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Website: www.nano.upenn.edu Email: info@nano.upenn.edu Visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/singhcenternano/ Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/UPennSinghNano

SINGH CENTER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018

Visiting Address Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology University of Pennsylvania 3205 Walnut Street Philadelphia, PA 19104

Singh Center for Nanotechnology Annual Report 2017-2018

Member National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure

University of Pennsylvania


2017-2018 Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Annual Report


Foreword 6 Facilities Updates & Usage 8 Research Highlights 18 Singh Center Initiatives 29 Events Graduates 60 Research News 68 Research Achievements 70 Patents & Statistics 70 Awards & Honors 72 Publications 76


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology


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2017-2018 Singh Center for Nanotechnology .


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

A Message from the Director As we celebrate our fifth year of operations at the Singh Center for Nanotechnology, I am pleased with our continued transformation from a select group of independent research laboratories to a cutting-edge multipurpose nanotechnology facility that serves the community needs of academic, industrial and entrepreneurial users in the Mid-Atlantic region. Guided by our mission in being a catalytic force for research and innovation, our Center has shown robust advancement and growth in all areas of operations, most notably in the efforts to provide training and educational opportunities to our internal users and external community. Our user numbers have diversified for the fourth consecutive year, and it’s worthwhile to note, our customers have substantially increased geographically; users came from 33 states, up from 19 in 2017 and 13 in 2016. We attribute a portion of this increase to the programs and training our Center provides, and the tremendous support of the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure (NNCI) program, a coalition comprised of 16 university research and development facilities dedicated to nanoscale research throughout the United States. With this increase, our Center has sought to bolster our strategic planning with the establishment of an external advisory board. The role of this board, a group of accomplished industry and academic professionals with experience in global business and technology, is to provide guidance and assistance with the needs and strategic goals of the Center. Their collective experience and insight should prove resourceful in our managerial decision-making efforts. As part of the NNCI network, the Singh Center for Nanotechnology participated in several consortium activities throughout the year, including hosting the October 2017 NNCI Meeting where 80 representatives of the 16 nodes were in attendance. Additional cooperative NNCIrelated activities include leading efforts to negotiate the purchase price of network-wide nanolab materials and consumables. At the core of our mission is the equipment that we provide to our users. Our goal is to ensure the Center’s tools and equipment meets the needs of our most advanced researchers. We have made a substantial financial investment in the acquisition of two transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) to complement our suite of next-generation tools. One of these microscopes is the first of its kind installed in North America, and allows researchers to study materials at the atomic level with unprecedented precision.


In addition to fulfilling our research mandate, our commitment to provide resources to the regional community has taken considerable investment in two key areas of support: education and outreach. From an educational perspective, the University, in understanding the global impact of nanoscience, has established nanotechnology courses. These courses offer academic instruction on nanotechnology, and provide hands-on instruction in device making and fabrication. Every year the Center's Research for Undergraduate Experience (REU) Program provides research opportunities to undergraduates from outside colleges and universities. The ten-week program assigns research projects to students along with Penn faculty mentors to offer academic guidance to develop broader scientific and career skills. Within the last three years, our Seed Grant program has offered close to $50,000 in lab fees, equipment, and technical support to more than 25 startup companies and individuals engaging in early stage product development. Continuing this trend on the academic front, the Center has created several training programs to provide students with hands-on instructions in cleanroom techniques and building nanofabrication devices. The Graduate Student Fellows program (GSF), offers in-the-lab training on device creation and tool maintenance, and provides masters students with additional skills beyond classroom instruction. The Center continues to support year-round initiatives in nanotechnology outreach education, including STEM-focused events such as NanoDay. The Center also provides boot camps and training courses to the community at large every semester on nanoscience topics. As we’ve surpassed our projections during this five-year mark, our focus is intensely concentrated on the future to ensure this bedrock of success provides a solid foundation to build upon for the approaching years. Through strategic planning and engagement with the School of Engineering and Applied Science, and support from the University of Pennsylvania, we’re confident of our vision and path for the future. Our success wouldn’t have been achieved without the support of our family of staff, faculty and advisors of the Center. For their commitment, I commend their efforts through these first five years, and I welcome their engagement in challenges and endeavors in the approaching years. Sincerely, Mark G. Allen

Director, Singh Center for Nanotechnology University of Pennsylvania


2017-18 Annual Report 2017-2018 Annual Report Singh SinghCenter Centerfor forNanotechnology Nanotechnology


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Facilities Updates and Usage


2017-2018 Facilities Highlights

Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility (QNF)

Scanning and Local Probe Facility

The QNF supports nanoelectronics, nanomaterials

The facility contains multiple atomic force

development and integration, soft matter, and

microscopes for measuring the size, shape,

MEMS/NEMS. In addition, a complimentary

and electro-mechanical properties of materials,

facility for soft materials and laser micro-

devices, and structures with nanometer

machining is maintained by QNF for diverse

precision. Two of these AFMs work with a

materials processing, microfluidics, and

confocal Raman microscope for combined

lab-on-chip activities.

force and optical measurements while another is paired with a fluorescence microscope.

Property Measurement Facility

Nanoscale Characterization

Capabilities include magnetometry, thermal

Nanoscale Characterization supports

and electrical transport, heat transfer capacity

equipment for electron and ion beam analyses

and UV-vis-IR optics.

for university and industry users. The facility includes an integrated sample preparation laboratory with complete sample coating and plasma cleaning capabilities, as well as cryogenic TEM sample preparation equipment.


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Facilities Highlights EQUIPMENT ACQUISITION The Singh Center for Nanotechnology capital investments totaled $5.4M in equipment purchases for 2017-2018. Most prominent among the acquisitions are the JEOL NEOARM, and the JEOL F200 microscopes. The JEOL NEOARM is the first instrument of its kind installed in North America and is essential for research projects that require the highest levels of magnification. Additional purchases include four process furnace tubes, as well as enhancements to our scanning probe facility, and some additional smaller support pieces of fabrication equipment.

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2015-16 Annual Report 2017-2018 SinghEquipment New Center for Nanotechnology

Microscopes JEOL NEOARM and JEOL F200 The JEOL NEOARM is a scanning / transmission electron microscope, equipped with a spherical aberration corrector for the probe-forming optics. This corrector has improved stability and optimizes 5th order aberrations, leading to <0.7Ă&#x2026; imaging at 200kV, and <1.6Ă&#x2026; at 30kV. The instrument is equipped with a high-brightness cold field emission source, and two large area energy dispersive x-ray spectrometers that permit rapid atomic-resolution EDS mapping. It is also equipped with a Gatan Image Filter, incorporating Dual EELS capability to ensure accurate energy calibration, and a K2-IS direct electron detector at the end of the filter. This detector has a detection quantum efficiency that is close to 1.0, and thus allows high sensitivity, leading to the detection of very high energy losses. The detector also allows 2k x 2k image acquisitions at 400 frames/second, and 512k x 512k image acquisitions at 1600 frames/second, making it optimal for in-situ/ operando microscopy. The instrument will have STEMx capability, which allows rapid collection of diffraction images during STEM acquisition, and which thus allows ptychography (a technique to overcome diffractionpattern phase problems), strain measurement, and other novel forms of quantitative image information extraction. The JEOL F200 is is a 200kV scanning / transmission electron microscope with a cold field emission source, two large area energy dispersive x-ray spectrometers, and Gatan OneView IS camera for in situ/operando imaging at 30 frames per second. Like the JEOL NEOARM, the F200 will also incorporate STEMx capability.

The JEOL NEOARM transmission electron microscope is the first to be installed in the United States.

The MRL Cyclone Furnace stack recently installed in the nanofabrication lab..


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Scanning Probe Lab Enhancements Raman-NSOM System A third laser (491 nm) for the Raman-NSOM system to complement the wavelengths of the existing lasers has been added. The 491 nm laser provides higher spatial resolution and improved Raman yield for a given amount of laser power when compared with the other lasers and is better suited to analyze surface-enhanced Raman modes. Disco TIRF The Disco TIRF is a special implementation of Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence microscopy that introduces a pivoting mirror to rotate the source of laser illumination. By rotating the laser beam 360 degrees azimuthally (at about 30 Hz) we in effect replace a point source with a ring source, yielding a more even excitation and sharper fluorescence images.

Process Hood for Furnace Operations To accompany the new furnaces the Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility installed a new wet bench from ReynoldsTech to handle the RCA clean steps to prepare samples for processing in the new MRL Cyclone furnaces. The wet bench is equipped with two heated quartz tanks, an unheated tank for dilute HF, and three dump-rinse tanks to ensure the cleanliness of samples prior to processing in the furnaces. Probe Station The Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility has acquired and installed a manual probe station from Micromanipulator, capable of accommodating samples up to 200 mm wafers, with five individual probes available, and separate chuck biasing. It is currently supported with two Keithley model 2450 Source/Meter units which are capable of sourcing/measuring 20 mV to 200 V, 10 nA to 1 A, with an output power of 20 Watt.

Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility Additions Furnaces The Local and Scanning Probe facility recently installed a 4-stack MRL Cyclone furnace from Sandvik Thermal Process Inc. equipped with: • An atmospheric wet/dry thermal oxidation tube • An LPCVD tube for deposition of silicon nitride and HTO, • Two atmospheric anneal tubes plumbed with Nitrogen and a 5% hydrogen/95% nitrogen mix for annealing RCA cleaned, and non-RCA cleaned samples. The system is designed to accommodate sample sizes ranging from pieces to full 150 mm wafers and up to a load of 50 wafers.

The Reynoldstech RCA clean hood installed to support furnace operations..

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Other Academic Large Corporation Small Corporation

2017-2018 Singh Center for Nanotechnology Users

Affiliation Usage

Affiliation Breakdown of

Disciplinary Usage

Disciplinary Breakdown of Singh Users

Singh Users

Materials Life Science and Medicine

Local Site Academic

Physics

Other Academic

MEMS

Large Corporation

Process Optics

Small Corporation

Other

July 2017- June 2018 | USAGE BY USER AFFILIATION AND DISCIPLINE

Hours usage by user affiliation Disciplinary Usage

Hours usage by user discipline

Affiliation Materials Breakdown of Singh Users Life Science and Medicine

Disciplinary Breakdown of Singh Users Materials

Physics Local Site Academic MEMS

Life Science and Medicine

Process Other Academic Optics Large Corporation Other

Physics

Process

Small Corporation

Optics

MEMS

Other

July 2017- June 2018 | USAGE BY LAB HOURS

Fees by user affiliation

Fees by user discipline

Affiliation Breakdown of

Disciplinary Breakdown of

Singh Users

Singh Users Materials

Local Site Academic Other Academic Large Corporation Small Corporation

Life Science and Medicine Physics MEMS Process Optics Other

July 2017- June 2018 | USAGE BY USER FEES


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Usage Highlights SITE USAGE HIGHLIGHTS The pie charts on the left show how the 600 unique users at the Singh Center identify their field of research. These statistics were gathered for the fiscal year July 1, 2017 to June 30, 2018. The graphs on top show the relative number of users from Penn, other academic institutions, and from industry. Approximately one third of our users come from outside the Penn Community. Materials and Life Sciences/Medical research make up a significant portion of our researchers areas of interest. The center charts show the number of hours researchers accumulated using the equipment at Singh. The lower charts shows the distribution of fees among researchersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; affiliations and disciplines.

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2017-18 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

July 2017- June 2018 | External Academic Users and Corporate Users

MANTH Hub

Singh Center

has served

600 unique users

July 2017- June 2018 | External Academic Users and Corporate Worldwide Users Germany

Canada

France

Brazil São Paulo

USA

Canada British Columbia Quebec Toronto Ecuador Cumbayá, Quito France Gières Grenoble Paris Germany Bochum

Ecuador Brazil


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Research Engagement SITE RESEARCH ENGAGEMENT As a multi-purpose facility for nanoscience and nanotechnology, the scope of research conducted at our center varies from wearable technologies to implantable medical devices. Designated as the Mid-Atlantic Nanotechnology Hub (MANTH) by the National Science Foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (NSF) National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure (NNCI) program, the Singh Center for Nanotechnologyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s successful expansion of users from 33 states, up from 19 in our previous year, illustrates the diverse opportunities the Center offers its users. The highlights on the following pages provide a small sample of research conducted in the Singh Center for Nanotechnology.

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2015-16 Annual 2017-2018 Annual Report Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology


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Research Highlights


2017-2018

Research Highlights

Geosciences Research

Life Sciences and Engineering Collaborative Research

The study of the transformation of minerals down to the nano- and near-atomic scale allows for exploration of their geological history and the effects of environmental exposure (e.g., weathering). Analogously, transformations occurring at this scale can be used to improve our knowledge of the mechanisms and lead to understanding mineral-related health effects and comprehend how to “disarm” these minerals through bioremediation strategies. The combination of ESEM and advanced TEM techniques give a complete picture of the state of minerals starting from their crystallo-chemical identity and morphology down to the oxidation state and binding of its atoms. Ruggero Vigliaturo’s group from Penn’s Earth and Environmental Science department conducted this research.

Researchers from the Penn schools of Medicine and Engineering and Applied Science studied the diffusion of quantum dots (QDs) within cells to gain a better understanding of a drug delivery mechanism. The QDs were injected into individual cells with a nano-pipette and then tracked via fluorescence microscopy at the Local and Scanning Probe facility. Particle tracking illustrated in the figure below, revealed significant enhancement in the mobility of biocompatible quantum dots, within fibrosarcoma cells versus their healthy counterparts, fibroblasts, as well as in actin destabilized fibroblasts versus untreated fibroblasts, demonstrating that intracellular diffusion of non-specific nanoparticles is enhanced by disrupting the actin network, which has implications for drug delivery efficacy. This work has been recently published in Soft Matter, 2017, 13, 1873-1880, “Intracellular nanoparticle dynamics affected by cytoskeletal integrity”, Martha E. Grady, Emmabeth Parrish, Matthew A. Caporizzo, Sarah C. Seeger, Russell J. Composto, and David M. Eckmann.

Complex agglomerate of bundles made of chrysotile asbestos fibers as seen with the ESEM.

Individual QD particle trajectories within (a) fibroblasts, (b) fibrosarcoma cells, and (c) fibroblasts with cytochalasin D treatment with overlay insets where all 699, 634, and 353 trajectories are shown.


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

The Singh Center Industry Users The Singh Center has initiated a campaign to encourage industrial users to utilize the facilityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resources. Here are the research directions of two such recent members. Lumiode Lumiode is a semiconductor startup working on next generation microdisplays for augmented reality. Their core-technology is the integration of LEDs with silicon thin-film transistors to address the need for highbrightness and high-efficiency displays. Much of our development work relies on flexible R&D facilities to perform fast iterations on semiconductor process development and process optimization. At our center, Lumiode engineers use a wide variety of equipment in the nanofabrication facility including photolithography, deposition, etch, and metrology. Ultimately, Lumiode's aim is to perform process optimization develop a scalable semiconductor process and work towards commercialization of these microdisplays.

CorMedix Inc. CorMedix Inc. (NYSE: CRMD), is a biopharmaceutical company headquartered in Berkeley Heights, NJ that is leveraging its flagship product, taurolidine, a nonantibiotic antimicrobial, to develop a pipeline of medical devices as therapeutic products for the prevention and treatment of infectious and inflammatory disease. CorMedix is working in partnership with multiple toptiered institutions to develop and test a biodegradable composite delivery system containing particles encasing taurolidine for treating infection in severe deep burn wounds. The company-initiated work at the Singh Center in Spring of 2018: first, using SEM to characterize particles prepared by spray-drying; second, preparing a suite of particles with varying compositions of polymer encapsulating varied levels of taurolidine by a double emulsion precipitation strategy. This program is supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R43GM122156.

A Lumiode LED array under probe testing.

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2017-2018

Research Highlights

Academic and Industry Collaboration: Microfluidics Devices for Pharmaceuticals Pharmaceuticals owe their effects not only to their chemical composition, but also to their packaging of these drugs into specific physical formulations. Many drugs are encapsulated in solid microparticles, whose size and shape determine the timing of the drugâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s release. Consistency is a key parameter and standard manufacturing techniques may produce uneven results. Microfluidics provides a potential solution to these problems. However, there are intrinsic limitations to how fast these microscale devices can work. A team at Penn, in collaboration with researchers at the pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline, has created a new architecture that can manufacture these drug particles a thousand times faster than ever before. These systems, built in our centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s microfluidics lab, contain more than 10,000 of devices running in parallel, all on a silicon-and-glass chip.

Top-down optical microscope views of 3 different droplet formation devices and their cross-sections.

This work is described in an upcoming article in Nature Communications. The team is led by David Issadore, assistant professor in the School of Engineering and Applied Scienceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department of Bioengineering.

Droplet formation in action for 2 different devices and 3 different flow conditions.


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Outside Academic Research Use: Electrode Coatings for Neurostimulation The exchange of charge (and information) between biological systems (ion-containing solutions) and implantable electrodes (conduction electrons) can be facilitated using large surface area or reactive coatings. Iridium oxide (IrO2) coatings have been investigated for this purpose. These have been synthesized using reactive sputter deposition and characterized at the Singh Center. Under some deposition conditions, including increased deposition pressure, oxygen partial pressure, or temperature, a striking microstructure, as shown in Figure 2, is observed. The microstructure can be adjusted by changing the deposition parameters. Images of example microstructures are shown, all at the same magnification, in Figure 1.

Note that the Research microstructures differ significantly. The Academic To Startup: coatings with varying perform differently Nanoscale Poresmicrostructure For Dna Sequencing when tested electrochemically in phosphate buffered Precision drilling of nanopores in silicon suspended saline solution using cyclic voltammetry measurements. on glass chips for DNA sequencing has been carried From left to right in Figure 1, the coatings enhance out with our Transmission Electron Microscopes. charge exchange by factors of 6.2, 26, and 51 times The nanopore diameter is in the range of 1-2 nm (for the exchange found on a bare electrode. IrO coatings comparison, a single stranded DNA molecule2 is 1.1 nm in without the additional microstructure improve coupling diameter) and the measurement error of +/- 0.1 nm. The by only a factor of four. membrane thickness is about 3 to 5 nm, monitored in situ the electron energy loss signal. Error! Reference Thisby research has been conducted by Professor Jeffrey source not found. shows a schematic drawing of the Hettingerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s group from Rowan University. nanopore device. The image in Error! Reference source not found. shows an electron microscope view of one of these pores. A publication of this work is in preparation. Prof. Marija Drndicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lab at Penn conducted this research.

Top, figure 1: Three IrO2 coatings on stainless steel substrates deposited under different conditions imaged at the same magnification. Bottom, figure 2: Secondary electron images of the microstructures observed on the surfaces of IrO2 coatings at two magnifications.

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2017-2018

Research Highlights

Academic Research to Startup: Nanoscale Pores for DNA Sequencing Precision drilling of nanopores in silicon suspended on glass chips for DNA sequencing has been carried out with our Transmission Electron Microscopes. The nanopore diameter is in the range of 1-2 nm (for comparison, a single stranded DNA molecule is 1.1 nm in diameter) and the measurement error of +/- 0.1 nm. The membrane thickness is about 3 to 5 nm, monitored in situ by the electron energy loss signal. Figure 1 shows a schematic drawing of the nanopore device. The image in Figure 2 shows an electron microscope view of one of these pores. A publication of this work is in preparation. Professor Marija Drndicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lab at Penn conducted this research.

Top, figure 1: Schematic top-down and cross-sectional views of nanopore devices. Bottom, figure 2. A transmission electron microscope image of a nanopore.

Goeppert Goeppert, a startup company and user of the Singh Center, has the goal of disrupting the $10 billion DNA sequencing market. Their nanopore-based DNA sequencing methods, based on the technology, are able to sequence large continuous DNA strandsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; a feature highly desired by the DNA sequencing market. As a user, Goeppert was able to deliver the first generation of their nanopores to beta customers and researchers worldwide. Goeppert attributes the expertise of the Singh staff and their enthusiastic support of startups to their successful completion of a beta project in half the time originally planned.


2017-2018 Annual Report

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Singh Center for Nanotechnology

A Single Mask Process for the Realization of Fully-isolated, Dual-height MEMS Metallic Structures Separated by Narrow Gaps Multi-height metallic structures are of importance for various MEMS applications, including master molds for creating 3D structures by nanoimprint lithography, or realizing vertically displaced electrodes for outof-plane electrostatic actuators. Normally these types of multi-height structures require a multi-mask process with increased fabrication complexity. In this work, a fabrication technology is presented in which fully-isolated, dual-height MEMS metallic structures separated by narrow gaps can be realized using a selfaligned, single-mask process. The main scheme of this proposed process is throughmold electrodeposition, where two photoresist mold fabrication steps and two electrodeposition steps are sequentially implemented to define the thinner and

thicker structures in the dual-height configuration. The process relies on two self- aligned steps enabled by the electrodeposited thinner structures: a wet-etching of the seed layer utilizing the thinner structure as an etch-mask to electrically isolate the thinner and the thicker structures, and a backside UV lithography utilizing the thinner structure as a lithographic mask to create a high-aspect-ratio mold for the thicker structure through-mold electrodeposition. The latter step requires the metallic structures to be fabricated on a transparent substrate. Test structures with differences in aspect ratio are demonstrated to showcase the capability of the process. This work has been recently published in the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, 2018, 28 (2) 027001, “A single mask process for the realization of fullyisolated, dual-height MEMS metallic structures separated by narrow gaps,” Yuan Li, Min Soo Kim, and Mark G. Allen.

Top left: SEM images of microfabricated ring-like test structures. (top) HAR KMPR molds after the second lithography step, 100 µm in height and (a) 30 µm, (c) 20 µm and (e) 10 µm in gap sizes. (b), (d) and (f) show the corresponding dual-height (5 µm and 35 µm) structures after the second electrodeposition and mold stripping. Bottom left: SEM images of microfabricated square-like test structures. (top) HAR KMPR molds after the second lithography step (a), (c), (e), (g) and (i); and the corresponding dual-height (5 µm and 35 µm) structures (b), (d), (f), (h) and (j) after the second electrodeposition and mold stripping.


