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Annual report 2013


Content Foreword 04 1. Strategy 1.1 The world around us 1.2 Strategy, vision and mission 1.3 Core values 1.4 Simavi Theory of Change 1.5 Objectives for 2013 2. Simavi programmes 2.1 SRHR activities and results 2.2 WASH activities and results 2.3 Monitoring and evaluation

05 06 06 07 08 10

3. Fundraising and partnership development 3.1 Income from direct fundraising 3.2 Income from third-party campaigns 3.3 Government grants 3.4 Partnership development

29 31 32 33 35

4. Communication 4.1 Communication strategy 4.2 Raising awareness and involving stakeholders 4.3 Brand

37 38 38 39

5. Organisation 5.1 Organisational development 5.2 Organogram 5.3 Executive Board and Management Team 5.4 Employees 5.5 Internal organisation 5.6 Risk management

41 42 42 43 43 44 45

13 15 21 26

6. Outlook 47 6.1 Strategy 48 6.2 Financial outlook 49 7. Report Supervisory Board 51 8. Annual accounts 55 9. Other information 83 Appropriation of result 84 Independent auditor’s report 85 Annex

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Colophon 101


Foreword

We invest in Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) and in Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR). WASH and SRHR are crucial for people to be able to lead a healthy life, build a better existence and find a way out of poverty. Therefore we strive for a world in which ‘basic health’ is accessible for all. We cannot afford to bring water, sanitation and health facilities to single communities, and therefore we have been scaling up our programmes. It is our ambition to structurally improve the basic health of 10 million people in 2020.

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Foreword

But we cannot make all of these dreams come true alone. We work together and create lasting partnerships. I am very grateful to everyone who we have worked with this year - our local partners, alliance partners, corporate partners, our individual and corporate donors, our collectors, and the governments we have worked with. I would like to thank everyone who supports us, believes in our approach and cooperates with us. And last but certainly not least I want to thank our motivated and enthusiastic employees who made the changes feasible. I trust that in 2014 we will continue to work together on our vision: basic health for all.

Let’s make a difference together! Ariette Brouwer

photo: Huib van Wersch

It is with much pride that I present to you the Simavi 2013 annual report. In this report you will find details of our activities and results over the past year - a year in which we were able to reach more than 2 million people directly with hygiene and health education, and created access to Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) and Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) services for about a million people in marginalised communities in Africa and Asia. This impressive achievement is the result of our work in consortia, such as the Dutch WASH Alliance, the SRHR Alliance, the SHAW programme in Indonesia and the Football for Water partnership, but it also results from the successful implementation of existing Simavi programmes in the nine countries where we are active. Without the many exciting new programmes we developed, such an impact would not have been achieved. One of these programmes is our Water and Sanitation programme, in which we cooperate closely with engineering agency Witteveen+Bos and management consultant firm Berenschot in Ghana. Another good example is our long-term partnership with the Swiss Agency for Development Cooperation, aiming to implement a large-scale water and sanitation programme in Tanzania. Within the ASK programme we will improve Access, Skills and Knowledge (ASK) of young people and women, in order to boost safe motherhood and SRHR services in Kenya, Ghana, Indonesia and Uganda. Furthermore, we are delighted that one of our Sexual Reproductive Health & Rights projects in India has won us the Vodafone Mobile for Good Challenge. In 2013 we have further strengthened our strategy to contribute even better to the challenges of a rapidly changing world in a sustainable way. With the aim of reaching a lasting achievement in mind, the Simavi Theory of Change has been developed, which comprises an integrated approach to structural improvement of people’s health across the globe.


photo: Prabuddha Paul

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1. Strategy

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Strategy


1. Strategy

1.1 The world around us The world around us is undergoing major changes. While the traditional North-South paradigm is steadily becoming a thing of the past, the gap between rich and poor within developing countries and within regions is becoming ever larger. At the same time, population is growing at an astounding rate. The current world population will increase by more than 1 billion over the next 10 years, and will reach 9 billion in 2050. The population in developed regions will remain largely unchanged at around 1.3 billion, in stark contrast with the populations of the lesser developed countries in Africa and Asia, where populations are projected to double by 2050. This rapid population growth brings with it a major new challenge - a challenge that has already become noticeable around us: the resources challenge. Or in other words, we are starting to see food, water, energy and mineral crises. The agricultural sector already uses seventy per cent of available drinking water, while the world’s demand for food (and with it, water) is set to double over the coming fifty years. This presents a threat to low and middle-income communities all over the world. Along with population growth and the resource crisis, a trend of rapid urbanisation is also taking place all over the world. Today more than fifty per cent of people already live in cities. But whilst the eyes of the world are on its cities, large groups of people still live in remote areas without safe drinking water or clinics where women can give birth safely. Forty per cent of the world’s population still has no access to a toilet; every day thousands of children die from a lack of safe drinking water, and every minute a mother dies during childbirth. Simavi realises that the best way to address these complex challenges is by working together. Today, public private partnerships are realising a sustainable impact all over the world. It is a fortunate trend that development aid is no longer the domain of development organisations and governments alone. The private sector, in its search for new markets or raw materials, is increasingly taking its activities to developing countries. At the same time, a new type of business - social entrepreneurship - presents new opportunities to achieve lasting change. Facilitating and enabling sustainable development and practising development aid have become two different things. Simavi has embraced the new opportunities arising from this combination of trade and aid, as our partnerships with the private sector show.

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Strategy

These trends and developments have influenced the way Simavi works which resulted in our current Theory of Change on our integrated approach for basic health (see paragraph 1.4). For example, we work together with our local partners to empower and enable communities to fight poverty and improve people’s health, rather than merely ‘providing’ services. To ensure sustainability, it is crucial that projects are demand-driven instead of needs-driven. At the same time, we are bolstering our cooperation with (local) governments, the private sector and other institutional stakeholders; in this way we can involve them in creating an enabling environment for local communities in which system change can take place. Empowering communities and creating an enabling environment means working with a wide range of organisations. This includes our long-term local partners, international NGOs, local and national governments and knowledge institutions, but also new partners such as consultancy firms, the private sector and social enterprises. Simavi’s added value within these partnerships lies in our network and in our expertise: on sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR); on water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH); on our FIETS sustainability principles (see paragraph 1.4), on our community-based approach and on programme management. Simultaneously, we actively urge companies and government bodies (both in the Netherlands and internationally), to keep sight of the interests of marginalised communities in their actions and policy. Times are changing, and Simavi is keeping pace. But what is not changing is our deep-rooted conviction that everyone is entitled to healthy living conditions.

1.2 Strategy, vision and mission Strategy In 2013 Simavi developed a strategy for 2014-2020, including a redefined vision, mission and a Theory of Change aimed at achieving structural change. The four pillars of the new strategy are: 1. Realising structural improvement to the health of people in marginalised communities in Africa and Asia; 2. Diversified financing and innovative partnerships; 3. A strong brand and transparent communication showing our results; 4. A fresh organisational culture nourishing entrepre


Basic health definition In Simavi’s vision, basic health is a crucial stepping stone for building a better existence and creating a way out of poverty. It refers to fundamental health conditions that need to be fulfilled in order to allow development; people can only go to school, engage in work and contribute positively to their community, when they are in good health. To achieve the goal of basic health, Simavi invests in water, sanitation, hygiene (WASH) and in sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR). We know from experience that WASH and SRHR education as well as access to WASH and SRHR services are crucial for people to be able to lead a healthy life, build a better existence and find a way out of poverty.

It is our ambition to structurally improve the basic health of 10 million people in marginalised communities in Africa and Asia by 2020.

With local communities Simavi believes in the power of people. As soon as people take personal responsibility to solve the challenges of their local community, and start cooperating, positive change is set in motion. That is why we bring people together. We support local communities to become more organised and to share knowledge and experience. In order to achieve this, we involve local leaders, health workers, schools and other actors. But no matter what activity we are engaging in, the needs, wants and ideas of the people of the communities are at the core of our work.

With organisations and authorities neurship and innovation. The strategy will be published online in June 2014.

Vision Simavi strives for a world in which basic health is accessible to all, since basic health is the first step towards building a better existence and creating a way out of poverty. We can break the cycle of poverty by investing in basic health. We believe that everyone has the right to healthy living conditions. Unfortunately, too many people in developing countries are falling ill or even dying, due to a lack of knowledge about health and hygiene, a lack of health services and difficult political, cultural and economic circumstances. As a consequence perpetuating (gender) inequality and deathly diseases such as diarrhoea, dysentery, typhus, cholera and HIV/aids still occur on a large scale.

Mission Simavi realises structural improvement to the health conditions of people in marginalised communities in Africa and Asia. We invest in Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) and in Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR). Our programmes focus on: • Empowering communities to demand quality services and to engage in healthy behaviour; • Creating an enabling environment, ensuring that governments, private sector and NGOs are involved, are held accountable and know their roles and responsibilities. • Ensuring that affordable, suitable and sustainable WASH and SRHR services are actually utilised by the people;

Problems are often too complex to be solved by individuals or groups on their own. Therefore we bring health issues to the attention of the relevant authorities, and we work intensively with the private sector to deliver goods and services that improve people’s health. We also push for the involvement of civil society organisations, such as international NGO’s and our local partners. This thorough approach ensures that any changes brought about will be carried forward as structural changes.

Making a difference together Our strength lies in connecting and bringing together all stakeholders: people from different sectors who want change, who believe in our goals, and work with us in the field, as well as those who invest in our work, support us, donate to our organisation or write about us. Together we make a difference and come closer to our vision: basic health for all.

1.3 Core values To realise our ambition, we have defined five core values that drive our decisions, and state what we stand for and how we work: Sustainable: Our work is based on a long-term vision for the future. We aim for structural changes. We use an effective integrated programmatic approach. Powerful: We are seen as powerful and confident. We are proud of our daily work. We believe in the strength and the passion of people. Connecting: We put our heart and soul into what we do. By doing so, we cooperate intensively with others. Together we can make a difference.

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Inspiring: We bring forward new ideas and we think out of the box. We inspire each other and the partners with whom we work. We offer an inspiring working environment. Righteous: We believe that everyone has the right to healthy living conditions. We have respect for the differences between people, cultures and organisations. We work according to people’s equal right to development.

1.4 Simavi Theory of Change

in marginalized communities, Simavi has developed a threefold, integrated approach - our Theory of Change. In the first place, our work focuses on empowering communities to ensure they will demand quality services and engage in healthy behaviour. Secondly, we build an enabling environment in which all stakeholders are aware of their roles and responsibilities, work together and can be held accountable for their responsibility of fulfilling people’s rights. And finally, we ensure that affordable and sustainable WASH and SRHR services are in place and are actually utilised by the people. Our Theory of Change helps us to realise this structural change.

To realise structural improvement of the health of people

STRUCTURAL IMPROVEMENT OF BASIC HEALTH (WASH & SRHR) OF PEOPLE IN LOW INCOME AND MIDDLE INCOME COUNTRIES

IMPACT

LONG TERM OUTCOME

OUTCOME

OUTPUT

THROUGH PUT

INPUT SIMAVI

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Strategy

Empowered communities: including healthy behaviour of individuals

Supportive enabling environment (government, private sector, NGOs)

Utilisation of sustainable WASH and SRHR services

Active commitment of communities to stimulate healthy behaviour and maintain WASH and SRHR services

Transparent and effective collaboration between stakeholders; stakeholders act upon roles

Well managed WASH and SRHR services

People with increased knowledge and attitudes

Stakeholders know role and responsibility and act accordingly; platforms are established

WASH and SRHR services established

Capacity strengthening, evidence-based advocacy, organising platforms and dialogues

Improving and linking all WASH and SRHR service elements

Functioning WASH and SRHR community groups

Capacity strengthening, community awareness, education and demand creation

• WASH EXPERTISE • SRHR EXPERTISE • SUSTAINABILITY (FIETS) • COMMUNITY BASED APPROACH • PROJECT AND PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT • NETWORK AND PARTNERSHIPS


Pillar 1: Empowered Communities How does it work? Empowering communities means making sure that the voice of the community is being heard and the interests of all community members, irrespective of age, gender, sexual preference, religion or ethnicity, are being represented. We contribute to empowering communities through setting up and training community groups. Examples of this are training the organisational skills of WASH and health committees and raising awareness on WASH and SRHR issues. Increasing the capacity of community groups leads to a better understanding of how to monitor the health situation in their village and how to channel the population’s demand for water, sanitation and sexual reproductive services and rights. At the same time, it supports people to stimulate healthy behaviour in their communities.

What is the outcome? In all individuals, increased knowledge about health contributes to healthy behaviour: when ways of preventing WASH and SRHR related health problems are known, people act accordingly. Examples of this behaviour are washing hands or demanding safe deliveries attended by skilled birth attendants. Empowered communities have the ability to analyse their own health problems, they know their rights, can articulate their needs, and urge those whose duty it is to fulfil their needs. Finally, our community empowerment work stimulates communities to partner with local stakeholders in demanding adequate and sustainable services in the field of WASH and SRHR.

Pillar 2: Enabling Environment How does it work? A supportive, enabling environment means that stakeholders, such as governments and authorities on all levels, as well as stakeholders from the private sector, are actively involved in a community’s health situation. All stakeholders work in line with their roles; they act according to laws and policies, rules and regulations, and are accountable for their responsibilities. Moreover, they work together to align their interests and efforts to improve the health of people. Simavi involves these relevant stakeholders and strengthens their capacity. The focus of our work in this area is on training governmental health and WASH providers and making them aware of national laws and regulations. Another priority is involving the private sector. An instance of this is training local craftsmen to build latrines in more sustainable ways, or supporting small-scale businesses in producing quality latrine floors that meet the demands

in communities. International advocacy is a crucial factor in increasing the impact of our approach. We ensure that local evidence and information from the communities and partners we work with is heard and used by influential (inter)national stakeholders. This contributes to the development of an enabling environment with good policies in place, and sufficient budget allocation for WASH and SRHR both internationally and in the countries where we work.

What is the outcome? Creating an enabling environment leads to more responsible and accountable stakeholders - stakeholders who know it is their responsibility to deliver quality health services in line with the needs of the community and to be transparent about health budgets, WASH policies and management. At the same time, strengthening the capacity of relevant stakeholders leads to platforms on which transparent dialogue and collaboration between local stakeholders and the community can take place. For example, these platforms enable communities to engage in discussion with local governments concerning matters such as budget allocation for WASH facilities, or the presence of skilled health providers in health clinics. In the long run, an enabling environment encourages and enables healthy behaviour at the community level, and increases high quality and sustainable health services and facilities.

Pillar 3: Utilisation of sustainable WASH & SRHR services How does it work? Access to qualitative and affordable WASH and SRHR services is needed in order to improve basic health. These services should meet community needs and be set up according to the five sustainability principles of FIETS: financial, institutional, environmental, technical and social sustainability. To this end, we train WASH and SRHR service providers, amongst others, in organisational and financial management. For example, we train WASH committees in simple bookkeeping, and in setting up a financially sound water and sanitation maintenance system for their communities based on actual water consumption, availability and costs. More specifically, we ensure that they attain capacity with regard to health information systems and setting up maintenance services in close collaboration with other stakeholders.

What is the outcome? The main consequence of increased capacity of WASH and SRHR service providers is that the sustainability, quality, affordability and availability of these services

Strategy

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improves. This in turn causes a significant growth in the effective and sustainable use of WASH and SHRH services.

Conclusion This threefold integrated approach, with Simavi’s expertise and network as input, leads to structural improvement of basic health for marginalised communities in Africa and Asia. Simavi’s added value lies in: our network and partnerships; our expertise on Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR); our expertise on Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH); our FIETS sustainability principles, our community-based approach and our ability to lead complex programmes and consortia.

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BASIC HEALTH FOR ALL

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INPU TS IM AV I

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Project & progra mme ma nag em en EMPO t

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Simavi works according to the five aforementioned sustainability principles: Financial, Institutional, Environmental, Technological and Social (FIETS) sustainability. Any programme will only lead to structural improvement of basic health and to sustainable development if all five principles have been integrated. Financial sustainability means establishing local payment systems, working based on business models, involving the local business community and mobilising government budget locally. This is how we prevent structural dependency on donated money. Institutional sustainability in the WASH sector means that WASH systems, institutions, policies and procedures at the local and national level are functional and meet the demand of users of WASH services. All relevant parties are aware of their own roles, tasks and responsibilities. We set up alliances with these parties and we work on capacity building, policy influencing and monitoring.

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Simavi’s Theory of Change.

1.5 Objectives for 2013 Simavi’s objectives for 2013 were stated in our Strategic Plan 2011–2013. The principal aim is to improve public health in the nine countries in which Simavi is active. We formulated four focus areas for 2013, each with their own objectives: • Improvement of basic health • Financing and partnership development • Communication and brand • Organisational structure and culture It should be noted that Simavi’s vision, mission and ambition to improve the basic health of 10 million people by 2020 (see paragraph 1.2) were defined in 2013 and are part of our strategic plan for 2014–2020.

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FIETS sustainability

Strategy

Environmental sustainability implies placing WASH interventions in the wider context of the natural environment. This includes implementing an approach of integrated and sustainable management of (waste) water flows and resources. It takes into account that WASH interventions connect to and affect the natural environment and hence impact people’s livelihood. Technological sustainability means that the technologies we use in our work suit local needs and are adapted to the local situation. Quality, affordability and availability form a fundamental part of the decision-making process. Social sustainability means that our work responds to local demands and needs and is accessible to the poor, to women and to vulnerable groups. We have a strong focus on equal rights, regardless of gender, social position, sexual preference, religion or culture.


Project case: Theory of Change at work in Bangladesh Dhaka, with its 12 million inhabitants, is one of the fastest growing cities in the world, absorbing an estimated 300,000 to 400,000 migrants annually. About one third of the total population of Dhaka city is poor and lives in slum and squatter areas. The water supply, sanitation, wastewater and solid waste disposal practices of these Low Income Communities (LIC) are very poor and unhygienic. Drinking water conditions are extremely bad. Large parts of the population have unauthorised connections, in which quality of water is not secure and fees are high. Some people rely on communal, poorly maintained latrines, while most of them use open pit toilets with no connection to sewerage or a septic tank. In addition, a solid or liquid waste management system is lacking, drainage facilities are absent and the nearby factories discharge industrial waste water directly into the communities. The LIC area is often flooded due to poor drainage. Furthermore, hygiene knowledge and practice are all weak. This leads to diseases, infections, preventable deaths and perpetuating inequality.

Public Private Partnership The Water Operators Partnership is a five-year project in which Vitens Evides International (VEI) and Simavi support the Dhaka Water and Sewage Authority (DWASA) to manage its water services in a more efficient way. Key focus areas within this Public-Private Partnership are capacity building of DWASA staff, decreasing water from unauthorised connections and increasing access of Low Income Communities to DWASA’s water and sewerage system. Target is to contribute to the sustainable development of a working WASH system that structurally improves the basic health of 60,000 people. This project is a pilot project that will serve as a supporting case for a LIC strategy for DWASA and will allow for a legal framework in which LIC can be further developed and the livelihood of many people improved.

Sustainable access to WASH Service provision in the slum areas may not be sustainable, as slum dwellers often lack tenancy rights. There is always a risk that the use of the area is denied by the private landlords. Consequently, DWASA and other (public) service providers are hesitant to invest in the slum areas. To enhance sustainable access to the services, creating an enabling environment is crucial. Agreements with the private landlords and the public authorities

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about roles, responsibilities, service delivery and payment need to be made. Simavi, our local partner DSK, DWASA and VEI work together on developing a model that ensures sustainable access to public drinking water and sanitation.

Programme design and activities Community empowerment Simavi and her local partners initiated various hygiene promotion activities to improve hygiene and sanitation practices and to create attitudinal change towards paying for WASH services. Six different hygiene modules were developed. There were separate sessions for women, children and adolescents as well as for community leaders. In this way, ownership and collaboration of the community throughout the project was ensured. Community management committees have been established, which ensure that services (drinking water, sanitation and solid waste collection) are paid by its users, and are subsequently operated and maintained. Enabling environment To support the creation of a sustainable enabling environment, a multi-stakeholder process was undertaken to ensure that different key stakeholders agreed on their roles and responsibilities in the programme. DWASA staff were trained to maintain the infrastructure and sustain the services provision, and communities were empowered to facilitate the appropriate community lobby for WASH services. This results in better cooperation between the different stakeholders and a better understanding of each other’s positions and roles. Involving all stakeholders is a prerequisite to develop a legally embedded and sustainable approach that can be applied elsewhere. Utilisation of services In the first place WASH services and facilities have been created by constructing and installing facilities for water supply, sanitation, drainage and solid waste collection. The capacity of the private sector has been increased to offer affordable, appropriate and quality WASH services in an effective and efficient manner. This was supported by the development of community-managed finance structures e.g. fee systems, household contributions or revolving funds.

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Strategy

Results In 2013, Simavi’s integrated WASH approach created access to safe and affordable WASH services for more than 11,000 people. The hygiene situation of these same people has significantly improved by the establishment of a solid waste collection system and the installation of a proper drainage system. Various community groups were made aware of the importance of sanitation and hygiene, and efforts in building sustainable cooperation between the local community management committees and DWASA have already started paying off.

Shahanaj (22) from Dhaka Shahanaj (22 years old) is a resident of the Jheelpar Ta block – a low income community (e.g. slum area) in the north-west of Dhaka with almost 12,000 people living in poor housing conditions. Shahanaj is a housewife and has two daughters. Her husband Zakir Hussain is a street vendor and has irregular income. All of a sudden, her youngest daughter, Tanzila (7 months) started vomiting and had severe diarrhoea. Based on consultation with neighbours she started using egg paste along with milk and put the paste on her baby’s head. After three days, Tanzila became very weak. Shahanaj felt anxious and did not know what to do. At that time, Smrity Kona, community facilitator of the programme visited her house as part of a doorto-door awareness raising campaign on hygiene and good practices such as hand washing at critical times of the day, drinking water treatment, safe sanitation etc. During her visit she heard about Tanzila’s situation and started an in-depth query on her well-being. After consultation and lengthy discussion she managed to convince Shahanaj that the situation with her daughter pointed in the direction of infectious diarrhoea and that she needed consultation and treatment by a medical doctor. Shahanaj visited a nearby Health Clinic with her baby for a consultation. The doctor prescribed medication and this saved her child who was severely dehydrated and weak. Back home Shahanaj started to apply hygienic practices, e.g. boiling the water before drinking and also shared her experience with her neighbours and encouraged them to use safe water.


