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S I G N É

THE OUTDOORSMAN

THE FERR ARI PORTOFINO CAPTURES THE TRUE SPIRIT OF THE OUTDOOR

A DISCREET REVOLUTION THE MAISON MOY NAT STORY OF THE PAST AND THE PRESENT

THE ONE

THE MERCEDES-AMG PROJECT ONE F1 INSPIRED STREET CAR

RESURRECTION OF A LEGEND

We follow the Salvator Mundi to the Louvre Abu Dhabi


LANVIN.COM


Publishers’ letter AED 30 KWD 2.5 QAR 30

Edition 29

ACCELERATE

Cover Illustration Nujoomi Denjypady

In this edition, we immerse ourselves in the world of automobiles. From the pit lane at the last F1 to a photoshoot in the middle of the Mojave desert, we had our fill covering some of the best cars at the start of the year. We had an exclusive photoshoot with the all-new Ferrari Portofino, and oh what a Ferrari of a car it is! This Italian Riviera inspired Grand Tourer is worthy of all praises. It truly impresses upon the owner the need to get out and enjoy the great outdoors. We then flew to Los Angeles to capture on film the AMG Project One, a real Unicorn if there was ever such a mythical creature. Limited to 300 pieces and designed for the track, this F1 inspired racecar is the closest you can ever get to F1 spec on the street. Our cover story for this edition marks the conclusion of a very long journey. The journey of a remarkable painting across many continents and multiple owners until its final stop home at the Louvre Abu Dhabi. The story of the Salvator Mundi is one that will leave you pondering. Our heritage story throws light on the story of the great trunk maker, Moynat. The Parisian Atelier is busy rewriting its already rich legacy as one of the best in the leather craft industry. We eagerly look forward to its store opening in the Dubai Mall. We bring you a shortlist of fine-dining and travel venues in our La Dolce Vita section, so make sure to give our recommendations a try! As always, enjoy the read.

Daniel & Sunaz

www.signemagazine.com EDITORIAL Publisher Daniel Giacometti Editor-in-Chief Sunaz Sharaf sunaz@signemagazine.com Associate Editor Mehdi Mabrouk Art Director Nujoomi Denjypady Junior Editor Almas Salman Copy Editor Sameer Denzi COMMERCIAL INQUIRIES sales@signemagazine.com MEDIA REPRESENTATIVE Fierce International Business Central Tower A
 Dubai Media City P.O.Box 502979, Dubai U.A.E Tel: +9714 421 5455 Tarek@fierce-international.com PUBLISHED BY ALTA VERBA FZ LLC 17, The Iridium Building, Umm Suqeim Road, Al Barsha P.O.Box 391186, Dubai U.A.E Tel: +9714 360 3498 info@signemagazine.com Published under licensing from

All rights reserved. No part of the material protected by this copyright notice may be reproduced or utilised in any form or by any means, without written permission from the Publisher. SIGNÉ does not take any responsibilities for incorrect information. The advertising appearing within this publication reflects the opinion and attitudes of their respective brands and not necessarily those of the Publisher or SIGNÉ.

ISSN 2410-4523


TIMEPIECES OF DISTINCTION The L.U.C collection, handcrafted since 1860 for distinguished gentlemen. A truly individual statement in time.

L.U.C TIME TRAVELER ONE (161942-5001), MANUFACTURE CALIBRE L.U.C 01.05-L AUTOMATIC


Selections

For Her

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Scholars

PURE EXCESS XS by Paco Rabbane is excess in its pure state, implicit, explicit and pure fantasy.

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STAR WITH A NAME Look back at the story of the charming English fashion designer Simon Spurr.

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BEYOND JEWELS Signé sat down with the namesake wizard behind the jewellery brand, Marco Bicego.

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FABULOUS Tom Ford expands his Private Eyewear Collection.

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Art & Design

Signé talks with Dirk Fetzer about luxury and the future of Maybach.

Fluidity and movement - the inspiration for the Corneliani Spring/Summer 2018 collection.

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The story behind the Andy Warhol museum and its relationship with Cadillac.

We catch up with Omega President, Mr. Raynald Aeschlimann.

The all-new Portofino is a hard-top convertible that is the epitome of luxury lifestyle.

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The Mercedes-AMG Project ONE is the closest one can get to driving a race car on the street.

Richard Mille introduces the RM 53-01 Pablo Mac Donough, a watch built for Polo.

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TOP OF THE LINE

LEADING THE EVOLUTION

THE VOYAGE

THE OUTDOORSMAN

Savoir faire

BUILT FOR CHAMPIONS

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MR. PETER HARRISON

Lotusier of London introduces a range of handcrafted Tea Humidors.

We take a closer look at the Salvador Mundi by Leonardo Da Vinci.

