Issuu on Google+

V/Butterick Sewing_cover_FINAL:Layout 1

12/5/12

4:58 PM

Page 1

SEWING

®

Vogue Butterick Step-by-Step GUIDE TO SEWING TECHNIQUES

CRAFTS

An Illustrated A-to-Z Sourcebook for Every Home Sewer ®

Now in a newly revised and updated edition, the Vogue /Butterick Step-by-Step Guide to Sewing Techniques is a must-have reference that should be within easy reach of any sewer—novice or expert. The editors of Vogue® and Butterick Patterns present 500 fundamental and frequently used sewing techniques in clearly written step-by-step text, accompanied by illustrations. The 47 topics are arranged alphabetically: • Appliqués

• Drawstrings

• Interfacing

• Fabric Bands

• Edge & Seam Finishes

• Layouts

• Basting For more than 100 years, the editors at Vogue® and Butterick Patterns have provided high-quality patterns for home sewing. They originally created this guide in 1989, and since then it has been continuously in print and has become a classic bestseller.

• Fabric Belts, Buckles & Belt Carriers • Bias Binding • Buttonholes & Buttons • Casings • Collars • Cuffs • Cutting Basics

sixthandspringbooks.com

PRINTED IN CHINA

• Darts

• Lining

• Seam Construction • Types of Seams

• Elastic Applications

• Loops

• Embroidery by Hand

• Machine Stitching

• Eyelet Applications

• Marking

• Snaps

• Overlock Sewing

• Tucks

• Facings

• Pleats

• Godets

• Pockets

• Gussets

• Pressing Guidelines

• Hand Sewing • Hems

• Quilting

• Hooks & Eyes

• Ruffles

• Shoulder Pads • Sleeves • Smocking

• Underlining • Velcro®/ Hook-and-Loop Tape • Vents • Waistbands • Yokes • Zippers

$24.95 • $29.95 CANADA ISBN ISBN978-1936096275 978-1936096275

Vogue Butterick ®

Step-by-Step

GUIDE TO

SEWING

Techniques REVISED & UPDATED EDITION

52495

9 781936 096275

$24.95 • $29.95 CANADA

T H E E D I T O R S O F V O G U E® A N D B U T T E R I C K P A T T E R N S

Vogue Butterick ®

Step-by-Step

GUIDE TO

SEWING

Techniques

T H E E D I T O R S O F V O G U E® A N D BUTTERICK PATTERNS In this newly revised and updated edition of the classic bestseller, the experts at Vogue® and Butterick Patterns have created the ultimate reference for every home sewer. More than 500 essential sewing techniques are covered in alphabetical sections—from Appliqués to Zippers, and everything in between. With detailed, illustrated step-by-step instructions, including updates to reflect the latest in trends and techniques, the Vogue®/Butterick Step-by-Step Guide to Sewing Techniques is an essential part of every modern sewer’s library.


The Vogue /Butterick

Step-by-Step Guide to

sewing techniques


The Vogue速 /Butterick

Step-by-Step Guide to

sewing techniques An Illustrated A-to-Z Sourcebook for Every Home Sewer

The Editors of Vogue速 and Butterick Patterns

New York


Sixth&Spring Books 161 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10013 First Edition

2013 Edition

Sixth&Spring Books

Executive Editor PATRICIA PERRY

Editorial Director JOY AQUILINO

Vice President, Publisher TRISHA MALCOLM

Editor-in-Chief JANET DU BANE

Developmental Editor LISA SILVERMAN

Creative Director JOE VIOR

Illustrations CYNTHIA NGAI

Editor BETH BAUMGARTEL

Production Manager DAVID JOINNIDES

Project Director MARTHA K. MORAN

Illustrations MARGEAU SOBOTI STABILIMENTA DESIGN

President ART JOINNIDES

Layout and Design ARETA BUK JACKIE KERR Artwork and text © 1989 by Butterick Company Additional artwork and text copyright © 2013 by Sixth&Spring Books All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or used in any form or by any means—graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or information storage-and-retrieval systems—without written permission of the publisher. The written instructions and artworks are intended for the personal, noncommercial use of the retail purchaser and are under federal copyright laws; they are not to be reproduced in any form for commercial use. Permission is granted to photocopy patterns for the personal use of the retail purchaser. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data The Vogue® /Butterick Step-by-Step Guide to Sewing Techniques : An Illustrated A-to-Z Sourcebook for Every Home Sewer / The Editors of Vogue® and Butterick Patterns. — Revised Edition. pages cm Includes index. ISBN: 978-1-936096-27-5 1. Sewing. I. Butterick Company. TT705.V64 2013 646.4—dc23 2012042899 Manufactured in China 1 3 5 7 9 10 8 6 4 2 First Edition 1989 This Revised Edition 2013