Strategy

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foto: xxxxxxxxxx

2. Simavi programmes


2. Simavi programmes

In 2013, our number one ambition was to reach 1.5 million people directly with hygiene and health education, prompting positive changes in behaviour, and to create access to WASH and SRHR services for 1 million people in marginalised communities in Africa and Asia. Simavi implemented a total of 121 projects in Bangladesh, Nepal, Indonesia, India, Tanzania, Ghana, Malawi, Uganda and Kenya. In these same countries, we operated in strong alliances and partnerships to address basic health.

Results

Access to services SRHR access: 370,000 WASH access: 685,000 Total: 1,055,000

Health education SRHR education: 609,000 WASH education:1,498,000 Total: 2,107,000

Awareness through media SRHR reached through media: 9,600,000 WASH reached through media: 21,300,000 Total: 30,900,000

selection of the major results and outcomes achieved with our SRHR and WASH programmes is presented in paragraphs 2.1 and 2.2.

62+38+F 68+32+F

education

access

SRHR

About 609,000 people have received education about diverse health topics, such as sexuality education, family planning, sexual transmittable diseases, safe pregnancies and deliveries. Another 370,000 have gained access to health services.

education

access

WASH

Approximately 1.5 million people have received education about water, sanitation and hygiene issues through awareness raising activities in communities, such as community dialogues and door-to窶電oor campaigns. Another 685,000 have gained access to safe drinking water facilities or toilets.

Simavi provided improved access to WASH and SRHR services for a total of about one million people in 2013. Besides, more than 2 million people were reached by education activities in communities, while almost 30 million people where reached by awareness-raising media campaigns.

Lessons learned

Overall the targets on creating access have been reached and the targets on education have been exceeded by 33 per cent. This is a result of the programmes of the Dutch WASH alliance (see paragraph 2.2.3) that are now in full swing and are performing better than expected. Besides, Simavi reached more people with education and awareness raising thanks to good performance of several partners and use of new media technologies. A

Based on our experience with social accountability tools (see the cases on Empowering Health Committees in India on page 17 and Community Scoring Cards in Ghana on page 19) such as community dialogue, scoring cards and maternal mortality surveys, we concluded that our work on social accountability is of the utmost importance in order to sustainably reach our goals. We will therefore continue to expand our activities in the field of social accountability.

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Simavi programmes


2.1 SRHR activities and results Sexual and Reproductive Health is a contributor to overall health throughout the life cycle of both men and women. We know that investing in Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, including access to health services, contraception and sexuality education is indispensable to poverty reduction and sustainable development. However –despite major improvements over the past decades- every year 290,000 women die as a result of pregnancy or childbirth; the unmet need for contraception remains as high as 36 per cent in subSaharan Africa; and every day 20,000 girls below the age of 18 give birth in developing countries. In some parts of the world, two out of three girls reported having no idea of what was happening to them when they began menstruating. These problems concentrate in the poorest countries, regions and rural areas in the world, leading to major inequalities.

Activities Simavi promotes, protects and improves SRHR for all people, particularly for (young) women, their families and marginalized groups. Crucial elements of SRHR are ensuring that planned pregnancies proceed and end successfully, reducing maternal mortality and ensuring that children are born in safe and hygienic circumstances. In order to achieve this, Simavi supports local partners in raising awareness on sexuality, child marriage, teenage pregnancies, family planning (contraception and if necessary abortion and post-abortion care), safe pregnancies, sexually transmitted infections (STIs),) and other such issues. In addition, we ensure that local health workers and volunteers dispose of sufficient knowledge and information to fulfil their role and to refer people to the right care, as they are an important link between the community and the official healthcare system (clinic or hospital). At the same time, Simavi makes sure that people are aware about their sexual and reproductive rights, and know what services they are entitled to. By ensuring that people are well organised, we enable local communities to improve their own health status and hold both the SRHR service providers and (local) governmental authorities accountable for their responsibilities. Through this approach, Simavi increases knowledge and awareness on SRHR, improves access to adequate quality services and creates a supportive and enabling environment for SRHR. In 2013 Simavi invested in SRHR through three large programmes: 1. The Simavi Community Health programme 2. The Unite for Body Rights programme (UFBR)

3. The Access, Skills and Knowledge programme (ASK) The following sections provide a selection of the major results Simavi achieved in these SRHR programmes, along with a brief note on each of them. The full details can be found in annex 1.

2.1.1 Results Simavi Community Health programme Programme result indicators

Results (number of people reached directly)

Access to SRHR

Number of people that have better access to SRHR services in 2013 than in 2012

79,600

Education on SRHR

Number of people that received information about SRHR through direct information sharing in community meetings and door-to-door campaigns

164,000

Awareness through media

Number of people that received information on SRHR through media (TV, Radio, newspaper, mobile phone, internet)

149,700

In 2013, Simavi implemented sixteen community health projects. These projects were financed with funds from private donors, corporate sponsors and foundations in the Netherlands. The above overview shows the combined results of these SRHR projects. As a result of these projects, almost 80,000 people gained access to better primary health care. About 314,000 people were reached directly by education and awareness raising activities about primary healthcare and sexual and reproductive health care. We also trained a great number of health-care workers (1,000), government employees (400) and private sector service providers (900) on SRHR and health service delivery. In addition, large groups of our partner’s staff (900 people) and community groups (2,300 people) were trained on topics such as health care and management.

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Additional programme specific achievements Capacity Strengthening stakeholders* Number of NGO staff members trained Number of Community groups trained

900 2,300

Number of Government Health Service Providers trained

400

Number of Private Sector Service Providers trained

900

Number of health workers trained

planned. In Malawi a large number of (peer) educators have been trained in SRHR, and targets regarding community awareness raising activities were exceeded. This is thanks to successful use of (new) media tools (sms-services, a telephone hotline and Facebook) and a well functioning partner organisation that is training very motivated peer educators who organise successful youth clubs. Also local leaders, community members and teachers are spreading more and more information on SRHR, whilst these topics were still considered sensitive before. Read more about the UFBR programme in the project case at the next page.

1,000

* WASH and SRHR are combined in these capacity building

Programme result indicators

Results Simavi

Access to SRHR

Number of young people and adults that services were provided to young people under the age of 25 years

261,900

Education on SRHR

Number of community members and community leaders participating in SRHR awareness raising activities at community level

367,300

Awareness through media

Number of people reached by SRHR awareness raising activities through (new) media

8,400,000

activities

2.1.2 Results Simavi within the UFBR programme In 2011, the SRHR Alliance launched the five-year programme Unite for Body Rights (UFBR). Members of this alliance are: Simavi, Rutgers WPF, AMREF Flying Doctors, Choice, and Dance4life. The SRHR Alliance focuses on reducing maternal mortality and including vulnerable groups in SRHR, particularly women and young people, but also men. In the UFBR programme, the partner organisations of the alliance are cooperating to achieve three of the eight millennium goals: achieving gender equality, reducing maternal mortality & increasing access to contraception, and fighting HIV/ AIDS. The Simavi programme runs in: India, Bangladesh, Kenya, Malawi and Tanzania. In 2013, large groups of stakeholders have gained access to solid knowledge in SRHR subjects. There was good participation of community leaders and individuals in awareness-raising meetings, and reaching people by SRHR awareness raising activities through (new) media has been very successful. The number of health workers trained in SRHR matters was higher than originally planned. This was particularly the case in India, where one of our partners was requested to participate in a large-scale campaign to train health workers by the government. In Bangladesh the programme is running somewhat behind; building a strong alliance with the different international alliance partners and training the staff of local partners took more time than anticipated. In Malawi, Tanzania and India, the programmes showed great progress and more activities were done than

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Additional programme specific achievements Number of educators trained to deliver SRHR education Number of service providers trained to deliver SRH services Number of partners with an implemented advocacy strategy and advocacy working plan on SRHR Number of advocacy meetings conducted at a local, regional, or national level

2,900

22,700

10

300


Project case: Empowering Health Committees in India

maternal mortality, a higher uptake of family planning methods (contraception) and other SRHR issues.

Simavi works together with our local partner Voluntary Health Association of India-Aparajita (VHAI) in Orissa State in India to promote access to public Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) services. We inform people about their right to have access to services in their villages and when to use services, specifically during pregnancy and delivery. At the same time, we cooperate with service providers to ensure outreach activities in the villages.

To this end, Simavi has activated Village and Health Sanitation Committees (VHSC) in 160 villages with representation of villagers, local governments, health providers and mother support groups. They have been trained to use a Community Based Monitoring tool to analyse the state of SRH services in the village. Village health workers and groups of local women come together on a monthly basis to rate the availability of SRH services. They discuss whether they meet community needs and how these services should be improved. For instance, score cards measure whether all the villages were visited by the outreach team on a regular basis, the number of immunization campaigns organized in a month, the number of mothers and children who received supplementary nutrition, how many deliveries took place in the health facility, as well as the availability of contraceptives. By bringing together health workers and decision makers, a social accountability mechanism was put in place; a platform was created where people could voice their concerns and the resulting interactions led to positive responses from the government and health workers. This is a perfect example of combining community empowerment activities with working on an enabling environment for SRHR (see Simavi Theory of Change, paragraph 1.4).

Activating Health Committees

Results 2013

During 2013, much attention was paid to closing the gap between SRHR services and communities. Making people aware of their rights, mobilizing them and letting them demand improvements in the delivery of SRH services are essential for reducing

As a result of the systematic approach of village health committees and mother support groups, the provision of standard SRH packages to the villages has significantly improved. At the start of the programme in 2011, 16 local health facilities had

In India, local governments are responsible for organising and providing standard SRH packages to communities. Such SRH packages include important services such as health education, antenatal care for pregnant women and information about family planning. However in reality, these services are often not provided; services do not match needs in communities, or their quality is low. As a consequence, India has the highest maternal mortality in the world in absolute terms, particularly in remote and rural areas. Few women receive appropriate check-up’s and many babies are delivered at home. Although National and State level policies are comprehensive and target these wellknown SRH-problems, implementation at local level lags behind.

An integrated approach

photo: Sara Ahrari

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an average score of 1.8 out of 10, which increased to 5.6 in 2013. The biggest achievement of the programme this year, however, concerns the creation of regular outreach services, which ensure that more people use modern contraceptives and antenatal care, and more Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI’s) are treated. Moreover, Community Based Monitoring made it possible to urge the government to extend the range of provided services within the SRH packages. Whilst it initially only contained immunisation services, today the package includes ante-natal care, family planning counselling, distribution of contraceptives and reproductive health education sessions for youth. This programme is managed and implemented by Simavi and our local partner Voluntary Health

Association of India-Aparajita (VHAI) as part of the bigger Unite for Body Rights programme of the SRHR Alliance.

Minati Mishra, Project Volunteer, VHAI: “During the initial period of the project, when I came to know that the topics like safe sex, sex and sexuality, sexuality transmitted disease and sexual rights would be covered in the project, I was shocked. I thought that I could never share these aspects at community level. The community would never allow discussing these aspects with adolescent girls, adolescent boys, and women. But after attending the training programmes, I gradually started feeling comfortable to discuss these issues. Now I am quite confident. I am facilitating SRHR education sessions not only to girls and women but also to adolescent boys”

2.1.3 Results Simavi within the ASK programme The ASK programme, which was launched in 2013, together with partners RutgersWPF, IPPF, Dance4Life, AMREF, Flying Doctors, Choice and Stop Aids Now (the Youth Empowerment Alliance), focuses on improving Access, Skills and Knowledge (ASK) of disadvantaged young people between 10 and 24 years old. The objectives of the programme are to better inform the youth about sexuality and sexual transmitted diseases, and to improve SRHR services for this target group. Simavi implements this programme in Kenya, Ghana, Indonesia and Uganda.

The first year of the ASK programme showed results that vary highly from country to country. Because of delayed contract signing in Indonesia and Uganda, the partners in those countries were less able to meet their targets. Also in Kenya programme implementation is lagging behind, because the focus has been on supporting an innovative community-based research that aimed at aligning local health services with the needs and expectations of the youth. Setting up the innovative components took more time than expected. In Ghana, the programme managed to have a quick start and has already reached more young people with information and services, than planned. Read more about the ASK programme in the project case at the next page.

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Programme result indicators

Results Simavi

Number of young people and adults that services were provided to

16,800

Number of clients that receive antiretroviral (ARV) drugs

80

Number of women (under 25) receiving ante natal care (at least four visits) in targeted health services

4,200

Number of birth attended by skilled health personal in the targeted health clinics

3,600

Number of SRH services, through health facilities and outreach provided to young people under 25 years.

3,900

Education on SRHR

Number of young people that have received information on SRH and SRH services

68,300

Awareness through media

Number of people reached by SRHR awareness raising activities through (new) media

8,400,000

Access to SRHR


Additional programme specific achievements Results Simavi Number of health clinics with improved integrated sexual and reproductive health services, achieved by implementing the integrated package of essential services for young people.

120

Number of educators capacitated through e-learning/e-support

1,000

Project case: Community Scoring Cards - Ghana

photo: Jeppe van Pruissen

The north of Ghana has a high maternal mortality rate. Main causes of this are poverty, unsafe abortion, postpartum haemorrhage and the unavailability of referral services. Teenage pregnancies play an important role as well. Despite the low level of awareness around sexual and reproductive health and the critical situation of maternal deaths in the region, little is done by local governments to improve the quality of SRH services, even though clear policy guidelines to make these improvements exist. For instance, according to existing regulations, delivery in the health facility should be absolutely free, however in reality women pay high fees. Therefore, continuous dialogue with and feedback to communities forms a critical factor in bringing about improvements and ensuring governments fulfil their responsibilities.

Community Scoring Cards are used to enable communities to assess the quality of health services and identify areas for improvement. Scores are monitored with key indicators that have been generated by communities themselves. In the north of Ghana, the committees monitor for instance the 24 hour availability of general health services; availability of drugs and contraceptives; (continuous) presence of health staff including midwives; and quality and frequency of outreach services. CHCs engage with local health authorities and service providers to discuss the results of the scoring cards. In these meetings, local authorities have the opportunity to respond, and joint priorities for action are identified. The local government

Community Scoring Cards In the north of Ghana, Simavi works together with partner organisation Northern Presbyterian Health Services (NPHS) to improve access to and quality of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services. Community Health Committees (CHCs) are set up to hold local authorities and services providers accountable. To channel and strengthen the voice of communities, it is important to have a formal structure in place that link the people to the local government and service providers. CHCs fulfil an advisory, advocacy and facilitating role, and ensure active participation of the community in decisions concerning health in the area.

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is held accountable when for instance they have been reluctant to pay for a midwife in the clinic, or when additional facilities are required in a remote area. This ensures budgets are allocated and the necessary improvements are made in SRH services in accordance with existing national health policies and laws.

As a result of the improved communication between communities, health providers and local governments, SRH service delivery has improved. The Community Scoring Cards have been an important tool as they enable communities to formalize their concerns, voice their needs and hold their government accountable. Results include:

Finally, Simavi and our partner NPHS continuously urge the Ghanaian government to make sure delivery in the health facility is absolutely free. Nurses often demand payment from women for clean needles, cotton and other necessary materials, creating a barrier for women to have a safe delivery at the health facility. Through the CHCs and Community Scoring Cards, such cases of payments can be identified. The government is called to its responsibility to ensure free and safe deliveries.

• Free ambulance services are available for pregnant women in labour;

This programme is managed and implemented by Simavi and our local partner

Results 2013

2.1.4 Results SRHR Advocacy Only when people and organisations at community, regional, national and international levels are aware of their roles and responsibilities and work together, can structural improvement in basic health be achieved. Therefore Simavi advocates SRHR on all levels. Simavi´s advocacy strategy at community level has a specific focus on social accountability. A good example of social accountability is provided by the case Community Scoring Cards in Ghana on page 19.

Advocacy in the Netherlands and internationally In 1994 at the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in Cairo, 179 countries took up a rights-based agenda for population issues. In a twenty-year agenda, these countries committed to develop new policies, laws and budgets to improve Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights. The Netherlands play a major role in taking the ICPD agenda forward and investing in SRHR in developing countries. SRHR is one of the four priority areas within Dutch development cooperation. Simavi urged the Dutch government to maintain that leading position and allocate adequate budgets to SRHR. Moreover, Simavi collaborated with partner organisations to strengthen the recognition of SRHR at the United Nations, to continue a strong ICPD agenda, and to ensure that SRHR will become part of the new

20

• More nurses are present in the health facility and provide 24 hour services; • Waiting times in health facilities have been reduced; • Health facility structures have been renovated.

Simavi programmes

development framework after 2015.

Highlights in 2013: • While minister Ploumen was writing her new policy for aid, trade and development in the spring of 2013, Simavi and the SRHR Alliance advocated the continuation of the SRHR policy and funding. When the policy titled ‘A World to Gain’ came out, the SRHR Alliance was satisfied with the strong position reserved for SRHR in the minister’s plans. Simavi was also delighted that she refrained from cutting the SRHR budget. Furthermore, the CEO’s of the SRHR Alliance met with the minister to voice their concerns about the drastic cuts in funding for civil society after 2015. • Simavi initiated and co-organised a Global Health conference at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs with representatives from the private sector, NGO’s, knowledge institutes, Ministry of Economic Affairs and Ministry of Health. The goal was to bring multiple players together to identify success factors, dilemmas and challenges in working on health initiatives in low and middle-income countries. It showed that the Netherlands has much to offer, and has an interest in improving health beyond its boundaries. • In 2013, the Netherlands developed its position and priorities in the international negotiations concerning the post-MDG agenda and the future of the ICPD. Simavi and the SRHR Alliance urged the Dutch government to prioritize SRHR and to take a clear


stance within the European Union and at the UN. There are ample examples in which the Dutch government has done so. • Simavi launched an initiative to involve its partners more closely with international advocacy towards the ICPD. In preparation for the twentieth anniversary of the ICPD, at a landmark conference in New York in April 2014, Simavi organised a workshop with partners from Ghana, Malawi, Uganda, Kenya and India to strengthen their capacity and jointly advocate for a progressive SRHR agenda at this conference. Partners participated in preparatory regional conferences and urged their governments to hold progressive views on SRHR.

2.2 WASH activities and results Access to drinking water and sanitation is a human right and a basic condition for a healthy life, but is distributed unequally between areas, no matter whether measurements compare urban versus rural areas, slums and formal settlements, men and women or compare disadvantaged groups and the general population. As of today, nearly 800 million people still have no access to sources of drinking water protected from outside contamination, 2.5 billion people lack access to improved sanitation and over a billion people still practice open defecation. Lack of access to drinking water, sanitation and hygiene leads to preventable diseases (such as diarrhoea, typhus and cholera), deaths (in Africa alone 115 people die every hour due to poor sanitation, poor hygienic conditions and contaminated drinking water) and economic losses (which can amount to 1.5 per cent of the gross domestic product of a country). In comparison, more people die of diarrhoea every day than of HIV/Aids, even though diseases such as diarrhoea, typhus and cholera can be easily prevented when adequate WASH services are in place.

Activities Simavi brings people in low and middle–income communities together and enables them to demand quality services for safe drinking water, sanitation, and good hygiene. We help people to improve their water and sanitation facilities, promote hygiene in their communities and act accordingly. As a result, communities are committed to stimulating healthy behaviour and to maintaining services. Simavi has a particular focus on sustainable operation, management and maintenance of WASH services. We ensure WASH services are not only established but also affordable and maintained and thereby actively utilised in the long term. Realisation of the right to water and sanitation also

requires a concerted effort of governments, civil society organisations, the private sector and communities. Each of these plays a role and has responsibilities to perform. In the long term, WASH sectors and markets will be strengthened, will become more effective and will achieve more impact if they are governed better, if forces are joined, if all stakeholders bring in their unique strength and expertise, and if learning and adaptation takes place. Therefore Simavi supports its partner organisations to take co-responsibility for multi-stakeholder processes, to participate in networks and advocate governments. As a result, stakeholders act upon their roles and collaboration between them is effective and transparent. Increasing access to safe drinking water and sanitation, and informing people about proper hygiene, reduces the incidence of a great many illnesses. Children go to school more often, families spend less on medication, and women have more time for the family, the family income, housekeeping and food production. In 2013 Simavi invested in WASH through three large programmes: 1. The Simavi WASH programme 2. The Sanitation, Hygiene and Water programme (SHAW) in Indonesia 3. The Dutch WASH alliance programme The following sections provide a selection of the major results achieved with our WASH programmes, along with a brief note on each. Full details can be found in annex 1.

2.2.1 Results Simavi WASH programme Programme result indicators

Results

Number of people that obtained access to safe drinking water

137,200

Number of people that obtained access to improved sanitation facilities

123,600

Education on SRHR

Number of people reached through direct education in the community

311,200

Awareness through media

Number of people that received information on WASH subjects

1,625,000

Access to SRHR

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Additional programme specific achievements Capacity Strengthening stakeholders* Number of NGO staff members trained Number of Community groups trained

900 2,300

Number of Private Sector Service Providers trained Number of health workers trained

900

working together to increase both awareness and access to sanitation and other hygiene facilities. Simavi coordinates the SHAW Programme and supports the Indonesian government in its objective to scale up Community Based Total Sanitation (STBM) throughout Indonesia. The SHAW programme was the first to implement STBM at scale. Read more about the SHAW programme in the project case at the next page.

1,000

* WASH and SRHR are combined in these activities.

