Page 1

SPRING 2013

The Magazine

Byrd Years THE

SUCCESS A LEGACY OF


| special message

An enduring vision have had the privilege to serve as a Simpson College Trustee for 29 years, the last six as Board Chair, and I have gotten to know John Byrd quite well. It didn’t take long to realize he not only had a passion for higher education, but also the vision and the will to make and implement decisions that would positively impact Simpson students and the experiences they have while they are here. I was particularly grateful to see John quickly grasp the importance of the Simpson Experience but also the need to make changes in enrollment, curriculum, fundraising and contact with the Indianola and Des Moines communities in order to enhance that experience. He had a vision of how he wanted to improve Simpson and, despite the challenging economic environment during most of his tenure, he worked collaboratively with all the necessary constituencies to bring about many positive changes on campus. His ability to communicate, inspire and guide has allowed us to accomplish much during his presidency, as you will read in the pages that follow. From helping to implement a new four-credit course curriculum that better prepares Simpson students for success, to overseeing major facility upgrades including the new Kent Campus Center, to dramatically improving the diversity on campus, John’s leadership has left a lasting legacy on Simpson College. Fred S. Hubbell Chair, Board of Trustees

I would be remiss, however, if I did not mention one of John’s greatest assets — his wife Nancy. We all know it takes a good team to accomplish great things, and Nancy’s involvement and support have been truly valuable to the Simpson family as well as the community of Indianola. Her energy and creativity have been felt in many ways, and I am certain her contributions are greater than many of us know. Working with John and Nancy and getting to know them personally has been a wonderfully rewarding experience. They will be leaving Simpson College a stronger and better place than when they arrived, poised for a successful future under the leadership of its 23rd president, Dr. Jay Simmons and his wife, Jenné. Thank you, John, for giving to Simpson College a part of yourself that will live on beneath these whispering maples. We wish you and Nancy all the best as you embark on your next adventure.

2

W W W. S I M P S O N . E D U / MAGAZINE


contents

The Magazine Simpson College President John Byrd Produced by the Office of Marketing and Public Relations Jill Ramthun Johnson ’85 Executive Director of Marketing and Public Relations Leslie Byars Diehl ’03 Art Director Ken Fuson Marketing Writer/Media Specialist

14

Greg Votava Digital Content Specialist Amanda Leichty ’10 Graphic Designer Bryan Geelan ’07 Athletics Communication Director

25

Oscar Preis Web Development Specialist Mary Fortune Administrative Assistant Jenifer Mertes Welch ’12 Copy Center Manager

12

Touring the Years Editor Sara Thompson

6 Investing in Simpson 7 Faculty Pursuits - Fred Jones

- Where Are They Now? - Faculty Accomplishments

Photography Luke Behaunek Dave Peterson

12 A SIMPSON SPACE 14 Cover story

N COL L SO

W

25 ATHLETICS 28 UPCOMING EVENTS 30 EXTRA!

- Remembering Joe Walt - Undergraduate Research Symposium

- Homecoming & Family Weekend 34 TOURING THE YEARS

ON THE COVER: In this issue, we reflect on the legacy of John Byrd, Simpson’s 22nd president. To see stories that touch on his many accomplishments during the past eight years, look for the Simpson seal.

I

A.

SIM P

E EG

24 CHAPLAIN’S CORNER

D

I

N O LA, IO

IN

D

A

W

A.

E EG

SIM P

The Byrd Years

IN

The Simpson magazine is published by the Office of Marketing and Public Relations. Letters to the Editor and story ideas are welcomed. Send correspondence to themagazine@simpson.edu

Graduate programs

N COL L SO

Office of College Advancement Bob Lane ’81 Vice President 515-961-1549

11 Evening, Weekend &

N O LA, IO

Office of Alumni Relations Erin Heeren Director 515-961-1547

A

Contributing Writers Ken Fuson Bryan Geelan ’07 Jill Ramthun Johnson ’85 Fritz Wehrenberg

THE MAGAZ INE | SPR I N G 2 0 1 3

3


N COL L SO

I

A.

SIM P

E EG

D

N O LA, IO

W

IN

I

N O LA, IO A

D

A

W

IN

A.

E EG

SIM P

| this is simpson

TEAM SIMPSON ON RAGBRAI

B Y J acki H a rrison Ask e lson ’ 9 7 a nd J a son Ask e lson ’ 9 7 , J o h nston , I owa

N COL L SO

e are so thankful Simpson has pulled together a RAGBRAI Team for the last several years, and it would not have been possible without President Byrd’s vision. When RAGBRAI announced Indianola as a host-town for the first time ever in 2009, President Byrd, being a biking enthusiast, asked the question—why doesn’t Simpson get a team together for this historic ride? And so, a new Simpson tradition was born. The best memory we share with President Byrd from Team Simpson has to be from the 2010 ride. The ride started in Sioux City, and the first night our friends at Morningside College so graciously hosted our team. We had one of the best spots on campus just off the baseball/softball fields—flat, close to working bathrooms and a good distance from any other team’s camp. It was a luxury spot by RAGBRAI standards. Imagine our team, 40 tents grouped together, settling in for a good night’s sleep. It was a quiet, peaceful evening. Peaceful, that is, until the middle of the night, when we all awoke suddenly by sounds of … what the heck is that … is that … OH, NO … SPRINKLERS! Underground sprinklers popped up among our tent community and we were under fire from all directions. Every single tent got wet. A handful of tents were no match for the force of the sprinklers and water soaked in, getting sleeping bags and gear wet. President Byrd took the brunt of the pain for Team Simpson. Not only did he set up his tent inches away from a sprinkler, he also had the misfortune of setting up his tent’s rain guard on top of the sprinkler. So when the sprinklers unleashed their fury, every drop of water was forced inside his tent, soaking everything­—including President Byrd. President Byrd handled it like the field general he is for our team. He treated it like a setback but never let his frustration show. On RAGBRAI, a positive attitude is a must or you will never make it. With some help from Bob Lane, Chris Goodale and Kelly Bradder taking care of drying his gear that day, he still managed to ride, beating most of the team (including us) to the next host town. The funniest thing from that experience was just how fast the story spread among the entire RAGBRAI community. A couple of days later we were riding, wearing our Team Simpson jerseys, and struck up a conversation with a random rider who said, “Team Simpson…wow…I heard what happened to your president!” Thank you, President Byrd, for sparking the idea of Team Simpson and riding with us all these years. It is the catalyst for re-engaging us to this Simpson community and we are grateful. Your presence on the ride will be missed, but we hope to continue the tradition in honor of you. Congratulations on your retirement. ■

4

WWW. S I M P S O N . E D U / MAGAZINE


DECEMBER N COL L SO

I

lasting feature of President John Byrd’s tenure at Simpson College will be the opportunity for students who finish their studies in December to participate in a formal commencement ceremony. SIM P

E EG

A.

IN

N O LA, IO

W

D

I

N O LA, IO

BY STEVE GRIFFITH, S e nior V ic e P r e sid e nt a nd Ac a d e mic D e a n

A

D

A

W

IN

A.

E EG

SIM P

COMMENCEMENT N COL L SO

Before this change was adopted, students who graduated in December were invited to return for the May commencement ceremony. Some still prefer to attend that event, but the December event has proven very popular. On Dec. 15, for example, Simpson recognized 108 candidates for degree. I had the honor of presenting the students. President Byrd and the Rev. Fritz Wehrenberg, the college’s chaplain, handed out the diplomas.

Smith Chapel, beautifully decorated for the Christmas season, provides an appropriate venue for December commencement. A unique feature of Simpson’s December commencement is that a local business person is asked to share her or his reflections on career and life success. Jay Byers ’93, CEO of the Greater Des Moines Partnership, was the speaker last December. The ceremony is less formal and more intimate than the college’s spring graduation ceremony, held in the college’s field house. President Byrd’s support for instituting the December commencement was very important in establishing it as a new tradition at the college. ■

THE MAGAZ INE | SPR I N G 2 0 1 3

5


N COL L SO

I

A.

SIM P

E EG

D

N O LA, IO

W

IN

I

N O LA, IO A

D

A

W

IN

A.

E EG

SIM P

| investing faculty pursuits in simpson

A LEGACY OF GIVING

N COL L SO

ow does a family’s legacy of giving begin? Do parents sit their children down one day and explain the merits of helping others? Or does a faithful father explain the passage from the chapter of Luke in the Bible, the one that says, “to whom much is given, much will be required?” “My father was a man of few words,” Gage Kent says, “but when he spoke, he was always lasered to the key points. He basically lived by example, not by words. But he did always say that giving is a learned trait.” Kent is the chairman and chief executive officer of the family-owned Kent Corporation in Muscatine, as well as a member of the Simpson College Board of Trustees. He also is a member of a family for whom philanthropy and service to others is a way of life. At Simpson, the Kent Campus Center stands as proof. The Kent family contributed $4 million to the $14 million project. It represents the largest outright gift from a living donor in Simpson’s 153-year history. But the truth is, Kent’s father, James H. Kent, had been contributing anonymously to Simpson for nearly 50 years, as well as to civic projects in Muscatine and to many other colleges and universities. In fact, Gage Kent says, the Kent Center marks one of the rare times he allowed the family’s name to be attached to a project­—and the first time to a building. “He was not driven by recognition, he was driven to accomplish good things,” he says. “I think it’s fitting that he allowed it to be done at Simpson, which meant so much to him.” James Kent died Oct. 29 at the age of 89, a mere 10 days after he received a prolonged standing ovation from the people who attended the grand opening of the Kent Center. “We weren’t sure he was going to be able to be there, and I am so thankful he was,” Gage Kent says. “But I think both

6

W W W. S I M P S O N . E D U /MAGAZINE

James H. Kent and family at the Kent Campus Center dedication.

of us also wanted to give a standing ovation in return to all of the other people who donated to the project. My goodness, a lot of people gave a lot of money to make this happen.” James Kent’s devotion to Simpson began as a boy in Indianola. He attended the college, but World War II interfered with his plans to graduate. He eventually served the college for 33 years on the board of trustees. “His spirit never wavered,” Gage Kent says. “I think that had a great deal to do with his religious faith. He was all about paying it forward. Twenty years ago, he gave a talk in which he said the secret to success and happiness was a strong faith in God and the blessings and wisdom that come from a consistent prayerful relationship with Him.” Kent says he sees many of his father’s personality traits in John Byrd, the Simpson president who is retiring in May. “He’s a straight-shooter,” he says. “You always know where you stand with him. John has made absolutely the most of his time at Simpson.” Kent said he agreed with Byrd and other college officials that a new student center was necessary. That’s when he first considered a significant contribution from the Kent family, as a lasting, fitting tribute to his father. What he didn’t know was how his father might react to the idea. “But he was on board right from the start,” he says. “Largely because of the huge consensus that this was an important project for Simpson’s future. He always loved Simpson.” ■ (To read more about James H. Kent, see the obituary on page 39.)


N COL L SO

I

A.

SIM P

E EG

D

N O LA, IO

W

IN

I

N O LA, IO

A

D

A

W

IN

A.

E EG

SIM P

faculty pursuits |

FINDING A WAY TO GET THINGS DONE

N COL L SO

red Jones spent four years at Simpson as a student and 42 years as a member of the faculty. He has seen college presidents come and go. Where would he rank John Byrd? “I think he has been a great president,” he says. “He’s just got the most incredible attitude. He sees opportunity in any situation. The economy has basically been belly-up since he arrived here, but he still raised all this money. He sees hard times as a chance for us to reinvent ourselves, and I think we have. He’s just the most optimistic person I’ve ever known.” Jones believes many of the accomplishments under Byrd’s tenure, such as adoption of the Engaged Citizenship Curriculum, the creation of the Iowa History Center and some of the physical changes, won’t fully be appreciated for five to 10 years. He includes the Simpson Urban Studies Institute (SUSI) on that list. The Institute gives Simpson students the opportunity to research important urban issues in the Des Moines area. “John thought it was a great idea, and so did I,” Jones says. “The primary benefits are, 1) it certainly gets Simpson’s name out in the community—we have very action-oriented students, 2) it provides them research opportunities that you just don’t find at most liberal arts colleges and 3) it really prepares them for graduate school. The research is very impressive.” Jones’ involvement with SUSI and with the development of the criminal justice master’s degree has given him a first-hand look at Byrd’s leadership style. “So often in the past the things that faculty wanted to do had been viewed as pipedreams,” he says. “That’s not his way of doing things. His approach has been, ‘If this is something we need to do, how do we do it?’ He tends to find a way.” Jones says he still looks forward to work every morning, so much so that he arrives in his campus office at 6:30 a.m. “I love the type of connections you can make with students,” he says. “I still communicate with students who graduated in the ’70s. I must admit, I don’t always recognize them, but they probably don’t recognize me, either!” ■

Fred Jones ’66

Professor of Sociology & Criminal Justice Education: • B.A. in sociology, Simpson, 1966 • M.A. in sociology of family, University of Iowa, 1970 • Ph.D. in sociology of deviant behavior (criminology), Mississippi State University, 1974

FOUR QUESTIONS FOR FRED JONES: What’s the most interesting thing in your office? Probably the travel mementos. I love taking students abroad. I’ve gone to London twice, Italy, Greece and France. It’s such a wonderful experience to see the growth of students.You take these kids from these little tiny towns and take them to London. Invariably, the first time you get them on the tube, they look like a bunch of little scared children. In three days they’re running all over by themselves. If I weren’t teaching sociology, I would… Probably be a lawyer. I would like to be a prosecutor. What is your favorite book? One of the books that had the greatest impact on my life was actually written by a former Simpson professor, Roger Betsworth. It’s called Social Ethics. It’s a fantastic book. I’ve used it in class many times. It’s influenced me in a lot of ways. If I won the lottery, I would…. Well, I wouldn’t retire. I would give some of it back to the college. It has certainly given me more than I’ve ever given back. I owe a lot to Simpson. And I’d take care of my family.