Contents

Introduction: How to Use This Book Appliqués

Bias Binding 9

11–17

Transferring Designs 11 Preparing Appliqués 13 Positioning Appliqués 15 Sewing Appliqués by Hand 15 Sewing Appliqués by Machine 16 Fusing Appliqués 17

Fabric Bands

18–34

Bands for Garment Openings Neck Bands 28

Basting

18

35–37

Basting Guidelines 35 Hand Basting 35 Machine Basting 36 Other Basting Methods 37

Fabric Belts, Buckles & Belt Carriers 38–49 Making Fabric Belts/Sashes 38 Attaching Belt Buckles to Fabric Belts 42 Making Fabric Belt Carriers/Belt Loops 43 Attaching Fabric Belt Carriers 45 Making and Attaching Thread Belt Carriers 47

50–60

Making Bias Binding 50 Applying Double or French Binding— Hand Finished 52 Applying Single Binding—Hand Finished 53 Applying Single Binding—Machine Finished 54 Special Binding Techniques 55

Buttonholes & Buttons

61–71

Buttonhole Preparation 61 Machine-Worked Buttonholes 64 Hand-Worked Buttonholes 64 Two-Piece Bound Buttonhole 66 Button Size and Placement Guidelines 69 Attaching Buttons 70 Reinforcing Buttons 71

Casings

72–77

Drawstring Openings 72 Applied Casings 74 Casing in a Seam Allowance Self-Fabric Casing 77

Collars

75

78–104

Rolled Collars: Band, Notched, and Shawl 79 Flat Collars 97 Stand Collars 99


Cuffs

105–115

Facings

Preparing the Lower Edge 105 Band Cuff with Opening 106 Barrel Cuff 112 Turned-Back Cuff 113 Rib Knit Cuff 114 Cuff Link Buttons 115

Armhole Facings 134 Neckline Facings 140 Neck and Armhole Facings Front Facings 151 Waistline Facings 153

Godets Cutting Basics Darts

134–155

116

147

156–157

In a Seam 156 In a Slash 157

117–119

Sewing All Darts 117 Trimming and Clipping Darts Pressing Darts 119

Drawstrings With Elastic

Gussets

158

118

Hand Sewing

120 120

Edge & Seam Finishes 121–123

Hems

Knit Fabric Edge Finishes 121 Woven Fabric Edge Finishes 122

Elastic Applications

124–125

Applying Elastic at an Edge 124 Applying Elastic Away from an Edge 125

Embroidery by Hand

126–132

Threads 126 Embroidery Needles 126 Embroidery Hoops 127 Starting, Ending and Finishing Embroidery Stitches 129

Hand-Worked Eyelets Metal Eyelets 133

133 133

127

159

166–177

Measuring Hems 166 Interfacing Hems 167 Standard 1-inch to 3-inch (1.5cm to 7.5cm) Hems Narrow Hems 169 Hem Variations 171

Hooks & Eyes

Eyelet Applications

159–165

Hand Sewing Guidelines 159 Beginning Hand Stitching Knot Ending Hand Stitching 160 Hand Sewing Stitches 161

168

178–179

Attaching Hooks and Eyes to Edges That Meet 178 Attaching Hooks and Eyes to Edges That Overlap 178

Interfacing

180–187

Choosing Interfacing 180 Where to Interface 181 Working with Fusible Interfacing Working with Sew-In Interfacing

183 186


Layouts

188–198

Layouts: Fabric Preparation 188 Understanding Layout Options and Terms 191 Preparing and Laying Out the Pattern 194

Lining

199–205

Lining a Back Pleat 199 Lining a Back Vent 200 Inserting Jacket Lining by Hand Inserting Jacket Lining by Machine 204