Simavi works on improving the access and use of WASH services in all 9 countries through 45 different projects. The overview above shows that with these WASH projects, 137,000 people gained sustainable access to safe drinking water and 124,000 people gained access to improved sanitation. In addition, Simavi reached over 1.6 million people with information on improved use, maintenance and operation of WASH services and with information that stimulates people to improve their hygiene behaviour to ensure increased health impact of WASH interventions. Besides, large groups of government employees, employees of our partners and community groups were intensively trained on several different aspects related to water supply, sanitation and hygiene improvement issues (including WASH management) to strengthen the sustainability of the WASH interventions. Within the WASH projects we are stimulating our partners to develop and strengthen their partnerships with other relevant stakeholders such as local government and private WASH entrepreneurs to ensure the actors within the local WASH sector are operative and complementing each other.

2.2.2 Results SHAW Programme Since 2010, The Indonesian Sanitation, Hygiene and Water (SHAW) Programme has realised sustainable improvement of public health in rural communities in eastern Indonesia. The programme focuses on creating a stimulating environment in which people are motivated and enabled to change their behaviour with regard to hygiene and to maintain that new behaviour. This includes their willingness to invest in and pay for sanitation. In order to achieve this, governments, social organisations, entrepreneurs and donors are

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Access to WASH

Education on WASH

Programme result indicators

Results

Number of people with access to water facilities

8,900

Number of people reached with education activities in de community

849,900

Additional programme specific achievements Number of toilets built by the communities within the SHAW programme

57,000

In the third year of the programme, all targets set for this year were exceeded. With one more year to go to complete this programme, Community Based Total Sanitation (STBM) was introduced in 94 per cent of all selected villages. Half of these villages have now reached STBM verification. This indicates that the end goals of the programme can be expected to be met. This has been achieved in spite of initial scepticism from governments at the national level about Simavi’s nonsubsidised behavioural change approach based on the principle that people pay for their own services. In 2014, emphasis will be placed on sustainability and advocacy work.


Project case: Sanitation and Hygiene at scale in Indonesia The Sanitation, Hygiene and Water Programme (SHAW) in Indonesia improves people’s sanitation and hygiene behaviour, in line with the so called Community Based Total Sanitation (STBM) strategy of the Government of Indonesia. STBM targets five sanitation and hygiene aspects to obtain a clean and healthy living environment: 1. Stop open defecation, 2. Hand washing with soap, 3. Household water treatment & safe storage of drinking water and food, 4. Household solid waste management and 5. Household liquid waste management. The original aim of the SHAW Programme was to motivate 750,000 people in rural Eastern Indonesia to adopt and sustain STBM behaviour, as well as creating an enabling environment ranging from village to national level. In this way, the behaviour change would be supported in order to be lasting. Another aim was to strengthen the capacities of the participating Indonesian NGOs. Over the years, however, better population data increased the aim to 1.3 million people in more than one thousand villages in 2013.

and work towards a cleaner and healthier living environment. Based on evidence, lessons learned and achievements from the field, also during 2013, the SHAW STBM approach was developed further. This is illustrated by the fact that over the years, it has become clear that a change in sanitation and hygiene behaviour is not guaranteed when the necessary facilities, such as toilets, hand washing facilities or garbage bins, are installed. Achieving lasting change in behaviour also requires a long-term follow-up system that supports deep internalisation of hygienic behaviour by the individual, the family and the community. Interesting to see is that some communities are so proud of what they have achieved, that they spread their message to neighbouring communities as well as to local governments. As a result, in 2013 some key individuals from these communities were invited to visit other communities and elaborate on their approach, best practices and challenges.

Innovative School approach Enriched with many experiences of the last three years, early in 2013 the STBM in School approach was developed. In the first step of this approach, district staff of the Education and Health Departments is trained on how to realise STBM in school. Subsequently, the staff trains the sub-district Health and Education services as well as school teachers and the Parent Committees. In turn, the teachers train their students in STBM and make sure the STBM activities at school are linked to the community to increase the effect of this schoolbased approach.

Enabling environment

A pioneering role The SHAW programme was the first to implement STBM at scale. This completely new approach was developed in 2010, with as its main aim to empower communities to take up their own responsibility

Effective and lasting change in sanitation and hygiene behaviour cannot be imposed, but has to come from the individual person. Yet, continuous support from their environment is needed to enable a lasting change of behaviour. Much attention was being paid to creating this enabling environment in 2013. The frequency of support visits increased and a clear division of roles and responsibilities between the different stakeholders was realised, including the responsibility of making WASH budgets available. This year, the majority of involved villages have allocated budget for WASH data collection. Also, sub-district health services allocated budget for field visits for STBM promotion and for holding meetings with village leaders on the subject. At the same time, the private sector has been actively involved in the

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programme by promoting hardware such as selfproduced squatting slabs (latrine floors) and the construction of facilities. Inspired by the results of the SHAW programme, some government health services as well as NGOs already started STBM implementation using the SHAW approach in 2013.

Monitoring project Finally, 2013 saw the conclusion of the SHAW monitoring project, in which output (quality of facilities) and outcome (behaviour) were measured. A participative monitoring system has been installed. Depending on the situation, every three or six months the village volunteers go from door to door and observe the situation. The data are then aggregated and discussed per neighbourhood for eventual follow-up. Similar steps are consecutively taken at village, sub-district and district level. This way, the collected information is understood and used in the village and region, and is not only stored in an anonymous database for statistical purposes. In December 2013, a total of 1,360,000 people in 300,000 houses in 985 villages (92 per cent coverage) were monitored. The outcome was promising: at least 875,000 people already respect all five aspects of the STBM approach, with one year to go for the SHAW Programme.

2.2.3 Results Simavi within the Dutch WASH Alliance Programme The Dutch WASH Alliance is a consortium of six Dutch NGOs (Simavi, AMREF Flying Doctors, Akvo, ICCO, RAIN Foundation, and WASTE) led by Simavi. We joined forces in running a programme focussed on sustainable improvement of access to and use of water, sanitation and hygiene services. The programme runs in eight countries in Africa and Asia.

Access to WASH

Education on WASH

Awareness through media

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Programme result indicators

Results Simavi

Number of people that use improved sanitation facilities

218,000

Number of people that use improved drinking water sources

197,000

Number of people that have been reached with awareness campaigns on hygiene and sanitation in the community

337,000

Number of people that 19,600,000 have been reached through the media on hygiene and sanitation


Additional programme specific achievements Number of people (small entrepreneurs or service providers) trained and/or supported on WASH service delivery

1,000

With our WASH Alliance programme, Simavi reached near 20 million people by information campaigns in the media which will improve their behaviour towards the use of WASH services. Marginalised people have come to realise that their WASH situation requires improvements, drawing the attention of policy makers so that they take serious action. Additionally, more than 300,000 people received more intense awareness sessions on hygiene and sanitation. The access and use of toilets was improved for about 218,000 people and the access and use of drink water supply for almost 197,000 people. By and large, the results were in line with the goals set. To sustain the reached results, specific attention is paid throughout the WASH programme to strengthening the institutional structures needed to operate and manage the services and on involving parties in the private sector and the relevant governmental agencies. In the coming year these activities will be intensified.

2.2.4 Results WASH Advocacy Only when people and organisations at community, regional, national and international levels are aware of their roles and responsibilities and work together, can structural improvement in basic health be realised. Therefore Simavi advocates WASH on all levels. Simavi´s advocacy strategy at community level has a specific focus on social accountability (see the project case Empowering Health Committees in India on page 17). The right of access to drinking water and sanitation has received a lot of attention from the international community over the past 20 years: from the Earth Summit in 1992 to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in 2000, the Rio+20 conference in 2012 and the current post-2015 process. However, much more attention is still needed: over 40 per cent of all people without access to improved drinking water live in subSaharan Africa, and 83 per cent of the World population without access to an improved drinking-water source live in rural areas. Sanitation is the MDG lagging behind the most, and with a view to the current development of countries and populations, the potential demand for water is projected to increase by 55 per cent by 2050. Startlingly, (Western) donors are continuously cutting

their budgets for drinking water, sanitation and hygiene programmes, despite the clear need for (increased) attention for WASH. In 2013, Simavi focussed on achieving increased and transparent financing of the WASH sector by both public and private sector on national and international level. On a national level, Simavi has chaired the lobby and advocacy working group of the Netherlands Water Partnership and the Dutch WASH Alliance. On the international level, we have financed and actively participated in the End Water Poverty Network, a network of 260 NGOs advocating universal access to WASH. Additionally, we have been the Civil Society Organisation (CSO) focal point for the Netherlands within the Sanitation and Water for All partnership, a global partnership of over 90 partners from different fields. A selection of activities realised: • We worked at European Union level to create the right environment for blending public and private funding for WASH. Here we talked with representatives from the EU on possibilities to continue funding WASH programmes. Work on this level will further continue in 2014. • During an economic trading mission to Indonesia, joined by Prime Minister Rutte and Minister Ploumen, as well as a large delegation from the private sector, we advocated a more central position for NGOs in general and specifically for the WASH component of the Jakarta NCICD project at policymaking decision level. • We continued providing relevant information to policymakers and Members of Parliament for debates on general policy (such as ‘What the world deserves’ - Wat de wereld verdient) as well as water specific (ministerial) policy such as Sustainable Water Fund (Fonds Duurzaam Water) and the One Water Vision architecture. • We have been the focal point for the Dutch civil society organisations (CSO) and represented our sector during a 3 day Sanitation and Water for All (SWA) meeting in Geneva, a runner-up towards the High Level Meeting in 2014, including a special CSO focal point meeting following this SWA meeting to further discuss outcomes relevant for CSO focal points. • We attended the Multi-Stakeholder Dialogue on Water prior to World Water Day, hosted by the Dutch government. The Multi-stakeholder dialogue generated a wake-up call on water, designed by a wide spectrum of stakeholders present at the dialogue.

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2.3 Monitoring and evaluation Simavi works with its local partners under a planning, monitoring, and evaluation (PME) methodology to guarantee that our projects are carried out in accordance with commitments that have been made. Once the project has started, we ask our partners to submit a narrative and financial progress report twice a year. We also ask them to submit their annual report and audit report, we visit running programmes regularly, and we conduct satisfaction surveys among our partners. Based on this information we assess the progress, make adjustments where necessary and decide whether Simavi will continue to support a certain project. On completion, the project as a whole is evaluated.

Outcome monitoring In 2013 Simavi has monitored outcomes of the bigger programmes realised in alliances. Examples of outcomes are mentioned in 3.2 and in the project cases. For the other Simavi programmes, the activities and number of people reached are monitored as well as improved access to WASH and SRHR services, according to the result indicators that we defined. In 2013 a start was made with a new Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (PME) system. Indicators at each level (output, outcome and impact) for the three pillars of the Theory of Change are being formulated, according to the Strategy 2014-2020. The PME system will be finalised in 2014.

Evaluations Simavi multi-year programmes are evaluated at the end and in the case of bigger programmes at mid-point. Evaluations for the programmes listed below were conducted in 2013.

view on the progress of the WASH Alliance from a strategic, programme management and implementation perspective. The evaluation concluded that the Dutch WASH alliance is on track on output level (outcome measurement results were not yet available at the moment of the evaluation). Working in an Alliance has added value and FIETS and integrated WASH are being applied in the countries, which helps to reach our targets. There is a joint identity and much energy in the Alliance. At the same time, the evaluation confirmed our own findings that the WASH Alliance can improve on working more effectively and efficiently. These conclusions are supported by findings that show the strengths and weaknesses and ways to improve for the WASH alliance. In annex 2 a summary with the main findings of the evaluation and how the Dutch WASH alliance will work on the follow-up can be found.

End evaluation Netwas Kenya Simavi conducted an end evaluation of Netwas, our partner in Kenya. The objective of the project with Netwas was to improve knowledge and practice in water resources management and water quality monitoring through capacity building of WASH actors in Mashuru District. The evaluation showed the following results: Education of health workers and community members was done according to plan; for example 89 per cent of community members had adopted the habit of treating drinking water. The approach employed to include women and vulnerable groups during the trainings can be improved. Especially in trainings, gender inclusion proved to be difficult. It appeared that husbands would not allow their wives to be away from home for two days. The evaluation recommended that the trainings are held as close to the community as possible, so that women and vulnerable groups attain better involvement.

2.3.1 Evaluations of WASH programmes

2.3.2 Evaluation of SRHR programmes

WASH Alliance midterm evaluation

UFBR midterm evaluation

In 2013 the Dutch WASH alliance has performed an extensive midterm evaluation with two objectives. First, to assess to what extent the WASH Alliance is making progress towards the end of programme targets and in terms of strategy and approaches (FIETS and integrated WASH towards systems change). Secondly, it assessed the added value of working in an Alliance. The evaluation methodology consisted of documentary research, interviews, discussions and observations both in the Netherlands and in the field and an online survey. The midterm evaluation provided an independent

At the end of 2013, a midterm review (outcome measurement) took place to highlight main achievements of the Unite for Body Rights programme (UFBR) of the SRHR alliance after three years. Reports on outcome monitoring were made per country. The other part of the midterm review - evaluation of the SRHR alliance building - will take place in 2014. Below we present the results of the outcome measurement for India and Malawi.

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Example of outcome measurement:


Malawi and India The SRHR Alliance defined outcome indicators that are monitored per country in the case of Malawi and per partner in the case of India. India was on track in all indicators, while Malawi was on track in 50 per cent of the outcome indicators assessed (six out of the twelve components improved according to plan).

The following table shows a comparison between some results from 2013 and baseline data, which were collected through sampling.

Example of outcome measurement: Malawi and India Malawi baseline 2011

Results Malawi India baseline 2011 2013*

Results India 2013**

Correct basic knowledge on SRHR in the target group

24.4%

72.9%

HIV: 35.0% FP***: 67.8% STIs****: 37.0%

HIV: 67.5% FP: 80.6% STIs: 69.7%

Correct right based attitudes in SRHR*****

66.4%

69.3%

3.3%

8.5%

61.2%

74.6%

Use of modern family planning methods Feel empowered to make correct decision in SRHR

27.6%

49.6%

Improvement of services in Maternal Health facilities

Scoring 2.9 in 5 facilities

Scoring 2.5 in 5 facilities (no improvement)

Each partner had checklist with standard services

In 49/ 53 (92.5%) facilities, considerable improvement was recorded

Client satisfaction with SRH services

Rating 3.2 out of 5 (2 facilities)

Rating 3.2 out of 5 (2 facilities, no improvement)

Each partner had checklist with area specific satisfaction criteria

In all 30 health facilities (100%), satisfaction considerably increased

Total number of SRHR services (in sample area)

587

997 (69.8% increase)

13,937

17,840 (28.0% increase)

Three visits for Antenatal Care

8

47 (587% increase)

1,942

2,845 (46.4% increase)

123

115 (decrease, specifically among women > 24 years)

673

3,691 (448% increase)

Deliveries by Skilled Birth Attendant

*

Out of the 4 partners, 2 partners are Simavi partners

**

These are results of Simavi partners

***

FP = Family Planning methods

****

STI= Sexually Transmitted Infections

*****

These questions explore whether young people should have information on SRHR and be allowed to make their

own decisions.

Simavi programmes

27


Lessons learned To improve the services in Maternal Health in Malawi, more attention to quality of services will be given through a “quality of care plan� that has been formulated with the district health authorities. Also community scoring cards will be revisited so as to improve client satisfaction.

External evaluation UFBR Programme in Bangladesh A separate mid-term evaluation was done for the UFBR programme in Bangladesh. The objective was to understand the progress, the context of the change, the intensity of outreach and the overall enabling environment that the programme has brought about. The three pillars of the programme were examined: comprehensive sexuality education, youth friendly services and creating an enabling environment. The most important objective of the programme was to create an enabling environment, ensuring a safe and secure social space for adolescents and youths to learn and equip themselves with proper knowledge, attitude and behaviour on sexuality. The evaluation revealed that parents, community leaders, teachers and other stakeholders have been successfully convinced of the need for the programme. The advocacy and mobilisation

28

Simavi programmes

efforts to create an enabling environment for sexuality education and youth friendly services have been found to be impressive at many levels. The programme has demonstrated that, if properly addressed, teachers and community leaders may become the key individuals in promoting sexuality education within institutions and communities. The demands demonstrate how significant the programme is for youth and society. Furthermore, the evaluation confirmed that the programme so far has been successful in introducing sexual and reproductive health and rights to the target group of adolescents and youth The concept of youth friendly services is a very innovative approach. The programme has been found to respond to the needs of the adolescents and youth, yet certain opportunities still can be addressed: There are instances of some places where centres were not accessible to the youth for whom they had been set up. This was because sometimes the awareness raising and education activities took place in other areas than where the services were provided. In 2014 coordination will be improved. Also more focus will be on community mobilisation along with mobilisation in schools, in order to enhance the sustainability of the changes that have been brought about.


Strategy

29

foto: xxxxxxxxxx

3. Fundraising and partnership development


3. Fundraising and partnership development

Simavi further broadened the scope for fundraising in 2013, going from mainly private and governmental donors, to working together with companies, other business associates and multilateral institutions. Our focus was threefold: • To intensify our already existing relations with Dutch individual donors and parties in the private sector; • To develop public-private partnerships in which each partner brings in their specific expertise and network; • Institutional fundraising with development agencies of

international governments, multilateral institutions and international donors. We believe that setting up sustainable partnerships with different stakeholders is an essential factor in achieving structural change. In addition to successfully managing and participating in strategic alliances, such as the WASH Alliance, the SRHR Alliance or the Football for Water partnership, this year’s focus was therefore on expanding our cooperative efforts with the private sector and institutional partners.

Actual 2013

Budget 2013

Difference Actual 2013 - Budget 2013

608,000

566,000

42,000

1,744,000

1,990,000

-246,000

34,000

100,000

-66,000

548,000

150,000

398,000

2,934,000

2,806,000

128,000

210,000

240,000

-30,000

Co-financing projects other

53,000

322,000

-269,000

National Postcode Lottery

926,000

900,000

26,000

1,189,000

1,462,000

-273,000

Min. Foreign Affairs for Simavi

7,690,000

8,365,000

-675,000

Min. Foreign Affairs for WASH Alliance partners

5,947,000

6,715,000

-768,000

296,000

652,000

-356,000

Total, government grants

13,933,000

15,732,000

-1,799,000

Income from investments

97,000

124,000

-27,000

Other income

43,000

-

43,000

18,196,000

20,124,000

1,928,000

INCOME 2013 (in €) Income from direct fundraising Collections Donations and gifts (individual giving, private sector and foundations) Sponsoring Legacies and bequests Total, direct fundraising Income from third-party campaigns Co-financing projects Aqua for All

Total share of third-party campaigns Government grants

Other government grants (Swiss Development Cooperation SDC)

TOTAL INCOME

30


3.1 Income from direct fundraising 3.1.1 Collection In 2013, the nationwide door-to-door collection raised funds for the project Yes I can! in Ghana. Yes I can! focuses on awareness raising amongst mothers about the prevention of illness, the importance of vaccination and good hygiene. The project aims to improve the health of 5,000 children and 3,000 women in the north of Ghana. Six days in a row about 16,000 volunteers collected funds for Yes I can! Over the years it has become increasingly difficult to engage enough volunteers for the nationwide doorto-door collection. Costs for recruitment increased due to amongst others new privacy legislation in the Netherlands (‘Bel me niet register’ – ‘Don’t call me-list’). Therefore we concluded that the costs of the nationwide door-to-door collection are too high compared to the benefits. So the 2014 nationwide door-to-door collection will be the last and we will look for other ways of raising funds. Still, the total revenue of the collection in 2013 (€608,000) was more than budgeted, due to the sale of collecting-boxes to other NGOs.

satisfaction survey (see paragraph 4.2). Our approach concerning bequests and legacies is an important part of our fundraising strategy towards individual givers. We will be putting more emphasis on the possibilities to bequeath Simavi in people’s will. Two main fundraising activities took place in 2013: the nationwide door-to-door collection (see above) and the “Wandelen voor Water (Walking for Water)” campaign.

Dutch ‘Wandelen voor Water (Walking for Water)’ campaign Walking six kilometres with six litres of water on your back is part of daily life for many children in developing countries. In Walking for Water, 10,848 Dutch primary school students experienced how hard this is. The event is an initiative by Aqua for All in collaboration with Simavi, Amref, ZOA, Akvo, Rotary clubs, and partners from the water sector such as drinking water companies Dunea and PWN. In addition to walking, the children were also given guest lectures at school on the need for safe drinking water and good hygiene in developing countries. They could collect money for projects in Kenya and Uganda, for projects such as building toilets in homes and schools. In this way, Dutch schoolchildren were able to help fellow pupils in Kenya and Uganda, while Simavi raised €196,000 through this campaign.

3.1.2 Individual giving The total income from Donations and gifts (individual giving, private sector and foundations) was €1,744,000 in 2013. To involve private donors in the Netherlands, Simavi uses a targeted and creative strategy in order to counterbalance the effects of recession, increasing competition in the sector and society’s changing views on development aid. In 2013 we revised our strategy for individual giving, placing more focus on involving our individual givers with our work through a personalised approach, making sure people’s wishes as to how and when they want to be involved are met. In this strategy, we have defined a specific approach concerning legacies and bequests: more emphasis has been put on the possibilities for donors. Besides this, we invested in attracting new donors. Thanks to this new approach, we were able to welcome more than 3,000 new donors, which resulted in 13,000 individual givers at the end of 2013. We increased our revenues by 2 per cent from €701,000 in 2012 to €712,000 in 2013, which is a good result in a difficult market. We are confident about the effects of the personalised approach and expect to minimise our outflow of donors, to see an increase in average donations and better achievement on the

In 2013 we were confirmed in our observation that more and more private individuals no longer commit themselves for long periods to the same charity. Instead we see people donating to very different causes as a result of changing interests. At the same time, many people still want to engage with charities to make the world a better place. These people increasingly want to know how their donation is spent. We have therefore decided to look towards additional ways of engaging people with our work and improve communication about programmatic results (see paragraph 4.2), next to the more personalised approach already implemented. In 2014 we will further develop our strategy on community engagement and events. See chapter 6 for more information.

