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TWO LOCAL HEROES AND THE BATTLE OF QUARANTINE PARK SHIBUKU: SUSHI ON THE HIGHWAY ANDREW MARCHBANK: THE PRO AT POINT WALTER PLANTING IN PALMYRA ISSUE TEN AUTUMN 2018

ONE RESIDENTIAL 6157 BY O N E RE S ID E N T IAL 1 Q U A R T E R LY M A G A Z I N E


ONE. THE MOST RECOMMENDED AGENCY IN THE CITY OF MELVILLE

A publication of: One Residential Sales and Property Management 329a Canning Highway (faces McKimmie Road), Palmyra WA 6157 Phone (08) 9339 8833 Mobile 0419 904 907 michael@oneresidential.com.au

oneresidential.com.au

CONTENTS EVERY STREET TELLS A STORY: The Battle of Quarantine Park 3

MARKET UPDATE Palmyra : Unrushed but hopeful 7

Welcome to 6157.

WE LOVE_______: Shibuku Japanese Restaurant 8

Here’s our tenth edition of 6157, and our first for 2018! Happy New Year!

MY CLUB:

Our ninth edition received some of the greatest feedback of our issues to date with the story of Father Francis Ughanze, the Priest of Our Lady of Fatima Parish in Palmyra, striking a chord in the community.

Point Walter Golf Course 10

The Autumn edition has more great stuff from where you live. We take a look at the Battle of Quarantine Park - the story of two Bicton residents and their work in saving the beautiful tract of land from residential development back in the early eighties.. 6157 also looks at the current property market, talks with Andrew Marchbank at Point Walter Golf Course, and has a bite to eat at Shibuku Japanese on Canning Highway. Thanks for your feedback so far— hope you enjoy the read!

Michael Forzatti Managing Director

Andrew Marchbank and

ONE ON ONE Planted in Palmyra 11

SELLING in 6157 Palmyra 12-13

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT in 6157 When stable is all kinds of good 14

ONERS Action in the One Residential Team 15

KIDS’ CORNER Autumn means get outta here! 16

CONTRIBUTORS Design: The Globe, Writer: Simon Elliott With thanks to the following: Malcolm Doig, Max Trott and Allan Ulrich, Peter from Shibuku, James Duff, Andrew Marchbank from Point Walter Golf Course, realestate.com.au, REIWA, ratemyagent.com.au, and the City of Melville.

ONE’s team of market leading salespeople and cracking admin crew celebrated another accolade with the release of ratemyagent’s 2018 Awards. The team consolidated its position as #1 agency in the City of Melville by number of listings sold, value of sales, and number of recommendations (160!) over the twelve month period!.

2018

City of Melville’s Most Recommended Agency


6157: EVERY STREET TELLS A STORY

THE BATTLE OF

QUARANTINE PARK S T O R Y+ P H O T O S :

S IMO N E LLI OT T

In the early eighties, a group calling themselves “The Friends of Bicton,� mobilised a small but mighty army to fight the State Government over three hectares of land that had been used by the Commonwealth Department of Health as an Animal Quarantine Station. In an era predating social media and online petitions, the group drew together local residents, local government, state, and local politicians, and petitioned everyone up to the Prime Minister at the time, Bob Hawke. The catalyst for the action, which would eventually end in triumph, was two men who have been locals for a lifetime: Malcolm Doig and Allan Ulrich. While shunning the glare of the spotlight, even thirty years after the fact, this is their story; the story of the Battle for Quarantine Park. 6157 BY O N E RE S ID E N T IAL

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Reflecting the mood of the eighties, the gung-ho government of the day, headed by Brian Burke, proposed to sub-divide the Qarantine Station site for residential use. While the acquisition had been made under the former government of Sir Charles Court, the incumbent government saw revenue-raising potential.

In 2018, thousands upon thousands of residents and others travelling from further afield will revel in the undulating green public open space of Quarantine Park. It’s a place for picnics, family gatherings, Australia Day celebrations, and an ideal vantage from which to view all that happens in this little stretch of the Swan. Enjoying such an idyllic setting, it is difficult to believe that in the eighties, this oasis was earmarked for 25 building lots to pour money into the State Government coffers. Perhaps more challenging to comprehend still, is the original use of the land. WHERE THE ANIMALS ARRIVED From 1916 to 1983, the land now known as Quarantine Park was used by the Commonwealth Government as a quarantine facility for inbound domestic and farm animals. Originally acquired on 8 March 1916 for around 2,000 pounds, the stakes would eventually become far higher and the battle for its use, more fraught than ever imagined. The site had been identified for its river access and proximity to the port, as well as its remoteness from urban development. That too would change. For 67 years, animals coming into Australia via Fremantle would pass through the Commonwealth

