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TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER ACTIVITIES The researchers and scientists at SIU continue to develop novel innovations and technologies that strengthen SIU’s longstanding history of productive basic and applied research. This activity helps foster and nurture relationships with industry partners that create opportunities for new product development, student jobs and revenue for the university. SUCCESS - BY THE NUMBERS

Historical Achievements In the 15 years starting with FY 2000, SIU Carbondale and SIU School of Medicine have collectively processed 324 invention disclosures, filed 177 U.S. patent applications and received 62 issued U.S. patents. During this time period, 67 licenses/options have been executed and more than $6.7 million in licensing revenue has been received. In FY2013 and FY2014 Invention disclosures: 43 U.S. patent applications filed: 29 U.S. patents issued: 9 Licenses/options executed: 3 Licensing revenue: $1,420,524

SUPPORTING TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION

Concept Development Award The School of Medicine continues to operate its proof-of-concept fund, the Concept Development Award. To date, 22 projects have been funded, totaling slightly more than $224,000. These awards have resulted in several journal publications, one active technology license and more than $4.9 million in subsequent external grant funding. Technology Innovation Expos The fourth annual expo took place Oct. 19, 2012. The event featured technology presentations and the first Saluki Idea Competition for students. Inventor of the Year was Kathleen Campbell, School of Medicine, Department of Surgery. Innovator of the Year was Lichang Wang, College of Science, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Startup of the Year was Thermaquatica Inc. Student Startup of the Year was Rovertown.com. The fifth annual expo took place Oct. 25, 2013. The event featured technology presentations and the second Saluki Idea Competition for students. Inventor of the Year was David Lightfoot, College of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Plant, Soil and Agricultural Systems. Innovator of the Year was Peter Fadde, College of Education and Human Services, Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Startup of the Year was Minerals Development Technologies Inc. Student Startup of the Year was Orderbolt Inc.

RECENT PATENTS ISSUED

U.S. Patent #8,383,887 “Methods of Using Plants Containing the gdhA Gene.” Issued Feb. 26, 2013, to Ahmad Fakhoury and David Lightfoot, College of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Plant, Soil and Agricultural Systems. U.S. Patent #8,435,396 “Method of Detecting Analyte-Biomolecule Interactions.” Issued May 7, 2013, to Luke Tolley and Matt McCarroll, College of Science, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. U.S. Patent #8,443,647 “Analyte Multi-Sensor for the Detection and Identification of Analyte and a Method of Using the Same.” Issued May 21, 2013, to Andrei Kolmakov (former faculty) and Victor Sysoev (former visiting scholar). U.S. Patent #8,506,881 “Intermetallic Bonded Diamond Composite Composition and Methods of Forming Articles from Same.” Issued Aug. 13, 2013, to Dale Wittmer (retired faculty) and Peter Filip, College of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Energy Processes. U.S. Patent #8,551,720 “Methods for Diagnosing Bowel Disease.” Issued Oct. 18, 2013, to Deliang Cao, School of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology. U.S. Patent #8,563,791 “Process for the Dissolution of Coal, Biomass and Other Organic Solids in Superheated Water.” Issued Oct. 22, 2013, to Ken Anderson, John Crelling and William Huggett, College of Science, Department of Geology. U.S. Patent #8,632,133 “Water Sprays for Dust Control on Mining Machines.” Issued Jan. 21, 2014, to Y. Paul Chugh, College of Engineering, Department of Mining and Mineral Resources Engineering. U.S. Patent #8,648,114 “Use of Transplantation to Prevent Hearing Loss.” Issued Feb. 11, 2014, to Vickram Ramkumar, School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, and Debashree Mukherjea and Len Rybak, School of Medicine, Department of Surgery.

Research Centers and Institutes Advanced Coal and Energy Research Center acerc.siu.edu Applied Research Consultants arc.siu.edu Center for Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders siumed.edu/alz Center for Archaeological Investigations cai.siu.edu Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders casd.siu.edu Center for Dewey Studies deweycenter.siu.edu/ Center for Ecology ecology.siu.edu Center for Embedded Systems engr.siu.edu/ces/ Center for Fisheries, Aquaculture, and Aquatic Sciences fisheries.siu.edu Center for Health Law and Policy law.siu.edu/academics/center-programs/health-law-policy/ Center for Rural Health and Social Service Development crhssd.siu.edu Center for Workforce Development cwd.siu.edu Cooperative Wildlife Research Laboratory wildlife.siu.edu Global Media Research Center mcma.siu.edu/research-creative/gmrc/ Illinois Soybean Center coas.siu.edu/research/illinois-soybean-center Materials Technology Center mtc.siu.edu Meyers Institute for Interdisciplinary Research in Organic and Medicinal Chemistry chem.siu.edu/research/meyers-institute Middle Mississippi River Wetland Research Field Station ecology.siu.edu/field-station Neuroscience Research Center siumed.edu/circns Paul Simon Public Policy Institute paulsimoninstitute.siu.edu Safety Center ehs.siu.edu/her/safety.php Simmons Cancer Institute at Southern Illinois University siumed.edu/cancer Special Collections Research Center lib.siu.edu/scrc Statistical Consulting Unit ehs.siu.edu/epse/graduate/ems/statlab.php To learn more about SIU research, visit siu.edu/research, or contact: James E. Garvey • (618) 453-4551 • jgarvey@siu.edu

Interim Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Dean

Wayne Glass • (618) 453-4520 • wglass@siu.edu Director, Office of Sponsored Projects Administration

R esearch P r o f i l e

2 0 1 4 Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY CARBONDALE

Southern Illinois University is a major research school nestled in a scenic part of the state, with rivers, parks, ample wildlife and all the amenities of a large city. We are recognized by the Carnegie Foundation as a “high research” institution, including us among the top 5 percent of about 4,000 universities in the nation for scholarly output. The Carnegie Foundation also recently categorized us as a “community engaged” university, joining us with 361 other schools contributing substantially to their homes. SIU conducts research that matters regionally and nationally, keeping us true to our roots as a university with the heart of a small college plus the brains of a major, internationally recognized research school. We are serious about incorporating research and scholarly creative activity into all levels of campus life. Our graduate school, and our Center for Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities, are dedicated to pairing our students with worldclass researchers, artists and other scholars on SIU’s campus. Our faculty members are accessible and dedicated to achieving success beyond the lecture hall, providing our students with real-world experiences that translate to critical thinking skills and competitive career opportunities. Our research productivity is high, even given the reduced availability of state and national research funding and greater competition among our peers. In 2014, SIU Carbondale had nearly $71 million in research expenditures in science and engineering fields. Our faculty members are leaders in their fields, receiving competitive awards from agencies such as the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. We pursue partnerships with industry and use these to develop technology, industry and economic activity in our region. Someday Southern Illinois may well become the Silicon Valley of the Midwest, with SIU at the lead. Many new initiatives have been implemented to enhance research and creative activity at SIU. A 60,000-squarefoot collaborative research space is in the initial stages of construction that will house diverse, interdisciplinary faculty and students from fields such as chemistry, biology, engineering, computing, design, communications and agriculture. Key

U.S. Patent #8,685,666 “ARL-1 Specific Antibodies and Uses Thereof.” Issued April 1, 2014, to Deliang Cao, School of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology. Published by the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Dean. For copies, contact the Office of Sponsored Projects Administration at (618) 453-4540 or ospa@siu.edu. Produced by University Communications at SIU Carbondale. Designer: Nathan Krummel. Photos University Communications and ShutterStock. Printed by the authority of the State of Illinois, 02/2015, x M, XXXXXXXXX

occupants will include the Fermentation Institute, the Saluki Aquarium, the SIU Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, and a multiuser Maker Space. A collaborative, internal grant program facilitates interactions among faculty on campus in all disciplines. And our research centers continue to foster participation in university initiatives such as energy engineering, neurological science, ecology, and fisheries and wildlife. SIU recently increased network capacity, computing storage and computational power for researchers on campus. We take our role as a comprehensive university seriously. Our arts and humanities faculty are leaders in their disciplines, producing books, exhibits, musical scores, plays, documentaries and many other kinds of creative works that draw worldwide attention. Our medical researchers are developing novel therapies that can be applied by clinicians at our medical school. Our chemists and engineers are interacting to create the next generation of materials that improve our lives and the technology we use. Our students have access to all of these experiences, leading to an enriching and stimulating learning environment at SIU. Like most universities nationwide, SIU experienced a sharp decline in research awards after 2012 that was caused by the elimination of federal stimulus funding. In 2014, our research funding began showing signs of recovering, which will continue as new faculty members join our ranks and adapt to the changing external research environment. Our eight colleges and School of Medicine have active grants and contracts for research. More than 250 grants were awarded in 2014, with the College of Education and Human Services and School of Medicine leading the way. Much of this activity translates to commercial licenses, patents, software and even popular books, all which stimulate economic activity in the region. The SIU Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research is committed to supporting all of our scholars, allowing them to achieve their highest potential – and to share their successes with local stakeholders and colleagues around the world. It is our goal to eliminate boundaries, facilitate collaboration and ensure that SIU is a destination for discovery in a nurturing environment. James E. Garvey Interim Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Dean


TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER ACTIVITIES The researchers and scientists at SIU continue to develop novel innovations and technologies that strengthen SIU’s longstanding history of productive basic and applied research. This activity helps foster and nurture relationships with industry partners that create opportunities for new product development, student jobs and revenue for the university. SUCCESS - BY THE NUMBERS

Historical Achievements In the 15 years starting with FY 2000, SIU Carbondale and SIU School of Medicine have collectively processed 324 invention disclosures, filed 177 U.S. patent applications and received 62 issued U.S. patents. During this time period, 67 licenses/options have been executed and more than $6.7 million in licensing revenue has been received. In FY2013 and FY2014 Invention disclosures: 43 U.S. patent applications filed: 29 U.S. patents issued: 9 Licenses/options executed: 3 Licensing revenue: $1,420,524

SUPPORTING TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION

Concept Development Award The School of Medicine continues to operate its proof-of-concept fund, the Concept Development Award. To date, 22 projects have been funded, totaling slightly more than $224,000. These awards have resulted in several journal publications, one active technology license and more than $4.9 million in subsequent external grant funding. Technology Innovation Expos The fourth annual expo took place Oct. 19, 2012. The event featured technology presentations and the first Saluki Idea Competition for students. Inventor of the Year was Kathleen Campbell, School of Medicine, Department of Surgery. Innovator of the Year was Lichang Wang, College of Science, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Startup of the Year was Thermaquatica Inc. Student Startup of the Year was Rovertown.com. The fifth annual expo took place Oct. 25, 2013. The event featured technology presentations and the second Saluki Idea Competition for students. Inventor of the Year was David Lightfoot, College of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Plant, Soil and Agricultural Systems. Innovator of the Year was Peter Fadde, College of Education and Human Services, Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Startup of the Year was Minerals Development Technologies Inc. Student Startup of the Year was Orderbolt Inc.