2017-2018

Research Highlights

Devices for Smart Soil Moisture Monitoring Plasmonic nanostructures provide excellent platforms for colorimetric sensors in chemical, biological, and environmental applications. In contrast to the existing library of plasmonic sensors, an angle-independent optical sensor that is designed for monitoring soil moisture and operating on rough surfaces. The optical moisture sensor is constructed by coating hydrogel on top of an ultrathin, plasmonic Au nanorod lattice array, built at the Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility. The refractive index changes of the hydrogel upon exposure to moisture are transduced into spectral shifts of the resonances of the array. Robust, eco-friendly optical moisture sensors with angle-independent resonances provide a promising sensing platform for smart soil moisture monitoring important to tackle the challenge of water scarcity in agriculture.

2-D Materials Characterization and Device Fabrication Monolayer materials are sensitive to their environment because all of the atoms are on their surface. A group at Penn is investigating how exposure to the environment affects the electrical properties of CVDgrown monolayers of MoS2 by monitoring electrical parameters of MoS2 transistors as their environment is changed from atmosphere to high vacuum. The mobility increases, and contact resistance decreases simultaneously as either the pressure is reduced, or the sample is annealed in vacuum. A previously unobserved, non-monotonic change in threshold voltage with decreasing pressure was discovered. This result could be explained by charge transfer on the MoS2 channel and Schottky contact formation due to adsorbates at the interface between the gold contacts and MoS2. This project was done through a collaboration of the Marija Drndic and A.T. Charlie Johnson groups at the Department of Physics at Penn.

Professor Cherie Kaganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s group from Pennâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Electrical and Systems Engineering department conducted this research.

a.the moisture sensor fabrication process. b. a scanning electron microscope view of the Au nanorod array. c.visible light transmission spectra changes with moisture exposure.

a) a top-down view of MoS2 devices, b) a close-up of one device. c) the Raman spectra as atmospheric pressure is applied. d) a schematic of the device.


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Penn Engineering Research Gives Optical Switches the ‘Contrast’ of Electronic Transistors Current computer systems represent bits of information — the 1’s and 0’s of binary code — with electricity. Circuit elements, such as transistors, operate on these electric signals, producing outputs that are dependent on their inputs. As fast and powerful as computers have become, Ritesh Agarwal, professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, knows they could be more powerful. The field of photonic computing aims to achieve that goal by using light as the medium. In a paper published in Nature Communications, he and his colleagues have taken an important step: precisely controlling the mixing of optical signals via tailored electric fields, and obtaining outputs with a near perfect contrast and extremely large on/off ratios. Those properties are key to the creation of a working optical transistor.

Agarwal Lab members Ming-Liang Ren, Jacob S. Berger, Wenjing Liu and Gerui Liu all contributed to the research. This research was supported by the US Army Research Office through grants W911NF-11- 1–0024 and W911NF-12-R-0012–03, and the National Science Foundation through a Materials Research Science and Engineering Center seed grant, award number DMR11– 20901. Nanofabrication and electron microscopy characterization was carried out at Penn’s Singh Center for Nanotechnology.

To address this issue, Agarwal’s research group started by finding a system which has no background signal to start: a nanoscale “belt” made out of cadmium sulfide. Then, by applying an electrical field across the nanobelt, Agarwal and his colleagues were able to introduce optical nonlinearities to the system that enable a signal mixing output that was otherwise zero. “Our system turns on from zero to extremely large values, and hence has perfect contrast, as well as large modulation and on/off ratios,” Agarwal said. “Therefore, for the first time, we have an optical device with output that truly resembles an electronic transistor.”

Figure A shows a diagram of the the Agarwal research group’s “nanobelt.”

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2017-18 Annual 2017-2018 Annual Report Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology


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2017-2018 Initiatives


2017-2018 Initiatives

Mid-Atlantic Cleanroom Managers Meeting The Singh Center staff organized several regional meetings of nanofab managers, which we refer to as the Mid-Atlantic Region Cleanroom Managers Workshops. Our Center created the semi-annual meetings in 2015 and has played a leadership role since then. The Advanced Science Research Center at City University of New York (CUNY) hosted the meeting in April 2017, where the discussion focused on the coordination of efforts between regional cleanroom facilities, environmental health and safety personnel, and local response teams. The George Washington University Nanofabrication and Imaging Center hosted the meeting in October 2017, where the discussion focused on the various methods used by facilities in the region to determine and manage the cost recovery and charging for maintaining operations of the respective facilities. The Carnegie Mellon University Nanofabrication Facility hosted the meeting in April 2018, where the discussion focused on the methods used for evaluating new equipment, identifying sources for and means of securing funding for these acquisitions, and a variety of budgeting strategies to cover the installation and long-term costs of ownership.


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Attending Institutions: New York Brookhaven National Laboratory City University of New York Columbia University

New Jersey Rutgers University Princeton University

Pennsylvania Pennsylvania State University Carnegie Mellon University Drexel University Singh Center of Nanotechnology University of Pennsylvania

Delaware University of Delaware

Maryland Johns Hopkins University

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universities and government laboratories were in attendance

National Institutes of Standards & Technology Army Research Laboratory University of Maryland

Washington D.C. Georgetown University George Washington University

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2017-2018 Initiatives

Wednesday Open Process Sessions

Cleanroom Summer School

Each Wednesday, staff members hold an open forum for users in the Mid-Atlantic community. The primary purpose of the event is assembling Singh Center staff with researchers to offer solutions to their fabrication problems â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ranging from simple devices to complex multi-level process integration issues. It also allows researchers with limited backgrounds in fabrication to learn how staff and their community peers design devices and work through the challenges of device fabrication.

The Quattrone staff have continued to develop and implement its Cleanroom Summer School, open to all. The course consists of a series of lectures, device design sessions, advanced processing applications and some hands-on fabrication techniques. Topics include lithography (optical, imprint, direct write), reactive ion etching, thin film deposition (thermal, electron beam, sputtering), process metrology, and Design of Experiments. These lectures and demos were held throughout the summer. Over 100 attendees participated in at least one of the sessions of the Cleanroom Summer School last year; approximately 20% of the participants were from other universities or industry.


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Cleanroom Boot Camp In addition to the Cleanroom Summer School, the Singh Center staff developed a more intensive “boot camp”. This two-day program teaching basic nanofabrication techniques consisted of both lectures and an in-fab workshop. The lectures consisted of the following fundamental processes for nanofabrication: • Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition) • Resist application and contact lithography • Reactive Ion Etching • Key metrology techniques for monitoring the thin film deposition, lithography, and etch processes The workshop portion included gowning up for the cleanroom and applying the lecture principles on the actual tools over two days. Twelve participants were able to gain hands-on experience with photolithography, plasma etching, deposition, and characterizations. The participants took home a processed 100mm silicon wafer that they used throughout the boot camp program.

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2017-2018 Initiatives

Big Ideas through Small Technology

The Seed Grant program was developed to encourage the use of the facilityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resources by providing grants for equipment use, ranging in size from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars, to start-up and small companies. The program is launched in the spring of each year. Applicants submit proposals describing their projects and goals and Singh staff evaluate them over several meetings. Final applicants review the scope of work with the staff in-person or remotely in the form of a presentation and Q&A before funding decisions are made.

2018 Seed Grant Winners The 2018 Singh Center for Nanotechnology recently announced the recipients of the 2018 Seed Grant Competition awards. The grants are providing $17,500 in laboratory and equipment time funding for nine startup and entry-level businesses. In addition, the program has been expanded to allow up to two successive years of funding if judged appropriate by the staff.

The Big Ideas through Small Technology Seed Grant Competition grants are providing $17,500 in laboratory and equipment time funding for 9 startup and entry-level businesses.


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

2018 Innovation Seed Grant Competition Winners Pouya Dianat – NanoGrass Solar LLC Opto-plasmonic Photodetectors for Low-Cost Optical Communications Beyond 100Gb/s. This project produces high-speed photodetectors in an Indium-Phosphide material system that operates in tele/data communication rates beyond 200Gbit/sec, and are compatible with Silicon Photonics (SP) technology through heterogeneous integration with silicon. This product solves a bottleneck in high-speed SP Integrated Circuits that use Germaniumbased photodetectors as optical receivers. Jay Morreale – P-Brane The purpose of this project is to demonstrate a graphenebased frequency source that will emit electromagnetic radiation. Wafer size graphene FETs are to be fabricated in four iterations or batches with the goal of reaching 10-100 GHz output frequencies. Katie Van Aken, Adam Fontecchio – Dragon Spectral This project aims to integrate tunable thin film optical filters onto a CMOS detector for future applications in miniature cameras. In theory, the technology could be used to integrate hyperspectral imaging into mobile devices for applications in allergen detection, drone integration, food quality control, etc. Theresa Dankovich – Folia Water SEM imaging of our metal nanoparticle papers of our current product, Folia Filters, and future products under development enables determination of aggregation/ nanoparticle morphology and substrate porosity. This nano-material characterization is important for quality control and materials performance purposes as well as future product design improvements for other materials applications, such as medical uses or food packaging. (continuation from previous year) Brandon Kao, Rui Jing Jiang, Adarsh Battu – VisiPlate We are creating a revolutionary treatment for the secondleading cause of blindness in the world: glaucoma. VisiPlate, a nanoscale ocular implant, is transforming the industry paradigm for glaucoma treatment. Small nanoporous plates are utilized to keep open ocular drainage channels, allowing alleviation of intraocular pressure in the eye.

Tanya Garza – Chromation The ability to pattern an opaque, light-absorbing layer at the wafer scale is important for manufacturing of Chromation’s spectrometers. The goal of this project is to develop a simple process to pattern adhesive-backed black polyimide on fused silica while maintaining the transparency of the cleared fused silica regions. Neha Saxena, Thais Sielecki – PolyAurum LLC PolyAurum’s novel gold-polymer nanoparticles have shown increased tumor cell death, decreased tumor size, and increased survival rates in animal tumor models. Here, we aim to characterize our particles before and after scaleup to determine if the use of a Precision Nanosystems NanoAssemblr is viable for future, pre-clinical studies. Sumedh Surwade, Kalpana Madgula – SAS Nanotechnologies LLC We propose to develop smart, self-healing, polymer-based microcapsules encapsulated with corrosion inhibitor as anticorrosive additives in coatings. At the onset of corrosion, these microcapsule additives in the coating will be activated and release the corrosion inhibitor at the corroding site, protecting the underlying metal from corrosion. Zhao Li, Ping Wang – Paper-Based HIV POC Device The proposed POCT technology develops a high-sensitivity and multiplexed electrochemical immunoassay on a paper-based microfluidic device, which can not only provide quantitative results for both HIV-1 and HIV-2 in ~20 minutes, but also offer the potential to early detect HIV at 2 weeks after infection.

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2017-2018 Initiatives Research Outreach

Events and Activities The Singh Center staff took active roles in hosting several organized events in the past year to promote the Center, the NNCI, and nanotechnology in general. One example is a workshop for the 2nd Microfluidics Congress in July 2017. This conference on the research, manufacturing, and business of microfluidic devices included a keynote presentation by George Whitesides from Harvard University. The one-day workshop, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip technologies for commercial product development: strategies, technologies, markets and applicationsâ&#x20AC;? was held in the Glandt Forum at the Singh Center for Nanotechnology. The agenda for the event aimed at providing a broad overview of Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) technologies as an enabling technology for new product development in diagnostics and the life sciences. Emphasis was put on the complete development process for commercial microfluidics-enabled products, covering aspects of development strategies, manufacturing technologies, application cases, markets as well as aspects of commercialization and latest trends in the academic world. Recent product examples were presented as well as lessons learned during all stages of the development and commercialization process of LOC-enabled devices.


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Microfluidics Workshops Staff members, led by our Soft Lithography Lab manager Eric Johnston, continue to host monthly Microfluidic Workshops as a form of outreach to local university medical schools (Penn, Drexel, Temple, Jefferson and Cooper) as well as to other researchers in the region. We continue to target MD/PhD (research driven) programs and have now added several more industrial researchers. The workshop format of the core course remains the same as that described in previous reports: Researchers enroll in a six-hour session that consists of lectures and hands-on device fabrication. Each researcher provides a design of interest for the workshop that will be built into a functioning device by the end of the day.

We continue to find that researchers make use of our library of device designs for particle sorting, gradient generation, and fluid mixing. Over 120 people have participated in this program from May 2017 to April 2018. In the past year, two advanced workshops, (Solving Problems in Microfluidics, and Two-Level Microfluidic Fabrication) were added to complement the core program.

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2017-2018 Initiatives Research Outreach

Singh Center for Nanotechnology Staff Conference and Panel Leadership Our staff members have been active in contributing to local and national technical conferences and panels. Below is a list of highlights of these activities.

Noah Clay Director of the Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility • Conference Chair of the University, Government, Industry, Micro/Nanotechnology (UGIM) Symposium at the University of Pennsylvania. This internationally attended conference on micro- and nano-technology laboratory management, safety, and training is held every 2 years. Gerald Lopez Director of Business Development • Session Chair for Electron Beam Lithography II at the Electron, Ion, and Photon Beam and Nanofabrication (EIPBN) Conference, held in Orlando, June 2017. • Presented research at EIPBN on "The Impact of Isofocal Dose-Based Proximity Effect Correction on Effective Process Blur Tolerance" • EIPBN 2018 Commercial Session Committee member responsible for the planning and execution of marketing strategies to generate revenue through the sponsorship of conference activities and exhibitor participation. Total revenue through the exhibitor portal has outperformed past conferences with fewer exhibitors and ahead of previous campaign efforts. • Chair for the Meeting for Advanced Electron Beam Lithography (MAEBL) April 2018 at the Singh Center for Nanotechnology.

Meredith Metzler Senior Manager for Thin Films and Equipment Engineering • Served as session chair for the American Vacuum Society’s “Nano Optomechanical Systems/Multiscale Nanomanufacturing” session at the AVS Annual Meeting, held in Tampa Florida, October 29 – November 3, 2017 • Coordinated Mid-Atlantic Nanofabrication Manager’s Meetings, October 2017 hosted at George Washington University and April 2018 hosted at Carnegie Mellon University. George Patrick Watson Director of User Programs • Pat Watson is on the Advisory Committee of the Electron, Ion, and Photon Beam and Nanofabrication Conference (EIPBN) and served as the Program Chair of the June 2016 meeting held in Pittsburgh, and as a session chair for the 2017 meeting.


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

79

Total Papers

29,379

Worldwide Total Downloads

23,600 7,262 Protocols and Report Downloads

Worldwide Downloads in 2017–2018

16,363 Tool Operation Downloads

Network Information Dissemination The Singh Center for Nanotechnology has published approximately 79 documents in the Penn Library System through Scholarly Commons (http://repository.upenn.edu/qnf/). For the calendar year 2017, there have been over 7,262 downloads of Protocols and Reports. These documents, covering the spectrum of nanofabrication-related topics. In addition, there were 16,363 downloads of tool operation data last year. Downloads are worldwide and have increased to a total of over 23,600 downloads last year.

Example submissions from 2017-2018 include: • Surface Roughness Dependence of Inkjet Printing of Ag Nanoparticles • DisCharge: Spin-On Anti-Charging Agent for Electron Beam Lithography • CSAR 62 Contrast Curves • CSAR 62 Spin Curve • MicroChem S1818 Contrast Curve Optimization • Troubleshooting on the sample preparation for SU-8 to SU-8 wafer level bonding • Mask Flaw Propagation Using 360nm Long Pass Filter • SU-8 Post Development Bake (Hard Bake) Study • Alignment Error Examination of Elionix E-Beam Writer ELS-7500EX

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2017-2018 Initiatives Network Activities

Annual NNCI Meeting Over 80 participants from the 16 member sites, the NSF, and the NNCI Advisory Committee attended the NNCI conference, hosted by the Singh Center for Nanotechnology. The first day included site overviews from their directors, and this year the overviews were presented in the form of short presentations followed by panel discussions. The four topics of these panel discussions: Redefining Traditional Roles; Resource Allocation and New Equipment; Future Research Directions; and New Education and Outreach, were chosen to help the sites understand how to best serve our users. The panels invoked lively questions, answers, and comments from the participants. On the second day of the conference, breakout sessions looked into Facility Management, Diversity, New Business Development Concepts, and Training Programs and Workshops. These sessions were followed by a review of the discussions before all of the attendees. The meeting concluded with an Advisory Board Report. Parallel meetings were held to discuss nanotechnology education and nanotechnology societal and ethical implications. Two technical talks were presented at the conference: Professor Mehdi Javanmard from Rutgers University described research his group is conducting at the Singh Center on electro-fluidic nanotechnology, which provided an outside academic user perspective; and Professor Eric Stach from the University of Pennsylvania, who described the new research avenues he expects to pursue with the electron microscope suite the center is currently installing.


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

NNCI Commercialization Committee

NNCI Equipment, Maintenance and Training Working Group

The NNCI Commercialization Committee, consisting of W. Wilson, D. Dickensheets, K. Walsh, T. Thornton, Y. Lo, D. Herr, M. Allen (chair); and G. ’Pat’ Watson (staff), met in April 2018. The Committee is charged with understanding, promoting, assessing, and reporting on the commercial and translational impact of the NNCI Sites and the NNCI Network.

Meredith Metzler, a Singh Center senior manager and an expert in thin film processing, is currently the chair of the Equipment, Maintenance and Training Working group (EMT). The working group is tasked with identifying and addressing issues that affect member sites in the areas equipment, maintenance, and training. Early conversations have focused on cost saving measures related to equipment operations and upkeep. As an example, each facility faces financial constraints that require aging equipment to be kept operational rather than being replaced. Many facilities in the network have aging fleets of tools and systems that are becoming more resource intensive to maintain. By leveraging our experience and relationships, both within the network and with equipment vendors, we feel there is an opportunity to collectively address these challenges.

To this end, the Committee discussed a number of tasks to impact translation of NNCI-enabled technology, including: assessment of NNCI site and network economic impact; collection of commercialization best practices and ‘success stories’; understanding what programs can be recommended to the nodes to foster commercialization;understanding how university nodes can connect existing or newly developed educational programs (e.g., in entrepreneurship) to further commercial impact of the NNCI; and to identify ways that the network can be more than the sum of its parts when it comes to commercialization and translation of nanotechnology.

The working group now consists of members representing University of Pennsylvania, Stanford University, University of Texas - Austin, Cornell University, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, and University of Washington is planning to meet in September at Stanford University during the NNCI Etch workshop.

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2017-2018 Initiatives Network Activities

NNCI Photolithography Working Group Pat Watson, Director of User Programs, along with staff engineers David Jones and Gyuseok Kim, are leading this new working group. Photolithography is an essential component of micro- and nanofabrication technology and is available in some form in all cleanroom facilities. However, there are restrictions on the substrate size, the topography of the substrate surface, the chemistry of the substrate surface, resist type and thickness, and especially feature size, that limit the type of devices some researchers can construct at some facilities. This working group intends to construct a database of the expertise and special equipment available across the network so that when researchers have unique requirements, site staff can search to see if a process is available to help create in-house capability, or which network lab can run the process for that user. A database would also allow the working group to identify where gaps in capabilities are, and what new equipment or process development may be required in the future. The database would make use of the new capabilities that are planned for the NNCI website; a password-protected part of the site may be used to store, grow, and share this information across the network. A public access version of this information will also be made available. The database can be expanded in the future to keep track of other capabilities, such as lithography simulation software. Members of cleanroom staff from 9 NNCI sites are participating in the Photolithography Working Group. They are: • • • • • • • • • • •

Paul Kimani, University of Minnesota Phil Himmer, Michigan State University Jiong Hua, University of Nebraska Xuekun Lu, University of California, San Diego Garry Bordonaro, Cornell University Curt McKenna, University of Louisville Vinh Nguyen, Georgia Institute of Technology Mary Tang, Stanford University Pat Watson, University of Pennsylvania David Jones, University of Pennsylvania Gyuseok Kim, University of Pennsylvania


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Node-To-Node Research Collaboration

Singh Center for Nanotechology Leadership on NNCI Cost Savings

The Singh Center for Nanotechnology has made use of equipment andcollaborated with the following NNCI partner sites:

At the Singh Center, as with other NNCI sites, we rely deeply on excellent relationships with our suppliers and competitively bid all purchases to achieve best pricing, particularly in the area of consumables. This activity is spearheaded by Charles Veith, a staff member from our Center. Last year, the Singh Center for Nanotechnology was able to secure materials such as high purity gold and electron beam resist at much lower costs and pass those savings onto other NNCI sites. Recent purchasing highlights from the Singh Center consist of:

• The Singh Center provided LPCVD SiNx deposition and annealing services to the NNCI partner the University of Washington. • Cornell CNF and the Singh Center continue to assist each other on several fronts. The CNF has provided anti-stiction coatings to Singh users for nano-imprinting. The CNF has also provided BPSG deposition services and SiNx ALD coatings to Singh researchers. • We have assisted the Cornell CNF with ellipsometry measurements, and with supplying XeF2 for Si etching. We also helped them restore equipment capability by assisting with a turbomolecular pump swap. • We have helped node member the University of Minnesota with supplies of the e-beam lithography resist ZEP 520A.

Providing an alternative source for PDMS curing agent. Dow Chemical has had difficulties providing this vital component for microfluidic device fabrication. The Singh Center identified Gelest as another source and shared this information with other network nodes.

Bulk purchase of XeF2. The Singh Center for Nanotechnology has purchased a relatively large quantity of this important gas-phase Si etchant at a substantially lower cost and is providing it to Network labs (and other government and academic labs) including Cornell.

Alternative for O-rings for vacuum systems. The Singh Center for Nanotechnology has had identified a new domestic supplier of these vital parts of vacuum equipment. The new supplier is giving a 30 to 60% reduction in cost and substantial reduction in lead-time.

• Expendables discount information has been shared with other NNCI sites and will lead to a 40% reduction in costs of these materials. We intend to fold this activity into the NNCI vendor relations working group, currently chaired by Michael Khbeis from the University of Washington’s NNCI nanofab facility.

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2017-2018 Initiatives Educational Outreach

Singh Center for Nanotechnology Education and Outreach Programs Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) The Singh Center hosted six REU students for a 10week summer research program. Students are hosted in labs and work on projects that use the Singh Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Facilities (Quattrone Nanofabrication, Nanoscale Characterization, Scanning and Local Probe). Students participate in weekly brown bags and lectures series and complete assignments leading to a final oral presentation and written paper based on their summer research.