Animal Quarantine Station. These included domestic pets, farm animals, birds, fish, bees and the like. Animals would be transported by barge from Fremantle Port to the Bicton Jetty. The jetty was fenced to prevent animals from escaping. The animals would then be corralled from the jetty, up the hill to their respective quarantine areas. On release, cars and trucks would travel down Phipps Street and collect the animals for transport to their new homes. On Sundays, when the jetty wasn’t needed for quarantine use, the Melville Swimming Club and ferry operators used it for recreational purposes. Australia has always been fastidious when it comes to quarantine regulations - an epidemic of Rinderpest (cattle-plague) in parts of the world in 1924 only made authorities more exacting. We even forced equestrian events to Stockholm for the 1956 Olympics rather than entertain the potential of disease from horses coming into the country! As demand grew and resources become stretched, complaints of noise became a problem. Barking dogs and the odour from on-site incinerators caused a groundswell of discontent. While the load on the facility would become predominantly domestic by 1973, several alternatives were being considered for a possible relocation. Byford, in the southern metropolitan area, was the preferred choice.


THE CALM BEFORE THE STORM When the Commonwealth Government closed the facility, the prime site was purchased by the State Government in 1980 for $1.085 million. The figure wasn’t a reflection of the value of the land as much as it was compensation for the cost of relocation.

“It was seven years all up”. In the process, they enlisted all the help they could. The pair went door-to-door in the area with a petition that would reach 200 signatures—concerned residents with a greater desire for the provision of public open space than a land subdivision.

“Let’s be clear: this was a big team effort from the Reflecting the mood of the eighties, the gung-ho beginning. We may have got things started, but government of the day, headed by Brian Burke, plenty of people played their part,” Malcolm said. proposed to sub-divide the land for residential use. While the acquisition had been made under Local and state politicians were enlisted to rally the former government of Sir Charles Court, the behind the cause. The Labor MLC, Garry Kelly, incumbent government saw revenue-raising potential. became an influential and tireless advocate for the campaign, while the local member, Barry Hodge, Two local residents in particular weren’t so keen on also played an important part. that idea! THE BATTLE FOR QUARANTINE PARK Having caught wind of a proposal to subdivide the land into twenty-five 800m2 blocks, Malcolm Doig and Allan Ulrich put their heads together. Surely it would be of greater public benefit for this land which connected with a jetty and was adjoined to the Bicton baths, to be accessible for all. Surely there are greater benefits than an economic dividend alone. They resolved to enter the fray and go to battle. “We agitated as best we could for as long as it took - we wanted to be a catalyst for something better,” Malcolm remembers.

The pair also worked alongside the Melville City Council, who were enthusiastic about the legacy that could be created for future generations if this combined effort was successful. There was help from the media as the Fremantle Herald, The West Australian, The Daily News, and the Western Mail all played their part in keeping the battle in the public spotlight. The message was being heard, both in the public arena and in the political corridors of power, but progress was slow. Sometimes, one step forward, sometimes, two steps back. If the tide was going to turn, it would be a long and winding road.

For three summers, they pumped water from their homes onto the parched land to bring it back life, while council workers did their part by keeping the flourishing grounds wellmanicured.

Clockwise from top left: Bicton Baths (c.1936), the view to Swan River from Quarantine Park, various press clippings from the early eighties


GUERILLA TACTICS

Reflecting on the events over thirty years later, Malcolm recalls turning to Allan in the wake of the ‘Battle of Quarantine Park’ victory back in 1985 and saying, “this may be one of the most significant achievements that you or I have in our lifetime”. I think we were right back then.

Right: Allan Ulrich enjoys one of the park benches at the top of Quarantine Park nearby his home.

Sensing that the State Government wanted the asset to fall into disrepair in an effort diminish its value to the general public, Allan and Malcolm vowed to keep the dream alive. For three summers, they pumped water from their homes onto the parched land to bring it back life, while council workers did their part by keeping the flourishing grounds well-manicured. “We wanted people to realise that this land was important and worth saving. So we did what we could. “We towed around big sprinklers and hundred foot hoses to get the job done and, with the help of council mowers, the quarantine station looked increasingly like a park!” said Malcolm.

The blocks sold for a combined total of around $1 million and the bulk of the land became an A Class Reserve, protected from the spectre of a subdivision. In quick time, the quarantine buildings were demolished, the small network of internal roads removed, and the toilet block preserved to service the needs of those using it for recreational purposes. Since that time, hundreds of thousands of people have gained quiet enjoyment from the passive recreation opportunities Quarantine Park affords. Visit anytime, and you’ll likely spot families picnicking, small groups meeting together, weddings being photographed, and many more stealing some solace on their own with a book and some peace and quiet. LOOKING BACK

“It was a whole host of people working together for something worth preserving,” said Malcolm.