Loops

Handling Corners and Curves with Overlock 229 Overlock Hems 231 Attaching Elastic and Trim with Overlock 233 Making Overlock Loops and Straps 235

Pleats 201

237–244

Marking Pleats 238 Pressing Pleats 238 Knife/Straight Pleats 239 Box Pleats 240 Inverted Pleats 241

206–210

Making Tubing for Fabric Loops Attaching Loops 207 Frogs 209 Dress Hanger Loops 209 Thread Loops 210

Machine Stitching

206

211–217

Basic Machine Stitches 211 Specialty Machine Stitches 216

Marking

218–222

Marking with Clips into the Seam Allowance 218 Pin Marking 218 Thread Marking 219 Marking with Disappearing Marking Pen/Tailor’s Chalk/Chalk Pencil 221 Marking with Dressmaker’s Carbon Paper and Tracing Wheel 222

Overlock Sewing

223–236

Basic Functional Overlock Stitches 223 Overlock Seams and Seam Finishing 225

Pockets

245–260

Patch Pockets 245 Mock Flap Pockets 253 Side Seam Pockets 255 Side-Front Slanted Pockets Welt Pockets 258 Mock Welt Pockets 260

Pressing Guidelines Pressing Tools 261 How to Press 263 Pressing Special Fabrics

Quilting

257

261–268

267

269–274

Quilting Basics 269 Machine Quilting 270 Corded Quilting 272 Trapunto Quilting 273

Ruffles

275–283

Straight Ruffle, Double Layer 275 Straight Ruffle, Single Layer 278 Circular Ruffle, Double Layer 281 Circular Ruffle, Single Layer 283


Seam Construction

284–290

Preparing to Stitch 284 Stitching a Seam 286 Keeping Seams Flat 289

Types of Seams

305–315

Set-In Sleeves 305 Kimono Sleeve 310 Raglan Sleeves 312

Smocking

316–326

Fabrics and Notions 316 Adding a Smocked Insert 316 Marking 316 Pre-Gathering 317 Smocking Stitches 318

Snaps

327–329

Sew-On Snaps 327 Gripper Snaps 329

Tucks

Cutting 336 Marking and Basting 336 Stitching Underlining Seams Darts 337

337

Velcro®/ Hook-and-Loop Tape 338 298

Sew-On Velcro 338 Iron-On Velcro 338

300–304

Types of Shoulder Pads 300 Covering Shoulder Pads 301 Attaching Shoulder Pads 302

Sleeves

336–337

291–299

Special Seam Situations 291 Decorative Seams 296 Self-Finished (Enclosed) Seams

Shoulder Pads

Underlining

Vents

339–345

Lined Jackets, Skirts, or Dresses 339 Unlined Jackets, Skirts, or Dresses 340 Vents for Sleeves 341

Waistbands

346–357

Elasticized Waistbands 346 One-Piece, Non-Elastic Waistbands 352 Two-Piece, Non-Elastic Waistband (Faced) 357

Yokes

358–360

Back/Shoulder Yokes

Zippers

358

361–370

Guidelines 361 Applications: Centered, Lapped, Mock Fly and Separating 364

330–335

Marking and Basting 330 Stitching Tucks 331 Pressing Tucks 331 Types of Tucks 332

Useful Information Index

372–383

371


How to Use This Book

The Vogue® /Butterick Step-by-Step Guide to Sewing Techniques provides quick access to the most frequently used and popular sewing procedures found in Vogue® and Butterick Patterns. The experts at Vogue® /Butterick originally created this guide in 1989, and since then it has been continuously in print and has become a classic bestseller and must-have resource for sewers. The authors selected more than 500 of the most essential methods and techniques out of more than 2,000 standard dressmaking and tailoring procedures used in the Vogue® /Butterick patterns. And this new edition has been revised and updated to reflect the latest sewing trends and techniques, bringing to your library the same authority as the original. The Table of Contents lists 47 broad sewing technique categories alphabetically, from “Appliqués” to “Zippers,” along with the essential techniques therein. Under the “Pockets” section, for example, you’ll find Mock Flap, Mock Welt, Patch, Side Seam, Side-Front Slanted, and Welt pockets. Since we give you several variations for most procedures, the index provides a much more detailed listing. If you look under “Patch Pockets,” you’ll find these variations: lined, self-faced, self-faced and top-stitched, self-lined, slanted edge, and self-flap.

