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A North American Baptist Seminary

2100 S. Summit Ave. I Sioux Falls, SD 57105

Sioux Falls, SD I Omaha, NE I Online 800.440.6227 or 605.336.6588 info@sfseminary.edu

2014 I Issue 2

www.sfseminary.edu www.sfseminary.edu/omaha #SFSeminaryImpact

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Have you ever wondered why you were called to serve with God and if you are worthy to be a member of his team? John 15:16 reads: “You did not choose me, but I chose you. And I appointed you to go and bear fruit, fruit that will last, so that the Father will give you whatever you ask him in my name.” For a lot of us, the call of God came sneaking into our lives like a surprise spiritual ice bucket and just about as welcome. I’ve heard many stories over the years. Some people talk about avoiding their calls for ten, fifteen, or thirty years. I put it off for a decade myself. I knew I was called from the time I was fifteen years old. But I’d never met a preacher I really liked, so it took me a long time to realize that pastoral ministry actually was the best way to do what I really wanted—help people learn how to live well. Just as it was for the disciples Jesus spoke with that night in the upper room, it was for me and it may also be for you. We didn’t really choose this. Jesus chose us. It is natural, of course, to wonder what in the world Jesus must have been thinking. I’m guessing that’s what people wondered about that first bunch of disciples too. We can almost hear their questions as if they were our own. “What, who me, Jesus? I hate getting up in front of people! I couldn’t be a counselor! I’d never get it right! I can’t be anybody’s pastor. I’m too much of a mess myself!” Yet with all of our doubts, sins, Sioux Falls Seminary impact

Sioux Falls Seminary

facebook.com/SiouxFallsSeminary

By Ron Sisk Academic Vice President and Dean

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impact

and shortcomings, we got picked for the Jesus team. God gave us each a unique calling to serve with him, but how do we go and bear fruit? Seminary is where great ideas, great thoughts, and great ministries begin growing. You need what happens here. This time will shape everything you do in the kingdom. For me, seminary made all the difference. But hear me carefully—it’s not about what happens here. Getting picked for the Jesus team is about what happens out there. “I chose you that you should go and bear fruit.”

developing people for their unique callings

+ life & ministry

+ character

knowledge/Skills

= developed for call

People have hard lives, and they need the Lord. We can bear fruit that lasts. We come to seminary to learn how to interpret scripture for what it really says. We come to learn the rich pageant of Christian history and theology, so we know what the church has thought and done, what we’ve gotten right, and what we’ve gotten wrong since that night when Jesus talked with his disciples about the vine and the branches. We come to learn how the human mind works, how families are put together, and how to help people learn to make good decisions. We come to think through what it really means to live the Christian life for ourselves and how to lead the church of Jesus in the 21st Christian century. We come here so we can go out there and, with God’s help, make a difference. That’s what happens when you get picked for the Jesus team. 2014 I Issue II


impact

STAYING in

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alumni news + prayer

Sioux Falls Seminary

table of

contents 2014 I Issue 2

The impact is published two times per year for the benefit of the seminary community, friends, alumni, and supporters.

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from the

president

10 partnership summit house

A new strategic partnership with Compassion Child Care in Sioux Falls is providing affordable housing and care to single mothers.

President Greg Henson talks about theological education at Sioux Falls Seminary and the process of developing people for their unique callings.

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missio dei

& students introducing

kairos

Learn more about our new track within the M.Div. and MACL programs that weaves theological education into a student’s life and ministry.

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alumni in action

spotlight

Sioux Falls Seminary impact

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sfs event

calendar staying in

touch

the Jesus

team

Ron Sisk, Academic Vice President and Dean, talks about what it means to be picked for the Jesus team.

served the local church and the far reaches of the world. She built relationships and led trainings on trafficking, helping others learn more about the issues involved. In addition, she helped women and girls, locally and globally, find new life through Be Free Ministries.

‘09

‘95

‘10

Michele Bradley was honored in September at the ABC Dakotas Biennial gathering in Rapid City, SD, as she begins retirement. Having spent much of her adult life as a prison pastor, Michele was instrumental in building the Church of Hope in the SD Women’s Prison in Pierre. Through her work, she helped inmates experience forgiveness and hope.

‘96

Joel Higgins is serving The Celebration, a United Methodist Church in Brandon, SD.

‘99

Judy De Wit has moved from Fridley, MN, to Sioux Falls, SD. She began a part-time position at Stronghold Counseling Services in May 2014 and is now a Doctor of Ministry student at the seminary.

‘07

Nancy Manning is serving Salem United UMC, PC-USA, and Montrose UMC in South Dakota.

‘08

Ryan Zurbriggen is now serving as the part-time family pastor at First Baptist Church in Elgin, IA.

Miranda Schunk was licensed as a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor by the Minnesota Board of Behavioral Health and Therapy in September 2014. She lives in Windom, MN.

Suzanne Grote is now a chaplain at Altru Health Systems Valley Memorial Homes in Grand Forks, ND. Gwen Mader is pastor of Britton, Claremont, and Hecla United Methodist Churches in South Dakota. Sara Nelson has been appointed Senior Pastor of First United Methodist Church in Watertown, SD, where she has served as Associate Pastor.

‘12

Derek Baum is serving as the Associate Pastor at First United Methodist Church in Aberdeen, SD. Victor Ojo and family have moved from New York to Mansfield, TX (a suburb of Dallas-Fort Worth), to be closer to their extended family.

‘13

Matt Paulson is sharing some of the knowledge he has gained while building his online business in his first book, 40 Rules for Internet Business Success, now available on Amazon.com. Hilary Satrang is the new Interim Director at Wesley Acres Camp

and Retreat Center in Dazey, ND. Wesley Acres is a UMC facility and a ministry of the Dakotas Annual Conference. Hilary previously served as parish administrator at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Rapid City, SD, and in cooking and hospitality at Outlaw Ranch in the Black Hills of SD.

in memoriam ‘97

Wesley Halbritter died peacefully on April 16, 2014. After retiring from the laboratory at Sioux Valley Hospital, he became a pastor and did hospice ministry. He was 86 and is survived by his wife, Beverly, four sons, six grandchildren, one great-grandson, and a brother.

‘98

Jeff Thumma died July 13, 2014, following a dive training incident. He volunteered with the Minnehaha County (SD) Emergency Management Dive Team and assisted several churches in the Sioux Falls area while concurrently working at CitiBank. He is survived by his parents, Greg and Carol Thumma, a brother, and two grandmothers.

‘04

Kevin Karhoff passed away on October 18, 2014, at the age of 47, after a battle with lymphoma. He served churches in Michigan and Iowa and was the Associate Pastor at First Reformed Church in Mitchell, SD. He is survived by his wife, Kim, seven children, and a son-in-law. 13

2014 I Issue II


SUBMIT UPDATES ONLINE AT SFSEMINARY.EDU/ALUMNI

STAYING in

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From the President Greg Henson

sioux falls seminary alumni news + prayer

The well-known adage about fishing goes as follows: Give a person a fish; feed them for a day. Teach a person to fish; feed them for a lifetime. I would like us to add a third statement: develop a fisherman in partnership; feed a village for generations.

sioux falls seminary

alumni news and prayer requests

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‘55

Donald Miller, former Vice President for Development at Sioux Falls Seminary (1969-1977), recently celebrated the 20th anniversary of his founding of Samaritan Ministries, a humanitarian organization in Ukraine. He has completed seven books, most of which deal with the fate of Russian Germans in Volhynia, Russia (now Ukraine). Don and his wife, Nancy, live in Hillsboro, OR.

‘66

Manfred Brauch of Mt. Pleasant, SC, is mourning the passing of his wife of 53 years, Dr. Marjean Brauch, on February 22, 2014. Marjean was a retired physician and enjoyed giving of her time Sioux Falls Seminary impact

by doing volunteer medical work throughout the world. Marjean is also survived by two sons, Chris and Greg, and a daughter, Tonya.