RECENT PATENTS ISSUED

U.S. Patent #8,383,887 “Methods of Using Plants Containing the gdhA Gene.” Issued Feb. 26, 2013, to Ahmad Fakhoury and David Lightfoot, College of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Plant, Soil and Agricultural Systems. U.S. Patent #8,435,396 “Method of Detecting Analyte-Biomolecule Interactions.” Issued May 7, 2013, to Luke Tolley and Matt McCarroll, College of Science, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. U.S. Patent #8,443,647 “Analyte Multi-Sensor for the Detection and Identification of Analyte and a Method of Using the Same.” Issued May 21, 2013, to Andrei Kolmakov (former faculty) and Victor Sysoev (former visiting scholar). U.S. Patent #8,506,881 “Intermetallic Bonded Diamond Composite Composition and Methods of Forming Articles from Same.” Issued Aug. 13, 2013, to Dale Wittmer (retired faculty) and Peter Filip, College of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Energy Processes. U.S. Patent #8,551,720 “Methods for Diagnosing Bowel Disease.” Issued Oct. 18, 2013, to Deliang Cao, School of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology. U.S. Patent #8,563,791 “Process for the Dissolution of Coal, Biomass and Other Organic Solids in Superheated Water.” Issued Oct. 22, 2013, to Ken Anderson, John Crelling and William Huggett, College of Science, Department of Geology. U.S. Patent #8,632,133 “Water Sprays for Dust Control on Mining Machines.” Issued Jan. 21, 2014, to Y. Paul Chugh, College of Engineering, Department of Mining and Mineral Resources Engineering. U.S. Patent #8,648,114 “Use of Transplantation to Prevent Hearing Loss.” Issued Feb. 11, 2014, to Vickram Ramkumar, School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, and Debashree Mukherjea and Len Rybak, School of Medicine, Department of Surgery.

Research Centers and Institutes Advanced Coal and Energy Research Center acerc.siu.edu Applied Research Consultants arc.siu.edu Center for Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders siumed.edu/alz Center for Archaeological Investigations cai.siu.edu Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders casd.siu.edu Center for Dewey Studies deweycenter.siu.edu/ Center for Ecology ecology.siu.edu Center for Embedded Systems engr.siu.edu/ces/ Center for Fisheries, Aquaculture, and Aquatic Sciences fisheries.siu.edu Center for Health Law and Policy law.siu.edu/academics/center-programs/health-law-policy/ Center for Rural Health and Social Service Development crhssd.siu.edu Center for Workforce Development cwd.siu.edu Cooperative Wildlife Research Laboratory wildlife.siu.edu Global Media Research Center mcma.siu.edu/research-creative/gmrc/ Illinois Soybean Center coas.siu.edu/research/illinois-soybean-center Materials Technology Center mtc.siu.edu Meyers Institute for Interdisciplinary Research in Organic and Medicinal Chemistry chem.siu.edu/research/meyers-institute Middle Mississippi River Wetland Research Field Station ecology.siu.edu/field-station Neuroscience Research Center siumed.edu/circns Paul Simon Public Policy Institute paulsimoninstitute.siu.edu Safety Center ehs.siu.edu/her/safety.php Simmons Cancer Institute at Southern Illinois University siumed.edu/cancer Special Collections Research Center lib.siu.edu/scrc Statistical Consulting Unit ehs.siu.edu/epse/graduate/ems/statlab.php To learn more about SIU research, visit siu.edu/research, or contact: James E. Garvey • (618) 453-4551 • jgarvey@siu.edu

Interim Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Dean

Wayne Glass • (618) 453-4520 • wglass@siu.edu Director, Office of Sponsored Projects Administration

R esearch P r o f i l e

2 0 1 4 Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY CARBONDALE

Southern Illinois University is a major research school nestled in a scenic part of the state, with rivers, parks, ample wildlife and all the amenities of a large city. We are recognized by the Carnegie Foundation as a “high research” institution, including us among the top 5 percent of about 4,000 universities in the nation for scholarly output. The Carnegie Foundation also recently categorized us as a “community engaged” university, joining us with 361 other schools contributing substantially to their homes. SIU conducts research that matters regionally and nationally, keeping us true to our roots as a university with the heart of a small college plus the brains of a major, internationally recognized research school. We are serious about incorporating research and scholarly creative activity into all levels of campus life. Our graduate school, and our Center for Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities, are dedicated to pairing our students with worldclass researchers, artists and other scholars on SIU’s campus. Our faculty members are accessible and dedicated to achieving success beyond the lecture hall, providing our students with real-world experiences that translate to critical thinking skills and competitive career opportunities. Our research productivity is high, even given the reduced availability of state and national research funding and greater competition among our peers. In 2014, SIU Carbondale had nearly $71 million in research expenditures in science and engineering fields. Our faculty members are leaders in their fields, receiving competitive awards from agencies such as the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. We pursue partnerships with industry and use these to develop technology, industry and economic activity in our region. Someday Southern Illinois may well become the Silicon Valley of the Midwest, with SIU at the lead. Many new initiatives have been implemented to enhance research and creative activity at SIU. A 60,000-squarefoot collaborative research space is in the initial stages of construction that will house diverse, interdisciplinary faculty and students from fields such as chemistry, biology, engineering, computing, design, communications and agriculture. Key

U.S. Patent #8,685,666 “ARL-1 Specific Antibodies and Uses Thereof.” Issued April 1, 2014, to Deliang Cao, School of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology. Published by the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Dean. For copies, contact the Office of Sponsored Projects Administration at (618) 453-4540 or ospa@siu.edu. Produced by University Communications at SIU Carbondale. Designer: Nathan Krummel. Photos University Communications and ShutterStock. Printed by the authority of the State of Illinois, 02/2015, x M, XXXXXXXXX

occupants will include the Fermentation Institute, the Saluki Aquarium, the SIU Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, and a multiuser Maker Space. A collaborative, internal grant program facilitates interactions among faculty on campus in all disciplines. And our research centers continue to foster participation in university initiatives such as energy engineering, neurological science, ecology, and fisheries and wildlife. SIU recently increased network capacity, computing storage and computational power for researchers on campus. We take our role as a comprehensive university seriously. Our arts and humanities faculty are leaders in their disciplines, producing books, exhibits, musical scores, plays, documentaries and many other kinds of creative works that draw worldwide attention. Our medical researchers are developing novel therapies that can be applied by clinicians at our medical school. Our chemists and engineers are interacting to create the next generation of materials that improve our lives and the technology we use. Our students have access to all of these experiences, leading to an enriching and stimulating learning environment at SIU. Like most universities nationwide, SIU experienced a sharp decline in research awards after 2012 that was caused by the elimination of federal stimulus funding. In 2014, our research funding began showing signs of recovering, which will continue as new faculty members join our ranks and adapt to the changing external research environment. Our eight colleges and School of Medicine have active grants and contracts for research. More than 250 grants were awarded in 2014, with the College of Education and Human Services and School of Medicine leading the way. Much of this activity translates to commercial licenses, patents, software and even popular books, all which stimulate economic activity in the region. The SIU Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research is committed to supporting all of our scholars, allowing them to achieve their highest potential – and to share their successes with local stakeholders and colleagues around the world. It is our goal to eliminate boundaries, facilitate collaboration and ensure that SIU is a destination for discovery in a nurturing environment. James E. Garvey Interim Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Dean


TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER ACTIVITIES The researchers and scientists at SIU continue to develop novel innovations and technologies that strengthen SIU’s longstanding history of productive basic and applied research. This activity helps foster and nurture relationships with industry partners that create opportunities for new product development, student jobs and revenue for the university. SUCCESS - BY THE NUMBERS

Historical Achievements In the 15 years starting with FY 2000, SIU Carbondale and SIU School of Medicine have collectively processed 324 invention disclosures, filed 177 U.S. patent applications and received 62 issued U.S. patents. During this time period, 67 licenses/options have been executed and more than $6.7 million in licensing revenue has been received. In FY2013 and FY2014 Invention disclosures: 43 U.S. patent applications filed: 29 U.S. patents issued: 9 Licenses/options executed: 3 Licensing revenue: $1,420,524

SUPPORTING TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION

Concept Development Award The School of Medicine continues to operate its proof-of-concept fund, the Concept Development Award. To date, 22 projects have been funded, totaling slightly more than $224,000. These awards have resulted in several journal publications, one active technology license and more than $4.9 million in subsequent external grant funding. Technology Innovation Expos The fourth annual expo took place Oct. 19, 2012. The event featured technology presentations and the first Saluki Idea Competition for students. Inventor of the Year was Kathleen Campbell, School of Medicine, Department of Surgery. Innovator of the Year was Lichang Wang, College of Science, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Startup of the Year was Thermaquatica Inc. Student Startup of the Year was Rovertown.com. The fifth annual expo took place Oct. 25, 2013. The event featured technology presentations and the second Saluki Idea Competition for students. Inventor of the Year was David Lightfoot, College of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Plant, Soil and Agricultural Systems. Innovator of the Year was Peter Fadde, College of Education and Human Services, Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Startup of the Year was Minerals Development Technologies Inc. Student Startup of the Year was Orderbolt Inc.

RECENT PATENTS ISSUED

U.S. Patent #8,383,887 “Methods of Using Plants Containing the gdhA Gene.” Issued Feb. 26, 2013, to Ahmad Fakhoury and David Lightfoot, College of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Plant, Soil and Agricultural Systems. U.S. Patent #8,435,396 “Method of Detecting Analyte-Biomolecule Interactions.” Issued May 7, 2013, to Luke Tolley and Matt McCarroll, College of Science, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. U.S. Patent #8,443,647 “Analyte Multi-Sensor for the Detection and Identification of Analyte and a Method of Using the Same.” Issued May 21, 2013, to Andrei Kolmakov (former faculty) and Victor Sysoev (former visiting scholar). U.S. Patent #8,506,881 “Intermetallic Bonded Diamond Composite Composition and Methods of Forming Articles from Same.” Issued Aug. 13, 2013, to Dale Wittmer (retired faculty) and Peter Filip, College of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Energy Processes. U.S. Patent #8,551,720 “Methods for Diagnosing Bowel Disease.” Issued Oct. 18, 2013, to Deliang Cao, School of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology. U.S. Patent #8,563,791 “Process for the Dissolution of Coal, Biomass and Other Organic Solids in Superheated Water.” Issued Oct. 22, 2013, to Ken Anderson, John Crelling and William Huggett, College of Science, Department of Geology. U.S. Patent #8,632,133 “Water Sprays for Dust Control on Mining Machines.” Issued Jan. 21, 2014, to Y. Paul Chugh, College of Engineering, Department of Mining and Mineral Resources Engineering. U.S. Patent #8,648,114 “Use of Transplantation to Prevent Hearing Loss.” Issued Feb. 11, 2014, to Vickram Ramkumar, School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, and Debashree Mukherjea and Len Rybak, School of Medicine, Department of Surgery.