Fundraising and partnership development

31


3.1.3 Foundations Simavi works with a number of foundations, both corporate foundations and family funds. 2013 was a successful year for Simavi in terms of fundraising with corporate foundations. The foundations and private sector income increased from €689,000 in 2012 to €1,032,000 in 2013. Three new large foundations granted donations to Simavi. The Waterloo Foundation supported our WASH programme in Tanzania, while the Porticus Foundation provided funding to help us increase access to youth-friendly SHR services in Uganda. Thirdly, the Vodafone Foundation funded a new and innovative programme Mobile for Mothers (see below).

Mobile for Mothers Vodafone Foundation Simavi’s project Mobiles for Mothers has won the first prize in the ‘Mobiles for Good’ Vodafone Challenge - an initiative of the Vodafone foundation to collect and stimulate innovative ideas for mobile applications in health care. The winning application supports health care workers to effectively inform pregnant women, identify risks and refer them timely to the clinic, so as to decrease maternal mortality in India. The application uses text, pictures and voice and is thus tailored to the needs of semi-literate health workers and their clients. Meanwhile it collects health information that is relevant for the pregnant mothers and health workers, but also for government health administrators. The project also includes a research component, which aims to understand the impact of the project on the health of the mothers and their new-borns. Simavi conducts this project together with local partner NEEDS and an Indian ICT company. The aim is to reach 10,000 pregnant women in India by training more than 400 health care workers.

32

Fundraising and partnership development

In addition to the three foundations mentioned above, we received support from 30 Dutch foundations contributing a total of €483,000 (2012: 34 foundations and €375,000). Except for Foundations such as Flexiplan, Anna Muntz and Schmalhausen Foundation, the majority of these foundations wish to remain anonymous.

3.1.4 Private sector In line with the afore mentioned diversification of fundraising, our focus on collaborating with the private sector was bolstered in 2013. We sought cooperation with organisations that have well integrated social responsibility into their policies or go beyond it. In 2013 Simavi’s business network consisted of 18 corporate sponsors. Good examples are our partnerships with CWS, Dunea and Dopper. Water-bottle company Dopper has donated five per cent of its net turnover to one of our drinking water projects in Nepal, while sanitary hygiene specialist CWS has supported us significantly with the launch of our World Toilet Day campaign. And the South-Holland drinking water company Dunea has asked 1.2 million clients to contribute to one of Simavi’s WASH projects in Tanzania and also has supported the Wandelen voor Water event (see below). Based on the success in 2013, next year we will continue our strategy of increasing business partnerships.


3.2 Income from third-party campaigns

3.2.1 Dutch National Postcode Lottery The Dutch National Postcode Lottery raises funds for charitable organisations committed to a greener and fairer world. Simavi has been one of the beneficiaries of Postcode Lottery since 1998. As in previous years, Simavi received a grant of €900,000 in 2013. This support is of incredible value to us as it can be put towards any new initiative that come from our own organisation’s mission and vision. Simavi is grateful to the lottery’s employees for the lottery’s open and pro-active attitude, and we congratulate the Postcode Lottery with becoming the second largest private donor in the world, after the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The current cabinet has decided to continue the modernisation of the current policy on gambling and games of chance. We strongly hope that the National Postcode Lottery will be able to maintain their crucial position, which enables them to support good causes. Without the Postcode Lottery and its participants, Simavi and other charities would lose an important pillar of support. Therefore, Simavi supported the lobby activities of Postcode Lottery. Simavi and the Postcode Lottery are close partners who work intensively together. This year for example, Postcode Lottery used Simavi in advertisements in the NRC newspaper, and Simavi publicised this partnership through our website, in our campaigns, the Nationwide door-to-door collection, newsletters and social media. Also, Simavi and the Postcode Lottery cooperated closely on the Peepoo project, a sanitation project in the slums of Nairobi. The €26,000 additional income from the NPL as recognised in 2013 relates to the Peepoo project. The National Postcode Lottery reviews its partnership

with Simavi every five years. The last evaluation was in 2012. In its evaluation report, the Postcode Lottery stated that Simavi was a trustworthy leader in the field of good causes, and very capable of developing and carrying out innovative projects in collaboration with local partners. We are very pleased to report that the supervisory board of the National Postcode Lottery has decided to renew its contract with Simavi for a further period of five years, starting from the first of January 2013. In 2014, we hope to continue our longstanding and successful collaboration. Another important milestone is that in February 2014, thanks to the so called ‘13th extra lottery draw’, an amount of more than €2,000,000 was awarded for the menstrual hygiene programme “Gewoon... Ongesteld” in India. A programme that will be implemented in cooperation with Rutgers WPF and Women on Wings.

3.3 Government grants Next to the government grants from the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs for four major multi-year programmes (UFBR, ASK, the programme of the Dutch Wash Alliance and the SHAW programme), our institutional fundraising showed a remarkable result with two new institutional partners in 2013. The Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) awarded Simavi a budget of €296,000 in 2013 to prepare an extensive project in Tanzania for drinking water supplies at primary health facilities, in cooperation with Witteveen+Bos, Akvo, and three Tanzanian partners. In total the grant for 20142019 amounts to approximately 8 million US dollars. On top of this, a consortium of Simavi, Witteveen+Bos and Berenschot received funding worth €3,150,000 (of which €2.050.000 for Simavi) from the Dutch Embassy in Ghana, aimed at rolling out a WASH programme in Ghana in 2014 and 2015. This success is a result of our increased efforts on institutional fundraising. The main reasons why institutional partners award funds to Simavi are our integrated approach, our sustainability principles, involvement of local partners and the high quality of our programme proposals, including budget and planning. A lesson learned from 2013 is that working with the private sector in developing programmes and applying for institutional funds is more time-consuming than expected. In order to increase our fundraising capacity, we hired an extra institutional fundraiser and a business development manager in 2013.

Fundraising and partnership development

33


In 2013 the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) has awareded Simavi a contract to prepare an extensive project in the Dodoma region in Tanzania for drinking water supplies at primary health facilities. Out of 342 health centres in the region, more than half have no access to water at all. Only a third have access to tap water and the remaining part have access to water via boreholes with unknown water quality. Therefore, SDC has prioritised upgrading water supplies at public primary health facilities, making it one of its strategic goals in Dodoma. From August to December, Simavi and its partners have conducted thorough field research and developed a plan to realise reliable water supplies at as many small health centres as possible in Dodoma Region in Tanzania. In addition to drinking water supplies, Simavi will also work on establishing management structures and the promotion of hygienic practices by medical staff and patients. The project fits well within Simavi’s mission to empower underserved communities to achieve better health through improved access to safe drinking water, sanitation and hygiene. Women hold a special place in the programme, with specific attention being given to female hygiene needs and safe motherhood. For instance, one of the issues that the project aims to resolve is that pregnant women have to bring their own water to the health centre when they are about to give birth.

Ghana Netherlands WASH programme: Master Planning - Dutch Embassy in Ghana Just before the end of 2013, it was announced that Simavi, engineering consultant Witteveen+Bos (lead agency) and management consultant Berenschot had been awarded a contract for a large WASH programme in Ghana. The project is part of the

34

Fundraising and partnership development

foto: Marieke Appelboom

Upgrading Water Supplies at Primary Health facilities in Tanzania - SDC

Furthermore, village health workers will be trained to teach women and girls about hygienic behaviour, for instance during menstruation. Simavi is the project manager in this initiative, and is supported by Witteveen+Bos and local NGOs, the Community-Based Health-Care Council (CBHCC), PATUTA and UFUNDIKO. These parties all complement each other in knowledge and experience. After the preparation phase, Simavi will continue its partnership with the Swiss government and upgrade at least 100 health facilities over the next five years, to the benefit of the more than 2 million inhabitants of Dodoma.

Ghana Netherlands WASH programme initiated by the Dutch embassy, which aims to improve the technical, institutional and financial water supply and sanitation infrastructure in Ghana. The programme targets five fast-growing urban municipalities along Ghana’s southern coast, where adequate sanitation and solid waste management are major issues. The task of the Dutch consortium will be to work together with the five urban municipalities targeted by the programme on a long-term Master


Plan, thereby creating full ownership of the many stakeholders involved. This will be a challenging task, as there are hardly any WASH strategies, or even policy plans, at municipal level at the moment. The programme also needs to set the stage for more investments and development projects in the WASH infrastructure. Within the consortium, Simavi is involved in the

Master Planning process but is also responsible implementing specific activities to improve WASH at seventy schools, launching a behavioural change campaign and reducing the practice of open defecation. In these activities, Simavi will work with KNVB World Coaches, Akvo, local partners HFFG and Pronet and all relevant stakeholders identified in the project area. photo: Jeppe van Pruissen

3.4 Partnership development With an extensive local and international network within the WASH and SRHR sectors, Simavi brings together organisations into one project that would otherwise not collaborate. As a linking pin between governments, NGOs and the private sector, Simavi creates synergies and promotes the exchange of experience. When working with us, our partners become part of a bigger programme aimed at achieving structural change on a large scale together. In similar vein, we link our local partners to a national and often also international network via our WASH and SRHR programmes across Africa and Asia. Organising exchange visits or working together on innovative methodologies or approaches are key to unlocking the potential of these connections. Driven by our entrepreneurial spirit, Simavi is active

in exploring innovative funding possibilities for its programmes. Working together with companies gives us opportunities to leverage more funding and to increase the scale of our work. Our partnership strategy is based on the success factor that the partners are complementary to each other, and bring in their own expertise and networks to create extra added value. Instances of this are engineering agency Witteveen+Bos and management consultant firm Berenschot, two organisations with which we cooperate in the GhanaNetherlands WASH programme (GNWP, see paragraph 3.3). Another example is the Football for Water partnership in which the Dutch football federation KNVB, UNICEF, Simavi, Vitens Evides International, Aqua for all, Akvo and the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs all join hands. The goal is providing 750,000 schoolchildren with safe drinking water, sanitation, and hygiene in schools within

Fundraising and partnership development

35


four years. As a strategic combination of football, awareness raising on hygiene and delivering WASH services to schools, Football for Water is unique in the world. The KNVB is contributing through its World Coaches programme. World Coaches are being trained and deployed at every school, and any school football pitches in need of repair are serviced. UNICEF, Simavi, and VEI make sure that the schools have water and sanitary facilities and work towards sustainable use and management of those. Simavi adds its expertise on behavioural change on hygiene issues. UNICEF’s great strength is in fund-raising and partnering with governments in the south. VEI provides expertise in the field of water projects in urban areas. Aqua4All provides design support for the business approach, and AKVO handles the online communication platform. Simavi also works together in a public-private partnership with Royal Haskoning-DHV in Malawi and with Vitens Evides International in Bangladash (see case study Theory of Change at work in Bangladesh on page 11). In the Netherlands we also strengthened our cooperation with the private sector in order to raise

36

Fundraising and partnership development

awareness and raise funds (see paragraph 3.1.4).

Partnership policy We take ethical dilemmas into consideration when cooperating with parties in the private sector. Together with the Partnerships Resource Centre of Rotterdam Erasmus University, Simavi started the development of a partnership policy. It will be finalised in 2014. Our current policy is to check whether the mission and core values of our partners are in line with Simavi’s, and if they have a sound Corporate Social Responsibility policy

Alliances and consortia In 2013, Simavi continued its participation in the SRHR Alliance and the Dutch WASH Alliance (see paragraph 2.1 and 2.2). In addition to these ongoing programmes, Simavi started a new three year SRHR programme called ASK, together with Rutgers WPF, IPPF, Dance4Life, AMREF Flying Doctors, Choice and Stop Aids Now (see paragraph 2.1.3. Also for the above mentioned Football for Water partnership, SDC-programme, and GNWP-programme Simavi works in consortia of different organisations and companies.


foto: xxxxxxxxxx

4. Communication

foto: Benno Neeleman

37

Strategy


4. Communication

Involving our stakeholders in our work to achieve structural improvement of basic health is important for the success of our organisation. Investing in a strong and recognisable brand helps us build long-term relationships with our partners and lends us credibility among our donors.

4.1 Communication strategy The communication strategy followed by Simavi focuses on mobilising, engaging and involving our partners and stakeholders with our work. We do this via campaigns and various corporate and marketing communication activities. This communication strategy not only helps us to raise awareness about the importance of basic health, but also supports our fundraising activities both internationally and in the Netherlands. The communication strategy in 2013 had three objectives. In the first place, we aimed to raise awareness about the most important areas of our work: safe drinking water, maternal health and the worldwide shortage of clean toilets. A second priority in 2013 was developing a new Simavi corporate identity and brand house, in line with our future strategic direction. A third objective was to increase the appreciation of our stakeholders by transparent communication about results and expenditure.

4.2 Raising awareness and involving stakeholders 4.2.1 Marketing communication

Current and future individual givers, corporate sponsors, Dutch family and private foundations and the general Dutch public constitute our target groups for marketing communication. To keep our current 13,000 individual givers involved, they are called annually and a satisfaction survey takes place every year. Their general appreciation for Simavi was on average 7.7 out of 10. Our volunteers even rated the organisation 8 out of 10. This was the first time we did a survey with exact numbers. Previously ‘satisfaction ratings’ were used (highly insufficient, insufficient, sufficient, good, excellent); therefore an increase cannot be shown. With our current 18 corporate sponsors we communicate

38

Communication

personally by fostering good account management and involving them in our work by inviting them to network events. This is supported with a bi-monthly newsletter (+900 subscribers). Three awareness campaigns were launched this year, covering both awareness and fundraising purposes. More than 9 million people have been reached by Simavi’s core message in 2013. The first campaign took place leading up to and during the Nationwide door-to-door collection in March, for which we have used the project Yes I can! in Ghana. The people who donated money received a flyer with prizes to win if they participated at www.simavi.nl. The campaign was successful and created more than 4,000 new email leads. With the second campaign, around Mother’s Day in May, we organised a small event together with corporate partner Suzuki. For every person who booked a test drive through a specially set-up website, Suzuki donated €10 to Simavi. During the third campaign, leading up to World Toilet Day in November, we highlighted our ‘WASH in schools’ project in Kenya. In this campaign, we worked together with several corporate partners, one of which was hygiene specialist CWS (see paragraph 3.1.4). In addition to the campaigns, we made use of regular marketing communication channels such as regular e-newsletters (+7,000 subscribers), website (+70,000 unique visitors per year), Socutera Charity TV (+1,350,000 viewers) and social media (Twitter 1,150 and Facebook 1,100 followers). Growth was more than planned (2013 targets: Twitter 1000: and Facebook: 900). Social media messaging was integrated in all three campaigns. Social media however also have a negative side. The World Toilet Day campaign received several negative reactions from people in the Netherlands with a negative opinion about international cooperation. These were removed if discriminatory or received a reply. The campaigns met their visibility targets. At the same time evaluations showed that success can be increased by being more specific about our target groups and by connecting with them through our stories. A targeted strategy to increase (brand) awareness with a smaller group of stakeholders will be more effective than reaching a broad public in the Netherlands. Therefore we will further develop our communication strategy in 2014 and be more precise on who we see as our constituency and how we plan on reaching them and communicating with them. Also, we will focus more on our storytelling to


create meaningful and valuable content for those who support us by donating their time, money or expertise.

4.2.2 Corporate communication Our corporate target groups are constituted by partner NGO’s and networks, companies that are involved in public-private partnerships and programmes, multilateral institutions, ministries of development, institutional funds, research and knowledge centres. We involve our current and potential institutional, business and civil society partners through newsletters, our website, social media and network events. We started sending out a quarterly newsletter with information on our programmes and organisational updates to a well-informed targeted audience of 300 corporate stakeholders in 2013. Moreover, we attended World Water Week in Stockholm, where we shared a stand with the Dutch WASH Alliance to promote our FIETS sustainability approach (see paragraph 1.4) in Bangladesh. A lesson that has been learned is that with the new organisational strategy 2014-2020, in which the focus on partnerships is key, communication channels that make sole use of Dutch can no longer suffice. In 2014 we will set up corporate communications for international audiences.

Simavi brand experience In order to make the goal of basic health for all come true, we cooperate and connect with our partners. This belief lies at the core of our work and actions. By working together, possibilities for structural improvement will materialise, so that we truly make a difference together. Our promise is literally and metaphorically shown in our logo. In its shape - we join hands - and in the use of colour. Orange represents the earth, fertility and health. Orange also symbolises Simavi’s Dutch roots. Blue represents willpower, ideals and trust. Blue stimulates communication and self-expression.

4.2.3 Results All our stakeholders are informed about our results regularly, both through our newsletters (one for individual givers and general public, one for businesses and foundations, one for corporate stakeholders) and through social media. The results of the annual report have been spread by mail or regular post, including an info graphic with the main results and they have been published in our newsletters and through social media. Bigger corporate sponsors and private foundations receive a progress report of the project they support once a year and an evaluation after the project has been completed.

4.3 Brand Within the strategic framework that has been developed, Simavi takes on the commitment towards all our stakeholders that, in everything we do, we will work on basic health for all. The objective for 2013 was to develop a new Simavi corporate identity and matching brand in line with this strategy. This was achieved as planned.

Communication

39


40

Communication


foto: xxxxxxxxxx

5. Organisation

foto: Benno Neeleman

41

Strategy


5. Organisation

Simavi was founded by two doctors in 1925 as an association of tropical doctors. Over the years, the focus shifted from exclusively health-related projects towards additionally preventing health problems by investing in water, sanitation and hygiene and sexual and reproductive health and rights. Today, Simavi is a modern foundation with 46 employees from a wide range of disciplines working to improve basic health conditions of marginalised communities in Africa and Asia.

5.1 Organisational development An important focus area for Simavi in 2013 has been investing in an efficient and effective organisational structure and a performance-driven culture with much room for innovation and entrepreneurship. Priority has been placed on human resource management and financial management, as well as on employee satisfaction and engagement. The respective main objectives were: • Improve human resource management through clear job descriptions and profiles • Improve financial management through introducing systemic financial processes and reporting. • Improve overall employee satisfaction

effectiveness, and improved accordingly, which resulted in a new financial reporting system at the end of 2013. In May 2013, Simavi conducted an extensive Employee Satisfaction Survey, exploring topics such as management performance, employee engagement, work-life balance and working conditions. The survey showed that more than 80 per cent of the employees working at Simavi were satisfied. At the same time employees were critical about internal communication, strategy development and human resource management in times of a changing organisation. These topics are recognised by the management and have been integrated into the Strategy 2014-2020 for the internal organisation.

5.2 Organogram

In 2013, much effort was put in improving our human resource management. The job description and profile of every employee was analysed and updated, and core competences were reformulated. In continuation of this effort, next year’s focus will be on personal development. Financial processes were analysed on efficiency and

Simavi has restructured the organisation in 2013 in order to reflect our new strategy and Theory of Change. This process has led to a revised organogram. While we used to be organised based on geography (in an Africa Team and an Asia Team) at our Programme Department, we switched to a clear thematic focus, which materialised in an SRHR team and a WASH team at Simavi’s Programme Department. Those teams consist of both Senior and Junior professionals with excellent thematic expertise. A new department Partnership Development was created to strengthen our partnerships with the private sector, governments and institutional donors. In 2013 Simavi had one field office in Indonesia to support the SHAW programme and a local representative in Ghana.

Managing Director Finance & Operations

PME

WASH

42

Partnership development

Programmes

WASH Alliance

Organisation

Public Affairs

SRHR

Institutional Fundraising

Local Representation

Communication & Fundraising

Business Development

Fundraising

Marketing & Communication


5.3 Executive Board and Management Team In accordance with its statutory provisions, Simavi is managed by a one-person executive board (the Managing Director). The Managing Director and the heads of the four departments make up Simavi’s management team (MT). On 1 January 2013, Ariette Brouwer took up the position of Managing Director of Simavi. Pauline Eenhoorn is responsible for the Communication and Fundraising department and Andy Palmen for the Partnership Development department. Ewout van Galen is leading the Programmes department and Mike van Crugten the Finance and Operations department. The Managing Director is evaluated by the supervisory board, and the members of the management team are evaluated by the Managing Director. The Managing Director’s contract has been extended in 2013 as a result of a good performance. In 2013, the MT met 24 times. In these meetings, the MT discussed topics such as the strategic plan for the future, the rebranding strategy, Simavi’s new organisational structure, the Theory of Change model and partnership development in addition to the fixed agenda items. In

accordance with standards of the Dutch Fund-raising Institutions Association (VFI), Simavi does not remit bonuses to its management team or other employees.

Remuneration of Managing Director The Supervisory Board has determined a yearly director’s remuneration package well under the guidelines of the VFI for management salaries of charitable organisations (Adviesregeling Beloning Directeuren van Goede Doelen). Managing Director Ariette Brouwer received € 93,312 in 2013. This includes the gross salary and holiday allowance. No 13th month and end of year benefits are applicable. More details can be found in the annual accounts. Ariette Brouwer had no relevant additional functions.

5.4 Employees The number of employees is stable. Simavi carefully monitors the balance between fixed and temporary contracts in order to ensure a flexible organisation that can adapt to changing circumstances. Simavi is satisfied that it has been able to maintain the number of volunteers at head office and increase the numbers of trainees. They help us achieve our targets and are

Employees per 31 december 2013 2013

2012

46

45 (a)

Number FTEs

40.9

39

Part-time workers (less than 36 hours per week)

72%

76%

32

31.1

25/21

23/22

8/38

11/34

3/2

3/2

Average age

41

42

University education

24

24

University of applied sciences

12

13

Office volunteers

12

12

6

2

3.97%

4.9%

Employees leaving the organisation

7

6

New employees

8

8

Number of employees

Average number of hours Permanent/temporary contracts Men/women Men/women in management team

Work-placement trainees Absenteeism due to illness

a) In Indonesia, four employees are working for Simavi through other organisations. These employees are not included in the above table. The fifth employee in Indonesia has a Dutch contract and is included in the table above.