CEO, Richard Mille EMEA

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THE ONE

RESURRECTION OF A LEGEND

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THE JOYS OF TEA

CADILLAC X WARHOL

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While at Raffles, why not visit Dubai?


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Obsession

SPICE UP From sunrise to sunset, BHAR will add a little spice to your life.

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ON THE TRACK Signé experiences the Abu Dhabi F1 alongside the Renault Formula 1 team.

La Dolce Vita

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Z ZEGNA introduces the latest innovation in Techmerino.

TUMI collaborates with a global influencer, Filmmaker, Ali F. Mostafa.

THE ALPHA BRAVO

WASH & GO

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LIFE AT SEA

Heritage A DISCREET REVOLUTION

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Scalini opens its doors to diners at the Four Seasons Jumeirah.

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AN ITALIAN FEAST Exciting new offering from The Artisan by Enoteca Pinchiorri.

ECD BY NIGHT El Chringuito Dubai launches ‘ECD BY NIGHT’.

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The Heavenly Spa by Westin offers unique experiences for everyone to unwind and relax.

Riviera Seafood Grill in Rixos Premium Dubai launches BBQ Under the Stars.

THE HEAVENLY SPA

We explore the Maison Moynat story of the past and the present.

A PERSONAL TOUCH

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Anantara Kalutara Resort in Sri Lanka is a peacefully secluded coastal hideaway.

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UNDER THE STARS

SYMBIOSIS OF FORM & FUNCTION

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Aston Martin’s DB11 has been setting quality standards and breaking sales records.

The Iridium Spa at The St. Regis Dubai has become a spa haven in the heart of the bustling city.

The new First Class suite on Emirates Airlines’ new Boeing 777-300ER.

THE IRIDIUM SPA

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LUXURY AT ZERO GRAVITY

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FIRST MOVERS WILL ALWAYS CHANGE THE WORLD. BUT WHICH ONE? >> Discover our approach at juliusbaer.com/visionary-thinking

Julius Baer is the leading Swiss private banking group and present in some 50 locations worldwide. From Dubai, Frankfurt, Geneva, Guernsey, Hong Kong, London, Lugano, Monaco, Montevideo, Moscow, Nassau, Singapore to Zurich (head office).


S C H O L A R S · S TA R W I T H O U T A N A M E

STAR WITHOUT A NAME Simon Spurr had the Midas touch when it came to men’s fashion. He was at his peak when it all went downhill. We look back at the triumphs and tribulations of this gifted and charming Englishman “What’s in a name?” Shakespeare once asked. Well, if a name is also a brand, then it has a lot of value, a lot of invested time, effort and emotion. If one is a Ralph Lauren or a Calvin Klein, then this overlap is a source of great personal pride, as well as emotional and financial joy. But for others, such an overlap has proven to be a source of great despair. Such is the tale of Simon Spurr, the once fast-rising star of the New Your men’s fashion scene. He who launched his own men’s designer wear bearing his own name, which quickly became a much-beloved brand, and then, it all unravelled. Now, Simon Spurr the man, and Simon Spurr the brand no longer have anything in common other than a shared past and a shared spelling. Growing up in Kent, England, Simon did not have dreams of one day becoming a fashion designer though he says he had a creative mind and a natural talent for tailoring. He attributes his artistic bend to his mother’s family who were sculptors. Born in 1974, to banker parents, Simon claims his father’s sense of style, particularly his suits of the late sixties and early seventies, when the lapels were still slim and the shoulders narrow, played a major role in shaping his design perspectives. Simon had enrolled as an art student at the Kent Institute of Art and Design. However, while still in his arts foundation course he was pushed to consider fashion instead by two of his female professors. So he applied to

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study Men’s fashion at Middlesex University and was accepted. He was hired by Nautica straight after graduation in 1996. Then Yves Saint Laurent under the stewardship of Hedi Slimane came calling. It was Slimane, claims Simon, who directed him to set visions for himself and not to follow trends. This bold new approach had a lasting influence on the young designer, as well as bringing him much accolade. In 2001, he moved to New York City as the head men’s wear designer for cK Calvin Klein. Then in 2003, he was recruited to work on Polo Ralph Lauren’s Purple Label. A year later, he was the Design Director for their Purple and Black Labels. While at Ralph Lauren, Simon began contemplating his future: whether to climb the corporate ladder where he was told he had a promising future or to cash in on his accumulated clout and experience to venture out on his own. Simon loved blue jeans. He grew up in them, but could never find a pair he fell in love with. So he decided he would make his own. With his plans ready, he partnered with Judd Nydes, a young financial manager and the Nydes-Spurr Group LLC was born in 2006. After some deliberation, they settled on SPURR as their brand even though Simon was fully aware of the risks. His friend, Tommy Fazio, the men’s fashion director at Bergdorf Goodman bought the first thirty-six pairs of jeans which sold out in four days. As sales grew, so did Simon’s confidence, and so did his range, to include knitwear, sportswear, and suiting.