Each technique is presented in a detailed, illustrated step-by-step format, from beginning to completion. When fundamental preparatory steps are common to several techniques, these steps have been organized into an introductory “Basics” section. The stepby-step illustrations have the right side of the fabric shaded for easy identification. In some cases, part of an illustration is enlarged and circled so that fine details can be seen clearly. When garment sections are machine-stitched, the stitching is shown in the direction it would be stitched on your machine; thread ends are always shown at the end of the stitching, not at the beginning. Vogue® /Butterick Sewing vocabulary terms recur throughout this book. These terms refer to very basic procedures every sewer needs to know to follow and execute sewing instructions. Each term is defined and illustrated. Vocabulary terms are not defined at each use in an instruction, but you will find a helpful page reference in parentheses. For instance, the Flat Collar instructions say: “Apply interfacing (pages 180–187) to the wrong side of one collar section.” The accompanying illustration may show this procedure in one step, but if you don’t know how to interface, you’ll find How to Use This Book 9


complete step-by-step instructions on the referenced pages.

references may direct you to another technique within the same section.

Every set of instructions focuses on a specific garment area or technique. To avoid unnecessary repetition, clear references are made to other sections of the book for recurring preliminary or ending steps. For instance, since there are several options for finishing a sleeve lower edge, you would be referred to “Casings,” “Cuffs,” or “Hems.” In some cases, such as the finishing variations of Edgestitching, Topstitching, or Edgestitching and Topstitching,

For example, there are two separate techniques for making a Flat Collar, but the edge finishes are the same in each technique. The second Flat Collar technique refers you to the first Flat Collar for the illustrated edge finish.

10 How to Use This Book

The Vogue® /Butterick Step-by-Step Guide to Sewing Techniques will be useful any time you sew: in using patterns, altering or repairing garments, or even creating your own designs.


Appliqués Layering shaped fabrics is a great way to put your perfectly good fabric scraps to use while creating color, texture, and design interest. Appliqué designs are sold in books, as individual templates, or as part of a pattern, or you can simply create your own.

Transferring Designs There are several ways to transfer an appliqué design from paper to fabric, including using a template, dressmaker’s carbon paper, fusible web, and heat transfer. Once you’ve transferred the design, decide how you are going to apply it before you cut it out. If you want a smooth edge, you’ll need to add 1⁄4" (6mm) seam allowance to the design, so you can fold the raw edge under before stitching. You’ll also need seam allowance if you intend to make a lined appliqué. If you intend to zigzag or blanket stitch the appliqué in place, you don’t need seam allowance.

Template You can purchase or make a template. To make a template, simply trace the design onto card stock or cardboard and carefully cut around the traced lines. To transfer the design onto the fabric, trace around the template on the right side of the appliqué fabric. You can use a template multiple times.

Dressmaker's Carbon Paper Position the colored side of dressmaker’s carbon paper on the right side of the appliqué fabric and mark the design with a pencil or tracing wheel. This method, like the template method, allows you to use the same design multiple times.

TIP If you are using white or very lightcolored threads and/or fabrics, transfer the design using white dressmaker’s carbon paper.

Appliqués 11


Paper-Backed Fusible Web Before tracing the design onto fusible web, check to see if the design is symmetrical (i.e. different right and left sides, such as letters). If the design is symmetrical, you can simply trace the design directly on the paper side of the fusible web. If the design or pattern is asymmetrical, then you should trace it onto tracing paper. Then turn the tracing paper over to copy it (wrong side up) onto the paper side of the fusible web. If you don’t do this, the asymmetrical design will appear in reverse on the fabric.

Symmetric

TIP Be sure to use a press cloth larger than the appliqué to avoid getting the fusible product on your iron.

Heat Transfers Asymmetric

1

Trace the design directly onto the paper backing (smooth side), but don’t cut out the design on the design lines.

2

Place the fusible side of paper-backed fusible web against the wrong side of the chosen appliqué fabric. Fuse, following the manufacturer's instructions, and then cut the appliqué fabric and web together along the design lines.

12 Appliqués

Heat transfers are included in some patterns and are often sold in books. They can usually be used only once and come with complete transfer instructions. As a general rule, you’ll need an iron and press cloth. Simply position the transfer, design side down, on the appliqué fabric. With the press cloth over the transfer, apply heat and pressure to transfer the design lines directly on the appliqué fabric. Before lifting the transfer off, check a corner to be sure the design lines transferred completely.


