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Quilting

the new classics

20 INSPIRED QUILT PROJECTS

TRADITIONAL TO MODERN DESIGNS

MICHELE MUSKA


161 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10013 sixthandspringbooks.com

Editorial Director JOY AQUILINO

Managing Editor KRISTINA MCGOWAN

Developmental Editor LISA SILVERMAN

Editor JENNIFER SPIELVOGEL

Art Director DIANE LAMPHRON

Book Design CHRISTINA JARUMAY FOX

Illustrations JOHN BAUMGARTEL Photography JACK DEUTSCH STUDIO

Editorial Assistant JOHANNA LEVY

Proofreader DARYL BROWER

Vice President TRISHA MALCOLM

Publisher CAROLINE KILMER

Production Manager DAVID JOINNIDES

President ART JOINNIDES

Chairman JAY STEIN

Copyright © 2014 by Michele Muska All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or used in any form or by any means—graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or information storage-and-retrieval systems—without written permission of the publisher. The written instructions, photographs, designs, projects, and patterns are intended for the personal, noncommercial use of the retail purchaser and are under federal copyright laws; they are not to be reproduced in any form for commercial use. Permission is granted to photocopy patterns for the personal use of the retail purchaser. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Muska, Michele. Quilting the new classics : 20 inspired quilt projects: traditional to modern designs / Michele Muska; foreword by Meg Cox; foreword by Janneken Smucker.     pages cm ISBN: 978-1-93-6096-80-0 1. Quilting–United States–Patterns. 2. Patchwork–United States–Patterns.  I. Title. TT835.M93 2014 746.46--dc23 Manufactured in China 1 3 5 7 9 10 8 6 4 2

First Edition

2014008560


Dedication Dedicated to Nena and Papa (in spirit) for their ever-present love and support in all my creative adventures. Thank you to my husband Dan for his constant support and the bottomless cup of tea he always provides to keep me going. To my boys Devon and Logan for their belief in me as an Artist. And for the continued love and support I receive from all my sweet nieces, nephews, family and friends, and especially from my “girls,” Kathy, Karen, and Tara.

Acknowledgements Thanks to my friend Scott for bringing me into this

Pam Weeks, Curator NEQM and Marsha MacDowell of

industry. Over the past ten years, I have met so many

MSU Museum for working with me to secure images. A

amazing people and have experienced so many new

very special thank you goes to Nancy Bavor, Curator of

things, I can hardly believe it. And thank you to Jan

Collections at the San Jose Museum of Quilts and Textiles.

and Brooke for continuing to inspire me.

Without Nancy’s generosity, I would not have been able

My sincerest thank you to my editor Joy Aquilino for her belief in my vision and her trust in my abilities, as well as everyone at Sixth & Spring Books. To my dear friends who kept me grounded in reality during this process:

to secure enough images to do this book justice! Roderick Kiracofe, thank you for your kindness and support. And to Barbara Parsons Cartier who was an incredible asset and tech editor… so happy we found each other again!

I thank Victoria, Susan, Jo, Darlene, Haley, Drew, Leslie,

And lastly, but most importantly, thank you to all the

Allie and “my goddesses,” Meg and Janneken, for your

artists that agreed to come on this journey with me.

kind and wonderful words. Leslie Tucker Jennison,

I love you all and the work you do. You are an

Judy Novella, and Teresa Coates, for your contribution.

inspiration to me and to the quilt and fiber world we

Amy Milne, Executive Director of The Quilt Alliance;

live and work in.

Michele Muska, author and Quilt Alliance board member, will donate a portion of the proceeds of this book to Michigan State University Museum for the following, in the hopes that it will benefit The Quilt Alliance in their mission to preserve the culture and history of quilting:

The Quilt Index is a joint project of the Quilt Alliance; MATRIX: The Center for Humane Arts, Letters and Social Sciences Online at Michigan State University; and the Michigan State University Museum.

Michigan State University Museum has made a partial donation of images for this publication to further promote the documentation of quilts and quiltmakers for the future.