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The growth was such that they needed additional capital and expertise. Nydes brought in Hugo Stenbeck to provide additional capital, while Simon brought in Tommy Fazio to manage the front end of the business. They moved to a new headquarters, expanded to 120 stores, and launched a designer men’s line under the SIMON SPURR brand. His apparel was worn by the likes of Bradley Cooper, Ryan Gosling, Justin Timberlake among others. On the outside things could not have been better. On the inside, however, the constant friction between the artistic minded Simon Spurr and the finance-minded Judd Nydes grew as the business grew. There are claims and counter claims as to what really happened, but whatever it was, it was unreconcilable. Then in 2012, seeing no resolution in sight, Simon Spurr walked away from his baby; Simon Spurr the brand. Without Simon, the brand went into decline. And without the brand, Simon went into depression, lost his spark, and even separated from his wife. He tried to regain his composure as the creative director of a couple of English brands. But the spark was gone. So he took a hiatus in 2016 and travelled. He re-emerged on the other side having regained his passion. He briefly dabbled in a new venture called MarchNYC footwear with his own funds, designed by him, and handmade from calfskin in Reggio Emilia, Italy. In November 2017, Simon returned to men’s wear as the Creative Director of Eidos, a Neapolitan brand founded by ISAIA.


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SCHOLARS · TOP OF THE LINE

TOP OF THE LINE Signé talks with Dirk Fetzer about bulletproof cars, luxury and the future of Maybach. On the sidelines of the 2017 Dubai International Motor Show, we had the opportunity to sit with Dirk Fetzer the Head of Product Management S-Class and Derivates, S-Class Maybach. Head of Mercedes-Benz GUARD.

for luxury is there everywhere in the world. So I’ve tried not to take a single market out, and we are proud to serve a customer even if he is in a small country and the only one.

Can you tell us more about the Maybach line? When Mercedes-Benz relaunched the Maybach in 2014, it was because we got feedback from our customers saying that they wanted a little more from their cars. They wanted something extra; they wanted to go a bit further in the luxury and bespoke direction. When we relaunched the first model, the success that we had with it actually was quite overwhelming. We sold 15,000 Maybach since then which is for us a great success on a worldwide scale; one in 10 S Class is a Maybach.

How would you describe the Maybach customer? It is slightly different all over the world when it comes from region to region but I think there’s one common denominator for the Maybach customers. They obviously see and appreciate the extra portion of luxury the car has to offer. They have an exquisite taste, but they do not want to show off. Maybach is the Mercedes’ niche product; the car will never be and never wants to be tacky. I like to call it a connoisseur’s car, and it is so subtle that only people who share the same taste will recognize and therefore there’s always a show but no show-off.

In which market is the Maybach performing best? The Maybach is doing well in the United States as well as the Middle East and China; these are the main markets for this line. The desire

What are the production steps for a car like the Maybach and what is its life cycle? I think along the lines of car development and the process. This is

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SCHOLARS · TOP OF THE LINE

for me one of the most exciting things that I ever experienced in my professional career. There is a lot of collaborations between departments, and it is excellent to see how very experienced interdisciplinary teams are organized in the project. Several years before a car is on the market, the Mercedes-Benz team are already working on the communication strategy as well as the rough outline and details of the vehicle. The strength of Mercedes-Benz is the great mixture of experienced people and young new engineers and technicians. There is a lot of exchange between divisions, and I believe this communication process is the key to our success and the reason why we create some of the best cars in the world. How long does it take from the first drawing to the first sale? Seven years’ cycle is an average; sometimes it is longer and sometimes shorter. It is difficult to indeed identify all the steps. The most important thing before diving into the engineering part is understanding what customers really want. That is why we spend a lot of time and resources conducting customer research.

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We have recently seen a Maybach concept car, the Vision 6. Is it something that we could see on the roads anytime soon? The concepts are a statement of where the company wants to go, in terms of design philosophy. What we usually do with concepts is testing the customer response. Now the feedback from the customers for the Vision 6 was outstanding. We usually listen to our customers very carefully therefore never say never. Currently, we don’t plan to bring it to life yet. So I always say that with a little bit of a smile but that’s the usual story with concept cars. You are also in charge of the bulletproof car division at Mercedes-Benz, can you tell us more about it? We have the longest history of building bulletproof cars worldwide. We’ve been doing this since 1928. I’m proud to say that we are probably producing the best and the highest protected bulletproof cars in the world. The art of building a bulletproof car is having the highest protection without necessarily noticing it at first glance and without compromising on interior space, comfort, luxury or even longevity. It is a very demanding division that