Interfacing Interfacing is used to maintain the shape of garment details, particularly garment edges (necklines, front openings), cuffs, pockets, collars, and waistbands. Almost all garments require some interfacing. Tailored garments are always interfaced, however even a simple knit T-shirt benefits from interfacing at the neck edge to prevent stretching.

Choosing Interfacing Type Interfacing is available in a variety of fibers, weights and crispness, however the two application methods are used to categorize interfacing; sew-in or fusible interfacing. Sew-in interfacing is hand- or machine basted to the wrong side of the garment piece. Fusible interfacing has a resin coating on one side that fuses to the wrong side of the garment with the application of heat, moisture and pressure.

Construction Interfacings are constructed in one of three ways: woven, non-woven or knit. The package or bolt that holds the interfacing will indicate the fiber content and construction method, and will have detailed application instructions. Woven interfacing has a grainline and should be cut on the straight grain, or on the bias for softer shaping in collars and hemlines. 180 Interfacing

Nonwoven interfacing has no grainline and can be applied in any direction to the garment. Knitted interfacing has lengthwise stability and crosswise stretch to mimic the characteristics of knitted fabrics.

Selection In addition to the application method and construction of the interfacing, the weight and/or crispness of the interfacing must complement the fabric. The care instructions of the fabric and interfacing must be the same as well. In general the interfacing should not be heavier than the garment fabric. Hold the interfacing together with the fabric and roll and shape the two layers together to check that you like the crispness and shape. Sheer or featherweight: Use on lightweight woven and knitted fabrics Lightweight: Use on dress weight fabrics Medium weight: Use on suiting and medium to heavyweight fabrics Heavyweight: Use on accessories and crafts


Where to Interface

• Front and back neckline facings

The area to be interfaced depends on the style of the garment and whether the interfacing being used is fusible or sew-in.

Fusible Always apply fusible interfacing to the facing sections, rather than garment sections, and interface the following areas: • Front and/or back garment openings

• Upper collars of dresses, blouses, tailored jackets, coats

• Entire waistband or cuff

Interfacing 181


Pockets Patch pockets and interior pockets are the two general categories into which most pockets fall. Patch pockets are made of matching or decorative fabric and are applied directly onto the right side of a garment or project. Interior pockets are made of lining or lightweight fabric and are caught within a seam or slash and are sometimes covered by a flap or welt that shows on the right side of the garment.

Patch Pockets Both decorative and functional, patch pockets come in wide variety of shapes and sizes and can be constructed in many different ways.

2

Press the seam toward the lining. Fold the seamed piece with the right sides together so all edges align. Stitch the sides and lower edge.

Lined with Lining Fabric If the pocket fabric is lightweight, you can use it as lining, otherwise lining fabric makes a nice finish for a medium- to heavyweight fabric pocket.

1

With the right sides together, stitch the pocket lining to the upper edge of the pocket, leaving an opening. (The lining piece is smaller than the pocket piece.)

3

Trim the seam allowance, trimming diagonally across the corners.

Pockets 245


4

Turn the pocket right side out through the opening in the upper edge seam; press. Slipstitch the opening closed.

6

Pin the pocket to the garment along the placement lines indicated on the pattern, matching the symbols or wherever you want. Use one of the following methods to secure the pocket along the sides and lower edges, reinforcing the upper edges with stitching, if desired:

5

Leave the upper edge of the pocket plain or finish it in one of the following ways: Reinforced upper edge

Edgestitch

Edgestitch only

Topstitch

Topstitch only

Edgestitch and topstitch

246 Pockets


Smocking Smocking is created by hand-stitching in a specific and decorative pattern directly on the right side of a cluster of accordion-like folds. Patterns with smocking details already include the fullness and markings needed to create the pleats.

Fabrics and Notions • Select any fabric that is lightweight and gathers easily, such as batiste, gingham, chambray, challis, broadcloth, crepe de Chine, dotted swiss, muslin, or percale. • Use two or three strands of six-strand embroidery floss, depending on the fineness of the fabric. • Embroider smocking stitches with a #7 or #8 crewel needle.