Organisation

43


of great value to the organisation. The percentage of absenteeism through illness decreased because several people who were ill for an extended period of time returned to work.

5.5 Internal organisation Education/training Personal development of employees is key in Simavi’s HR strategy. Educational needs are addressed during the regular planning, evaluation and performance cycle of every employee. These are combined into an organisational training plan.

Employee representation Simavi’s Employee Representative Body consists of three employees. Its tasks have been set out in the Rules and Regulations of the Employee Representative Body. In 2013, the Employee Representative Body convened five times. On one occasion, Frans Blanchard, the confidential advisor for the Supervisory Board, attended the meeting. In addition to the fixed agenda items, in 2013 the Employee Representative Body focused intensively on a possible relocation since the current building is at its maximum capacity. Other topics were re-election of the Employee Representation members, the Occupational Health Doctor system, travel expenses, the restructuring of the organisation and the revision of the employee terms and conditions that will be done in 2014. The Employee Representative Body highly values professionalism in the fulfilment of its tasks. All three members undertook relevant training in 2013 on topics such as work pressure and the Occupational Health regulation in the Netherlands. The Employee Representative Body has informed employees about developments and current issues in plenary meetings on four occasions this year.

Code of conduct New employees are familiarised with Simavi’s code of conduct for staff upon commencing employment. By basing our code of conduct on the code of conduct of the Dutch Fund-raising Institutions Association (VFI), Simavi endorses this association’s code. In addition, sections from the international code of conduct for humanitarian assistance of the International Federation of Red Cross Societies have been included in our code of conduct. The code, which can be found on our website, was enforced in 2013 and no reports of irregularities in relation to the code were received.

44

Organisation

Policy for volunteers Simavi has a policy for volunteers, which can be found on www.simavi.nl. People who work for Simavi for at least four working days per month are offered a volunteer contract setting out their rights and obligations. We make verbal agreements with all other volunteers. All departments have volunteers and interns who support employees. Our volunteers are valued highly because they help us realise our ambition. Volunteers are an integrated part of the team. They are involved in celebrations and receive a small gift on their birthday. The 16,000 volunteers for the nationwide door-todoor collection receive special attention. They are well prepared, receive information, have the option to call a specific Simavi employee, can attend to a meeting in their region and receive feedback on the results of the collection as well as on how the money collected is spent. This is done by regular post and telephone since most of those involved are above retirement age.

Complaints procedure
 Simavi has a complaints procedure that can be found on the website in Dutch and English. Formal complaints will be registered and dealt with within two weeks. No formal complaints have been submitted in 2013, leading Simavi to also start tracking informal complaints. While in 2012, seventeen of these were received, in 2013 the amount decreased to only five. These complaints concerned subjects ranging from the focus of our communication campaigns to inattentive relationship management. All these informal complaints were handled satisfactorily.

Sustainability Sustainability is a key issue for Simavi. We pursue sustainability in our programmes in developing countries in accordance with our FIETS strategy (see paragraph 1.4). However, we are also aware of our responsibilities with regard to our operations in the Netherlands. We offset our CO2 emissions from our road and air travel, and our lunches largely consist of organic and fair trade products. Furthermore, we use biodegradable cleaning products, separate waste, purchase green electricity, and source FSC-approved paper for our newsletters.

Certification The quality of our work is of crucial importance to Simavi. We work according to an ISO quality management system to monitor and evaluate our internal processes. An external audit conducted by Certiked concerning our ISO certification (ISO 9001: 2008) was carried out in 2013. Simavi successfully completed this audit, and the present certificate is valid until 23 November 2015.


5.6 Risk management As an organisation that stimulates innovation and entrepreneurship, Simavi encounters risks. Below is an overview of the risks, the possible consequences and the strategies that are employed to cope with these risks.Evaluations for the programmes listed below were conducted in 2013.

5.6.1 Financial risks Fluctuations in income are the main financial risk for Simavi, and could have a significant impact on the organisation and the continuation of projects. For example the financial crisis and a changed Dutch governmental view and policy on international development (resulting in cutbacks in development aid) posed a risk in 2013. To cope with this challenge, Simavi aims to spread its income sources by diversified fundraising strategies. In 2013 we invested significantly more in our relationships and partnerships with the private sector, institutional partners and international governments. At the same time, much attention was paid to retain and expand our private donor base, and we have developed new fund-raising methods for new

markets such as the international and online markets. This way non-earmarked funds (which can be spent on any project) remain available. This in turn increases flexibility and is a necessity in obtaining funds through the concept of matching. Simavi does not invest in shares, bonds or other financial instruments such as derivatives. Funds are on a regular savings-account and can be withdrawn at any time. In order to ensure adequate spending, Simavi has commissioned a financial audit to be performed by its auditor KPMG, and Simavi monitors results of the programmes. Furthermore, internal procedures, including internal audits, are in place and comply with ISO 9001âˆś 2008 certification. Simavi has insurances for common risks, such as a travel insurance, health insurance and liability insurance.

5.6.2 Programmatic risks Simavi’s programmes are carried out together with local partner organisations. Simavi finances, guides, supports, monitors and evaluates the implementation. Many programmes in the Netherlands as well as in developing countries are also developed and carried out in alliances,

Programmatic risks Risk

Level

Possible consequences

Mitigation Strategy

Cooperation in alliances is Medium difficult in certain countries because of a difference in views and culture.

Implementation delays; Higher costs for guidance and consultation; Conflicts and dissatisfaction, possibility of partners pulling out.

Clear communication, agreements and coordinating from the start; Clear governance agreements;

Fraud by local partner organisations.

Medium

Loss of financial resources that should have been used for programmes, resulting in objectives not being met;

Work with sound, reliable and results-oriented partners with much experience and local network in WASH and SRHR; Conduct an extensive pre-selection, monitoring and evaluation procedure; Maintain open contact and a broad network in the countries involved; Stimulate cooperation between organisations and peer reviews; Have a clear fraud and sanction policy in place.

Vulnerability of staff to violence, diseases or accidents during business trips.

Low

Harmful to well-being and health of staff; Damage to Simavi’s image.

No business trips to high-risk areas; Ensuring staff is well-prepared for trips; Protocols and emergency numbers being developed.

Organisation

45


and with institutional partners as well as partners from the private sector. In 2013 no incidents of fraud occurred in our programmes. Updates on working in alliances can be found in paragraph 3.4 and in paragraph 2.1 and 2.2.

Keystone Performance Survey Simavi At the end of 2013, Simavi requested Keystone Accountability, an external consultant on accountability issues, to conduct a partner satisfaction survey among its local partners. Simavi was rated 2nd out of 63 international NGOs and 1st of 17 Dutch NGOs in terms of ‘overall satisfaction’ among the partner organisations

with whom we implement our programmes in Africa and Asia. Despite our high ranking, the survey also provided points for improvement. For example, partners want to be more involved in strategy development, and they would like to receive more capacity building on participatory approaches. This will receive follow-up by Simavi programme management in 2014.

5.6.3 Reputational risks A good reputation is a prerequisite in building and maintaining relationships with our partners, and in retaining credibility among our donors.

Reputational risks Risk

Level

High Brand awareness could decline because of the increasing number of charitable organisations and the age of the Simavi constituency in the Netherlands.

Possible consequences

Strategies

Invisibility resulting in decreasing income.

A clear brand identity based on a strong brand strategy. This was developed in 2013 (see 4.2)

Declining trust in development aid organisations affects Simavi.

Medium

Decreasing income; Less political support.

Transparent communication on results as well as failures; Emphasise the impact of our work; Active participation in sector organisations such as Partos and VFI.

Negative publicity in the media affects Simavi’s reputation.

low

High impact of reputational damage to the organisation and the brand.

Issue management on most probable or high risk issues.

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Organisation


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6. Outlook

foto: Huib van Wersch

47

Strategy


6. Outlook

In 2013 Simavi prepared the strategy for 2014–2020, matching the challenges and opportunities of today’s world. We have sharpened the focus of our programmes, ensuring our expertise and approach to have a clear added value, which will lead to tangible and sustainable results. We will develop and start implementing performance indicators and a monitoring system of outcomes on the three pillars of our integrated approach in 2014. Our redefined vision, mission, Theory of Change and programmatic approach can be found in paragraph 1.2 and 1.4.

6.1 Strategy Simavi believes that everyone is entitled to healthy living conditions. WASH and SRHR are crucial for people to be able to lead a healthy life, build a better existence and find a way out of poverty. Therefore it is our ambition to have structurally improved the basic health of 10 million people in marginalised communities in Africa and Asia by 2020. In order to achieve this successfully, we have formulated four focus areas, each containing clear targets, and we are committed to achieving these over the next years.

A. Diversified financing approach Simavi puts great emphasis on working together with institutional partners and business associates. During the next few years, our focus on cooperation with the private sector will be further intensified. With our revised strategy, we aim at creating a mix of financing by governments, the private sector, multilateral institutions, private funding and other sources. The following four key activities will help us to increase innovation and entrepreneurship within our financing approach: • Institutional fundraising: As financing by the Dutch government is under pressure, we will work on strengthening our relationships with development agencies of international governments, multilateral institutions and international donors. • Public-private partnerships (PPPs): Working together in consortia with the private sector, in which each partner brings in specific expertise and network, has proven to be a success. In the next few years, we will actively look for opportunities to enter into long term PPPs. • Direct fundraising: Intensifying our relations with private donors, with family and corporate foundations and within the Dutch private sector, will retain them as true and loyal ambassadors of Simavi. Furthermore, we

48

Outlook

will expand our network and develop new relationships with companies, trusts and donors that share our values or have a natural –business- fit with our themes WASH and SRHR. Shared value creation for everyone involved is at the centre of this approach. • We will develop a brand activation-strategy in 2014 in which we will look to find additional ways of fundraising through events and community engagement.

B. Live our Theory of Change In order to achieve a lasting impact, Simavi has developed a threefold integrated approach, our Theory of Change (see paragraph 1.4). We will incorporate this approach in all our programmes. This helps us to exceed our added value and make optimal use of our core competences. In the coming years, our Theory of Change will be used as a practical tool in the design, development and evaluation phases of our programmes management. We will focus on: • Formulating evidence-based Key Performance Indicators for the three pillars of the Theory of Change; • Identifying new partners, who understand our approach and have the capacities and networks to help us roll out our Theory of Change in the nine countries in which we are active.

C. Strong brand Simavi needs to be a strong brand to achieve our ambitious goals. Only then we will be considered and recognised as the preferred partner for integrated WASH and SRHR programmes by current and future partners. Clear communication to our stakeholders is key, which means: • Segmented communication: We will develop communication messages that meet the needs, and take into account the reality of our three stakeholder groups: corporate (institutional) stakeholders, the private sector and our marketing communication target groups within the Dutch public. • Focused communication: To support our positioning and recognisable brand, our communication will always focus on our integrated approach, Theory of Change, our expertise and the FIETS sustainability principles. • Evidence-based communication: In order to convince donors and partners that Simavi is the right partner to become involved with when it comes to integrated WASH and SRHR, we will show the impact of our programmes, and back this up with evidence. Communication helps to show how our approach creates structural improvement of basic health.


• Being a proactive sparring partner: We will share our experience with our partners and with the sector at large. We hold an open attitude towards cooperation. We will develop innovative approaches and link & learn together. • Two-way communication: we do not simply spread a message or a story, but make sure people can engage with us. We will mobilise our partners and network to share our stories, spread our message and become active supporters of our work - be it financially or as ambassadors.

D. Organisation structure & culture From 2014 onwards, Simavi will operate under the new organisational structure as explained in chapter 5. This structure reflects the new organisational strategy and Theory of Change. Two departments that have recently been established or restructured, namely the Partnership Development and Programme departments. Both consist of a specialised WASH and SRHR team, and will be operational from the beginning of 2014. Apart from the thematic focus, Simavi will start operating under a so-called ‘matrix’ structure from 2014, bringing together different disciplines within the organisation (thematic expertise, communication, fundraising and policy influencing) around the themes of SRHR and WASH (see paragraph 5.2). This will greatly enhance our ability to approach our main themes in an integral manner, taking into account all disciplines at the same time.

to break down barriers between people - physically and emotionally.

6.2 Financial outlook Simavi has a solid financial base for the coming two years. A large part of our activities in this period will be associated with programmes that have been already formulated and launched under a number of grants. We will prepare for the future from this secure base, while bearing in mind that we operate in a rapidly evolving environment that can have a major effect on Simavi’s relevance and financial base. The management is confident that a sound basis for a stable organisation is created for the future. Simavi is expected to be able to operate and reach the targets with a slightly increased workforce (fte) in 2014. The budget for 2014 is included in the annual accounts. Simavi is subject to a variety of risks, including financial, liquidity and exchange rate risks. It is Simavi’s policy to mitigate major risks (see paragraph 5.6).

Our people are key to the success of our organisation. Simavi employees are experienced and engaged professionals, open to learn and grow, creative, and constantly working on both their personal development and that of Simavi as a whole. Together we have built a powerful organisation that stimulates innovation and entrepreneurship. Our impact-driven culture, which reinforces our strategic plan, fosters talent and rewards achievement, and creates the preconditions for long term careers. We aim for a culture in which we not only focus on performance but also on the health and wellbeing of our organisation and co-workers. Over the years to come, we will encourage our employees to give it their all every single day. To this end, every employee will receive the opportunity to participate in a personal development programme. Learning and development through training or workshops will be actively promoted in every layer of the organisation. We believe that open dialogue and constructive feedback among our employees and between employees and management is extremely valuable for the growth of our organisation. Therefore, we will seek

Outlook

49


50

Outlook


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7. Supervisory Board

Strategy

51


7. Supervisory Board

The general performance of the Supervisory Board, as well as the way we supervise, manage and implement at Simavi, are laid down in the Declaration of Accountability (see Annex 5). All members of the Supervisory Board and Simavi’s management have endorsed and approved the Declaration of Accountability. In 2013, Simavi operated in accordance to the agreements reached on management and supervision.

Composition As of 31 December 2013, Simavi’s Supervisory Board was composed as follows: Members supervisory board

Area of expertise

Current position

Other ancillary positions

Maria Martens, chair

Politics, management, development cooperation

Politics, member of the First Chamber

Chairwoman of the Board, VSOP Member Supervisory Board ‘s-Heerenloo

Frans Blanchard, member of audit committee

Communication

Legal consultant for the creative industry

Laura de Graaf, member Finance of audit committee

Financial manager Amsterdam Fund for the Arts, financial consultant

Esther Scheers, vicechair

Health, Public Health, International Reproductive Health & Tropical Medicine

Gynaecologist

Instructor at Groningen University, board member of Zambia Platform, member of working group on International Safe Motherhood & International Health

Ron Thiemann, board member

Water

Director Deltares

Board member NWP (Netherlands Water Partnership)

Rotation and election procedure The rotation schedule of the Supervisory Board of Simavi is as follows (appointments for a maximum of two terms of four years): Members supervisory board

Appointed as of

End of first term

End of second term

Ron Thiemann

2006 (November)

2010

2014

Frans Blanchard

2008 (November)

2012

2016

Maria Martens

2010 (July)

2014

2018

Laura de Graaf

2011 (July)

2015

2019

Esther Scheers

2012 (June)

2016

2020

52

Supervisory Board


Hans Kruijssen left the Supervisory Board, due to reaching the end of the allowed two terms of office in 2013. His duties for the Audit Committee have been taken over temporarily by Frans Blanchard. The Supervisory board is currently in the process of filling the vacancy on the board. Each board position has a specific profile, and selection is based on the areas of expertise. The Supervisory board appoints the new members, while the Managing Director advises this process.

Supervisory Board Meetings The Supervisory Board convened four times in 2013. The Executive Board was present in these meetings, and other members of the management team attended the meeting if relevant.

Remuneration of Supervisory Board The remuneration policy for supervisors remains unchanged. In accordance with the Code of Good Management, supervisors do not receive remuneration, but only receive an expense allowance, based on actual expenditure made.

Evaluation According to the Declaration of Accountability, the Supervisory Board conducts a performance evaluation once every two years. April 2012 the Supervisory Board reviewed its own performance, led by an independent external facilitator. The evaluation showed that a member with a focus area in health would be of added value. The need for confidential half hour meetings was also noted in this evaluation. These two items have been followed up in 2012 and 2013.

Audit committee The audit committee convened four times in 2013. The meetings were held with the Managing Director and the Head of Finance & Operations. Subjects included the annual and quarterly figures, the auditor’s report and budget and forecasts. The annual accounts and the auditors’ report were discussed together with the auditor.

Agenda 2013 Fixed agenda items for the Supervisory Board are the annual plan, the budget, the Annual Report, the quarterly reports, the progress of the organisation and alliances, campaigns and activities, the assessment of the Managing Director, results of audits and evaluations, risk assessments, and vacancies and appointments in the Supervisory Board. The confidential counsellor of the Supervisory Board consults the Employee

Representative Body at least once a year. Minutes are kept of all meetings, accompanied by a list of decisions and actions. Interim meetings with individual members of the Supervisory Board on subjects relating to their areas of expertise have also taken place; one of the issues discussed was the new corporate identity of Simavi.

Focus areas In addition to the fixed agenda items, the main themes for the Supervisory Board in 2013 were: 1. Strategic Plan 2014 - 2020 2. Strategic HR & organisational structure 3. WASH Alliance progress 4. Partnership with Peepoople

Strategic Plan 2014 - 2020 Throughout the year, the Supervisory Board has been involved in the development of Simavi’s 2014-2020 strategy, working on the ambition to structurally improve the health of 10 million people in 2020. Key areas within this strategy are a focused financing strategy (including intensified collaboration with the private sector), strong branding, a flexible organisational structure & culture and an evidence-based Theory of Change.

Strategic Human Resource The Supervisory Board was consulted and informed about the steps required to build a powerful, flexible and efficient organisation that stimulates innovation and entrepreneurship. Human Resource will focus on an impact-driven culture, fostering and rewarding talent, maintaining open dialogue and leadership, whilst safeguarding strong aspects of the formerly prevailing family culture such as involvement, commitment, collaboration and human-centeredness. The new organisational structure is in line with the 2014-2020 organisational strategy that has been determined.

WASH Alliance progress As Simavi is the lead agency for the Dutch WASH Alliance, the progress and developments within this strategic programme were often on the agenda of the Supervisory Board. In addition to discussing the Balance Score Card, the Annual Report, and the outcomes of the review performed by the Dutch ministry of foreign affairs (DGIS), the Supervisory Board was involved in strategic discussions about system change, up scaling and the WASH business case. Also, the Supervisory Board provided input on the Mid Term Evaluation (executed by external consultant MDF). The board requested special attention for the Alliance’s targets on sanitation.

Supervisory Board

53


Peepoo At the beginning of 2013 it became clear that Simavi’s partner Peepoople in the Peepoo project in Kibera, Kenya was not able to meet its targets for the second year in a row. Based on an extensive evaluation conducted together with Simavi, the appointment of a new management at Peepoople and strict progress reports, funding partner Dutch National Postcode Lottery decided to provide continued support for the completion of the Peepoo project in Kibera. The Supervisory Board closely followed progress and strategically advised Simavi’s executive board with regard to this programme. With support from Simavi, PeePoople revised and further developed their business model. The current business model has been greatly improved as a result of this process. Through close monitoring, advise and face-toface meetings in both the Netherlands and Kenya, great steps towards achieving the targets have been made. The supervisory board would like to thank the managing director of Simavi, the management team and all other employees and volunteers for their collective hard work and commitment that helped Simavi this year in realising its goals and in setting up a solid strategy and organisational structure for the years to come.

54

Supervisory Board


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8. Annual accounts

Strategy

55


8. Annual accounts

The annual accounts form an integral part of Simavi’s annual report. The chapters 1 to 7 give a detailed account of Simavi’s strategy, programmes, fundraising and other developments. The introduction below describes the main financial developments during 2013, Simavi’s financial policy and the budget for the year 2014.

Introduction Simavi’s overall financial objective in 2013, was to reach total income of €20,124,000. In 2013 however, Simavi realised total income of €18,196,000. Although this was an increase of more than 13 per cent compared to 2012, it was significantly lower than planned. The main reason for the deviation compared to budget was the decline in income from government grants. This decline is partly due to the presentation of amounts paid to WASH alliance partners. In general, the MFS II grants had a strong effect on the income (and expenditure), particularly the grant for the WASH Actual 2013

Budget 2013

Difference Actual 2013 - Budget 2013

608,000

566,000

42,000

1,744,000

1,990,000

-246,000

34,000

100,000

-66,000

548,000

150,000

398,000

2,934,000

2,806,000

128,000

210,000

240,000

-30,000

Co-financing projects other

53,000

322,000

-269,000

National Postcode Lottery

926,000

900,000

26,000

1,189,000

1,462,000

-273,000

Min. Foreign Affairs for Simavi

7,690,000

8,365,000

-675,000

Min. Foreign Affairs for WASH Alliance partners

5,947,000

6,715,000

-768,000

296,000

652,000

-356,000

Total, government grants

13,933,000

15,732,000

-1,799,000

Income from investments

97,000

124,000

-27,000

Other income

43,000

-

43,000

18,196,000

20,124,000

1,928,000

INCOME (in €) Income from direct fundraising Collections Donations and gifts (individual giving, private sector and foundations) Sponsoring Legacies and bequests Total, direct fundraising Income from third-party campaigns Co-financing projects Aqua for All

Total share of third-party campaigns Government grants

Other government grants (Swiss Development Cooperation SDC)

TOTAL INCOME

56

Annual accounts


Alliance, of which Simavi is lead agency. The amounts received as lead agency and paid out to WASH alliance partners are presented gross on the statement of income and expenditure in accordance with the applicable accounting rules. In 2013, the amounts paid to alliance partners totalled €5,947,000 compared to budget of approximately €6.7 million (in 2012, €6,305,000). This method of presentation has no impact on the net result.