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William H. Jones, D.Min., has written a new book titled A Christian Visits Israel. It is intended for Christians who want to visit Israel in a church group. It is available Amazon.com.

‘78

David Lake retired from Bethel Baptist Church in Harvey, ND.

‘79

Jim Church retired from Rabbit Hill Baptist Church in Leduc County, AB, on July 31, 2014.

‘85

Ronald Ford, who also holds an M.Div. from Acadia Divinity Col-

lege, graduated again this year with an M.A. in Theology. He and his wife, Wendy, recently moved to White Head Island, NB. Their twin daughters, born during their time in Sioux Falls, are now 30 years old.

‘89

Valerie Reinhiller and her husband, Ross, are serving First United Methodist Church in Aberdeen, SD.

‘90

Greg Kroger is now the Senior Pastor of First United Methodist Church in Rapid City, SD, where he now lives. He also serves on the seminary’s Board of Trustees.

‘93

Susan Omanson (M.Div. ‘93; MACO ‘95) was honored at the ABC Dakotas Biennial gathering in Rapid City, SD, in September as she begins retirement. Susan

The process of personal development goes beyond teaching. It is about more than acquiring knowledge or a specific set of skills. Developing someone is a formational process that includes teaching, equipping, training, educating, action, and reflection as parts of a holistic journey. While fishing has never been something I enjoy (I know, that sounds blasphemous), it is something I know how to do. I can pick a spot, bait a hook, cast a line, and catch a fish, but that doesn’t make me a fisherman. Sammy Hoag, a friend of mine, is a fisherman. He has the ability to walk alongside others and teach them how to fish. He knows how to create within people a passion for fishing. Sammy knows how to distill multiple sources of information regarding fishing into succinct, useful, and actionable data. Sammy is a fisherman who can develop others in that manner. I have simply been taught how to fish. For over 100 years, theological education has focused on teaching people for pastoral ministry. It may be time for us to devote an immense amount of time to creating systems of theological education that develop people for their unique callings. The paradigm of training leaders narrows our focus to the acquisition of skill and knowledge. Neither skill nor knowledge is helpful unless a person integrates that skill and knowledge into his or her rhythm of life and ministry. In order to create that rhythm, students must walk through an intentional development process with multiple mentors facilitating that process. It is in that process of personal and holistic development that an individual comes to understand his or her unique call. God has gifted each of us in unique ways in order that we might participate in his redemptive mission. Theological education should help students understand, articulate, and grow in their unique callings without being removed from their contexts. Developing pastoral leaders for service in local churches is one of the primary roles of theological education and something I believe we find in Scripture. However, it’s also important to recognize that many students do not plan to serve through congregational ministry when they graduate. That’s why a system of theological education should develop people for their unique callings. Doing so develops people who see and understand their unique roles in God’s mission. That process will enable us to “feed” the church for generations to come.

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2014 I Issue II


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Convocation Message

sfs event

calendar

November 11 I Kingdom Entrepreneurship date

Chapel and Lunch with Sid Webb Join us as we explore the topic of Kingdom Entrepreneurship: Unleashing Ministry with a New Mindset with Dr. Sid Webb. The chapel and meal are free to the first 50 individuals to RSVP. After the first 50, the cost to attend will be $10 per person. 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m., SFS, 2100 S. Summit Avenue

Missio Dei

30 I Advent Begins

Download and Share a Copy of our 2014 Advent Booklet

and the

April

3 I Good Friday

Sioux Falls Seminary will be closed on Good Friday, April 3.

14 I Hiller Lectureship

Wayne Gordon to Speak on Community Development The Rev. Dr. Wayne “Coach” Gordon will bring over 37 years of ministry and community development experience to the 2015 Hiller Lectureship at Sioux Falls Seminary. He will share how churches and others can impact community development work. SFS, 2100 S. Summit Avenue

May

Development of Students

15 I Commencement Banquet With the 157th academic year underway, we reflect on

Ephesians 4:1: “…walk in a manner worthy of the calling to which you have been called…” This verse speaks of what seminaries are really all about, or should be about.

by

Visiting Professor of Intercultural Studies 2

One of the primary purposes of a seminary, I believe, is to help develop students to better “walk in a manner worthy of their callings” in whatever ministry situation to which they have been called. But just how can seminaries develop people? What are the important elements that make up a seminary’s task? The primary element in relationship to a seminary’s task relates to what a seminary actually teaches. When we who are the professors of a seminary help develop students for their unique callings, we do so not just from

Celebrate the 2014 season of Advent by downloading and sharing a copy of Sioux Falls Seminary’s Advent Devotional Booklet. This year’s theme is His Kingdom Among Us. Download a copy by visiting www.sfseminary.edu/story-center.

Celebration with the Class of 2015 The class of 2015 will celebrate their accomplishments with family, friends, and the faculty of Sioux Falls Seminary. Advance tickets required. Call 800.440.6227 or 605.336.6588 for more information. 6:30 p.m., Room 102, SFS, 2100 S. Summit Avenue

December

16 I 157th Commencement Service

The seminary will be closed in observance of the Christmas and New Year’s Holidays. Our offices will close at 12 noon on Tuesday, December 23. We will reopen again for business on Monday, January 5, 2015.

Bishop Bruce R. Ough to Speak Degrees will be conferred to the 157th graduating class of Sioux Falls Seminary. Bruce R. Ough, Bishop of the DakotasMinnesota Episcopal Area of the United Methodist Church. 2:00 p.m., First Baptist Church, 1401 S. Covell Avenue

January

eNews Updates at SFS

12/23 - 1/4 I Christmas & New Year’s Break

5-16 I January Term 2015

Term A: 5-9; Term B: 12-16; Term AB: 5-16 Join us for a class or two this January. Some of the courses to be offered include Substance Abuse and Addiction; Mental Health Ministry; Water, Bread, and Cup; The Book of Acts; Ministry and Financial Stewardship; and Intro to Islam: Christian Perspective. To register or learn more, call 800.440.6227. SFS, 2100 S. Summit Avenue

If you want to receive occasional news and event updates from Sioux Falls Seminary, register today at sfseminary.edu/signup.

more online sfseminary.edu/events 11

24/7

Larry Caldwell Sioux Falls Seminary impact

26 I Spring 2015 Semester Begins

2014 I Issue II


Partnership to Provide Affordable Housing and Care to Mothers and their Children In an effort to expand the reach and opportunities for service to the community, Sioux Falls Seminary is excited to enter into a strategic partnership with Compassion Child Care to provide affordable housing and care to single mothers. Through the newly-formed partnership, Sioux Falls Seminary will lease its property at the corner of 12th Street and Summit Avenue to Compassion Child Care for the purpose of providing affordable housing, restoration, and rejuvenation to single mothers. Although the new program was created by Compassion Child Care to more fully minister to whole families, it also addresses the growing problem for safe and affordable housing in the community. The property will accommodate up to five single mothers, each of whom will have their own quarters in addition to a shared kitchen and living spaces. An on-site resident assistant couple will offer support and encouragement to tenants. The women tenants will also gain life skills and build financial security through the housing program.