2018 NNCI REU Cohort The 2018 students are rising seniors, and rising juniors, from the mid-Atlantic institutions of Carnegie Mellon University, Georgetown University, Muhlenberg College, Rowan University, St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s University, Thomas Jefferson University. Five of the six students participated in the NNCI REU Convocation at Research Triangle Nanotechnology Network site in Chapel Hill, NC on August 5-7, 2018.

Students completed general lab safety and responsible conduct of research training, and any additional lab safety and equipment training appropriate for their specific projects. The weekly brown bags, two field trips, and the mentor-mentee BBQ provided opportunities for the students to develop relationships with each other through the program that will enhance their longerterm networks.

2018 Singh Center REU students


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

2018 Projects and Host Labs To host an REU student, Penn faculty were required to propose summer projects that involved the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s use of the Singh Center facilities. Students were matched to projects based on their project preferences and the preferences for specific backgrounds and skills requested by the hosting labs.

Name

Project Title

PI Department

Lisanne De Groot

Self-powered triboelectric sensors for soft robots

J. Pikul

Mechanical Engineering

Hannah Kline

Quantum photonic engineering in diamond

L. Bassett

Electrical Engineering

Patrick Mulcahey Fabrication of transparent Ti3C2 titanium carbide electrodes for studying neural circuits

B. Litt/F. Vitale

Bioengineering/Neurology

Alexander Ng

Electrode Preparation using Focused Ion Beam (FIB) for in situ transmission electron microscopy

E. Detsi

Materials Science & Engineering

Melanie Padalino

Characterization of the morphology of amyloid fibrils consisting of a-sheets

F. Gai

Chemistry

Deborah Wang

Transient Biodegradable Moisture Sensors for Agriculture

K. Turner

Mechanical Engineering

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2017-2018 Initiatives Educational Outreach

Local College Educational Outreach: Swarthmore College Seven students from Prof. Kyle Wagnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Swarthmore College course â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Topics in Surface Chemistry and Surface Analysisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; visited The Singh Center for Nanotechnology in April 2018 for a presentation and in-cleanroom demonstration of fabrication technology. The course is seminar style and intended for junior and senior chemistry majors and minors. A theme of the course is based on the ability to design and specifically modify surfaces at the molecular level and how this enables miniaturization of many technologies. Topics include methods to fabricate micropatterned surfaces, and techniques used to characterize surfaces chemically and spatially using microscopy and surface spectroscopies. The students were introduced to fundamental components of micro and nano fabrication technology in the cleanroom. They were given hands-on experience with photolithography, plasma etch, and deposition tools and processes. In total, seven students visited the Singh Center, and all are graduating this Spring. Of the students who visited, one student is an engineering major, while the other six were chemistry or biochemistry majors (one dual major with math). Three of the students are attending graduate school this Fall and will study chemistry or chemical engineering. Three other students plan to attend graduate school or medical school after a gap-year. The success of this program has encouraged the Singh Center to reach out to other local colleges.


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

K-12 Outreach Collaboration During the 2017-2018 academic year, the Singh Center, and the Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter (LRSM) hosted monthly field trips for Philadelphia middle and high school students. During these visits, students had introductory lessons on Nanotechnology and Materials Science, had lunch, and went on campus tours. Some students also suited up for the clean room at the Quattrone Nanofabrication facility, where they observed and, when possible, assisted with lithography, etching, and soft-lithography. Over the course of the year, 124 students from four schools participated in the field trip program, of which 81% were under-represented minorities and 96% were low-income. All expenses (including transportation, lunch, and supplies) were covered for participating schools. One example of this activity is our centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hosting a visit for students attending the Boyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Latin of Philadelphia Charter School last year. Twenty-five students from this school gowned up and toured the cleanroom, and participated in lithography, etch, and microfluidics processing activities. Singh Staff also participated in career day events at the near-by Alexander Adaire Elementary school in May 2018. Staff explained the principles of nanofabrication through presentations with handouts and cleanroom gowning demonstrations throughout the day for kindergarten to 8th grade students.

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2017-2018 Initiatives Educational Outreach

High School Outreach | NanoDay@Penn In October, 2017, the Singh Center hosted a group of 155 high school students from around the Greater Philadelphia Region for a day of STEM related fun and learning. These students were treated to a whole host of nano-related activities, including: microscopy demonstrations, a window tour of the Singh Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cleanroom and a hands-on microfluidics activity. Members from the School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS) AddLab and GRASP Lab, also volunteered to demonstrate principles of 3-D manufacturing and robotics. However, one of the most popular activities for both the high school students and the army of University of Pennsylvania volunteers that supports this event came in the form of the 10 different experiment demo tables.

Nanoday@Penn 2017 :

155 students

from 10 Philadelphia schools


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

We were fortunate this year to have nine different Faculty Lab Groups out of the Penn SEAS and School of Arts and Sciences (SAS) Departments, along with students from the Nanotechnology Master’s Program and others run this year’s experiment demo tables. At these tables, students from 10 different high schools learned about everything from thin films and water desalination filters to how to create gold nanoparticles. When asked about their experience, one high school student said that “This was one of the best experiences that I’ve had with engineering”, while multiple high school educators indicated that this event has given them ideas of how to incorporate more nanotechnology related activities into their curriculum, and that this event is consistently rated as one of the best experiences of the year for their class.

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2017-2018 Initiatives

Site Curricular Education

ESE 536 – Nanofabrication and Nanocharacterization

MSE 610 –Transmission Electron Microscopy And Crystalline Imperfections

This course was developed and offered for the first time in the Center for Nanotechnology facilities in Spring 2017; it ran again in Spring 2018 and is intended for first year graduate students interested in the experimental practice of nanotechnology. There continues to be a heavy demand from students based on registration and 19 students took part this year.

This course describes the theory and application of transmission electron microscopy methods to problems in materials science and engineering, condensed matter physics, soft matter, polymeric materials, inorganic chemistry and chemical engineering. The principles of microscope operation, electron scattering, image formation and spectroscopy will be described, with an emphasis on both theory and experiment. This year, hands-on laboratory work using the Nanoscale Characterization microscope facility was emphasized.

Students gain familiarity with both top-down and bottom-up fabrication and characterization technologies with hands-on device fabrication. This is achieved through the realization of a variety of microand nanoscale structures and devices that can exhibit either classical or quantum effects at the small scale. Although concepts relevant to the laboratories are emphasized in lecture, it is expected that students will already have been exposed to many of the underlying theoretical concepts of nanotechnology in previous courses. Last year’s teaching assistants went on to a career at Global Foundries and to graduate schools at the Universities of Connecticut and Pennsylvania. Students from that first class went on to intern at NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Students from this year’s class are using the skills they they learned in the course by interning at Micron Semiconductor, Trumpf Photonics, and Boeing this summer.


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Other Penn Courses The Singh Center for Nanotechnology continues to host a variety of courses in its core laboratories that support undergraduate and graduate students. Below is a list and a description of each course.

ESE 218 Electronic, Photonic, and Electromechanical Devices This first course in electronic, photonic and electromechanical devices introduces students to the design, physics and operation of physical devices found in today's applications. The course describes semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices, including light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, photovoltaics, transistors and memory; optical and electromagnetic devices, such as waveguides, fibers, transmission lines, antennas, gratings and imaging devices; electromechanical actuators, sensors, transducers, machines and systems.

ESE 460/574 Semiconductor Microfabrication This is a laboratory-based course on fabricating microelectronic and micromechanical devices using photolithographic processing and related fabrication technologies. Lectures discuss: clean room procedures; microelectronic and microstructural materials; photolithography; diffusion, oxidation; materials deposition; etching and plasma processes. Basic laboratory processes are covered for the first two thirds of the course with students completing structures appropriate to their major in the final third. Students registering for ESE 574 will be expected to do extra work (including term paper and additional project).

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2017-2018 Initiatives

MEAM 537 Nanomechanics and Nanotribology Engineering is progressing to ever-smaller scales, enabling new technologies, materials, devices, and applications. This course provides an introduction to nano-scale tribology and the critical role it plays in the developing areas of nanoscience and nanotechnology. We discuss how contact, adhesion, friction, lubrication, and wear at interfaces originate, using an integrated approach that combines concepts of mechanics, materials science, chemistry, and physics. We cover a range of concepts and applications, drawing connections to both established and new approaches. We discuss the limits of continuum mechanics and present newly developed theories and experiments tailored to describe micro- and nano-scale phenomena. We emphasize specific applications throughout the course. Reading of scientific literature, critical peer discussion, individual and team problem assignments, and a peer-reviewed literature research project is assigned as part of the course.

MSE 250 Nanoscale Materials Laboratory The course provides an in-depth experimental introduction to key concepts in materials and the relationships between nanoscale structure, their properties and performance. The use of laboratory methods to examine the structure of materials, to measure the important properties, and to investigate the relationship between structure and properties is covered. Emphasis is placed on a complete exposure of Nano- and Materials science as a field. Most experiments require multiple laboratory sessions, with priority given to experiments in which students explore the entire range of materials science, from the synthesis of materials and the characterization of structure, thermodynamics and composition, to the measurement of properties and discussion of applications. Students are able to realize working devices as an end product of the key laboratories in this course. Practice in oral and written communication is realized through course assignments.


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

MSE 465/565 Fabrication and Characterization of Nanodevices

MSE 500 Experimental Methods in Materials Science

This course surveys various processes that are used to produce materials structured at the micron and nanometer scales for electronic, optical and chemical applications. Basic principles of chemistry, physics, thermodynamics and surface/interfacial science are applied to solid state, liquid, and colloidal approaches to making materials. The approaches to nano- and microfabrication: photolithography, soft lithography, nanoimprint lithography, 3-D printing and selfassembly, are covered. The course is heavily lab based, with 25% of class time and 30% of the homework devoted to hands-on experiences. Lab assignments are a series of structured individual/group projects. Evaluation is based on 3-4 lab reports, 4 problem sets with journal paper reading assignment, and a final project design.

This laboratory course introduces students to a variety of experimental methods used in materials science and engineering. Hands-on training will be provided for atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction and scattering, mechanical testing with image capture, Rutherford backscattering, and dynamic light scattering. Students will use numerous software packages for data collection and analysis, as well as being introduced to LabVIEW as a method for customizing experiments. In addition, students will see demonstrations of scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron diffraction and analyze data from these methods.

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2017-2018 Initiatives

Graduate Student Fellows Program Understanding the gap that exists from academic learning to practical experience for young professionals is an issue the Singh Center for Nanotechnology has chosen to address. Under the direction of Noah Clay, and Guyseok Kim, the Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility has instituted the Graduate Student Fellows (GSF) program to provide Master's students with hand's on instruction in cleanroom device fabrication to complement their academic education. A total of ten master students at Penn engineering were chosen as Graduate Student Fellows (GSF). Conceived in 2015 by Noah Clay, Staff Director of the Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility (QNF), the GSF program is a highly regarded and competitive program that provides Penn masters students with nanofabrication experience in a world class cleanroom. The GSFs will develop hands-on skills in fabricating devices, establishing fundamental and advanced level processes, and developing and participating in educational components for lab courses and workshops. “We want the GSFs to have hands-on nanofabrication experiences which cannot be obtained by textbook”, Gyuseok Kim, GSF program coordinator, mentioned. For a year, each student makes their own device, such as multichannel biosensors, transducers for cochlear implants, nanopore membranes, MEMS devices, 2-D graphene sensors, and quantum dot devices. Projects are collaborations with Penn faculty as well as faculty from other institutions, such as Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and UFPR in Brazil. While GSFs develop their device, they will also learn how materials and tools are used in the processes, and how to troubleshoot. “Another purpose of this program is to share our knowledge to the world”, Gyuseok added. As a member of National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure (NNCI), QNF has shared the protocol and tool data since 2015 through Scholarly Commons. As a team, GSFs are building a community to share the nanofabrication experience through weekly meetings to discuss and share progress on their devices and processes. Each GSF presents to the team every third week, giving them the opportunity to practice public speaking and professional development. Since 2015, the GSF program at QNF has become an integral and vital element of the continuing goal of service to the University of Pennsylvania as well as to the wider academic and business communities.


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Graduate Student Fellows Program Awardees Name

Program

FRANCISCO SALDANA FERNANDEZ

NANOTECHNOLOGY MASTERS

AKSHAYA VENKATAKRISHNAN

NANOTECHNOLOGY MASTERS

HANNAH HASTINGS

NANOTECHNOLOGY MASTERS

MENGWEI LIU

MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

MEIYUE ZHANG

MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

HANG QIAN

MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

NINGZHI XIE

MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

ERIN PUZO

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

JEFF WU

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

UNNATI JOSHI

CHEMICAL AND BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING

55


2017-2018 Initiatives Community Outreach

League of United Latin American Citizens' National Educational Service Centers Upward Bound Program Fieldtrip Site

Community Outreach

During the academic year, the Singh Center coordinates monthly after-school programming in Penn labs and facilities for LNESC Upward Bound students. Eight visits were organized between June 2017 – May 2018 for this group of mixed-level high school students.

The Singh Center participates in various large-scale public outreach events, typically partnering with other organizations to provide demos and activities. Recently, the Singh Center partnered with the A.J. Drexel Nanomaterials Institute to present a booth at the Philadelphia Science Fair’s Science in the Park event on April 21, 2018 (https://www.fi.edu/psf/programs/ science-in-the-park). At the booth, volunteers from the Drexel and the Singh Center engaged visitors with answering the question, “How Big is Nano?” .

The sessions were entitled: • Using car crash dummies and neuroscience to study injury • From Flashlights to Brain Monitors, Diffuse Optics in Tissue • Nanotechnology: why the world at the scale of atoms is making big changes on our technology • Building on the Nano-Scale • Robots, Origami, and 3-D Printing: Machines for All • Controlling Light and Colors • Scanning and Local Probe Facility: Singh Center Microscope Labs • Glasses and the Glass Transition • The Electronic Nose: How we can detect cancer and other diseases in the early stages


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Marketing and Communications Website

Newsletter and Other Documents

We have made a substantial effort in social media engagement this year, beginning with the relaunch of the Singh Center website. The objective of the site development re-design was to increase the visibility of the centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s programs and initiatives. Elements of the new design allow for a direct search of our inventory of equipment and tools. News and events are now prominently displayed on the top third of the home page to share upcoming information and events. The number of our menu categories on the homepage navigation bar has been increased from 4 to 7 (now including Education, Initiatives, and Facilities) that chronicle additional engagements of the Singh Center for Nanotechnology.

John Russell, Program Coordinator, has created a digital newsletter in the past year, intended to provide our mid-Atlantic community with current information about our center-related activities. Each issue includes sections on recent activities of faculty, research, and information about upcoming programs and events. In addition to the newsletter, Russell has digitized our annual reports and facility brochures to provide downloadable versions of these informational resources to our network. Social Media Presence John Russellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s social media efforts in Twitter and Facebook have produced sizeable increases of audience engagement. The production of posts on these platforms have been comparable from the previous year, with an audience reach of 19,970 in 2017 to 40,074 in 2018 (a 101% increase). Twitter impressions for the Singh Center for Nanotechnology have also shown a substantial rise in viewer connections, with 23,230 impressions in 2017 to 37,114 in 2018 (a 60% increase).

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2017-2018 Initiatives Community Outreach

Nanotechnology Technicians Training Program The Community College of Philadelphia (CCP) and the Singh Center organized two meetings for industry representatives to provide their thoughts about the need for and structure of a nanotechnology technicians training program. The first meeting was on August 31, 2017 at the Singh Center and the second was held at CCP on December 12, 2017. The meetings were attended by 12 and 6 external participants, respectively. Participants were selected as representatives of industry that would be potential future employers of nanotechnology technicians. Discussion centered around the skills and training the participants felt would be necessary for success of newly hired technicians in their companies, labs or industries more generally. Despite most participants stating that their companies were currently or would in the future be interested in hiring technicians with the type of nano- and/or micro-scale training discussed in the meetings, the evidence that the opportunities would be hyperlocal was less strong. Most CCP students would be seeking work that is within commuting distance from Philadelphia. Thus, CCP decided to begin its training program by adding a single nanotechnology course to its curriculum, rather than a full program, and observe how the uptake and interest progressed from that course.


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

The industry meetings also revealed that training in additive manufacturing could provide skills that make students competitive for local jobs. Based on this information, CCP plans to start a course focused on additive manufacturing, in addition to the new course in nanotechnology. The Singh Center for Nanotechnology is also in a position to inform this course due to its partnership with and co-investment in equipment in Penn’s Additive Manufacturing Laboratory. Towards these aims, CCP has outlined the nanotechnology course content with feedback from the Singh Center, and over the summer, will flesh out the laboratory activities for the course. The expected timeline is that the course development and CCP administrative approval process will be completed during Fall 2018 and that the course will be offered in Spring 2019. Course and lab content are also being informed by materials used by the NACK Network, nanoHUB, Nano-Link and peer NNCI sites involved with curriculum-design at community colleges to leverage existing resources and expertise. The new Nano course would follow CCP’s standard of designing courses that allows for smooth transfer of credit for students who pursue bachelor’s degrees in four-year institutions. CCP courses typically enroll 12-24 students per semester. The impact of the Nano course on students’ future job and academic interests would help CCP further evaluate whether building a larger nanotechnology program would serve both students and local employers. For the additive manufacturing course, CCP has started to collect initial information about the appropriate content by meeting with the Penn Engineering AddLab staff, a partner of the Singh Center, which supports multiple courses in Penn’s Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics. wCCP plans to further discuss with members of the local advanced manufacturing industry about strategic training in this area.

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2015-16 Annual Report 2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology


61

2017-2018 Events and Graduates


2017-2018 Events

2017 Annual User Meeting The annual User Meeting was held on October 17-18th at the Singh Center for Nanotechnology. This event was designed to showcase the research being done by the Singh Center’s User Community, along with that of the greater Mid-Atlantic Research Community. It also provided a platform to increase nanotechnology awareness and demonstrate specific applications of the technology. As in the past, the conference was broken into specific segments designed to appeal to broad range of interests and backgrounds. This year we featured nanotech in medicine, energy and the environment, and entrepreneurship, in addition to a segment featuring research being done solely by the Singh user community. On the first day of the event, a cross-section of the Singh Center’s User Community presented work on topics ranging from the creation of new coating for biomedical electrodes to learning about how companies like ExPonent regularly use the Singh Center’s facilities to conduct failure analysis. The next day’s activities were directly focused on the advances from the Singh Center’s user community. Highlights included presentations by Dr. Brian DiPaolo from Halo Lab, Dr. Steven Baxter from Arkema, Dr. Matthew Sfeir from Brookhaven National Labs and Dr. John Lettow from Vorbeck Materials.

Mid-Atlantic Electron Beam Lithography Workshop The 2nd annual Meeting for Advanced Electron Beam Lithography workshop was held at the University of Pennsylvania Singh Center for Nanotechnology in April 2018. The meeting provided an intimate space to bring together the community to openly discuss topics devoid of conference formality and hardware vendors. The purpose of the meeting was to connect active novice to experienced tool owners and users to exchange practical and directly applicable knowledge. Structured talks, lectures and planned discussions in additional to over three hours of networking is built into the one-day program.Topics included novel processing with HSQ and epitaxial growth; demystifying proximity effect correction; leveraging scripting to automate data creation, preparation and exposure; discussing common issues in EBL; optimizing shape fidelity through proper shot placement; and fabricating superconducting quantum bits (qubits).


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

University, Government, Industry, Micro-nanotechnology | UGIM Symposium At the twenty-second meeting of the UGIM Symposium, a total of 41 presentations were given at the University of Pennsylvania from June 24-27th, 2018. There were approximately 290 attendees from 21 countries, as well as 42 sponsors (micro- and nanotechnology equipment providers) who contributed graciously to the success of the Symposium. Noah Clay served as Conference Chair. The purpose of the symposium was to assemble educators and researchers involved in micro/ nanotechnology management around the world and to provide a forum for exchanging information and presenting new lab operations and educational concepts. Representatives of micro/nano fabrication facilities, ranging from new labs to nationally and internationally recognized facilities, have found this symposium an excellent forum for exchanging information and networking. Industry/university interactions, including new equipment trends, collaborative research, and training efforts are included.

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2017-2018 News

PhD Degree Graduates

Name

Dissertation Title

Advisor

Department

BRIAN D. COSGROVE

Engineering Complex Microenvironments to Manipulate and Study Cellular Mechanobiology

ROBERT L. MAUCK

BE

GOPINATH DANDA

Two-Dimensional Nanopore and Nanoporous Devices for Molecular Sensing and Ion Selectivity

MARIJA DRNDIC

ESE

YANHAO DONG

Cation Kinetics and Electric Field Effect in Zirconia

I-WEI CHEN

MSE

YUAN LI

Microlamination Based Lumped and Distributed Magnetic MEMS Systems Enabled by Through-Mold Sequential Multilayer Electrodeposition Technology

MARK G. ALLEN

ESE

CHEN LIN

Microstructures and Mechanical Metamaterials for Energy Conversion and Other Applications

IGOR BARGATIN

MEAM

IRIS BI LIU

Capillary Assembly of Microparticles on Curved Fluid Interfaces

KATHLEEN J. STEBE

CBE


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Singh Center for Nanotechnology

PhD Degree Graduates

Name

Dissertation Title

Advisor

Department

YANG LU

Quantum Electronic Interference in Nano Amorphous Silicon and Other Thin Film Resistance Memory

I-WEI CHEN

MSE

TZIA MING ONN

Preparation of Active and Stable High-Surface Area Catalysts by Atomic Layer Deposition

RAYMOND J. GORTE

CBE

FRANKLIN S. STINNER JR.