Income from direct fundraising The income from direct fundraising presents a mixed picture. The total income from direct fundraising exceeded the 2013 budget by €128,000. This mainly resulted from higher income from legacies compared to budget (€548,000). Income from legacies and bequests is always conservatively budgeted given the uncertainties surrounding this form of income. The funds raised from the 2013 door-to-door collection (€608,000) were well above the minimum threshold of € 500,000 as stipulated by the Collecteplan Foundation, and they were noticeably higher than budget and last years’ realisation (2012: €578,000; see paragraph 3.1). Although income from donations and gifts increased with 9 per cent compared to 2012, income was €246,000 lower than budgeted. Both the number of donors and the average donation remained below budget due to a difficult market.

Income from third-party campaigns The income from third parties was €273,000 lower than the 2013 budget. The lower income mainly relates to budgeted income of €269,000 not being realised from the 13th draw of the National Postcode Lottery (NPL). However, we are proud to state that the NPL renewed its contract for the standard contribution with Simavi for a 5-year period starting in 2013 (€900,000 per year, in accordance with budget ). The €26,000 additional income from the NPL as recognised in 2013 relates to the Peepoo project.

Government grants The income from government funding amounted to €13,933,000, as compared to a budget of €15.7 million and €12,531,000 accounted for in 2012. This income is derived for the most part from multi-year grants under which the actual collection of the funding as well as the recognition of income depends on the actual performance of the programmes in each year. The difference with budget as well as compared to last year is mainly due to timing differences. The difference between grant funding received and eligible expenditure is accounted for on the balance sheet as amounts received in advance or yet to be received. Interest earnings on grant funding received in advance is ultimately spent on the original purpose of the grant, by means of forming a designated fund. In April 2010, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (through the Dutch embassy in Jakarta) awarded a grant for SHAW activities in Indonesia. This grant runs until the end of 2014 and amounts to a total of €8.6 million. Of this, €2,143,000 was accounted for as income in 2013 (2012: €1,752,000). The grant is not evenly distributed over the grant period, but is received and recognised as income depending on actual performance of the projects within the programme at that particular moment. In 2011, grants were allocated for SRHR and WASH activities; these grants will continue until the end of 2015. The annual allocation depends on the actual approval of the budget by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (the so-called budget reservation). Simavi is the lead agency of the WASH Alliance. The total of funding received in 2013 was €9,480,000, €5,947,000 of which was paid to WASH Alliance partners. The share intended for Simavi was €3,533,000. This is offset by eligible costs of €2,874,000 (2012: €2,699,000); this amount plus the payments of €5,947,000 to alliance partners was accounted for as income in the statement of income and expenditure for the year 2013. Simavi received a grant of €1,550,000 for SRHR. A total of €1,889,000 in eligible costs is recognised as income in 2013 (2012: €1,628,000). Under the ASK alliance (SRHR fund of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs) Simavi received €1,012,000 in 2013; the total expenditure in 2013 amounted to €688,000. Under Football for Water, Simavi received no payments in 2013 and €58,000 in 2012. In 2013 the total expenditure under Football for Water program was €330,000, €98,000 of which was funded by the Football for Water alliance

Annual accounts

57


(funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs), the remainder being financed through own funding. The assigned interest income on advance grant funding received, in the amount of €71,000, has been added to the designated fund and will be applied towards the underlying objectives. The interest received form advance grant fund of Ministry of foreign affairs of the Netherlands is €68,000. EXPENDITURE

Actual 2013

Budget 2013

Difference Actual 2013 Budget 2013

15,644,000

18,535,000

-2,891,000

Total costs of income generation

706,000

807,000

-101,000

Total management & administration costs

854,000

782,000

72,000

17,204,000

20,124,000

-2,920,000

(in €)

Total spent on objective

TOTAL EXPENDITURE

Expenditure on objectives The actual expenditure on the objectives is €2.9 million lower than budgeted. The difference between budget and realisation was caused by several reasons. In some countries setting up the ASK programme took more time than expected (see paragraph 2.1.3), which resulted in less expenses. Secondly, not all the funds that were received in 2013 for the programme of the Dutch WASH alliance were transferred in the same year to the alliance members. Finally, not all institutional and third-party funds that Simavi planned to raise were realised, which resulted in less income but also in less expenditure than budgeted. At the same time this expenditure increased with €1.1 million compared to 2012, from €14,527,000 in 2012 to €15,644,000 in 2013. This is the result of new programmes started following the grants received for the SRHR programme called ASK (€605,000) and a grant from the Swiss Development Cooperation of €296,000 and an increase of expenditure on existing programmes of €0.2 million. KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

2011

2012

2013

Total income

15,843,000

16,070,000

18,196,000

Total expenditure

15,478,000

15,989,000

17,204,000

Expenditure on objectives

14,108,000

14,527,000

15,644,000

% expenditure on objective / total income

89.0%

90.4%

86.0%

% expenditure on objective / total expenditure

91.1%

90.9%

90.9%

(in €)

The percentage of expenditure on objectives as compared to the total actual income in 2013 was 86.0 per cent, as compared to 90.4 per cent in 2012 and 92.1 per cent as budgeted. Corrected for the effect of recognised income and expenditure following the payments to the WASH alliance partners, the percentage in 2013 was 79.2 per cent (compared to 84.2 per cent in 2012 and 88.1 per cent as budgeted). The decrease in percentage is mainly due to the fact that part of 2013’s realised income will only be spent after the balance sheet date (see appropriation of result).

Management and administration costs Costs for management and administration increased by €72,000 compared to budget and by €109,000 compared to 2012 mainly following external advice, consultants and staff costs relating to the development of the new strategy and Theory of Change.

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Annual accounts


Financial Key Performance Indicators Simavi uses, in addition to the indicators used for expenditure on objectives (see above), three key performance indicators to report over its expenditure. These are: 1. The costs of fund-raising, expressed as a percentage of the income realised from direct fundraising (CBF standard); 2. The total cost of the Simavi organisation, expressed as a percentage of total expenditure; 3. Management and administration costs, expressed as a percentage of total expenditure. For the first two of these, we strive to maintain an average of below 25 per cent over three years. Our set maximum for the percentage of management and administration costs is 6.8 per cent. KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

2011

2012

2013

15,478,000

15,989,000

17,204,000

2,487,000

1,951,000

2,934,000

Cost of direct fundraising

604,000

552,000

554,000

Total management and administration costs

694,000

745,000

854,000

24.3%

28.3%

18.9%

4.5%

4.7%

5.0%

(in €) Total expenditure Total income from direct fundraising

% costs own fundraising / income direct fundraising (CBF%) % costs management & administration / total expenditure

The cost percentage fund-raising in 2013 amounted to 18.9 per cent (in 2012: 28.3 per cent). Taking the average over three years (2011, 2012 and 2013) gives a percentage of 23.8 per cent, This is according to the standard of CBF. The costs for management and administration, expressed as a percentage of the total expenditure, amounted to 5.0 per cent (4.7 per cent in 2012). Excluding the effect of recognised income and expenditure following the payments to the WASH alliance partners, the percentage was 7.6 per cent (7.7 per cent in 2012). The percentage of 7.6 is higher then the set maximum of 6.8 per cent, because Simavi has the structure (among others additional staff) in place to manage the entire WASH alliance.

Result The financial year 2013 closed with a positive result of €992,000. An amount of €943,000 has been added to the reserve for financing programme obligations and capacity building, per balance €13,000 is withdrawn from designated funds and €11,000 from the reserve for financing assets. As a result an amount of €73,000 is added to the continuity reserve of Simavi. For further details on our capital position and policy we refer to the notes to the annual accounts and the explanatory notes below under ‘Reserves and funds’. The result includes negative currency exchange rate differences of €24,336 on contracts in foreign currencies. The contracts with these currency exchange rate differences are a result of spending from Simavi’s own funds, and therefore do not lead to any change in chargeable expenditure for the determination of the grant amounts. The risk of currency exchange rate differences is limited as a result of measures taken by Simavi.

Financial position At Simavi, our premise is that we spend as much as possible of the received funds on the designated goals. However, we need to maintain certain reserves in order to safeguard the continuity of the projects and programmes we carry out and support. More information is provided in the section on reserves and funds.

Investments and liquidity The investment policy assumes that the nominal value of the investments is maintained under all circumstances; this explicitly means that we do not invest in shares, whereby the value of any other investments can be no larger than the

Annual accounts

59


size of the continuity reserve. Since 2012, Simavi decided to no longer invest the continuity reserve in bonds, due to their low expected rate of return. In 2013, all funds were placed on savings and deposit accounts with Dutch banks, maintaining a good spread between banks. This is part of Simavi’s risk-averse investment policy.

Reserves and funds After appropriation of results, the continuity reserve amounts to € 2,215,000. Notes on the capital policy can be found in the explanatory notes to the Annual Accounts. The reserve for financing of assets consist of funds tied up in tangible fixed assets. In 2013 a special-purpose reserve was formed through the appropriation of result in the amount of €943,000. This reserve will be used in coming years to invest in capacity building (€240,000) and for the financing of programmes (€703,000) of which realisation is conditional upon third-party funding not yet realised. The intended investment in capacity building has the aim to broaden and deepen our partner portfolio, so as to be able to anticipate growth and attract new donors. Attracting new donors can currently only take place if Simavi has more capacity to accommodate more funds. The fund can be used to identify new partners through identification missions, by performing capacity strengthening of existing partners and identify new partners and offer small ‘start-up capital’ to initiate small (pilot)programmes with them. In 2012, a special-purpose reserve was formed in the amount of €466,000 for Football for Water. This special-purpose reserve guaranteed the financing of this programme under the conditions of the grant. The designated fund consists of funds received, generally from legacies, which are earmarked for a specific goal, but which can, for various reasons, only be spent on that goal in a later year. In addition, the interest received on the advances for the WASH, SRHR, and SHAW grant was added to this fund because these funds must also be spent on the designated programmes. At the end of 2013, the designated fund totalled to € 429,000. In the coming years, these will be spent on the objectives for which they were intended. Further information can be found in the explanatory notes to the Annual Accounts.

Budget 2014 The Statement of income and expenditure for the year 2013 includes - for information purposes only - the budget for the year 2014. Over the course of the year 2014, the budget is evaluated and where appropriate or necessary adjusted by means of forecast updates. As explained in paragraph 3.1.1., Simavi decided that the nationwide door-to-door collection will be the last given the high cost of the collection compared to the benefits. Due to the absence of significant investments in the campaigns surrounding this last collection, it is anticipated that the 2014 income derived from it will be substantially lower than income realised in 2013. In budget 2014, income from legacies and bequests is included as a PM (Pro Memori) given the uncertainties surrounding this type of income. In 2014, Government grants are expected to increase in accordance with contracts and the expected timing of programmes and projects that are eligible under these grants. The main reason for the increase in income from government grants is due to the SDC and GNWP programmes (see paragraph 3.3) and expectations following new prospects initiated by our partnership development department . The expected increase in income in 2014, is expressed in a virtually congruent increase in the spending on Simavi’s objectives.

60

Annual accounts


Annual accounts Balance Sheet as per December 31, 2013 (after appropriation of results) ASSETS (in â‚Ź)

Note

31.12.2013

31.12.2012

32,000

43,000

p.m.

p.m.

438,000

363,000

Interest to be recieved

49,000

67,000

Grants to be recieved

235,000

89,000

Other receivables and prepayments/accrued income

384,000

427,000

Total, receivables and prepayments/accrued income

1,106,000

946,000

Cash on hand, bank accounts and deposit accounts

7,435,000

8,969,000

TOTAL ASSETS

8,573,000

9,958,000

31.12.2013

31.12.2012

2,215,000

2,143,000

32,000

43,000

1,409,000

466,000

429,000

442,000

4,085,000

3,093,000

208,000

1,118,000

1,448,000

2,590,000

11,000

25,000

2,821,000

3,142,000

8,573,000

9,958,000

Tangible fixed assets

1

Equipment Current assets

2

Receivables and accrued income Legacies with usufruct Bequests to be recieved

Cash and cash equivalents

LIABILITIES (in â‚Ź) Reserves and Funds

Note

3

Reserves Continuity reserve Reserve for financing assets Reserve for financing programme obligations Funds Designated fund Total reserves and funds Long-term liabilities Allocated project/programme commitments Short-term liabilities Allocated project/programme commitments (short-term) Taxes and social insurance premiums (short-term) Other liabilities, accruals and deferred income (short-term) TOTAL LIABILITIES

4

Annual accounts

61


Statement of Income and Expenditure for the year 2013 INCOME (in â‚Ź)

Note

Budget 2014

Budget 2013

Actual 2013 Actual 2012

358,000

566,000

608,000

578,000

2,018,000

1,990,000

1,744,000

1,598,000

-

100,000

34,000

78,000

p.m.

150,000

548,000

145,000

-

-

-

-448,000

2,376,000

2,806,000

2,934,000

1,951,000

251,000

240,000

210,000

72,000

30,000

322,000

53,000

42,000

-

-

-

-

The Dutch National Postcode Lottery

1,159,000

900,000

926,000

1,261,000

Total, share of third-party campaigns

1,440,000

1,462,000

1,189,000

1,375,000

Min. Foreign Affairs for Simavi

9,421,000

8,365,000

7,690,000

6,168,000

Min. Foreign Affairs for WASH Alliance partners

6,224,000

6,715,000

5,947,000

6,305,000

-

-

-

58,000

1,750,000

652,000

296,000

-

17,395,000

15,732,000

13,933,000

12,531,000

125,000

124,000

97,000

213,000

102,000

-

43,000

-

21,438,000

20,124,000

18,196,000

16,070,000

Income from direct fundraising Collections Donations and gifts Sponsoring Legacies and bequests Debit: Value correction on claim: legacies and bequests Total, direct fundraising

Income from third-party campaigns

7

Co-financing projects Aqua for All Co-financing projects other International funds

Governments grants

8

Co-financing projects PSO Other funds Total, government grants

Income from investments

Other Income TOTALE INCOME

62

Annual accounts

9


Statement of Income and Expenditure for the year 2013 EXPENDITURE (in â‚Ź)

Note

Budget 2014

Budget 2013

1,086,000

651,000

912,000

1,028,000

12,963,000

10,829,000

8,469,000

6,857,000

6,224,000

6,715,000

5,947,000

6,305,000

377,000

340,000

316,000

337,000

20,450,000

18,535,000

15,644,000

14,527,000

566,000

693,000

554,000

552,000

97,000

113,000

145,000

149,000

-

-

6,000

6,000

1,000

1,000

1,000

1,000

Costs of other income

193,000

-

-

9,000

Total costs of income generation

857,000

807,000

706,000

717,000

Spent on objective

Actual 2013 Actual 2012

10

Mobilisation Spent on mobilisation Programmes Spent on Simavi projects Paid to WASH Alliance partners Lobbying Spent on lobbying Total spent on objective Income generation

11

Costs of direct fundraising Cost of third-party campaigns Costs of obtaining government grants Costs of investments

Total management & administration costs

12

775,000

782,000

854,000

745,000

TOTAL EXPENDITURE

13

22,082,000

20,124,000

17,204,000

15,989,000

-644,000

-

992,000

81,000

166,000

-

73,000

-

Withdrawal from continuity reserve

-

-

-

-472,000

Addition to reserve for financing programme obligations

-

-

943,000

466,000

-810,000

-

-

-

Addition to reserve for financing assets

-

-

-

-

Withdrawal from reserve for financing assets

-

-

-11,000

-4,000

Addition to designated fund

-

-

71,000

91,000

Withdrawal from designated fund

-

-

-84,000

-

-644,000

-

992,000

81,000

RESULT Appropriation of result Addition to continuity reserve

Withdrawal from reserve for financing programme obligations

Annual accounts

63


CASH FLOW STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR 2013 (in â‚Ź) Result Value correction on claim re: legacies and bequests Adjustment for unarchieved exchange rate differences

-/-

Adjustment for amortization/depreciation

2013

2012

992,000

81,000

-

448,000

- -/-

43,000

21,000

22,000

1,013,000

508,000

Changes in operating capital Change in receivables

-/-

160,000 -/-

115,000

Change in short-term liabilities

-/-

1,467,000 -/-

1,569,000

Change in short-term liabilities based on project/programme commitments

-/-

910,000 -/-

776,000

Cash flow from operational activities

-/-

1,524,000 -/-

1,952,000

-/-

10,000 -/-

18,000

-/-

1,534,000 -/-

1,970,000

Cash flow from investment activities Investments in tangible fixed assetd Cash flow from financing activities Change in cash and cash equivalents

Balance of cash/cash equivalents on 1 January

8,969,000

10,939,000

Balance of cash/cash equivalents on 31 December

7,435,000

8,969,000

1,534,000 -/-

1,970,000

Change in cash and cash equivalents

64

Annual accounts

-/-


Accounting policies General The annual accounts have been prepared in accordance with the Dutch Accounting Standard for Fundraising Institutions (RJ 650) and is subjected to the “Wet Normering bezoldiging Topfunctionarissen publieke en semi publieke sector” (WNT). The annual accounts aim to provide a fair presentation of the financial position of the Simavi foundation as at December 31, 2013 and of its income and expenditure for the year 2013. The financial year coincides with the calendar year. The annual accounts are denominated in euros, Simavi’s functional and reporting currency. Transactions denominated in foreign currencies conducted during the reporting period are recognised in the annual accounts at the rate of exchange on the transaction date. Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are translated into the functional currency at the rate of exchange at the reporting date. Any resulting exchange differences are recognised through income or expenditure. With reference to the Netherlands Civil Code, Title 9, Article 407 1a, Section 13, the financial data of “Stichting NFICH” and “Stichting Zien” have not been consolidated. The auditor did not perform an audit on the budget for 2014.

Use of estimates In applying the accounting policies and standards for preparing annual accounts, the management of Simavi is required to make estimates and judgments that might be essential for the amounts disclosed in the annual accounts. If necessary for the purposes of providing the view required under Section 362(1), Book 2 of the Netherlands Civil Code, the nature of these estimates and judgments, including the related assumptions, has been disclosed in the notes to the relevant items.

Basis of measurement Unless indicated otherwise, the annual accounts have been prepared using the historical cost basis.

Basis for the valuation and presentation of assets and liabilities Tangible fixed assets Tangible assets are carried at cost less straight-line depreciation over their estimated useful lives. The percentages used are: Equipment 10 % Office machines 20 % Computers: 33 % Simavi has been located in a rented property since May 2005.

Financial instruments Financial instruments include receivables, liquid assets, allocated project/programme commitments, accounts payable, and other payable entries. Financial instruments are initially processed at fair value. Any directly attributable transaction costs are part of this initial valuation. After the initial processing, the financial instruments are valued in the manner described below.

Legacies with usufruct The capital acquired from legacies where third parties have rights to the usufruct are not included in the Annual Accounts due to uncertainty about the size of future payments and the time of payment.

Annual accounts

65


Receivables and accrued income Receivables and accrued income are initially included at fair value, and are subsequently valued at amortised cost price, allowance is made for obsolescence where necessary.

Reserves In order to secure the continuity of the foundation for at least one year in case of unexpected events, part of the Simavi’s capital was transferred to a separate continuity reserve as of 1996, in accordance with CBF regulations. The reserve is intended to rebuild the income within one year in the event of a revenue shortfall. The reserve also serves to ensure that Simavi can continue to support the projects which it has contractually agreed to support for the duration of the project and to complete these projects with support from the Netherlands. In forming the continuity reserve, Simavi adheres to a maximum size equal to one and a half times the annual costs of the work organisation based on the budget for the following year plus recruitment costs. This procedure is in accordance with the assets’ guidelines set by the Association for Fund-raising Institutions (VFI). Specifically, this means that there is a maximum amount of €4,815,000 for the continuity reserve as of 31 December 2013. The actual continuity reserve amounts to €2,215,000 at the end of 2013, after appropriation of the result for 2013. Furthermore, Simavi holds a reserve for financing fixed assets in the amount of €32,000 and for guarantying the financing of programme obligations of which realisation is conditional upon third-party funding not yet realised or is designated by management to finance future partner capacity building efforts (total €1,409,000). Both reserves are unrestricted and are expected to be used within 2-3 years after the balance sheet date. The designated fund (in the amount of €429,000 at the end of 2013) represents all received earmarked funds that the donor intended for a specific purpose, of which the objective has not yet been achieved. Furthermore, interest income has been added to the designated fund as earned on the advance payments of grants regarding the WASH, SHAW, and SRHR programmes. The earmarked funds from the designated fund are expected to be used in the coming years.

Pension scheme Simavi’s pension scheme is managed by Delta Lloyd and includes, in part, a retirement pension based on a final salary system; for members of staff who joined after 1 December 2006, it is an average salary system. This scheme is considered a defined pension scheme. Because Simavi qualifies as a small legal entity, this scheme has been included in the annual accounts as a defined contribution scheme, in accordance the Dutch Council for Annual Reporting for small legal entities. This could mean that not all risks related to this pension scheme are included in the pension commitment recorded in the balance sheet.

Allocated project/programme commitments The grants allocated as of the balance sheet date, which have not been paid yet (money pledged to projects in Africa and Asia) are divided into short-term liabilities (to be settled within one year of balance sheet date) and long-term liabilities. The amounts that are expected to be settled after more than one year after the balance sheet date, are accounted for as long-term liabilities. The expected duration of the projects is a maximum of three years. The grants not yet paid are held at the bank as assets, which accounts for the high sum of cash and cash equivalents.

Conversion of foreign currency Cash assets and liabilities in foreign currency are converted into euros at the closing rate at year’s end. Exchange differences are accounted for in the statement of income and expenditure, where their method of presentation depends on the nature of the underlying asset or liability.

66

Annual accounts


Basis for determining the results Income from collections, donations, gifts and sponsoring Income from collections, donations and gifts and sponsoring are accounted for in the year in which they are received, with the exception of receivables that can be attributed to a period in which a certain activity took place and can be considered as realised.