“We are extremely grateful for this opportunity to continue our mission of expressing God’s compassion to families. We believe providing this housing opportunity will help us become more family-focused,” said Rich Merkouris, board member for Compassion Child Care. “Sioux Falls Seminary is a great partner. They have a passion for community development, as demonstrated by their commitment to training up leaders who are focused on building God’s kingdom.” The partnership is also opening up possibilities for Sioux Falls Seminary. In the future, seminary students will receive the opportunity to minister to and counsel mothers at the site, giving students first-hand experience in community development and the care of single mothers and children. “Sioux Falls Seminary is excited about this partnership. God calls all of us to participate in the work he is doing, and partnerships like this enable people and institutions to serve in unique and powerful ways,” added Greg Henson, President of Sioux Falls Seminary. “Compassion Child Care is a great partner, and we look forward to embarking on this journey together.” Since 2008, the property at 12th Street and Summit Avenue housed seminary students who were engaged in community development work. During that period of time, students at Sioux Falls Seminary interacted with residents of Pettigrew Heights through Bible studies, community meals, relationships with the homeless, and community gardening urban agriculture initiatives.

Sioux Falls Seminary impact

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neighbor and, second, to make disciples of all the ethne (people groups) of the world. So how does this background of my understanding of the missio Dei relate to seminary education, especially seminary education done at Sioux Falls Seminary? I contend that as we develop our students for their unique callings we do so in light of our individual disciplines rooted in the overall deeper, foundational level of the our expertise in a particular subject matter. Rather, we do so from a deeper foundation, one that far predates our own individual disciplines. For me, that foundation is the missio Dei, the Mission of God. There are many definitions and understandings of this phrase, missio Dei. My understanding, following the South African missiologist David Bosch, views the missio Dei in a Trinitarian sense in relationship to the church: “The Father, Son, and the Holy Spirit sending the church into the world.” I couple Bosch’s understanding of the missio Dei with an understanding of the Kingdom of God here on earth. The Trinity is sending the church into the world to help further that now-butnot-yet Kingdom of God, that Kingdom to be ultimately established one day in its fullness in a new heaven and a new earth.

It is in Jesus where we best see the missio Dei and Kingdom of God come together. In his life, the Son carries out

the work of Father, and it is fulfilled—the Kingdom of God is at hand. Jesus actively carries out God’s mission in both word and deed. Jesus gives two great commands to his followers: first, to love God and love

missio Dei. For me, therefore, the

heart of seminary education is the developing of our students to better love God, better love neighbors, and better make disciples; in a nutshell, better at helping carry out the missio Dei to their family, friends, neighbors, communities, and peoples of this world.

And how do we do this? Here, I believe that all of the various disciplines of a seminary must submit unequivocally to the missio Dei. So every Greek or Hebrew verb that is parsed must be done in relationship to the missio Dei. Likewise, every theological concept studied, every church history event or creed that is examined, every counseling technique that is learned —all must resonate around this core idea: How will knowing this help further the missio Dei? In other words, how will knowing this help develop our students to be fully encouraged to love God, fully ready to better love neighbors, and fully prepared to better make disciples? If this direct linkage to the missio Dei is not happening, perhaps we as professors are not doing our full duty. 3

2014 I Issue II


PILOT PROJECT

This fall we began a pilot project— one that could help shift the focus of theological education. The Kairos Project, academically challenging yet flexible, is offering a path for those who would otherwise not be able to receive the education to which they feel God calling them. Fifteen students embarked on the journey together this October. Chronos vs. Kairos There are two words for time in Greek. The first, chronos, refers to chronological time – seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks, years, etc. The second, kairos, refers to a specific moment in time or a specific time in which an activity or incident occurs. For many years, the primary method of theological education has been based on the “chronos” understanding of time. Students progress chronologically through a specific set of courses over a certain number of years and, provided they pass the courses, receive a degree at the end. Sioux Falls Seminary impact

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at the seminary

Unfortunately, this model has, in many instances, developed a system of theological education that is prohibitively expensive, lacks integration, and is built around content instead of outcomes. Chronological time spent in class and the grades received in that class have been used as the primary measurement of student learning.

Creating a New System of Theological Education Our vision is to create a system of theological education that shifts the focus from chronos to kairos. In this system, students are fully engaged, and learning is more effective because it’s built around moments in time that naturally encourage integrated learning. In addition, students are held accountable to specific outcomes rather than to the chronological progression through a set of courses. As students are engaged in learning, life, and ministry, a team of mentors walks alongside them, providing encouragement and assistance. The Kairos Project: Shifting the Focus of Theological Education is our first step in achieving this vision.

Rethinking the Full-Time Student Schools traditionally define a full-time student based on the number of credit hours he or she completes in a given term. This number tends to move between 9 and 15 credits and is traditionally connected to the number of hours a student spends in a classroom. When added to the myriad of things clamoring for an individual’s time, the life of a traditional full-time student

Pictured (left to right): Nate Helling, Gretchen Hartmann, Paul Rainbow, Karla Tschetter.

2014 excellence awards presented The seminary’s volunteers, faculty, and staff help create a culture of excellence in Christian service. In thankfulness for their work, the individuals below were named recipients of the 2nd annual Excellence Awards. Dr. Paul Rainbow received the Powell Award for Excel-

lence in Service by Faculty for contributing to a culture of excellence in service to students and the seminary community through scholarly research and thoughtful teaching of the New Testament.

Nate Helling, Rauschenbusch Award for Excellence in Service by Staff and Administration recipient, was chosen for demonstrating outstanding leadership qualities while keeping the main focus of his work on the well-being of students and God’s Kingdom work. Gretchen Hartmann received the Zimbelman Award for

Excellence in Service through Sioux Falls Psychological Services because of her commitment to ethical standards and her ability to connect with clients, students, and peers.

Karla Tschetter, Sioux Falls, SD, was awarded the Schmeltekopf Award for Excellence in Volunteer Service for faithfully serving through the Women’s Auxiliary, mailings, and management of the seminary’s food pantry.

celebrating the 40th anniversary of sf psychological services Sioux Falls Psychological Services is celebrating 40 years of service to the community. It was founded by Dr. Ernie and Mrs. Dorothy Zimbelman in 1974. After 17 years of service, the Zimbelmans gave their clinic to Sioux Falls Seminary. Today, the counseling center continues to be an active and growing psychological practice. In addition, it serves as the training site for graduate students in the seminary’s counseling and marriage and family therapy programs. Through Sioux Falls Psychological Services, we meet people where they are and offer them hope. Our group of mental health professionals serve the emotional, relational, and spiritual needs of individuals and families through Sioux Falls Psychological Services (for the insured), the Marriage and Family Clinic (for the uninsured), the Child & Adolescent Therapy Clinic (children ages 1-18), River Counseling Services (Platte, SD), and Augustana Student Counseling (Augustana College students). To learn more about Sioux Falls Pyschological Services, visit www.offermehope.com. 9

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KAIROS: A BLESSING TO STUDENTS A few Kairos students share why the project is a blessing in their lives.

Doug Kempton

a bit of

what’s new

COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR, GOOD SAMARITAN SOCIETY SAC CITY, IA

It was during college that Emily first felt a call from God to walk alongside others in their spiritual journeys. As others began to recognize this call on her life, Emily began to develop an understanding of how God might use her gifts and abilities. She writes, “Seminary was an impossible, lost dream due to motherhood, finances, my full-time job, and a long list of other responsibilities.” Emily is thankful for and committed to her calling as a mother, wife, and employee and is searching for a way to integrate theological education into those roles versus being separated from them.

Tom Henderson FOUNDER, RESTORATION GENERATION SIOUX FALLS, SD

As the founder of and lead communicator for Restoration Generation, Tom speaks at music festivals, schools, camps, retreats, and conferences. His first book, Heart [Not Hype], was published in 2013 and provides a seven-day discipleship journey for new believers. Throughout Tom’s 17 years of service in ministry, he has been encouraged to attend seminary and has often considered it. However, the traditional model would not allow him to continue ministering around the country. The prohibitive cost of theological education added another barrier.

wayne gordon to speak at hiller lectureship; fellowships offered

Since it began in 2009, women of all ages have been exploring God’s plans for their lives through the Women in Community events at the seminary. The 2014 installment took place on September 4 in Omaha and September 5 in Sioux Falls.