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meets the highest standards. The customers that we target with our bulletproof S Class and Maybach are heads of state or people that run multinational companies that have specific requirements for safety and security. The goal of this division is basically to make the bulletproof models look like the traditional ones? I would say that only automotive experts would see that they are bulletproof cars and this is very important for us. People with specific requirements for safety and security don’t want to be seen; they don’t want to show that they are cruising in a bulletproof car. I can tell you from my own experience even if those vehicles are roughly double the weight of an average car because of the protection level, they drive like a normal car, and everything else is basically the same. Are the bulletproof cars made-to-order? Or the factory produces some in case of urgent requirements? We have some cars in stock, in case a customer has an immediate need for protection. We need to serve this purpose so I have a

team that takes care of not only sales but also after sales; we have it all under one roof, which has a very specific customer service. However, some customers might have special requests and can afford to wait, then obviously we customise the cars to their needs, the team often works on entire fleets, and it can take up to six months to deliver. What are your thoughts on the rise of electric cars? Our commitment to electric cars and electric fixation in the car is evident and even from Maybach. You can see that Vision 6 Roadster is for a good reason an electric car. We believe that we need to listen to our customer’s needs. Currently, in luxury cars, the customers have an extremely high need for a lot of systems and support in the car, options that underline the luxury of massage seats to heat to the arm panels. There’s a lot of electricity consumed in the car, and our customers have a specific range requirement. Currently, all of those elements in a fully electric car have not been realized yet. And this is why we are listening to the customer’s needs. We will gradually take it in a direction where we can satisfy all of the requirements ideally.

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SCHOLARS · LEADING THE EVOLUTION

LEADING THE EVOLUTION

We catch up with Omega President, Mr. Raynald Aeschlimann, on the heels of the first day of the much anticipated Omega Dubai Desert Classic 2018 The Omega Dubai Desert Classic, taking place annually at the Emirates Golf Club is an event we eagerly look forward to at Signe. This year we had the fortune of interviewing Mr. Raynald Aeschlimann, President of Omega and member of the extended management board at Swatch Group. We find out what has changed at Omega since we last spoke to him in 2015, before his transition into the role of President. From your old role to the current one as CEO of the company, on a broad basis as well as on a daily basis, what has changed? First of all, while on the one side there have been many changes, on the other side there is the same old passion. If you look back at my career, I have been for a very long time leading the evolution of our sales, retail and distribution across the world; including here with Rivoli. So when you are leading the operations in a country, you are already the boss for that country. You have to implement the rules and take decisions, and you are [therefore] ‘Mr. Omega’ to all the people concerned. So I already have a working relationship with our affiliates across the globe from Brazil to Indonesia, to the Philippines, to India and so on. At the headquarters, being a member of the management of the group, and being part of the decision-making process gave me a broad understanding of the functioning of whole Swatch Group. What has changed is that now I have the role of leading everybody at our brand headquarters. It is now about bringing my experiences from being in the stores and talking to customers, to all my colleagues in logistics, financing, production, and marketing. On a daily basis, I have as many meetings as I used to have before, but I have

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fewer trips. It is now more of continuing with the strategy that has brought Omega to the level we are at because of customer orientation, of being close to market trends regarding estimates and expectations, and of focusing on our strengths and trying to improve on them. As the CEO, I also have to manage, coordinate and find solutions to interdepartmental matters and challenges. Most importantly though, create and spread this vision for our brand, both around the world, and even more so here at our headquarters where the product is developed and marketed from. What do you see as your vision for Omega going forward? I have been in management for a very long time, almost twenty years now which has made me very much a part of the system. In that time I have had opportunities to discuss and challenge my predecessors’ visions. But when I was elected by the board there was no discussion about bringing in a revolution of any sort. They wanted continuity, and having me as the CEO was a very clear sign that they wanted continuity because I was also very much of this opinion. The focus was on what was happening in the world, on what the challenges are, on how do we react or be proactive in facing them. How do you see Omega fit in with the current online generation which is exact in its demands and which is quick to give its feedback? I think this development is the best thing that could have happened to a brand like us because our success is based on bringing our message, our image, and our products directly to the customers. For me, it is also about transparency, about being very clear and very straight with the customer. That is why we brought in the