Research Centers and Institutes Advanced Coal and Energy Research Center acerc.siu.edu Applied Research Consultants arc.siu.edu Center for Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders siumed.edu/alz Center for Archaeological Investigations cai.siu.edu Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders casd.siu.edu Center for Dewey Studies deweycenter.siu.edu/ Center for Ecology ecology.siu.edu Center for Embedded Systems engr.siu.edu/ces/ Center for Fisheries, Aquaculture, and Aquatic Sciences fisheries.siu.edu Center for Health Law and Policy law.siu.edu/academics/center-programs/health-law-policy/ Center for Rural Health and Social Service Development crhssd.siu.edu Center for Workforce Development cwd.siu.edu Cooperative Wildlife Research Laboratory wildlife.siu.edu Global Media Research Center mcma.siu.edu/research-creative/gmrc/ Illinois Soybean Center coas.siu.edu/research/illinois-soybean-center Materials Technology Center mtc.siu.edu Meyers Institute for Interdisciplinary Research in Organic and Medicinal Chemistry chem.siu.edu/research/meyers-institute Middle Mississippi River Wetland Research Field Station ecology.siu.edu/field-station Neuroscience Research Center siumed.edu/circns Paul Simon Public Policy Institute paulsimoninstitute.siu.edu Safety Center ehs.siu.edu/her/safety.php Simmons Cancer Institute at Southern Illinois University siumed.edu/cancer Special Collections Research Center lib.siu.edu/scrc Statistical Consulting Unit ehs.siu.edu/epse/graduate/ems/statlab.php To learn more about SIU research, visit siu.edu/research, or contact: James E. Garvey • (618) 453-4551 • jgarvey@siu.edu

Interim Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Dean

Wayne Glass • (618) 453-4520 • wglass@siu.edu Director, Office of Sponsored Projects Administration

R esearch P r o f i l e

2 0 1 4 Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY CARBONDALE

Southern Illinois University is a major research school nestled in a scenic part of the state, with rivers, parks, ample wildlife and all the amenities of a large city. We are recognized by the Carnegie Foundation as a “high research” institution, including us among the top 5 percent of about 4,000 universities in the nation for scholarly output. The Carnegie Foundation also recently categorized us as a “community engaged” university, joining us with 361 other schools contributing substantially to their homes. SIU conducts research that matters regionally and nationally, keeping us true to our roots as a university with the heart of a small college plus the brains of a major, internationally recognized research school. We are serious about incorporating research and scholarly creative activity into all levels of campus life. Our graduate school, and our Center for Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities, are dedicated to pairing our students with worldclass researchers, artists and other scholars on SIU’s campus. Our faculty members are accessible and dedicated to achieving success beyond the lecture hall, providing our students with real-world experiences that translate to critical thinking skills and competitive career opportunities. Our research productivity is high, even given the reduced availability of state and national research funding and greater competition among our peers. In 2014, SIU Carbondale had nearly $71 million in research expenditures in science and engineering fields. Our faculty members are leaders in their fields, receiving competitive awards from agencies such as the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. We pursue partnerships with industry and use these to develop technology, industry and economic activity in our region. Someday Southern Illinois may well become the Silicon Valley of the Midwest, with SIU at the lead. Many new initiatives have been implemented to enhance research and creative activity at SIU. A 60,000-squarefoot collaborative research space is in the initial stages of construction that will house diverse, interdisciplinary faculty and students from fields such as chemistry, biology, engineering, computing, design, communications and agriculture. Key

U.S. Patent #8,685,666 “ARL-1 Specific Antibodies and Uses Thereof.” Issued April 1, 2014, to Deliang Cao, School of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology. Published by the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Dean. For copies, contact the Office of Sponsored Projects Administration at (618) 453-4540 or ospa@siu.edu. Produced by University Communications at SIU Carbondale. Designer: Nathan Krummel. Photos University Communications and ShutterStock. Printed by the authority of the State of Illinois, 02/2015, x M, XXXXXXXXX

occupants will include the Fermentation Institute, the Saluki Aquarium, the SIU Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, and a multiuser Maker Space. A collaborative, internal grant program facilitates interactions among faculty on campus in all disciplines. And our research centers continue to foster participation in university initiatives such as energy engineering, neurological science, ecology, and fisheries and wildlife. SIU recently increased network capacity, computing storage and computational power for researchers on campus. We take our role as a comprehensive university seriously. Our arts and humanities faculty are leaders in their disciplines, producing books, exhibits, musical scores, plays, documentaries and many other kinds of creative works that draw worldwide attention. Our medical researchers are developing novel therapies that can be applied by clinicians at our medical school. Our chemists and engineers are interacting to create the next generation of materials that improve our lives and the technology we use. Our students have access to all of these experiences, leading to an enriching and stimulating learning environment at SIU. Like most universities nationwide, SIU experienced a sharp decline in research awards after 2012 that was caused by the elimination of federal stimulus funding. In 2014, our research funding began showing signs of recovering, which will continue as new faculty members join our ranks and adapt to the changing external research environment. Our eight colleges and School of Medicine have active grants and contracts for research. More than 250 grants were awarded in 2014, with the College of Education and Human Services and School of Medicine leading the way. Much of this activity translates to commercial licenses, patents, software and even popular books, all which stimulate economic activity in the region. The SIU Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research is committed to supporting all of our scholars, allowing them to achieve their highest potential – and to share their successes with local stakeholders and colleagues around the world. It is our goal to eliminate boundaries, facilitate collaboration and ensure that SIU is a destination for discovery in a nurturing environment. James E. Garvey Interim Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Dean


Summary of Grant Funding, FY 20141 (July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014)

Total funds awarded ................................................................................................................$61,671,514

Number of grant awards received........................................................................................................418

Number of agencies awarding grants.................................................................................................202

Number of faculty, staff, and students receiving grants...................................................................261

Number of grant projects active during fiscal year .........................................................................963

2

3

Grant Funding by Project Type Training - $4.93 M

Jeanne Kitchens and Elizabeth Freeburg (retired) are the lead investigators on the Layoff Aversion and Rapid Response project, funded by the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO). With a grant of nearly $500,000 from DCEO, the project will identify the actions needed to coordinate workforce resources for dislocated workers and develop the tools that will be used as part of the state’s layoff aversion strategy. The project is located in the Workforce Education and Development department of the College of Education and Human Services. The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) continues to support WSIU Public Broadcasting through its Community Service Grant program. Housed in the College of Mass Communications and Media Arts, WSIU stations serve more than 3 million people across five states through three digital television channels, three radio stations, an HD radio channel, a website, local production units, and an education and community outreach department. With $118,494 in support from the administrative office of the Illinois courts, John Erbes in the School of Law will establish the Juvenile Justice Clinic that will be available for appointment as guardian ad litem in cases of juvenile abuse, neglect and dependency in Jackson County. The clinic will be an excellent educational opportunity for SIU Law students.

SIMEC is complementary to another program of the Office of Economic and Regional Development, the Rural Microenterprise Technical Assistance Program (RMAP). The nearly $40,000 RMAP grant was provided by Southern Illinois Coal Belt Champion Community Inc. (SICBCC). RMAP, under the direction of Robyn Russell, provides technical assistance to small businesses who are applying for loans from SICBCC.

RESEARCH

We were particularly pleased that two of our faculty received a prestigious CAREER award from the National Science Foundation (NSF). Eric Chitambar from the Physics department will be studying fundamental questions in quantum information theory and classical cryptography, while Kyle Plunkett, Chemistry and Biochemistry, will be investigating new electron acceptor materials based on cyclopenta-fused polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Plunkett’s research (with a $260,000 grant) could lead to lower-cost photovoltaic devices. Chitambar’s research (funded with a $100,000 grant) has implications on information security. The U.S. Department of Agriculture is providing a grant of nearly $500,000 to Jesse Trushenski with the Center for Fisheries, Aquaculture and Aquatic Sciences to study the essential fatty acid requirements of commonly cultured fishes. Her research will lead to recommendations that will ensure proper nutrition of cultured

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.................................... $14,811,348

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services...................................... $7,880,736

Illinois Department of Children and Family Services................................ $6,180,483

Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity................ $3,234,832

Illinois State Board of Education.................................................................. $4,165,997

National Science Foundation....................................................................... $3,069,536

National Science Foundation....................................................................... $3,916,059

U.S. Department of Agriculture.................................................................... $1,310,710

Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity................ $3,660,161

Illinois Department of Natural Resources.................................................. $1,211,763

U.S. Department of Education...................................................................... $2,264,241

U.S. Department of the Interior..................................................................... $1161,762

Illinois Department of Natural Resources.................................................. $1,446,780

Howard G. Buffett Foundation......................................................................... $986,300

U.S. Department of Agriculture.................................................................... $1,374,524

U.S. Department of Defense............................................................................ $956,936

Illinois Department of Public Health............................................................ $1,240,010

Syncrude Canada............................................................................................. $922,525

Illinois Department of Transportation.......................................................... $1,166,514

Monsanto Company......................................................................................... $718,017

Federal - $28.18 M Foundation - $2.03 M

Agricultural Sciences - $4.75 M

Education & Human Services - $18.39 M

Other - $1 M

Medicine - $15.37 M

Other - $.26 M Engineering - $2.47 M Illinois Clean Coal Institute - $1.98 M Liberal Arts- $2.20 M Mass Communications Liberal Arts - $1.61 M and Media Arts - $1.3 M IL Clean Coal Institute - $1.98 M

86

$ 14,674,679

12

$ 2,355,974

37

$ 11,152,873

State of Illinois

37

$ 5,225,315

12

$ 1,522,795

31

$ 9,668,560

Industry

63

$ 5,034.498

6

$ 362,892

3

$ 69,443

Foundation

25

$ 1,801,763

7

$ 168,334

5

$ 56,600

Other

43

$ 2,409,194

18

$ 519,181

33

$ 6,649,414

Total

254

$ 29,145,449

55

$ 4,929,176

418

$ 61,671,515

Medicine includes both Carbondale and Springfield campuses. Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research includes: Advanced Coal and Energy Resource Center; Center for Fisheries, Aquaculture and Aquatic Sciences; Center for Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities; Meyers Institute for Interdisciplinary Research in Organic and Medicinal Chemistry; Materials Technology Center; Center for Ecology; Office of Sponsored Projects Administration; Neuroscience Research Center; and Cooperative Wildlife Research Laboratory.

Total Awards for Last Ten Fiscal Years5 80 70

Research Expenditures in Science & Engineering (S&E) Fields, FY 2014 from federal grants: $18,398,000

50

20

30

10

10 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

Additional grant funding data is available at ospa.siu.edu.