THE MAGAZ INE | SPR I N G 2 0 1 3

7


RUTH WEATHERLY N COL L SO

I

SIM P

E EG

A.

IN

N O LA, IO

W

D

I

N O LA, IO A

D

A

W

IN

A.

E EG

SIM P

where are they now? has left.

uth Weatherly certainly hasn’t slowed down since she left Simpson as a full-time faculty member. In fact, it may not be entirely accurate to say that she

Although her “Professor Emeritus” certificate is dated Aug. 24, 2012, Weatherly still maintained a campus office and taught two classes in the fall 2012 semester.

N COL L SO

Weatherly began teaching at Simpson in the fall of 1991. A professor of management, she primarily taught the following classes in rotation: Business Law I, Business Law II, Human Resources Management, Management Concepts, Senior Colloquium, Organizational Communication and a popular May Term course called Personal Financial Management. She designed and developed three other classes—Labor and Industrial Relations, Principles of Insurance and Organizational Ethics and Social Responsibility. She also is planning a course for the fall of 2013, derived from the Personal Financial Management May Term class. The course will be the first one integrated with Forum events, and it will provide one credit for students who attend the presentations and complete the coursework. Anyone and everyone else (in addition to credit-seeking students) will be invited to attend the Forum-designated events, mostly presentations by outside experts on various topics, such as income taxes, investments and insurance. What are you doing these days? I am now practicing mediation and arbitration, focused on the labor and employment field. My arbitration practice involves some travel, in both the Midwest and the Rocky Mountain region, due to affiliation with the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. 8

W ww. simpson . e du / magaz in e

What do you miss most about Simpson? What I miss most is my contact with some of my colleagues. What stands out from your time here? On looking back, how quickly 20 years “flew” by is starkly apparent. I also am aware of how technology changed faculty relationships with students, both in and outside of the classrooms. For example, students once would actually drop by faculty offices, or call on the telephone. Then, e-mail contacts became more typical. Telephone contacts all but disappeared and it’s my understanding that many students now prefer not to e-mail. What are your favorite memories? I remember clearly the process of seeking to introduce firstyear students to the atmosphere of college learning. What would you like people to know about a professor’s job? I often reflect upon how poorly understood is the professor’s “job” at a small liberal arts teaching institution. Unless one is an “insider” or very close to someone who is an “insider,” the assumptions are that faculty at Simpson and similar institutions are much better paid than we really are, and that we work much less than we really do. This issue of the Magazine is being devoted to President Byrd’s time on campus. Do you have any favorite memories? My anecdotes about President Byrd relate to our conversations about dogs, starting with my first meeting with his late Westie, “Keltie,” and our shared interests and conversations about classic cars. ■


cover stor y |

faculty accomplishments JOHN BENOIT, professor of music, led the Ballyhoo Foxtrot Combo and Orchestra in performances for the St. John’s Midweek Music recital series and the Salisbury House Chamber Music Series, respectively. Benoit also served as a trombone clinician and guest soloist for the Ankeny middle and high school jazz bands’ annual “JazzoRama.” He has recently served as a judge for the Perry Band Olympics, the Hoover JazzFest and the Iowa Federation of Music Clubs’ composition contest. CONNIE KOSTELAC, assistant professor of sociology and criminal justice, chaired a panel and presented her work on civilian employees in police organizations at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology in Chicago, Ill. The presentation was entitled, “Variation in Levels of Civilianization Across Large Municipal Police Agencies.” Kostelac has also been selected as a recipient of the 2013 SAGE Junior Faculty Professional Development Award through the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences. DAVE CAMWELL, associate professor of saxophone and jazz studies, hosted the 8th annual Simpson College Jazz Festival on January 31 and February 1. He also judged at various high school jazz festivals including Hoover, NWIBA, Woodward-Granger and Cherokee. This spring, Camwell is slated to perform as the guest artist in residency at Fort Dodge High School and as the featured guest artist at Millersville University’s Single Reed Symposium, the Oasis Quartet at Simpson College and Drake University, and at a guest recital at Reiman Music. He will also be a featured performer and competition judge at the North American Saxophone Alliance Region III conference. Finally, Camwell designed a consortium for a new piece for saxophone by noted composer Marc Mellits. BOB KLING, adjunct professor of art, completed this year’s painting for the National Balloon Classic. The 36” x 48” acrylic on canvas painting is titled, “Bursting to Life,” and depicts the first burst of air from the inflation fan as it hits the top of the balloon envelope during a cold air inflation.

JAMES POULSEN, instructor of music, attended performances of his orchestral work, “Heartland Poem,” by the Dubuque Symphony Orchestra. He also accompanied six finalists to the annual NATS (National Association of Teachers of Singing) vocal competition. Poulsen was asked to speak to a film music class at Loras College, the invitation stemming from his years as a composer for business films and the scoring of one full-length horror film in the ’90s. Some of Poulsen’s Poe-related art songs are to be performed by students at Missouri State University this spring. Finally, Poulsen completed a new performance work based on the last words of 26 people, entitled “Famous Last Words,” which will be performed by a vocal performance major on Simpson’s campus this spring. KIMBERLY ROBERTS, faculty soprano, and BERNARD MCDONALD, director of opera, at the piano, performed together at a preview concert for the Des Moines Metro Opera’s 2013 season at Des Moines’ Moberg Gallery. BERNARD MCDONALD conducted vocal masterclasses at the Creative and Performing Arts High School in Pittsburgh and at the Cobb County Center for Excellence in the Performing Arts in Atlanta this past fall. This February, he conducted the Simpson College premiere of Massenet’s “Cinderella.” RON ALBRECHT, professor of music­— piano/music theory, had a new composition titled Two Portraits: Starry Night (Van Gogh) and The Scream (Munch) for Saxophone and Computer Soundscape accepted for publication by Northeastern Publications. The soundscape was created by manipulating a vast array of sounds from digital banks as well as imported sounds from Internet sources using the latest electronic composition software. The result is a work that features a live performer with a complex accompaniment that is sent through a large stereo system from a computer. ELIAS SIMPSON, adjunct instructor teaching college writing, has had several poems and translations published and accepted in online and print journals. InTranslation, an online affiliate of The Brooklyn Rail, published the poems “In the Mouth,” “The Splendid Homage” and “Their Fog of Happiness.” The journal Asymptote

accepted a translation of “Paradise,” which will be published soon. The translations are collaborations with a professor of French at Virginia Tech of the contemporary French poet, Ariane Dreyfus. PATRICIA CALKINS, professor of German, MARZIA CORNI-BENSON, academic support coordinator, TRACY DINESEN, associate professor of Spanish, and SHARON WILKINSON, professor of French, presented “Teaching Culture from Day 1” at the Iowa World Language Association’s annual meeting in Des Moines, and the session was voted “Best Session” of the conference. As part of this honor, they will make this presentation again at the Central States Conference on the Teaching of Foreign Languages in St. Louis in February 2014. PATRICIA CALKINS and SHARON WILKINSON presented “Creating Dynamic, Flexible, Compelling Language Programs (with Only One Professor)” at the annual meeting of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages in Philadelphia.
 TRACY DINESEN is now President of the Iowa World Language Association, the state organization for world language teachers K-16. BRUCE BROWN, assistant professor of music, was the auditions coordinator for the Iowa District NATS (National Association of Teachers of Singing) auditions held on the Simpson campus. Brown raised the bar this year for hosting NATS by utilizing the Turning Point software and clickers for the panel of 40 judges to cast their votes. STEVE ROSE, professor of education, attended the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD) Fall Conference in Atlanta. Rose represented the Heartland Area Education Agency Board of which he is a member. Rose also attended a town hall meeting with Iowa Department of Education Chief Jason Glass as part of his Iowa ASCD role. MIKE PRINDLE, assistant professor of accounting, has obtained certification as a Chartered Global Management Accountant (CGMA). The certification is awarded through the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. continued >>>>>> THE MAGAZ INE | SPR I N G 2 0 1 3

9


faculty accomplishments JJ BUTTS, assistant professor of English, was awarded Honorable Mention for African American Review’s Joe Weixlmann Award, which recognizes the best essay on a 20th or 21st Century topic, for his essay, “New World A-Coming: African American Documentary Intertexts of the Federal Writers’ Project,” published last fall. TODD LITTLE, director of the Hawley Academic Resource & Advising Center, presented a paper entitled, “Knowledge Creation in the Context of KnowledgeIntensive Business Processes,” at the Business Process and Services conference held in Orlando. He was also selected to review submitted research papers for the Business Process Management segment of the upcoming 2013 European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS). MICHAEL ECKERTY, assistant professor of music and director of bands, served as a conductor for the South Central Iowa Bandmasters Association’s Middle School Honor Band in Urbandale. NICK PROCTOR, department chair of history, facilitated a two-day workshop entitled, “Defining a Nation: India on the Eve of Independence, 1945,” for 25 faculty members and graduate students as part of a regional Reacting to the Past Conference at Duke University. JACK GITTINGER, professor of education, presented two sessions this year at the Iowa Council of Teachers of Mathematics (ICTM) 2013 Conference in West Des Moines. The presentation session was on “The GeoGebra Institute of Iowa.” The laboratory session was “Handson Geometry in the Elementary Math Program Using GeoGebra.”
GeoGebra is a free dynamical mathematics software package used world-wide for geometry and algebra from elementary school to university levels. EDUARDO MAHALHAES III, professor of political science, started his second year of a two-year term on the Midwest Model United Nations Board of Directors as a Faculty Advisor Representative. The Midwest Model UN is an organization that has been running a UN simulation since 1960. Each year over

10

WW W. S I M P S O N . E D U /MAGAZINE

500 students from more than 50 schools gather to debate major international issues of the day. Mahalhaes will also be acting as organizer and moderator for the Third Annual North Central Council of Latin Americanists (NCCLA) Teaching and Learning Workshop. Faculty from around the country with an interest in Latin America gather to spend the day talking about an issue of pedagogy in the field. JAN EVERHART, associate professor of religion, had two papers published in a Sheffield-Phoenix press book, Teaching the Bible in the Liberal Arts Classroom. She also presented a paper entitled “Integrating Ecological Concerns into the Biblical Studies Classroom” at the Society of Biblical Literature Annual Meeting in Chicago. PATRICIA WOODWARD-YOUNG, professor of education, has been appointed to the Executive Board for Iowa Safe Schools. She was also elected as the chair of the planning committee for the upcoming 8th Annual Iowa Governors Conference on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Questioning (LGBTQ) Youth. ROSEMARY LINK, associate vice president for academic affairs, together with Dr. Lynne Healy, professor of social work, University of Connecticut, were honored at a reception of the International Commission of the Council on Social Work Education for their work as editors of the Oxford University Handbook on International Social Work, Human Rights & Social Development. Academics from more than 20 countries attended the reception. SAL MEYERS, professor of psychology, presented a poster at the 14th annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology in New Orleans. She co-authored the poster with four current Simpson College students. MAEVE CALLAN, assistant professor of religion, authored an article, “Of Vanishing Fetuses and Maidens Made-Again: Abortion, Restored Virginity and Similar Scenarios in Medieval Irish Hagiography and Penitentials,” that was named as one of the top ten medieval news stories of 2012 by medievalist.net, a highly popular

continued

medievalist blog site. Callan will have two articles published in the next issues of two highly respected Irish journals. “The Case of the Incorrigible Canon: Dublin’s First Heresy Conviction and the Rivalry between its Cathedral Chapters” will appear in the Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, 113C (2013). Callan’s transcription and translation of the letter from the fourteenth-century manuscript, Liber Niger titled “Dublin’s First Heretic? Archbishop-Elect Richard de Haverings’ Letter to Thomas de Chaddesworth concerning Philip de Braybrook, 4 September, 1310,” will appear in Analecta Hibernica 44C (2013). Finally, Callan is writing a paper exploring emotion and sainthood in early medieval Ireland and will present it at the International Congress on Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, Mi. MEGAN STOUT SIBBLE, adjunct professor of history, will be defending her doctoral dissertation this spring, marking the final step in completing her Ph.D. in history. JOHN PAULEY, professor of philosophy and chair of the philosophy department, was invited to be co-editorin-chief of Janus Head, a peer-reviewed interdisciplinary journal that places emphasis on the intersections among literature, continental philosophy, phenomenological psychology and the arts. As co-editor, he will be able to offer Simpson students a variety of different opportunities related to the publication from entry-level editorial experience to graphic design, website and layout work. Pauley has previously had two essays published in this international journal. JACQUELINE CRAWFORD, professor of education, is serving as the Iowa representative for the Association of Independent Liberal Arts Colleges of Teacher Education (AILACTE). She was also appointed to the Early Childhood Taskforce for revising the Iowa Early Learning Standards (IELS). Additionally, she was appointed to two Iowa Department of Education task forces charged with aligning the new IELS with Iowa’s Common Core and selecting the specific PRAXIS II tests that were mandated by the Iowa Legislature. ■


N COL L SO

I

A.

SIM P

E EG

D

N O LA, IO

W

IN

I

N O LA, IO A

D

A

W

IN

A.

E EG

SIM P

evening, weekend & graduate programs |

Lifelong Learners thank President Byrd B Y RO S E M A RY L I N K , Associ at e V ic e P r e sid e nt for Ac a d e mic Affa irs

N COL L SO

uring his tenure at Simpson College, President Byrd has supported a more diverse portfolio of academic programs and thereby strengthened our overall position in the higher education arena of Iowa. Dr. Byrd gave his voice to the College mission that: “Simpson College promotes integrative learning that enables students of all ages to develop intellectual and practical skills,” and this includes graduate programs. The Master of Arts in Teaching is thriving and graduated 19 students in 2011-12. The graduate education program has expanded to include a variety of endorsements and summer courses. Similarly, the Master of Arts in Criminal Justice program has graduated its first cohorts in 2011 and 2012. “The Simpson College master’s in Criminal Justice is focused on practical problems, and provides a head start on some of the most intractable issues that criminal justice professionals will face today and tomorrow,” says Roxann Ryan, attorney with the Iowa Department of Public Safety. Kristin Meyer of Nevada, a teacher and volleyball coach, says, “Joining the MAT program was one of the best decisions I have ever made. Without the Simpson MAT program, I probably would have never pursued my true career passion of teaching and coaching.”