Adding a Smocked Insert To add a smocked insert to a garment that does not have one as a design feature on the pattern, allow 3" (7.5cm) of flat fabric for every 1" (25mm) of finished smocking.

1

Determine the desired length and width of the finished insert.

316 Smocking

2

Cut the fabric equal in depth to the finished insert plus two seam allowances, and equal in length to three times the finished insert plus two seam allowances. For example, to make a 10" (25cm) long x 5" (12.5cm)-deep smocked section, cut the fabric 30" + 11⁄4" (76cm + 3.2cm) by 5" + 11⁄4" (12.5cm + 3.2cm).

Marking If the pattern includes smocking, transfer dots are provided. If you are designing your own smocking, sheets of transfer dots may be purchased in many needlework and fabric stores. Sheets of transfer dots allow you to evenly, and in parallel rows, transfer rows of evenly-spaced dots on the wrong side of fabric to act as guidelines for smocking stitches and pleats.

1

When transferring dots to fabric, follow the manufacturer's directions carefully and make a test sample first.

2

Transfer the dots onto the wrong side of the fabric so the rows are parallel to the lengthwise and crosswise grain of the fabric. This guarantees that the finished smocking will fall into even, graceful folds.


Pre-Gathering Use rows of running stitches (page 164) to connect the dots and draw the fabric up into evenly spaced pleats. For each row of running stitches, use two strands of contrasting thread, or one strand of heavy-duty thread. Once the pleats are formed, the sewing lines provide a guide for the rows of embroidery stitches. When the embroidery stitches are completed and the smocked section has been stitched to the rest of the garment, remove the running stitches.

3

Pull up on all the threads at one time, forming straight, close, even pleats. Pull the threads until the fabric section is equal to the desired finished size (plus seam allowances) or the size indicated in the pattern instructions. Securely knot each thread end.

1

Because it cannot be joined in the middle, the thread must be long enough to complete each row of stitches. Knot the thread end before beginning.

2

Working on the wrong side of the fabric and starting at the end of one horizontal row of dots, insert the needle into the fabric just before the first dot. Bring the needle out of the fabric at the other side of the dot, picking up just a few threads of fabric. Work across the entire row, so that long running stitches form between dots. Repeat for the remaining horizontal rows of dots. Leave long thread ends.

4

Place the fabric on a flat surface and smooth the pleats so they are evenly spaced. Hold the iron slightly above the fabric and steam the pleats, never resting the iron on the fabric. Let the pleated fabric dry thoroughly before embroidering.

Smocking 317


Zippers Zippers are available in a variety of colors, lengths, weights, and types for all sorts of garment closings. Choose a zipper based on the application method you will use and the weight of the fabric. The standard, conventional zipper is suitable for most fabric weights and most applications. Separating zippers, invisible zippers and heavy-duty zippers are considered specialty zippers.

• Choose the weight and type of zipper based on the weight of the fabric.

• Use an adjustable zipper foot that permits machinestitching on either side of the zipper without turning the fabric.

• Preshrink any zippers that have cotton tape and will be applied in washable items.

• Always close the zipper before laundering or dry cleaning the garment.

Guidelines A bit of zipper knowledge makes applying a zipper that much easier.

Preparation

• Close the zipper and press out the packaging creases before application. When pressing a garment with a zipper, press on the right side of the garment, use a press cloth to prevent any unsightly shine, puckers or impressions. • Staystitch (page 214) the seam allowances of the zipper opening edges directionally. • Stay (page 288) bias seams or stretchy fabrics before applying the zipper. • Match the design of plaids, stripes, etc. at the zipper closing by slip-basting (page 165) the seam edges together. • Always pin the zipper from the top downward.

Shortening

If you can’t find the right length zipper, buy one longer than required and shorten it. To shorten a zipper, you need to make a new zipper stop. Place the zipper along the opening edge to determine the correct length. On the zipper, mark the desired placement of the new zipper stop. Whipstitch (page 165) across the zipper teeth at the marking. Cut the zipper 3⁄4" (20mm) below the new stop. Zippers 361


Basting

Basting Tape

It is always a good idea to baste the zipper to the garment before stitching it in place. There are several ways to do this. Baste the seam closed first.

Use basting tape or a glue stick to secure the edges of the zipper to the seam allowances.