To Whadjuk Noongars, this stretch is known as ‘kwoppa kepa’, which translates to ‘beautiful water’.

“I reckon they were three of the hottest summers on record, those summers in the early eighties!” he added.

There are more stories to be told of the history of this stretch of land. Some of these stories date back to oyster beds, early settlers, tea rooms, rowing and yacht clubs, and horse racing. They’ll have their time to be told, but this moment of Bicton’s history is worth savouring on its own. It speaks of legacy, mateship, determination, community, and cooperation.

THE VICTORY In 1985, after the State Government had waxed and waned over their commitment to preserve or sell the land, a compromise was made. The turning point would be when the local member, Barry Hodge, convinced the State Government to contribute $300,000. The tide began to turn. Nine prime lots at the top end of the site near Brindle Close (about one-quarter of the total land area) would be sold to recoup the $1.085 million the State Government had spent acquiring the site. Further, the Melville City Council agreed to contribute another $300,000 so that no further land would need to be sold, reducing the proceeds required from land sales to just under $500,000.

Reflecting on the events over thirty years later, Malcolm recalls turning to Allan in the wake of the ‘Battle of Quarantine Park’ victory in 1985 and saying, “this may be one of the most significant achievements that you or I have in our lifetime”. They weren’t overstating the magnitude of the battle won. As Allan sits on a bench, looking out over rolling lawns that are uninterrupted down to the water’s edge, it’s difficult to disagree. Two mates committed to a plan that has benefitted generations to date; a gift that keeps on giving.


6157: PALMYRA

PALMYRA: MARKET UPDATE cess to so many tools and indicators, it can almost trig2018 started with a bang at One ger paralysis! While this makes the next 6-12 months with some “stunning” sales results an interesting phase of the market cycle as we edge achieved by our hard working team closer to a genuine longer term upswing, it’s likely to over the Christmas/ New Year have little impact on the current motivations for sellers holiday period. This momentum has and buyers, and little impact on prices in the market. continued through the first quarter. Whether we’re talking a 1% increase or Michael Forzatti was the highest selling salesperson in Western Australia in 2016/17 (by listings sold). He has won this award for the past three years. The largest portion of Michael’s sales is in the Palmyra area, an area where One Residential is the clear market leader. In this market update, Michael provides some qualitative thoughts on selling in the current market.

Perhaps more particular to Palmyra than surrounding areas, and certainly more accurate for buyers than sellers, but 2018 kicked off with the preparation that would turn to decision and action. Some of this delay, curiously enough, reflects a renewed optimism in the market. With some anticipating an imminent acceleration in property prices, it would make sense to wait a little longer, correct? I don’t want to burst any bubble, and the sentiment is reasonable, but the early shutes of optimism are amidst the reality of a stable, steady market. Recent performance certainly bears this out. A small annual decline of 1.5% continues to prevail in the area while sales of some property types (typically larger homes on larger blocks) show high interest and are often realising strong results. The level of analysis and anticipation from sellers in the market has never been more sophisticated. With ac-

1% decrease in the market, we’re talking stable and steady right now.

There’s certainly more confidence in the market on the part of buyers in the market. I see greater levels of decisiveness on their part than I have in recent times. They’re expecting good value, they’ve heard it’s out there, and they’re coming to get it. Stock levels in Palmyra are currently stable with the only exception still evident of an abundance is lower end 2/3 bed villa type properties in small strata groups. Buyer demand is still very active for the unique homes, character cottages and the rare full blocks! Through 2018, I am expecting transaction of property sales to slowly build as buyers punt on the bottom of the current real estate cycle and steady enquiry rate from genuine buyers looking to establish their young family dream in this community minded neighbourhood.

THE CURRENT PALMYRA MARKET

-1.5% SUBURB GROWTH, CURRENT QUARTER

3298

NUMBER OF PROPERTIES IN PALMYRA

Median sale price:

$612,000

6157 BY O N E RE S ID E N T IAL

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ONE LOVES :

SHIBU K U JA PA N ESE

WHERE: 341 Canning Highway Palmyra WA 6157 WHEN: TUES - SUN 11:30AM - 2:30PM 5:30PM - 9:30PM MON: CLOSED REVIEW: 3.8 ON ZOMATO PRICE POINT:

$$$


MA KIN G SHIBU K U’S SUSHI Here’s how to recreate Shibuki’s sushi at home! INGREDIENTS (Bamboo sushi mat, for prep) 400g Japanese short-grain sushi rice 2 Tbsp sushi rice seasoning or seasoned rice vinegar 6-7 sheets of sushi nori 1 Tbsp wasabi paste Sushi ginger and Japanese soy sauce, for serving

Four miso soups were enjoyed as we waited for the more substantial offerings to arrive. We’re all fans of miso and these were no disappointment.