In the past few years, Dr. Byrd saw the value of the move of the West Des Moines campus to the beautiful Century II building that faces Interstate 235. Since that move, the College’s Evening, Weekend and Graduate programs have created a “Simpson Speaker Series: Insights on Leadership” at the campus to encourage networking and mentoring for students of any age. Leaders from across the Midwest have participated and last year’s speakers included Dr. Suku Radia, president and CEO of Bankers Trust; Dr. Paul Mueller, ethicist for the Mayo Clinic; Laura Hollingsworth, vice president of Gannett Publishing, and Dr. Douglas Dorner, surgeon and director of medical education at Iowa Health. Students from the campus in Indianola also have the opportunity to participate in these events and take classes on Saturday mornings by taking the Simpson bus. The campus at Ankeny similarly serves students from a wide group of employers and has partnerships with Bridgestone Firestone, DuPont Pioneer and Casey’s. Both branch campuses also receive groups, including Walmart, Nike, Wells Fargo and Ankeny Young Professionals, for retreats and training.

The Evening and Weekend undergraduate continuing education program has also continued to flourish.

Simultaneously under President Byrd’s watch, the use of technology in the delivery of education has mushroomed. Thoughtfully and carefully, Simpson College has entered into online learning. This summer, 28 fully online courses will be offered to both degree-seeking students and students returning for refreshers, endorsements or certificates.

The program recently celebrated its 33rd anniversary, featuring “Thirty over Thirty” of our graduates who are now leaders, senior managers, VP’s and supervisors in the Greater Des Moines area.

Lifelong learning is the key to the health of schools such as Simpson, where we “bring the liberal arts to work” for people in all stages of life, and Dr. Byrd has been our inspiration. ■ THE MAGAZ INE | SPR I N G 2 0 1 3

11


| a simpson space

college KENT CAMPUS hall CENTER B y Emily S c h e ttl e r ’ 1 0

lthough open only a few months, the Kent Campus Center now feels as much a part of the campus as College Hall or Smith Chapel. It has quickly become the prime meeting place for students. Atrium: Perhaps the best place to fully appreciate the breadth of the $14 million, 54,000-squarefoot building. The architects allowed enough space in the atrium to provide an open, inviting atmosphere. Students can gather in groups or study individually and be assured privacy in both instances. The Principal Financial Group Black Box Theatre: Call it the fun space. It’s large enough to host bands or standup comedians, but small enough to feel intimate. The theatre can serve as a venue for a diverse array of events, including concerts, lectures and other performances. Food Options: You can get everything from a smoothie at Red Mango, to a cup of chili at Au Bon Pain or a mushroom cheeseburger at Tyler’s, where you can also watch the latest sports event on one of several flat screen TVs. Students say the restaurants provide the perfect complement to Pfeiffer Dining Hall.

12

WW W. S I M P S O N . E D U /MAGAZINE

Granite Seal: This impressive seal, 12 feet in diameter, promises to become the most photographed spot on campus other than College Hall itself. (Try out the view from the second floor.) The massive seal was installed in pieces. To see a timelapse video of the work, go to YouTube and type in, “Simpson College Seal Time-lapse.”


Travis Mickle works in his lab at KemPharm, Inc., in Iowa City.

Senate Room: It has the polished look and serious feel of a corporate boardroom. It’s a space that can host meetings of various sizes—the room can be divided in two—and also offers the latest technology for presentations. ■ Hubbell Hall: This is a beautiful space, with large windows allowing a compelling view of campus. It can seat 500 people for lectures and as many as 350 people for sit-down banquets. THE MAGAZ INE | SPR I N G 2 0 1 32

13


14

WW W. S I M P S O N . E D U /MAGAZINE


I

A.

SIM P

E EG

D

N O LA, IO

W

IN

I

N O LA, IO A

D

W

A.

SIM P

E EG

IN

A

Byrd Years THE

N COL L SO

SUCCESS A L E GACY OF

N COL L SO

erhaps the best way to assess the legacy of John and Nancy Byrd at Simpson College is to return to June 9, 2005, the day he assumed the duties of being the college’s 22nd president. • There was no Kent Campus Center. • The academic curriculum had not been enhanced to address the changing needs of employers and the global marketplace. • Blank Performing Arts Center had not been expanded. • There were fewer than 70 minority students on campus, and the college’s reach outside of Iowa was slight. • The Carver Medal did not yet exist. • The John C. Culver Public Policy Center, the Iowa History Center and the Simpson Urban Studies Institute had not arrived on campus. • There were no plans for Simpson to partner with the Indianola community for a new YMCA and an exciting business incubator. • A new brand initiative­—to tell Simpson’s great story to a broader audience—had not been launched. • Improvements had not been made to the football stadium and field. • The Cowles/Carse Fitness Center renovation had not begun. • Simpson students could not get a degree in nursing, major in neuroscience, obtain a master’s degree in criminal justice or earn a certificate in healthcare administration.

All of those improvements, and many more, occurred the past eight years during President Byrd’s tenure as president. He could take credit for all of that, but he won’t. “What has happened over the past eight years isn’t what I’ve done; it’s what we’ve done,” he says in an interview you will find in our seven-page, special section to commemorate the legacy of John and Nancy Byrd. It’s a celebration of an era of great change in the Simpson College story. In this section, you will find testimonials from the many people whose lives intersected with the Byrds. All of them say that President Byrd was the right person at the right time in Simpson’s 153-year history—and that his wife Nancy was the perfect partner and a vibrant Simpson champion in her own right. We’ll also let others provide some more details about the many accomplishments that occurred since that June day in 2005. You’ll be impressed by how much has changed in the past eight years, but we’ll give President Byrd the final word: “In many ways Simpson is fundamentally the same,” he says. “I think if you do it the right way, the underlying values and mission of the institution are always there.” continued on page 16 …

THE MAGAZ INE | SPR I N G 2 0 1 3

15


A CONVERSATION WITH

SIMP SO N P RE S I D E N T

John Byrd

Q.

This was your first job as a college president. Did anything surprise you?

Q.

Do you ever get used to having your every action and statement so closely monitored?

There weren’t a lot of surprises, to tell you the truth. There’s a lot to learn, and a lot of people to get to know who are connected to the institution. One of my fellow presidents in the state likened the first year to trying to get a sip of water from a fire hose. There’s just so much to learn, and you need to learn it as quickly as you can. That was one of the revelations.

Q.

One of the things you learn is that it’s not just what you say, it’s what you don’t say. You work really hard to make sure there is communication within the institution, because ultimately people do look to the president as the person most responsible for making sure that every constituency is involved and knowledgeable about what’s going on. That’s a big challenge.

A college has so many different constituencies—students, faculty, staff, administrators, alumni, benefactors, the board of trustees. IS IT difficult dealing with so many diverse groups?

Q.

There have been a great number of changes during your eight years here. Did you expect to be such a change agent when you began?

As a president, you deal with more constituencies, and you’re dealing with them more often in many cases. But that’s also one of the great attractions of being a president. You have the opportunity to be involved in the life of the college through the people who care about it most. It keeps the position interesting.

I suspect that every president anticipates the need for change. Every institution wants to improve. In order to get better, to move the organization forward, you have to facilitate change. It’s not an even process, however. Right from the start, I was told we needed to expand our geographical reach and improve diversity. Those numbers have steadily improved over the last eight years. We also had a couple of major continued on page 18 …

They say many major business deals are finalized on a golf course. With President Byrd, it was a bike trail, assuming you were able to keep up with him, of course. I can think of a number of great discussions I had with President Byrd that related to the mathematics department or Simpson College in general that took place out on a bike trail during his tenure at Simpson College. Over the years the institution benefitted a great deal from his vision for the future and his efforts in terms of making sure the short-term goals were accomplished.” 16

WW W. S I M P S O N . E D U /MAGAZINE

-Rick Spellerberg Professor of Mathematics


When I think of John, the first word that comes to mind is “passionate.” He is a passionate leader. He’s passionate first and foremost about the students and making sure they get a quality education. He wants Simpson to give students the opportunity to take the next step in their lives.” -Rich Willis ’74 Member, Board of Trustees President, Willis Auto Campus, Des Moines

THE MAGAZ INE | SPR I N G 2 0 1 3

17


projects already on the table—the Blank Performing Arts Center renovation and a campus center—that were projects the college had placed in its strategic plan as a high priority. It took awhile to get the fund-raising going on those two projects. Then 200809 hit, which made raising money all that more challenging, but we managed to get it done. I think you have to see yourself in the role of a change agent, but that change doesn’t always occur on the timetable you have established.

18

Q.

Nobody could accuse you of having been a caretaker during your time here.

I hope not. There were some big projects, but also some smaller projects that really weren’t all that small. We finished the fourth floor of Mary Berry Hall, we put fencing around the football field, and we put $1.5 million in new surfaces on the track and football field. The new curriculum was an enormous undertaking on which the faculty, at least from my perspective, did a fantastic job. It’s an effort that has gained a lot of attention regionally and nationally.

Q.

IS this a different campus than WHEN YOU FIRST ARRIVED?

In some ways it clearly has changed. You could look at the new buildings and the curriculum and make the case for change. But in many fundamental ways it’s the same. I think if you grow the right way, the underlying values and mission of the institution are constantly being strengthened.

Q.

Is there one thing you can point to and say, “That’s what I’m proudest of?”

It’s hard to do that. It’s like asking someone which child do they like best. (Laughter.) What I’m most proud of is that we held true to one of the great traditions at Simpson where the faculty, staff and administrators have worked together for the good of the institution. I am very proud that everyone here has worked so well together in accomplishing all the goals that have been achieved during my tenure here. I am also proud that community, quality and respect are core values that have guided all we have accomplished together over the past eight years.

Q.

Did your leadership style change? Would the John Byrd of eight years ago be the same person we know now?

Fundamentally, my leadership style has remained about the same. At the same time, I have been shaped by my experiences as president. I made some comments to a group of college presidents just recently, and I told them that you may go in thinking that

WWW. S I M P S O N . E D U / MAGAZINE

STRATEGIC

P L AN B y J im T h orius , V ic e P r e sid e nt for S tud e nt D e v e lopm e nt a nd D e a n of S tud e nts

The strategic plan was something that President Byrd initiated in his second year. There were probably 1,500 or more faculty, staff, alumni, students and community leaders involved in the process. The plan identified five learning initiatives, and we’ve met many of the goals. The Engaged Citizenship Curriculum came out of it. We set goals for promoting global perspectives, and we’ve done that. We decided to increase our diversity and geographical range, and we’ve certainly accomplished things there. In one sense, this is something that every college president does. But this plan was different in that it focused on the questions: What do we want the outcome of the Simpson Experience to be? What do we want students who come here to be like when they leave? During this process, I learned that John Byrd was somebody who was committed to making the Simpson Experience stronger. He wanted to define it and make it clearer. As he often said, how can we make sure that we prepare students not just for their first job, but for their best job? The strategic plan has served as a guide for doing just that. ■


a big part of your job is to shape the institution, and what you find out is that the institution shapes you. Because you have to understand the dreams and aspirations of all the people that are here, and incorporate those into your thinking. In some ways that becomes part of your DNA. You have to internalize it. It’s not just about what you hope to accomplish, or the dreams you have. You really have to represent the dreams and aspirations of everybody. I think presidents sometimes fail because they think it’s all about their personal dream or their vision. One of the underlying principles I’ve tried to follow in my career is that I’ve always felt an institution gets what it wants when people who work there get what they want. We’re all in harness, working together, even though we may have different perspectives. You try to get people excited and engaged about going in the same direction.

Q.

There must be a great sense of accomplishment when it happens.

Yes, there is a great sense of accomplishment. It is very satisfying. Whenever you see positive change happen, it’s most satisfying when you know that everyone else is feeling the same thing, that everyone has a stake in that success.

Q.

Like the day of the grand opening of the Kent Campus Center?

Absolutely, because you knew so many constituencies had a role in making it happen. All of those constituencies are not only proud of that success, but they also feel like they’ve had a role in positioning the college for the future. It can’t be a singular point of pride. When you feel best is when the whole community is feeling what you’re feeling. continued on page 20 …

President Byrd’s continued support for the Culver Center demonstrates his commitment to the belief that creating heightened awareness of public service and providing compelling educational opportunities that promote civic engagement are an integral part of the Simpson experience.” -Mary Sheka Executive Director, John C. Culver Public Policy Center

CULVER CENTER B Y F ormer U. S . S en ATO R J o h n C . C ulver

It is largely because of John Byrd that the John C. Culver Public Policy Center is located at Simpson College. I have known of Simpson College for many years, and it presented itself as a possible location because of its historic connection to the extraordinary Wallace family of Iowa and George Washington Carver (whom I wrote about in a biography of Henry A. Wallace). President Byrd’s vision and his enthusiastic support of the concept of a nonpartisan Center dedicated to inspiring students to public service enabled us to develop and

launch the Culver Center in 2010. In particular, President Byrd has assured the continuance of scholarships for up to five Culver Fellows each year. It is a tribute to President Byrd’s foresight and leadership that, in two short years, the Center has enriched the undergraduate experience at Simpson by bringing distinguished speakers with national reputations to the campus and presenting more than 20 programs on topics ranging from education reform and gun rights to political advertising and the Supreme Court. ■ THE MAGAZ INE | SPR I N G 2 0 1 3

19


20

Q.

Talk a little about the role your wife, Nancy, has played on and off campus.