Wayne “Coach” Gordon will be the featured speaker at the 2015 Hiller Lectureship on April 14. The Rev. Dr. Wayne Gordon is the founding pastor of Lawndale Community Church in Chicago, IL, and the President of the Christian Community Development Association (CCDA). He has over 37 years of ministry and community development experience and will share how churches can impact community development work. He has poured his heart into empowering individuals, breaking down racial barriers, and paving the way for God’s truth in the lives of those he encounters.

An emphasis was placed on God’s ability to take simple acts and make them extraordinary. Several women shared how they responded to God’s prompts in their lives and used their influence and resources to make a difference in the lives of others. Sioux Falls Seminary impact 8

Doug’s story winds through college, becoming a founder of Kinko’s, the launch of a nonprofit to serve inner-city kids, and a three-year discipleship journey that brought him to his role as Interim Lead Pastor at Grace Community Church in Detroit, Michigan. Doug writes, “It’s taken me a long time to reconcile my heart’s desire and God’s calling on my life, but I am there now.” He has a strong desire to serve God to the best of his ability and believes that theological education should be an important aspect of his development. However, his commitments as a husband, father, executive director, and lead pastor did not mesh well with the traditional model of theological education.

Emily Thompson

Women in community event series empowering and inspiring women

Guest speaker Sharon Epps of Women Doing Well, Atlanta, GA, engaged in conversation with attendees about their ability to impact the lives of others by: • understanding the unique beauty Christ has placed within them; • realizing that no matter their situation in life, they have much to be grateful for; • joining together in community to find encouragement and inspiration to make a difference.

EXECUTIVE PASTOR OF GRACE COMMUNITY CHURCH & FOUNDING DIRECTOR OF EAGLE SPORTS CLUB, DETROIT, MI

Through a generous gift, fellowships will again be offered. This honor recognizes individuals who demonstrate excellence in ministry and pastoral care. Fellows will receive special recognition, the opportunity to learn from a renowned speaker, and reimbursement for expenses. If someone you know demonstrates excellence in ministry and pastoral care and is actively serving in pastoral ministry, please inquire about a fellowship. E-mail shandas@sfseminary.edu.

can be hectic, draining, and truly difficult to maintain without experiencing burnout. Today, in most cases, seminary is something that is added on to rather than integrated into a student’s life and ministry. Every student in the Kairos Project is a full-time student. However, they are not full-time students in the traditional sense. With Kairos, a student’s personal development process is fully integrated into his or her life and ministry. Class simply functions differently in this new paradigm. The student is required to have a concurrent and continual ministry context while earning their degree. That context is intentionally integrated into his or her progression toward the specific outcomes of a program. Rather than seminary being added onto the life of a student, the journey of theological education is woven throughout the experiences of his or her life and ministry. In this new track, students complete the same amount of coursework as those pursuing their degrees in the

traditional format. As Kairos students progress through the year in their ministry context, they also progress through assessments, outcomes, and courses for the degree program. A mentor team, including a member of the seminary’s faculty, guides the learning experience. The Kairos Project simply provides a framework to guide and develop students while they are participating in the Mission of God. Because it is not built around the chronological progression through courses, it gives students the opportunity to dive deeply into topics, discussions, learning experiences, and biblical reading that are relevant to their current challenges in ministry.

Kairos Video Illustration Visit: sfseminary.edu/kairos 5

2014 I Issue II


sioux falls

alumni in action

by: Rev. Randy Tschetter, D.Min.

Director of Church and Alumni Relations

Exploring Alum’s Unique Call Matt Paulson, Entrepreneur

Based on Ephesians 4:1, “I therefore, a prisoner for the Lord, urge you to walk in a manner worthy of the calling to which you have been called,” Sioux Falls Seminary develops individuals to fulfill their unique callings. When asked about his unique calling, Sioux Falls Seminary alumnus Matt Paulson (MACL ‘13) described himself as an equipper and encourager of ministers and missionaries. Paulson is among a rising number of individuals choosing to serve God outside of traditional ministry settings, a trend that illustrates how God’s call extends to people from all walks of life. Paulson says he is called to invest his time, talents, and treasures to enable ministers of the Gospel to carry out their work more efficiently and effectively. In the past, he has built websites, software systems, and online giving portals for different ministries. He has also served on various search committees and non-profit boards. As his business has grown, so has his desire to bless others, “It is fun to be able to support exciting and innovative ministries” at Sioux Falls Seminary and around the world. Like John Wesley, he believes in the philosophy of “earn all you can, give all you can, and save all you can.” Matt admits that his entry to seminary put him on a steep learning curve. Theological words like pneumatology and Christology were new to him. Church history and theology opened his eyes and mind to as-

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pects of the church and the Christian faith that he had not thought about before. But one of the most exciting things about his time at the seminary had to do with the leadership lessons he learned and how much they cross over into the business world. He believes that there is much that those in the church and the business world can learn from one another—simple things like how to treat others well and how to do things more efficiently. Matt is excited about the integration of faith, business, and money into the seminary curriculum. It is “bringing missional ideas into the business world.” Paulson found the seminary to be a warm and inviting place for individuals like him who were not called to traditional church or pastoral roles but saw their work as ministry. Paulson added that the denominational diversity within the student body made learning rewarding. Matt and his wife, Karine, are the proud parents of twoyear-old Micah. Matt serves on the Board of Trustees at Central Baptist Church in Sioux Falls, SD, and helps with the church’s information technology needs. His recent book, 40 Rules for Internet Business Success: Escape the 9 to 5, Do Work You Love, and Build a Profitable Online Business, enables him to share his entrepreneurial knowledge with others. In visiting with Matt, two themes emerged: the overwhelming blessing of God’s grace as the source of forgiveness and the call to generosity in response to God’s grace. To learn more about Matt’s work and his recent book, visit mattpaulson.com.

degree & program

news seminary

In addition to our new Kairos Project, we are excited to announce a number of other exciting academic and program developments.

New Doctor of Ministry Partnerships Two new concentrations in the Doctor of Ministry program are being offered through partnerships. Students can now focus their doctoral work in the following areas: •

Missional Church Leadership Possible through partnerships with the North American Baptist Next Community Initiative and Forge Canada

Pastoral Psychoanalysis Working with the Brookhaven Institute for Psychoanalysis and Christian Theology (BIPACT) to offer a first-of-its-kind Doctor of Ministry degree

enabling Sioux Falls Seminary to pursue CACREP accreditation in a few years

giving students the opportunity to pursue areas of expertise including, but not limited to, marriage and family therapy, child and adolescent behavior, and mental health counseling

Updated Outcomes for the M.Div., MACL, and MABT Degree Programs New degree program outcomes for the Master of Divinity, M.A. in Christian Leadership, and M.A. (Bible and Theology), to be tested over the next year, are:

M.A. in Christian Leadership Redesign

A redesign in the Master of Arts in Christian Leadership program, that adjusted the program to 37 hours, is:

allowing for more engagement with scripture throughout the programs

integrating learning across disciplines

holding a high regard for academic rigor

honoring each student’s unique call

helping students develop in character and competency as much as in knowledge and skills

enhancing core theological foundations

allowing students to create custom concentrations

creating opportunities for partnerships with organizations

Updated M.A. in Counseling Degree Updates to the Master of Arts in Counseling are: •

providing an increased number of licensure opportunities

positioning the MACO as our primary (and eventually only) counseling degree

Online Portal A new online portal, my.sfseminary.edu, will: •

offer students a place to register for class, pay bills, receive information from the seminary, check grades, and much more

provide a centralized area for staff to find information relevant to their role at the seminary 7

2014 I Issue II


sioux falls

alumni in action

by: Rev. Randy Tschetter, D.Min.