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METAS certification [by the Swiss Federal Institute of Metrology] instead of just putting a Faraday cage like some of our competitors do to deal with the problem of magnetism. In fact, our customer can go on the Internet [Omega’s website] and [using the individual watch’s serial number] find out its performance during the certification process. Why should the watch industry hide things that are very important to the consumers? People don’t just want to buy; they also want to know things about what they are buying; even more so for Omega customers. So the demands of the digital age is not an issue for us. We want to be transparent with our customers. We want to be close to our customers. We want their instant feedback. We have invested a huge amount of money to communicate with them, to explain who we are. We are not just about creating a buzz around an image. There has been a lot of ‘Fresh’ in the last few releases. Was it intentional? It is, and it is not. It would be a bit arrogant of me to say it was all planned. First of all, the luxury industry is all about creating emotion with reason, but if you don’t have the backbone behind it, then I truly believe that you cannot sell for long. But then you also have to communicate your new ideas; you have to surprise them. If it works they respond by coming to your store, and by buying your watch. Now there are new ways of communicating with people which I love to use. One result of such a process is the ‘Speedy Tuesday.’ Not every brand could have created this limited edition series because ‘Speedy Tuesday’ was inspired by a community on Instagram. The way in which it sold out proves that it was the right decision. This is why we have to be ‘fresh,’ as you say because the brand and its customers deserve it. So not all of the


brands will be able to create the magic that this brand can create whenever we push it to the next level. We still have plenty of other new ideas in the works. When I am travelling, when I talk to people, when I listen and exchange ideas with Omega customer, I realise that the Omega brand has that potential to surprise. Omega has long-standing associations, famously with space travel, with the Olympics, and regionally there’s the long-running Omega Dubai Desert Classic. How do you see such relationships moving forward? Our main objective is to keep it fresh, to

keep it magical. You don’t do it because you must do it, but because you want to bring in some new ideas. I like coherency, and I like the continuity but not boring ones, and not because you’ve done it forever. The industry has sometimes been in trouble because of this. You do it to create your DNA. So Rory [McIlroy] and Sergio [Garcia] participating in our constellation clinics for youngsters make our brand fashionable to them while still maintaining our standards. Baselworld is in March 2018. What can we expect from Omega? I’m not going to give you too many details because it’s confidential. I can tell you that

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there will be two big celebrations which are very important for us besides the limited editions. First, our Seamaster range will be celebrating 60 years, while the Seamaster 300M, the ‘James Bond Watch’ will be celebrating 25 years. This is going to be a very important theme for us. This is an iconic collection that we are very well known for. We will also be celebrating the launch of a new range of ladies watches which will only be available in the States and Japan called Trésor. It’s a very feminine watch, beautifully finished with gold and diamond on the dials, and 6-millimetre thickness across the whole range.

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S AV O I R FA I R E · T H E J O Y S O F T E A

THE JOYS OF TEA Lotusier of London recently introduced its innovative and exquisite range of handcrafted Tea Humidors. We take a closer look at this new and unique craft, as well as the precious ingredient it’s designed to preserve. Tea: a small word of only three letters, representing a beverage brewed from an unexceptional looking shrub, that changed the course of global history, culture, and politics. The use of Tea leaves for the preparation of a beverage goes back almost five thousand years when it was discovered by the Chinese emperor Shen Nong around 2,700 BCE. Under the Tang dynasty (618-907 CE), it became their national beverage, and the classic treatise on tea titled ‘Ch’a Ching’ was composed. Marco Polo wrote about it. The Portuguese introduced it to Europe. The Dutch turned it into a profitable commodity. The British East India Company globalised and monopolised it; a practice which eventually led to a revolution in the American colonies, and to a political reform at home. Tea has also, more than any other beverage, impacted the cultural habits of its consumers. The Buddhist monk Saichō introduced tea drinking to Japan; a country now famous for its meticulous ‘Chanoyu’ tea ceremony. For most people in India, the day begins and ends with a cup of ‘chai.’ In the Maghreb, a meal or a gathering of friends is never complete without a cup of ‘atay.’ One only needs to view the list of tea related words and phrases in the English language to gauge its cultural impact. Anyone who has sipped the deep copper coloured brew will understand its widespread appeal. The way it can unlock the