Flexible, Photopatterned, Colloidal CdSe Semiconductor Nanocrystal Integrated Circuits

CHERIE R. KAGAN

ESE

DANIEL J. STRICKLAND

Mechanics of Colloidal Assemblies

DANIEL S. GIANOLA

MSE

EDWARD TRIGG

Controlled Folding in Precisely Functionalized Polyethylenes: Designing Nanoscale Lamellar Structures for ION Transport

KAREN I. WINEY

MSE

EMMABETH PARRISH VAUGHN

Nanoparticle Diffusion in Polymer Networks

RUSSELL J. COMPOSTO

MSE


2017-2018 News

Master's Degree Graduates

Name

Program

WEI-HAN CHEN

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

MING ONN

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

MICHAEL SYNODIS

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

RYAN YUAN HUANG

Electrical Engineering

CHEN LIN

Electrical Engineering

ADAM L ZACHAR

Electrical Engineering

KATHRYN ROSE HASZ

Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

LISA MARIANI

Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

ANA ISABEL ALVAREZ

Materials Science and Engineering

MARK ROBERT COCHRANE

Materials Science and Engineering

MING YUAN CHUANG

Materials Science and Engineering

ZILING DENG

Materials Science and Engineering

JINTAO FU

Materials Science and Engineering


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Master's Degree Graduates

Name

Program

XING GAO Materials Science and Engineering XIN LIU Materials Science and Engineering YIWEI QIANG

Materials Science and Engineering

MURARI RAMKUMAR

Materials Science and Engineering

TIANCHENG WANG

Materials Science and Engineering

YUCHEN WANG

Materials Science and Engineering

CHENGYU WEN

Materials Science and Engineering

SHUANG WU

Materials Science and Engineering

MINGYUE ZHANG

Materials Science and Engineering

RIMJHIM CHAUDHARY

Nanotechnology

GLEN RICHARD DE VILLAFRANCA

Nanotechnology

SURYA GONA

Nanotechnology

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2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology


69

2017-2018 Research News


2017-2018 Researchers

2017â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2018

28

Confidential Disclosure Agreements

23

Invention Disclosures

22

Provisional Patents Filed

12

5

Non Provisional Patents Filed

Sponsored Research Agreements

13

Patents Issued

LEAD INVENTOR

PATENTS

Jason Burdick

Protease triggered release of molecules from hydrogels

Jason Burdick

Stabilizing shear-thinning hydrogels

I-Wei Chen

Non-volatile resistance-switching al- and si-based thin film devices

Russell Composto

Multifunctional chitosan grafted surfaces and uses thereof

Dennis Discher

Bioreactor for isolation of rare cells and methods of use

Nader Engheta

Manipulating and routing optical signal narrow paths on graphene and graphene as a platform for metamaterials

Raymond Gorte

Direct carbon fuel stack designs

Alan T. Johnson

Graph Paper: A scaleable, printable, sheet of high mobility graphene on flexible substates

Cherie Kagan

Nanocrystal thin film device fabrication methods and apparatus

Virgil Percec

Modular synthesis of amphilic janus glycodendrimers and their self-assembly into glycodendrimersomes and other complex architectures with bioactivity to biomedically relevant lectins

A. Joshua Wand

A method to enhance nuclear spin polarization

Karen Winey

Polymerized ionic liquid block copolymers as battery membranes

6

License Agreements


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Research Achievements SITE RESEARCH ACHIEVEMENTS The essential need for nano-science research continues to accelerate with technological advances and a growing world population. Our research achievements continue to play a vital role in contributing and shaping the world of nano-science development of technologies in the fields of electronics, magnetics, optics, information technology, materials development and biomedicine. Through our shared vision and collaborative culture, the following pages demonstrate the success and contributions our researchers have provided in the field in academics and industry.

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2017-2018 Researchers

Honors and Awards

Krishna P. Singh

Robert Carpick

Krishna P. Singh, member of the Penn Engineering Board of Overseers, Adjunct Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Penn, was named Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, a professional distinction accorded to academic inventors.

Robert Carpick, John Henry Towne Professor and Chair of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, has been named a Fellow of the Materials Research Society (MRS). The fellowship honors those MRS members who are notable for their distinguished research accomplishments and their outstanding contributions to the advancement of materials research worldwide.

Mark G. Allen Mark G. Allen, Alfred Fitler Moore Professor in Electrical and Systems Engineering and Scientific Director of the Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology, was named Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, a professional distinction accorded to academic inventors.

Paulo E. Arratia Paulo E. Arratia, Professor in Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, was a recipient of a 2018 Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching. The Lindback Awards were established in 1961 with the help of the Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Foundation. They are the most prestigious teaching awards given by the University of Pennsylvania.

Jason Burdick Jason Burdick, Professor in Bioengineering, was selected as the 2017-2018 recipient of the George H. Heilmeier Faculty Award for Execellence in Research for “pioneering contributions to designing and developing polymers for applications in stem cell biology and regenerative medicine.” This award honors a Penn Engineering faculty member whose work is scientifically meritorious and has high technological impact and visibility.

Nader Engheta Nader Engheta, H. Nedwill Ramsey Professor in Electrical and Systems Engineering, was a recipient of the 2018 IEEE Nanotechnology Council Pioneer Award in Nanotechnology for “his transformative contributions to the nanoscience and nanotechnology of photonic metamaterials and for the development of optical nanocircuits.” Engheta was also elected Fellow of the International Union of Radio Science.

Nader Engheta Nader Engheta, H. Nedwill Ramsey Professor in Electrical and Systems Engineering, has been selected to receive the 2017 William Streifer Scientific Achievement Award from the IEEE Photonics Society. He is being recognized “for development of, and pioneering contributions to extreme-parameter metamaterials in optics and photonics.” He has also been named one of Photonics Media’s “Beacons of Photonics.”


2017-2018 Annual Report

73

Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Raymond Gorte

Eric Stach

Raymond Gorte, Russell Pearce and Elizabeth Crimian Heuer Professor in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, was elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) for “fundamental contributions and their applications to heterogeneous catalyst and solid state electrochemical devices.” Election to the NAE is among the highest professional distinctions accorded to an engineer.

Eric Stach, Professor in Materials Science and Engineering, has been elected a 2017 Fellow of the American Physical Society within the Division of Materials Physics. The citation reads, “For development and application of insitu and operando methods in materials research using transmission electron microscopy, entrepreneurial activity to commercialize these methods, and for sustained service to the community.”

Daniel A. Hammer

Karen Winey

Daniel A. Hammer, Alfred G. and Meta A. Ennis Professor in Bioengineering, was a recipient of the Provost’s Distinguished Ph.D. Teaching and Mentoring Award. This award is presented by the University of Pennsylvania to standing faculty members for their distinguished teaching and mentoring of doctoral students.

Karen Winey, TowerBrook Foundation Faculty Fellow and Professor in Materials Science and Engineering, was selected to receive the Trustees Council of Penn Women 6th Annual Advising Award. This award recognizes undergraduate advisors who provide outstanding assistance and advice to their advisee students and who have made a significant impact on the academic experience of these students.

Daeyeon Lee Daeyeon Lee, Professor in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, is the recipient of the 2017 Soft Matter Lectureship. This is an annual award that honors an early-career researcher for significant contributions to the soft matter field. The recipient is selected by the Soft Matter Editorial Board from a list of candidates nominated by the community.

David Meaney David Meaney, Solomon R. Pollack Professor and Chair of Bioengineering, has been elected to the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES) 2017 Class of Fellows. Fellow status is awarded to Society members who demonstrate exceptional achievements and experience in the field of biomedical engineering.

Shu Yang Shu Yang, Professor in Materials Science and Engineering, has been selected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC), a professional society based in the United Kingdom with over 50,000 members worldwide. Fellow status applies to society members who have made an outstanding contribution to the advancement of the chemical sciences, or to the advancement of the chemical sciences as a profession.


2017-2018 Researchers

In the News

Nader Engheta Named “Beacon of Photonics Industry” https://medium.com/ penn-engineering/nader-engheta-namedbeacon-of-photonics-industry-1f239df60f4c Immune system function in the microgravity of space https://medium.com/pennengineering/immune-system-function-inthe-microgravity-of-space-4b7641400e3 New Penn Engineering Professor is Developing Artificial Octopus Camouflage https://medium.com/penn-engineering/newpenn-engineering-professor-is-developingartificial-octopus-camouflage-64651e57c2f3 Penn and KIST Researchers Offer Insights Into Lightweight Material That Expands With Heat https://medium.com/penn-engineering/ penn-and-kist-researchers-offer-insightsinto-lightweight-material-that-expands-withheat-e3b94c660ab0 Geometry Plays an Important Role in How Cells Behave, Penn Researchers Report https://medium.com/penn-engineering/ geometry-plays-an-important-role-in-howcells-behave-penn-researchers-report6c3f13c1b86f Penn Engineers Develop Filters That Use Nanoparticles to Prevent Slime Build-up https://medium.com/penn-engineering/ penn-engineers-develop-filters-that-usenanoparticles-to-prevent-slime-build-upaf53250248f0 Penn Researchers Working to Mimic Giant Clams to Enhance the Production of Biofuel https://penntoday.upenn.edu/news/pennresearchers-working-mimic-giant-clamsenhance-production-biofuel Penn Researchers Demonstrate How to Control Liquid Crystal Patterns https:// penntoday.upenn.edu/news/pennresearchers-demonstrate-how-controlliquid-crystal-patterns Deep Jariwala Among Forbes 30 Under 30: Science https://medium.com/pennengineering/deep-jariwala-among-forbes-30under-30-science-9c4b791431fc

Nader Engheta Receives Honorary Doctorate From Ukraine’s National Technical University https://medium.com/ penn-engineering/nader-engheta-receiveshonorary-doctorate-from-ukraines-nationaltechnical-university-1a34e52e443f Target: Zika — A Low-Cost Diagnostic for Developing Nations https://medium. com/penn-engineering/target-zika-a-lowcost-diagnostic-for-developing-nationsfee9e83eca91 Penn Researchers Develop an Injectable Gel that Helps Heart Muscle Regenerate after a Heart Attack https://medium.com/ penn-engineering/penn-researchersdevelop-an-injectable-gel-that-helps-heartmuscle-regenerate-after-a-heart-attack9809fca878df Penn Engineers: Bone Marrow Transplant Stem Cells Can “Swim” Upstream https:// medium.com/penn-engineering/pennengineers-bone-marrow-transplant-stemcells-can-swim-upstream-5388749c6076 Mark Allen named 2017 National Academy of Inventors Fellow http://www.seas.upenn. edu/media/news/allen-dec-17.php Y-Prize Startup VisiPlate is Opening Eyes and Attracting Funding https://medium. com/penn-engineering/y-prize-startupvisiplate-is-opening-eyes-and-attractingfunding-16ce8c8c1c3d Adding a Twist Makes 3D-Printed Structures Tougher https://medium.com/pennengineering/adding-a-twist-makes-3dprinted-structures-tougher-7b8cd3394e6b Jason Burdick Receives Heilmeier Research Award https://medium.com/ penn-engineering/jason-burdick-receivesheilmeier-research-award-85ee4b70d130 Penn Engineering Research Gives Optical Switches the ‘Contrast’ of Electronic Transistors https://medium.com/pennengineering/penn-engineering-researchgives-optical-switches-the-contrast-ofelectronic-transistors-7c01aac5626a


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Nanoscale Drug Delivery for Hard-toHeal Tissues https://medium.com/pennengineering/nanoscale-drug-delivery-forhard-to-heal-tissues-45af53ed4b77 Raymond Gorte Elected to National Academy Of Engineering https:// medium.com/penn-engineering/raymondgorte-elected-to-national-academy-ofengineering-e7d14a64c6ca Penn Engineers Present New ‘Eye-ona-Chip’ https://medium.com/pennengineering/penn-engineers-present-neweye-on-a-chip-f8a7771f7c33 Three Engineers Receive 2018 University Awards for Distinguished Teaching https:// medium.com/penn-engineering/threeengineers-receive-2018-university-awardsfor-distinguished-teaching-794d759989a6 Nader Engheta Receives 2018 IEEE Nanotechnology Council Pioneer Award in Nanotechnology https://medium.com/ penn-engineering/nader-engheta-receives2018-ieee-nanotechnology-council-pioneeraward-in-nanotechnology-4f92ee6d2fd9 New Nanoparticle Synthesis Facility is Getting Stalled Neuroscience Research Back on Track http://web.sas.upenn.edu/ onehealth/2018/04/04/new-nanoparticlesynthesis-facility-is-getting-stalledneuroscience-research-back-on-track/ ‘Calculus III for cells’ https://medium.com/ penn-engineering/calculus-iii-for-cellscae08344c2cc Penn Engineers’ Liquid Assembly Line Makes Drug Microparticles a Thousand Times Faster Than Ever Before https:// medium.com/penn-engineering/pennengineers-liquid-assembly-line-makes-drugmicroparticles-a-thousand-times-fasterthan-ever-3952dc6e05cd Dhruv Turakhia: Voices of Penn Engineering Master’s Alumni https://medium.com/pennengineering/dhruv-turakhia-voices-of-pennengineering-masters-alumni-4355c8412029

Penn Engineers Update a User-friendly Device for Point-of-Care Diagnostics https:// medium.com/penn-engineering/pennengineers-update-a-user-friendly-device-forpoint-of-care-diagnostics-6e84d765dd06 Paving the Way for Safer, Smaller Batteries and Fuel Cells https://medium.com/pennengineering/penn-engineers-design-newsolid-polymer-electrolyte-paving-way-forsafer-smaller-batteries-and-5794be76673b An innovative approach to better energy storage https://medium.com/pennengineering/an-innovative-approach-tobetter-energy-storage-dd1143e999a0 Q&A with Nader Engheta in Optics & Photonics News https://medium.com/pennengineering/q-a-with-nader-engheta-inoptics-photonics-news-6abfd2b5845e Earthquakes at the nanoscale https:// medium.com/penn-engineering/earthquakesat-the-nanoscale-15b710380be0 Three Engineers Receive 2018 University Awards for Distinguished Teaching https:// medium.com/penn-engineering/threeengineers-receive-2018-university-awardsfor-distinguished-teaching-794d759989a6 Penn Engineers’ Liquid Assembly Line Makes Drug Microparticles a Thousand Times Faster Than Ever Before https:// medium.com/penn-engineering/pennengineers-liquid-assembly-line-makes-drugmicroparticles-a-thousand-times-fasterthan-ever-3952dc6e05cd

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2017-2018 Publications

Selected Publications from Singh Center for Nanotechnology Researchers

Ritesh Agarwal

Mark Allen

Lee Bassett

R Agarwal, NM Krook, ML Ren, LZ Tan, W Liu, AM Rappe, R Agarwal, “Anion Exchange in II-VI Semiconducting Nanostructures via Atomic Templating” Nano Letters, Vol. 18(3), 1620-1627, 2017

C Huang, A Armutlulu, MG Allen, SAB Allen, “Model-assisted development of microfabricated 3D Ni (OH) 2 electrodes with rapid charging capabilities”, Journal of Power Sources, Vol. 358, p 101-111, 2017

RR Grote, T Huang, SA Mann, DA Hopper, A Exarhos, GG Lopez, EC Garnett, L Bassett, “Imaging a Nitrogen-Vacancy Center with a Diamond Immersion Metalens” arXiv:1711.00901 [physics.optics] 2017

W Liu, Y Wang, CH Naylor, B Lee, B Zheng, G Liu, AT Johnson, A Pan, R Agarwal, “Understanding the Different Exciton–Plasmon Coupling Regimes in Two-Dimensional Semiconductors Coupled with Plasmonic Lattices: A Combined Experimental and Unified Equation of Motion Approach” ACS Photonics, Vol. 5(1), 192-204, 2017

BS Klosterhoff, M Tsang, D She, KG Ong, MG Allen, NJ Willett, RE Guldberg, “Implantable sensors for regenerative medicine”, Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, Vol. 139, iss. 2, p 021009, 2017

A Exarhos, DA Hopper, RR Grote, A Alkauskas, L Bassett, “Optical signatures of quantum emitters in suspended hexagonal boron nitride” ACS Nano, Vol. 11(3), 3328-3336, 2017

B Lee, W Liu, CH Naylor, J Park, SC Malek, JS Berger, AT Johnson, R Agarwal “Electrical tuning of exciton–plasmon polariton coupling in monolayer MoS2 integrated with plasmonic nanoantenna lattice” Nano Letters, Vol. 17(7), 4541-4547, 2017

J Kim, MG Allen, “Nanolaminated CoNiFe Cores with Dip-Coated Fluoroacrylic Polymer Interlamination Insulation: Fabrication, Electrical Characterization, and Performance Reliability”, Electronic Components and Technology Conference (ECTC), 2017 IEEE 67th, p 798-803, 2017

SC Malek, HS Ee, R Agarwal, “Strain multiplexed metasurface holograms on a stretchable substrate” Nano Letters, Vol. 17(6), 3641-3645, 2017 P Nukala, M Ren, R Agarwal, J Berger, G Liu, AT Johnson, R Agarwal, “Inverting polar domains via electrical pulsing in metallic germanium telluride” Nature Communications, Vol. 8, 15033, 2017 D Agarwal, CO Aspetti, M Cargnello, M Ren, J Yoo, CB Murray, R Agarwal, “Engineering localized surface plasmon interactions in gold by silicon nanowire for enhanced heating and photocatalysis” Nano Letters, Vol. 17(3), 18391845, 2017

Conferences

J Kim, YK Yoon, MG Allen, “Double-side exposure UV-LED CNC lithography for fine 3D microfabrication”, Nano/Micro Engineered and Molecular Systems (NEMS), 2017 IEEE 12th International Conference on, p 463-466, 2017 M Kim, J Kim, MG Allen, “Composite materials with controllable macromechanical properties based on MEMS-assisted structural manipulation of low-dimensional subcomponents”, Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), 2017 IEEE 30th International Conference on, p 708-711, 2017 D Kim, DC Ahn, MG Allen, YK Choi, “Triboelectrification driven fin-fact (flip-flop actuated channel transistor) for security application”, Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), 2017 IEEE 30th International Conference on, p 171-174, 2017 Igor Bargatin C Lin, K Davami, Y Jiang, J Cortes, M Munther, M Shaygan, H Ghassemi, JT Robinson, KT Turner, I Bargatin. “Enhancing the stiffness of vertical graphene sheets through ion beam irradiation and fluorination”, Nanotechnology, Vol. 28, 29, 295701, 6/26/2017

Conferences RR Grote, T Huang, S Mann, D Hopper, A Exarhos, G Lopez, E Garnett, L Bassett, “Imaging a Quantum Emitter with a High-NumericalAperture Diamond Metalens” Frontiers in Optics 2017, 18th-21st December, 2017 DA Hopper, RR Grote, L Bassett “Enhanced quantum sensing with nitrogen-vacancy centers in nanodiamonds using all-optical charge control”, Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO),14th -19th May, 2017 SM Parks, RR Grote, DA Hopper, L Bassett, “Improving photoluminescence collection from nitrogen vacancy ensembles in diamond via surface texturing” Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO),14th -19th May, 2017 A Exarhos, D Hopper, R Grote, J Saouaf, A Alkauskas, L Bassett, “Electronic and Structural Symmetry of Quantum Emitters in Hexagonal Boron Nitride” APS Meeting Abstracts, March 13th -17th March, 2017 Tobias Baumgart Q Xiao, SE Sherman, SE Wilner, X Zhou, C Dazen, T Baumgart, EH Reed, DA Hammer, W Shinoda, ML Klein, V Percec,"Janus dendrimersomes coassembled from fluorinated, hydrogenated, and hybrid Janus dendrimers as models for cell fusion and fission." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, 34, p E7045-E7053, 2017 ZT Graber, Z Shi, T Baumgart, “Cations induce shape remodeling of negatively charged phospholipid membranes”, Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, Vol. 19, p 15285-15295, 2017 N Li, N Sharifi-Mood, F Tu, D Lee, R Radhakrishnan, T Baumgart, KJ Stebe, “Curvature-driven migration of colloids on tense lipid bilayers”, Langmuir, Vol. 33, 2, p 600-610, 2017


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Sue Ann Bidstrup Allen

Jason Burdick

Robert Carpick

C Huang, A Armutlulu, M G Allen, SAB Allen, “Model-assisted development of microfabricated 3D Ni (OH) 2 electrodes with rapid charging capabilities”, Journal of Power Sources, Vol. 358, p 101-111, 2017

LL Wang, Ying Liu, JJ Chung, T Wang, AC Gaffey, M Lu, CA Cavanaugh, S Zhou, R Kanade, P Atluri, EE Morrisey, JA Burdick, “Sustained miRNA delivery from an injectable hydrogel promotes cardiomyocyte proliferation and functional regeneration after ischaemic injury,” Nature Biomedical Engineering, Vol. 1, 12, 983, 2017

F Mangolini, BA Krick, TDB Jacobs, SR Khanal, F Streller, JB McClimon, J Hilbert, SV Prasad, T Scharf, JA Ohlhausen, JR Lukes, WG Sawyer, RW Carpick,“Effect of silicon and oxygen dopants on the stability of hydrogenated amorphous carbon under harsh environmental conditions”, Carbon, Vol. 130, 2017

YC Yeh, EA Corbin, SR Caliari, L Ouyang, SL Vega, R Truitt, L Han, KB Margulies, JA Burdick, “Mechanically dynamic PDMS substrates to investigate changing cell environments,” Biomaterials, Vol. 145, 23-32, 2017

K Tian, N Gosvami, DL Goldsby, RW Carpick, “Stick–Slip Instabilities for Interfacial Chemical Bond-Induced Friction at the Nanoscale”, The Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 2017

Markus Blatz JJ Mete, VL Rajguru, SP Dange, HD Alsayed, NM Alqahtani, YM Alzayer, D Morton, NZ Baba, AM BinMahfooz, OA Qutub, TY Marghalani, MF Ayad, AA Maghrabi, UE Tandale, SS Dahiwale, N Sen, IB Sermet, S Cinar, M Strasding, V Fehmer, BE Pjetursson, I Sailer, D Lalande, JA Hodd, JS Brousseau, V Ramos, F Rueggeberg, I Tulunoglu, MH Lee, ML Taifur, O Tulunoglu, F Ozer, A Naden, V Turp, F Mante, MB Blatz, WYH Lam, RTC Hsung, WWS Choi, HWK Luk, EHN Pow, T Wimmer, M Eichberger, N Lümkemann, B Stawarczyk, “Aluminum barrier laminate or plastic tube as a dispenser for modeling plastic impression compound for border molding.”, The Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, 2017 F Ozer, A Naden, V Turp, F Mante, D Sen, MB Blatz, “Effect of thickness and surface modifications on flexural strength of monolithic zirconia”, The Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, 2017 J Conejo, R Nueesch, M Vonderheide, MB Blatz, “Clinical Performance of All-Ceramic Dental Restorations”, Current Oral Health Reports, Vol. 4, iss 2, p 112-123, 2017 BC Yaman, Ö Irmak, EO Orhan, B Karabucak, F Ozer, MB Blatz, The effect of canal cleansing protocols on cementation of a fiber post to saliva-contaminated root canals”, Journal of Adhesion Science and Technology, Vol. 31, iss 1, p 71-81, 2017 S Bayrak, N Tuloglu, F Ozer, MB Blatz, Effect of fluoride varnish with added casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate on bond strength to enamel”, Journal of Adhesion Science and Technology, Vol. 31, iss 6, p 581-590, 2017 Dawn Bonnell J Hou, H Zhu, JC Reed, F Yi, E Cubukcu, DA Bonnell “Nanoantenna-induced current enhancement of nano-sized metal/oxide interfaces”, Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 110 (4), art. no. 043103, 2017

