION PAVILION water reflections are projected into the walls of a subsurface tunnel from surface light and a water reservoir.

4

2

1

[-80’ - 6”]

[-96’ - 6”]

25


26


ADDRESSING THE FITNESS AND TRANSPORTATION NEEDS OF URBAN RESIDENTS

NORTHERN PHILADELPHIA COMMUNITY CENTER Philadelphia, Pennsylvania First Year Studio, Spring 2010 Critic: Kian Goh The Northern Philadelphia Community Center addresses the fitness and transportation needs of urban residents by providing exercise facilities, running and bicycle tracks, and accompanies a network of city-wide bicycle lanes and bicycle sharing satellites. The Community center is organized around bicycle and running tracks—A bicycle velodrome circles the perimeter of the community center— two sloped running tracks compose the main volume of the community center, and interweave to create a two-story continuous circuit inside the community center. In addition to the bicycle and running tracks, the community center also contains bike rentals, exercise equipment and a large open space that can accommodate various community needs.

CITY-WIDE BIKE SHARING SATELLITE

27


TRACK DIAGRAM

TRACK PATHWAYS

28


TRACK PATHWAY AND VELOCITY The shape, slope and roughness of the track surfaces is differentiated to accommodate and separate bicyclist and runner users: The smooth oval velodrome track is optimal for bicyclists. The faceted, slopped interior circuits discourage high velocity bicyclists, providing a safe track for runners .

COMMUNITY CENTER PROGRAM Exercise equipment is located on the first and second stories of the community center. An open atrium space on the ground floor accommodates various programmatic needs of community residents.

29


1

running track

2

bicycle track

3

bike sharing

4

atrium

5

elevators

6

treadmills

7

exercise bike

8

weight training

A | SECTION PERSPECTIVE running track exercise equipment

bicycle city-wide sharing

A | LONG SECTION

second level [45’ - 0”]

first level [21’ - 6”]

ground level [0’ - 0”] base level

30

[-14’ -0”]


B

PLAN | FIRST LEVEL

1

1 4 5

velodrome track 2

8

A 6

7

B | CROSS SECTION

second level [45’ - 0”]

first level [21’ - 6”]

ground level [0’ - 0”] bicycle track [-18’ -0”]

31


EXTERIOR VIEW FROM BICYCLE TRACK

INTERIOR CONDITIONING The interior space of the community center is environmentally conditioned through a combination of radiant light and prevalent winds—The interior atrium is heated by radiant light that enters through the glass shell of the community center structure. Air circulation removes excess heat out the top of the building.

32

INTERIOR VIEW FROM TOP FLOOR


INTERIOR VIEW FROM FIRST FLOOR

SECTION PERSPECTIVE | EAST

33


HYBRID PROGRAM TO BLUR COMMERCIAL, RESIDENTIAL AND PERFORMING ARTS ELEMENTS

CRYSTAL FORMATION PERFORMING ARTS CENTER New York City, New York Second Year Studio, Spring 2011 Partner: Ying Xu Critic: Hina Jamelle The site of the Crystal Formation Performing Arts Center is situated between residential high-rises to the east and commercial skyscrapers and a highway to the west. In order to incorporate these contextual elements in the performing arts center, the building formation responds differently to the residential and commercial sides, and utilizes a hybrid program of office spaces, luxury residential and hotel units and various performing arts spaces to blur the commercial and residential elements—generating a building that is active for 24-hours.

34


QUARTZ CRYSTAL TRANSFORMATION

1

sharp|angular|irregular

2

fluid|interlaced|delicate

3

overlapped|fractured|stretched delicate|stretched|skeletal

4

SPATIAL TRANSFORMATION STUDIES The transformation of quartz crystals were studied and spatially formalized in order to respond to the various contextual elements of the site— Sharp and angular building elements respond to the commercial skyscrapers on the east side of the site, while delicate, fluid building elements compose the residential units, and respond to the Hudson River on the west side of the site.

Study Model

Residential Side (East)

Commercial Side (West)

35


LOBBY

UNDERGROUND GARAGE

CORE

APARTMENT UNITS

TOWER PROGRAM The tower program is split between office and residential units. Residential units are located on the west side (foreground)), office units on the east (background). Each unit occupies two stories. The base of the tower includes two concert halls, three lecture halls, and separate lobbies for residents, office workers and concert attendees. TOWER STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS Tower floor plates are supported by a central core and the structural facade. The tower core seperates the office and residential program with seperate elevators, fire escapes, and corridors.