$

species and reduce reliance on marine resources. Continuing to build on the university’s expertise in soybean research, Jason Bond of the Department of Plant, Soil and Agricultural Systems in the College of Agricultural Sciences received a grant of $101,688 from the United Soybean Board to conduct a soybean commercial variety test. The objective of the research is to increase the value of U.S. soybean meal to the entire value chain by reducing losses to seedling diseases. The departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering (College of Engineering) and Economics (College of Liberal Arts) received an $896,629 award from the National Science Foundation for the project “Efficient Temporal-spatial Spectrum Sharing Through Voluntary Exchange,” under the direction of Xiang Zhou (Engineering) and Alison Watts (Economics). The project will study the feasibility and efficiency of different spectrum-sharing mechanisms, and the impact on users and society.

NONTRADITIONAL EDUCATION AND STUDENT SUPPORT

Two researchers at SIU Carbondale – Boyd Goodson (Chemistry and Biochemistry) and Saikat Talapatra (Physics) – will lead the latest round of funding of the university’s Research for Undergraduate (REU) projects supported by the National Science Foundation. The $105,000 grant from NSF will be used to train 10 undergraduate students each summer in the area of materials research. The university has had an REU program since 2006, through which dozens of students have benefited. With a grant of $281,374 from the U.S. Department of Education, the university will be able to continue to offer targeted support to low-income and first-generation students, and to students with disabilities. The project, led by Renada Greer in Student Support Services, is integral to the mission of SIU to be accessible to students from all social and economic backgrounds.

COLLABORATIONS

40

$ 1. Reported by date awards processed during the fiscal year. Data subject to rounding errors. 2. All fiscal data exclude Financial Aid Office Awards. The term "grants" includes contracts and cooperative agreements. 3. Some projects are funded by one-time awards that cross fiscal years. 4. All federal data include federal flow-through funding (federal funds awarded via subcontracts to the University from non-federal sources 5. Fiscal years 2011 and previous reported by date processed through that year’s processing cutoff date (date varies). Beginning FY2012, reported by date processed during the fiscal year.

50

30

20 Derived from a report for the National Science Foundation, which ranks universities based on expenditures made by each institution for research projects in a given fiscal year, rather than on research grant dollars received during that year. S&E fields include agriculture, the social sciences, and psychology, but exclude education, humanities, the arts, law, library science, and all other non-science fields. “All sources” includes institutional funds and grants.

Total Research Awards for Last Ten Fiscal Years5

40

60

from grants: $35,091,000

Engineering - $2.44 M

Service/Other

Federal

from all sources: $70,854,000

Agricultural Sciences - $4.53 M

Other: Applied Sciences & Arts, Education & Human Services.

Other: Applied Sciences & Arts, Chancellor’s Office, Law, Library Affairs, Provost, University College.

Grant Funding by Source versus Project Type4 Training

Vice Chancellor for Research - $ 3.86 M

Medicine - $10.57 M

Vice Chancellor for Research - $3.87 M Science- $5.46 M

Research

Science - $3.85 M

Chancellor’s Office- $4.89 M

Other - $9.58 M

Public Service/Other - $27.6 M

Research Grant Funding by Area

Millions

The School of Medicine, Department of Family and Community Medicine (SOM), under the direction of Janet Albers, received funding of $722,419 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for a Health Center Cluster project. Focused on the significant health needs and health disparities in the SIU/ SOM service area (low birth weight, need for prenatal care and teen pregnancy), the project will provide comprehensive primary, preventive and supplemental health care services, including access to oral and mental health services.

Industry - $5.47 M

The Southern Illinois Manufacturing Excellence Center (SIMEC) received additional funding from the Bradley University IMEC. SIMEC is one of three regional manufacturing extension centers in Illinois that provides services and support technology transfer to enhance the productivity and strengthen the global competitiveness of Illinois manufacturers. Under the direction of Kyle Harfst, Lynn Anderson Lindberg and Robyn Russell in the university’s Office of Economic and Regional Development, SIMEC receives support from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, and the Illinois Board of Higher Education.

Top Sponsors, Research Grant Funding

Grant Funding by Area

State of Illinois - $16.48 M

Research - $29.15 M

ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND OUTREACH

Top Sponsors, All Grant Funding

Grant Funding by Source

Millions

Continued Excellence In Scholarship And Creativity

Scholarship and creativity take many forms at SIU Carbondale. While traditional research often grabs the headlines, the university is involved in many initiatives that transcend basic research and have a significant impact on improving the quality of life in Southern Illinois, the state, the nation and even internationally. What follows are but a few examples of the breadth of our faculty’s contributions to scholarship, training, creativity and research in 2014.

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

The Cumulative Environmental Management Association is supporting the work of Dale Vitt, with the Department of Plant Biology in the College of Science, with his project titled “Nitrogen Addition Experiments in Boreal Ecosystems: Understanding the Fate of Atmospherically Deposited Nitrogen in order to Determine Critical Loads.” Through his research, Vitt will be able to provide recommendation for the establishment of region-specific critical loads for nitrogen in Jack Pine upland forests, fens and bogs. Vitt is working with collaborators at Villanova University (Pennsylvania), the Integral Ecology Group (Victoria, British Columbia), Trent University (Ontario), University of Victoria (British Columbia) and Alberta Innovates Technology Futures (Calgary, Alberta) on the $193,634 grant.

Faculty members in the Colleges of Science and Agricultural Sciences have joined forces to study the use of nanoparticles to enhance food safety and quality. Ruplal Choudhary (Plant, Soil and Agricultural Systems), Punit Kohli (Chemistry and Biochemistry), and John Haddock (Microbiology) were funded by the Binational Agricultural Research and Development Fund with a $145,000 grant to conduct a proof-of-concept study aimed at testing the use of antimicrobial and antioxidant functionalized nanoparticles for treating the surfaces of food processing equipment and packaging materials to control microbial and oxidative spoilage of food products.

NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL IMPACT

Heather Lapham in the Center for Archaeological Investigations (CAI) is working with Peabody Energy to provide technical consulting services for the curation and upgrade of collections storage of the Black Mesa Archaeological Project (BMAP) artifacts. Peabody Energy is supporting the project with a $128,000 grant, part of a long-term commitment of the company to this project. The BMAP in Arizona is one of the longestrunning archaeological projects in North America, having started in 1967. The project has produced more than a million artifacts encompassing Navajo and Hopi history. Eric Ferre in the Department of Geology, College of Science, received a grant of $56,413 from the International Ocean Discovery Program to participate in the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 352. Ferre will drill a section through the volcanic stratigraphy of the outer forearc of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana trench system to trace the processes of magmatism, tectonics and crustal accretion associated with subduction initiation. Izumi Shimada (Anthropology) received a grant of $25,000 from the National Geographic Society to study a unique precious metal workshop discovered at the Huaca Loro (Peru) temple at the Middle Sicán capital of Sicán (900-1100 CE). This preHispanic Andean site was discovered in 2008. Michael Robertson, Bryan Harrison and Lorelei Ruiz (Aviation Management and Flight in the College of Applied Sciences and Arts) will use a grant of $40,000 from Ohio State University to conduct the project titled “PEGASAS: Weather Technology in the Cockpit Program: Quantifying Causality.” The project will quantify the causality of weather-related accidents and incidents, with the ultimate goal of helping to determine the capability of cockpit weather information products to improve general aviation safety.


Summary of Grant Funding, FY 20141 (July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014)

Total funds awarded ................................................................................................................$61,671,514

Number of grant awards received........................................................................................................418

Number of agencies awarding grants.................................................................................................202

Number of faculty, staff, and students receiving grants...................................................................261

Number of grant projects active during fiscal year .........................................................................963

2

3

Grant Funding by Project Type Training - $4.93 M

Jeanne Kitchens and Elizabeth Freeburg (retired) are the lead investigators on the Layoff Aversion and Rapid Response project, funded by the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO). With a grant of nearly $500,000 from DCEO, the project will identify the actions needed to coordinate workforce resources for dislocated workers and develop the tools that will be used as part of the state’s layoff aversion strategy. The project is located in the Workforce Education and Development department of the College of Education and Human Services. The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) continues to support WSIU Public Broadcasting through its Community Service Grant program. Housed in the College of Mass Communications and Media Arts, WSIU stations serve more than 3 million people across five states through three digital television channels, three radio stations, an HD radio channel, a website, local production units, and an education and community outreach department. With $118,494 in support from the administrative office of the Illinois courts, John Erbes in the School of Law will establish the Juvenile Justice Clinic that will be available for appointment as guardian ad litem in cases of juvenile abuse, neglect and dependency in Jackson County. The clinic will be an excellent educational opportunity for SIU Law students.

SIMEC is complementary to another program of the Office of Economic and Regional Development, the Rural Microenterprise Technical Assistance Program (RMAP). The nearly $40,000 RMAP grant was provided by Southern Illinois Coal Belt Champion Community Inc. (SICBCC). RMAP, under the direction of Robyn Russell, provides technical assistance to small businesses who are applying for loans from SICBCC.

RESEARCH

We were particularly pleased that two of our faculty received a prestigious CAREER award from the National Science Foundation (NSF). Eric Chitambar from the Physics department will be studying fundamental questions in quantum information theory and classical cryptography, while Kyle Plunkett, Chemistry and Biochemistry, will be investigating new electron acceptor materials based on cyclopenta-fused polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Plunkett’s research (with a $260,000 grant) could lead to lower-cost photovoltaic devices. Chitambar’s research (funded with a $100,000 grant) has implications on information security. The U.S. Department of Agriculture is providing a grant of nearly $500,000 to Jesse Trushenski with the Center for Fisheries, Aquaculture and Aquatic Sciences to study the essential fatty acid requirements of commonly cultured fishes. Her research will lead to recommendations that will ensure proper nutrition of cultured

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.................................... $14,811,348

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services...................................... $7,880,736

Illinois Department of Children and Family Services................................ $6,180,483

Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity................ $3,234,832

Illinois State Board of Education.................................................................. $4,165,997

National Science Foundation....................................................................... $3,069,536

National Science Foundation....................................................................... $3,916,059

U.S. Department of Agriculture.................................................................... $1,310,710

Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity................ $3,660,161

Illinois Department of Natural Resources.................................................. $1,211,763

U.S. Department of Education...................................................................... $2,264,241

U.S. Department of the Interior..................................................................... $1161,762

Illinois Department of Natural Resources.................................................. $1,446,780

Howard G. Buffett Foundation......................................................................... $986,300

U.S. Department of Agriculture.................................................................... $1,374,524

U.S. Department of Defense............................................................................ $956,936

Illinois Department of Public Health............................................................ $1,240,010

Syncrude Canada............................................................................................. $922,525

Illinois Department of Transportation.......................................................... $1,166,514

Monsanto Company......................................................................................... $718,017

Federal - $28.18 M Foundation - $2.03 M

Agricultural Sciences - $4.75 M

Education & Human Services - $18.39 M

Other - $1 M

Medicine - $15.37 M

Other - $.26 M Engineering - $2.47 M Illinois Clean Coal Institute - $1.98 M Liberal Arts- $2.20 M Mass Communications Liberal Arts - $1.61 M and Media Arts - $1.3 M IL Clean Coal Institute - $1.98 M

86

$ 14,674,679

12

$ 2,355,974

37

$ 11,152,873

State of Illinois

37

$ 5,225,315

12

$ 1,522,795

31

$ 9,668,560

Industry

63

$ 5,034.498

6

$ 362,892

3

$ 69,443

Foundation

25

$ 1,801,763

7

$ 168,334

5

$ 56,600

Other

43

$ 2,409,194

18

$ 519,181

33

$ 6,649,414

Total

254

$ 29,145,449

55

$ 4,929,176

418

$ 61,671,515

Medicine includes both Carbondale and Springfield campuses. Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research includes: Advanced Coal and Energy Resource Center; Center for Fisheries, Aquaculture and Aquatic Sciences; Center for Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities; Meyers Institute for Interdisciplinary Research in Organic and Medicinal Chemistry; Materials Technology Center; Center for Ecology; Office of Sponsored Projects Administration; Neuroscience Research Center; and Cooperative Wildlife Research Laboratory.