Director of Church and Alumni Relations

Exploring Alum’s Unique Call Matt Paulson, Entrepreneur

Based on Ephesians 4:1, “I therefore, a prisoner for the Lord, urge you to walk in a manner worthy of the calling to which you have been called,” Sioux Falls Seminary develops individuals to fulfill their unique callings. When asked about his unique calling, Sioux Falls Seminary alumnus Matt Paulson (MACL ‘13) described himself as an equipper and encourager of ministers and missionaries. Paulson is among a rising number of individuals choosing to serve God outside of traditional ministry settings, a trend that illustrates how God’s call extends to people from all walks of life. Paulson says he is called to invest his time, talents, and treasures to enable ministers of the Gospel to carry out their work more efficiently and effectively. In the past, he has built websites, software systems, and online giving portals for different ministries. He has also served on various search committees and non-profit boards. As his business has grown, so has his desire to bless others, “It is fun to be able to support exciting and innovative ministries” at Sioux Falls Seminary and around the world. Like John Wesley, he believes in the philosophy of “earn all you can, give all you can, and save all you can.” Matt admits that his entry to seminary put him on a steep learning curve. Theological words like pneumatology and Christology were new to him. Church history and theology opened his eyes and mind to as-

Sioux Falls Seminary impact

6

pects of the church and the Christian faith that he had not thought about before. But one of the most exciting things about his time at the seminary had to do with the leadership lessons he learned and how much they cross over into the business world. He believes that there is much that those in the church and the business world can learn from one another—simple things like how to treat others well and how to do things more efficiently. Matt is excited about the integration of faith, business, and money into the seminary curriculum. It is “bringing missional ideas into the business world.” Paulson found the seminary to be a warm and inviting place for individuals like him who were not called to traditional church or pastoral roles but saw their work as ministry. Paulson added that the denominational diversity within the student body made learning rewarding. Matt and his wife, Karine, are the proud parents of twoyear-old Micah. Matt serves on the Board of Trustees at Central Baptist Church in Sioux Falls, SD, and helps with the church’s information technology needs. His recent book, 40 Rules for Internet Business Success: Escape the 9 to 5, Do Work You Love, and Build a Profitable Online Business, enables him to share his entrepreneurial knowledge with others. In visiting with Matt, two themes emerged: the overwhelming blessing of God’s grace as the source of forgiveness and the call to generosity in response to God’s grace. To learn more about Matt’s work and his recent book, visit mattpaulson.com.

degree & program

news seminary

In addition to our new Kairos Project, we are excited to announce a number of other exciting academic and program developments.

New Doctor of Ministry Partnerships Two new concentrations in the Doctor of Ministry program are being offered through partnerships. Students can now focus their doctoral work in the following areas: •

Missional Church Leadership Possible through partnerships with the North American Baptist Next Community Initiative and Forge Canada

Pastoral Psychoanalysis Working with the Brookhaven Institute for Psychoanalysis and Christian Theology (BIPACT) to offer a first-of-its-kind Doctor of Ministry degree

enabling Sioux Falls Seminary to pursue CACREP accreditation in a few years

giving students the opportunity to pursue areas of expertise including, but not limited to, marriage and family therapy, child and adolescent behavior, and mental health counseling

Updated Outcomes for the M.Div., MACL, and MABT Degree Programs New degree program outcomes for the Master of Divinity, M.A. in Christian Leadership, and M.A. (Bible and Theology), to be tested over the next year, are:

M.A. in Christian Leadership Redesign

A redesign in the Master of Arts in Christian Leadership program, that adjusted the program to 37 hours, is:

allowing for more engagement with scripture throughout the programs

integrating learning across disciplines

holding a high regard for academic rigor

honoring each student’s unique call

helping students develop in character and competency as much as in knowledge and skills

enhancing core theological foundations

allowing students to create custom concentrations

creating opportunities for partnerships with organizations

Updated M.A. in Counseling Degree Updates to the Master of Arts in Counseling are: •

providing an increased number of licensure opportunities

positioning the MACO as our primary (and eventually only) counseling degree

Online Portal A new online portal, my.sfseminary.edu, will: •

offer students a place to register for class, pay bills, receive information from the seminary, check grades, and much more

provide a centralized area for staff to find information relevant to their role at the seminary 7

2014 I Issue II


F

KAIROS: A BLESSING TO STUDENTS A few Kairos students share why the project is a blessing in their lives.

Doug Kempton

a bit of

what’s new

COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR, GOOD SAMARITAN SOCIETY SAC CITY, IA

It was during college that Emily first felt a call from God to walk alongside others in their spiritual journeys. As others began to recognize this call on her life, Emily began to develop an understanding of how God might use her gifts and abilities. She writes, “Seminary was an impossible, lost dream due to motherhood, finances, my full-time job, and a long list of other responsibilities.” Emily is thankful for and committed to her calling as a mother, wife, and employee and is searching for a way to integrate theological education into those roles versus being separated from them.

Tom Henderson FOUNDER, RESTORATION GENERATION SIOUX FALLS, SD

As the founder of and lead communicator for Restoration Generation, Tom speaks at music festivals, schools, camps, retreats, and conferences. His first book, Heart [Not Hype], was published in 2013 and provides a seven-day discipleship journey for new believers. Throughout Tom’s 17 years of service in ministry, he has been encouraged to attend seminary and has often considered it. However, the traditional model would not allow him to continue ministering around the country. The prohibitive cost of theological education added another barrier.

wayne gordon to speak at hiller lectureship; fellowships offered

Since it began in 2009, women of all ages have been exploring God’s plans for their lives through the Women in Community events at the seminary. The 2014 installment took place on September 4 in Omaha and September 5 in Sioux Falls.

Wayne “Coach” Gordon will be the featured speaker at the 2015 Hiller Lectureship on April 14. The Rev. Dr. Wayne Gordon is the founding pastor of Lawndale Community Church in Chicago, IL, and the President of the Christian Community Development Association (CCDA). He has over 37 years of ministry and community development experience and will share how churches can impact community development work. He has poured his heart into empowering individuals, breaking down racial barriers, and paving the way for God’s truth in the lives of those he encounters.

An emphasis was placed on God’s ability to take simple acts and make them extraordinary. Several women shared how they responded to God’s prompts in their lives and used their influence and resources to make a difference in the lives of others. Sioux Falls Seminary impact 8

Doug’s story winds through college, becoming a founder of Kinko’s, the launch of a nonprofit to serve inner-city kids, and a three-year discipleship journey that brought him to his role as Interim Lead Pastor at Grace Community Church in Detroit, Michigan. Doug writes, “It’s taken me a long time to reconcile my heart’s desire and God’s calling on my life, but I am there now.” He has a strong desire to serve God to the best of his ability and believes that theological education should be an important aspect of his development. However, his commitments as a husband, father, executive director, and lead pastor did not mesh well with the traditional model of theological education.

Emily Thompson

Women in community event series empowering and inspiring women

Guest speaker Sharon Epps of Women Doing Well, Atlanta, GA, engaged in conversation with attendees about their ability to impact the lives of others by: • understanding the unique beauty Christ has placed within them; • realizing that no matter their situation in life, they have much to be grateful for; • joining together in community to find encouragement and inspiration to make a difference.