Nancy has been very active in the community, everything from chairing the United Way campaign to being on the Child Abuse Prevention Council and the Fine Arts Commission. She’s on the Girl Scouts statewide board, so she’s been very much involved in the community. She’s also been involved in a variety of other social events and activities in the life of the college. She’s been a great ambassador for Simpson College. I say people will be okay seeing me leave, but they’ll really be sorry to see Nancy leave. (Laughs.) She has been with me every step of the way and has worked tirelessly on behalf of the college.

Q.

Is there any particular decision or project you’d like to take a mulligan on?

I’m a forward-looking kind of person. I don’t look over my shoulder a lot. When I reflect, I generally think about what I should have done more of. Should I have spent more time communicating at certain times? Should I have spent more time out on the road, raising money? How I spend my time is a big challenge. There have certainly been things we’ve had to do that were unpleasant. Eliminating positions, that wasn’t any fun, and the campus community was a bit demoralized by that. But we kept our focus and kept moving forward.

WW W. S I M P S O N . E D U /MAGAZINE

Q.

In the past couple of years, you have contacted, or tried to contact, every admitted student. That involves hundreds of phone calls. What have you discovered doing that?

I’ve always loved talking with students. We discovered when we did our marketing research that the No. 1 person the students wanted to hear from is the president, which surprised all of us. It surprised me. I’ve found the students really enjoy that call. For many of them, it’s significant. It’s not about me, but it says something about the institution and the kind of place it is. We are very fortunate in that we attract very good students. They’re hard working, they’re earnest and they’re appreciative of what happens here. We should be very proud of the students we attract here.

Q.

Fill in the blank: If I could change one thing about Simpson, it would be….

The size of the endowment. We’re a healthy institution financially, but we’re not wealthy. You do dream from time to time about another $100 or $200 million in the endowment. We’ve done so much here, but there would be so much more that could be done if we had more resources.


Q.

Five or 10 years from now, someone is going to be sitting in the Matthew Simpson Room and their gaze will land on your portrait. What do you hope they would think?

I hope they would be thinking that I did my part to help Simpson move forward and to get better. I would hope people might believe that we established a foundation on which future success was possible. I’ve told a number of people that I hope Jay Simmons is the most successful president in Simpson College’s history. But then I hope that’s true of the president after him, too. It’s our job to create a strong foundation on which the institution can continue to grow and get better. I hope people remember that what has happened during our eight years together isn’t what I’ve done; it’s what we’ve done. I consider a circle to be the perfect organizational chart, because in reality, everyone’s important. If you weren’t important to the success of the organization, you wouldn’t be here. People here have worked very, very hard to create a better future for Simpson and to leave a stronger Simpson to the next generation.

Q.

What are you most looking forward to in retirement?

More traveling. Nancy has a brother in Australia who we’d like to visit. Also I’d like the chance to do more bicycling and spend more time woodworking, which I haven’t had much time to do. We also have a place in the Ozarks where we would like to spend a bit more time.

Q.

What will you miss the most about Simpson? That answer is always easy. It’s the people. This wonderful community is full of great people. The hard part will be leaving the people who have meant so much to Nancy and me. ■

Perhaps my favorite memory of John Byrd was one weekend when he came over to share birthday ice cream with my son Duncan, who was turning three or four. For his birthday, Duncan got a Fisher-Price pitching machine, so after ice cream we all trooped outside to see him attempt to hit the wiffle ball with the big, red plastic bat. John took up a post several feet away. Imagine his shock—and ours—when Duncan blasted the next pitch straight at John’s head. Only a quick duck saved him from a wiffle ball to the head! We’ll miss the college president and his partner, but even more, we’ll miss our neighbors and friends.” -Amy Duncan Publisher, Indianola Record-Herald

CARVER AND DIVERSITY B Y Walter L ain ’ 8 1 , Assista nt D e a n of M ulticultur a l a nd I nt e rn ation a l Affa irs

President Byrd was instrumental in the establishment of the Carver Medal in 2008. We had been inviting speakers in to give the annual Carver Lecture since 1975, and he was looking for a way to elevate Carver’s legacy and do something noteworthy on campus. The medal has been very wellreceived. Pastor Fred Luter Jr., who was awarded the medal this year, wore it the next time he preached in his church in New Orleans. It has turned out to be a very good move, and I hope it’s something we can continue. We introduced the Carver Fellowship and Carver Scholars program about the same time. I give President Byrd enormous credit in our successful efforts to improve the number of minority students on campus. We’ve gone from about 60 minority students to more than double that figure, almost 10 percent of the student body population. For that to change, it took President Byrd. He has been a positive force on campus, especially when we talk about the recruitment of minority students and making the campus more accessible to students who are coming from faraway places. That was definitely one of his priorities, and we’ve achieved many of the goals he set. ■

THE MAGAZ INE | SPR I N G 2 0 1 3

21


Sweet Memories Sweet memories oft will linger Of those dear days of old When beneath the Whis’pring Maples We flaunted the Red and Gold. hose closings lines of the alma mater have taken on added meaning as Nancy and I reflect on all that has made our time at Simpson so special. The entire third stanza is a somber reflection about the sense of loss and longing that comes when one leaves friends and a place knowing that you will never return in quite the same way. The growing reality that we will soon be leaving our day-to-day connection to this wonderful community has given depth and meaning to the emotions that the author no doubt meant to evoke. Simpson is indeed a difficult place to leave. Nancy and I have so much to be grateful for as we reflect on our time at Simpson. While we have enjoyed so many aspects of the Simpson Experience, it has been our connection with all of you that has made our time here so meaningful. From our colleagues among the faculty, staff, administration and trustees to the special connections we have had with alumni, students and parents, we have been blessed by your friendships, support and encouragement all along the way. Through our mutual belief in and love of all things Simpson, we have worked together to build a stronger foundation for the future. A wonderful new curriculum, new academic programs, a stunning new Kent Campus Center and Blank Performing Arts Center, an array of new student activities, and initiatives that have increased geographic and racial diversity, all retain the fingerprints of those who brought them and so many other new initiatives to life. We have come to appreciate the deep commitment to excellence that all Simpsonians have to the mission and values that have sustained and guided Simpson’s development for 153 years.

N O S

The history of Indianola and Simpson College are inextricably intertwined in the same way our life at Simpson has been so positively entwined with our life in this community. From the Simpson Guild, Rotary, the Simpson-Indianola Breakfast Club, to the Child Abuse Prevention Council, the Indianola Fine Arts Council, The Greater Iowa Girl Scout Council and United Way, our involvement in this community made us aware of all those who make Indianola so special. Life in this community enriched our lives.

Forever flaunting the Red and Gold,

22

WW W. S I M P S O N . E D U /MAGAZINE

SIM P

Nancy and I can only think of our time as part of this place and community as one of the most rewarding experiences of our lives. Thank you for the great privilege of being in the service of this wonderful institution for the past eight years. As difficult as it is to leave, rest assured that “sweet memories oft will linger” as we remain loyal Simpsonians for the rest of our days.


My Simpson Experience ou can’t pick up any piece of Simpson literature without seeing some mention of the Simpson Experience. At first, I was not sure what it meant. Many tried to describe it to me, becoming so passionate about their personal journey at Simpson that I knew I wanted to find “it”—my own Simpson Experience. And so the journey began. From our first moment on campus in 2005, we were greeted warmly by you, the people who are the heart of Simpson. This love affair with Simpson has continued, and has been rewarding beyond measure. The treasured friendships, the unselfish passion to make tomorrow better than today for our students and a willingness by others to join in pursuing Simpson’s potential have made an impact on both John and me that, quite honestly, has been overwhelming. Could this be the “it” I sought? I was struck the first time I witnessed the utter excitement yet apprehension of a student boarding an airplane for the first time, heading well beyond Iowa to a May Term overseas. I witnessed how an international experience for students could be transformational. Seeing the happy faces of Simpson students dancing with at-risk kids at an Argentinean school reminded me of the blessing of being surrounded by students who cared as much about others as themselves. Providing a shoulder to lean on when a first-year student became overwhelmed with paralyzing homesickness. Cheering with joy when that same student became a very selfassured and accomplished student and graduate. I have been humbled and brought to tears seeing a grandmother cry as her granddaughter—a first generation college graduate—received her diploma. I have felt enormous pride witnessing the talents and passions of our students, faculty and staff, whether that be in a music performance, on an athletic field, in a classroom or at a “Yell Like Hell” Homecoming rally.

COL L

I will miss the walks through campus, savoring the colors of the maples and the sweet scents of flowers, enjoying the meticulous work of our campus support staff. I will miss watching the transformation from Move-In Day to Baccalaureate. So many treasured memories. The sum total of which will remain forever in our hearts. John and I will miss these little things of life at Simpson.

E EG

I now understand that the Simpson Experience really is not just one thing, but a sum of all the little things that make this place so special. I think I have finally have found “it.” George Washington Carver found it when he walked up the stairs at College Hall in the early years, and was welcomed with open arms and generous hearts. Like Dr. Carver, students, faculty, parents and friends have found that special “it” for more than 150 years. Thank you for allowing us to be a part of this great place for the past eight wonderful years, for taking us in and transforming us. We will hold dear forever the little things that have had such a profound impact on us, our Simpson Experience! With a grateful heart,

THE MAGAZ INE | SPR I N G 2 0 1 3

23


| chaplain’s corner

SAYING GOODBYE B Y F R I T Z W EH R E N B E R G , C HA P L A I N

ach year we offer an energetic beginning as we welcome first year and returning students, presenting new possibilities for relationships, classes and community. Move-In Weekend is an electric time to be on campus. Equally, when it comes to the sending of our graduates, there is an elegance and elevation that arises out of the commencement ceremony. With everyone robed and qualified, we make our way in procession to the conferring of the degrees and the congratulations well deserved. Between those highly stylized, anticipated moments, we have many opportunities to say “hello” and “goodbye.” While I remain concerned about how we might be losing the ability to say “hello” in our digitally-engaged world, that is for another conversation. This is about the goodbyes which remain. We are not very practiced at saying goodbye. It is so conclusive, like falling off the edge of the world. We don’t like saying “goodbye;” it is so final. It acknowledges the end of something that, generally, we don’t want to end. “Goodbye” commits us, emotionally connecting us to ultimate moments. Acknowledging The End is something we avoid if at all possible. “Goodbye” is also complicated by the ways we might remain digitally connected though days and miles will inevitably separate us. I don’t have to say “goodbye” anymore: we will follow each other on Twitter; our Facebook friendship will automatically notify us whenever there has been an update to either page; Skype allows us to “see” one another when we want to talk. As we live into this world of endless connection, we now behave as if we have the capacity to shift time itself. Why say “goodbye?” We live in a temporal world; things and people have endings. It is more than important; it is essential that we are able to recognize, acknowledge and integrate this truth. “Goodbye” is a potent moment, a time in which we both recognize and acknowledge the very time-bound nature of our journey. It is one significant way in which we remind our very selves that we are not all there is and that the journey does have punctuation. 24

WWW. S I M P S O N . E D U / MAGAZINE

Jesus was clearly aware of this, weeping at Lazarus’s tomb and in the Garden of Gethsemane. Jesus committed three years to prepare friends and followers for a time beyond their imagination, a time after “goodbye” in which they then manifest his presence. In the resurrection he opens life in such a way that “goodbye” acknowledges the abundance that has been present and will continue to be present, though in a different configuration. God’s passion for the whole world involves reconciliation and restoration. “Goodbye” is part of this process, acknowledging what is past and creating space for what is to come. The now of one’s “goodbye” is essential for the profusion of hope created in the reconciling, restoring story. So, it is with a deep and abiding sense of God’s abundance that I now say to you … goodbye. ■ Fritz Wehrenberg plans to retire in July after 38 years as an ordained minister. “(It) has been a remarkable, gracious trip with many gifted and faithful people,” said Wehrenberg. The entire Simpson family wishes him well in his retirement when he will be traveling, volunteering, working on home improvement projects and catching up on nearly 40 years of movies.


athletics |

RENOVATION

Another exciting construction project is underway at Simpson College.The Cowles/Carse Fitness Center Renovation began in early March and will create a first-class, comprehensive fitness complex in the heart of campus. he $6 million, 20,000 square-foot project will allow Simpson to offer exceptional resources for students, faculty and staff in one central location. “One of the best parts of this project is that it will support our total education philosophy,” said John Sirianni, the former athletic director who is currently involved in fundraising for the project. “It will greatly increase the opportunities for recreation, fitness, athletics and wellness for our campus community but it will also have a very positive impact on two of our most popular majors, exercise science and athletic training.” Indeed the renovation and expansion of classrooms is a primary focus including additional classrooms and an exercise science and athletic training lab and a Swim Ex rehabilitation and therapy pool that will create hands-on experiences for Simpson students. These types of amenities will permit instructors and students to perform laboratory exercises and demonstrations, essentially utilizing the new complex as a classroom, ensuring Simpson students receive instruction in real-world environments. The exercise science program prepares students for careers in health promotion, performance enhancement/strength and conditioning, cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation and corporate wellness. Those majoring in athletic training often go on to become physical therapists, physicians and chiropractors. Both of these academic programs are making strides in preparing successful graduates who will make a difference in the communities where they live.

Fitness facilities in Cowles will include a 4,500 squarefoot aerobic and strength training room, a 1,500 squarefoot dance studio and a 5,500 square-foot strength and conditioning facility. Expanded wrestling space will also be housed in the lower level of the building. This much-needed project is important to Simpson’s efforts to recruit and retain students and to help our student athletes reach their full strength, speed, agility, quickness and competitive potential. It will put the college in a very competitive position among colleges in the Midwest. Much of this renovation is possible in the current space because Simpson will be removing its swimming pool and repurposing that space for the fitness center. The college will partner with the newly constructed Indianola YMCA to use their state of the art swimming facility for its competitive program. The renovated fitness center will be connected to the brand new Kent Campus Center, giving students nearly 170,000 square feet of activity space right in the center of campus. Sirianni commented, “Having these high quality facilities is a great benefit for our students. It will be a great enhancement for the Simpson Experience and just one more way we are helping our students achieve success.” The renovation is expected to be completed in January 2014. ■

THE MAGAZ INE | SPR I N G 2 0 1 3

25


A TREMENDOUS OPPORTUNITY fter spending 29 years leading and building Simpson’s athletic program, John Sirianni stepped down as athletic director in late January to take on a new role at the college.