36

CONCERT HALL

OFFICE UNITS


37


A

CONCERT HALL SECTION | A

CONCERT AND LECTURE HALLS | LEVEL 4

38


APARTMENT AND OFFICE UNITS | LEVEL 22

SITE PLAN | LEVEL 30

39


TYPICAL OFFICE WALL SECTION

40


CRYSTAL FORMATION HIGH-RISE, OFFICE UNITS

41


CONCERT HALL INTERIOR

42

MAIN CONCERT HALL INTERIOR

CONCERT HALL ENTRANCE


43


44


HOTEL + STUDIO SPACES INTERCONNECTED TO ENCOURAGE COLLABORATION

TRIBECA LINKSPACE New York City, New York “Inspiration Hotel: Spaces for Artistic Creation” Competition Partner: Patrick Corrigan Located within an established artists’ community in Tribeca, New York City, the LinkSpace Hotel offers artists, musicians, dancers and meditators an opportunity to collaborate by way of a networking system integrated into the design of the hotel. The users have a choice between using the system to share their workspaces with those who have a similar interest within their creative medium, or by changing their privacy settings, use the workspace privately to concentrate or meditate in solitude. The interface and spaces are designed to accommodate the possibility of guests exchanging and developing ideas with those they have never met, breaking down the typical social barriers of a hotel creating a realm of unexpected ventures.

BOUTIQUE HOTELS TRIBECA

LinkspaceHotel 45


INTERFACE

AXONOMETRIC VIEW Hotel rooms and workspaces are detached from each other, and located beneath a long skylight to allow natural light into each space. LEVELS 7 - 8

Private rooms + workspaces

LEVELS 3 - 6 Art gallery, auditorium, meditation rooms, group rooms + workspaces

LEVELS 1 - 2 Lobby, library, restaurant, Group exercise rooms LINKSPACE LOBBY INTERFACE

4

4

Circulation to workspaces

3

View LCD panel activity, decide to connect to current guests to collaborate

2

Check-in + get LinkSpace user ID

1

Enter

3

2 1

46


ROOM INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE lobby

ROOM / WORKSPACE COMBINATION (Typical)

atrium

LED interface / workspace interface bedroom public / private workspace

private entrance

living space

47


SECTION PERSPECTIVE

7

15

HOTEL PROGRAM 13

6

Hotel rooms and workspaces are detached from each other, and located beneath a long skylight to allow natural light into each space, and also to pro-

15

vide an acoustic buffer between workspaces and 13

6

hotel rooms. Wood surfaces in music workspaces provide acoustics for musicians. Ventilation shafts and plaster surfaces in the artist workspaces ac-

15

commodate artist needs. 12

6

WORKSPACES artist

music

dance

public

15

15

16

12

6

14

6

14

6

11

10

8

7

3

48

6

1

hotel entrance

2

hotel lobby

3

hotel library

4

hotel restaurant

5

circulation

6

hotel corridor

7

atrium [light well]

8

interactive LED wall

9

interactive interface

10

public viewing gallery

11

public workspace

12

music workspace

13

artist workpsace

14

dance workspace

15

private room

16

private bathroom

17

privite meditation space


11

11

10

8

8

SECTION DIAGRAM | HOTEL WORKSPACES

top lvl [95’ - 3”]

6th lvl | art studios [83’ - 4”]

5th lvl | art studios [71’ - 9”]

4th lvl | music studios [58’ - 0”]

3rd lvl | music studios [45’ - 4”]

2nd lvl | meditation [33’ - 4”]

1st lvl | dance studios [21’ - 9”]

mezzanine | public [11’ - 3”] 1

2

8

8

1

LONG SECTION B | HOTEL ROOMS

49


HOTEL LOBBY & INTERACTIVE LED INTERFACE

HOTEL PROGRAM A large 10 ft. high interactive LED network interface located on the ground floor lobby provides hotel and guest users an up-to-date account of open workspaces and potential collaborations.

50

1

hotel entrance

2

hotel lobby

3

hotel library

4

hotel restaurant

5

circulation

6

hotel corridor

7

atrium [light well]

8

interactive LED wall

9

interactive interface

10

public viewing gallery

11

public workspace

12

music workspace

13

artist workpsace

14

dance workspace

15

private room

16

private bathroom

17

privite meditation space


5

5

5

11

11

11

11

1 7

7

1

A

2

3

4

B 1

GROUND FLOOR | LOBBY & RESTAURANT

top lvl [95’ - 3”]

6th lvl | art studios [83’ - 4”]

5th lvl | art studios [71’ - 9”]

4th lvl | music studios [58’ - 0”]

3rd lvl | music studios [45’ - 4”]

2nd lvl | meditation [33’ - 4”]

1st lvl | dance studios [21’ - 9”] 10

1

mezzanine | public [11’ - 3”] 1

LONG ELEVATION | FACADE

51


HOTEL INTERIOR LIGHT-WELL & WORKSPACES

HOTEL PROGRAM Public workspaces are primarily located on the ground floor of the hotel. Public spaces on upperfloors separate and open-up the hotel facade to allow pedestrians a view into the interior workspaces.