RL Sala, MY Kwon, M Kim, SE Gullbrand, EA Henning, RL Mauck, ER Camargo, JA Burdick, “Thermosensitive Poly (N-vinylcaprolactam) Injectable Hydrogels for Cartilage Tissue Engineering,”, Tissue Engineering Part A, Vol. 23, 17-18, 935-945, 2017 F Qu, JL Holloway, JL Esterhai, JA Burdick, RL Mauck, “Programmed biomolecule delivery to enable and direct cell migration for connective tissue repair,” Nature Communications, Vol. 8, 1, 1780, 2017 M Kim, MJ Farrell, DR Steinberg, JA Burdick, RL Mauck, “Enhanced nutrient transport improves the depth-dependent properties of tri-layered engineered cartilage constructs with zonal co-culture of chondrocytes and MSCs,” Acta Biomaterialia, Vol. 58, 1-11, 2017 L Ouyang, CB Highley, W Sun, JA Burdick, “A Generalizable Strategy for the 3D Bioprinting of Hydrogels from Nonviscous Photo-crosslinkable Inks,” Advanced Materials, Vol. 29, 8, 2017 YC Yeh, L Ouyang, CB Highley, JA Burdick, “Norbornene-modified poly (glycerol sebacate) as a photocurable and biodegradable elastomer,” Polymer Chemistry, Vol. 8, 34, 5091-5099, 2017

ED Cubuk, RJS Ivancic, SS Schoenholz, DJ Strickland, A Basu, ZS Davidson, J Fontaine, JL Hor, YR Huang, Y Jiang, NC Keim, KD Koshigan, JA Lefever, T Liu, XG Ma, DJ Magagnosc, E Morrow, CP Ortiz, JM Rieser, A Shavit, T Still, Y Xu, Y Zhang, KN Nordstrom, PE Arratia, RW Carpick, DJ Durian, Z Fakhraai, DJ Jerolmack, D Lee, J Li, R Riggleman, KT Turner, AG Yodh, DS Gianola, AJ Liu, “Structure-property relationships from universal signatures of plasticity in disordered solids”, Science, Vol. 358, iss 6366, p 1033-1037, 2017 J Liu, Y Jiang, DS Grierson, K Sridharan, Y Shao, TDB Jacobs, ML Falk, RW Carpick, KT Turner, “Tribochemical Wear of Diamond-Like CarbonCoated Atomic Force Microscope Tips”, ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Vol. 9, iss 40, p 35341-35348, 2017 Y Shao, TDB Jacobs, Y Jiang, KT Turner, RW Carpick, ML Falk, “Multibond Model of SingleAsperity Tribochemical Wear at the Nanoscale”, ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Vol. 9, iss 40, p 35333-35340, 2017 CA Thom, EE Brodsky, RW Carpick, GM Pharr, WC Oliver, DL Goldsby, “Nanoscale Roughness of Natural Fault Surfaces Controlled by ScaleDependent Yield Strength”, Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 44, is 18, p 9299-9307, 2017 Y Jiang, JA Harrison, JD Schall, KE Ryan, RW Carpick, KT Turner, “Correcting for Tip Geometry Effects in Molecular Simulations of SingleAsperity Contact”, Tribology Letters, Vol. 65, iss 3, p 78, 2017 CH Naylor, WM Parkin, Z Gao, J Berry, S Zhou, Q Zhang, JB McClimon, LZ Tan, CE Kehayias, M Zhao, RS Gona, RW Carpick, AM Rappe, DJ Srolovitz, M Drndic, ATC Johnson, “Synthesis and physical properties of phase-engineered transition metal dichalcogenide monolayer heterostructures”, ACS Nano, Vol. 11, iss 9, p 8619-8627, 2017

77


2017-2018 Publications

Selected Publications from Singh Center for Nanotechnology Researchers

PC Nalam, HS Lee, N Bhatt, RW Carpick, DM Eckmann, RJ Composto, “Nanomechanics of pH-Responsive, Drug-Loaded, Bilayered Polymer Grafts”, ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Vol. 9, iss 15, p 12936-12948, 2017 K Tian, NN Gosvami, DL Goldsby, Y Liu, I Szlufarska, RW Carpick,“Load and Time Dependence of Interfacial Chemical BondInduced Friction at the Nanoscale”, Physical Review Letters, Vol. 118, iss 7, p 076103, 2017 CH Naylor, WM Parkin, Z Gao, H Kang, M Noyan, RB Wexler, LZ Tan, Y Kim, CE Kehayias, F Streller, YR Zhou, RW Carpick, Z Luo, YW Park, AM Rappe, M Drndić, JM Kikkawa, ATC Johnson, “Large-area synthesis of high-quality monolayer 1T’-WTe2 flakes”, 2D Materials, Vol. 4, iss 3, p 021008, 2017 P Gong, Q Li, Xin-Zhou Liu, R W Carpick, P Egberts, “Adhesion Mechanics between Nanoscale Silicon Oxide Tips and Few-Layer Graphene”, Tribology Letters, Vol. 65, iss 2, p 61, 2017 F Mangolini, J Hilbert, JB McClimon, JR Lukes, RW Carpick, “Thermally-Induced Structural Evolution of Silicon-and Oxygen-Containing Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon”, arXiv preprint arXiv:1711.00957, 2017 I-Wei Chen W Dong, J Xu, C Wang, Y Lu, X Liu, X Wang, X Yuan, Z Wang, T Lin, M Sui, I-W Chen, F Huang “A Robust and Conductive Black Tin Oxide Nanostructure Makes Efficient Lithium-Ion Batteries Possible”, Advanced Materials, Vol. 29, 24, art. no. 1700136, 2017

Russell Composto

Conferences

JP Koski, RC Ferrier Jr, NM Krook, H Chao, RJ Composto, AL Frischknecht, RA Riggleman, “Comparison of Field-Theoretic Approaches in Predicting Polymer Nanocomposite Phase Behavior” Macromolecules, Vol. 50(21), 87978809, 2017

R Composto “Self-Assembled Nanorods and Nanoplates in Polymer Nanocomposite Films” APS March Meeting Abstracts, 13th -17th March, 2017

CC Lin, M Cargnello, CB Murray, N Clarke, KI Winey, RA Riggleman, RJ Composto, “Nanorod Mobility Influences Polymer Diffusion in Polymer Nanocomposites” ACS Macro Letters, Vol. 6(8), 869-874, 2017 CC Lin, PJ Griffin, H Chao, MJA Hore, K Ohno, N Clarke, RA Riggleman, KI Winey, RJ Composto, “Grafted polymer chains suppress nanoparticle diffusion in athermal polymer melts” The Journal of Chemical Physics, Vol. 146(20), 203332, 2017 A Karatrantos, RJ Composto, KI Winey, N Clarke, “Polymer and spherical nanoparticle diffusion in nanocomposites” The Journal of chemical physics, Vol. 146(20), 203331 E Parrish, MA Caporizzo, RJ Composto, “Network confinement and heterogeneity slows nanoparticle diffusion in polymer gels” The Journal of Chemical Physics, Vol. 146(20), 203318 PC Nalam, HS Lee, N Bhatt, RW Carpick, DM Eckmann, RJ Composto, “Nanomechanics of pH-Responsive, Drug-Loaded, Bilayered Polymer Grafts” ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Vol. 9(15), 12936-12948, 2017

Y Dong, L Qi, J Li, I-W Chen “A computational study of yttria-stabilized zirconia: I. Using crystal chemistry to search for the ground state on a glassy energy landscape”, Acta Materialia, Vol. 127, pp. 73-84, 2017

HS Lee, C Myers, L Zaidel, PC Nalam, MA Caporizzo, CA. Daep, DM Eckmann, JG Masters, RJ Composto, “Competitive Adsorption of Polyelectrolytes onto and into Pellicle-Coated Hydroxyapatite Investigated by QCM-D and Force Spectroscopy” ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Vol. 9(15), 13079-13091, 2017

H Choi, T Liu, K Nath, R Zhou, IW Chen “Peptide nanoparticle with pH-sensing cargo solubility enhances cancer drug efficiency”, Nano Today, Vol. 13, pp. 15-22, 2017

J Choi, N Clarke, KI Winey, RJ Composto, “Polymer Diffusion from Attractive and Athermal Substrates” Macromolecules, Vol. 50(7), 30383042, 2017

Y Dong, L Qi, J Li, I-W Chen “A computational study of yttria-stabilized zirconia: II. Cation diffusion”, Acta Materialia, Vol. 126, pp. 438-450, 2017

EC Glor, RC Ferrier, C Li, RJ Composto, Z Fakhraai, “Out-of-plane orientation alignment and reorientation dynamics of gold nanorods in polymer nanocomposite films” Soft Matter, Vol. 13(11), 2207-2215, 2017

Y Dong, H Wang, I-W Chen “Electrical and hydrogen reduction enhances kinetics in doped zirconia and ceria: I. grain growth study”, Journal of the American Ceramic Society, Vol. 100, 3, pp. 876-886, 2017

ME Grady, E Parrish, MA Caporizzo, SC Seeger, RJ Composto, David M Eckmann, “Intracellular nanoparticle dynamics affected by cytoskeletal integrity” Soft Matter, Vol. 13(9), 1873-1880, 2017

MJ Vettleson, C Li, EC Glor, RC Ferrier, RJ Composto, Z Fakhraai, “Using in-Situ Ellipsometry to Monitor Self-Assembly of Polymer Nanocomposites during Solvent Annealing” APS March Meeting Abstracts, 13th -17th March, 2017 B Rasin, B Lindsay, X Ye, J Meth, C Murray, R Riggleman, R Composto, “Position and orientation of gold nanorods in vertical cylinder diblock copolymer films” APS March Meeting Abstracts,13th -17th March, 2017 ME Grady, RJ Composto, DM Eckmann, “Cytoskeletal Perturbing Drugs and Their Effect on Cell Elasticity” Mechanics of Biological Systems and Materials, Volume 6, 169-177, Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series, 21st September, 2017. David P Cormode J Kim, P Chhour, J Hsu, HI Litt, VA Ferrari, R Popovtzer, DP Cormode "Use of nanoparticle contrast agents for cell tracking with computed tomography". Bioconjugate Chemistry, Vol. 28, 6 1581-1597, 5/18/2017 A Al-Zaki, D Cormode, A Tsourkas, JF Dorsey. “Increasing the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy using nanoparticles”, Increasing the Therapeutic Ratio of Radiotherapy, 241265, 2017


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

John Crocker Y Wang, JT McGinley, JC Crocker. "Dimpled Polyhedral Colloids Formed by Colloidal Crystal Templating." Langmuir, Vol. 33, no. 12, 3080-087, 2017

H Zhu, F Yi, E Cubukcu “Plasmonic metamaterial device for optomechanical amplification and dampening”, 2017 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics, CLEO 2017, Vol. 2017, pp. 1-2, 2017

CL Porter, JC Crocker. “Directed assembly of particles using directional DNA interactions”. Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science, Vol. 30, Pg 34-44. 2017

F Yi, M Ren, H Zhu, W Liu, R Agarwal, E Cubukcu “Voltage tunable dual wavelength light source via optomechanically controlled CdS nanoplates”, Conference on Lasers and ElectroOptics, CLEO 2017, Vol. 2017, pp. 1-2, 2017

Y Wang, IC Jenkins, JT McGinley, T Sinno, JC Crocker “Colloidal crystals with diamond symmetry at optical length scales”. Nature Communications, Vol. 8, 14173, 2017

Eric Detsi

TS Shim, ZG Estephan, Z Qian, JH Prosser, SY Lee, DM Chenoweth, D Lee, S-J Park, JC Crocker. “Shape changing thin films powered by DNA hybridization”. Nature Nanotechnology, Vol. 12, 1, 41, 2017 Conferences Y Wang., IC Jenkins, JT McGinely, T Sinno, JC Crocker “Diamond Lattice Collodial Crystals from Binary DNA-grafted Microspheres”. APS March Meeting, 2017 TS Shim, Z Estephan, Z Qian, D Chenoweth, D Lee, S-J Park, J Crocker. “Shape Changing Thin Films Powered by DNA Strand Exchange”. APS Meeting Abstracts, 2017 Ertugrul Cubucku

Z Deng, E Detsi, “Enhancing the free corrosion dealloying rate with a catalytically driven reaction,” Nanoscale, Vol. 9, 33, 2017 Scott Diamond M Tomaiuolo, CN Matzko, I Poventud-Fuentes, L Nettey, BA Herbig, JW Weisel, SL Diamond, LF Brass, TJ Stalker, “Platelet Fragmentation During the Hemostatic Response and its Prevention by a P2Y12 Antagonist”, Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, Vol. 37, Suppl 1, p A40-A40, 2017 JD Welsh, I Poventud-Fuentes, S Sampietro, SL Diamond, TJ Stalker, LF Brass, “Hierarchical organization of the hemostatic response to penetrating injuries in the mouse macrovasculature”, Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Vol. 15, iss 3, p 526-537, 2017

X Zhang, S Choi, D Wang, CH Naylor, ATC Johnson, E Cubukcu “Unidirectional Doubly Enhanced MoS2 Emission via Photonic Fano Resonances”, Nano Letter, Vol. 17 (11) pp. 67156720, 2017

LF Brass, P Ma, M Tomaiuolo, SL Diamond, TJ Stalker, “A Systems Approach to the Platelet Signaling Network and the Hemostatic Response to Injury”, Platelets in Thrombotic and Non-Thrombotic Disorders, p 367-378, 2017

J Hou, H Zhu, JC Reed, F Yi, E Cubukcu, DA Bonnell “Nanoantenna-induced current enhancement of nano-sized metal/oxide interfaces”, Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 110, 4, art. no. 043103, 2017

C Bouckaert, S Zhu, JWP Govers-Riemslag, M Depoorter, SL Diamond, L Pochet, “Discovery and assessment of water soluble coumarins as inhibitors of the coagulation contact pathway”, Thrombosis Research, Vol. 157, p 126-133, 2017

Conferences H Zhu, F Yi, E Cubukcu “Plasmonic metamaterial device for optomechanical amplification and dampening”, Optics InfoBase Conference Papers, Part F42-CLEO_QELS 2017, 2 p, 2017 F Yi, M Ren, H Zhu, W Liu, R Agarwal, E Cubukcu “Voltage tunable dual wavelength light source via optomechanically controlled cds nanoplates”, Optics InfoBase Conference Papers, Part F42-CLEO_QELS 2017

Paul Ducheyne CJ Hawley, L Wu, G Xiao, I Grinberg, AM Rappe, PK Davies, JE Spanier, “Structural and ferroelectric phase evolution in [KNbO 3] 1− x [BaNi 1/2 Nb 1/2 O 3− δ] x (x= 0, 0.1)”, Physical Review B, Vol. 96, iss 5, p 054117, 2017

Marija Drndić S Friedensen, JT Mlack, M Drndić, “Materials analysis and focused ion beam nanofabrication of topological insulator Bi 2 Se 3,” Scientific reports, Vol. 7(1) 13466, 2017 CH Naylor, WM Parkin, Z Gao, J Berry, S Zhou, Q Zhang, JB McClimon, LZ Tan, CE Kehayias, MQ Zhao, RS Gona, RW Carpick, AM Rappe, DJ Srolovitz, M Drndic, ATC Johnson, “Synthesis and physical properties of phase-engineered transition metal dichalcogenide monolayer heterostructures”, ACS Nano, Vol. 11, iss 9, p 8619-8627, 2017 A Cupo, PM Das, CC Chien, G Danda, N Kharche, D Tristant, M Drndić, V Meunier, “Periodic Arrays of Phosphorene Nanopores as Antidot Lattices with Tunable Properties”, ACS Nano, Vol. 11, iss 7, p 7494-7507, 2017 JH Ahn, WM Parkin, CH Naylor, ATC Johnson, M Drndić, “Ambient effects on electrical characteristics of CVD-grown monolayer MoS 2 field-effect transistors”, Scientific Reports, Vol. 7, iss 1, p 4075, 2017 JT Mlack, A Rahman, G Danda, N Drichko, S Friedensen, M Drndic, N Markovic, “Patterning Superconductivity in a Topological Insulator”, ACS Nano, Vol. 11, iss 6, p 5873-5878, 2017 JT Mlack, PM Das, G Danda, YC Chou, CH Naylor, Z Lin, NP López, T Zhang, M Terrones, ATC Johnson, M Drndić, “Transfer of monolayer tmd ws 2 and raman study of substrate effects”, Scientific Reports, Vol. 7 p 43037, 2017 S Shekar, CC Chien, D Niedzwiecki, M Drndić, K Shepard, “Improving the Temporal Resolution of Nanopore Recordings”, Biophysical Journal, Vol. 112, iss 3, p 24a-25a, 2017 CH Naylor, WM Parkin, Z Gao, H Kang, M Noyan, RB Wexler, LZ Tan, Y Kim, CE Kehayias, F Streller, YR Zhou, R Carpick, Z Luo, YW Park, AM Rappe, M Drndić, James M Kikkawa, ATC Johnson, “Large-area synthesis of high-quality monolayer 1T’-WTe2 flakes”, 2D Materials, Vol. 4, iss 2, p 021008, 2017 G Danda, PM Das, YC Chou, JT Mlack, WM Parkin, CH Naylor, K Fujisawa, T Zhang, LB Fulton, M Terrones, ATC Johnson, M Drndić, “Monolayer WS2 nanopores for DNA translocation with light-adjustable sizes”, ACS Nano, Vol. 11, iss 2, p 1937-1945, 2017

79


2017-2018 Publications

Selected Publications from Singh Center for Nanotechnology Researchers

S Friedensen, WM Parkin, JT Mlack, M Drndic, “TEM Nanosculpting of Topological Insulator Bi $ _2 $ Se $ _3$”, arXiv preprint arXiv:1712.02032 2017 Conferences G Danda, PM Das, YC Chou, JT Mlack, C Naylor, N Perea-Lopez, Z Lin, LB Fulton, M Terrones, ATC Johnson, M Drndic, “WS2 nanopores for molecule analysis”, APS Meeting Abstracts, 2017 JT Mlack, G Danda, S Friedensen, A Rahman, N Drichko, N Markovic, M Drndic, “TEM analysis of superconducting Pd doped Bi2Se3”, APS Meeting Abstracts, 2017 A Cupo, PM Das, G Danda, N Kharche, M Drndic, V Meunier, “Tunable Band Gap in Phosphorene Antidot Lattices”, APS Meeting Abstracts, 2017 PM Das, G Danda, A Cupo, PJ Thiruraman, V Meunier, M Drndic, Electronic transport properties of suspended few-nm black phosphorus nanoribbons”, APS Meeting Abstracts, 2017 S Friedensen, W Parkin, J Mlack, M Drndic, “Electron-beam nanosculpting and materials analysis of exfoliated bismuth selenide”, APS March Meeting Abstracts 2017 David Eckmann A Ranganathan, J Campo, J Myerson, V Shuvaev, B Zern, V Muzykantov, DM Eckmann “Fluorescence microscopy imaging calibration for quantifying nanocarrier binding to cells during shear flow exposure”, Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology, Vol. 13 (6), pp. 737-745, 2017 PC Nalam, H-S Lee, N Bhatt, RW Carpick, DM Eckmann, RJ Composto “Nanomechanics of pHResponsive, Drug-Loaded, Bilayered Polymer Grafts”, ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, Vol. 9, 15, pp. 12936-12948, 2017 ME Grady, E Parrish, MA Caporizzo, SC Seeger, RJ Composto, DM Eckmann “Intracellular nanoparticle dynamics affected by cytoskeletal integrity”, Soft Matter, Vol. 13, 9, pp. 1873-1880, 2017 ME Grady, RJ Composto, DM Eckmann “Cytoskeletal perturbing drugs and their effect on cell elasticity”, Conference Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Mechanics Series, Vol. 6, pp. 169-177, 2017

Nader Engheta

Conferences

M Zhang, DJ Magagnosc, I Liberal, Y Yu, H Yun, H Yang, Y Wu, J Guo, W Chen, YJ Shin, A Stein, JM Kikkawa, N Engheta, DS Gianola, CB Murray, CR Kagan, “High-strength magnetically switchable plasmonic nanorods assembled from a binary nanocrystal mixture,” Nature Nanotechnology, Vol. 12, 3, 228, 2017

MJ Vettleson, C Li, EC Glor, RC Ferrier, R Composto, Z Fakhraai, “Using in-Situ Ellipsometry to Monitor Self-Assembly of Polymer Nanocomposites during Solvent Annealing”, APS Meeting Abstracts, 2017