John Sirianni

Sirianni will remain as special assistant to the Simpson president until the fall of 2014, when he will retire.

Niemuth is in his 26th season as head women’s basketball coach and was in his second year as assistant athletic director, a title he added in the fall of 2011.

Brian Niemuth, head women’s basketball coach and assistant athletic director, was named interim director of athletics.

“Brian brings a wealth of experience and a clear understanding of the values we uphold in our program,” Byrd said. “I know he will do a great job in leading our program over the next several months.”

“The converging of a number of projects are coming together right now,” Sirianni said. “In order for us to have the best shot at getting this all done, I needed to shift my responsibilities.” Sirianni’s new role will focus on completing fundraising for a new fitness center and assisting in the launch of a new healthcare administration program, in addition to a number of small capital projects for the athletic department. “John has enjoyed excellent results in his fundraising efforts, and we both feel that his remaining months at Simpson are best spent working on these important projects,” President John Byrd said in a campus-wide email. Sirianni is relinquishing his day-to-day administrative duties in order to focus on large-scale projects, starting with Simpson’s new athletic facility. “This is a tremendous opportunity for me because I can focus on two or three projects I really want to get done before my career comes to an end,” he said. “It gives me the freedom to go out and finish this project and set the stage for other facilities on campus.” Sirianni’s family life also played a factor in his decision. He and his wife, Ginger, have four children and five grandchildren living around the country.

26

“This is a life-planning decision for my wife and me and my children and grandchildren,” he said. “In athletic administration, you don’t have the chance to travel much. I want my wife and I to have the opportunity to travel together, be with our children, and be grandparents.”

WW W. S I M P S O N . E D U /MAGAZINE

The longest tenured head coach on campus, Niemuth has held a number of roles in the athletic department since coming to Simpson in 1987. In addition to his basketball duties, he has been the athletic training director, an instructor in the physical education department, assistant baseball coach, intramural director and outdoor facilities manager. “I look forward to the challenges my new role will bring,” Niemuth said. “John has done a great job of building this athletic department and we want to continue to move in the right direction.” Since Sirianni took over as Director of Athletics in 1984, Simpson has won two NCAA Division III National Championships (softball in 1997 and 1999), 61 Iowa Conference Championships and made 61 appearances in the NCAA Tournament. He was directly responsible for five conference championships himself. In 22 years as the head baseball coach, he led Simpson to a record of 510-307-2 while winning five conference crowns. His coaching career began in 1985 and lasted until 2006, when he became the athletic director on a full-time basis. With Byrd’s retirement set for the end of this school year, incoming president Jay Simmons will hire the program’s next director of athletics. ■


A DRIVING FORCE The driving force behind Simpson’s remarkable season, women’s basketball player Kate Nielsen, raked in the honors in 2012-13. A senior from Urbandale, Nielsen was one of the nation’s leading scorers and rebounders, piecing together one of the greatest seasons in Simpson history. Nielsen brought home numerous individual honors in 2012-13, including: • Jostens Trophy Finalist (Division III Player of the Year) • Capital One Academic All-America® First Team honoree • Iowa Conference Most Valuable Player

A PART OF THE ROUTINE o label the 2012-13 women’s basketball season a “success” would be an understatement. Granted, Simpson has made a routine of stringing together winning seasons in Brian Niemuth’s 26 years as head coach. But the 2012-13 campaign will long be remembered as one of the best in the program’s storied history. Simpson’s season came to an end in the Sweet 16 round of the NCAA Division III Women’s Basketball Championship with a 76-63 loss to UW-Whitewater on March 8, closing the season with an overall record of 27-3. Before advancing to the third round, the Storm had already reached heights rarely—if ever—seen since the program began in the mid-1970s. Simpson won its sixth straight Iowa Conference Championship—tying a conference record — by dominating the league schedule, ending the season with a nearly perfect 13-1 record. Simpson actually clinched the title with three games remaining in the regular season. The Storm finished the regular season 25-2, winning the Iowa Conference Tournament Championship to earn a ninth-straight trip to the NCAA Tournament. There, thanks to a No. 1 ranking in the West Region, Simpson hosted the first and second rounds. Simpson rolled Westminster (Mo.) 91-58 in the first round before beating UW-Stevens Point in dramatic fashion, 88-84, all while enjoying a home-court advantage at Cowles Fieldhouse. The win over Stevens Point allowed Simpson to reach the Sweet 16 for just the third time in school history and the first time since 2008. It also gave Simpson 27 wins on the season, tying the school record set in 2007-08. Simpson achieved all of this with a starting lineup consisting of four seniors (Kate Nielsen, Nicole Crisp, Chelsie Rohrs, Kelsie Reeves) and one freshman (Brooke Panzer). Including Panzer, the team featured five freshmen who averaged more than 10 minutes per game. Many times throughout the year, the lineup on the floor featured five freshmen, something that certainly bodes well for the future. With the end of the conference season came numerous individual awards. Nielsen was crowned conference MVP, Crisp earned defensive player of the year honors and Niemuth was recognized as coach of the year.

• Seven-time Iowa Conference Player of the Week ■

500th Game Simpson’s long-time head women’s basketball coach Brian Niemuth gained admittance into one of college basketball’s elite clubs when he won the 500th game of his career in Simpson’s 75-62 victory over Loras on Feb. 9, 2013. Niemuth became only the 20th coach in NCAA Division III women’s basketball history to reach the milestone. At the end of the season, Niemuth’s career record stands at 505-196 in 26 seasons on the court. ■

MVP HONORS Joe Farrand earned Most Valuable Track Performer honors at the 2013 Iowa Conference Indoor Track & Field Championships, held Feb. 23-24 in Dubuque. A sophomore from Raytown, Mo., Farrand — who was a cross country national qualifier — won the 5,000-meter run on the first day of the championships and the 3,000-meter run on day two. He edged out Central’s Eli Horton in each race to become Simpson’s first male IIAC Track and Field MVP since Corey Carrell in 1997. Simpson placed fifth at the meet and finished the season ranked ninth in the Central Region. ■

It’s all just a part of the routine for a program that is a true picture of success. ■ THE MAGAZ INE | SPR I N G 2 0 1 3

27


On Our Calendar APRIL 1

Easter Break, offices closed

7

Madrigal Singers Concert, Smith Chapel, 3 p.m.

Simpson College Community and Student Orchestra Concert, Kent Campus Center, 7 p.m.

9

Jazz Ensemble Concert with John Kizilarmut, Amy Robertson Music Center, 7:30 p.m.

12-14

The Winter’s Tale by William Shakespeare, Blank Performing Arts Center

14

Simpson College Choir and Women’s Chorale Concert, Smith Chapel, 7 p.m.

18

Undergraduate Research Symposium, Kent Campus Center

Honors Convocation, Kent Campus Center, 12:00 p.m.

23-25

Final exams

27

Commencement

29

May Term begins

MAY 17

May Term ends

It’s there on the signs in the skywalks near the Wells Fargo Arena: “Your Success Starts Here.”

JUNE 11-14

Summer orientation

And it’s there on the giant banner that hangs at the Jordan Creek Town Center near the movie theatre: “Your Success Starts Here (well, a few miles from here.)”

JULY 21-27

Team Simpson on RAGBRAI

AUGUST 5-9 Iowa Private College Week 27

Classes begin

SEPTEMBER 19 Wayne Carse Storm Athletic Benefit OCTOBER 10 Matthew Simpson Lecture, Amy-Jill Levine, Amy Robertson Music Center, 7 p.m. 11-13

Homecoming and Family Weekend Reunion gatherings for the classes of 1963 and 1988

For more information about these and other upcoming alumni events, visit www.simpson.edu/alumni. 28

WW W. S I M P S O N . E D U /MAGAZINE

verywhere you look in Des Moines, the signs are pointing to success at Simpson College. It’s there on the giant billboard that tells travelers heading into Des Moines: “Success is Within Your Reach.”

But that banner also offers shoppers a bonus. They are instructed to download an app and point their cellphone at the banner, on which they can watch a promotional video about Simpson. One of the skywalk signs offers the same technology. It’s called augmented reality, a new technology that is proving increasingly popular. This is the first time an Iowa private college has tried it, and the first time it has been done at Jordan Creek. “This is not only a cutting-edge technology that soon will be everywhere, but it’s also a fun, creative and different way to engage people about the great opportunities for success at Simpson College,” said Jill Ramthun Johnson ’85, executive director of Marketing and Public Relations. The signs, along with radio advertisements, intheatre ads and program inserts, were designed to increase Simpson’s presence during the state wrestling and basketball tournaments. To learn more about Simpson’s use of augmented reality, and to see it in action, go to www.simpson. edu/augmented-reality. ■


The Corporate Leadership Scholarship Program supports 28 students across 11 different majors.

t Simpson College, we understand the importance of making meaningful connections between students and corporations. This leads to opportunities for students to participate in internships that prepare and train them for employment opportunities. Businesses that provide financial assistance to increase scholarships not only help students excel in academic areas such as management and business, they also prepare them to contribute to the betterment of society following graduation. The Corporate Leadership Scholarship program at Simpson provides much-needed support to students who otherwise may not be able to attend college. This program gives students the financial assistance they need to succeed and presents an opportunity for students to become immersed in a corporate environment where they can put their education and skills to work and develop hands-on expertise that will transfer to their careers. Simpson is dedicated to expanding the Corporate Leadership Scholarship program to prepare students for careers in various industries and to develop a larger pool of professionals. ■

Kevin Halterman

President/CEO | Peoples Bank Indianola

How long has Peoples Bank been involved with the Corporate Leadership Scholarship at Simpson? Is this something you do with other colleges, too? Peoples Bank has supported Corporate Leadership at Simpson College for the last five years. Given our proximity and locations, Simpson is the only college we support. How does supporting higher education fit in with Peoples Bank charitable giving goals? Supporting our youth and young adults through education is one of the cornerstones of the community support of Peoples Bank and its Board of Directors.

2012-2013 MAJOR Supporters

3M Atlantic Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Bank of America Bankers Trust Community Bank Dee Zee, Inc. Essex Meadows, Inc. Garner Printing Gilcrest/Jewett Lumber Company ING Meredith Corporation Foundation MidAmerican Energy Foundation Peoples Bank Principal Financial Group SVPA Architects, Inc.

Does Peoples Bank help choose the students who are selected, or help set the guidelines? We provided general guidance, however we do not participate in the actual selection of the student. Finally, is there anything else you would like to add about Peoples Bank’s participation in the Corporate Leadership Scholarship and/or your support to Simpson College? We feel fortunate to have Simpson College in our community. They provide many opportunities to both our employees as well as our citizens. They are a huge economic engine and provide a strong stable workforce plus the support the students provide to our merchants and businesses in our community. It is a blessed relationship for both Indianola and Simpson. ■ THE MAGAZ INE | SPR I N G 2 0 1 3

29


Dr.JoeWalt | extra!

R E M E M B E R I N G

1924-2013

riends, former students and colleagues gathered in Smith Chapel on Jan. 16 to remember and celebrate the remarkable life of Joseph W. Walt. The beloved professor emeritus, who not only wrote the history of Simpson College but was also an influential part of it, died Jan. 2 at the age of 88. Walt was a Simpson history professor from 1955 to 1994. Hundreds of students took his Western Civilization course, which he continued to teach even after his retirement as a professor emeritus. “It is impossible to calculate the impact that Joe Walt had at Simpson College,” said President John Byrd. “Joe supported the College in so many ways. Even as generations of my fellow Simpsonians grieve, we celebrate his truly extraordinary legacy to Simpson College.”

In the 1990’s, since I was the college librarian and archivist, we worked together on the college history. I helped him locate resources and photographs and he wrote much of text at a table at the back of the first floor in Dunn Library. He sharing would deliver each chapter to me to read as it came off of a printer in Mary Berry.

Dr. Walt loved what he knew and encouraging others to teach, to lead and to serve.” -Cyd Dyer

Bob Lane, vice president for College Advancement and a 1981 Simpson graduate, said Walt “touched the lives of literally thousands of alumni.” Walt will be long remembered as the author of Beneath the Whispering Maples: The History of Simpson College, which was released in 1994. It remains the authoritative guide to most of Simpson’s 153-year history.

30

Indianola Rotary meetings. He invited me to be a member the first year women around the world could join Rotary. He’d greet me with ‘Hey, kiddo’ and usually end conversations with ‘Take care.’

For the last two years, Fridays were spent with Joe at the Village Care Center here in town. Events may have changed where he lived, but Joe was still there—kind and inquisitive. I loved the days when his blue eyes sparkled and he smiled as we spoke about his life: his time at Simpson, as a Mormon missionary, travels abroad, SAE and, of course, libraries.

Joe remembered living in a houseful of books. I packed up hundreds of his books in that house and remembered delicious New Year’s brunches by the fireplace and the many exchange students he had living in his home over the years. Later this year, we will have book sales with the funds going to the college archives. I asked Joe what he loved best about teaching. It was when a student ‘got it’ and history came alive for them.

Cyd Dyer, the college’s librarian/archivist and a friend of Walt’s, spoke at his memorial service. What follows are her remarks:

I was at peace when I received the call the morning of his passing. Joe had told me that his Christmas wishes were to be at home with his family and for peace on Earth.

Fridays with Joe—that’s what I will always remember. For 24 years, I spent Fridays with Joe. First, it was going with him to

My special friend Joe Walt got his wish to be with his family. And his second wish? He left that one to us… ■

WW W. S I M P S O N . E D U /MAGAZINE


ne of the highlights of Simpson’s academic year will occur on April 18 when the college hosts the third annual Undergraduate Research Symposium.