It may not have been our first plan, but when a pre-booked function hijacked Plan A, we ended up just around the corner from One Residential at Shibuku Japanese Restaurant. With a strict editorial policy of eschewing franchise options in lieu of local owners, it would be 6157’s first review involving Japanese cuisine! Let’s get a couple of things out of the way early. Shibuku is not going to win any awards for interior or exterior design any time soon. Nor will their branding be celebrated for aesthetic excellence. In fact, aside from tables and chairs, it would be easy enough to pass the establishment along Canning Highway and mistake it for a tattoo parlour! That said, we didn’t come to the restaurant to eat the furniture! Previously a kebab shop, Shibuku has been operated by Peter (a Justinian Street resident) and his parents, for the past five years. As alluded, the appointment of the restaurant is basic and the clash of different design execution is haphazard, but the service was good and menus and orders happened in good succession. It was a balmy Friday night when we visited and the restaurant was all but full with a steady stream of takeaway customers coming and going.

The carnivore was famished and her ordering options were skewed towards ‘deep-fried anything’. Karaage Chicken and Tempura Prawns were acconied by Teriyaki Beef with nary a thought for the Vegetarian. She’d hit the wall early but it would be with a smile on her face. Her willing partners in crime, the five and ten-year-old, made quick work of the parade of plates that were being ferried to the table. The Carnivore’s biggest thumbs up were for the prawns; the light batter, hot-to-the-table, were generous in size, and disappeared quickly. The Karaage Chicken was a hit with the younger brigade, (probably chuffed that they’d managed to score something that seemed a lot like KFC!) For the Vegetarian, Teriyaki Tofu was the order of the day, with a side of Avocado Rolls to keep the party going. Again, lightly battered and piping hot, they were swimming in a shallow pool of teriyaki sauce that was enough for the tofu with a little left to be mopped up by the steamed rice. Good gear all round. The Avocado Rolls were the ‘nude’ version (seaweed on the inside not the outside!). Beautifuly made, perfectly formed, they were highly sought at our table. The banter from the kitchen to the front of house was unintelligible for this monolinguist. We’re told it’s Mandarin not Japanese, but either way, it gave some authenticity to the ambience. While there’s little doubt that Shibuku could be injected with a dose of aesthetic style, the core food offering and its presentation - as many testified that Friday night - is already strong.

For the filling: Half a cucumber, cut into thin strips along the whole length, no seeds 1 avocado, sliced lengthways 2-3 cooked larger prawns. METHOD 1) Rinse the rice in cold water and place in a pan with 600ml cold water. Cover and bring to the boil, then lower heat and simmer for 10 mins. Turn off the heat and leave for 15 mins without removing lid. 2) Tip rice into a bowl, add the sushi seasoning or rice vinegar and mix it in with a spatula. 3) Place a sheet of sushi nori on a bamboo mat. Spread 6-8 Tb of sushi rice over. Leaving a 1cm gap at the top and bottom. Dot wasabi paste along the rice on the nearest edge. 4) Put a piece of cucumber along the length, and next to it, strips of avocado, and then prawns. 5) Starting at the edge nearest you, roll nori into a tight cylinder using the mat. When you reach the top border, wet the nori, then finish rolling and hold it for a few seconds to help it stick. Cover with cling film, chill. 6) Cut each roll into 6 pieces and serve with sushi ginger and soy sauce. Eat on the day you make them.

- THE VEGETARIAN and THE CARNIVORE 6157 BY O N E RE S ID E N T IAL

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Planting in Palmyra WITH ANDREW MARCHBANK

Andrew Marchbank’s passion for golf began in his backyard at the age of eight - it just turns out that his backyard backed on to Ashgrove Golf Club! These days he’s the golf pro at Point Walter Golf Course. We caught up for chat about golf and growing up. Where did the passion for golf begin? I grew up loving all sports. Cricket, soccer, swimming, tennis, golf, BMX anything, really. When I was 8, our family moved from Sydney to Brisbane, and the house they bought backed on to Ashgrove Golf Club. Around 10, I started getting more interested and took to the course. By 17, I was in the senior team, and by 21 I was For golf coaching for any age, whether one-on-one, in school groups, MyGolf, social or corporate groups, call Andrew at Point Walter Golf Course on 0427 158 317.