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“Tea is given a stage, a mise-en-scène, where it is protected, nurtured and admired – before it is even infused – thereby sparking an emotion, an anticipation, and a promise.” proverbial knots of the mind and body; the way it can soothe one with its sensual stimulation; the way it can provide an escape route from the burdens of the day, even if for a brief moment. Is it any wonder then that people have formed strong emotional attachments to a cup of tea? For some, this passion extends to the preservation and ageing of tea, in particular its complex aromatic and taste properties; and it is not without good reason. Exposure to air, light and heat can cause the oils and moisture inside the tea leaves to evaporate resulting in the loss of flavour. External odour can cause the taste to change. Humidity can cause a deterioration in the structure of the leaves thus affecting its properties. Ideally, the tea leaves must be kept in sealed containers, deprived of light and in relative humidity of 55 to 70 percent. Maintaining these conditions, particularly the humidity levels, and especially in very humid and very dry climates can be a challenge, to say the least. To address these concerns, Åsa Eriksson-Ahuja designed the world’s first Tea Humidor, which is being manufactured and marketed under the London-based Lotusier brand; specialising in comprehensive, bespoke design solutions for luxury residential and commercial spaces, and who take on new clients exclusively on a referral basis. The Tea Humidor is Lotusier’s first ‘ready-to-buy’ product. It is a symbiotic marriage of art, design, and function using only the most refined materials, and exquisitely finished. It is designed to be a robust and portable case that can protect tea leaves from air, light, heat, odour, and most importantly, humidity in varying climatic conditions. Sycamore wood was chosen as the base material for the case because of its durability and because it is odour neutral. To regulate and ensure even distribution of humidity at all levels, the case comes with its own German-made hygrometer; ventilation holes and discreetly hidden two-way humidity sachets. Inside, the tea leaves are kept in four or six hand blown, airtight crystal containers that can hold up to 70 grams of loose tea leaves. These containers are designed to keep flavours from being contaminated by external odours, and more importantly to prevent the flavours from blending into each other. To regulate and distribute the humidity levels evenly within the containers, they are equipped with specially designed channels, a built-in thermometer, and have a stainless steel base. The case and its contents are made completely by the hands of specialist artisans. It is finished in polished veneer with chrome

fittings. It is currently available in five design themes inspired by the five prominent tea cultures of the world: Cha Jing (China), Saicho (Japan), Indus (India), Mooris (Morocco/Spain) and Déco (Euro-American); as well as tailor-made custom designs for their ‘Centurion’ members. It is in particular demand from yacht owners and globe-trotting tea connoisseurs for its functionality. Its finishing, however, makes it an objet d’art in itself. It has received high praise, including those from Madame Yu Hui Tseng, one of the only ten recognized Gongfu Tea Masters across the globe. “What touched me when Åsa presented to me her “Tea Humidor” creation, by Lotusier, was that it creates a new realm for the celebration of tea. Indeed, beyond its ability to preserve tea in suitable conditions, the Tea Humidor liberates tea from pantries and kitchens, where it is typically stored and prepared - allowing it to ascend to the privileged places we reserve in our lives, the spaces where we live, work and entertain. Just as with cigars and liqueurs in their cases and cabinets, tea is given a stage, a miseen-scène, where it is protected, nurtured and admired – before it is even infused – thereby sparking an emotion, an anticipation and a promise. Tea has won a place of honour in the intimate spaces where we share our lives, where we reflect, and where we make decisions.” The Tea Humidor perfectly embodies Lotusier’s emblematic attention to detail, its penchant for innovation, and a signature aesthetic that is both rich and contemporary. It is the first of its kind and sets a whole new benchmark in its field. However, it all began as a personal quest by Lotusier’s founder, Åsa Eriksson-Ahuja, to create a unique gift – a search that evoked such fascination and revealed so much potential that it soon became a true labour of love. Lotusier’s journey of many years in researching, developing and perfecting the Tea Humidor inspired the entire team to become deeply passionate about tea. The company goes to great lengths to find woods for the Tea Humidor that are not only of the highest quality but obtained from ecologically sustainable forestry (using only wood that is Forest Stewardship Council certified). This is in keeping with Lotusier’s philosophy of looking towards the future – relying heavily on natural materials and fibres that are recyclable – while drawing on the finest responsible sourcing and resources. Enhancing the art and awareness of preserving and enjoying fine and rare teas is a calling to which the Lotusier team is fully devoted.

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SELECTIONS · PURE EXCESS

PURE EXCESS A fantasy embodied by an excessively perfect and perfectly indecent man. Pure XS is excess in its pure state, implicit, explicit and pure fantasy Paco Rabanne is always where you least expect it. Iconoclastic, offbeat, essential. Capturing the spirit of the times only to go against the grain. A knack for provocation, inherited from its founder, cultivated with irony. Pure XS announces the comeback of the chosen ones to fulfil their feelings. With excess in its very genes. To give a face to its heir, Paco Rabanne wanted a personality that embodied both vice and virtue, between the romanticism of a Visconti hero and the appeal of an irresistible ladies’ man. Francisco Henriques is the one. Far from the virile and monolithic male standards, this 21-year-old model exudes an erotic power. His noble beauty and juvenile freshness express both masculinity

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and femininity: intense charm and natural sensuality, an expressive mouth, a certain nonchalance and, above all, a candour that wins over all the girls. To capture fantasy in a bottle, the designer focused on powerful, stylised restraint that conveys excess in its animality and purity at the same time. Bold and disturbing, the Pure XS bottle is an extremely beautiful object that knows how to make itself desired. For the olfactory signature of Pure XS, the challenge was to convey the sensation of skin shivering with desire and burning with pleasure in an olfactory expression. This idea of a “smouldering shiver” guided the perfumers to achieve a composition with two accords that contrast and

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harmonise with each other: a body-to-body caught between two contrary excesses. The fragrance also had to call on all of the senses. Smell, of course, but also taste and touch, like a sensory trap. Pure XS is a vibrant, magnetic and fresh oriental fragrance. The first excess: explosive freshness. During this, the senses go wild and tingle with an overdose of almost icy ginger. A carnal second wind: the green creaminess of the ultra-masculine thyme. The second excess: Cinnamon adds a piquant touch and makes mouths water. Followed by a surge of power with noble vanilla infused with leatherliquor-musk inflections. Finally, it’s time to let go and sink into the pulsing warmth of myrrh dusted with sugar.