Total Awards for Last Ten Fiscal Years5 80 70

Research Expenditures in Science & Engineering (S&E) Fields, FY 2014 from federal grants: $18,398,000

50

20

30

10

10 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

Additional grant funding data is available at ospa.siu.edu.

$

species and reduce reliance on marine resources. Continuing to build on the university’s expertise in soybean research, Jason Bond of the Department of Plant, Soil and Agricultural Systems in the College of Agricultural Sciences received a grant of $101,688 from the United Soybean Board to conduct a soybean commercial variety test. The objective of the research is to increase the value of U.S. soybean meal to the entire value chain by reducing losses to seedling diseases. The departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering (College of Engineering) and Economics (College of Liberal Arts) received an $896,629 award from the National Science Foundation for the project “Efficient Temporal-spatial Spectrum Sharing Through Voluntary Exchange,” under the direction of Xiang Zhou (Engineering) and Alison Watts (Economics). The project will study the feasibility and efficiency of different spectrum-sharing mechanisms, and the impact on users and society.

NONTRADITIONAL EDUCATION AND STUDENT SUPPORT

Two researchers at SIU Carbondale – Boyd Goodson (Chemistry and Biochemistry) and Saikat Talapatra (Physics) – will lead the latest round of funding of the university’s Research for Undergraduate (REU) projects supported by the National Science Foundation. The $105,000 grant from NSF will be used to train 10 undergraduate students each summer in the area of materials research. The university has had an REU program since 2006, through which dozens of students have benefited. With a grant of $281,374 from the U.S. Department of Education, the university will be able to continue to offer targeted support to low-income and first-generation students, and to students with disabilities. The project, led by Renada Greer in Student Support Services, is integral to the mission of SIU to be accessible to students from all social and economic backgrounds.

COLLABORATIONS

40

$ 1. Reported by date awards processed during the fiscal year. Data subject to rounding errors. 2. All fiscal data exclude Financial Aid Office Awards. The term "grants" includes contracts and cooperative agreements. 3. Some projects are funded by one-time awards that cross fiscal years. 4. All federal data include federal flow-through funding (federal funds awarded via subcontracts to the University from non-federal sources 5. Fiscal years 2011 and previous reported by date processed through that year’s processing cutoff date (date varies). Beginning FY2012, reported by date processed during the fiscal year.

50

30

20 Derived from a report for the National Science Foundation, which ranks universities based on expenditures made by each institution for research projects in a given fiscal year, rather than on research grant dollars received during that year. S&E fields include agriculture, the social sciences, and psychology, but exclude education, humanities, the arts, law, library science, and all other non-science fields. “All sources” includes institutional funds and grants.

Total Research Awards for Last Ten Fiscal Years5

40

60

from grants: $35,091,000

Engineering - $2.44 M

Service/Other

Federal

from all sources: $70,854,000

Agricultural Sciences - $4.53 M

Other: Applied Sciences & Arts, Education & Human Services.

Other: Applied Sciences & Arts, Chancellor’s Office, Law, Library Affairs, Provost, University College.

Grant Funding by Source versus Project Type4 Training

Vice Chancellor for Research - $ 3.86 M

Medicine - $10.57 M

Vice Chancellor for Research - $3.87 M Science- $5.46 M

Research

Science - $3.85 M

Chancellor’s Office- $4.89 M

Other - $9.58 M

Public Service/Other - $27.6 M

Research Grant Funding by Area

Millions

The School of Medicine, Department of Family and Community Medicine (SOM), under the direction of Janet Albers, received funding of $722,419 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for a Health Center Cluster project. Focused on the significant health needs and health disparities in the SIU/ SOM service area (low birth weight, need for prenatal care and teen pregnancy), the project will provide comprehensive primary, preventive and supplemental health care services, including access to oral and mental health services.

Industry - $5.47 M

The Southern Illinois Manufacturing Excellence Center (SIMEC) received additional funding from the Bradley University IMEC. SIMEC is one of three regional manufacturing extension centers in Illinois that provides services and support technology transfer to enhance the productivity and strengthen the global competitiveness of Illinois manufacturers. Under the direction of Kyle Harfst, Lynn Anderson Lindberg and Robyn Russell in the university’s Office of Economic and Regional Development, SIMEC receives support from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, and the Illinois Board of Higher Education.

Top Sponsors, Research Grant Funding

Grant Funding by Area

State of Illinois - $16.48 M

Research - $29.15 M

ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND OUTREACH

Top Sponsors, All Grant Funding

Grant Funding by Source

Millions

Continued Excellence In Scholarship And Creativity

Scholarship and creativity take many forms at SIU Carbondale. While traditional research often grabs the headlines, the university is involved in many initiatives that transcend basic research and have a significant impact on improving the quality of life in Southern Illinois, the state, the nation and even internationally. What follows are but a few examples of the breadth of our faculty’s contributions to scholarship, training, creativity and research in 2014.

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

The Cumulative Environmental Management Association is supporting the work of Dale Vitt, with the Department of Plant Biology in the College of Science, with his project titled “Nitrogen Addition Experiments in Boreal Ecosystems: Understanding the Fate of Atmospherically Deposited Nitrogen in order to Determine Critical Loads.” Through his research, Vitt will be able to provide recommendation for the establishment of region-specific critical loads for nitrogen in Jack Pine upland forests, fens and bogs. Vitt is working with collaborators at Villanova University (Pennsylvania), the Integral Ecology Group (Victoria, British Columbia), Trent University (Ontario), University of Victoria (British Columbia) and Alberta Innovates Technology Futures (Calgary, Alberta) on the $193,634 grant.

Faculty members in the Colleges of Science and Agricultural Sciences have joined forces to study the use of nanoparticles to enhance food safety and quality. Ruplal Choudhary (Plant, Soil and Agricultural Systems), Punit Kohli (Chemistry and Biochemistry), and John Haddock (Microbiology) were funded by the Binational Agricultural Research and Development Fund with a $145,000 grant to conduct a proof-of-concept study aimed at testing the use of antimicrobial and antioxidant functionalized nanoparticles for treating the surfaces of food processing equipment and packaging materials to control microbial and oxidative spoilage of food products.

NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL IMPACT

Heather Lapham in the Center for Archaeological Investigations (CAI) is working with Peabody Energy to provide technical consulting services for the curation and upgrade of collections storage of the Black Mesa Archaeological Project (BMAP) artifacts. Peabody Energy is supporting the project with a $128,000 grant, part of a long-term commitment of the company to this project. The BMAP in Arizona is one of the longestrunning archaeological projects in North America, having started in 1967. The project has produced more than a million artifacts encompassing Navajo and Hopi history. Eric Ferre in the Department of Geology, College of Science, received a grant of $56,413 from the International Ocean Discovery Program to participate in the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 352. Ferre will drill a section through the volcanic stratigraphy of the outer forearc of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana trench system to trace the processes of magmatism, tectonics and crustal accretion associated with subduction initiation. Izumi Shimada (Anthropology) received a grant of $25,000 from the National Geographic Society to study a unique precious metal workshop discovered at the Huaca Loro (Peru) temple at the Middle Sicán capital of Sicán (900-1100 CE). This preHispanic Andean site was discovered in 2008. Michael Robertson, Bryan Harrison and Lorelei Ruiz (Aviation Management and Flight in the College of Applied Sciences and Arts) will use a grant of $40,000 from Ohio State University to conduct the project titled “PEGASAS: Weather Technology in the Cockpit Program: Quantifying Causality.” The project will quantify the causality of weather-related accidents and incidents, with the ultimate goal of helping to determine the capability of cockpit weather information products to improve general aviation safety.


Summary of Grant Funding, FY 20141 (July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014)

Total funds awarded ................................................................................................................$61,671,514

Number of grant awards received........................................................................................................418

Number of agencies awarding grants.................................................................................................202

Number of faculty, staff, and students receiving grants...................................................................261

Number of grant projects active during fiscal year .........................................................................963

2

3

Grant Funding by Project Type Training - $4.93 M

Jeanne Kitchens and Elizabeth Freeburg (retired) are the lead investigators on the Layoff Aversion and Rapid Response project, funded by the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO). With a grant of nearly $500,000 from DCEO, the project will identify the actions needed to coordinate workforce resources for dislocated workers and develop the tools that will be used as part of the state’s layoff aversion strategy. The project is located in the Workforce Education and Development department of the College of Education and Human Services. The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) continues to support WSIU Public Broadcasting through its Community Service Grant program. Housed in the College of Mass Communications and Media Arts, WSIU stations serve more than 3 million people across five states through three digital television channels, three radio stations, an HD radio channel, a website, local production units, and an education and community outreach department. With $118,494 in support from the administrative office of the Illinois courts, John Erbes in the School of Law will establish the Juvenile Justice Clinic that will be available for appointment as guardian ad litem in cases of juvenile abuse, neglect and dependency in Jackson County. The clinic will be an excellent educational opportunity for SIU Law students.

SIMEC is complementary to another program of the Office of Economic and Regional Development, the Rural Microenterprise Technical Assistance Program (RMAP). The nearly $40,000 RMAP grant was provided by Southern Illinois Coal Belt Champion Community Inc. (SICBCC). RMAP, under the direction of Robyn Russell, provides technical assistance to small businesses who are applying for loans from SICBCC.