captaining that team. It all flowed from there. Tell us about your club. I’m currently the Teaching Professional at Point Walter Golf Course, a public club with some of the most magnificent views you’ll ever see on a golf course! What’s the age range of the golfers you coach? Almost limitless! One of our significant programs (a partnership between the PGA and Golf Australia), is a junior program called MyGolf. It’s designed for children from 5 to 12 years old, but I’ve had some parents trying to sneak in their 3-year-olds! At the other end, the oldest beginner I’ve worked with was a delightful 84-yearold lady. For me, this is one of the brilliant things about golf - you’re never too old to start and (almost) never too young either. How did the Golf Pro career come about? There are essentially two career pathways for the golfer wanting to make a career out of the sport: the touring professional or the club professional. I settled on club pro after missing out on joining the PGA circuit by one shot

some years back. I became a PGA member and completed my traineeship at Ashgrove Golf Club in Brisbane in 2003 - my home course!. From there I worked as an Assistant Pro at the Royal QLD Golf Club, Tournament Coordinator at the PGA (WA) and the Pro at Royal Fremantle Golf Club, before coming to Point Walter. Did you have a golf hero growing up? Oh, it was hard to go past the Great White Shark. Greg Norman was an absolute rock star in an era where golfers weren’t the most fashionable sportsmen! And he was a Queenslander - it was an irresistible combination! Why should people join Point Walter? You’re going to learn a whole lot about life playing golf, no doubt. Many of the character traits I’ve developed into adulthood, had their foundations in golf. The club itself is open - it welcomes anyone with interest in golf without formality and regardless of ability. It’s the sort of club at which anyone can find themselves at home. Thanks, Andrew!

In the eight years to November 2017, there were fewer than four Palmyra properties sold above $1 million, yet in the last four months alone, Michael Forzatti has transacted four million dollar-plus sales. Here, he talks about the attraction of the upper end of the Palmyra property market and why people are moving in to stay.

ONE ONE

w i t h M I C H A E L F O R Z AT T I

“My Club”


Ask almost anyone with their finger near the pulse on Perth residential property about the state of the market right now, and you’ll likely hear the phrase ‘mixed bag’ in there somewhere. While there’s an undeniable increase in buyer interest and activity, the upswing is not unilateral, and it’s yet to reach the point of being reflected in stronger housing prices across entire suburbs (with occasional exceptions). In Palmyra, it’s the larger blocks with established homes, and bespoke designed homes that are catching the eyes of buyers, leading to substantial sales. It’s a different story when it comes to multiple dwellings and strata unit developments—there simply isn’t sufficient heat and demand in the market to see these properties moving quickly at the moment. Patience is a virtue, though; the market will turn again soon!

J M H T I W A + Q

There’s no doubt that there are more buyers in the market right now, particularly at the higher end of Palmyra. There’s an influx of families looking to move up to the next bracket of homes in the area and, I’m heartened to add, they want to sink deep roots into the area for the long haul.

Years back, owners may have viewed Palmyra as a stepping stone suburb. Now it’s a destination. That’s a significant reclassification. With that motivation, rather than a ‘flip it and move on’ motivation, the property sales above $1 million make even more sense. In the last four months, I’ve transacted sales in Tamar Street ($1Million Plus), Zenobia Street ($1Million Plus), Adrian Street ($1Million Plus), and another in Zenobia Street ($1Million Plus). Add to this a more tailored, sophisticated approach to marketing these properties, and the results are

of little surprise. Those inspecting these properties are pre-qualified and tailor-made for ‘VIP viewings’. These inspections are attracting genuine buyers ready to buy rather than a rent-a-crowd. This delivers a further upside as I’m often in a position to present multiple, strong offers with the level of interest among buyers. It’s been a while since we’ve seen this level of interest in any property type and reflects an increased optimism in unique segments of the market. These purchasers have confidence in both the stability and positive outlook for the market. Palmyra has an enviable reputation among purchasers. The area has become highly sought after for its rare blend of community, convenience, authenticity, and prestige. Prices, in turn, are reflecting this desirability, as well as the nature and scale of homes that are being built in the area. I’m seeing professional couples who are yet to start a family moving into the area with an intent to establish themselves in the area and raise a family here in the years to come. I’ve also had a couple of clients who’ve bought larger blocks, or both halves of a duplex and knocked them down to build large family homes on a generous-sized block. I love seeing this sort of reclamation, and it certainly bodes well for the overall confidence that residents are displaying in Palmyra. We’re not getting ahead of ourselves, and we’re all about ‘keeping it real in Palmyra’, but many purchasers are recognising the deeper investment value in calling Palmyra ‘home’. The trend is our friend, and the trend in Palmyra is to get planted over the long haul and invest in tomorrow. Not only financially, but for the future of your family.