Simpson College Undergraduate Symposium 2013 Honoring Excellence in Research, Scholarship and Creativity

APRIL 18, 2013

The day-long event, held in various venues, showcases outstanding scholarly works by students through the presentation of papers, performances, posters and/or panel discussions. The event is held on the same day as the Honors Convocation, which adds to the sense of accomplishment and success on campus. The public is invited. Come see the best that Simpson students have to offer! ■

NEW & EXCITING

PARTNERSHIP

n exciting new partnership holds the potential for Simpson students to get in on the ground floor of a successful business launch. Called the Indianola + Simpson College Entrepreneurial Development Initiative, the goal is to bring together mentors, students and existing businesses to create a business incubator for new enterprises, products and services. The partners are Simpson, the Indianola Development Association and Indianola Municipal Utilities. The incubator—which was the focus of a front-page story in the Des Moines Register—will be housed temporarily at Simpson until a permanent home is found. Chris Draper, who has been part of the Des Moines-based Start Up City, will lead the collaborative venture. “Great companies are built by great teams,” he said. “We have plenty of innovative technologists in our state, but we have not always focused on supporting the enablers of innovation companies. Simpson’s backyard is home to an unprecedented convergence of community, technology and connectivity.” More than 25 Simpson students have already agreed to work on their Senior Capstone Projects through the new initiative. ■ THE MAGAZ INE | SPR I N G 2 0 1 3

31


The Carver Legacy mith Chapel has certainly heard its share of sermons through the years, but it’s unlikely that any have been more spirited than the one delivered by the Rev. Fred Luter, Jr. on Jan. 10. Luter, the first African-American named president of the Southern Baptist Convention, received the Carver Medal and delivered the annual Carver Lecture, two honors established to recognize the legacy of George Washington Carver. But this was less a lecture than an oldfashioned revival. “Ladies and gentlemen,” he told the crowd, “you will be amazed at what can happen in your life if you’re faithful to God. You will be amazed at what can happen in your life, in your home, in your marriage if you’re faithful to God.”

Luter’s own life story is nothing short of amazing. A serious motorcycle accident inspired his spiritual transformation, which led to preaching on street corners in the Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans. “For the first time in my life, I started thinking seriously about my relationship with God,” he said. “I made a decision that would literally change my life and forever change my future. I asked Jesus Christ to come into my life.” Luter helped grow the Franklin Avenue Baptist Church in New Orleans from 50 members to more than 7,000 members. He is the 40th person to deliver the Carver Lecture. “It’s not often that you hear a talk with that much passion and power,” Simpson President John Byrd said. “It was spectacular.” ■ ■

SIMPSON STUDENTS

TO NYC

n October, CBS News invited four Simpson students to New York City to tell the nation their views about the upcoming presidential election. Senior Jesse Van De Krol, junior Madison Boswell, sophomore Shanice Whitney and freshman Steffi Lee appeared on the “CBS Evening News” the night of the presidential debate at Hofstra University, in Hempstead, N.Y. They were interviewed by Scott Pelley, who happily showed off his Simpson College t-shirt, a gift from the students. The interviews were arranged through the John C. Culver Public Policy Center on the Simpson campus. ■

32

WW W. S I M P S O N . E D U /MAGAZINE

Jesse Van De Krol, Scott Pelley, Shanice Whitney, Madison Boswell and Steffi Lee.


Mark your calendars!

October 11-13, 2013 your Simpson experience!

• Come back to campus and relive The weekend’s events include Yell Like Hell, a tailgate party, the football game and much more! •

Reunions will be celebrated for the classes of 1963 and 1988.

• More information, including a full schedule of events, will be available soon. Visit www.simpson.edu/homecoming to view the details as they become available. ■

SIMPSON MUSIC RECEIVES

NATIONAL RECOGNITION It’s always gratifying to see someone else affirm what we already knew: Simpson’s music program has been designated one of the top 100 programs in the country. Simpson is one of only two colleges or universities in Iowa to be honored in the ranking. To learn more, go to http://www.bearshare.com/top-music-programs.html. Tim McMillin, chair of the Simpson music department, said the national recognition is appreciated and represents a team effort. “The thing that makes music at Simpson such a special experience is the ‘big school’ opportunities that our students have lavished upon them within the ‘small school’ environment,” he said. “It truly is the best of both worlds, where students have huge opportunities paired with the individual attention and guidance that a small, private college setting allows.” ■ THE MAGAZ INE | SPR I N G 2 0 1 3

33


| touring the years CLASS NOTES Dr. Lester L. Moore ’49 was named as the recipient of the 2012 Francis Asbury Award for fostering United Methodist Ministries in higher education in the Iowa Annual Conference. The award was presented by Bishop Trimble during the 2012 Annual Conference and recognizes individuals who continue to faithfully guide the church in ministries to and with the higher education learning community. The award is named for Francis Asbury, who in 1791 challenged all Methodists to “…give the key of knowledge…to your children, and those of the poor in the vicinity of your small towns and villages.” John Lewis ’54 is a retired Presbyterian clergy and resides in Antioch, Tenn. In retirement, he has devoted his life to advocating for the mentally ill and has also taken up geneology as a hobby. He and his wife, Marjorie Ann, are planning a trip to Wales, where his 4th great grandfather came from in the 1730’s to settle in the Shenandoah Valley. Marleta Hill Matheson ’54 has recently been inducted into the UNI School of Music Hall of Fame. She is an emeritus professor and was head of Group Piano on the faculty from 1964 to 1990. She also taught piano accompanying, was a keyboardist for the Waterloo-Cedar Falls Symphony Orchestra, and has worked with the Young Artist’ Concerts for the Hearst Center for the Arts and the Cedar Falls Rotary Club. Leonard Hines ’58 is retired and resides in Hampton Cove, Ala., with his wife Benita. Phillip Lotz’ 59 is retired and resides in Jamesport, Mo., with his wife, Marjorie. James Willis ’60 is retired and resides in Plymouth, Minn., with his wife, Barbara. He was recently elected to his third term to the Plymouth City Council. The couple has lived in Plymouth since 1971 and

34

WW W. S I M P S O N . E D U /MAGAZINE

has two daughters and three grandchildren.

and his wife, Sharon, reside in Canton, Ohio.

Dorothy Binau Higdon ’62 is a volunteer coordinator at Cedar Rapid Justice For Our Neighbors, a legal service for low income immigrants. Dave Higdon ’62 has retired as a United Methodist pastor. Dave and Dorothy reside in Cedar Rapids.

Virginia “Ginny” Hilmers Hotaling ’70 is the vice president of government affairs at the Chicago Botanic Garden.

C. Lynn Robertson Farris ’64 is retired and resides in Pebble Beach, Calif.

Dennis Moore ’72 retired from teaching after forty years in the West Des Moines Community School District. He is currently an adjunct instructor in composition at Des Moines Area Community College.

Kathryn Pickrel Pegelow ’65 is retired and resides in Lake View Terrace, Calif., with her husband, Gary. Jim Seidel ’65 is a retired teacher and resides in Strawberry Point with his wife, Barbara. Robert Ferrell ’67 is retired and resides in Mechanicsburg, Pa., with his wife, Janice. Bill Kribble ’67 is retired and resides in Henderson, Nev., with his wife, Mary. Lance Vander Zyl ’67 is retired and resides in Yuma, Ariz. Dr. Campbell Howard ’69 works for Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation as a senior director and clinical indication leader. Campbell and his wife, Anne, reside in Yardley, Pa. Sally Novak Hyduk ’69 recently retired after 40 years of teaching. She and Brian, her husband of 42 years, raised three sons and now have five grandchildren. The couple is enjoying retirement in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. George Marzeck, Jr. ’69 is retired and resides in West Burlington. Jon Mattison ’69 is retired but still performs with Kent University Wind Ensemble, Roscoe Brass Quintet, Southeast Ohio Symphony, Malone University Brass Ensemble, Sound of Sousa Professional Concert Band and the Greater Canton Men’s Chorus. Jon

Stuart Goldman ’71 is the president/CEO of Masters Institute of Media Arts in Oxnard, Calif., where he resides.

Richard Rogers ’73 is the theatre manager for Indianola Schools. He and Judy Shepherd Rogers ’75 reside in Indianola. Richard Burk ’75, in his off-Broadway debut in 2011, directed the musical “The Magdalene” at the Theatre at St. Clements on 46th Street in Manhattan. Produced by Emerald Green Productions, this musical, book by James Olm and Shad Olsen, with music by James Olm, featured a cast of 14, all members of Actors Equity Association, and was supported by Creative Consultant, Tony award winner Richard Maltby, Jr.

John Wilson ’76 is the director of publications at Tai Sophia Institute in Maryland. Mike Miller ’81 is a senior director for Vocollect. Keri Hansaker Miller ’92 is an assistant at Frisco ISD. The couple resides in Prosper, Texas. Cheryl Majorowicz Browne ’82 is a research analyst at Macalester College in Minnesota. Connie Canaday Howard ’82 is the director of theatre at the College of DuPage in Illinois, where she resides with her husband, Rex. Edwin McClure ’82 is a managing partner and secretary of professional corporation at Matthews, Campbell, Rhoads, McClure & Thompson, PA. He and his wife, Kathy, reside in Rogers, Ark. Jack Hays ’83 is the owner and founder of Miami Tan and Jack Hays Fitness, LLC. Jack resides in Dania Beach, Fla.

Julie Bosanko Mohr ’75 is a broker associate for Coldwell Banker Real Estate Professionals in Iowa City. Julie and Gary Mohr ’74 reside in Coralville. Jerry Taylor ’75 is a human resources manager at Tom Hovland Enterprises, Inc. in Mason City, where he resides with his wife, Ann. Lorene Koniuszy Van Dam ’75 is a retired podiatrist. William Van Dam ’75 has a doctoral degree in ministry and is also retired. The couple resides in Gilbert, Ariz. Jerry Fee ’76 is an account manager at Menards. Jerry and his wife, Pam, reside in Melcher. Cherie Sprosty ’76 is a Catholic liturgist in New York, where she resides with her husband, Fred, and three children, Ben, Meredith and Ethan.

Bob Mackenzie ’70 was recently named Businessperson of the Year by the Johnston Chamber of Commerce. He is being commended for his contributions to the Youth Homes of Mid-America during his 17 years with the organization. Bob was the first full-time development staff member for the organization, and during his tenure he expanded the annual fund goal from $30,000 a year to $300,000. He raised millions of dollars through annual giving and by creating a capital campaign, planned giving program and an annual golf outing fundraiser. Bob has changed the lives of thousands of children and left a lasting legacy when he retired in December of 2012.


Jack Jetmund ’83 is manager of business management group at the Federal Aviation Administration. Jack and his spouse, Vince Keilman, reside in Washington, DC. David Pearson ’83 is a regional travel manager for Avis Budget Group in Chicago, where he resides. Robert Matthews ’84 works at Truman State University as an associate professor of computer science. Vicki Klinge Born ’85 is the assistant activities director at Carlisle High School. Barb Starrett Newhart ’85 works for Community & Family Resources in Ames as a substance abuse counselor. Kelly Kirts ’86 is a deputy director for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance for the U.S. Air Force. Kelly and his wife, Dawn, reside in Colorado Springs, Colo. Marden Hermanson ’88 is self employed as a life coach and resides in Madison, N.J. Trace Pickering ’88 is employed at The Gazette Companies as director of community building. Trace and his wife, Kim, reside in Palo. Their daughter, Samantha, is a freshman at Simpson. Shane Rowse ’88 works for American Heartland Theatre as a resident lighting designer and technical director. Shane and his wife, Marianne, reside in Kansas City.

Donald currently serves as the distribution management division chief for the Iowa Army National Guard’s Logistical Directorate. He has also served as the support operations officer of the 248th Aviation Support Battalion, located in Boone. He was deployed to Camp Ramadi, Iraq, with the 224th Engineer Battalion in 2004-05, as the battalion maintenance officer, head of all battalion maintenance operations. Donald resides in Audubon with his wife, Jennifer Schossow Mosinski ’89, and children, Sarah, Rachel and Luke. Kathi Steinkuehler Wells ’89 is a sales and marketing consultant for Forethought Financial Group. Kathi and her husband, William, reside in Kailua, Hawaii, where he is working in his first job following 20 years of active service in the U.S. Air Force. Visitors welcome! Shawn Williams Heimer ’90 is a daycare provider and resides in Caledonia, Minn., with her husband, John. Stephanie Fagen Stouder ’90 is a prosthodontist with the U.S. Air Force. She received her Certificate of Prosthodontics from Wilford Hall Medical Center in 2006 and her MS in biomedical sciences from UTHSCSA in 2011. Stephanie and her husband, Bruce, reside in Bellevue, Neb. Tara Jenson ’91 is the CEO of Eldora Plastics, Inc. J Michael Kellar ’91 recently joined Businessolver as a client service manager. Rhonda Vry-Bills ’91 is the president/CEO of Long Term Care Strategies, Inc., a company that she founded in 2005. Rhonda resides in Altoona with her children, KJ (20) and MacKenzie (19).