RESEARCH

We were particularly pleased that two of our faculty received a prestigious CAREER award from the National Science Foundation (NSF). Eric Chitambar from the Physics department will be studying fundamental questions in quantum information theory and classical cryptography, while Kyle Plunkett, Chemistry and Biochemistry, will be investigating new electron acceptor materials based on cyclopenta-fused polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Plunkett’s research (with a $260,000 grant) could lead to lower-cost photovoltaic devices. Chitambar’s research (funded with a $100,000 grant) has implications on information security. The U.S. Department of Agriculture is providing a grant of nearly $500,000 to Jesse Trushenski with the Center for Fisheries, Aquaculture and Aquatic Sciences to study the essential fatty acid requirements of commonly cultured fishes. Her research will lead to recommendations that will ensure proper nutrition of cultured

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.................................... $14,811,348

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services...................................... $7,880,736

Illinois Department of Children and Family Services................................ $6,180,483

Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity................ $3,234,832

Illinois State Board of Education.................................................................. $4,165,997

National Science Foundation....................................................................... $3,069,536

National Science Foundation....................................................................... $3,916,059

U.S. Department of Agriculture.................................................................... $1,310,710

Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity................ $3,660,161

Illinois Department of Natural Resources.................................................. $1,211,763

U.S. Department of Education...................................................................... $2,264,241

U.S. Department of the Interior..................................................................... $1161,762

Illinois Department of Natural Resources.................................................. $1,446,780

Howard G. Buffett Foundation......................................................................... $986,300

U.S. Department of Agriculture.................................................................... $1,374,524

U.S. Department of Defense............................................................................ $956,936

Illinois Department of Public Health............................................................ $1,240,010

Syncrude Canada............................................................................................. $922,525

Illinois Department of Transportation.......................................................... $1,166,514

Monsanto Company......................................................................................... $718,017

Federal - $28.18 M Foundation - $2.03 M

Agricultural Sciences - $4.75 M

Education & Human Services - $18.39 M

Other - $1 M

Medicine - $15.37 M

Other - $.26 M Engineering - $2.47 M Illinois Clean Coal Institute - $1.98 M Liberal Arts- $2.20 M Mass Communications Liberal Arts - $1.61 M and Media Arts - $1.3 M IL Clean Coal Institute - $1.98 M

86

$ 14,674,679

12

$ 2,355,974

37

$ 11,152,873

State of Illinois

37

$ 5,225,315

12

$ 1,522,795

31

$ 9,668,560

Industry

63

$ 5,034.498

6

$ 362,892

3

$ 69,443

Foundation

25

$ 1,801,763

7

$ 168,334

5

$ 56,600

Other

43

$ 2,409,194

18

$ 519,181

33

$ 6,649,414

Total

254

$ 29,145,449

55

$ 4,929,176

418

$ 61,671,515

Medicine includes both Carbondale and Springfield campuses. Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research includes: Advanced Coal and Energy Resource Center; Center for Fisheries, Aquaculture and Aquatic Sciences; Center for Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities; Meyers Institute for Interdisciplinary Research in Organic and Medicinal Chemistry; Materials Technology Center; Center for Ecology; Office of Sponsored Projects Administration; Neuroscience Research Center; and Cooperative Wildlife Research Laboratory.

Total Awards for Last Ten Fiscal Years5 80 70

Research Expenditures in Science & Engineering (S&E) Fields, FY 2014 from federal grants: $18,398,000

50

20

30

10

10 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

Additional grant funding data is available at ospa.siu.edu.

$

species and reduce reliance on marine resources. Continuing to build on the university’s expertise in soybean research, Jason Bond of the Department of Plant, Soil and Agricultural Systems in the College of Agricultural Sciences received a grant of $101,688 from the United Soybean Board to conduct a soybean commercial variety test. The objective of the research is to increase the value of U.S. soybean meal to the entire value chain by reducing losses to seedling diseases. The departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering (College of Engineering) and Economics (College of Liberal Arts) received an $896,629 award from the National Science Foundation for the project “Efficient Temporal-spatial Spectrum Sharing Through Voluntary Exchange,” under the direction of Xiang Zhou (Engineering) and Alison Watts (Economics). The project will study the feasibility and efficiency of different spectrum-sharing mechanisms, and the impact on users and society.

NONTRADITIONAL EDUCATION AND STUDENT SUPPORT

Two researchers at SIU Carbondale – Boyd Goodson (Chemistry and Biochemistry) and Saikat Talapatra (Physics) – will lead the latest round of funding of the university’s Research for Undergraduate (REU) projects supported by the National Science Foundation. The $105,000 grant from NSF will be used to train 10 undergraduate students each summer in the area of materials research. The university has had an REU program since 2006, through which dozens of students have benefited. With a grant of $281,374 from the U.S. Department of Education, the university will be able to continue to offer targeted support to low-income and first-generation students, and to students with disabilities. The project, led by Renada Greer in Student Support Services, is integral to the mission of SIU to be accessible to students from all social and economic backgrounds.

COLLABORATIONS

40

$ 1. Reported by date awards processed during the fiscal year. Data subject to rounding errors. 2. All fiscal data exclude Financial Aid Office Awards. The term "grants" includes contracts and cooperative agreements. 3. Some projects are funded by one-time awards that cross fiscal years. 4. All federal data include federal flow-through funding (federal funds awarded via subcontracts to the University from non-federal sources 5. Fiscal years 2011 and previous reported by date processed through that year’s processing cutoff date (date varies). Beginning FY2012, reported by date processed during the fiscal year.

50

30

20 Derived from a report for the National Science Foundation, which ranks universities based on expenditures made by each institution for research projects in a given fiscal year, rather than on research grant dollars received during that year. S&E fields include agriculture, the social sciences, and psychology, but exclude education, humanities, the arts, law, library science, and all other non-science fields. “All sources” includes institutional funds and grants.

Total Research Awards for Last Ten Fiscal Years5

40

60

from grants: $35,091,000

Engineering - $2.44 M

Service/Other

Federal

from all sources: $70,854,000

Agricultural Sciences - $4.53 M

Other: Applied Sciences & Arts, Education & Human Services.

Other: Applied Sciences & Arts, Chancellor’s Office, Law, Library Affairs, Provost, University College.

Grant Funding by Source versus Project Type4 Training

Vice Chancellor for Research - $ 3.86 M

Medicine - $10.57 M

Vice Chancellor for Research - $3.87 M Science- $5.46 M

Research

Science - $3.85 M

Chancellor’s Office- $4.89 M

Other - $9.58 M

Public Service/Other - $27.6 M

Research Grant Funding by Area

Millions

The School of Medicine, Department of Family and Community Medicine (SOM), under the direction of Janet Albers, received funding of $722,419 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for a Health Center Cluster project. Focused on the significant health needs and health disparities in the SIU/ SOM service area (low birth weight, need for prenatal care and teen pregnancy), the project will provide comprehensive primary, preventive and supplemental health care services, including access to oral and mental health services.

Industry - $5.47 M

The Southern Illinois Manufacturing Excellence Center (SIMEC) received additional funding from the Bradley University IMEC. SIMEC is one of three regional manufacturing extension centers in Illinois that provides services and support technology transfer to enhance the productivity and strengthen the global competitiveness of Illinois manufacturers. Under the direction of Kyle Harfst, Lynn Anderson Lindberg and Robyn Russell in the university’s Office of Economic and Regional Development, SIMEC receives support from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, and the Illinois Board of Higher Education.

Top Sponsors, Research Grant Funding

Grant Funding by Area

State of Illinois - $16.48 M

Research - $29.15 M

ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND OUTREACH

Top Sponsors, All Grant Funding

Grant Funding by Source

Millions

Continued Excellence In Scholarship And Creativity

Scholarship and creativity take many forms at SIU Carbondale. While traditional research often grabs the headlines, the university is involved in many initiatives that transcend basic research and have a significant impact on improving the quality of life in Southern Illinois, the state, the nation and even internationally. What follows are but a few examples of the breadth of our faculty’s contributions to scholarship, training, creativity and research in 2014.

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

The Cumulative Environmental Management Association is supporting the work of Dale Vitt, with the Department of Plant Biology in the College of Science, with his project titled “Nitrogen Addition Experiments in Boreal Ecosystems: Understanding the Fate of Atmospherically Deposited Nitrogen in order to Determine Critical Loads.” Through his research, Vitt will be able to provide recommendation for the establishment of region-specific critical loads for nitrogen in Jack Pine upland forests, fens and bogs. Vitt is working with collaborators at Villanova University (Pennsylvania), the Integral Ecology Group (Victoria, British Columbia), Trent University (Ontario), University of Victoria (British Columbia) and Alberta Innovates Technology Futures (Calgary, Alberta) on the $193,634 grant.

Faculty members in the Colleges of Science and Agricultural Sciences have joined forces to study the use of nanoparticles to enhance food safety and quality. Ruplal Choudhary (Plant, Soil and Agricultural Systems), Punit Kohli (Chemistry and Biochemistry), and John Haddock (Microbiology) were funded by the Binational Agricultural Research and Development Fund with a $145,000 grant to conduct a proof-of-concept study aimed at testing the use of antimicrobial and antioxidant functionalized nanoparticles for treating the surfaces of food processing equipment and packaging materials to control microbial and oxidative spoilage of food products.

NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL IMPACT

Heather Lapham in the Center for Archaeological Investigations (CAI) is working with Peabody Energy to provide technical consulting services for the curation and upgrade of collections storage of the Black Mesa Archaeological Project (BMAP) artifacts. Peabody Energy is supporting the project with a $128,000 grant, part of a long-term commitment of the company to this project. The BMAP in Arizona is one of the longestrunning archaeological projects in North America, having started in 1967. The project has produced more than a million artifacts encompassing Navajo and Hopi history. Eric Ferre in the Department of Geology, College of Science, received a grant of $56,413 from the International Ocean Discovery Program to participate in the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 352. Ferre will drill a section through the volcanic stratigraphy of the outer forearc of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana trench system to trace the processes of magmatism, tectonics and crustal accretion associated with subduction initiation. Izumi Shimada (Anthropology) received a grant of $25,000 from the National Geographic Society to study a unique precious metal workshop discovered at the Huaca Loro (Peru) temple at the Middle Sicán capital of Sicán (900-1100 CE). This preHispanic Andean site was discovered in 2008. Michael Robertson, Bryan Harrison and Lorelei Ruiz (Aviation Management and Flight in the College of Applied Sciences and Arts) will use a grant of $40,000 from Ohio State University to conduct the project titled “PEGASAS: Weather Technology in the Cockpit Program: Quantifying Causality.” The project will quantify the causality of weather-related accidents and incidents, with the ultimate goal of helping to determine the capability of cockpit weather information products to improve general aviation safety.