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In a quiet tree-lined street of Palmyra, Sienna Cary has carved out a little oasis of calm. A beautician and ‘Feather Touch Brow Artist’, Sienna’s Tamar Street home salon has become a regular stop for treatments, massages and the best eyebrows in town! We caught up with Sienna to discover what started the ball rolling and what’s keeping it moving! How long have you been operating from Palmyra? About 18 months, but we’ve lived in Palmyra for the last 8 years. My Mum went to school at Pally Primary, so we’ve got a long history in the area although Dad’s work (oil and gas) saw us living in Indonesia for much of my childhood. What’s your background in beauty? Long and varied! I’ve been in the industry for 18 years. I’ve run my own business in Nedlands, done massage therapy in the Whitsundays, and, most recently, managed a medispa in Claremont. Why did you open something from home? It was an opportunity to work the business around parenting, but also create a space where clients can bring their own children. That’s not always possible at a salon - but it’s just fine here! My clients are mostly local. Some come from further afield for the eyebrow work, but much of my clientele is from Palmyra and surrounding suburbs. What sort of beauty therapy services do you provide? All the usual, really. Facials, waxing, tinting, organic spray tan, massage and, particularly the feather touch eyebrow tattoos.

Tell us about the eyebrows! The eyebrows are my specialty! Feather touch eyebrow tattooing is a relatively painfree recent beauty innovation that helps create hyper-realistic 3-D hair strokes. Each stroke is by hand, so steady hands are helpful! The service is particularly useful for those who have sparse eyebrows or, perhaps through medical treatment, have lost their eyebrows completely. The work isn’t necessarily instead of eyebrows but to supplement any hair they have and give brows a fuller look. The goal is the most natural look possible rather than something fake or scary! The eyebrow work needs to happen in a clinical, clean, controlled environment, so we’ve worked hard to make the salon ideal for the sort of work we do here. Given the eyebrow tattoos last for three years, you really want to be using someone who has had plenty of experience. It’s one of the reasons I’ve worked hard to grow my skills in this area. What are your plans for the business? The business takes up 3-4 full days at the moment. With my youngest in pre-primary next year, there’s an opportunity to build the business further. What do you enjoy most about your work? I’m social - I love meeting new people and making them feel beautiful. People leave here feeling like a new person - particularly those for whom growing new hair is a challenge. I find that so rewarding.

To see Sienna’s eyebrow work or range of treatments, visit siennacary.com, follow her on Insta (@siennacary) or book an appointment on 0418 905 753.

SOME OF THE ONES IN

PALMYRA

66 HAMMAD STREET $749,000 - $769,000 SUPERIOR SPACE - STREET FRONT STUNNER! This immaculately presented home is spaciously proportioned for family lifestyle ease. The attractive floorplan provides generous light-filled living and entertaining zones, supersize kitchen, meals area for large gatherings and renovated bathrooms with luxurious appointments.

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87B AURELIAN STREET ELEVATED TUSCAN RETREAT

Fr$699,000

Nestled away on an ultra-private and quiet rear 568sqm GREEN TITLE block, this inviting and versatile home offers a very functional and well-balanced layout, ideal for grand entertaining and separation zones if required.

FOR SALES DATA, ADVICE AND EXPERTISE IN PALMYRA, CALL THE MARKET LEADER, MICHAEL FORZATTI ON 0419 904 907

A BEAUTIFUL,, HIGH-BROW,, PATCH OF,, PALMYRA.,

FOR SALE

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220 MARMION STREET Fr $699,000 GRAND CHARACTER FAMILY LIVING! Privately screened behind a high brick fence and offering a superior supersize floorplan, this attractive BRICK AND TILE home ticks all the boxes for a family looking to move into this fantastic suburb.

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THE SUSHI IS O N S H IB U K U !

8B SOLOMON STREET Fr$499,000 DUPLEX DELIGHT - PREMIER LOCATION

41 ZENOBIA STREET SOMETHING SPECIAL!

Set in a prime position at the East Freo end of town and oozing potential on ~530sqm street front block! You will love the long Perth summers with a sparkling below ground pool and studio at the rear plus enclosed games/storage room.

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Cut out/bring in this voucher to Shibuku Japanese Restaurant, spend over $10 on your lunch, and they’ll add a side of sushi for the table! Just for reading 6157!

SHIBUKU JAPANESE 341 Cannign Highway Palmyra 6157

48C AURELIAN STREET Fr $749,000 STUNNING QUALITY - PRIZED POSITION!

30B SOLOMON STREET PEACEFUL PRIVATE RETREAT

With a gorgeous street appeal and a sense of refined quality this spacious residence offers a wonderful lifestyle opportunity with low maintenance surrounds and private, peaceful outdoor entertaining.