EXECUTIVE PASTOR OF GRACE COMMUNITY CHURCH & FOUNDING DIRECTOR OF EAGLE SPORTS CLUB, DETROIT, MI

Through a generous gift, fellowships will again be offered. This honor recognizes individuals who demonstrate excellence in ministry and pastoral care. Fellows will receive special recognition, the opportunity to learn from a renowned speaker, and reimbursement for expenses. If someone you know demonstrates excellence in ministry and pastoral care and is actively serving in pastoral ministry, please inquire about a fellowship. E-mail shandas@sfseminary.edu.

can be hectic, draining, and truly difficult to maintain without experiencing burnout. Today, in most cases, seminary is something that is added on to rather than integrated into a student’s life and ministry. Every student in the Kairos Project is a full-time student. However, they are not full-time students in the traditional sense. With Kairos, a student’s personal development process is fully integrated into his or her life and ministry. Class simply functions differently in this new paradigm. The student is required to have a concurrent and continual ministry context while earning their degree. That context is intentionally integrated into his or her progression toward the specific outcomes of a program. Rather than seminary being added onto the life of a student, the journey of theological education is woven throughout the experiences of his or her life and ministry. In this new track, students complete the same amount of coursework as those pursuing their degrees in the

traditional format. As Kairos students progress through the year in their ministry context, they also progress through assessments, outcomes, and courses for the degree program. A mentor team, including a member of the seminary’s faculty, guides the learning experience. The Kairos Project simply provides a framework to guide and develop students while they are participating in the Mission of God. Because it is not built around the chronological progression through courses, it gives students the opportunity to dive deeply into topics, discussions, learning experiences, and biblical reading that are relevant to their current challenges in ministry.

Kairos Video Illustration Visit: sfseminary.edu/kairos 5

2014 I Issue II


PILOT PROJECT

This fall we began a pilot project— one that could help shift the focus of theological education. The Kairos Project, academically challenging yet flexible, is offering a path for those who would otherwise not be able to receive the education to which they feel God calling them. Fifteen students embarked on the journey together this October. Chronos vs. Kairos There are two words for time in Greek. The first, chronos, refers to chronological time – seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks, years, etc. The second, kairos, refers to a specific moment in time or a specific time in which an activity or incident occurs. For many years, the primary method of theological education has been based on the “chronos” understanding of time. Students progress chronologically through a specific set of courses over a certain number of years and, provided they pass the courses, receive a degree at the end. Sioux Falls Seminary impact

4

at the seminary

Unfortunately, this model has, in many instances, developed a system of theological education that is prohibitively expensive, lacks integration, and is built around content instead of outcomes. Chronological time spent in class and the grades received in that class have been used as the primary measurement of student learning.

Creating a New System of Theological Education Our vision is to create a system of theological education that shifts the focus from chronos to kairos. In this system, students are fully engaged, and learning is more effective because it’s built around moments in time that naturally encourage integrated learning. In addition, students are held accountable to specific outcomes rather than to the chronological progression through a set of courses. As students are engaged in learning, life, and ministry, a team of mentors walks alongside them, providing encouragement and assistance. The Kairos Project: Shifting the Focus of Theological Education is our first step in achieving this vision.

Rethinking the Full-Time Student Schools traditionally define a full-time student based on the number of credit hours he or she completes in a given term. This number tends to move between 9 and 15 credits and is traditionally connected to the number of hours a student spends in a classroom. When added to the myriad of things clamoring for an individual’s time, the life of a traditional full-time student

Pictured (left to right): Nate Helling, Gretchen Hartmann, Paul Rainbow, Karla Tschetter.

2014 excellence awards presented The seminary’s volunteers, faculty, and staff help create a culture of excellence in Christian service. In thankfulness for their work, the individuals below were named recipients of the 2nd annual Excellence Awards. Dr. Paul Rainbow received the Powell Award for Excel-

lence in Service by Faculty for contributing to a culture of excellence in service to students and the seminary community through scholarly research and thoughtful teaching of the New Testament.

Nate Helling, Rauschenbusch Award for Excellence in Service by Staff and Administration recipient, was chosen for demonstrating outstanding leadership qualities while keeping the main focus of his work on the well-being of students and God’s Kingdom work. Gretchen Hartmann received the Zimbelman Award for

Excellence in Service through Sioux Falls Psychological Services because of her commitment to ethical standards and her ability to connect with clients, students, and peers.

Karla Tschetter, Sioux Falls, SD, was awarded the Schmeltekopf Award for Excellence in Volunteer Service for faithfully serving through the Women’s Auxiliary, mailings, and management of the seminary’s food pantry.

celebrating the 40th anniversary of sf psychological services Sioux Falls Psychological Services is celebrating 40 years of service to the community. It was founded by Dr. Ernie and Mrs. Dorothy Zimbelman in 1974. After 17 years of service, the Zimbelmans gave their clinic to Sioux Falls Seminary. Today, the counseling center continues to be an active and growing psychological practice. In addition, it serves as the training site for graduate students in the seminary’s counseling and marriage and family therapy programs. Through Sioux Falls Psychological Services, we meet people where they are and offer them hope. Our group of mental health professionals serve the emotional, relational, and spiritual needs of individuals and families through Sioux Falls Psychological Services (for the insured), the Marriage and Family Clinic (for the uninsured), the Child & Adolescent Therapy Clinic (children ages 1-18), River Counseling Services (Platte, SD), and Augustana Student Counseling (Augustana College students). To learn more about Sioux Falls Pyschological Services, visit www.offermehope.com. 9

2014 I Issue II


Partnership to Provide Affordable Housing and Care to Mothers and their Children In an effort to expand the reach and opportunities for service to the community, Sioux Falls Seminary is excited to enter into a strategic partnership with Compassion Child Care to provide affordable housing and care to single mothers. Through the newly-formed partnership, Sioux Falls Seminary will lease its property at the corner of 12th Street and Summit Avenue to Compassion Child Care for the purpose of providing affordable housing, restoration, and rejuvenation to single mothers. Although the new program was created by Compassion Child Care to more fully minister to whole families, it also addresses the growing problem for safe and affordable housing in the community. The property will accommodate up to five single mothers, each of whom will have their own quarters in addition to a shared kitchen and living spaces. An on-site resident assistant couple will offer support and encouragement to tenants. The women tenants will also gain life skills and build financial security through the housing program.

“We are extremely grateful for this opportunity to continue our mission of expressing God’s compassion to families. We believe providing this housing opportunity will help us become more family-focused,” said Rich Merkouris, board member for Compassion Child Care. “Sioux Falls Seminary is a great partner. They have a passion for community development, as demonstrated by their commitment to training up leaders who are focused on building God’s kingdom.” The partnership is also opening up possibilities for Sioux Falls Seminary. In the future, seminary students will receive the opportunity to minister to and counsel mothers at the site, giving students first-hand experience in community development and the care of single mothers and children. “Sioux Falls Seminary is excited about this partnership. God calls all of us to participate in the work he is doing, and partnerships like this enable people and institutions to serve in unique and powerful ways,” added Greg Henson, President of Sioux Falls Seminary. “Compassion Child Care is a great partner, and we look forward to embarking on this journey together.” Since 2008, the property at 12th Street and Summit Avenue housed seminary students who were engaged in community development work. During that period of time, students at Sioux Falls Seminary interacted with residents of Pettigrew Heights through Bible studies, community meals, relationships with the homeless, and community gardening urban agriculture initiatives.

Sioux Falls Seminary impact

10

neighbor and, second, to make disciples of all the ethne (people groups) of the world. So how does this background of my understanding of the missio Dei relate to seminary education, especially seminary education done at Sioux Falls Seminary? I contend that as we develop our students for their unique callings we do so in light of our individual disciplines rooted in the overall deeper, foundational level of the our expertise in a particular subject matter. Rather, we do so from a deeper foundation, one that far predates our own individual disciplines. For me, that foundation is the missio Dei, the Mission of God. There are many definitions and understandings of this phrase, missio Dei. My understanding, following the South African missiologist David Bosch, views the missio Dei in a Trinitarian sense in relationship to the church: “The Father, Son, and the Holy Spirit sending the church into the world.” I couple Bosch’s understanding of the missio Dei with an understanding of the Kingdom of God here on earth. The Trinity is sending the church into the world to help further that now-butnot-yet Kingdom of God, that Kingdom to be ultimately established one day in its fullness in a new heaven and a new earth.