Summary of Grant Funding, FY 20141 (July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014)

Total funds awarded ................................................................................................................$61,671,514

Number of grant awards received........................................................................................................418

Number of agencies awarding grants.................................................................................................202

Number of faculty, staff, and students receiving grants...................................................................261

Number of grant projects active during fiscal year .........................................................................963

2

3

Grant Funding by Project Type Training - $4.93 M

Jeanne Kitchens and Elizabeth Freeburg (retired) are the lead investigators on the Layoff Aversion and Rapid Response project, funded by the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO). With a grant of nearly $500,000 from DCEO, the project will identify the actions needed to coordinate workforce resources for dislocated workers and develop the tools that will be used as part of the state’s layoff aversion strategy. The project is located in the Workforce Education and Development department of the College of Education and Human Services. The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) continues to support WSIU Public Broadcasting through its Community Service Grant program. Housed in the College of Mass Communications and Media Arts, WSIU stations serve more than 3 million people across five states through three digital television channels, three radio stations, an HD radio channel, a website, local production units, and an education and community outreach department. With $118,494 in support from the administrative office of the Illinois courts, John Erbes in the School of Law will establish the Juvenile Justice Clinic that will be available for appointment as guardian ad litem in cases of juvenile abuse, neglect and dependency in Jackson County. The clinic will be an excellent educational opportunity for SIU Law students.

SIMEC is complementary to another program of the Office of Economic and Regional Development, the Rural Microenterprise Technical Assistance Program (RMAP). The nearly $40,000 RMAP grant was provided by Southern Illinois Coal Belt Champion Community Inc. (SICBCC). RMAP, under the direction of Robyn Russell, provides technical assistance to small businesses who are applying for loans from SICBCC.

RESEARCH

We were particularly pleased that two of our faculty received a prestigious CAREER award from the National Science Foundation (NSF). Eric Chitambar from the Physics department will be studying fundamental questions in quantum information theory and classical cryptography, while Kyle Plunkett, Chemistry and Biochemistry, will be investigating new electron acceptor materials based on cyclopenta-fused polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Plunkett’s research (with a $260,000 grant) could lead to lower-cost photovoltaic devices. Chitambar’s research (funded with a $100,000 grant) has implications on information security. The U.S. Department of Agriculture is providing a grant of nearly $500,000 to Jesse Trushenski with the Center for Fisheries, Aquaculture and Aquatic Sciences to study the essential fatty acid requirements of commonly cultured fishes. Her research will lead to recommendations that will ensure proper nutrition of cultured

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.................................... $14,811,348

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services...................................... $7,880,736

Illinois Department of Children and Family Services................................ $6,180,483

Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity................ $3,234,832

Illinois State Board of Education.................................................................. $4,165,997

National Science Foundation....................................................................... $3,069,536

National Science Foundation....................................................................... $3,916,059

U.S. Department of Agriculture.................................................................... $1,310,710

Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity................ $3,660,161

Illinois Department of Natural Resources.................................................. $1,211,763

U.S. Department of Education...................................................................... $2,264,241

U.S. Department of the Interior..................................................................... $1161,762

Illinois Department of Natural Resources.................................................. $1,446,780

Howard G. Buffett Foundation......................................................................... $986,300

U.S. Department of Agriculture.................................................................... $1,374,524

U.S. Department of Defense............................................................................ $956,936

Illinois Department of Public Health............................................................ $1,240,010

Syncrude Canada............................................................................................. $922,525

Illinois Department of Transportation.......................................................... $1,166,514

Monsanto Company......................................................................................... $718,017

Federal - $28.18 M Foundation - $2.03 M

Agricultural Sciences - $4.75 M

Education & Human Services - $18.39 M

Other - $1 M

Medicine - $15.37 M

Other - $.26 M Engineering - $2.47 M Illinois Clean Coal Institute - $1.98 M Liberal Arts- $2.20 M Mass Communications Liberal Arts - $1.61 M and Media Arts - $1.3 M IL Clean Coal Institute - $1.98 M

86

$ 14,674,679

12

$ 2,355,974

37

$ 11,152,873

State of Illinois

37

$ 5,225,315

12

$ 1,522,795

31

$ 9,668,560

Industry

63

$ 5,034.498

6

$ 362,892

3

$ 69,443

Foundation

25

$ 1,801,763

7

$ 168,334

5

$ 56,600

Other

43

$ 2,409,194

18

$ 519,181

33

$ 6,649,414

Total

254

$ 29,145,449

55

$ 4,929,176

418

$ 61,671,515

Medicine includes both Carbondale and Springfield campuses. Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research includes: Advanced Coal and Energy Resource Center; Center for Fisheries, Aquaculture and Aquatic Sciences; Center for Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities; Meyers Institute for Interdisciplinary Research in Organic and Medicinal Chemistry; Materials Technology Center; Center for Ecology; Office of Sponsored Projects Administration; Neuroscience Research Center; and Cooperative Wildlife Research Laboratory.

Total Awards for Last Ten Fiscal Years5 80 70

Research Expenditures in Science & Engineering (S&E) Fields, FY 2014 from federal grants: $18,398,000

50

20

30

10

10 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

Additional grant funding data is available at ospa.siu.edu.

$

species and reduce reliance on marine resources. Continuing to build on the university’s expertise in soybean research, Jason Bond of the Department of Plant, Soil and Agricultural Systems in the College of Agricultural Sciences received a grant of $101,688 from the United Soybean Board to conduct a soybean commercial variety test. The objective of the research is to increase the value of U.S. soybean meal to the entire value chain by reducing losses to seedling diseases. The departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering (College of Engineering) and Economics (College of Liberal Arts) received an $896,629 award from the National Science Foundation for the project “Efficient Temporal-spatial Spectrum Sharing Through Voluntary Exchange,” under the direction of Xiang Zhou (Engineering) and Alison Watts (Economics). The project will study the feasibility and efficiency of different spectrum-sharing mechanisms, and the impact on users and society.

NONTRADITIONAL EDUCATION AND STUDENT SUPPORT

Two researchers at SIU Carbondale – Boyd Goodson (Chemistry and Biochemistry) and Saikat Talapatra (Physics) – will lead the latest round of funding of the university’s Research for Undergraduate (REU) projects supported by the National Science Foundation. The $105,000 grant from NSF will be used to train 10 undergraduate students each summer in the area of materials research. The university has had an REU program since 2006, through which dozens of students have benefited. With a grant of $281,374 from the U.S. Department of Education, the university will be able to continue to offer targeted support to low-income and first-generation students, and to students with disabilities. The project, led by Renada Greer in Student Support Services, is integral to the mission of SIU to be accessible to students from all social and economic backgrounds.

COLLABORATIONS

40

$ 1. Reported by date awards processed during the fiscal year. Data subject to rounding errors. 2. All fiscal data exclude Financial Aid Office Awards. The term "grants" includes contracts and cooperative agreements. 3. Some projects are funded by one-time awards that cross fiscal years. 4. All federal data include federal flow-through funding (federal funds awarded via subcontracts to the University from non-federal sources 5. Fiscal years 2011 and previous reported by date processed through that year’s processing cutoff date (date varies). Beginning FY2012, reported by date processed during the fiscal year.

50

30

20 Derived from a report for the National Science Foundation, which ranks universities based on expenditures made by each institution for research projects in a given fiscal year, rather than on research grant dollars received during that year. S&E fields include agriculture, the social sciences, and psychology, but exclude education, humanities, the arts, law, library science, and all other non-science fields. “All sources” includes institutional funds and grants.

Total Research Awards for Last Ten Fiscal Years5

40

60

from grants: $35,091,000

Engineering - $2.44 M

Service/Other

Federal

from all sources: $70,854,000

Agricultural Sciences - $4.53 M

Other: Applied Sciences & Arts, Education & Human Services.

Other: Applied Sciences & Arts, Chancellor’s Office, Law, Library Affairs, Provost, University College.

Grant Funding by Source versus Project Type4 Training

Vice Chancellor for Research - $ 3.86 M

Medicine - $10.57 M

Vice Chancellor for Research - $3.87 M Science- $5.46 M

Research

Science - $3.85 M

Chancellor’s Office- $4.89 M

Other - $9.58 M

Public Service/Other - $27.6 M

Research Grant Funding by Area

Millions

The School of Medicine, Department of Family and Community Medicine (SOM), under the direction of Janet Albers, received funding of $722,419 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for a Health Center Cluster project. Focused on the significant health needs and health disparities in the SIU/ SOM service area (low birth weight, need for prenatal care and teen pregnancy), the project will provide comprehensive primary, preventive and supplemental health care services, including access to oral and mental health services.

Industry - $5.47 M

The Southern Illinois Manufacturing Excellence Center (SIMEC) received additional funding from the Bradley University IMEC. SIMEC is one of three regional manufacturing extension centers in Illinois that provides services and support technology transfer to enhance the productivity and strengthen the global competitiveness of Illinois manufacturers. Under the direction of Kyle Harfst, Lynn Anderson Lindberg and Robyn Russell in the university’s Office of Economic and Regional Development, SIMEC receives support from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, and the Illinois Board of Higher Education.

Top Sponsors, Research Grant Funding

Grant Funding by Area

State of Illinois - $16.48 M

Research - $29.15 M

ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND OUTREACH

Top Sponsors, All Grant Funding

Grant Funding by Source

Millions

Continued Excellence In Scholarship And Creativity

Scholarship and creativity take many forms at SIU Carbondale. While traditional research often grabs the headlines, the university is involved in many initiatives that transcend basic research and have a significant impact on improving the quality of life in Southern Illinois, the state, the nation and even internationally. What follows are but a few examples of the breadth of our faculty’s contributions to scholarship, training, creativity and research in 2014.

2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

The Cumulative Environmental Management Association is supporting the work of Dale Vitt, with the Department of Plant Biology in the College of Science, with his project titled “Nitrogen Addition Experiments in Boreal Ecosystems: Understanding the Fate of Atmospherically Deposited Nitrogen in order to Determine Critical Loads.” Through his research, Vitt will be able to provide recommendation for the establishment of region-specific critical loads for nitrogen in Jack Pine upland forests, fens and bogs. Vitt is working with collaborators at Villanova University (Pennsylvania), the Integral Ecology Group (Victoria, British Columbia), Trent University (Ontario), University of Victoria (British Columbia) and Alberta Innovates Technology Futures (Calgary, Alberta) on the $193,634 grant.

Faculty members in the Colleges of Science and Agricultural Sciences have joined forces to study the use of nanoparticles to enhance food safety and quality. Ruplal Choudhary (Plant, Soil and Agricultural Systems), Punit Kohli (Chemistry and Biochemistry), and John Haddock (Microbiology) were funded by the Binational Agricultural Research and Development Fund with a $145,000 grant to conduct a proof-of-concept study aimed at testing the use of antimicrobial and antioxidant functionalized nanoparticles for treating the surfaces of food processing equipment and packaging materials to control microbial and oxidative spoilage of food products.

NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL IMPACT

Heather Lapham in the Center for Archaeological Investigations (CAI) is working with Peabody Energy to provide technical consulting services for the curation and upgrade of collections storage of the Black Mesa Archaeological Project (BMAP) artifacts. Peabody Energy is supporting the project with a $128,000 grant, part of a long-term commitment of the company to this project. The BMAP in Arizona is one of the longestrunning archaeological projects in North America, having started in 1967. The project has produced more than a million artifacts encompassing Navajo and Hopi history. Eric Ferre in the Department of Geology, College of Science, received a grant of $56,413 from the International Ocean Discovery Program to participate in the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 352. Ferre will drill a section through the volcanic stratigraphy of the outer forearc of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana trench system to trace the processes of magmatism, tectonics and crustal accretion associated with subduction initiation. Izumi Shimada (Anthropology) received a grant of $25,000 from the National Geographic Society to study a unique precious metal workshop discovered at the Huaca Loro (Peru) temple at the Middle Sicán capital of Sicán (900-1100 CE). This preHispanic Andean site was discovered in 2008. Michael Robertson, Bryan Harrison and Lorelei Ruiz (Aviation Management and Flight in the College of Applied Sciences and Arts) will use a grant of $40,000 from Ohio State University to conduct the project titled “PEGASAS: Weather Technology in the Cockpit Program: Quantifying Causality.” The project will quantify the causality of weather-related accidents and incidents, with the ultimate goal of helping to determine the capability of cockpit weather information products to improve general aviation safety.


TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER ACTIVITIES The researchers and scientists at SIU continue to develop novel innovations and technologies that strengthen SIU’s longstanding history of productive basic and applied research. This activity helps foster and nurture relationships with industry partners that create opportunities for new product development, student jobs and revenue for the university. SUCCESS - BY THE NUMBERS

Historical Achievements In the 15 years starting with FY 2000, SIU Carbondale and SIU School of Medicine have collectively processed 324 invention disclosures, filed 177 U.S. patent applications and received 62 issued U.S. patents. During this time period, 67 licenses/options have been executed and more than $6.7 million in licensing revenue has been received. In FY2013 and FY2014 Invention disclosures: 43 U.S. patent applications filed: 29 U.S. patents issued: 9 Licenses/options executed: 3 Licensing revenue: $1,420,524

SUPPORTING TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION

Concept Development Award The School of Medicine continues to operate its proof-of-concept fund, the Concept Development Award. To date, 22 projects have been funded, totaling slightly more than $224,000. These awards have resulted in several journal publications, one active technology license and more than $4.9 million in subsequent external grant funding. Technology Innovation Expos The fourth annual expo took place Oct. 19, 2012. The event featured technology presentations and the first Saluki Idea Competition for students. Inventor of the Year was Kathleen Campbell, School of Medicine, Department of Surgery. Innovator of the Year was Lichang Wang, College of Science, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Startup of the Year was Thermaquatica Inc. Student Startup of the Year was Rovertown.com. The fifth annual expo took place Oct. 25, 2013. The event featured technology presentations and the second Saluki Idea Competition for students. Inventor of the Year was David Lightfoot, College of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Plant, Soil and Agricultural Systems. Innovator of the Year was Peter Fadde, College of Education and Human Services, Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Startup of the Year was Minerals Development Technologies Inc. Student Startup of the Year was Orderbolt Inc.

RECENT PATENTS ISSUED

U.S. Patent #8,383,887 “Methods of Using Plants Containing the gdhA Gene.” Issued Feb. 26, 2013, to Ahmad Fakhoury and David Lightfoot, College of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Plant, Soil and Agricultural Systems. U.S. Patent #8,435,396 “Method of Detecting Analyte-Biomolecule Interactions.” Issued May 7, 2013, to Luke Tolley and Matt McCarroll, College of Science, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. U.S. Patent #8,443,647 “Analyte Multi-Sensor for the Detection and Identification of Analyte and a Method of Using the Same.” Issued May 21, 2013, to Andrei Kolmakov (former faculty) and Victor Sysoev (former visiting scholar). U.S. Patent #8,506,881 “Intermetallic Bonded Diamond Composite Composition and Methods of Forming Articles from Same.” Issued Aug. 13, 2013, to Dale Wittmer (retired faculty) and Peter Filip, College of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Energy Processes. U.S. Patent #8,551,720 “Methods for Diagnosing Bowel Disease.” Issued Oct. 18, 2013, to Deliang Cao, School of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology. U.S. Patent #8,563,791 “Process for the Dissolution of Coal, Biomass and Other Organic Solids in Superheated Water.” Issued Oct. 22, 2013, to Ken Anderson, John Crelling and William Huggett, College of Science, Department of Geology. U.S. Patent #8,632,133 “Water Sprays for Dust Control on Mining Machines.” Issued Jan. 21, 2014, to Y. Paul Chugh, College of Engineering, Department of Mining and Mineral Resources Engineering. U.S. Patent #8,648,114 “Use of Transplantation to Prevent Hearing Loss.” Issued Feb. 11, 2014, to Vickram Ramkumar, School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, and Debashree Mukherjea and Len Rybak, School of Medicine, Department of Surgery.

Research Centers and Institutes Advanced Coal and Energy Research Center Applied Research Consultants Center for Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Center for Archaeological Investigations Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders Center for Dewey Studies Center for Ecology Center for Embedded Systems Center for Fisheries, Aquaculture, and Aquatic Sciences Center for Health Law and Policy Center for Rural Health and Social Service Development Center for Workforce Development Cooperative Wildlife Research Laboratory Global Media Research Center Illinois Soybean Center Materials Technology Center Meyers Institute for Interdisciplinary Research in Organic and Medicinal Chemistry Middle Mississippi River Wetland Research Field Station Neuroscience Research Center Paul Simon Public Policy Institute Safety Center Simmons Cancer Institute at Southern Illinois University Special Collections Research Center Statistical Consulting Unit

acerc.siu.edu arc.siu.edu siumed.edu/alz cai.siu.edu casd.siu.edu deweycenter.siu.edu/ ecology.siu.edu engr.siu.edu/ces/ fisheries.siu.edu law.siu.edu/academics/center-programs/health-law-policy/ crhssd.siu.edu cwd.siu.edu wildlife.siu.edu mcma.siu.edu/research-creative/gmrc/ coas.siu.edu/research/illinois-soybean-center mtc.siu.edu chem.siu.edu/research/meyers-institute ecology.siu.edu/field-station siumed.edu/circns paulsimoninstitute.siu.edu ehs.siu.edu/her/safety.php siumed.edu/cancer lib.siu.edu/scrc ehs.siu.edu/epse/graduate/ems/statlab.php

To learn more about SIU research, visit siu.edu/research, or contact: James E. Garvey • (618) 453-4551 • jgarvey@siu.edu

Interim Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Dean

Wayne Glass • (618) 453-4520 • wglass@siu.edu Director, Office of Sponsored Projects Administration

R esearch P r o f i l e

2 0 1 4 Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY CARBONDALE

Southern Illinois University is a major research school nestled in a scenic part of the state, with rivers, parks, ample wildlife and all the amenities of a large city. We are recognized by the Carnegie Foundation as a “high research” institution, including us among the top 5 percent of about 4,000 universities in the nation for scholarly output. The Carnegie Foundation also recently categorized us as a “community engaged” university, joining us with 361 other schools contributing substantially to their homes. SIU conducts research that matters regionally and nationally, keeping us true to our roots as a university with the heart of a small college plus the brains of a major, internationally recognized research school. We are serious about incorporating research and scholarly creative activity into all levels of campus life. Our graduate school, and our Center for Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities, are dedicated to pairing our students with worldclass researchers, artists and other scholars on SIU’s campus. Our faculty members are accessible and dedicated to achieving success beyond the lecture hall, providing our students with real-world experiences that translate to critical thinking skills and competitive career opportunities. Our research productivity is high, even given the reduced availability of state and national research funding and greater competition among our peers. In 2014, SIU Carbondale had nearly $71 million in research expenditures in science and engineering fields. Our faculty members are leaders in their fields, receiving competitive awards from agencies such as the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. We pursue partnerships with industry and use these to develop technology, industry and economic activity in our region. Someday Southern Illinois may well become the Silicon Valley of the Midwest, with SIU at the lead. Many new initiatives have been implemented to enhance research and creative activity at SIU. A 60,000-squarefoot collaborative research space is in the initial stages of construction that will house diverse, interdisciplinary faculty and students from fields such as chemistry, biology, engineering, computing, design, communications and agriculture. Key

U.S. Patent #8,685,666 “ARL-1 Specific Antibodies and Uses Thereof.” Issued April 1, 2014, to Deliang Cao, School of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology. Published by the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Dean. For copies, contact the Office of Sponsored Projects Administration at (618) 453-4540 or ospa@siu.edu. Produced by University Communications at SIU Carbondale. Designer: Nathan Krummel. Photos University Communications and ShutterStock. Printed by the authority of the State of Illinois, 02/2015

occupants will include the Fermentation Institute, the Saluki Aquarium, the SIU Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, and a multiuser Maker Space. A collaborative, internal grant program facilitates interactions among faculty on campus in all disciplines. And our research centers continue to foster participation in university initiatives such as energy engineering, neurological science, ecology, and fisheries and wildlife. SIU recently increased network capacity, computing storage and computational power for researchers on campus. We take our role as a comprehensive university seriously. Our arts and humanities faculty are leaders in their disciplines, producing books, exhibits, musical scores, plays, documentaries and many other kinds of creative works that draw worldwide attention. Our medical researchers are developing novel therapies that can be applied by clinicians at our medical school. Our chemists and engineers are interacting to create the next generation of materials that improve our lives and the technology we use. Our students have access to all of these experiences, leading to an enriching and stimulating learning environment at SIU. Like most universities nationwide, SIU experienced a sharp decline in research awards after 2012 that was caused by the elimination of federal stimulus funding. In 2014, our research funding began showing signs of recovering, which will continue as new faculty members join our ranks and adapt to the changing external research environment. Our eight colleges and School of Medicine have active grants and contracts for research. More than 250 grants were awarded in 2014, with the College of Education and Human Services and School of Medicine leading the way. Much of this activity translates to commercial licenses, patents, software and even popular books, all which stimulate economic activity in the region. The SIU Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research is committed to supporting all of our scholars, allowing them to achieve their highest potential – and to share their successes with local stakeholders and colleagues around the world. It is our goal to eliminate boundaries, facilitate collaboration and ensure that SIU is a destination for discovery in a nurturing environment. James E. Garvey Interim Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Dean

SIU Carbondale Research Profile 2014  

Southern Illinois University is a major research school nestled in a scenic part of the state, with rivers, parks, ample wildlife and all th...

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