Income from legacies and bequests Legacies and bequests are accounted for as income in the year in which their amount can be reliably determined. Provisional payments in the form of advance payments are accounted for in the financial year in which they are received as income from legacies, in cases in which a reliable estimate was not possible at an earlier time.

Income from third-party campaigns Income from third-party campaigns relates to the activities in which the foundation bears no risk. This income is accounted for in the year in which the proceeds are received and/or committed by the third party.

Government grants Income from grants that have been allocated by the donor depending on actual project costs will be accounted for in the statement of income and expenditure in the year that the eligible expenditure is recognised. In this context, the (eligible) expenditure in respect of alliance partners in alliances where Simavi is the lead agency (WASH Alliance) is equal to the amounts paid to these partners. Differences in allocated and actual income from grants are accounted for in the statement of income and expenditure in the year in which these differences can be reliably estimated.

Expenditure For contracts financed by third parties the matching principle is applied; income and expenses will be allocated and accounted for in the statement of income and expenditure. Amounts spent on Simavi Projects and programmes are accounted for as expenditure in the financial year in which the contribution has been unconditionally pledged. The expenditure recognised in the statement of income and expenditure includes the related direct and indirect organisational costs. Fund-raising, mobilisation and management & administration costs are charged to the statement of income and expenditure in the year to which they pertain. Salaries, wages and social security contributions are recognised in the statement of income and expenditure based onthe pay and benefits package to the extent that they are payable to employees.

Expenditure allocation Expenditure allocation is described in note 13 of the notes to the statement of income and expenditure. Income from investment Income from investment mainly comprise of interest income, which is recognised on a time weighted basis

Notes to the cash flow statement The cash flow statement has been drafted using the indirect method. To determine the change in cash and cash equivalents during the reporting period, the result for that year is adjusted for items in the statement of income and expenditure and for balance sheet movements that did not result in actual cash flows. The cash flow statement makes a distinction between cash flow from operational, investment and financing activities. In this context, changes in long-term debts from allocated project/programme commitments will be presented as cash flow from operational activities.

Annual accounts

67


Notes to the balance sheet 1.

Tangible fixed assets

The book value of the Equipment can be specified as follows: TANGIBLE FIXED ASSETS

2013

2012

Book value as at 1 January

43,000

47,000

Investments

10,000

18,000

53,000

65,000

-/- 21,000

-/- 22,000

32,000

43,000

2013

2012

115,000

112,000

(in €) EQUIPMENT, OFFICE MACHINE AND COMPUTERS

Amortization/depreciation Book value as at 31 December

PURCHASE VALUES (in €) Purchase prices of assets listed above were as follows Equipment

The investments in 2013 consisted of the purchase of computers and servers amounting to €10,000. The acquisition price was offset by decommissioned computer equipment with a value of €7,000. The tangible fixed assets are used for operations.

68

Annual accounts


2.

Current assets

Receivables and accrued income Legacies with usufruct This represents seven (2012: 7) legacies encumbered with usufruct.

Bequests to be received The total of the bequests to be received has increased by €75,000. The bequests will be settled between 1 to 4 years after the balance sheet date. Any future revenue from heads of this legacy will immediately be recognised in the near future as income. The realised income from the legacies are in line with cash received by bank.

OTHER RECEIVABLES AND PREPAYMENTS/ACCRUED INCOME

2013

2012

Advance costs paid

202,000

118,000

Accounts receivable

177,000

278,000

5,000

31,000

384,000

427,000

(in €)

Other items

The accounts receivable item includes €156,000 in committed contributions to be received in 2014.

Cash and cash equivalents The total of cash and cash equivalents is €7,435,000. The cash and cash equivalents are placed on interest-bearing current accounts or savings accounts. There are no cash or cash equivalents placed on deposit. As of 31 December 2013, €7,435,000 was available upon demand. The average yield on the outstanding cash, and cash equivalents held was 1.30 per cent in 2013 (2012: 2.09 per cent).

Annual accounts

69


3.

Reserves and funds

RESERVES AND FUNDS

2013

2012

As per 1 January

2,142,000

2,614,000

Credit: Addition

73,000

-

-

472,000

2,215,000

2,142,000

2013

2012

43,000

47,000

(in €) Continuity reserve

Debit: Withdrawal As per 31 December

Special purpose reserves Reserve, financing assets As per 1 January Credit: Addition Debit: Withdrawal

-/-

As per 31 December

11,000

-/-

4,000

32,000

43,000

466,000

-

-

466,000

Credit: Addition Capacity building

240,000

-

Credit: Addition project/ programmes

703,000

-

1,409,000

466,000

Reserve, financing programme obligations As per 1 January Credit: Addition Football for Water

As per 31 December

Special purpose reserve The reserve for financing of assets consist of funds tied up in tangible fixed assets.

Football for Water In 2012 a fund was formed in the amount of €466,000 to cover the expenditure for projects within the Football for Water programme in 2014 and 2015, for that part not financed by government grants.

Capacity Building This fund is created with the main aim to broaden and deepen our partner portfolio, in order to be able to anticipate growth and attract new donors. New donors can currently only be attracted when Simavi has more capacity to accommodate more funds. The fund can be used to identify new partners through identification missions, to invest in capacity strengthening of existing partners and identify new partners and to offer small ‘start-up capital’ for initiating small programmes with them.

70

Annual accounts


Projects The fund for projects/ programmes is formed for those projects and programmes to be financed by third parties to which the matching principle by means of own funds of Simavi applies. Notwithstanding this fund, realisation of the relevant projects and programmes is, however, still depending on the actual realisation of third party financing. The expenditure for these projects will take place in 2014 and 2015.

DESIGNATED FUNDS

2013

2012

442,000

351,000

71,000

91,000

Debit: Withdrawal regarding children's eye care in Nepal

-44,000

0

Debit: Withdrawal regarding children's eye care in Irian Jaya

-40,000

0

As per 31 December

429,000

442,000

(in â‚Ź) For assets received with specific purpose designated by third parties As per 1 January Credit: Addition regarding interest to be spent on objective

The assigned interest income on advance grant funding received, in the amount of 71,000 euro, has been added to the designated fund and will be applied towards the underlying objectives. Specification of designated funds To be spent on MFS and SHAW projects To be spent on eye care in Nepal To be spent on children's eye care in Africa To be spent in Irian Jaya

221,000

150,000

2,000

46,000

146,000

146,000

60,000

100,000

429,000

442,000

Annual accounts

71


4.

Short-term liabilities

OTHER LIABILITIES, ACCRUALS AND DEFERRED INCOME

2013

2012

205,000

443,000

Current account Stichting NFIG and stichting Zien

77,000

77,000

Accrued for vacation hours

84,000

79,000

Accrued for holiday allowance

91,000

85,000

Accounting expenses

56,000

36,000

Still to be spent on Peepoo

50,000

75,000

Advance payment, projects

162,000

-

Advance payment, SHAW grant

155,000

1,106,000

Advance payment, WASH grant

1,077,000

418,000

864,000

540,000

-

273,000

2,821,000

3,132,000

(in â‚Ź)

Accounts payable

Advance payment, ASK grant Advance payment, SRHR grant

72

Annual accounts


Off balance sheet rights and obligations 5 .

Off-balance sheet rights

Simavi has received grants from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs for the 2011-2015 period. For WASH, the amount of the grant is €45,459,515 for the total alliance, for which Simavi acts as the lead agency. Of this, €9,480,000 was received in 2013. For 2014, an amount of €9,285,000 has been set. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs has put a reservation on the financing for the 2014-2015 period. This reservation is expressed in the contracts between Simavi and its alliance partners and southern partners. The provision of this reservation is that if the financing by the ministry changes in any way, Simavi’s financing will also change to the same degree. For SRHR, as member of the SRHR Alliance, Simavi has a conditional entitlement to a grant of €8,862,404 for the 2011-2015 period. In 2013, €1,550,000 was received, and in 2014, €1,889,000 will be received. For this grant, the ministry has also stipulated a reservation on the funding as it has for WASH. Simavi as an alliance partner of the Football for Water programme has a conditional entitlement to a total grant of €610,000 during the programme 2012-2016. In 2014 Simavi will receive an amount of €122,000 from the lead agency of in this programme. Due to the ASK programme, Simavi (as alliance partner) is granted a conditional right of €3,847,000 for the period 2013-2015. In 2013, €1,012,000 was received and in 2014, €1,333,000 will be received. For the SHAW programme Simavi will receive an amount of €1,918,000 of Ministry of Foreign Affairs in 2014.

6 .

Off-balance sheet obligations

Under the framework of the WASH, SRHR, ASK, F4W and SHAW programmes, Simavi and its Southern partners entered into contractual commitments to carry out projects in areas where Simavi operates. Where these contracts depend on conditions yet to be met, such as the external grant allocation by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, they have not been accounted for in the balance sheet as of 31 December 2013. These liabilities, not included in the balance sheet, amounted to €5,508,000 at the end of 2013. Additionally, for regular contracts where contracts depend on conditions yet to be met as well, off balance sheet commitments amounted to €1,488,000 at the end of 2013. In the context of Simavi’s role as lead agency of the WASH alliance, it has a contingent liability as of 31 December 2013 towards its alliance partners in the amount of €11,723,000. Here again, the Ministry’s grant allocation is conditional. A rental agreement has been entered into for the building at the Fonteinlaan 5 in Haarlem, with lease duration to 1 January 2015. As of 1 January 2014, the rental agreement will be €89,000 per year, subject to annual indexation. A bank guarantee for this lease has been issued in the amount of €28,000. Meanwhile, the rental agreement has been renewed for another 12 months and can be terminated by Simavi every three months starting from 1 januari 2015.

Annual accounts

73


Notes on the statement of income and expenditure 7 .

Income from third-party campaigns

In 2013, a sum of €210,000 (2012: €72,000) was recognised as income for the contribution of Aqua for All with regard to joint aid projects. In 2013, Simavi received €900,000 as a contribution from the Dutch National Postcode Lottery. Furthermore, Simavi received €1,621,000 from the Dutch National Postcode Lottery for the PeePoo project in 2011, of which €1,545,000 was committed or paid and accounted for as income in 2011 en 2012. In 2013, €26,000 was spent on this project and accounted for as income. At the end of 2013, the remaining amount to be spent, €50,000 was accounted for in the balance sheet as an advance contribution received from the National Postcode Lottery under the item ‘other liabilities, accruals and deferred income’ (see note 4).

8.

Government grants

The table below gives an overview of grants received from the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs. WASH

SRHR

SHAW

ASK

Football for Water

Totaal

Grants received for Simavi

3,533,000

1,550,000

1,192,000

1,012,000

-

7,287,000

Grants received for alliance partners

5,947,000

Total grants received from Ministry of Foreign affairs Netherlands

9,480,000

1,550,000

1,192,000

1,012,000

Credit: advance grants received as at 01-01-2013

418,000

273,000

1,106,000

540,000

Debit: grant income accounted for in 2013 based on expenditures

8,821,000

1,889,000

2,143,000

688,000

98,000 13,639,000

Advance grants received as at 31-12-2013

1,077,000

155,000

864,000

2,096,000

Grants still to be received as at 31-122013 Allocated interest income on advances received

5,947,000

66,000

31,000

21,000

7,000

9,000

58,000 13,292,000 (89,000)

2,248,000

129,000

195,000

-

68,000

Simavi is the lead agency of the MFS II WASH alliance. Along with general responsibility, this means that Simavi receives all grant payments from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs for the WASH Alliance (€9,480,000). A portion of these payments are immediately paid to the alliance partners for the implementation of the projects they support (€ 5,947,000), and recognised as income at the date of payment based on applicable accounting standards. The income from government grants based on eligible expenditure on programmes and costs of Simavi itself in the WASH alliance in 2013 amounted to €2,874,000. Total income from the Wash alliance recognised in 2013 amounted to €8,821,000 Under the MFS II SRHR alliance, Simavi received €1,550,000 in grant funding via the lead partner of that alliance,

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Annual accounts


RutgersWPF. Income from government grants recognised based on eligible expenditure amounted to €1,889,000 in 2013. Under the SHAW programme, Simavi received €1,190,000. Income from government grants recognised based on eligible expenditure amounted to €2,143,000 in 2013. For Football for Water, Simavi received no payments in 2013 and €58,000 in 2012. Income from government grants recognised based on eligible expenditure amounted to €98,000 in 2013. For the ASK programme Simavi received € 1,012,000 in 2013 from the SRHR fund of the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Income from government grants recognised based on eligible expenditure amounted to €688,000 in 2013. This programme started in 2013 and will run until 2015. The assigned interest income on advance grant funding received from the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, in the amount of €68,000,has been added to the designated fund and will be spend according to the underlying objectives. A positive balance between the grant funding received and the actual expenditure eligible for grant funding is presented in the balance sheet as advance grant funding under the ‘Other liabilities, accruals and deferred income’ item. In the event of a negative balance, these assets are accounted for as ‘Grants to be received’.

Other grants Simavi received in 2013 a grant from the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation of €296,000. This grant was fully spent in 2013, according to the planning of the contract with SDC. Assigned interest income amounted to €3,000 during 2013, which amount has been added to the designed fund.

9.

Result from investments

RESULT FROM INVESTMENTS (in €)

Budget 2014

Budget 2013

Actual 2013 Actual 2012

Interest income on bank balances and deposit accounts

125,000

124,000

97,000

213,000

Income from investments

125,000

124,000

97,000

213,000

Costs of investments

-1,000

-1,000

-1,000

-1,000

Net investment result

124,000

123,000

96,000

212,000

10. Expenditure spent on objectives Below, we present the ratio of total expenditures on the objective as a percentage of total income SPENDING PERCENTAGE (in €)

Budget 2014

Budget 2013

Total spent on objective

20,450,000

18,535,000

15,644,000

14,527,000

Total income

21,438,000

20,124,000

18,196,000

16,070,000

95.4%

92.1%

86.0%

90.4%

Spending percentage

Actual 2013 Actual 2012

Corrected for the effect of the payments to the WASH alliance partners, the percentage was 79.2% in 2013 (84.2% in 2012).

Annual accounts

75


11. Income generation COSTS OF DIRECT FUNDRAISING (in â‚Ź) Operating costs of internal organisation Collection Newsletter and mailings Acquisition of new donors Gift campaigns Bequests Corporate fundraising Walking for Water

Budget 2014

Budget 2013

Actual 2013 Actual 2012

214,000

202,000

170,000

208,000

31,000

149,000

146,000

192,000

260,000

232,000

193,000

75,000

8,000

24,000

16,000

49,000

10,000

1,000

4,000

1,000

-

15,000

-

1,000

9,000

7,000

5,000

6,000

34,000

63,000

20,000

20,000

566,000

693,000

554,000

552,000

Within the fixed total, the budget for the fund-raising costs is flexible. An annual plan is made in advance, listing the activities to which a budget is linked. During the year, it sometimes becomes clear that activities cannot be continued, or other activities take priority. This enables Simavi to actively take advantage of the opportunities that arise.

FUND-RAISING COST PERCENTAGE (in â‚Ź) Income from direct fundraising Costs of direct fundraising Fundraising cost percentage

76

Annual accounts

Budget 2014

Budget 2013

Actual 2013 Actual 2012

2,376,000

2,806,000

2,934,000

1,951,000

566,000

693,000

554,000

552,000

23.8%

24.7%

18.9%

28.3%


12. Management & administration MANAGEMENT & ADMINISTRATION (in â‚Ź)

Budget 2014

Budget 2013

Costs of management & administration

775,000

782,000

Actual 2013 Actual 2012

854,000

745,000

The increase in management & administration costs in 2013, as compared to 2012, can be largely attributed to the increase of the number of fulltime equivalents employed as administrative staff and the extra accounting costs entailed by the detailed reporting required for the MFS grants.

Annual accounts

77


13. Notes to expenditure appropriation EXPENDITURE APPROPRIATION (in €)

Mobilisation

Grants and contributions Publicity and communication and outsourced work

Programmes

Lobbying

Fundraising

Campaigns Third Parties

13,728,000

596,000

106,000

66,000

385,000

43,000

277,000

1,148,000

219,000

149,000

94,000

Accommodation costs

18,000

74,000

14,000

10,000

6,000

Office and general expenses

19,000

78,000

15,000

10,000

6,000

Amortization and interest

2,000

10,000

2,000

1,000

1,000

912,000

14,416,000

316,000

555,000

150,000

Staff costs

Total

All direct and indirect costs are allocated to 1) the three objectives of Simavi, being mobilisation, programmes and lobbying; 2) to the costs of income generation; and 3) to management & administration costs. Next to direct costs spent on Simavi Projects, all other direct costs are directly allocated to the activity and are specified under the ‘Publicity, communication and contracted work’ item. All indirect costs, such as staff, accommodation, office and general expenses and depreciation are allocated based on the number of hours employees spend on the aforementioned components. A calculation of the hours spent is made for every employee. This calculation is based on the employee’s job description, reviewed by Simavi’s management team and approved by the Managing Director. ‘Management & Administration costs’ includes all administrative and secretarial hours, as well as all hours classified by the organisation as overhead, such as meetings with the Supervisory Board and other meetings intended to provide guidance and direction for the organisation.

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Annual accounts


Investment

1,000

1,000

Other Income

Management & administration

Total 2013

Budget 2013

Total 2012

13,728,000

16,863,000

12,556,000

1,196,000

1,094,000

1,437,000

577,000

1,736,000

1,732,000

1,666.000

37,000

159,000

135,000

103,000

235,000

364,000

277,000

210,000

5,000

21,000

23,000

17,000

854,000

17,204,000

20,124,000

15,989,000

Annual accounts

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14. Explanatory notes to staff costs STAFF COSTS (in €)

Budget 2014

Budget 2013

1,999,000

1,849,000

1,796,000

1,936,000

Social insurance premiums, insurances

422,000

299,000

314,000

211,000

Costs of pension facilities

158,000

177,000

155,000

152,000

Other staff costs

132,000

156,000

199,000

88,000

subtotal, staff costs

2,711,000

2,481,000

2,464,000

2,387,000

Debit: Charged on

-893,000

-749,000

-728,000

-721,000

1,818,000

1,732,000

1,736,000

1,666,000

Salaries in the Netherlands

Actual 2013 Actual 2012

The increase of staff costs can mainly be attributed to the increase in the number of staff positions, as shown in the table below. The extra positions were mainly the result of the activities for the MFS II grants. The large increase under ‘Other staff costs’ was caused by the costs for external advice, consultant and staff relating to the development of the revised organisational strategy and the Simavi Theory of Change. The charged on costs relate to activities that can be attributed to the projects and can be reimbursed.

AVERAGE NUMBER OF PERSONS EMPLOYED

On Dutch contract In Indonesia through partner organisations

ACTUEL FTEs

On Dutch contract In Indonesia through partner organizations

Budget 2014

Budget 2013

Actual 2013 Actual 2012

48

48

46

44

4

3

4

3

Budget 2014

Budget 2013

43.4

42.2

40.6

38.3

4

3

4

3

Actual 2013 Actual 2012

Management model and remuneration As of 14 March 2007, Simavi has had a Supervisory Board for monitoring, supervision and giving advice, and a one person Executive Board (the Managing Director) for the implementation of Simavi’s Strategy and its day to day management. Notes can be found in Chapter 5.3 of the annual report.

Remuneration of Supervisory Board The members of the Supervisory Board receive no remuneration for their activities. Likewise, the members of the Supervisory board have not received any loans, advance payments or guarantees.

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Annual accounts


Remuneration of the Managing Director The Supervisory Board determines the remuneration policy, the level of the executive remuneration and other fixed remuneration components. The policy is reviewed periodically. The last review took place in 2011. Since then there have been no changes. Simavi follows the guidelines of the VFI Advisory Guidelines for the Remuneration of Executives of Charities and the Wijffels Code (see www.vfi.nl) in determining the remuneration policy and setting remuneration levels. The Advisory Guidelines stipulate a maximum norm for the annual income based on difficulty criteria. The weighting of the situation at Simavi was carried out by Simavi’s Audit Committee. This led to a BSD score of 415 points, with a maximum annual income of €109,550 in 2013. The actual annual income relevant for review against the VFI norm was, in 2013, €93,312 for the Managing Director A.D. Brouwer. Therefore the maximum as set by the VFI is not exceeded. There were no further emoluments other than the salary and holiday allowance; in other words, no bonuses were provided. Expense allowances are only made based on actual costs incurred, and contain no remuneration elements. Simavi does not, for example, offer lease cars. The level and composition of the remuneration is shown below. EMPLOYMENT MANAGING DIRECTOR

A.D. Brouwer Managing Director indefinite

Nature (term) hours

36

part-time percentage

100

period

1/1/13-31/12/13

gross wage/salary

86,400

vacation bonus

6,912

Remuneration (EUR) Annual income

93,312

Total annual income Costs of hiring interim exec, incl. VAT

9,000

Social insurance (employer portion) (commute travel expenses only)

Taxable expense reimbursements/additions (employer portion minus personal contribution)

Pension expenses

1,641 12,000 115,953

Total The Managing Director did not receive any loan, advance payment or guarantees.

Remuneration of Simavi Goodwill Ambassadors Ms Antje Monteiro and Ms Dieuwertje Blok, Simavi’s Goodwill Ambassadors, both carried out their activities without receiving remuneration.