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SELECTIONS · FABULOUS

FABULOUS Tom Ford expands his Private Eyewear Collection, an exclusive collection of optical frames and sunglasses made with quality materials, including genuine water Indian buffalo horn and Japanese titanium, worn by Mr. Ford himself and specially

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designed for eyewear lovers. Three more models have been added to the eleven existing Private Collection models, originally presented in April 2016 to commemorate Tom Ford’s eleven years of success in creating eyeglasses.

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TOM N.12 A new sunglasses style: TOM N.12, a timeless style made of dark brown striped or green striped genuine horn and featuring the iconic T logo, enhanced by photo-chromic lenses that darken and lighten automatically, depending on light conditions.

TOM N.13 An optical style with a classic soft round shape, is available in dark brown striped or light brown striped genuine horn and optical model.

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TOM N.14 Dark brown striped or light brown striped genuine horn with a fold-able metal clip-on and polarized lenses.

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SELECTIONS · THE VOYAGE

THE VOYAGE The idea of fluidity and movement has been the inspiration for the Corneliani Spring/Summer 2018 collection, which offers a fully coordinated wardrobe that flows from a metropolitan look to one of leisure. This dominant characteristic of our times, this continual rhythm of change, seems to dictate the beat of a new style. The collective rules fade away before our eyes, and before we can construct new ones, each of us seeks assurance in our own personal identities. This is reflected in the way we choose to portray ourselves. Fashion responds to this, offering concepts suited to

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the new geographic and existential nomadic restlessness, creating everyday objects that adapt to a variety of conditions, indulging us with elegance and delicacy. The uniting story behind the collection is one of a voyage, through city and desert, structured in three chapters and written with the language of colour, in pigments borrowed from an impressionist painting. The Spring highlights are dominated by cool tones: nuanced shades of the new “whale” blue are matched with masculine greys which are illuminated with an oil green accent, exclusively used for the accessories and

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knits. Emphasis on detail creates a synthesis between sportswear and tailored garments: hydro zips, nylon with prints extracted from traditional drapery, and cottons with a membrane add functionality while maintaining a tailored look. The Summer highlights are bolder and blend together to create new colour combinations. The various shades of oil green illuminate and determine the balance of colour. They are combined with all the shades of grey, from pale to black. The soft silhouette and natural fabrics contribute to the overriding sense of extreme sophistication and relaxation.


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SELECTIONS · THE OUTDOORSMAN

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THE OUTDOORSMAN Named after a charming town in the Italian Riviera, the all-new Portofino is a hard-top convertible that replaces the outgoing California T. While the California was Ferrari’s best-selling car, the all-new Portofino is better than the former in every way possible. Underneath the ‘Cavallino Rampante’ badge lies a 3.9-litre engine with an output of 592 bhp. We capture the essence of this spirited grand tourer via an exclusive photoshoot set against the backdrop of an outdoor lifestyle. Car Model: Ferrari Portofino Location Courtesy: Desert Palm Hotel & Resort, Dubai Storyboard & Art Direction: Sunaz Sharaf Photographer: Atif Abou Samra | Stylist: Ant Kidd Hair & Makeup: Katie Cousins | Model: Jan H., Niche Models

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S E L E CT ION S · B U I LT F OR C H A M P ION S

BUILT FOR CHAMPIONS Richard Mille introduces the RM 53-01 Pablo Mac Donough, a watch built to endure the extremes encountered during a competitive game of Polo Polo is a gentleman’s sport. However, the elegance it is reputed for by no means cancels out the extraordinary violence of its confrontations between players, or their horses. As a result, every piece of equipment is subjected to the harshest treatment. The 1930s witnessed a new adornment geared to polo players, oddlooking watches with pivoting cases, but none of these had visible movements. For over 70 years, this was the only solution anyone had found to protect the sapphire crystal from the impact. Released in 2012 by Richard Mille, the RM 053 Tourbillon Pablo Mac Donough was