NJ Greybush, Iñigo Liberal, L Malassis, James M Kikkawa, N Engheta, CB Murray, CR Kagan “Plasmon resonances in self-assembled twodimensional Au nanocrystal metamolecules,” ACS Nano, Vol. 11, 3, 2917-2927, 2017 Conferences BE Edwards, N Engheta, “Asymmetrical diffusion through time-varying material parameters”, Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics: Quantum electronics and Laser science, 14th19th May, 2017 Zaahra Faakhrai ED Cubuk, RJS Ivancic, SS Schoenholz, DJ Strickland, A Basu, ZS Davidson, J Fontaine, JL Hor, Y-R Huang, Y Jiang, NC Keim, KD Koshigan, JA Lefever, T Liu, X-G Ma, DJ Magagnosc, E Morrow, CP Ortiz, JM Rieser, A Shavit, T Still, Y Xu, Y Zhang, KN Nordstrom, PE Arratia, RW Carpick, DJ Durian, Z Fakhraai, DJ Jerolmack, Daeyeon Lee, Ju Li, R Riggleman, KT Turner, AG Yodh, DS Gianola, Andrea J Liu, “Structureproperty relationships from universal signatures of plasticity in disordered solids”, Science, Vol. 358(6366), 1033-1037, 2017 T Liu, AL Exarhos, EC Alguire, F Gao, ES Ranjbaran, K Cheng, T Jia, JE Subotnik, PJ Walsh, JM Kikkawa, Z Fakhraai, “Birefringent Stable Glass with Predominantly Isotropic Molecular Orientation”, Physical Review Letters, Vol. 119(9), 095502, 2017 EC Glor, RC Ferrier, C Li, RJ Composto, Z Fakhraai, “Out-of-plane orientation alignment and reorientation dynamics of gold nanorods in polymer nanocomposite films” Soft Matter, Vol. 13(11), 2207-2215, 2017

S Wolf, T Liu, Y Jiang, K Ablajan, Y Zhang, P Walsh, K Turner, Z Fakhraai, “Mechanical Properties of Stable Glasses Using Nanoindentation”, APS Meeting Abstracts, 2017 Feng Gai MR Hilaire, D Mukherjee, T Troxler, F Gai. “Solvent dependence of cyanoindole fluorescence lifetime”, Chemical Physics Letters, Vol. 685, 133-138, 2017 J Stöhr, H Wu, M Nick, Y Wu, M Bhate, C Condello, N Johnson, J Rodgers, T Lemmin, S Acharya, J Becker, K Robinson, M Kelly, F Gai, G Stubbs, SB Prusiner, WF DeGrado. “A 31-residue peptide induces aggregation of tau's microtubulebinding region in cells”, Nature Chemistry, Vol. 9, 9, 874, 2017 RM Abaskharon, SP Brown, W Zhang, J Chen, AB Smith III, F Gai. “Isotope-labeled aspartate sidechain as a non-perturbing infrared probe: Application to investigate the dynamics of a carboxylate buried inside a protein”, Chemical Physics Letters, Vol. 683, 193-198, 2017 MR Hilaire, IA Ahmed, C-W Lin, H Jo, WF DeGrado, F Gai. “Blue fluorescent amino acid for biological spectroscopy and microscopy”, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, 23, 6005-6009, 2017 JM Rodgers, RM Abaskharon, B Ding, J Chen, W Zhang, F Gai. “Fermi resonance as a means to determine the hydrogen-bonding status of two infrared probes”, Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, Vol. 19, 24, 16144-16150, 2017 Benjamin Garcia R Wang, XJ Cao, K Kulej, W Liu, T Ma, M MacDonald, CM Chiang, BA Garcia, Ji You, “Uncovering BRD4 hyperphosphorylation associated with cellular transformation in NUT midline carcinoma,” Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, 27, E5352-E5361, 2017


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Reto Giere

David Goldsby

J Chen, C Elmi, D Goldsby, R Gieré, “Generation of shock lamellae and melting in rocks by lightning-induced shock waves and electrical heating”, Geophysical Research Letters, 2017

K Tian, N Gosvami, DL Goldsby, RW Carpick. “Stick–Slip Instabilities for Interfacial Chemical Bond-Induced Friction at the Nanoscale”, The Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 2017

C Elmi, J Chen, D Goldsby, R Gieré, “Mineralogical and compositional features of rock fulgurites: A record of lightning effects on granite”, American Mineralogist: Journal of Earth and Planetary Materials, Vol. 102, iss 7, p 1470-1481, 2017

CA Thom, EE Brodsky, RW Carpick, GM Pharr, WC Oliver, DL Goldsby. “Nanoscale Roughness of Natural Fault Surfaces Controlled by ScaleDependent Yield Strength”, Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 44, 18, 9299-9307, 2017

Yale Goldman MA Caporizzo, CE Fishman, YE Goldman, “A Kinetic Model to Describe the Bidirectional Motility of Dimeric Molecular Motors,” Biophysical Journal, 112, Vol. 3, 273a, 2017 JH Lewis, RM Jamiolkowski, MS Woody, EM Ostap, Yale E Goldman, “Deconvolution of Camera Instrument Response Functions,” Biophysical Journal, 112, Vol. 6, 1214-1220, 2017 RM Jamiolkowski, C Chen, BS Cooperman, YE Goldman, “tRNA Fluctuations Observed on Stalled Ribosomes Are Suppressed during Ongoing Protein Synthesis,” Vol. 113, Issue 11, 2326-2335, Biophysical Journal, 2017 Conferences LG Lippert, T Dadosh, JA Hadden, V Karnawat, BT Diroll, CB Murray, ELF Holzbaur, K Schulten, SLR Peterson, YE Goldman, “Angular measurements of the dynein ring reveal a stepping mechanism dependent on a flexible stalk,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, (23), E4564-E4573, 2017 MS Woody, M Capitanio, EM Ostap, YE Goldman, “An ultra-fast EOD-based force-clamp detects rapid biomechanical transitions,” Optical Trapping and Optical Micromanipulation, XIV, 10347, V.103470Q, 2017

J Chen, C Elmi, D Goldsby, R Gieré “Generation of shock lamellae and melting in rocks by lightning-induced shock waves and electrical heating". Geophysical Research Letters, 2017 KM Kumamoto, CA Thom, D Wallis, LN Hansen, D Armstrong, JM Warren, DL Goldsby, AJ Wilkinson. “Size effects resolve discrepancies in 40 years of work on low-temperature plasticity in olivine”, (2017) Science Advances, Vol. 3, 9, e1701338, 2017 C Qi, DL Goldsby, DJ Prior. “The down-stress transition from cluster to cone fabrics in experimentally deformed ice”, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 471, 136-147, 2017 C Elmi, J Chen, D Goldsby, R Gieré "Mineralogical and compositional features of rock fulgurites: A record of lightning effects on granite." American Mineralogist: Journal of Earth and Planetary Materials, Vol. 102, 7, 1470-1481, 2017 K Tian, N Gosvami, DL Goldsby, Y Liu, I Szlufarska, RW Carpick. “Load and Time Dependence of Interfacial Chemical Bond-Induced Friction at the Nanoscale”, Physical Review Letters, Vol. 118, 7, 076103, 2017 CA Thom, EE Brodsky, RW Carpick, GM Pharr, WC Oliver, DL Goldsby. “Nanoscale Roughness of Natural Fault Surfaces Controlled by ScaleDependent Yield Strength”, Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 44, 18, 9299-9307, 2017 Conferences LN Hansen, KM Kumamoto, C Thom, D Wallis, DL Goldsby, WB Durham, DL Kohlstedt. “The grain-size dependence of yield strength during low-temperature plasticity of olivine: Evidence for weak lithospheric mantle”, AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts, 2017 C Thom, RW Carpick, DL Goldsby. “The Physical Mechanism of Frictional Aging Revealed by Nanoindentation Creep”, AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts, 2017

KM Kumamoto, C Thom, D Wallis, LN Hansen, DEJ Armstrong, DL Goldsby, JM Warren, AJ Wilkinson, “Size effects in olivine control strength in low-temperature plasticity regime”, AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts, 2017 Raymond Gorte T Cao, Y Cheng, RJ Gorte, Y Shi, JM Vohs, N Cai, “Effect of grain boundary diffusion on electrolyte stability in direct carbon fuel cells with antimony anodes”, Ceramics International, Vol. 43, iss 18, p 16575-16579, 2017 TM Onn, X Mao, C Lin, C Wang, RJ Gorte, “Investigation of the Thermodynamic Properties of Surface Ceria and Ceria–Zirconia Solid Solution Films Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition on Al2O3”, Inorganics, Vol. 5, iss 4, p 69, 2017 C Lin, X Mao, TM Onn, J Jang, RJ Gorte, “Stabilization of ZrO2 Powders via ALD of CeO2 and ZrO2”, Inorganics, Vol. 5, iss 4, p 65, 2017 TM Onn, S Dai, J Chen, X Pan, GW Graham, RJ Gorte, “High-Surface Area Ceria-Zirconia Films Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition”, Catalysis Letters, v 147, iss 6, p 1464-1470, 2017 Y Cheng, TS Oh, M Rahmanipour, R Wilson, RJ Gorte, JM Vohs, “Composite LSF-YSZ and LSCrF-YSZ Electrode Scaffolds for Infiltrated SOFC Cathodes”, ECS Transactions, Vol. 78, iss 1, p 729-740, 2017 YH Yeh, CE Tsai, C Wang, RJ Gorte, “Heat-Flow Measurements for n-Hexane Reactions on H-ZSM-5 and H (Zn)-ZSM-5: Implications for Endothermic Reforming in Hypersonic Aircraft”, Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, Vol. 56, iss 21, p 6198-6203, 2017 TM Onn, M Monai, S Dai, L Arroyo-Ramirez, S Zhang, X Pan, GW Graham, P Fornasiero, RJ Gorte, “High-surface-area, iron-oxide films prepared by atomic layer deposition on γ-Al 2 O 3”, Applied Catalysis A: General, Vol. 534, p 70-77, 2017 TM Onn, S Zhang, L Arroyo-Ramirez, Y Xia, C Wang, X Pan, GW Graham, RJ Gorte, “Highsurface-area ceria prepared by ALD on Al 2 O 3 support”, Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, Vol. 201, p 430-437, 2017 M Rahmanipour, Y Cheng, TM Onn, A Donazzi, JM Vohs, RJ Gorte, “Modification of LSFYSZ Composite Cathodes by Atomic Layer Deposition”, Journal of The Electrochemical Society, Vol. 164, iss 7, p F879-F884, 2017

81


2017-2018 Publications

Selected Publications from Singh Center for Nanotechnology Researchers

Y Ren, Y Cheng, RJ Gorte, K Huang, “Toward Stabilizing Co3O4 Nanoparticles as an Oxygen Reduction Reaction Catalyst for Intermediate-Temperature SOFCs”, Journal of The Electrochemical Society, Vol. 164, iss 10, p F3001-F3007, 2017

Erika Holzbaur

Dan Huh

JJ Nirschl, AE Ghiretti, ELF Holzbaur, “The impact of cytoskeletal organization on the local regulation of neuronal transport,” Nature Reviews Neuroscience, Vol. 18, 10, 585, 2017

Y Cheng, TS Oh, R Wilson, RJ Gorte, JM Vohs, “An Investigation of LSF-YSZ Conductive Scaffolds for Infiltrated SOFC Cathodes”, Journal of The Electrochemical Society, Vol. 164, iss 6, p F525-F529, 2017

LG Lippert, T Dadosh, JA Hadden, V Karnawat, BT Diroll, CB Murray, ELF Holzbaur, K Schulten, SLR Peterson, YE Goldman, “Angular measurements of the dynein ring reveal a stepping mechanism dependent on a flexible stalk,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, 23, E4564-E4573, 2017

MJ Mondrinos, YS Yi, NK Wu, X Ding, D Huh, “Native extracellular matrix-derived semipermeable, optically transparent, and inexpensive membrane inserts for microfluidic cell culture,” Lab on a Chip, Vol. 17, 18, 31463158, 2017

J Luo, M Monai, C Wang, JD Lee, T Duchoň, F Dvořák, V Matolín, CB Murray, P Fornasiero, RJ Gorte, “Unraveling the surface state and composition of highly selective nanocrystalline Ni–Cu alloy catalysts for hydrodeoxygenation of HMF”, Catalysis Science & Technology, Vol. 7, iss 8, p 1735-1743, 2017 M Monai, T Montini, M Melchionna, T Duchoň, P Kúš, C Chen, N Tsud, L Nasi, KC Prince, K Veltruská, V Matolín, MM Khader, RJ Gorte, P Fornasiero, “The effect of sulfur dioxide on the activity of hierarchical Pd-based catalysts in methane combustion”, Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, Vol. 202, p 72-83, 2017 Daniel A. Hammer Q Xiao, SE Sherman, SE Wilner, X Zhou, C Dazen, T Baumgart, EH Reed, DA Hammer, W Shinoda, ML Klein, V Percec. “Janus dendrimersomes coassembled from fluorinated, hydrogenated, and hybrid Janus dendrimers as models for cell fusion and fission”. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Vol. 114, 34, E7045-E7053, 2017 BS Schuster, R Parthasarathy, EH Reed, DA Hammer. “Engineering Protease-Triggered Disassembly of Intrinsically Disordered Protein Droplets". Biophysical Journal, Vol. 112, 3, Pg. 206a 2017 LL Wang, JN Sloan, AC Gaffey, CM Venkataraman, Z Wang, A Trubelja, DA Hammer, P Atluri, JA Burdick “Injectable, Guest-Host Assembled Polyethylenimine Hydrogel for siRNA Delivery”, Biomacromolecules, Vol. 18, 1, pp. 77-86, 2017

PP Gopal, JJ Nirschl, E Klinman, ELF Holzbaur, “Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked mutations increase the viscosity of liquid-like TDP-43 RNP granules in neurons,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, 12, E2466-E2475, 2017 BB McIntosh, ELF Holzbaur, EM Ostap, “Myo1C and Endophilin Promote KinesinDriven Tubulation at Engineered Cytoskeletal Intersections,” Biophysical Journal, Vol. 112, 3, 273a, 2017 JJ Nirschl, AS Moore, EL Holzbaur, “Deep Cell: Deep Learning in Biological Image Analysis and Phenotypic Profiling,” Molecular Biology of the Cell, Vol. .28, 2017 P Guedes-Dias, JJ Nirschl, N Abreu, M Tokito, EL Holzbaur, “Dynamic microtubules specify local delivery and capture of presynaptic cargo at en passant synapses,” Molecular Biology of the Cell, Vol. .28, 2017 Larry Hough C Cejas, JC Castaing, L Hough, C Frétigny, R Dreyfus, “Experimental investigation of water distribution in a two-phase zone during gravitydominated evaporation” APS Physics Rev, Vol. 96, 062908, 2017

J Seo, D Conegliano, M Farrell, M Cho, X Ding, T Seykora, D Qing, NS Mangalmurti, D Huh, “A microengineered model of RBC transfusioninduced pulmonary vascular injury,” Scientific Reports, Vol. 7, 1, 3413, 2017 David Issadore J Ko, N Bhagwat, SS Yee, N Ortiz, A Sahmoud, T Black, NM Aiello, L McKenzie, M O’Hara, C Redlinger, J Romeo, EL Carpenter, BZ Stanger, D Issadore, “Combining Machine Learning and Nanofluidic Technology to Diagnose Pancreatic Cancer Using Exosomes”, ACS Nano, Vol. 11 (11), 11182-11193, 2017 JF Liu, S Yadavali, A Tsourkas, D Issadore, “Microfluidic diafiltration-on-chip using an integrated magnetic peristaltic micropump”, Lab on a Chip, Vol. 17 (22), 3796-3803, 2017 J Ko, N Bhagwat, SS Yee, T Black, C Redlinger, J Romeo, M O'Hara, A Raj, EL Carpenter, BZ Stanger, D Issadore,” A magnetic micropore chip for rapid (< 1 hour) unbiased circulating tumor cell isolation and in situ RNA analysis”, Lab on a Chip, Vol. 17 (18), 3086-3096, 2017 HH Jeong, S Yadavali, D Issadore, D Lee,” Literscale production of uniform gas bubbles via parallelization of flow-focusing generators”, Lab on a Chip, Vol. 17 (15), 2667-2673, 2017 VR Yelleswarapu, HH Jeong, S Yadavali, D Issadore,” Ultra-high throughput detection (1 million droplets per second) of fluorescent droplets using a cell phone camera and time domain encoded optofluidics”, Lab on a Chip, Vol. 17(6), 1083-1094, 2017 Conferences V Yelleswarapu and D Issadore, "Multicolor detection of fluorescent droplets on a cell phone using time domain encoded optofluidics," IEEE Healthcare Innovations and Point of Care Technologies (HI-POCT), 6-8th November 2017


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Douglas Jerolmack ED Cubuk, RJS Ivancic, SS Schoenholz, DJ Strickland, A Basu, ZS Davidson, J Fontaine, JL Hor, Y-R Huang, Y Jiang, NC Keim, KD Koshigan, JA Lefever, T Liu, X-G Ma, DJ Magagnosc, E Morrow, CP Ortiz, JM Rieser, A Shavit, T Still, Y Xu, Y Zhang, KN Nordstrom, PE Arratia, RW Carpick, DJ Durian, Z Fakhraai, DJ Jerolmack, Daeyeon Lee, Ju Li, R Riggleman, KT Turner, AG Yodh, DS Gianola, Andrea J Liu, “Structure-property relationships from universal signatures of plasticity in disordered solids” Science, Vol. 358, 6366, 1033-1037, 2017 Conferences A Seiphoori, CP Ortiz, DJ Jerolmack, “Direct observation and determination of the mechanisms governing mobility of asbestos in porous media,” AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts, 2017 DB Lee, DJ Jerolmack, “The transition from intermittent to continuous bed-load transport arises from merger of" bursty" transport events,” AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts, 2017 F Qian, DB Lee, S Bodek, S Roberts, TT Topping, Y Robele, DE Koditschek, DJ Jerolmack, “Determination of erosion thresholds and aeolian dune stabilization mechanisms via robotic shear strength measurements,” AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts, 2017 A Seiphoori, DJ Jerolmack, PE Arratia, “Stability of aggregates in the environment: role of solid bridging,” AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts, 2017 AT Charlie Johnson R Vishnubhotla, J Ping, Z Gao, A Lee, O Saouaf, A Vrudhula, ATC Johnson, “Scalable graphene aptasensors for drug quantification”, AIP Advances, Vol. 7, 11, p 115111, 2017 X Zhang, S Choi, D Wang, CH Naylor, ATC Johnson, E Cubukcu, “Unidirectional Doubly Enhanced MoS2 Emission via Photonic Fano Resonances”, Nano Letters, Vol. 17, 11, p 67156720, 2017 H Henck, ZB Aziza, O Zill, D Pierucci, CH Naylor, MG Silly, N Gogneau, F Oehler, S Collin, J Brault, F Sirotti, F Bertran, P Le Fèvre, S Berciaud, ATC Johnson, E Lhuillier, JE Rault, A Ouerghi, “Interface dipole and band bending in the hybrid p− n heterojunction Mo S 2/GaN (0001)”, Physical Review B, Vol. 96, 11, p 115312, 2017

GR Wiedman, Y Zhao, A Mustaev, J Ping, R Vishnubhotla, ATC Johnson, DS Perlin.” An Aptamer-Based Biosensor for the Azole Class of Antifungal Drugs”, mSphere, Vol. 2, 4, p e0027417, 2017 W Liu, Y Wang, CH Naylor, B Lee, B Zheng, G Liu, ATC Johnson, A Pan, R Agarwal, “Understanding the Different Exciton–Plasmon Coupling Regimes in Two-Dimensional Semiconductors Coupled with Plasmonic Lattices: A Combined Experimental and Unified Equation of Motion Approach”, ACS Photonics, Vol. 5, iss 1, p 192204, 2017 JH Ahn, WM Parkin, CH Naylor, ATC Johnson, M Drndić, “Ambient effects on electrical characteristics of CVD-grown monolayer MoS 2 field-effect transistors” Scientific Reports, Vol. 7, 1, p 4075, 2017 B Lee, W Liu, CH Naylor, J Park, SC Malek, JS Berger, ATC Johnson, R Agarwal, “Electrical tuning of exciton–plasmon polariton coupling in monolayer MoS2 integrated with plasmonic nanoantenna lattice”, Nano Letters, Vol. 17, 7, p 4541-4547, 2017 P Nukala, M Ren, R Agarwal, J Berger, G Liu, ATC Johnson, R Agarwal ,“Inverting polar domains via electrical pulsing in metallic germanium telluride”, Nature Communications, Vol. 8, p 15033, 2017 J Ping, J Xi, JG Saven, R Liu, ATC Johnson, “Quantifying the effect of ionic screening with protein-decorated graphene transistors”, Biosensors and Bioelectronics, Vol. 89, p 689692, 2017 JT Mlack, PM Das, G Danda, YC Chou, CH Naylor, Z Lin, NP López, T Zhang, M Terrones, ATC Johnson, M Drndić, “Transfer of monolayer tmd ws 2 and raman study of substrate effects”, Scientific Reports, Vol. 7, p 43037, 2017 D Pierucci, H Henck, ZB Aziza, CH Naylor, A Balan, JE Rault, MG Silly, YJ Dappe, F Bertran, P Le Fèvre, F Sirotti, ATC Johnson, A Ouerghi, “Tunable doping in hydrogenated single layered molybdenum disulfide”, ACS Nano, Vol. 11, 2, p 1755-1761, 2017 CH Naylor, WM Parkin, Z Gao, H Kang, M Noyan, RB Wexler, LZ Tan, Y Kim, CE Kehayias, F Streller, YR Zhou, R Carpick, Z Luo, YW Park, AM Rappe, M Drndić, JM Kikkawa, ATC Johnson, “Large-area synthesis of high-quality monolayer 1T’-WTe2 flakes”, 2D Materials, Vol. 4, 2, p 021008, 2017