Contents Dedication & Acknowledgements....................................... 3 Foreword by Janneken Smucker.......................................... 4 Foreword by Meg Cox................................................................ 5 Preface............................................................................................ 8

The Quilts.............................................................................10 Double Wedding Ring.................. 12 Crazy Quilt................................................24 Dresden Plate.......................................38 Bear Paw......................................................50 Log Cabin......................................................64 Nine Patch...................................................76 Hexagon........................................................90 Yo-Yo................................................................102 Flying Geese..........................................114 Rail Fence.................................................128 Templates..................................................................................139 Essential Techniques............................................................148 Getting Started........................................................................150 Quilting Fundamentals........................................................153 Quilt Binding.............................................................................155 Suggested Reading...............................................................158 Resources & Photo Credits...............................................158 Bibliography & Special Contributors.............................159 Index............................................................................................160


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Quilting the New Classics


The Quilts TRADITIONAL MEETS MODERN

THE QUILTS

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12

Quilting the New Classics


Double Wedding Ring

DOUBLE WEDDING RING

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Quilting the New Classics


Bear Paw

BEAR PAW

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Drunkard’s Bear Paw Maker: A. Dunkle, Morrison’s Cover, Pennsylvania; Ca. 1865; Cotton; 74” x 76”; Michigan State University Museum #2007:107.7

Crow Foot in Mud Bear Paw Maker: Sina R, Phillips (Muskegon, MI); Ca. 1983; Cotton, polyester; 72” x 80”; Michigan State University Museum #6788.1

Bear Paw Quilt Maker: unknown; Ca. 1890-1910; San Jose Museum of Quilts and Textiles

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Quilting the New Classics


BEAR PAW Inspiration Just looking at some of the intricate patterns created by the Bear Paw block makes one realize how creative and talented our early quilters were in piecing together geometric shapes. This block of piercing geometric shapes is known by many names according to Barbara Brackman, including Bear Paw, Indian Trail, Forest Patch, Rambling Road, North Wind, and Irish Puzzle.* As people became more connected in the latter half of the 19th century through mail and newspapers, the sharing of quilt patterns followed suit—thus the wide variety of names. This certainly shows how regional quilt blocks were recognized and how the names of the blocks were often changed to support the environment of particular quilters, as well as the charitable causes for which the quilts might have been made. One such example is the quilt from Pennsylvania on the top left of the facing page. It’s the color combination of pinks and browns that attracted me to A. Dunkle’s Drunkard’s Bear Paw. They are visually calming and sweet. ■■ Darlene Zimmerman’s Bear Paw quilt is traditional in pattern

and color, but she added an attractive scallop border for design interest and to challenge her students. And, while Elisa Sims Albury’s crib quilt cannot be mistaken for anything else but a Bear Paw, her use of negative space and her color palette makes this a very modern design.

*Pg. 180 #1354, Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt Patterns, Complied by Barbara Brackman AQS

BEAR PAW

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102

Quilting the New Classics


Yo-Yo

YO-YO

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Traditional YO-YO

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Quilting the New Classics


Child’s Play Designed by Michele Muska, quilted by Shelly Pagliai of Prairie Moon Quilts, and circles cut by my son, Logan Nee

Finished Dimensions Approximately 40” wide x 80” long

Fabric I used fat quarter bundles from Robert Kaufman Kona Solids in True Blue Colorstory and Grecian Waters Colorstory for the yo-yos. For the quilt-top base, backing, and binding, I used Kona Solid in

Inspiration

Iron Grey. Feel free to use scraps or any fabrics that you choose. Yardages are based on 44”/45”-wide fabric.

I’ve loved making Yo-Yo quilts for many years: I’ve stuffed them,

Solid colors: 27 fat quarters

Binding: ½ yard in color of

beaded them, and tufted them.

for yo-yos

your choice

Neutral solid: 5 yards for quilt

Batting: slightly larger than

top base and backing

40” wide x 80” long

But I was especially excited when I took on the traditional Yo-Yo, and felt I should explore my love of color. Using 27 colors of Kona Solid Fabrics in rows of 12 brought back wonderful memories of my college painting days.

When I started designing my

Yo-Yo quilt, I imagined a long quilt

Supplies ■■ General Sewing Supplies (page 150) ■■ 5” circle dye cutter for Accuquilt

stretching the full length of my

GO! OR 5” Yo-Yo template

queen-size couch with all the little

provided on page 147

ones in my family lined up underneath to watch a favorite movie. I literally saw their tiny fingers tracing the circles and the spaces in between.