It is in Jesus where we best see the missio Dei and Kingdom of God come together. In his life, the Son carries out

the work of Father, and it is fulfilled—the Kingdom of God is at hand. Jesus actively carries out God’s mission in both word and deed. Jesus gives two great commands to his followers: first, to love God and love

missio Dei. For me, therefore, the

heart of seminary education is the developing of our students to better love God, better love neighbors, and better make disciples; in a nutshell, better at helping carry out the missio Dei to their family, friends, neighbors, communities, and peoples of this world.

And how do we do this? Here, I believe that all of the various disciplines of a seminary must submit unequivocally to the missio Dei. So every Greek or Hebrew verb that is parsed must be done in relationship to the missio Dei. Likewise, every theological concept studied, every church history event or creed that is examined, every counseling technique that is learned —all must resonate around this core idea: How will knowing this help further the missio Dei? In other words, how will knowing this help develop our students to be fully encouraged to love God, fully ready to better love neighbors, and fully prepared to better make disciples? If this direct linkage to the missio Dei is not happening, perhaps we as professors are not doing our full duty. 3

2014 I Issue II


save

12 3 4 5 6 the

Convocation Message

sfs event

calendar

November 11 I Kingdom Entrepreneurship date

Chapel and Lunch with Sid Webb Join us as we explore the topic of Kingdom Entrepreneurship: Unleashing Ministry with a New Mindset with Dr. Sid Webb. The chapel and meal are free to the first 50 individuals to RSVP. After the first 50, the cost to attend will be $10 per person. 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m., SFS, 2100 S. Summit Avenue

Missio Dei

30 I Advent Begins

Download and Share a Copy of our 2014 Advent Booklet

and the

April

3 I Good Friday

Sioux Falls Seminary will be closed on Good Friday, April 3.

14 I Hiller Lectureship

Wayne Gordon to Speak on Community Development The Rev. Dr. Wayne “Coach” Gordon will bring over 37 years of ministry and community development experience to the 2015 Hiller Lectureship at Sioux Falls Seminary. He will share how churches and others can impact community development work. SFS, 2100 S. Summit Avenue

May

Development of Students

15 I Commencement Banquet With the 157th academic year underway, we reflect on

Ephesians 4:1: “…walk in a manner worthy of the calling to which you have been called…” This verse speaks of what seminaries are really all about, or should be about.

by

Visiting Professor of Intercultural Studies 2

One of the primary purposes of a seminary, I believe, is to help develop students to better “walk in a manner worthy of their callings” in whatever ministry situation to which they have been called. But just how can seminaries develop people? What are the important elements that make up a seminary’s task? The primary element in relationship to a seminary’s task relates to what a seminary actually teaches. When we who are the professors of a seminary help develop students for their unique callings, we do so not just from

Celebrate the 2014 season of Advent by downloading and sharing a copy of Sioux Falls Seminary’s Advent Devotional Booklet. This year’s theme is His Kingdom Among Us. Download a copy by visiting www.sfseminary.edu/story-center.

Celebration with the Class of 2015 The class of 2015 will celebrate their accomplishments with family, friends, and the faculty of Sioux Falls Seminary. Advance tickets required. Call 800.440.6227 or 605.336.6588 for more information. 6:30 p.m., Room 102, SFS, 2100 S. Summit Avenue

December

16 I 157th Commencement Service

The seminary will be closed in observance of the Christmas and New Year’s Holidays. Our offices will close at 12 noon on Tuesday, December 23. We will reopen again for business on Monday, January 5, 2015.

Bishop Bruce R. Ough to Speak Degrees will be conferred to the 157th graduating class of Sioux Falls Seminary. Bruce R. Ough, Bishop of the DakotasMinnesota Episcopal Area of the United Methodist Church. 2:00 p.m., First Baptist Church, 1401 S. Covell Avenue

January

eNews Updates at SFS

12/23 - 1/4 I Christmas & New Year’s Break

5-16 I January Term 2015

Term A: 5-9; Term B: 12-16; Term AB: 5-16 Join us for a class or two this January. Some of the courses to be offered include Substance Abuse and Addiction; Mental Health Ministry; Water, Bread, and Cup; The Book of Acts; Ministry and Financial Stewardship; and Intro to Islam: Christian Perspective. To register or learn more, call 800.440.6227. SFS, 2100 S. Summit Avenue

If you want to receive occasional news and event updates from Sioux Falls Seminary, register today at sfseminary.edu/signup.

more online sfseminary.edu/events 11

24/7

Larry Caldwell Sioux Falls Seminary impact

26 I Spring 2015 Semester Begins

2014 I Issue II


SUBMIT UPDATES ONLINE AT SFSEMINARY.EDU/ALUMNI

STAYING in

T

UCH

From the President Greg Henson

sioux falls seminary alumni news + prayer

The well-known adage about fishing goes as follows: Give a person a fish; feed them for a day. Teach a person to fish; feed them for a lifetime. I would like us to add a third statement: develop a fisherman in partnership; feed a village for generations.

sioux falls seminary

alumni news and prayer requests

‘76

‘55

Donald Miller, former Vice President for Development at Sioux Falls Seminary (1969-1977), recently celebrated the 20th anniversary of his founding of Samaritan Ministries, a humanitarian organization in Ukraine. He has completed seven books, most of which deal with the fate of Russian Germans in Volhynia, Russia (now Ukraine). Don and his wife, Nancy, live in Hillsboro, OR.

‘66

Manfred Brauch of Mt. Pleasant, SC, is mourning the passing of his wife of 53 years, Dr. Marjean Brauch, on February 22, 2014. Marjean was a retired physician and enjoyed giving of her time Sioux Falls Seminary impact

by doing volunteer medical work throughout the world. Marjean is also survived by two sons, Chris and Greg, and a daughter, Tonya.

12

William H. Jones, D.Min., has written a new book titled A Christian Visits Israel. It is intended for Christians who want to visit Israel in a church group. It is available Amazon.com.

‘78

David Lake retired from Bethel Baptist Church in Harvey, ND.

‘79

Jim Church retired from Rabbit Hill Baptist Church in Leduc County, AB, on July 31, 2014.

‘85

Ronald Ford, who also holds an M.Div. from Acadia Divinity Col-

lege, graduated again this year with an M.A. in Theology. He and his wife, Wendy, recently moved to White Head Island, NB. Their twin daughters, born during their time in Sioux Falls, are now 30 years old.

‘89

Valerie Reinhiller and her husband, Ross, are serving First United Methodist Church in Aberdeen, SD.

‘90

Greg Kroger is now the Senior Pastor of First United Methodist Church in Rapid City, SD, where he now lives. He also serves on the seminary’s Board of Trustees.

‘93

Susan Omanson (M.Div. ‘93; MACO ‘95) was honored at the ABC Dakotas Biennial gathering in Rapid City, SD, in September as she begins retirement. Susan

The process of personal development goes beyond teaching. It is about more than acquiring knowledge or a specific set of skills. Developing someone is a formational process that includes teaching, equipping, training, educating, action, and reflection as parts of a holistic journey. While fishing has never been something I enjoy (I know, that sounds blasphemous), it is something I know how to do. I can pick a spot, bait a hook, cast a line, and catch a fish, but that doesn’t make me a fisherman. Sammy Hoag, a friend of mine, is a fisherman. He has the ability to walk alongside others and teach them how to fish. He knows how to create within people a passion for fishing. Sammy knows how to distill multiple sources of information regarding fishing into succinct, useful, and actionable data. Sammy is a fisherman who can develop others in that manner. I have simply been taught how to fish. For over 100 years, theological education has focused on teaching people for pastoral ministry. It may be time for us to devote an immense amount of time to creating systems of theological education that develop people for their unique callings. The paradigm of training leaders narrows our focus to the acquisition of skill and knowledge. Neither skill nor knowledge is helpful unless a person integrates that skill and knowledge into his or her rhythm of life and ministry. In order to create that rhythm, students must walk through an intentional development process with multiple mentors facilitating that process. It is in that process of personal and holistic development that an individual comes to understand his or her unique call. God has gifted each of us in unique ways in order that we might participate in his redemptive mission. Theological education should help students understand, articulate, and grow in their unique callings without being removed from their contexts. Developing pastoral leaders for service in local churches is one of the primary roles of theological education and something I believe we find in Scripture. However, it’s also important to recognize that many students do not plan to serve through congregational ministry when they graduate. That’s why a system of theological education should develop people for their unique callings. Doing so develops people who see and understand their unique roles in God’s mission. That process will enable us to “feed” the church for generations to come.