J Ping, KW Pulsipher, R Vishnubhotla, JA Villegas, TL Hicks, S Honig, JG Saven, IJ Dmochowski, ATC Johnson, “Structural-functional analysis of engineered protein-nanoparticle assemblies using graphene microelectrodes”, Chemical Science, Vol. 8, 8, p 5329-5334, 2017 CH Naylor, WM Parkin, Z Gao, J Berry, Q Zhang, B McClimon, LZ Tan, CE Kehayias, M Zhao, RS Gona, RW Carpick, AM Rappe, D Srolovitz, M Drndic, ATC Johnson, “Synthesis and physical properties of phase-engineered transition metal dichalcogenide monolayer heterostructures”, ACS Nano, Vol. 11, p 8619 – 8627, 2017 Conferences J Ping, ATC Johnson, ATC Johnson Team, “Nonperturbative Quantification of Ionic Charge Transfer through Nm-Scale Protein Pores Using Graphene Microelectrodes”, APS March Meeting Abstracts, 2017 Cherie Kagan R Ashkar, MJA Hore, X Ye, B Natarajan, NJ Greybush, T Lam, CR Kagan, CB Murray, “Rapid Large-Scale Assembly and Pattern Transfer of One-Dimensional Gold Nanorod Superstructures” ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Vol. 9, 30, 25513-25521, 2017 M Zhang, DJ Magagnosc, I Liberal, Y Yu, H Yun, H Yang, Y Wu, J Guo, W Chen, YJ Shin, A Stein, JM Kikkawa, N Engheta, DS Gianola, CB Murray, CR Kagan, “High-strength magnetically switchable plasmonic nanorods assembled from a binary nanocrystal mixture,” Nature Nanotechnology, Vol. 12, 3, 228, 2017 Y Wu, S Li, N Gogotsi, T Zhao, B Fleury, CR Kagan, CB Murray, JB Baxter, “Directional Carrier Transfer in Strongly Coupled Binary Nanocrystal Superlattice Films Formed by Assembly and in Situ Ligand Exchange at a Liquid–Air Interface,” The Journal of Physical Chemistry, Vol. 21, 8, 4146-4157, 2017 OE Semonin, GA Elbaz, DB Straus, TD Hull, DW Paley, AMV Zande, JC Hone, I Kymissis, CR Kagan, X Roy, JS Owen, “Correction to ‘Limits of Carrier Diffusion in n Type and p Type CH3NH3PbI3 Perovskite Single Crystals’,” The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, Vol. 8, 24, 6092-6093 2017

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2017-2018 Publications

Selected Publications from Singh Center for Nanotechnology Researchers

GA Elbaz, DB Straus, OE Semonin, TD Hull, DW Paley, P Kim, JS Owen, CR Kagan, X Roy, “Unbalanced hole and electron diffusion in lead bromide perovskites,” Nano Letters, Vol. 17, 3, 1727-1732 2017 NJ Greybush, Iñigo Liberal, L Malassis, James M Kikkawa, N Engheta, CB Murray, CR Kagan “Plasmon resonances in self-assembled twodimensional Au nanocrystal metamolecules,” ACS Nano, Vol. 11, 3, 2917-2927, 2017 T Paik, H Yun, B Fleury, SH Hong, PS Jo, Y Wu, SJ Oh, M Cargnello, H Yang, CB Murray, CR Kagan, “Hierarchical Materials Design by Pattern Transfer Printing of Self-Assembled Binary Nanocrystal Superlattices,” Nano Letters, Vol. 17, 3, 2017 D Jishkariani, JD Lee, H Yun, T Paik, JM Kikkawa, CR Kagan, B Donnio, CB Murray, “The dendritic effect and magnetic permeability in dendron coated nickel and manganese zinc ferrite nanoparticles,” Nanoscale, Vol. 9, 37, 1392213928, 2017 SJ Oh, DB Straus, T Zhao, J-H Choi, S-W Lee, EA Gaulding, CB Murray, CR Kagan, “Engineering the surface chemistry of lead chalcogenide nanocrystal solids to enhance carrier mobility and lifetime in optoelectronic devices,” Chemical Communications, Vol. 53, 4, 728-731 2017 Conferences SH Parra, D Straus, N Iotov, B Fichera, J Gebhardt, A Rappe, J Subotnik, J Kikkawa, CR Kagan, “Direct Observation of Electron-Phonon Coupling and Slow Vibrational Relaxation in Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Perovskites,” APS Meeting Abstracts, 2017 Bekir Karabucak BC Yaman, Ö Irmak, EO Orhan, B Karabucak, F Ozer, MB Blatz, “The effect of canal cleansing protocols on cementation of a fiber post to saliva-contaminated root canals,” Journal of Adhesion Science and Technology, Vol. 31, 1, 71-81, 2017

Jay Kikkawa D Jishkariani, JD Lee, H Yun, T Paik, JM Kikkawa, CR Kagan, B Donnio, CB Murray “The dendritic effect and magnetic permeability in dendron coated nickel and manganese zinc ferrite nanoparticles”, Nanoscale, Vol. 9, 37, pp. 1392213928, 2017 T Liu, AL Exarhos, EC Alguire, F Gao, E SalamiRanjbaran, K Cheng, T Jia, JE Subotnik, PJ Walsh, JM Kikkawa, Z Fakhraai, “Birefringent Stable Glass with Predominantly Isotropic Molecular Orientation”, Physical Review Letters, Vol. 119, 9, art. no. 095502, 2017 CH Naylor, WM Parkin, Z Gao, H Kang, M Noyan, RB Wexler, LZ Tan, Y Kim, CE Kehayias, F Streller, YR Zhou, R Carpick, Z Luo, YW Park, AM Rappe, M Drndić, JM Kikkawa, ATC Johnson “Large-area synthesis of high-quality monolayer 1T’-WTe2 flakes” 2D Materials, Vol. 4, 2, art. no. 021008, 2017 NJ Greybush, I Liberal, L Malassis, JM Kikkawa, N Engheta, CB Murray, CR Kagan “Plasmon Resonances in Self-Assembled TwoDimensional Au Nanocrystal Metamolecules”, ACS Nano, Vol. 11, 3, pp. 2917-2927, 2017 M Zhang, DJ Magagnosc, I Liberal, Y Yu, H Yun, H Yang, Y Wu, J Guo, W Chen, YJ Shin, A Stein, JM Kikkawa, N Engheta, DS Gianola, CB Murray, CR Kagan “High-strength magnetically switchable plasmonic nanorods assembled from a binary nanocrystal mixture”, Nature Nanotechnology, Vol. 12, 3, pp. 228-232, 2017 Hyun Koo G Hwang, B Koltisko, X Jin, H Koo “Nonleachable Imidazolium-Incorporated Composite for Disruption of Bacterial Clustering, Exopolysaccharide-Matrix Assembly, and Enhanced Biofilm Removal”, ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, Vol. 9, 44, pp. 3827038280, 2017 J Xiao, AT Hara, D Kim, DT Zero, H Koo, G Hwang, “Biofilm three-dimensional architecture influences in situ pH distribution pattern on the human enamel surface”, International Journal of Oral Science, Vol. 9, 2, pp. 74-79, 2017 L Gao, H Koo “Do catalytic nanoparticles offer an improved therapeutic strategy to combat dental biofilms?”, Nanomedicine, Vol. 12, 4, pp. 275-279, 2017

D Kim, A Sengupta, THR Niepa, B-H Lee, A Weljie, VS Freitas-Blanco, RM Murata, KJ Stebe, D Lee, H Koo “Candida albicans stimulates Streptococcus mutans microcolony development via cross-kingdom biofilm-derived metabolites”, Scientific Reports, Vol. 0007, art. no. 41332, 2017 G Hwang, Y Liu, D Kim, Y Li, DJ Krysan, H Koo “Candida albicans mannans mediate Streptococcus mutans exoenzyme GtfB binding to modulate cross-kingdom biofilm development in vivo”, PLoS Pathogens, Vol. 13, 6, art. no. e1006407, 2017 Changchun Liu MG Mauk, J Song, HH Bau, R Gross, FD Bushman, RG Collman, C Liu, “Miniaturized devices for point of care molecular detection of HIV,” Lab on a Chip, Vol. 17, 3, 382-394, 2017 MG Mauk, C Liu, X Qiu, D Chen, J Song, HH Bau (2017) Microfluidic “Pouch” Chips for Immunoassays and Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests. In: Prickril B., Rasooly A. (eds) Biosensors and Biodetection. Methods in Molecular Biology, Vol. 1572. Humana Press, New York, NY J Song, C Liu, MG Mauk, SC Rankin, JB Lok, RM Greenberg, HH Bau, ”Two-stage isothermal enzymatic amplification for concurrent multiplex molecular detection,” Clinical Chemistry, Vol. 63, 3, 714-722, 2017 MG Mauk, J Song, HH Bau, C Liu, “Point-of-Care Molecular Test for Zika Infection,” Clinical Laboratory International, Vol. 41, 25, 2017 MG Mauk, J Song, HH Bau, C Liu, “Unique manual on major components to IVD development,” BioSystems, Vol. 15, 2017


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Daeyeon Lee THR Niepa, L Vaccari, RL Leheny, M Goulian, D Lee, KJ Stebe,” Films of Bacteria at Interfaces (FBI): Remodeling of Fluid Interfaces by Pseudomonas aeruginosa”, Scientific Reports, Vol. 7 (1), 17864, 2017 ED Cubuk, RJS Ivancic, SS Schoenholz, DJ Strickland, A Basu, ZS Davidson, J Fontaine, JL Hor, YR Huang, Y Jiang, NC Keim, KD Koshigan, JA Lefever, T Liu, XG Ma, DJ Magagnosc, E Morrow, CP Ortiz, JM Rieser, A Shavit, T Still, Y Xu, Y Zhang, KN Nordstrom, PE Arratia, RW Carpick, DJ Durian, Z Fakhraai, DJ Jerolmack, D Lee, J Li, R Riggleman, KT Turner, AG Yodh, DS Gianola, AJ Liu, “Structure-property relationships from universal signatures of plasticity in disordered solids”, Science, Vol. 358(6366), 1033-1037, 2017 MF Haase, H Jeon, N Hough, JH Kim, KJ Stebe, D Lee, “Multifunctional nanocomposite hollow fiber membranes by solvent transfer induced phase separation”, Nature Communications, Vol. 8(1), 1234, 2017 L Tran, MO Lavrentovich, G Durey, A Darmon, MF Haase, N Li, D Lee, KJ Stebe, RD Kamien, TL Leon, “Change in Stripes for Cholesteric Shells via Anchoring in Moderation”, Physical Review, Vol. X 7, 041029, 2017 SD Hann, KJ Stebe, D Lee, “All-Aqueous Assemblies via Interfacial Complexation: Toward Artificial Cell and Microniche Development”, Langmuir, Vol. 33(39), 10107-10117, 2017 N Manohar, KJ Stebe, D Lee, “Solvent-Driven Infiltration of Polymer (SIP) into Nanoparticle Packings”, ACS Macro Letters, Vol. 6(10), 11041108, 2017 L Vaccari, M Molaei, THR Niepa, D Lee, RL Leheny, KJ Stebe, “Films of bacteria at interfaces”, Advances in Colloid and Interface Science, Vol. 247, 561-572, 2017 LC Bradley, ND Bade, LM Mariani, KT Turner, D Lee, KJ Stebe, “Rough Adhesive Hydrogels (RAd gels) for Underwater Adhesion” ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Vol. 9 (33), 27409-27413, 2017 SD Hann, KJ Stebe, D Lee, “AWE-somes: All Water Emulsion Bodies with Permeable Shells and Selective Compartments”, ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Vol. 9 (29), 2502325028, 2017

LC Bradley, WH Chen, KJ Stebe, D Lee, “Janus and patchy colloids at fluid interfaces”, Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science, Vol. 30, 25-33, 2017 G Duan, MF Haase, KJ Stebe, D Lee, “One-Step Generation of Salt-Responsive Polyelectrolyte Microcapsules via Surfactant-Organized Nanoscale Interfacial Complexation in Emulsions (SO NICE)”, Langmuir, Vol. 34(3), 847-853, 2017 D Kim, A Sengupta, THR Niepa, BH Lee, A Weljie, VSF Blanco, RM Murata, KJ Stebe, DLee, H Koo, “Candida albicans stimulates Streptococcus mutans microcolony development via cross-kingdom biofilm-derived metabolites”, Scientific Reports, Vol. 7, 41332, 2017 SD Hann, D Lee, KJ Stebe, “Tuning interfacial complexation in aqueous two phase systems with polyelectrolytes and nanoparticles for compound all water emulsion bodies (AWEsomes)”, Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, Vol. 19(35), 23825-23831, 2017 Conferences L Tran, M Lavrentovich, G Durey, A Darmon, M Haase, N Li, D Lee, K Stebe, R Kamien, TL Leon, “A change in stripes for cholesteric shells via modulated anchoring”, APS Meeting Abstracts, March 13–17, 2017 Francis Mante H Miyajima, F Ozer, S Imazato, FK Mante “Surface characteristics of bioactive Ti fabricated by chemical treatment for cartilaginousintegration”. (2017) Materials Science and Engineering C, Vol. 78, pp. 495-502, 2017 F Ozer, A Naden,V Turp, F Mante, D Sen, MB Blatz “Effect of thickness and surface modifications on flexural strength of monolithic zirconia”, Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, art, 2017

Robert Mauck F Qu, JL Holloway, JL Esterhai, JA Burdick, RL Mauck, “Programmed biomolecule delivery to enable and direct cell migration for connective tissue repair”, Nature Communications, Vol. 8, iss 1, p 1780, 2017 JT Martin, SE Gullbrand, DH Kim, K Ikuta, CG Pfeifer, BG Ashinsky, LJ Smith, DM Elliott, HE Smith, RL Mauck, “In Vitro Maturation and In Vivo Integration and Function of an Engineered Cell-Seeded Disc-like Angle Ply Structure (DAPS) for Total Disc Arthroplasty”, Scientific reports, Vol. 7, iss 1, p 15765, 2017 S Bansal, NM Keah, AL Neuwirth, O O'Reilly, F Qu, BN Seiber, S Mandalapu, RL Mauck, MH Zgonis,“Large Animal Models of Meniscus Repair and Regeneration: A Systematic Review of the State of the Field”, Tissue Engineering Part C: Methods, Vol. 23, iss 11, p 661-672, 2017 SJ Heo, SE Szczesny, DH Kim, KS Saleh, RL Mauck, “Expansion of mesenchymal stem cells on electrospun scaffolds maintains stemness, mechano-responsivity, and differentiation potential”, Journal of Orthopaedic Research, 2017 J Huegel, DH Kim, JM Cirone, AM Pardes, TR Morris, CA Nuss, RL Mauck, LJ Soslowsky, AF Kuntz, “Effects of autologous tenocyte-seeded nanofibrous scaffolds in rotator cuff repair are age-dependent”, Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, Vol. 26, iss 10, p e324-e326, 2017 David Meaney M Adegoke, O Teter, D Meaney. “The role of network size and architecture in recovery after targeted injury in neuronal islands”, Journal of Neurotrauma, Vol. 34, 12, A52-A52, 2017

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2017-2018 Publications

Selected Publications from Singh Center for Nanotechnology Researchers

Christopher Murray J Luo, M Monai, C Wang, JD Lee, T Duchoň, F Dvořák, V Matolín, CB Murray, P Fornasiero, RJ Gorte, “Unraveling the surface state and composition of highly selective nanocrystalline Ni–Cu alloy catalysts for hydrodeoxygenation of HMF,” Catalysis Science & Technology, Vol. 7, 8, 1735-1743, 2017 PA Pepin, BT Diroll, CB Murray, JM Vohs, “Morphological Dependence of the Thermal and Photochemical Reactions of Acetaldehyde on Anatase TiO2 Nanocrystals,” Topics in Catalysis, 1-14, 2017 D Agarwal, CO Aspetti, M Cargnello, ML Ren, J Yoo, CB Murray, R Agarwal, “Engineering localized surface plasmon interactions in gold by silicon nanowire for enhanced heating and photocatalysis,” Nano Letters, Vol. 17, 3, 18391845, 2017 PA Pepin, Benjamin T Diroll, Hyuck J Choi, Christopher B Murray, JM Vohs, “Thermal and Photochemical Reactions of Methanol, Acetaldehyde, and Acetic Acid on Brookite TiO2 Nanorods,” The Journal of Physical Chemistry, Vol. 121, 21, 11488-11498, 2017 LG Lippert, T Dadosh, JA Hadden, V Karnawat, BT Diroll, CB Murray, ELF Holzbaur, K Schulten, SL Peterson, YE Goldman, “Angular measurements of the dynein ring reveal a stepping mechanism dependent on a flexible stalk” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, 23, E4564 – E4573, 2017 CC Lin, M Cargnello, CB Murray, N Clarke, KI Winey, RA Riggleman, RJ Composto, “Nanorod Mobility Influences Polymer Diffusion in Polymer Nanocomposites,” ACS Macro Letters, Vol. 6, 8, 869-874, 2017 D Jishkariani, Y Wu, D Wang, Y Liu, AV Blaaderen, CB Murray, “Preparation and Self-Assembly of Dendronized Janus Fe3O4–Pt and Fe3O4–Au Heterodimers,” ACS Nano, Vol. 11, 8, 7958-7966, 2017 BT Diroll, Xuedan Ma, Yaoting Wu, Christopher B Murray, “Anisotropic Cracking of Nanocrystal Superlattices,” Nano Letters, Vol. 17, 10, 65016506, 2017 C Burel, A Alsayed, L Malassis, CB Murray, B Donnio, R Dreyfus, “Plasmonic-Based Mechanochromic Microcapsules as Strain Sensors,” Small, Vol. 13, 39, 2017

KC Elbert, D Jishkariani, Y Wu, JD Lee, B Donnio, CB Murray, “Design, Self-Assembly, and Switchable Wettability in Hydrophobic, Hydrophilic, and Janus Dendritic Ligand–Gold Nanoparticle Hybrid Materials,” Chemistry of Materials, Vol. 29, 20, 8737-8746, 2017 NJ Greybush, Iñigo Liberal, L Malassis, James M Kikkawa, N Engheta, CB Murray, CR Kagan “Plasmon resonances in self-assembled twodimensional Au nanocrystal metamolecules,” ACS Nano, Vol. 11, 3, 2917-2927, 2017 T Paik, H Yun, B Fleury, SH Hong, PS Jo, Y Wu, SJ Oh, M Cargnello, H Yang, CB Murray, CR Kagan, “Hierarchical Materials Design by Pattern Transfer Printing of Self-Assembled Binary Nanocrystal Superlattices,” Nano Letters, Vol. 17, 3, 2017 D Jishkariani, JD Lee, H Yun, T Paik, JM Kikkawa, CR Kagan, B Donnio, CB Murray, “The dendritic effect and magnetic permeability in dendron coated nickel and manganese zinc ferrite nanoparticles,” Nanoscale, Vol. 9, 37, 1392213928, 2017 SJ Oh, DB Straus, T Zhao, J-H Choi, S-W Lee, EA Gaulding, CB Murray, CR Kagan, “Engineering the surface chemistry of lead chalcogenide nanocrystal solids to enhance carrier mobility and lifetime in optoelectronic devices,” Chemical Communications, Vol. 53, 4, 728-731 2017 R Ashkar, MJA Hore, X Ye, B Natarajan, NJ Greybush, T Lam, CR Kagan, CB Murray, “Rapid Large-Scale Assembly and Pattern Transfer of One-Dimensional Gold Nanorod Superstructures” ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Vol. 9, 30, 25513-25521, 2017 M Zhang, DJ Magagnosc, I Liberal, Y Yu, H Yun, H Yang, Y Wu, J Guo, W Chen, YJ Shin, A Stein, JM Kikkawa, N Engheta, DS Gianola, CB Murray, CR Kagan, “High-strength magnetically switchable plasmonic nanorods assembled from a binary nanocrystal mixture,” Nature Nanotechnology, Vol. 12, 3, 228, 2017 Y Wu, S Li, N Gogotsi, T Zhao, B Fleury, CR Kagan, CB Murray, JB Baxter, “Directional Carrier Transfer in Strongly Coupled Binary Nanocrystal Superlattice Films Formed by Assembly and in Situ Ligand Exchange at a Liquid–Air Interface,” The Journal of Physical Chemistry, Vol. 21, 8, 4146-4157, 2017

Conferences B Rasin, B Lindsay, X Ye, J Meth, CB Murray, R Riggleman, R Composto, “Position and orientation of gold nanorods in vertical cylinder diblock copolymer films,” APS March Meeting Abstracts, 2017 Michael Ostap BB McIntosh, ELF Holzbaur, EM Ostap, “Myo1C and Endophilin Promote KinesinDriven Tubulation at Engineered Cytoskeletal Intersections”, Biophysical Journal, Vol. 112, iss 3, p 273a, 2017 Virgil Percec D Sahoo, M Peterca, E Aqad, BE Partridge, PA Heiney, R Graf, HW Spiess, X Zeng, V Percec, “Tetrahedral arrangements of perylene bisimide columns via supramolecular orientational memory,” ACS Nano, Vol. 11, 1, 983-991, 2017 SE Sherman, Q Xiao, V Percec, “Mimicking complex biological membranes and their programmable glycan ligands with dendrimersomes and glycodendrimersomes,” American Chemical Society, 2017 KA Andreopoulou, M Peterca, DA Wilson, BE Partridge, PA Heiney, V Percec, “Demonstrating the 81-Helicity and Nanomechanical Function of Self-Organizable Dendronized Polymethacrylates and Polyacrylates,” Macromolecules, Vol. 50, 14, 5271-5284, 2017 Q Xiao, SE Sherman, SE Wilner, X Zhou, C Dazen, T Baumgart, EH Reed, DA Hammer, W Shinoda, ML Klein, V Percec, “Janus dendrimersomes coassembled from fluorinated, hydrogenated, and hybrid Janus dendrimers as models for cell fusion and fission,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, 34, E7045 – E7053, 2017 J Kopitz, Q Xiao, AK Ludwig, A Romero, M Michalak, SE Sherman, X Zhou, C Dazen, S Vértesy, H Kaltner, ML Klein, HJ Gabius, V Percec, “Reaction of a Programmable Glycan Presentation of Glycodendrimersomes and Cells with Engineered Human Lectins To Show the Sugar Functionality of the Cell Surface” Angewandte Chemie Internatioanal Edition, Vol. 56, 46, 14677-14681, 2017