52

1

hotel entrance

2

hotel lobby

3

hotel library

4

hotel restaurant

5

circulation

6

hotel corridor

7

atrium [light well]

8

interactive LED wall

9

interactive interface

10

public viewing gallery

11

public workspace

12

music workspace

13

artist workpsace

14

dance workspace

15

private room

16

private bathroom

17

privite meditation space


5

5

12

7

5

11

12

12

12

7

7

7

7

11

7

A 15

11

15

15

15

15

B

5TH FLOOR | MUSIC WORKSPACES

top lvl [95’ - 3”]

6th lvl | art studios [83’ - 4”]

11

5th lvl | art studios [71’ - 9”]

11

4th lvl | music studios [58’ - 0”]

3rd lvl | music studios [45’ - 4”] 11

2nd lvl | meditation [33’ - 4”]

1st lvl | dance studios [21’ - 9”] 10

1

2

3

mezzanine | public [11’ - 3”] 4

1

LONG SECTION B | HOTEL ROOMS

53


BERLIN INDEPENDENT CINEMAS

ZEAGHAUS

BERLIN TOURIST ATTRACTIONS

TONI & TONIO

HIGH END 54 TILSITER LICHTSPIELE

54


THE FUTURE OF CINEMA CASE STUDY: EISZET KINO

NETWORKED INDEPENDENTS Berlin, Germany “Cinema of the Future” Exhibition Partner: Sarah Wan Critics: Winka Dubbeldam + Almut Grüntuch-Emst As part of a workshop titled “Cinema of the Future,” this project considers the networked possibilities of independent cinemas across Berlin, functioning as a multiplex, while maintaining individual identities.

INTIMES KINO

A unique paver, deployed city-wide, acts as a tag signifying presence and allows for the subliminal discovery of each cinema. Specifically in Kreuzberg, the Eiszeit Kino utilizes this paver typology to create a dynamic series of courtyards, culminating in the theater spaces.

FSK BABYLON

EISZEIT KINO | SITE PHOTOS COSIMA

SPUTNIK KINO

XENON 2 first courtyard

1 eiszeit kino entrance

KINO SPREEHOFE Z-INEMA

3 second courtyard

4 projection room

3

2 1

4

55


EIZSIET KINO ENTRANCE ILLUMINATED BY PAVERS

PAVER DEPLOYED CITY-WIDE The paver acts as a tag to become an integral part of Berlin’s identity and attract passers-by to the cinema.

LAUZITSER PLATZ

ALEXANDER PLATZ

56


57


FIRST COURTYARD

INTERIOR CINEMA A

Pull-out Table

Concrete Paver

Grass Paver

Shearing Panel

Acoustic Panel

PANEL TRANSFORMATION Illuminating the neighborhood as well as the cinema entrance, the paver typology changes and transforms to create inhabitable space.

58


Cafe

Open-air Cinema

Second Tunnel

First Courtyard [impromptu theater space] Illuminated Pavers

First Tunnel

59


[21’ - 6”] 5

4

[14’ - 6”]

3

2

[0’ - 0”]

NORTH | LONG SECTION

EAST | CROSS SECTION [27’ - 0”]

2

4

[14’ - 6”]

1

[-3’ - 0”]

60

1

cafe

2

projection screen

3

exterior seating

4

interior entrance

5

cinema


OPEN-AIR CINEMA

61


Community Finalist, Schenk Woodman 2010 Competition PennDesign Studio-wide Competition University of Pennsylvania Community Tube encourages the exposure of local artists and the gathering of the Kensington and Philadelphia Communities by engaging the “Second Life” or “Virtual Life” many people have within virtual communities. Community Tube was inspired by the work of Todd Tevlin, who creates art in the virtual community of “Secondlife” with his avatar Esch Snoats, and displays his work in Chicago art galleries. Community Tube Interfaces are scattered throughout the Kensington and the greater Philadelphia areas to allow pedestrians to create or upload art, which is transmitted to and projected at the Community Tube Center. Community users have control of the content projected in the Community Tube Center, which may include work from community artists, video media, and uploaded content. Community Tube users can also visit the Community Tube Center in Secondlife, which allows people to visit Kensington virtually, and view local artists from anywhere in the world.