Maj. Donald Mosinski ’89 has been promoted to lieutenant colonel in the Iowa National Guard. A 25-year veteran,

reside in Radford with their three daughters, Elena, Olivia and Mia. Tim McCuddin ’92 is a district sales manager for Automatic Data Processing. Tim and Janelle Sieren McCuddin ’92 reside in Farmington, Minn. Mike Underwood ’93 was recently named the fifth president in Guthrie County State Bank’s 81-year history. Mike has 20 years of banking experience and recently completed the Graduate School of Banking program in Colorado. He is a current board member of Community Banks of Iowa, president of the Guthrie Center Lions Club and past president of Midwest Partnership, a fourcounty economic development organization. Mike and his wife, Cara, reside in Guthrie Center with their three children. Scot Patrick ’94 and Michele Burkhart-Patrick ’95 reside in Indianola, where Michele is a librarian at the Indianola Public Library. She received her master’s degree in library & information science from the University of Iowa in 2008.

reside in Des Moines with their daughter, Kensi (1). Rev. Michael McIlheran ’98 has been named associate pastor of the First English and Bethany Lutheran Churches, Menahga, Minn., and Friends in Christ Lutheran Church, Sebeka, Minn. He has previously served as a chaplain for the Minnesota Department of Corrections and Minnesota Teen Challenge, a nationally-recognized drug and alcohol treatment agency in Minneapolis. Pastor McIlheran and his wife, Debra, reside in Brooklyn Center, Minn. Paul Hengesteg ’99 works for the University of Delaware as program coordinator for the Office of Equity and Inclusion. Paul resides in Bear, Del. Ali Davis Pescetto ’99 is a podiatrist for Kansas City Internal Medicine. She and her husband, Micah, reside in Greenwood, Mo., with their sons, Gino and Enzo. Anne Peterson ’99 is the director of human resources for Innovative Lighting, Inc., in Roland.

Melody Zamora Henderson ’96 and her husband, Matthew, relocated to Sydney, Australia, in April 2012 for his job.

Jon Schmitz ’99 works for the Fort Madison Community School District and resides in Fort Madison with his wife, Andrea.

Rebecca Edwards Needles ’96 is an assistant vice president at Community Bank and resides in Indianola with her husband, Kurt.

Traci Eichhorst Holloway ’00 is a support analyst in the sales business center at Savvis. She and her husband, Samuel, reside in Saint Peters, Mo.

Amanda King ’97 joined the staff of the Colorado Legislative Council as a senior researcher. She is currently the staff person for the Colorado House of Representatives’ Health and Environment Committee and resides in Denver, Colo.

Tyler Kamerman ’00 is the president and founder of the Des Moines Roosters Australian Football club. The club capped their first winning season in October, capturing the USAFL Division 4 national Championship by defeating defending champions, Milwaukee/Ohio Valley, by a score of 42-28.

Nickie Whitaker ’91 is a director at Public Financial Management in Des Moines.

Ryan Lewis ’97 is an elementary principal in the Clark County School District. Ryan and his wife, Kirsten, reside in Las Vegas, Nev., with their son, Owen.

Tom Gailbraith ’92 was named assistant athletics director for athletics communications at Radford University in Radford, Va. Tom and his wife, Janelle,

Jennifer Pfeifer-Malaney ’97 is part owner and treasurer of McCoy True Value Hardware in Indianola. Jennifer and her husband, Shawn Malaney,

Joanna Schmolke Schnedler ’00 is the general manager at the Fitzgerald Theater in St. Paul, Minn. Joanna and her husband, John, reside in Richfield, Minn.

THE MAGAZ INE | SPR I N G 2 0 1 3

35


Matt Baltes ’01 is a senior sales representative for Jostens in Ankeny. He and his wife, Kara, reside in Huxley. Megan Jameson Hardin ’01 received her Master of Arts in higher education in 2009 from Indiana State University. She is the sports information director at Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas, where she resides with her husband, Drew, and son, Alexander. Dan Keltner ’01 is a project manager at Antea Group in Naperville, Ill. Patrick Anderson ’02 is a senior buyer for Target in Minneapolis, Minn. Katie Braden ’02 is the finance operations manager at Bill Smith Group in New York, where she resides. Sarah Diehl Hatten ’02 is the wigmaster and makeup designer for the Lyric Opera of Chicago. She and her husband, Brett, reside in Chicago, Ill. Jill Benson Owens ’02 teaches for Iowa City Schools and resides in North Liberty with her husband, Michael, and son, Kyler. Casey Studer Rush ’02 is a senior manager of product marketing for CDC Global in Des Moines. She resides in Indianola with her spouse, Shannon. Andrea Monroe Baker ’03 works at the Ottumwa High School as a math teacher. She and her husband, Andy, reside in Oskaloosa with their two children, Annalysa and Daniel. Suzanne Messick Fesler ’03 is a team leader – process qc for Integrated DNA Technologies in Coralville. She and her husband, Chad, reside in North Liberty with their daughter, Elise. Tracie Whitney McCulla ’03 is employed at Ameriprise Financial as a financial advisor, CFP. Tracie and Matt McCulla ’03 reside in Otley.

36

WW W. S I M P S O N . E D U /MAGAZINE

Timothy Reuter ’03 received his Master of Public Affairs with special concentration in governance and organizational change in 2012 from Indiana University – School of Public and Environmental Affairs. Timothy is co-founder and partner at Growth Guiders, LLC and resides in Indianapolis, Ind. Cora Schuhmacher-Briggs ’03 is a clinical psychologist at Glen Haven Counseling Resources. She and her husband, Cory, reside in West Des Moines. Jennifer Richardson Todden ’03 is a residence life coordinator at the University of Florida. Jennifer and her husband, Zach, reside in Gainesville, Fla. Laina Toliver Edwards ’04 works for the University of Iowa in the Department of Family Medicine as curriculum coordinator. Laina and Matthew Edwards ’04 reside in Iowa City with their children, Jack and Leo.

Tessa Murphy ’05 is a legal secretary for Belin McCormic, P.C. Christopher Shaver ’05 is a loan administration manager for Wells Fargo. Kate Paulman Crowley ’06 is an assistant professor of law at Charlotte School of Law. She received her law degree, with honors, from the University of Missouri – Kansas City in 2009. Roger Huston ’06 graduated from Iowa State University in May 2011 with a Master of Public Administration. He will be pursuing a Doctor of Philosophy in public policy and administration at the University of Delaware and concentrating his studies on faith-based nonprofit organizations. Shawna Baker Huston ’07 graduated from Iowa State University in May 2011 with a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine and is now the associate veterinarian at Keystone Animal Hospital. Roger and Shawna reside in Oxford, Pa.

Rachael Spree Klooster ’04 is an elementary and middle school counselor for the Aplington Parkersburg Community School District. She and her husband, Kirk, reside in Parkersburg with their children, Peyton, Jenzen and Tate.

Becca Jackson ’06 recently completed her master’s in teaching degree at Kaplan University.

Heather Cain Watson ’04 works for Valley Hope Association as a corporate clinical supervisor. Heather and her husband, T.J., reside in Wichita, Kan.

Andrew Mitchell ’06 teaches in the West Des Moines Schools and received a master’s degree in education from Morningside.

Matt Cody ’05 is the band director for the Decorah Community School District. Matt and his wife, Nicole, reside in Decorah. Jamie McLain Letzring ’05 is a city administrator for the City of Oelwein, where she resides with her husband, Zach, and children, Nile (4) and McLain (18 months). Crystal VanDeCasteele Mistretta ’05 works for Home Productions, LLC as an art director. She and her husband, Justin, reside in Grimes.

Ashley McGraw Kohles ’06 is a commercial field underwriter at Allied Insurance in Kansas City, Mo.

Jeff Goodell ’07 works for DHR International as a principal. Jeff and his wife, Britney, reside in Coralville. Rachel LeValley ’07 has opened 818, her own graphic design company, and resides in Hudson. Eric Manuel ’07 is a special agent for the Iowa Division of Criminal Investigation and resides in Davenport with his wife, Emily. Abby Garvin Rinard ’07 teaches second grade for the Indianola School District. She received her Master of Education from Grand Canyon University in 2012. Abby and Corbin Rinard ’05 reside in Indianola. Britta Johnson Wey ’07 is a post issue processor – adjustments for MetLife in West Des Moines. Beriet Bichel ’08 is an elementary art teacher in the Burlington Community School District. Curtis DeVetter ’08 is pursuing his doctorate degree at the University of South Florida, College of Public Health. He recently completed his MPH in global health practice and graduate certificate in water, health and sustainability at the University of South Florida. Curtis resides in Tampa, Fla.

Lindsay Saunders ’06 received her doctorate in biology from Duke University in 2012. She and her husband, Hal Canary, III, reside in Durham, N.C.

Melissa Kopf ’08 is the program manager, global security services of Walgreen Co. in Deerfield, Ill. She received her master’s degree in international affairs from the George Washington University in 2010.

Erica Spiller ’06 works for Kaplan University as the composition department chair and resides in Des Moines. She also serves as director of operations at Tailgate Theatre Company, a non-profit theatre company in West Des Moines.

Sarah Burton Lindberg ’08 works for PLUS Relocation Services as a supplier relations support specialist. She received her Master of Divinity from Bethel Seminary in 2011. Sarah and her husband, Nicholas, reside in Minneapolis, Minn.

Rebekah Ellenwood ’07 works for Mercy Medical Center in Sioux City as a LEAN facilitator. She received her Master of Health Administration from Des Moines University.

Jessie Cotton Reimer ’08 completed her M.M. in vocal performance at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 2010. She and her husband, Ben, reside in North Kansas City, Mo.


Zachary Rus ’08 is the associate director of regional programs and alumni relations at the University of Chicago. Eric Burson ’09 is a business line relationship manager for Wells Fargo in Des Moines. Chelsea Donison ’09 is a freelance assistant director in the film industry and resides in New Orleans, La. Jessica Lashier ’09 works for Hy-Vee as the Healthmarket manager. Sarah Lefeber ’09 is the lead analyst for Catchfire Media in Des Moines. Erik Lickiss ’09 is a freelance opera singer and English teacher. He completed his Master of Music in opera performance at the University of Tennessee – Knoxville in 2011 and currently resides in Germany Kristen Towne ’09 is a mental health therapist for the Youth Shelter Care of North Central Iowa in Fort Dodge. Kyle Bochart ’10 is a customer service representative II for Nationwide Insurance. Lynnette Snyder Crawford ’10 is a teaching assistant at the University of South Florida, where she is working on her master’s degree in mathematics. Lynnette and Jayson Crawford ’09 reside in Tampa, Fla., with their daughter, Neya. Emily Davis ’10 is a pedagogical assistant and English teacher at Wissen International in France. Leah Newgren Martin ’10 works for ITS, Inc. in Johnston as a staff accountant. Lauren Burgers Vanderhorst ’10 is a school psychologist for the Heartland AEA. She received her Master of Education from the University of Northern Iowa in 2011. Lauren and Kyle Vanderhorst ’08 reside in Humboldt. Heather Weeda ’10 is a teacher in the Osceola Head Start program and resides in Osceola.

Kelcy Whitaker ’10 is attending Loyola University Chicago School of Law. Kelcy and her husband, Matt Claassen ’11, reside in Chicago, Ill. Christina Woldt ’10 is a preschool teacher at Willowbrook Elementary in the Southeast Polk Community School District. Lauren Anderson ’11 is a graduate assistant athletic trainer at Simpson College. Grant Bridgford ’11 is an environmental scientist at Apex Companies in Urbandale. Ashley Bumann ’11 is a records searcher for USIS in Denver, Colo.

Alicia Carlo Moritz ’11 is a category manager for Victoria’s Secret. She and her husband, Karl, reside in Stanhope. Amy Johnson Oxenford ’11 is working on her master’s degree in English at Creighton University. She and her husband, Joe, reside in Omaha. Molly Peterson ’11 is a teaching assistant at Marshall University and resides in Huntington, W.Va. Kristashea Sloan ’11 teaches reading in the Des Moines public schools. Jamie Sorensen ’11 is an accountant for TP Anderson & Company in Humboldt.

Danielle Caswell ’11 is a program supervisor for Lutheran Services in Iowa in Des Moines.

Keri Waterhouse Anderson ’12 works at Pioneer Hi-Bred International in Johnston and resides with her husband, Aaron, in Bondurant.

Veronica Cooper ’11 is a music teacher in the Clinton Community School District, where she resides.

Katie Anthony ’12 is employed at Meredith Corporation as an audience engagement coordinator.

Sarah Crow ’11 works for Wells Fargo in Des Moines as a loan document specialist.

Rebecca Bean ’12 is a fitness specialist for PRO Sport Club in Redmond, Wash.

Megan Culbertson ’11 is attending the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration to complete her Master of Art in social work.

Howard Berger ’12 teaches science at Lincoln High School. In addition to his Master of Arts in Teaching from Simpson College, he has degrees in meteorology and atmospheric and oceanic sciences. Howard and his wife, Heidi, reside in Des Moines.

Katrina Housholder ’11 is employed at Transamerica as an actuarial tech in Cedar Rapids. Jasmine Walker Kennedy ’11 works for Hockenberg Newburgh Sales & Marketing. Jasmine and Steven Kennedy ’09 reside in Norwalk. Matthew Kray ’11 is a senior accounting technician for SHAZAM and resides in Altoona with his wife, Desiree. Emily Ledger ’11 is an administrative assistant for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Emily also does freelance sound operations for theater shows on evenings and weekends.

Dylan Dinkla ’12 is attending Washburn University School of Law. Jessica Fox ’12 is an elementary teacher in the Indianola Community School District. Kelly Gerdts ’12 works at Wells Fargo in Eagan, Minn., as a loan servicing specialist. Allison Haack ’12 is attending Indiana University in pursuit of her Master of Library Science. Jill Jessee ’12 is working towards her doctorate in mathematics at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Jorie Landers ’12 is the service coordinator and chapel assistant at Simpson College. Vanessa Leonard ’12 is an elementary music teacher at Cornell Elementary in the Saydel Community School District. Kolayout Mila ’12 works for BridgeStone Americas Tire Operation, LLC as a crew manager in Des Moines. Melissa Miller ’12 is a library assistant for the City of Storm Lake. Jeremy Mourlam ’12 works for the Iowa Heart Center as an IHC EMR application analyst/ EMR. He and his wife, Angela, reside in Van Meter. Lindsey Oetken ’12 works at the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra ticket office and the Cowles Center for Dance and the Performing Arts ticket office. Matthew Paladino ’12 is an organic test prep analyst for Test America, Inc. in Cedar Falls, where he resides with his spouse, Cody. Ian Penly ’12 works for Nationwide Insurance as a senior business information analyst. Ian and his wife, Amy, reside in Des Moines. Patrick Poore-Christensen ’12 is currently attending Western Illinois University working on his master’s degree in recreation, parks and tourism administration. Trisha Schroeder ’12 is an assistant auditor for the State of Iowa. Joseph Sorenson ’12 is employed at Community Foundation of Greater Des Moines/ Americorps VISTA as an affiliate program coordinator. Tracy Sibbel Swalwell ’12 is working towards her law degree at Drake Law School. Tracy and Will Swalwell ’12 reside in Des Moines. Jordan Vorrie ’12 is working towards his Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine at Des Moines University. THE MAGAZ INE | SPR I N G 2 0 1 3

37


Chelsey Wilson ’12 works for First Iowa State Bank in Albia as a loan administrator.