Nestled away on a whisper quiet elevated rear 540sqm block in a wonderful location just a hop skip and a jump to parks, schools and cafes, this immaculate home has had one long term proud owner and is priced for genuine sale!

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PALMYRA WESTERN FARMERS MARKETS: EVERY SUNDAY Taste a little bit of the country in the city at Palmyra Western Farmers Market every Sunday 8 AM – 12 PM.

27A ADRIAN STREET PERFECTION IN PALMYRA!

Fr $629,000

53A ADRIAN STREET DESIGNER FAMILY DREAM HOME

Nestled away on a private and secure corner block, this fully renovated, single level home is filled with sophistication, comfort and style. Oozing tranquillity in every corner, the level of perfection and finish in this home will tempt the most fastidious buyer.

A statement in timeless elegance, this AS NEW (2016 build) pristinely presented residence strikes a super stylish tone with a classic contemporary coastal vibe and quality appointments.

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Supporting your local market directly funds the Kitchen Garden Program and allows Palmyra Primary School students to grow and cook produce as part of their curriculum. Absorb yourself in the vibrant community experience amongst great food and friends.

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ONE RESIDENTIAL: MANAGEMENT

MANAGING WITH ONE IN

WHEN STABLE MEANS ALL KINDS OF GOOD PRINCIPAL & DIRECTOR, RICHARD THURTLE LOOKS TO 2018 AND STABILITY OVER VOLATILITY REIWA recently published a feelgood story about the recovery of the property management market. It noted that while leasing activity declined by 1.6% in the December quarter, this was good news and reflected the general stabilisation of the market. There’s a cloud with every silver lining, so we caught up with One management Principal and Director, Richard Thurtle, to get some insights into the truth behind the data, and the outlook for the property management as we head through 2018.

>>>

In a market where few good news stories have been there to be told for some years, it’s great to hear some optimism for property management about the place. Is it too early to call? What does optimism look like in a market like this? We’re discovering that, as with much of life, stability is a good, good thing. The headline declared that ‘the worst appears over for the Perth rental market’, do you buy that? I think there’s a little bit of truth and a bit of hyperbole in there! There’s the sense that the worst is over because we’re suddenly seeing an upswing, but while I noted that there was some median rent price growth in some of the areas in which we manage properties, (Attadale ($455 per week), Bicton ($370 per week), Shelley ($430 per week), I think a story like that might be focussing on the silver lining. The December quarter is historically a quarter of higher activity. Most companies (national and international) tend to effect their transfers through this period and coupled with people moving areas for schooling reasons; there tends to be greater activity. As a result, executivetype properties tend to attract higher interest and premium prices through this time. Has that been true for One in recent times? Anecdotally, that’s certainly been the case for us. We had two properties (duplex halves) in Bicton. Both were two-story. One was larger, renovated, and featured a pool; the other was more standard, but still two-story. This home leased in November for $700/week, while the renovated property leased in December for $975/week. That’s a significant margin, but it reflects the desire for a particular sort of property rather than a general upswing in the market.

So, what’s reasonable to say about the market right now and is any of this good news? I think the market has reached a point where Groundhog Day is good. While that idea might be like someone’s worst nightmare, when it comes to the rental market, it’s actually a good thing. And I think that’s what is at the heart of the REIWA observations as well. The boom ended and rents dived. This was followed by a period of volatility in 2016-17 as some were still higher as others were being reviewed downwards. Most of the downward rental reviews have happened so there’s greater stability and less volatility. For a while there, people were comparing unadjusted properties that were still at a higher rate, with those that had come down to meet the market. Now, they’ve all come down to meet the market and this creates greater general certainty. No longer can similar properties have a significant disparity in weekly rental between them because one has been reviewed downwards while the other stayed high. This created the allure of the cost saving, but the ground is pretty much level now. Sure, it may not be the level of income that landlords would love to be seeing as a return on their investment, but the volatility in the market has diffused. What’s the upside now? The truth that a well-presented home in a decent area will attract good tenants for a good price is as true right now as in any other market. They’ll also be the properties that will move upwards before others and will be subject to competition between possible tenants. The greater upside through 2018 will be stability. More of the same. That might sound a little boring, but when you’ve moved through a period of volatility economically, predictability is a good friend!


:ONERS our people: out there and doing good stuff PALMYRA AND FORZATTI KICKS OFF NEW YEAR IN THE TOP THREE, STATEWIDE.

ONE’S RESIDENT GRANDMA GOES ONETWO IN JANUARY.

Top 3 by value sold

Recent sales figures released by REIWA for January highlight the strong start to the year by Palmyra’s market leader, Michael Forzatti.