Community Tube Interface | 2nd Street

Center City Philadelphia

62

Community Tube Interface | W. Girard Ave.

Kensington, Philadelphia


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64


North Phillips Street

West Oxford Street

West Jefferson Street

ground lvl [0’ - 0”]

2rd lvl [15’ - 0”]

3rd lvl [30’ - 0”]

North American Street

projection surfaces projection screen

public gallery

open-air cinema

vendor parking

SECTION PERSPECTIVE | PUBLIC GALLERIES

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PART III: RESEARCH + ELECTIVES


Rheotomic Wall System University of Pennsylvania Digital Fabrication

Partner: Martin Miller Critics: Ferda Kolatan

Modernists focused on the universality of the construction unit. Digital fabrication and computer

For the Rheotomic Wall system, a parametric rhetomic grid was used to organize the structure of

analytics have allowed architects to generate custom architectural responses, fostering a culture

the panel system. The rhetomic grid is organized around pre-determined focal points or “sinks.”

of malleability over universality and standardization. However, while computers allow architects

The grid structure emanates from the sinks in progressive Fibonacci growth patterns, adjoining

to test multiple iterations of complex geometries that can be attuned to specific performative

neighboring sinks to create a stable and varied network structure. When used as an architectural

conditions, ultimately the digital model is “baked” or frozen in time, becoming static. We are

wall system, the varied network system creates differentiated apertures and a complex aesthetic.

interested in how the process of digital fabrication; the digital development coupled with the

The protrusions that emanate off rhetomic structure of the wall panel system channel light

material fabrication, can create a more malleable, less static architecture.

through apertures to produce complex and dynamic light patterns.

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FABRICATION PROCESS

1

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polystyrene block CNC milled

2

polystyreme surface is prepared for mold

3

plaster mold created from polystyrene block


FINAL MODEL

4

plastic in plastic mold

5

final model plastic cast

FABRICATION PROCESS | A polyurethane foam block was CNC milled in order to cast a plaster mold. The surface of the plaster mold is a negative of the wall panel, and is reusable

so that multiple panels can be produced from a single mold. Plastic was used to create the final wall panel system. The wall system can be reduced to seperate panels and molded separately in concrete in order to produce a large scale architectural panel system.

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PLASTIC TRACTION ROBOT North Pacific Ocean Gyre Third Year Studio, Spring 2012 Partner: Sarah Wan Critics: Winka Dubbeldam The environment for the robot swarm system is the world’s oceans, which are currently polluted with millions of tons of plastic particulates in large “garbage patches.” These garbage patches not only degrade the quality of the ocean, but also result in the deaths of millions of oceanic wildlife each year, as the plastic particulates have become deeply imbedded in the plankton population, the food source for many marine animals. The plastic collection robots focus plastic cleaning efforts on preserving albatross wildlife, by separating the birds’ plankton food source from plastic particulates in order to provide plastic free, plankton rich zones. In order to increase wildlife preservation efforts, the plastic traction robot system also attempts to condition the behavior of the albatross populations to recognize cleaned area as safe feeding zones. Additionally, all collected plastic will be reused to create plastic construction products that can be sold to generate revenue for more plastic collection.

GREAT PACIFIC GARBAGE PATCH

The plastic particulates that polute the world’s ocean take decades to disintegrate, and kill millions of aquatic wildlife each year, as the particulates outweigh plankton 6 to 1.

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ROBOT SWARM FORMATION DIAGRAM

1

transport

2

plankton diversion

SECTION | COLLECTION ROBOT: OPEN

3

garbage collection

4

bots at capacity light bots return

SECTION | COLLECTION ROBOT: CLOSED

water ejection

5

return to recycling facility

water

magnetic shaft generator electric coil hydraulic shaft wing

collection panel expandable air chamber intake valve linear heaving buoy

collection panel wings

water + plastic

COLLECTION ROBOT CONFIGURATIONS

The collection robot has two primary configurations, wings closed and wings open. To switch between open and closed wing configurations, the collection robot uses compressed air and hydraulic pumps. water ejection

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PLASTIC COLLECTION DIAGRAM

5

A

Compressed Air & Power Generation

5

Plastic garbage collection

5

Return to water surface

The plastic removal process begins as the Collection Robot travels out to polluted ocean waters. As the collection robot floats, the undulation of the ocean waves moves hydraulic pumps in the robot wings, which add compressed air into reservation tanks.

B

When enough air is collected, the buoyancy of the collection robot changes, and begins to sink. The collection robot sinks to a depth of 30 meters, collecting plastic particulates on its way down.

