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TRAVEL

Shipping central Berthed in Singapore with time to kill? Eytan Uliel provides the inside lo-down

H

ead to the Robertson Quay area and start your day with breakfast at one of Singapore’s hippest cafes: Kith Cafe – hands down best coffee in town, or Epicurious – green eggs and ham, oddly delicious (both on Robertson Quay); or Baker & Cook (nearby on Martin Road) who make pastries to die for. Then stroll along the Singapore river, from Robertson Quay to the city (about 3 km). Along the way you’ll pass Clarke Quay, the Singapore parliament and civic district, and Boat Quay, with spectacular views of Singapore’s skyline. Criss-cross the river at various bridges and make sure you see the bronze sculptures that dot the riverfront along the way. For a touch of culture, pop into the Asian Civilisation Museum at Empress Place, where you’ll find a stunning museum in an equally stunning setting. Next up: time to shop. Singapore is a land of shopping malls, so why wouldn’t you have a quick wander through the best one? Cab to the Ion on Orchard Mall. The top floors are wall-to-wall designer brand names; you’ll find cooler, funkier stores in the basement levels. Remember most stores don’t open until 11am. If you are up for it, stroll along Orchard Road and check out some of the

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other malls – the section from Ion to Paragon Mall is best. By now you should be hungry again, so make like a local and head to a hawker stall, which is where Singaporeans get most of their daily sustenance. The Opera Food Court at Ion is a bustling yet gentle introduction to eating, Singapore style. Try local favourites like Hainan chicken rice, laksa (spicy curry noodles and seafood soup) or Singapore chilli crab. For real local flavour try coffee si – strong brewed coffee with condensed milk, and a serving of kaya toast (a green jam, made of pandan leaf, egg yolk and sugar – sinfully delicious). Finish with a deep-fried dough-ball ‘butterfly’, and your local dining credentials are assured. A short cab ride from Orchard

Road is the Singapore Flyer (pictured), one of the world’s largest observation wheels. A full cycle takes thirty minutes. Yes, it is cheesy and touristy, but it’s worldclass, and the views along the way give a real sense of the modern miracle that is Singapore. For the truly adventurous, visit Kenko Fish Spa in the mall beneath the flyer. Plunge your feet and lower-legs into tubs of water and watch small fish nibble the dead skin away. It might sound gross, but is a completely unique sensory sensation (a cross between massage, static-shock and tickling), and your feet will be smoother than a baby’s bottom when you are done. You can also get an excellent reflexology foot-massage or shoulder rub as well. Singapore’s latest gob-stopping attraction – the Gardens by the Bay – is a short cab ride from the Flyer, and is absolutely worth the hype. Here you will see flowers and plants galore, spectacularly displayed in giant greenhouses, complete with indoor mountains and waterfalls. Don’t miss the Supertrees, a grove of massive treelike structures covered in flora of the world. Once you’re all flowered out, cross the bridge and head to the Marina Bay Sands Hotel. Its tri-towers are an architectural marvel. Buy a ticket and ride the elevator up to the Skypark. Views are sublime, and the world’s most spectacular infinity swimming pool, 58 floors up, is something to behold. A cocktail up in the sky, or a meal at the ultra trendy Ku De Ta restaurant, will be the perfect way to end your day. ●

Your Day Plan Summary: 12 hours, around $250: Activity

Time

Cost

Breakfast at Robertson Quay

1 hours

$20

Stroll the Singapore River

1 hour, 30 minutes

Free

Visit the Asian Civilisation Museum

1 hour

$10

Mall visit

1 hour

Free

Hawker stall lunch

1 hour

$15

Ride the Wheel

1 hour

$30

Be eaten at the Fish Spa

1 hour

$75

Commune with nature at Gardens by the Bay

2 hours

$30

Amazing view at Marina Bay Sands

1 hour, 30 minutes

$40

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Maritime CEO Issue One 2014  

The former head of Hong Kong’s Pacific Basin and one of the best known wheeler dealers in shipping is on the cover of Maritime CEO’s first i...

Maritime CEO Issue One 2014  

The former head of Hong Kong’s Pacific Basin and one of the best known wheeler dealers in shipping is on the cover of Maritime CEO’s first i...

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