1

2014 I Issue II


impact

STAYING in

T

UCH

alumni news + prayer

Sioux Falls Seminary

table of

contents 2014 I Issue 2

The impact is published two times per year for the benefit of the seminary community, friends, alumni, and supporters.

1

from the

president

10 partnership summit house

A new strategic partnership with Compassion Child Care in Sioux Falls is providing affordable housing and care to single mothers.

President Greg Henson talks about theological education at Sioux Falls Seminary and the process of developing people for their unique callings.

2 4

missio dei

& students introducing

kairos

Learn more about our new track within the M.Div. and MACL programs that weaves theological education into a student’s life and ministry.

6

alumni in action

spotlight

Sioux Falls Seminary impact

11 12 14

sfs event

calendar staying in

touch

the Jesus

team

Ron Sisk, Academic Vice President and Dean, talks about what it means to be picked for the Jesus team.

served the local church and the far reaches of the world. She built relationships and led trainings on trafficking, helping others learn more about the issues involved. In addition, she helped women and girls, locally and globally, find new life through Be Free Ministries.

‘09

‘95

‘10

Michele Bradley was honored in September at the ABC Dakotas Biennial gathering in Rapid City, SD, as she begins retirement. Having spent much of her adult life as a prison pastor, Michele was instrumental in building the Church of Hope in the SD Women’s Prison in Pierre. Through her work, she helped inmates experience forgiveness and hope.

‘96

Joel Higgins is serving The Celebration, a United Methodist Church in Brandon, SD.

‘99

Judy De Wit has moved from Fridley, MN, to Sioux Falls, SD. She began a part-time position at Stronghold Counseling Services in May 2014 and is now a Doctor of Ministry student at the seminary.

‘07

Nancy Manning is serving Salem United UMC, PC-USA, and Montrose UMC in South Dakota.

‘08

Ryan Zurbriggen is now serving as the part-time family pastor at First Baptist Church in Elgin, IA.

Miranda Schunk was licensed as a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor by the Minnesota Board of Behavioral Health and Therapy in September 2014. She lives in Windom, MN.

Suzanne Grote is now a chaplain at Altru Health Systems Valley Memorial Homes in Grand Forks, ND. Gwen Mader is pastor of Britton, Claremont, and Hecla United Methodist Churches in South Dakota. Sara Nelson has been appointed Senior Pastor of First United Methodist Church in Watertown, SD, where she has served as Associate Pastor.

‘12

Derek Baum is serving as the Associate Pastor at First United Methodist Church in Aberdeen, SD. Victor Ojo and family have moved from New York to Mansfield, TX (a suburb of Dallas-Fort Worth), to be closer to their extended family.

‘13

Matt Paulson is sharing some of the knowledge he has gained while building his online business in his first book, 40 Rules for Internet Business Success, now available on Amazon.com. Hilary Satrang is the new Interim Director at Wesley Acres Camp

and Retreat Center in Dazey, ND. Wesley Acres is a UMC facility and a ministry of the Dakotas Annual Conference. Hilary previously served as parish administrator at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Rapid City, SD, and in cooking and hospitality at Outlaw Ranch in the Black Hills of SD.

in memoriam ‘97

Wesley Halbritter died peacefully on April 16, 2014. After retiring from the laboratory at Sioux Valley Hospital, he became a pastor and did hospice ministry. He was 86 and is survived by his wife, Beverly, four sons, six grandchildren, one great-grandson, and a brother.

‘98

Jeff Thumma died July 13, 2014, following a dive training incident. He volunteered with the Minnehaha County (SD) Emergency Management Dive Team and assisted several churches in the Sioux Falls area while concurrently working at CitiBank. He is survived by his parents, Greg and Carol Thumma, a brother, and two grandmothers.

‘04

Kevin Karhoff passed away on October 18, 2014, at the age of 47, after a battle with lymphoma. He served churches in Michigan and Iowa and was the Associate Pastor at First Reformed Church in Mitchell, SD. He is survived by his wife, Kim, seven children, and a son-in-law. 13

2014 I Issue II


A North American Baptist Seminary

2100 S. Summit Ave. I Sioux Falls, SD 57105

Sioux Falls, SD I Omaha, NE I Online 800.440.6227 or 605.336.6588 info@sfseminary.edu

2014 I Issue 2

www.sfseminary.edu www.sfseminary.edu/omaha #SFSeminaryImpact

I

Have you ever wondered why you were called to serve with God and if you are worthy to be a member of his team? John 15:16 reads: “You did not choose me, but I chose you. And I appointed you to go and bear fruit, fruit that will last, so that the Father will give you whatever you ask him in my name.” For a lot of us, the call of God came sneaking into our lives like a surprise spiritual ice bucket and just about as welcome. I’ve heard many stories over the years. Some people talk about avoiding their calls for ten, fifteen, or thirty years. I put it off for a decade myself. I knew I was called from the time I was fifteen years old. But I’d never met a preacher I really liked, so it took me a long time to realize that pastoral ministry actually was the best way to do what I really wanted—help people learn how to live well. Just as it was for the disciples Jesus spoke with that night in the upper room, it was for me and it may also be for you. We didn’t really choose this. Jesus chose us. It is natural, of course, to wonder what in the world Jesus must have been thinking. I’m guessing that’s what people wondered about that first bunch of disciples too. We can almost hear their questions as if they were our own. “What, who me, Jesus? I hate getting up in front of people! I couldn’t be a counselor! I’d never get it right! I can’t be anybody’s pastor. I’m too much of a mess myself!” Yet with all of our doubts, sins, Sioux Falls Seminary impact

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By Ron Sisk Academic Vice President and Dean

14

impact

and shortcomings, we got picked for the Jesus team. God gave us each a unique calling to serve with him, but how do we go and bear fruit? Seminary is where great ideas, great thoughts, and great ministries begin growing. You need what happens here. This time will shape everything you do in the kingdom. For me, seminary made all the difference. But hear me carefully—it’s not about what happens here. Getting picked for the Jesus team is about what happens out there. “I chose you that you should go and bear fruit.”

developing people for their unique callings

+ life & ministry

+ character

knowledge/Skills

= developed for call

People have hard lives, and they need the Lord. We can bear fruit that lasts. We come to seminary to learn how to interpret scripture for what it really says. We come to learn the rich pageant of Christian history and theology, so we know what the church has thought and done, what we’ve gotten right, and what we’ve gotten wrong since that night when Jesus talked with his disciples about the vine and the branches. We come to learn how the human mind works, how families are put together, and how to help people learn to make good decisions. We come to think through what it really means to live the Christian life for ourselves and how to lead the church of Jesus in the 21st Christian century. We come here so we can go out there and, with God’s help, make a difference. That’s what happens when you get picked for the Jesus team. 2014 I Issue II

Impact Magazine: 2014, Issue 2  

Sioux Falls Seminary is excited to play a role in God's mission by developing people for their unique callings.

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