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Kathleen Stebe THR Niepa, L Vaccari, RL Leheny, M Goulian, D Lee, KJ Stebe,” Films of Bacteria at Interfaces (FBI): Remodeling of Fluid Interfaces by Pseudomonas aeruginosa”, Scientific Reports, Vol. 7 (1), 17864, 2017 MF Haase, H Jeon, N Hough, JH Kim, KJ Stebe, D Lee, “Multifunctional nanocomposite hollow fiber membranes by solvent transfer induced phase separation”, Nature Communications, Vol. 8(1), 1234, 2017 DJ Shea, YW Li, KJ Stebe, K Konstantopoulos, “E-selectin-mediated rolling facilitates pancreatic cancer cell adhesion to hyaluronic acid”, The FASEB Journal, Vol. 31(11),5078-5086, 2017 L Tran, MO Lavrentovich, G Durey, A Darmon, MF Haase, N Li, D Lee, KJ Stebe, RD Kamien, TL Leon, “Change in Stripes for Cholesteric Shells via Anchoring in Moderation”, Physical Review X, Vol. 7, 041029, 2017 IB Liu, G Bigazzi, NS Mood, L Yao, KJ Stebe “Curvature capillary repulsion”, Physical Review Fluids, Vol. 2 (10), 100501, 2017 IB Liu, NS Mood, KJ Stebe, “Capillary Assembly of Colloids: Interactions on Planar and Curved Interfaces”, Annual Review of Condensed Matter Physics, Vol. 9, 283-305, 2017 SD Hann, KJ Stebe, D Lee, “All-Aqueous Assemblies via Interfacial Complexation: Toward Artificial Cell and Microniche Development”, Langmuir, Vol. 33(39), 10107-10117, 2017 N Manohar, KJ Stebe, D Lee, “Solvent-Driven Infiltration of Polymer (SIP) into Nanoparticle Packings”, ACS Macro Letters, Vol. 6 (10), 11041108, 2017 L Vaccari, M Molaei, THR Niepa, D Lee, RL Leheny, KJ Stebe, “Films of bacteria at interfaces”, Advances in Colloid and Interface Science, Vol. 247, 561-572, 2017 LC Bradley, ND Bade, LM Mariani, KT Turner, D Lee, KJ Stebe, “Rough Adhesive Hydrogels (RAd gels) for Underwater Adhesion” ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Vol. 9 (33), 27409-27413, 2017 SD Hann, KJ Stebe, D Lee, “AWE-somes: All Water Emulsion Bodies with Permeable Shells and Selective Compartments”, ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Vol. 9 (29), 2502325028, 2017

LC Bradley, WH Chen, KJ Stebe, D Lee, “Janus and patchy colloids at fluid interfaces”, Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science, Vol. 30, 25-33, 2017 G Duan, MF Haase, KJ Stebe, D Lee, “One-Step Generation of Salt-Responsive Polyelectrolyte Microcapsules via Surfactant-Organized Nanoscale Interfacial Complexation in Emulsions (SO NICE)”, Langmuir, Vol. 34(3), 847853, 2017 THR Niepa, L Hou, H Jiang, M Goulian, H Koo, KJ Stebe, D Lee, “Corrigendum: Microbial Nanoculture as an Artificial Microniche”, Scientific Reports, Vol. 7, 42568 D Kim, A Sengupta, THR Niepa, BH Lee, A Weljie, VSF Blanco, RM Murata, KJ Stebe, DLee, H Koo, “Candida albicans stimulates Streptococcus mutans microcolony development via cross-kingdom biofilm-derived metabolites”, Scientific Reports, Vol. 7, 41332 Conferences

Allison Sweeney HN Kim, S Vahidinia, AL Holt, AM Sweeney, S Yang, "Geometric Design of Scalable Forward Scatterers for Optimally Efficient Solar Transformers." Advanced Materials, Vol. 29(44) 2017 J Cai, JP Townsend, TC Dodson, PA Heiney, AM Sweeney, "Eye patches: Protein assembly of index-gradient squid lenses." Science, Vol. 357 (6351), 564-569, 2017 EI Rosenthal, AL Holt, AM Sweeney, "Threedimensional midwater camouflage from a novel two-component photonic structure in hatchetfish skin." Journal of The Royal Society Interface, Vol. 14, (130)20161034, 2017 JP Townsend, AM Sweeney, "From Blushing Beroids to Tenacious Tentaculata: New Evidence of Tyrosine Metabolites in Ctenophores and Their Functional Implications." In INTEGRATIVE AND COMPARATIVE BIOLOGY, Vol. 57, pp. E431-E431. JOURNALS DEPT, 2001 EVANS RD, CARY, NC 27513 USA: OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC, 2017

S Das, EB Steager, KJ Stebe, V Kumar, “Simultaneous control of spherical microrobots using catalytic and magnetic actuation”, International Conference on Manipulation, Automation and Robotics at Small Scales (MARSS), 2017

Conferences

L Tran, M Lavrentovich, G Durey, A Darmon, M Haase, N Li, D Lee, K Stebe, R Kamien, TL Leon, “A change in stripes for cholesteric shells via modulated anchoring”, APS Meeting Abstracts, March 13–17, 2017

A Radja, M Lavrentovich, E Horsley, R Kamien, A Sweeney, "Patterns on Pollen: a polysaccharide phase transition process." APS March Meeting 2017

SD Hann, D Lee, KJ Stebe, “Tuning interfacial complexation in aqueous two phase systems with polyelectrolytes and nanoparticles for compound all water emulsion bodies (AWEsomes)”, Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics 19(35), 23825-23831

Andrew Tsourkas

K Stebe, “Curvature Capillary Repulsion”, APS Meeting Abstracts, March 13–17, 2017 Y Luo, F Serra, D Wong, E Steager, K Stebe, “Near-field interaction of colloid near wavy walls”, APS Meeting Abstracts, March 13–17, 2017

E Kraus, P Janmey, A Sweeney, AV Oosten, "Strainweakening rheology of marine sponges and its evolutionary implication.", APS March Meeting 2017

CF Greineder, CH Villa, LR Walsh, RY Kiseleva, ED Hood, M Khoshnejad, RW Rothman, A Tsourkas, VR Muzykantov, "Site-specific modification of singlechain antibody fragments for bioconjugation and vascular immunotargeting." Bioconjugate Chemistry, Vol. 29(1), 56-66, 2017 JP Thawani, A Amirshaghaghi, L Yan, JM Stein, J Liu, A Tsourkas,"Photoacoustic-Guided Surgery with Indocyanine Green-Coated Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Clusters." Small, Vol. 13(37), 1703300, 2017 S Kartha, L Yan, CL Weisshaar, ME Ita, VV Shuvaev, VR Muzykantov, A Tsourkas, BA Winkelstein, Z Cheng, "Superoxide Dismutase-Loaded Porous Polymersomes as Highly Efficient Antioxidants for Treating Neuropathic Pain." Advanced Healthcare Materials, Vol. 6(17), 1700500, 2017

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2017-2018 Publications

Selected Publications from Singh Center for Nanotechnology Researchers

SH Crayton, AK Chen, JF Liu, EMH Dempsey, CH Huang, A Tsourkas, Z Cheng, "3.20 Molecular Imaging.", Vol. 424-466, 2017 JF Liu, S Yadavali, A Tsourkas, D Issadore. "Microfluidic diafiltration-on-chip using an integrated magnetic peristaltic micropump." Lab on a Chip, Vol. 17(22), 3796-3803, 2017 AA Zaki, D Cormode, A Tsourkas, JF Dorsey, "Increasing the therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapy using nanoparticles." In Increasing the Therapeutic Ratio of Radiotherapy, 241265. Humana Press, Cham, 2017 Kevin Turner JL Hor, Y Jiang, DJ Ring, RA Riggleman, KT Turner, D Lee, “Nanoporous Polymer-Infiltrated Nanoparticle Films with Uniform or Graded Porosity via Undersaturated Capillary Rise Infiltration,” ACS Nano, Vol. 11, 3, 3229-3236, 2017 HK Minsky, KT Turner, “Composite Microposts with High Dry Adhesion Strength,” ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Vol. 9, 21, 18322-18327, 2017 C Lin, K Davami, Y Jiang, J Cortes, M Munther, M Shaygan, H Ghassemi, JT Robinson, KT Turner, I Bargatin, “Enhancing the stiffness of vertical graphene sheets through ion beam irradiation and fluorination,” Nanotechnology, Vol. 28, 29, 295701, 2017 LC Bradley, ND Bade, LM Mariani, KT Turner, D Lee, KJ Stebe, “Rough Adhesive Hydrogels (RAd gels) for Underwater Adhesion,” ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Vol. 9, 33, 27409-27413, 2017 Y Jiang, JA Harrison, JD Schall, KE Ryan, RW Carpick, KT Turner, “Correcting for Tip Geometry Effects in Molecular Simulations of SingleAsperity Contact,” Tribology Letters, Vol. 65, 3, 78, 2017

J Liu, Y Jiang, DS Grierson, K Sridharan, Y Shao, TDB Jacobs, ML Falk, RW Carpick, KT Turner, “Tribochemical Wear of Diamond-Like CarbonCoated Atomic Force Microscope Tips,” ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Vol. 9, 40, 35341-35348, 2017 ED Cubuk, RJS Ivancic, SS Schoenholz, DJ Strickland, A Basu, ZS Davidson, J Fontaine, JL Hor, Y-R Huang, Y Jiang, NC Keim, KD Koshigan, JA Lefever, T Liu, X-G Ma, DJ Magagnosc, E Morrow, CP Ortiz, JM Rieser, A Shavit, T Still, Y Xu, Y Zhang, KN Nordstrom, PE Arratia, RW Carpick, DJ Durian, Z Fakhraai, DJ Jerolmack, D Lee, J Li, R Riggleman, KT Turner, AG Yodh, DS Gianola, Andrea J Liu, “Structure-property relationships from universal signatures of plasticity in disordered solids,” Science, Vol. 358, 6366, 1033-1037, 2017 Q Zhang, Y Tang, M Hajfathalian, C Chen, KT Turner, DA Dikin, G Lin, J Yin, “Spontaneous Periodic Delamination of Thin Films to Form Crack-free Metal and Silicon Ribbons with High Stretchability,” ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Vol. 9, 51, 44938-44947, 2017 John Vohs T Cao, Y Cheng, RJ Gorte, Y Shi, JM Vohs, N Cai, “Effect of grain boundary diffusion on electrolyte stability in direct carbon fuel cells with antimony anodes”, Ceramics International, Vol. 43(18), 16575-16579, 2017 Y Cheng, TS Oh, M Rahmanipour, R Wilson, RJ Gorte, JM Vohs, "Composite LSF-YSZ and LSCrF-YSZ Electrode Scaffolds for Infiltrated SOFC Cathodes." ECS Transactions, Vol. 78(1), 729-740, 2017 PA Pepin, BT Diroll, HJ Choi, CB Murray, JM Vohs, “Thermal and Photochemical Reactions of Methanol, Acetaldehyde, and Acetic Acid on Brookite TiO2 Nanorods”, The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 2017 Vol. 121 (21), 1148811498, 2017

X Liang, J Shin, D Magagnosc, Y Jiang, SJ Park, AJ Hart, KT Turner, DS Gianola, PK Purohit, “Compression and recovery of carbon nanotube forests described as a phase transition,” International Journal of Solids and Structures, Vol. 122, 196-209, 2017

M Rahmanipour, Y Cheng, TM Onn, A Donazzi, JM Vohs, RJ Gorte, "Modification of LSFYSZ Composite Cathodes by Atomic Layer Deposition.", Journal of The Electrochemical Society, Vol. 164 (7) F879-F884, 2017

Y Shao, TDB Jacobs, Y Jiang, KT Turner, RW Carpick, ML Falk, “Multibond Model of SingleAsperity Tribochemical Wear at the Nanoscale,” ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Vol. 9 40 35333-35340, 2017

Rebecca Wells J Llewellyn, G Khandekar, A Kriegermeier, N Theise, RG Wells, “Characterisation of a novel space in neonatal and adult extrahepatic bile duct”, Hepatology, Vol. 66, p 645A-646A, 2017

Jane Willenbring C Gonneau, K Miller, SK Mohanty, R Xu, W-T Hwang, JK Willenbring, BB Casper. “Framework for assessment and phytoremediation of asbestos-contaminated sites”, Environmental Science and Pollution Research, Vol. 24, 33, 25912-25922, 2017 SK. Mohanty, C Gonneau, A Salamatipour, RA. Pietrofesa, B Casper, M Christofidou-Solomidou, JK Willenbring. “Siderophore-mediated iron removal from chrysotile: Implications for asbestos toxicity reduction and bioremediation”, Journal of Hazardous Materials, 2017 C Gonneau, SK. Mohanty, LH Dietterich, W-T Hwang, JK Willenbring, BB Casper. “Differential elemental uptake in three pseudo-metallophyte C4 grasses in situ in the eastern USA”, Plant and Soil, 2017 Karen Winey EB Trigg, LR Middleton, DE Moed, KI Winey, “Transverse Orientation of Acid Layers in the Crystallites of a Precise Polymer” Macromolecules, Vol. 50 (22), 8988-8995, 2017 EB. Trigg, BJ Tiegs, GW Coates, KI Winey, “High Morphological Order in a Nearly Precise AcidContaining Polymer and Ionomer”, ACS Macro Letters, Vol. 6 (9), 947-951, 2017 CC Lin, M Cargnello, CB Murray, N Clarke, KI Winey, RA Riggleman, RJ Composto, “Nanorod Mobility Influences Polymer Diffusion in Polymer Nanocomposites”, ACS Macro Letters, Vol. 6 (8), 869-874, 2017 CC Lin, PJ Griffin, H Chao, MJA Hore, K Ohno, N Clarke, RA Riggleman, KI Winey, RJ Composto. "Grafted polymer chains suppress nanoparticle diffusion in athermal polymer melts.", The Journal of Chemical Physics, Vol. 146(20), 203332, 2017 A Karatrantos, RJ Composto, KI Winey, N Clarke. "Polymer and spherical nanoparticle diffusion in nanocomposites.", The Journal of Chemical Physics, Vol. 146(20), 203331, 2017 J Choi, N Clarke, KI Winey, RJ Composto, "Polymer Diffusion from Attractive and Athermal Substrates.", Macromolecules, Vol. 50(7), 30383042, 2017


2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

EB Trigg, MJ Stevens, KI Winey, "Chain folding produces a multilayered morphology in a precise polymer: simulations and experiments.", Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 139(10), 3747-3755, 2017

G Lin, D Ge, Y Tang, Y Xia, G Wu, L Han, S Yang, J Yin, “Cuts Guided Deterministic Buckling in Arrays of Soft Parallel Plates for Multifunctionality”, ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Vol. 9, iss 34, p 29345–29354, 2017

Conferences

D Ge, G Wu, L Yang, HN Kim, W Hallwachs, JM Burns, DH Janzen, S Yang, “Varying and unchanging whiteness on the wings of duskactive and shade-inhabiting Carystoides escalantei butterflies”, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 114, iss 28, p 7379-7384, 2017

EB Trigg, M Marechal, HM Jakani, TW Gaines, DE Moed, KB Wagener, P Rannou, MJ Stevens, KI Winey, "Role of Semi-Crystalline Morphology on Proton Conduction Pathways in a Precise Sulfonic Acid Polyethylene.", APS Meeting Abstracts, March 13–17, 2017 G Philip, E Bailey, M Tyagi, K Winey, "Unexpected Decoupling of Translational and Reorientational Segmental Dynamics in Attractive Polymer Nanocomposites.", APS Meeting Abstracts, March 13–17, 2017

W Panatdasirisuk, Z Liao, T Vongsetskul, S Yang, “Separation of Oil-in-Water Emulsions Using Hydrophilic Electrospun Membranes with Anisotropic Pores”, Langmuir, Vol. 33, iss 23, p 5872–5878, 2017

E Bailey, RA Riggleman, KI Winey, “Multi-Scale Polymer Conformations Between Confining Nanoparticles”, APS Meeting Abstracts, March 13–17, 2017

G Wu, H Cho, DA Wood, AD Dinsmore, S Yang, “Confined Assemblies of Colloidal Particles with Soft Repulsive Interactions”, Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 139, iss 14, p 5095–5101, 2017

E Bailey, H Chao, RA Riggleman, KI Winey, “Chain-Scale Polymer Dynamics Through Homogeneously Confining Nanoparticles”, APS Meeting Abstracts, March 13–17, 2017

Y Tang, G Lin, S Yang, YK Yi, RD Kamien, J Yin, Programmable Kiri-Kirigami Metamaterials”, Advanced Materials, Vol. 29, iss 10, p 1604262, 2017

J Pressly, R Jones, R Riggleman, K Winey, “Polymer Conformation Under 1-Dimensional Rigid Symmetric Confinement”, APS Meeting Abstracts, March 13–17, 2017

J Kim, Y Wang, H Park, MC Park, SE Moon, SM Hong, CM Koo, KY Suh, S Yang, H Cho, “Nonlinear Frameworks for Reversible and Pluripotent Wetting on Topographic Surfaces”, Advanced Materials, Vol. 29, iss 7, p 1605078, 2017

John H. Wolfe

D Ge, X Yang, Z Chen, L Yang, G Wu, Y Xia, S Yang, “Colloidal inks from bumpy colloidal nanoparticles for the assembly of ultrasmooth and uniform structural colors”, Nanoscale, Vol. 9, iss 44, p 17357-17363, 2017

L Ramos, JE Hunter, JH Wolfe. “Viral vector gene delivery to the brain for treating neurogenetic diseases”. Drug and Gene Delivery to the Central Nervous System for Neuroprotection: Nanotechnological Advances, pp. 89-125, 2017. Shu Yang HN Kim, S Vahidinia, AL Holt, AM Sweeney, S Yang, “Geometric Design of Scalable Forward Scatterers for Optimally Efficient Solar Transformers”, Advanced Materials, Vol. 29, iss 44, p 1702922, 2017 B Anasori, A Sarycheva, S Buondonno, Z Zhou, S Yang, Y Gogotsi, “2D metal carbides (MXenes) in fibers”, Materials Today, Vol. 20, iss 8, p 481482, 2017

S Yu, H Cho, JP Hong, Hl Park, JC Jolly, HS Kang, JH Lee, J Kim, SH Lee, AS Lee, SM Hong, C Park, S Yang, CM Koo, “Shaping micro-clusters via inverse jamming and topographic close-packing of microbombs”, Nature Communications, Vol. 8, p 721, 2017 HS Kang, H Cho, W Panatdasirisuk, S Yang, “Hierarchical membranes with sizecontrolled nanopores from photofluidization of electrospun azobenzene polymer fibers”, Journal of Materials Chemistry A, Vol. 5, iss 35, p 18762-18769, 2017

E Alonso-Redondo, A Gueddida, J Li, B Graczykowski, CMS Torres, Y Pennec, S Yang, B Djafari-Rouhani, G Fytas, “Directional elastic wave propagation in high-aspect-ratio photoresist gratings: liquid infiltration and aging”, Nanoscale, Vol. 9, iss 8, p 2739-2747, 2017 J Jeong, SY Lee, X Gong, RD Kamien, S Yang, A Yodh, “Topography-guided buckling of swollen polymer bilayer films into three-dimensional structures”, Soft Matter, Vol. 13, iss 5, p 956 – 962, 2017 H Aharoni, Y Xia, X Zhang, RD Kamien, S Yang, “Making Faces: Universal Inverse Design of Surfaces with Thin Nematic Elastomer Sheets”, arXiv preprint arXiv:1710.08485, 2017 Arjun Yodh ED Cubuk, RJS Ivancic, SS Schoenholz, DJ Strickland, A Basu, ZS Davidson, J Fontaine, JL Hor, Y-R Huang, Y Jiang, NC Keim, KD Koshigan, JA Lefever, T Liu, X-G Ma, DJ Magagnosc, E Morrow, CP Ortiz, JM Rieser, A Shavit, T Still, Y Xu, Y Zhang, KN Nordstrom, PE Arratia, RW Carpick, DJ Durian, Z Fakhraai, DJ Jerolmack, Daeyeon Lee, Ju Li, R Riggleman, KT Turner, AG Yodh, DS Gianola, Andrea J Liu. “Structure-property relationships from universal signatures of plasticity in disordered solids”. Journal of Science, Vol. 358, 6366, 1033-1037, 2017 ZS Davidson, Y Huang, A Gross, A Martinez, T Still, C Zhou, PJ Collings, RD Kamien, AG Yodh. “Deposition and drying dynamics of liquid crystal droplets" Journal of Nature Communications, Vol. 8, 15642, 2017 J Jeong, Y Cho, SY Lee, X Gong, RD Kamien, S Yang, AG Yodh. “Topography-guided buckling of swollen polymer bilayer films into three-dimensional structures”, Soft Matter, Vol. 13, 5, 956-962, 2017 Conferences X Ma, Z Davidson, T Still, R Ivancic, SS Schoenholz, DM Sussman, AJ Liu, AG Yodh. “Heterogeneous activation in 2D colloidal glass-forming liquids classified by machine learning”, APS Meeting Abstracts 2017 W-S Wei, Y Xia, Shu Yang, AG Yodh “Self-assembly of nematic liquid crystal elastomer filaments", APS Meeting Abstracts 2017

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2017-2018 Annual Report Singh Center for Nanotechnology

The Singh Center Key Personnel Mark G. Allen Scientific Director Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology Noah Clay Director Quattrone Nanofabrication Facility Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology nclay@seas.upenn.edu Matthew Brukman Director Scanning and Local Probe Facility Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology mbrukman@seas.upenn.edu Douglas M. Yates Director Nanoscale Characterization Facility Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology dmyates@seas.upenn.edu

John Russell Program Coordinator Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology jrussell@seas.upenn.edu Pat Watson Director of User Programs Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology gewatson@seas.upenn.edu Christopher Montowski Building Administrator Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology montowsk@seas.upenn.edu Kristin L. Field Director of Programs Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology kfield@seas.upenn.edu Gerald Lopez Director of Business Development Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology lopezg@seas.upenn.edu

Credits Photos by: John Carlano , Felice Macera, John Russell, Albert Vecerka/Esto, Lamont Abrams All rights reserved. Design by Group M: group-m.com


2017-2018 Singh Center for Nanotechnology

Annual Report


Website: www.nano.upenn.edu Email: info@nano.upenn.edu Visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/singhcenternano/ Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/UPennSinghNano

SINGH CENTER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY ANNUAL REPORT 2017-2018

Visiting Address Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology University of Pennsylvania 3205 Walnut Street Philadelphia, PA 19104

Singh Center for Nanotechnology Annual Report 2017-2018

Member National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure

University of Pennsylvania

Profile for Singh Center for Nanotechnology

2017-2018 Singh Center for Nanotechnology Annual Report  

The 2017-2018 Singh Center for Nanotechnology at the University of Pennsylvania Annual Report, chronicling the research accomplishments, aca...

2017-2018 Singh Center for Nanotechnology Annual Report  

The 2017-2018 Singh Center for Nanotechnology at the University of Pennsylvania Annual Report, chronicling the research accomplishments, aca...