Like many Yo-Yo quilts from the

30s and 40s, my quilt has a solid background. I took the concept a bit further by having the base fabric quilted to strengthen the quilt and assure its longevity.

YO-YO

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Traditional FLYING GEESE

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Quilting the New Classics


Homeward Bound Designed, pieced and quilted by Jackie Kunkel, Canton Village Quilt Works

Finished Dimensions Approximately 63” wide x 82” long

Fabric Yardages are based on 44”/45”-wide fabric; adjust as needed.

Inspiration One of my favorite blocks is Flying Geese, in all shapes and forms. Either alone or combined with other

White solid: 4 yards

Batting: Twin size

A variety of 1930s prints: 2 yards total

Backing: 4½ yards

Supplies ■■ General Sewing Supplies (page 150)

patchwork blocks, the Flying Geese make any quilt sing. In this particular traditional design, a simple setting was best and, of course, a collection of 1930s prints brings the tradition to life.

Cutting the Fabric

1. From the white fabric, cut: ■■ Seventeen 37/8” x width of

fabrics, cut:

■■ Eight 7¼” x width of

fabric strips

fabric strips

Sub-cut into (164) 7/8

2. From the 1930s print

7/8

Sub-cut into forty-one

3 ” x 3 ” squares ■■ Thirteen 4” x width of fabric

strips; trim off the selvages

7¼” x 7¼” squares ■■ One 7¾” x 7¾” square

■■ Two 6½” x 28½” strips ■■ Two 6½” x 15½” strips ■■ One 7¾” x 7¾” square

Jackie Kunkel Jackie Kunkel has been a quilter for over 20 years:

Certified Teacher is involved, but according to Jackie,

in business for thirteen years, designing for magazines

worth every second. Now, Jackie teaches and travels to

for four years, and has taught classes for as long as she

share her love of Judy’s techniques and methods.

can remember. Jackie began her business as a long-arm

quilter and now owns her own online quilt shop, Canton

ducing a podcast, Jackie’s Quilting Chronicles, which can

Village Quilt Works. Jackie is one of Judy Niemeyer’s

be found on iTunes. She coordinated a quilt show at the

Nationally Certified Teachers and her online shop is a

New England Air Museum for the past three years, as

Judy Niemeyer Certified Shop. The process to become a

well. To find out more, visit www.cvquiltworks.com.

Jackie is an avid quilting blogger, and has been pro-

FLYING GEESE

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CRAFTS

Q U I LT I N G

Where Quilting Tradition Meets Modern Sensibility TRADITIONAL

MODERN DOUBLE WEDDING RING

DRESDEN PLATE

All quilters draw inspiration from the past. But how do today's artisans put their personal stamp on classic patterns? In Quilting the New Classics: 20 Inspired Quilt Projects: Traditional to Modern Designs, Michele Muska recruited 20 influential quilters — including Darlene Zimmerman, Jacquie Gering , Allie Aller, and Victoria Findlay Wolfe—and asked them to present their unique creative vision of timeless designs. Each pattern—Double Wedding Ring, Crazy Quilt, Dresden Plate, Bear Paw, Log Cabin, Nine Patch, Hexagon, Yo-Yo, Flying Geese, and Rail Fence—comes with step-by-step instructions for two adaptations: one traditional, the other modern. ALSO INCLUDED: ■ A history of each pattern

LOG CABIN

■ Images of heirloom or museum-quality quilts, for inspiration ■ Easy-to-use templates ■ Essential quilting techniques and resources

$21.95 US ■ $23.95 CAN IS B N 978-1-936096-80-0 52195

Take a look inside to jump-start your own creativity.

9 781936 096800

Profile for Sixth&Spring Books

Quilting the New Classics  

All quilters draw inspiration from the past. But how do today's artisans put their personal stamp on classic patterns? Twenty influential qu...

Quilting the New Classics  

All quilters draw inspiration from the past. But how do today's artisans put their personal stamp on classic patterns? Twenty influential qu...

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