BIRTHS/ADOPTIONS

Tyson Wirtz ’12 teaches social studies at North Union High School in Armstrong and resides in Whittemore. Carrie Wubben ’12 works for Medicap LTC & Vital Care Pharmacy in Indianola as a certified pharmacy technician.

MARRIAGES Amy Kluender ’95 and Mark Miller, April 14, 2012, Indianola. Cora Schuhmacher-Briggs ’03 and Cory Briggs, January 27, 2012, West Des Moines. Heather Cain ’04 and T.J. Watson, September 29, 2012, Wichita, Kan. Matthew Cody ’05 and Nicole James, August 18, 2012, Decorah. Lindsay Saunders ’06 and Hal Canary III, September 21, 2012, Durham, N.C. Sarah Burton ’08 and Nicholas Lindberg, November 3, 2012, Minneapolis, Minn.

Daniel David Baker, April 23, 2010, to Andrea Monroe Baker ’03 and Andrew D. Baker ’04, Oskaloosa, joins big sister, Annalysa. Addilane Beth Buchanan, June 20, 2011, to Chad R. Buchanan ’95 and Melanie Richardson Buchanan ’98, Tualatin, Ore., joins brother, Treyson. Owen Wayne Lewis, June 11, 2012, to Ryan J. Lewis ’97 and Kirsten Lewis, Las Vegas, Nev. Aubrey Isabella Masek, July 12, 2012, to Jennifer Bailey Masek ’99 and Tim Masek, Seward, Neb., joins sisters, Grace and Rebekah. Enzo Davis Pescetto, January 15, 2013, to Ali Davis Pescetto ’99 and Micah G. Pescetto, Greenwood, Mo., welcomed home by brother, Gino.

Sonya Nielsen ’10 and Alex Schiphoff, September 15, 2012, Avoca. Alicia Carlo ’11 and Karl Moritz, September 15, 2012, Stanhope. Amy Johnson ’11 and Joe Oxenford, August 25, 2012, Ledyard. Keri Waterhouse ’12 and Aaron Anderson, October 20, 2012, Bondurant.

38

WW W. S I M P S O N . E D U /MAGAZINE

Sullivan McCulla, August 16, 2012, to Tracie Whitney McCulla ’03 and Matthew R. McCulla ’03, Otley, joins Dana (3). Kinnick Joe Ocker, September 29, 2012, to Lindsey Bice Ocker ’03 and Bill J. Ocker ’03, Polk City. Leo Whitson Edwards, June 1, 2012, to Matthew C. Edwards ’04 and Laina Toliver Edwards ’04, Iowa City, joins big brother, Jack (5).

Quinn Harper Hildreth, December 24, 2012, to Ryan R. Hildreth ’05 and Sandra Hildreth, Rockwell City, joins Kathleen (2).

Kyle Vanderhorst ’08 and Lauren Burgers ’10, July 27, 2012, Humboldt. Alexander Jameson Hardin, February 22, 2013, to Megan Jameson Hardin ’01 and Drew Hardin, Georgetown, Texas. Emma Isabelle Connelly, November 8, 2012, to Amanda Knox Connelly ’02 and Dave Connelly, Johnston, joins big brother, Owen. Robert Edward English, April 11, 2012, to Sara Bieker English ’02 and Matthew E. English ’02, Omaha, Neb.

Reagan Sophia Wey, August 20, 2012, to Britta Johnson Wey ’07 and Kevin Wey, Johnston, welcomed home by big brother, Adam (4).

Elise Mae Fesler, May 3, 2012, to Suzanne Messick Fesler ’03 and Chad Fesler, North Liberty.

Rhett Gary Reeder, February 5, 2013, to James R. Reeder ’00 and Amy Reeder, Manchester, joins Robert (9), Reagan (5) and Roman (3).

Jessie Cotton ’08 and Ben Reimer, June 9, 2012, North Kansas City, Mo.

Steven Kennedy ’09 and Jasmine Walker ’11, December 31, 2011, Norwalk.

Kyler Alan Owens, February 8, 2013, to Jill Benson Owens ’02 and Michael A. Owens, North Liberty.

Logan Samuel Rinard, July 23, 2012, to Corbin B. Rinard ’05 and Abby Garvin Rinard ’07, Indianola. Conor Todd Smothers, June 29, 2012, to Dustin E. Smothers ’05 and Megan Hassebrock, Ames. Johanna Jacqueline Hannigan, May 28, 2012, to Heather Anderson ’06 and Mike Hannigan, Minneapolis, Minn. William Royal Mitchell, June 12, 2012, to Andrew R. Mitchell ’06 and Cassandra Mitchell, Norwalk.

Lennox Andrew Price Chilton, November 6, 2012, to Kally Hoskins Chilton ’08 and D. Anthony Chilton, Lincoln, Neb., joins big sister, Liana Victoria Marie. Neya Karen Crawford, July 2012, to Jayson R. Crawford ’09 and Lynnette Snyder Crawford ’10, Tampa, Fla.

DEATHS Frances Bunnell Ervin ’34, December 16, 2012, Liberty, Mo. Verlee Johnson Nelson ’34, November 26, 2012, Lexington, Ky. Russell C. Stemm ’35, January 20, 2013, Saint Cloud, Minn. Olive Gardner McCannon ’36, January 28, 2013, New Bern, N.C. Ellen Fouts Nelson ’36, October 26, 2012, Denison. Gail Sherrard Tuttle ’36, November 26, 2012, Moravia. Phyllis Bruggen ’38, April 3, 2012, Des Moines. LaVaughn Smith Clark Fowlie ’38, January 30, 2012, Coralville. Walter D. McEwen ’38, January 9, 2013, Des Moines. Alberta Bart Holaday ’39, August 26, 2012, Jamestown, N.D. Dorothy Snuggs Panther ’39, December 29, 2012, Waverly. Gertrude Luett Thomas ’39, November 6, 2012, Council Bluffs. Josephine Smiley Williams ’39, August 2, 2012, Sun City West, Ariz. Ruth Harris Beymer ’40, July 28, 2012, Indianola.


James H. Kent Maxine Smith Mosher ’40, November 10, 2012, Indianola. Giovanna Cunningham Ries ’40, March 18, 2012, Des Moines. Ruth Hall Hammer ’41, January 18, 2013, Cupertino, Calif. Elsie Bowans Lowman ’41, February 3, 2013, Des Moines. Lela Scheurmann Schwane ’41, March 12, 2011, Culdesac, Idaho. Marie Pies Sutton ’41, October 28, 2012, West Des Moines. Virginia Brittin Armstrong ’42, October 29, 2011, Largo, Fla. Pauline Keyes Primus ’42, January 29, 2013, Littleton, Colo. Mildred Bowles Barnard ’43, April 14, 2012, Waverly. Wilbur F. Ricks ’43, December 2, 2012, Creston. Eloise Dunlop Ritzman ’43, November 19, 2012, Perry. Raymond W. Squires ’43, January 23, 2013, Idaho Falls, Idaho. Jane Rogers Godwin ’44, June 4, 2012, Indianola. Edna Putnam Hukill ’44, February 20, 2013, Indianola. Betty Slocum Horn ’45, October 14, 2012, Colorado Springs, Colo. Elizabeth Trimble Lindskog ’45, November 12, 2011, San Mateo, Calif. Howard W. Myers, Jr. ’45, January 14, 2013, St Augustine Beach, Fla. Marjorie Zavitz Jefson ’46, December 10, 2012, Forest City. Marilyn Garlock Dykstra ’47, September 9, 2012, Rockford, Ill. Madeline Miller Strom ’47, May 17, 2012, Fontanelle. John R. Davis ’48, June 17, 2012, Davenport. Robert W. Tilford ’49, January 16, 2013, Las Vegas, Nev. Donald M. Maffett ’50, December 27, 2012, West Des Moines. Dr. Robert B. Phillips ’50, September 11, 2012, Dry Prong, La.

Bill D. Weeks ’50, May 11, 2012, Grinnell. Orville D. Bellville ’51, January 6, 2013, Ankeny. Betty M. Hollingshead Catrenich ’51, February 9, 2013, Chariton. Rev. Wauneita McConnell ’51, May 16, 2012, Indianola. Robert L. Miller ’51, July 9, 2012, Havre, Mont. Dr. David W. Scott ’51, August 4, 2012, Northridge, Calif. Bette Cross Squires ’51, October 1, 2011, Cresco. Margaret Uglow Whitaker ’51, September 23, 2011, Denver, Colo. Freda Nine Caviness ’52, October 30, 2012, Indianola. Earl W. Dunagan ’52, November 22, 2012, West Des Moines. Charles G. Linn ’52, November 22, 2012, Fort Smith, Ariz. Bernard E. Neary ’52, February 15, 2013, Audubon. Dr. George W. Paterson ’52, November 1, 2012, Iowa City. Rev. Walter F. Beck ’53, April 15, 2012, Des Moines. Wilma Walker Brass ’53, May 10, 2012, Hampton. Louanna Krapfel Carpenter ’53, August 9, 2012, Chula Vista, Calif. James C. Finch, Jr. ’53, May 24, 2012, Londonderry, N.H. Robert E. Dorsett ’54, February 14, 2013, Silver Spring, Md. Lyle D. Bitcon ’55, August 7, 2012, Traer. Jo Ann Guthrie Cramer Krivin ’55, March 31, 2012, Oneonta, N.Y. Wyllis I. Bolton ’56, March 18, 2012, Fort Dodge. Charles W. Crane ’57, October 18, 2012, Clear Lake. Elzora M. McCormick Town ’57, December 21, 2012, Milo. Deanna Dickey Estes ’59, October 26, 2012, Ankeny. Dean H. Witmer ’60, November 26, 2012, Perry.

Larry D. Keeney ’61, November 30, 2012, Carlisle. Charles E. Fillman ’62, January 20, 2013, Des Moines. Dr. Leland D. Wright, Jr. ’64, April 10, 2012, Kent, Ohio. Dr. Van M. Davis ’65, April 29, 2012, Hot Springs, Ark. Larry T. Kirkwood ’65, September 17, 2012, Knoxville. Shirlie Redetzke Yocom ’67, December 8, 2012, Des Moines. Stephen M. Wood ’68, February 12, 2013, Naples, Fla. Diana Conner Blair ’69, September 28, 2012, Cherokee. Dave L. Chapman ’69, January 16, 2013, Norwalk. Jerry M. Monson ’70, June 18, 2012, Altoona. Richard L. Shively ’71, February 1, 2013, Houston, Texas. William F. Botkin ’73, November 15, 2012, Roach, Mo. L. G. Sheldon ’79, January 25, 2013, Altoona. Paul W. Davis ’81, May 12, 2012, Chicago, Ill. Robert J. Lesh ’83, October 12, 2012, Chicago, Ill. Connie Anzivino ’03, February 13, 2013, Huxley. Anan J. Smith ’06, October 12, 2012, Independence, Mo.

Simpson College lost a great friend on Oct. 29 with the death of James H. Kent, 89, of Muscatine. Kent died only 10 days after he joined the Simpson community to celebrate the grand opening of the Kent Campus Center that bears his family’s name. “I am so grateful that Jim was here to see the impact he has had on Simpson College, and to hear how grateful and appreciative we are for his leadership,” said John Byrd, Simpson’s president. “Future generations of students will benefit greatly from his generosity. All of us extend our thoughts and prayers to his family.” Although not a Simpson graduate, Kent was an Indianola native whose devotion to the college was evident through his 33 years of service on the board of trustees (he was named an honorary member in 2006), and by the generous financial gift his family made for the construction of the Kent Center. He stood as one of Iowa’s most distinguished business leaders and citizens. Mr. Kent’s business career spanned six decades of success in agriculture related industries, including animal nutrition and feed manufacturing, corn refining and distillation and food products. In his early years as an adult, Mr. Kent interspersed college attendance in the U.S. and in England, with a tour of duty in Europe as a Machine Gun Sergeant with the 66th Infantry Division during WWII. Upon separation from the military in 1946, Mr. Kent joined his father in business in Muscatine. Various positions held in procurement, production and sales prepared him well for his eventual assignment in 1965 as operating president of the Muscatine industrial giants of Grain Processing Corporation and Kent Feeds, Inc. Nearly 40 years later, Mr. Kent was serving as chief executive officer of the privately held administrative parent company Kent Corporation. He held too many board and leadership positions to list them all. Known to his acquaintances and co-workers as the thoughtful asker of the key unanswered questions, James H. Kent devoted his life to the betterment of his family and to all who work, study and live in the great state of Iowa. THE MAGAZ INE | SPR I N G 2 0 1 3

39


701 North C Street Indianola, Iowa 50125 800.610.6369 l www.simpson.edu

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Des Moines, IA Permit No. 5740

CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

WELCOMING JAY & JENNÉ SIMMONS On Jan. 17, the Simpson College and Indianola communities welcomed Jay and Jenné Simmons to campus with a reception in Hubbell Hall in the new Kent Campus Center. Jay is set to become Simpson’s 23rd president on July 1. He was also spotted in the stands on March 2 when the Simpson women’s basketball team advanced to the Sweet Sixteen of the NCAA Division III championship. We’ll have more about Jay and Jenné Simmons in the next issue of the Magazine.

Spring 2013  

Spring 2013 Simpson Magazine