WNT FUNCTION

Managing Director

Name

Effective date of employment

Employment in FTE

Reward

Taxable fixed and variable expenses

Facilities remuneration payable in the future

A.D. Brouwer

01-01-13

1

89,000

2,000

12,000

Annual accounts

81


15. Multi-year income analysis Below is an overview of Simavi’s income over the past six years. The amounts in the table below are in thousands of euros. Collections

Individual giving

Foundations, private sector and sponsoring

Legacies and bequests

Third-party campaigns

Goverment Grants

Other

Total income

2008

491

734

614

382

1,687

2,524

394

6,826

2009

549

1,088

648

558

1,509

2,607

484

7,443

2010

601

1,018

131

859

1,525

4,583

286

9,003

2011

632

1,244

141

470

2,091

10,969

296 15,843

2012

578

701

975

-303

1,375

12,531

213 16,070

2013

608

712

1,066

548

1,189

13,933

140 18,196

With proceeds of €608,000, the collections reached a figure that was well above the defined limit of € 500,000. This threshold is designated as the minimum amount required by the Collecte Plan Foundation (SCP) to remain on the collection schedule. The costs of collection have increased substantially as looking for new collectors is hindered by the do-not-call register. Identifying new ways of fund-raising is an ongoing process. The increase in income from foundations, private sector and sponsoring reflects Simavi’s successful year in collaborating with the private sector. In 2013, proceeds from bequests increased from the level of the previous year. In 2012, the amount was strongly influenced by the write-off of a receivable previously recognised. Further the number of bequests has increased compared to 2012. An action plan has been drafted to motivate donors to make Simavi a beneficiary in their wills. The third-party campaigns include the contributions of the Dutch National Postcode Lottery, Aqua for All and other third parties. The regular contribution of the Dutch National Postcode Lottery was €900,000, as planned (see chapter 3.2.1). The decline compared to 2011 and 2012 mainly relates to the impact of the Peepoo project, a special programme financed by NPL. In 2013, grants were received for six programmes: the SHAW, WASH and SRHR programmes, ASK, Football for Water and SDC. The trend in other income is strongly affected by the development of interest percentages over the years.

Haarlem, 28 May 2014

Executive board

Supervisory board

Ariette Brouwer

Maria Martens Esther Scheers Laura de Graaf Frans Blanchard Ron Thiemann

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Annual accounts


foto: xxxxxxxxxx

9. Other information

foto: Lieke Ongering

Annual accounts

83


9. Other information

Appropriation of result The financial year 2013 closed with a positive result of €992,000. An amount of €943,000 has been added to the reserve for financing programme obligations and capacity building, per balance €13,000 is withdrawn from designated funds and €11,000 from the reserve for financing assets. As a result an amount of €73,000 is added to the continuity reserve of Simavi.

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Other information


Independent auditor’s report To: the Supervisory Board of Stichting Simavi

Report on the financial statements We have audited the accompanying financial statements 2013 of Stichting Simavi, Haarlem, which comprise the balance sheet as at 31 December 2013, the statement of income and expenditure for the year then ended and the notes comprising a summary of the accounting policies and other explanatory information.

The executive board’s responsibility The executive board of the Foundation is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements and for the preparation of the annual report, both in accordance with Directive 650 Fundraising Institutions of the Dutch Accounting Standards Board. Furthermore, the executive board is responsible for such internal control as it determines is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Auditor’s responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Dutch law, including the Dutch Standards on Auditing. This requires that we comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the foundation’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by the executive board, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion.

Opinion In our opinion, the financial statements give a true and fair view of the financial position of Stichting Simavi as at 31 December 2013, and of its result for the year then ended in accordance with Directive 650 Fundraising Institutions of the Dutch Accounting Standards Board.

Report on other legal and regulatory requirements We have no deficiencies to report as a result of our examination whether the executive board report, to the extent we can assess, has been prepared in accordance with Directive 650 Fundraising Institutions of the Dutch Accounting Standards Board. Further, we report that the executive board report, to the extent we can assess, is consistent with the financial statements. The Hague, 28 May 2014 KPMG Accountants N.V. H. Visser RA

Other information

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Annex 1 Programme results overview 2013 The list below is an overview of the results that are monitored under the Simavi planning, monitoring and evaluation system (see paragraph 2.3).

1.

Simavi Community Health and Simavi WASH programme

SIMAVI COMMUNITY HEALTH AND SIMAVI WASH PROGRAMME

Number of people that received information on WASH through media in 2013 (TV, Radio, newspaper, mobile phone, internet)

WASH

SRHR

1,625,100

Number of people that received information on WASH through direct information sharing in 2013 (community meetings, door to door visits)

311,200

Number of people that obtained access to safe drinking water in 2013

137,200

Number of people that obtained access to improved sanitation facilities in 2013

123,600

Number of people that improved their hygiene behaviour in 2013 compared to their behaviour in 2012

154,700

Number of people that received information on SRHR through media in 2013 (TV, Radio, newspaper, mobile phone, internet)

149,700

Number of people that received information SRHR through direct information sharing in 2013 (community meetings, door to door visits)

164,400

Number of people that have better access to SRHR services in 2013 than in 2012 Number of NGO staff members trained in 2013 Number of Community groups trained in 2013 Capacity Strengthening stakeholders

Simavi results

79,600 930 2,300

Number of Government Health Service Providers trained in 2013

400

Number of Private Sector Service Providers trained in 2013

900

Number of health workers trained in 2013

1,000

2. UFBR programme UFBR PROGRAMME

Programme Officers are actively involved in x number of relevant networks Number of CSO (staff members trained to increase their knowledge and skills on SRHR, based on Number of SRHR education programmes improved on quality standards of CSE Number of educators trained to deliver SRHR education Number of young people, women and men, who participated in SRHR education

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Simavi results

40 6,200 5 2,900 1,77,990


Number of service providers trained to deliver SRH services

22,700

Number of health facilities renovated

24

Number of SRH services provided by PO to young people and adults

261,900

Number of SRH services provided by subcontractors- government facilitated by partners

150,800

Number of partners with an implemented advocacy strategy and advocacy work plan on SRHR

10

Number of advocacy meetings conducted at local, regional, or national level Number of community members and community leaders participating in SRHR awareness raising Number of persons reached by SRHR awareness raising activities through (new) media

300 367,300 8,400,000

Number of people trained in awareness raising activities

5,900

Number of Key staff members trained in the areas mentioned

140

Number of partner organisations who have developed and implemented a capacity building plan

4

3. ASK programme ASK PROGRAMME

Number of contraceptive commodities by type provided to young people under the age of 25 years

Simavi results

16,800

Number of clients that receive ARV in targeted clinics and through outreach

80

Number of health clinics with improved integrated SRH services by implementing the integrated package of essential services for young people.

120

Number of clinics that comply with the most recent safe abortion guidelines (= Number of clinics that provide abortions through harm reduction model)

0

Number of women (under 25) receiving ante natal care (at least four visits) in targeted health services

4,200

Number of birth attended by skilled health personal in the targeted health clinics

3,600

Number of SRH services, through health facilities and outreach provided to young people under 25 years, including PCMT, safe abortion, VCT

3,900

X% of the project areas have a referral system linking public/private for profit SRH services Number of young people that have received information on SRH and SRH services

7 68,300

Number of information channels with referral systems in place.

12

Number of educators capacitated through e-learning/e-support

960

Number of staff of youth-led organisations trained in SRHR service in programming and advocacy

70

Number of youth led organisations with increase in organisational capacity in SRH service programming and advocacy

0

Annex

87


Number of staff of partner organisations trained in meaningful youth participation in programme design, planning, implementation,monitoring and evaluation, research and advocacy Number of partner organisations with functional structures for the involvement of young people in program design/planning/implementation/monitoring, evaluation, research and advocacy Number of followers innovative/internet based SRHR groups for young people Number of people reached by campaigns on Adolescents SRHR and access to services

30 0 600 96,900

Number of youth led community activities to gain SRHR support

10

Number of policy makers that actively take young people’s SRHR to the forefront of the political debate

20

Number of times a consortium, including youth led organisations, is invited by policy makers to participate in policy processes on SRHR and at district, national or international advocacy

3

4. Dutch WASH Alliance programme DUTCH WASH ALLIANCE PROGRAMME

Simavi results

Number of people that use improved sanitation facilities

218,100

Number of people that use improved drinking water sources

197,000

Number of people (small producers, businesses or service providers) trained and/or supported on WASH service delivery Number of credit products for WASH that have been institutionalised Number of pilots on credit for WASH service construction, operation and maintenance developed and tested

1,100 3 10

Number of lobby meetings attended by the Alliance representatives

140

Number of people from country programme partners or other WASH stakeholders trained on budget tracking methodologies

700

Number of multi-stakeholder WASH programmes are or are being implemented

20

Number of active WASH stakeholder coordination structures in the areas where the Alliance is working

100

Number of government representatives of local departments trained on their role in the WASH sector

200

Number of measures taken within governmental institutions as a result of awareness on the practical implications of people’s Right to Water and Sanitation (RWTS)

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Annex

7


Number of government representatives of local departments trained on RTWS Number of people that have access to improved sanitation facilities in public places like schools, health centres and markets

300 29,100

Number of people that have access to improved drinking water sources

145,800

Number of people that are reached with awareness campaigns on hygiene and sanitation

336,800

Number of people that are reached through the media on hygiene and sanitation

19,666,500

Number of partners with improved capacities compared to the baseline

9

Number of representatives from the CSO and private sector trained on RTWS

100

Number of country programme partners that have integrated the Sustainability Monitoring Framework in their operations and can provide accurate data on the sustainability of water and sanitation facilities in their area.

2

Number of country programme partners trained on the use of the Sustainability Monitoring Framework

4

Number of income generating initiatives on the use of waste, waste water, excreta, etc..

3

Number of people involved in pilots and trainings

2,400

Number of programme partners that have adopted the key elements of Environmental Sustainability (as defined by the WASH Alliance) in strategic documents related to their policy, planning, technical guidance, implementation, lobby & advocacy.

8

Number of representatives of country programme partners and stakeholders capacitated on approaches to Environmental Sustainability for WASH

100

Number of country programme partners that received tailor-made trainings as a follow-up to the organisational capacity assessment (mark yes under target and results if applicable'

10

5. SHAW programme SHAW PROGRAMME

Number of people reached with the SHAW programme Number of toilets built by local communities within SHAW programme Number of people with hand-washing facilities

Simavi results

849,900 57,000 176,200

Annex

89


Annex 2 Summary Dutch WASH Alliance mid term evaluation The following publication of the Dutch WASH Alliance is included in Simavi’s annual report to provide more insight in the outcomes of the midterm evaluation of this large programme.

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SUMMARY MID TERM EVALUATION

During the second half of 2013, the Dutch WASH Alliance decided to organise a Mid Term Evaluation to evaluate our progress. Since then, the eyes of the Alliance have been on MDF, the organisation we asked to help us. And today, the results are here! The first conclusion is: we are on track. Working in an Alliance has added value and FIETS and integrated WASH are being applied in the countries, which helps to reach our targets. At the same time, the agency says that the WASH Alliance can improve by working more effectively and efficiently. Although it is nice to get these points confirmed by an outside team, they are nothing new: we were already aware of them! Much more exciting are the findings that support these conclusions: what are our strengths and weaknesses? And how can we improve? So, if you want to know how we can become even better and work on a brighter WASH future together, please read on. In this summary, you will find the main results of the MTE. The report is made up of four sections: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Programme strengths and weaknesses Country Alliance strengths and weaknesses DWA strengths and weaknesses Follow up – today and within the Post 2015 strategic process

Once you have read the full report, if you think that you miss something important in the conclusions or in the suggested follow-up that are shared in this summary, then please let us know.

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1

programme strenghts and weaknesses

Strengths

1. FIETS is increasingly applied: everyone talks of FIETS and knows what it is. Our mindset has changed - this is step one towards system change.

2. F and I: more specifically, our F&I mindset has changed. This influenced our choice of partners, and intensified our focus on scale: in cases where there is fruitful cooperation with MFIs, governments and private entrepreneurs, the evaluators saw a rapid increase in scale. For some interesting system change examples, see below.

3. Lobby in all programmes: Lobby and advocacy activities are incorporated in all programmes. 4. Budget tracking: training in budget tracking led to positive results. This can be seen for example in Bangladesh.

5. E and T: E and T are taken into consideration more and more, (but still needs more systematic attention). 6. Functional WASH committees in the countries. 7. Stakeholder coordination structures are operational and play an important role in wider WASH coordination structures, on local and national level, and they gradually succeed in becoming multistakeholder structures. The evaluators use this term to refer to a country alliance, but also to other types of cooperation. A great achievement as it indicates the mindset change towards a multi stakeholder approach (MSA).

Weaknesses

1. Coherent country programmes: coherent country programmes are hampered by accountability questions: bilateral contract relations prevail over the mutual country interests, e.g. sometimes partner selection done by alliance members without consulting the country team or steering committee. Country coordinators and country leads feel most responsibility for good country programmes, but they are not in line management roles.

2. PME: our PME system is a bottleneck. Both the countries and the programme officers experience it as too bureaucratic: at field level there are problems in collecting data, while at alliance level, the matrix makes it too difficult to manage.

3. Roles and responsibilities: responsibilities are not clear: who delivers what? There is often confusion between line management and support roles.

4. Composition of alliances: partners of different capacity levels, synergy and complementarity are not optimal. Recommended to add new stronger partners, whose approaches are more in line with FIETS3. Review composition of alliances (in Netherlands and 8 countries) for more synergy and complementarity.

5. Pocket approach:

Services are delivered in a village, whereas the next village that has the same problems is ignored. It is important to have a full coverage – system- approach.

6. Service provision: there is too much emphasis on delivering services, compared to facilitating the development of sustainable WASH markets and sectors.

7. Capacity building: capacity building efforts are appreciated, for example on finance. So the mindset has changed, but country programme partners need more follow-up to be able to apply the knowledge.

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8. Lobby: a (joint) lobby and advocacy strategy at country level is lacking: partners do good lobby work, but it would be even better to have a strategic plan at alliance level (which can be implemented jointly or by one of the partners).

9. Empowerment communities, e.g. ‘consumers’: organisation of communities is there, but (depending on the partner NGO), actual empowerment of communities and women is sometimes lacking. It is recommended to see them as consumers or entrepreneurs, rather than as beneficiaries.

Good system change examples as seen by the evaluators: • • • •

hana: two multi-stakeholder approach cases in sanitation, e.g. Tamale urban WASH G Ethiopia: two urban public-private partnerships leading to commercial enterprises in WASH Bangladesh: civil-public collaboration in advocacy through budget-tracking Bangladesh: privatisation of sanitation market with entrepreneurs

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93


2

country alliance strenghts and weaknesses

Strengths

1. Functioning steering and coordination structures exist. 2. Some country Alliances are keen to continue working as an Alliance. 3. Joint identity and approach: with regard to integrated WASH and FIETS, all alliances try to apply a multistakeholder approach.

4. Recognized as valued players in the WASH sector:

they connect with local and national WASH structures. Close collaboration with governments is yielding positive results. The country alliances are recognized as one alliance, e.g. the country coordinator is member of a government platform on behalf of the alliance. They have become a recognised ‘brand’.

5. Role of the country coordinators: country coordinators play a strong role in facilitating collaboration, joint planning, and creating opportunities for capacity building and learning.

6. Capacity building:

All alliances are recognized for added value in knowledge and information exchange and promoting innovation.

7. Common agenda: there is a common agenda for PME, joint planning, implementation and monitoring.

Weaknessess

1. Ownership of Steering Committee: the ownership by the steering committees is limited, also because of bilateral relationships. To increase effectiveness, more attention is needed here.

2. Strategising capacity of the Steering Committee:

there is limited strategising capacity on for example lobby, gender, systems and scale and fundraising. There is a clear need for capacity building in this area.

3. Capacity: within the country alliances, there is a significant variety in capacity and large differences in vision, experience, PME and approach. This makes it sometimes difficult to create synergy and cooperation between some partners. It is assumed that sometimes selection did not took place on the basis of quality criteria.

4. Knowledge application: mind-sets have changed, but follow-up is needed to better apply new knowledge.

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3

dutch wash alliance strenghts and weaknesses

Strenghts

1.

Joint identity: a joint identity, approach and vision has been created and is shared by everyone.

2. Processes and procedures: the various processes and procedures within DWA, are well developed, understood and used.

3. Learning and Innovation: a promising learning programme was introduced and is being rolled out. 4. Mindset change: also within the Dutch alliance, the mindset with regard to FIETS and FIETS3 has changed. Weaknessess

1. Monitoring system: the monitoring system is considered too difficult and brings with it too much bureaucratic load.

2. Knowledge application: follow-up is needed to apply knowledge better. 3. Roles and responsibilities: more clarity is needed with regard to roles and responsibilities. Between whom? 4. Organisational structure: organisational revision is necessary for more a comprehensive (country) implementation.

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4 follow up From the conclusions, and the strengths and weaknesses as determined by the MDF team, the SC and the PG have determined what next steps should be taken for follow-up. Some steps differ from the recommendations proposed by the evaluation team, as they were not considered the right step to solve the problem. The next steps, described below, have been discussed in the programme group and in the steering committee, and will be taken further in the coming months - at DWA level, and in the respective countries.

Today What are the recommendations from the MTE that we should address immediately?

1.

Ownership: more ownership by local steering committees is needed. We also need to look at the composition of the local alliances: membership criteria should be developed.

2. Partners: there is a need for new, stronger partners, whose approaches and capacities are more in line with FIETS3.

3. Country programmes: country programmes need to be more comprehensive. Bilateral contracting gets in the way of comprehensive country programmes. New partners should be selected jointly with the entire team, the country coordinator and steering committee for more synergy and added value.

4. Follow up: more support should be created for follow-up, especially focusing on the new roles of NGOs how do we move from service delivery to facilitating up-scaling and system change?

5. Review the way we work together: we should take a close look at our roles and responsibilities, and reduce ambiguity (for example when it comes to line management/support, the role of the PG and CL).

6. Fundraising:

a fundraising and financing strategy should be developed in the Netherlands and in the

countries.

7. Showcases: more emphasis should be put on developing some showcases that demonstrate the added value of different alliance members.

Some of the above-described issues have already been taken up, such as support in follow-up through the learning trajectory and the diamond approach by WASTE. Others will be addressed at short notice.

Post 2015

1. A list of recommendations that will be taken into account in the Post 2015 strategic process: 2. Structure: rethinking the DWA organisational structure - lighter and more flexible. 3. Smarter/online PME that supports management of the programmes (rather than being a burden). 4. Total coverage country plans: country alliances should develop ambitious master plans - from pocket to total coverage, in which DWA has a support role. To do this, capacity building at country level should be enhanced. 5. Strategic plans: strategic plans have to be developed for lobby, private sector development, micro finance, gender and fundraising. At the same time, capacity for strategic planning in the countries should be enhanced. 6. Alignment with Dutch Embassy programmes: better alignment with Dutch Embassy programmes needs

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lobby at local and Dutch national level. At the same time funding opportunities can be explored.


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Annex 3 Project specific (earmarked) donations 2013 The table below shows the amounts donated by foundations, companies and private donors - for specific projects (earmarked donations) in 2013 and the names of the implementing partner organisations.

Project Number

Total project budget over several years (in €)

Received earmarked donations in 2013 (in €)

Partner organisation

1310005

292,537

41,250

NPHS

1409004

345,342

2,500

CABDA

1412009

450,000

215,932

CABDA Wandelen voor Water

1511004

199,411

62,475

Fresh Water

1610002

331,329

40,232

TABORA

1612004

137,527

68,946

MAMADO

1712001

406,168

164,192

HEWASA

1712002

240,000

72,403

EMESCO

1713003

122,747

50,000

FLEP

1810004

356,019

20,000

VWZ

1811001

40,568

2,147

Nyanje Mission

3110005

237,000

7,500

DORP

3109002

172,651

135

CHC

3110003

614,269

50,000

Uttaran

3111001

391,059

75,000

SLOPB

3112003

190,000

39,000

CHC

3112005

430,050

87,716

PSTC

3311001

91,731

2,000

SEWA

3312007

95,813

10,000

CINI

3313002

150,000

31,587

SRADHA

3409001

884,766

5,000

SHAW PPD

3508011

138,886

10,000

FSCN

3513001

750,000

195,118

BVHA

7,067,873

1,253,134

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Annex 4 Used Terminology and abbreviations

Basic Health

In Simavi’s vision, basic health is a crucial stepping stone for building a better existence and creating a way out of poverty. It refers to fundamental health conditions that need to be fulfilled in order to allow sustainable development; people can only go to school, engage in work and contribute positively to their community, when they are in good health.

ASK

Access, Skills and Knowledge programme

CBF

Central Bureau for Fund-raising

CSE

Comprehensive Sexuality Education

CSO

Civil Society Organisation

FIETS

Financial, Institutional, Environmental, Technical and Social sustainability

FP

Family Planning

GNWP

Ghana Netherlands WASH Programme

ICPD

International Conference on Population and Development

MDG

Millennium Development Goals

MFS

Medefinancieringsstelsel (Co Financing System); Name of the subsidy for development cooperation of the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs

MoFA

Ministry of Foreign Affairs

NGO

Non-governmental organisation

PCMT

Prevention of Mother to Child Transition

PME

Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

RTWS

Right to Water and Sanitation

SDC

Swiss Development Cooperation

SHAW

Sanitation, Hygiene and Water Programme in Indonesia

STI

Sexually Transmitted Infections

SRH

Sexual and Reproductive Health

SRHR

Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights

UFBR

Unite for Body Rights programme

VCT

Voluntary Counselling and Testing

VFI

Vereniging Fondsenwervende Instelling; The association of Dutch Fund-raising Institutions

WASH

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene

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Annex 5 Declaration of Accountability Simavi operates and reports in accordance with standard guidelines and rules specified by recognised authorities, covering accounting standards, fundraising and governance. Standards issued by the Dutch Accounting Standards Board (RJ650), the Central Bureau for Fundraising (CBF), the Dutch Fundraising Institutions Association (VFI) and Code Wijffels, are of particular importance. Simavi operates in accordance with these rules.

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Colophon

Edit: Dieuwertje Damen, Rainbow Collection Final edit: Suzannah Vree, Simavi English revision: Boot Tekst en Taal Design: Rixt Reitsma, Rainbow Collection Photography: Prabuddha Paul Huib van Wersch Jeppe van Pruissen Benno Neeleman

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