For One’s General Manager, Karen Thurtle, and Property Management Director, Richard Thurtle, January was a big, big month.

Michael finished January in the Top 3 by sales value with 8 sales for total value of $5,624,000. The figures highlight the robust property values in Palmyra (see page 11).

January 29 saw the birth of their second and third grandchildren; twins to their eldest daughter, Amy and her husband, Mark. Lyla Rose and Hunter Richard Jamieson came out smiling and spreading plenty of joy all round. Both grandparents are reported to be doing well.

JENNINGS LEADS MELVILLE, MULCAHY LEADS BOORAGOON

At the recent 2018 ratemyagent awards in Melbourne, it was high fives all round as One’s market leaders brought home the bacon. Shane Beaumont lead the way, being awarded the 2018 Western Australian ratemyagent Agent of the Year. This backs up his second placing (to Michael Forzatti) in last year’s REIWA awards and is testament to his tireless and prolific sales performance over the last couple of years. Shane was also awarded ratemyagent’s 2018 Gosnells Agent of the Year at the same event.

JAN

With this performance already exceeded in February’s results, 2018 is shaping up strong!

BEAUMONT CROWNED RMA AGENT OF THE YEAR (WA) AND HEADS GOSNELLS

RMA AWARDS: ONE NAMED 2018 AGENCY OF THE YEAR IN FOUR SUBURBS

FORZATTI TOPS PALMYRA AT 2018 RMA AWARDS

Michael Forzatti (here with Shane Beaumont) has been recognised has carried off the award for 2018 Agency of the Year and 2018 Agent of the Year in Palmyra.

Andrew Mulcahy and Michael Jennings were crowned 2018 Agents of the Year for Booragoon and Melville respectively at the ratemyagent Awards. Four market leaders from a team of seven is certainly a team of champions and a champion team! Consistent results; Month in, month out.

With over 50 properties sold in Palmyra in the last 12 months, Michael is also the most recommended agent in Palmyra, and the highest total sales price, Michael has sold over three times the value of real estate of his nearest competitor in the market. Nice work!

Team success and individual success commonly go together and the recent 2018 ratemyagent awards were no exception. One was awarded 2018 Agency of the Year in four different Perth suburbs: Palmyra, Melville, Booragoon, and Gosnells. In some of these areas, One has the first and second highest selling salespeople. Great work, team! 6157 BY O N E RE S ID E N T IAL

15


Autumn 1

Petra St

Preston Pt Rd

2

Stock Road

Getting your kids away from the screen and out of the house can be a challenge sometimes. Here’s some ideas to get them outside and exploring as we head into autumn, and some others for all year round.

1

Carrington St

GET OUTTA HERE

G R E E N WA S T E COLLECTION IN 6157

Canning Highway

AREA 1 26 MAR 2018 AREA 2 2 APR 2018

Sainsbury St

Autumn search: Go out and find 10 things that you will only see during Autumn.

2

In Autumn, pick 3-5 trees in your backyard or street. Each week, observe changes in the size and color of the leaves. How are they different? What trees keep their leaves the longest?

3

Plant bulbs, seeds or trees.

4

Rake fallen leaves and play in the piles. See how many different colours of leaves you can collect or identify.

The service, provided by the City of Melville is for collection from your verge according to council requirements and applies to residential properties only. White goods and junk is another verge-side pick up and will take place later in the year.

ALL YEAR ROUND 5

Anybody home? Go visit your neighbours! Spend some time looking for “neighbours” living under rocks, under leaves, under anything. Be a polite visitor! Put things back where you found them.

6

Make a bird feeder by putting peanut paste and seeds on a pine cone.

7

Leave out bits of string for birds to make their nests.

8

Adopt a tree! Choose a tree to monitor for the year. Check on it once a month. What do the leaves look like? What about the bark? Are there signs of wildlife? Are there plants that live near or on it?

9

10

Take art supplies outside with you (crayons and paper for younger children, markers, pencils or clay for older children). Choose one natural thing (tree, rock, plant, etc.) to draw. Draw it from a creative perspective (standing above it, lying underneath it, sitting very close to it, etc.). Pretend to be an ant and draw it from the ant’s point of view! Creative writing: Take a walk outside. Choose a plant or animal that you see. Pretend you are that animal and write a letter to someone. If you have a friend with you, write to each other!

One Residential Sales and Property Management 329a Canning Highway (faces McKimmie Road) Palmyra WA 6157 Mobile 0419 904 907 michael@oneresidential.com.au

oneresidential.com.au

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6157_Issue 10_Autumn 2018  

6157_Issue 10_Autumn 2018  

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