C

At the maximum depth of the dive, the collection robot releases the compressed air from its tanks, while simultaneously closing its wings, propelling the robot upward to the surface.

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COLLECTION BOT: TRAVEL MODE

COLLECTION BOT: GARBAGE COLLECTION

TOP VIEW | COLLECTION MODE

COLLECTION ROBOT | WING CONFIGURATIONS

In the wings closed configuration, the collection robot’s aerodynamics are increased, allowing it to move through the water faster.

TOP VIEW | TRAVEL MODE

wings and petals compact for travel

5’ 30’

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TRANSPORTATION POD | The function of the transportation pod is to collect and organize collection robots,

remove plastic content from the collection robot, and to transport and distribute robots in polluted waters.

A

Collection robots enter the transportation pod from below, and float upward into the interior cavity of the transportation pod.

B

Utilizing an interior air cavity, the transportation pods provides a dry dock in order to facilitate the removal of plastic content from robots.

C

When air from the interior cavity is released, the collection robots are sent upwards, out of the transportation pod.

TRANSPORTATION POD | STRUCTURE

The structure of the transportation pod is composed of a flexible lattice structure.

Attached to the lattice

structure are pedal components that overlap to create an airtight surface. The pedal components can rotate outward, allowing for the docking of collection robots. Each pedal component is equipped with light sensors to detect approaching robots.

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PART IV: PROFESSIONAL WORK


PROFESSIONAL WORK LIBERTY MEDICAL Pittsburgh, PA | September 2009 Description: The new construction of a 19,000sf, 4-story medical office building on Liberty Avenue creates a strong street presence that engages both users and observers of the architecture. The building bridges the two scales already present in the urban context—the seven story hospital across the street with the small houses alongside the building and behind on the hill. -Lubetz Architects. Duties: Assisted in writing specification documentation, and revising construction drawings. Accompanied project manager to site visits.

FACADE SYSTEM RENDERING

NIGHT VIEW LIBERTY AVENUE

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DAY VIEW LIBERTY AVENUE

FRONT ELEVATION


THE GLASS LOFTS Pittsburgh, PA | September 2009 Description: Mixed-use construction consisting of 39,000sf artist’s work spaces, 18 loft condominiums, retail and restaurant space, FDA offices and a flexible-use community space. The Glass Lofts is the result of a community-driven planning process actively involving neighborhood residents, artists and business owners in the development of the project. Duties: Produced study models in the preliminary design and development project phase. Assisted in writing specification documentation, and revising construction drawings. Sat in meetings with construction contractor and structural engineer. Accompanied project manager to site visits.

CONCEPTUAL RENDERING

AERIAL VIEW

GRASS PLAZA WITH ADJACENT RESTAURANT AND STUDIOS

STREET VIEW, PENN AVENUE

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PROFESSIONAL WORK 23RD STREET APARTMENTS Strip District, Pittsburgh | September 2008 Description: 51 apartment units on riverfront property in Pittsburgh’s Strip District. 100,00 SF new construction also includes car garage, and mixed-use spaces for apartment residents. Duties: Assisted Principal Architect in the preliminary design and development for a project proposal to real estate developers. Created building and apartment unit plans and 5 artistic renderings for a 2-week deadline.

CITY OF ASYLUM Northside, Pittsburgh | September 2008 Description: Mixed-use Commercial and non-profit housing for International Artists living in exile. Neighborhood provides venue for international artists to showcase art, and encourages public engagement and exploration with interactive installations. Duties: Participated in Design and Development of community area, assisted principal architect in the design of housing units, and created artistic renderings for New York Museum competition.

RESIDENTIAL UNIT

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23RD STREET APARTMENT FRONT VIEW

AERIAL VIEW OF SAMPSONIA WAY AXON OF RESIDENTIAL UNIT


CRUCIBLE STEEL Northside, Pittsburgh | September 2008 Description: Formerly a Carnegie Steel mill, the Crucible Steel building is undergoing a transformation in tandem with the revitalization rippling through the landmark Strip District. -Lubetz Architects Duties: Assisted Principal Architect in the Design and Development of the 130,000 SF renovation. Assisted in drafting the working construction plans for the building. Created eight artistic renderings. Created a Marketing Brochure for prospective tenants. AXONOMETRIC MODEL

EXTERIOR BUILDING FROM SMALLMAN STREET

EXTERIOR BUILDING FROM 31ST BRIDGE

ENTRANCE LOBBY

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STEVEN GUERRISI TEL: +717 202 5593 STEVEN.GUERRISI@GMAIL.COM UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SJGUERRISIPORTFOLIO.COM


Steven Guerrisi's Architectural Portfolio