Thread Baste

Hand- or machine-baste along the center of the zipper tape (both sides of the zipper).

Stitching Guides Use one of the following methods to create a stitching guide to follow for final stitching on the outside of the garment.

Basting or Transparent Tape

Place pieces of basting or transparent cellophane tape on the edges of the zipper tape and finger-press the zipper in position on the seam allowances.

362 Zippers

• Position transparent cellophane tape the width of the final stitching over or along the basted seam, according to the specific zipper application. Follow the edge of the tape when stitching.


Also from Sixth&Spring Books

Vogue Sewing revised and updated The ultimate guide to fashion sewing gets a new look with this fully revised and updated edition. A bestseller since its introduction in 1970, Vogue Sewing covers everything sewers need to know to create fashionable, professional-quality clothing—from fabric selection and construction basics to advanced pattern alterations and couture techniques. Inside you’ll find: • Info on the newest equipment, notions, fabrics, linings, and supplies • Color charts, step-by-step illustrations, and timesaving tips • Instructions on taking your measurements and adjusting patterns for a perfect fit This new, completely redesigned edition stays true to the classic original while bringing it up-to-date. With answers and inspiration for every skill level, it’s the premiere guidebook for a whole new generation of sewers! 460 pages • paperback 978-1-933027-00-5 Available wherever books are sold

sixthandspring.com


V/Butterick Sewing_cover_FINAL:Layout 1

12/5/12

4:58 PM

Page 1

SEWING

®

Vogue Butterick Step-by-Step GUIDE TO SEWING TECHNIQUES

CRAFTS

An Illustrated A-to-Z Sourcebook for Every Home Sewer ®

Now in a newly revised and updated edition, the Vogue /Butterick Step-by-Step Guide to Sewing Techniques is a must-have reference that should be within easy reach of any sewer—novice or expert. The editors of Vogue® and Butterick Patterns present 500 fundamental and frequently used sewing techniques in clearly written step-by-step text, accompanied by illustrations. The 47 topics are arranged alphabetically: • Appliqués

• Drawstrings

• Interfacing

• Fabric Bands

• Edge & Seam Finishes

• Layouts

• Basting For more than 100 years, the editors at Vogue® and Butterick Patterns have provided high-quality patterns for home sewing. They originally created this guide in 1989, and since then it has been continuously in print and has become a classic bestseller.

• Fabric Belts, Buckles & Belt Carriers • Bias Binding • Buttonholes & Buttons • Casings • Collars • Cuffs • Cutting Basics

sixthandspringbooks.com

PRINTED IN CHINA

• Darts

• Lining

• Seam Construction • Types of Seams

• Elastic Applications

• Loops

• Embroidery by Hand

• Machine Stitching

• Eyelet Applications

• Marking

• Snaps

• Overlock Sewing

• Tucks

• Facings

• Pleats

• Godets

• Pockets

• Gussets

• Pressing Guidelines

• Hand Sewing • Hems

• Quilting

• Hooks & Eyes

• Ruffles

• Shoulder Pads • Sleeves • Smocking

• Underlining • Velcro®/ Hook-and-Loop Tape • Vents • Waistbands • Yokes • Zippers

$24.95 • $29.95 CANADA ISBN ISBN978-1936096275 978-1936096275

Vogue Butterick ®

Step-by-Step

GUIDE TO

SEWING

Techniques REVISED & UPDATED EDITION

52495

9 781936 096275

$24.95 • $29.95 CANADA

T H E E D I T O R S O F V O G U E® A N D B U T T E R I C K P A T T E R N S

Vogue Butterick ®

Step-by-Step

GUIDE TO

SEWING

Techniques

T H E E D I T O R S O F V O G U E® A N D BUTTERICK PATTERNS In this newly revised and updated edition of the classic bestseller, the experts at Vogue® and Butterick Patterns have created the ultimate reference for every home sewer. More than 500 essential sewing techniques are covered in alphabetical sections—from Appliqués to Zippers, and everything in between. With detailed, illustrated step-by-step instructions, including updates to reflect the latest in trends and techniques, the Vogue®/Butterick Step-by-Step Guide to Sewing Techniques is an essential part of every modern sewer’s library.


Vogue/Butterick Step-by-Step Guide to Sewing Techniques: Revised & Updated Edition