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inspired by the helms of knights with a curiously double bowed titanium carbide armour. Twice as stiff as steel, titanium carbide, a composite material with a metallic matrix, owes its toughness to the inclusion of particles known as carbides. In terms of the Mohs hardness scale, diamond is at the top with a hardness of 10, titanium carbide (TiC) has a rating of 9.5. Six years after releasing his first polo watch, Richard Mille returns to one of his favourite playing fields with the sporty and dynamic RM 53-01 Pablo Mac Donough. The unprecedented laminated sapphire crystal of

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its Carbon TPT case offers a breath-taking look at the watch’s suspended tourbillon calibre. A new and complex accoutrement for this sport which, despite its risks, is still practised by gentlemen. Launched some two years ago, the project to develop the RM 53-01 returns to the original—and the seemingly absurd idea of having Pablo Mac Donough, one of the world’s greatest polo champions, wear a tourbillon calibre in competition. Exposed to convulsive shocks amongst riders, and polo mallets trading strikes from horseback at full gallop, a ‘classically designed’ tourbillon would have not even the slightest chance of surviving. The RM 53-01, on the other hand, was designed to confront precisely this mechanical watchmaking nightmare. More than any piece before it, the RM 53-01 combines the use of cutting-edge materials with the latest technological breakthroughs. Entirely designed for the practice of competitive polo, this watch is a testament to significant developments in the suspended movement using braided cables. Inspired by that masterpiece of contemporary engineering, the suspension bridge, this three-dimensional creation, unique in the world of watchmaking, required the milling of two grade-5 titanium baseplates. The first, ‘peripheral’ baseplate, is attached to the caseband and supports

the tensioner mechanism. The second, ‘central’ baseplate is attached by cables to the peripheral baseplate and incorporates all of the calibre’s wheels, as well as the winding mechanism. Movement architecture and extremely sophisticated skeletonisation are defining characteristics of many Richard Mille watches. The next task was to modify the properties of sapphire glass to make it the primary mechanism of protection. Well aware that your average crystal hardly offers the resistance necessary to withstand the swing of a polo mallet, Richard Mille engineers turned to the automotive industry for inspiration to produce a new type of sapphire glass, this time incorporating an unimaginably thin vinyl membrane. The brand’s earliest investigations of laminated glass were conducted in Collaboration with the Stettler Co. The patent application for the first-ever laminated sapphire glass is the technical recognition that crowns a staggering investment in development, all for a piece just 2.40 millimetres thick! Such is the price of the ultimate protection, if it is to combine transparency and strength. The RM 53-01, produced in a limited edition of 30 pieces, embodies this dual quest pursuing a combination of the extreme and the elegant.

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INTERVIEW · PETER HARRISON

MR. PETER HARRISON CEO, Richard Mille EMEA

As the CEO for Richard Mille EMEA, Mr. Peter Harrison brings with him 25 years of luxury goods sales and marketing experience. His years of experience led him to the creation of Redgrave Limited in 2006. Redgrave Luxury Ltd is a UK-based distribution company specializing in prestige luxury products internationally, particularly across Europe Middle East and Africa (EMEA). One of the stars of Redgrave Luxury’s portfolio is Swiss watch brand Richard Mille for which Redgrave is joint shareholder and sole distributor for EMEA. Unusually for this industry Richard Mille EMEA Ltd is in a joint venture (JV) between Redgrave Luxury and mother company HOROMETRIE SA in Switzerland. ‘’Richard and I have been friends for almost 20 years. When he started his watch brand in 2001 we discussed various opportunities on how to combine our experience and eventually settled on the concept of JV distribution. This enables the manufacturer to hold an investment in the distribution while the company grows and in the meantime day to day issues are being managed by my team in London. We have always agreed on the direction the JV has taken and we are delighted to have contributed so strongly to the brand’s international expansion’’ says Peter. We had the opportunity to meet with Peter during the SIHH 2018 in Geneva and discuss what makes Richard Mille so unique. R&D plays an important role at Richard Mille and you are known for being an innovative brand. Isn’t it a challenge when the brand identity is of one that is constantly innovating? Yes its challenge, but that is the way we do watches at Richard Mille! A company that has been doing watches in a certain way for 100 years cannot start doing them like we do, they would be copying and would be followers rather than leaders. We have a very personal way of producing watches, and that is the reason why our prices are what they are. We don’t start our creation process by thinking we need to do a watch in that particular price range. We rather start with a concept, and we work towards it. Could you tell us what are the main innovations in this year’s novelties and what were the main challenges? We presented a second watch for our ambassador Pablo Mac Donough. The interesting thing about Richard [Mille] is that he wants to have ambassadors that are not just good looking, but also active. He needs them to wear the watch and give feedbacks in order to develop new solutions. The first Pablo watch was made of Titanium Carbite (TiC), which was very scratch resistant, very hard, but it was covering most of the watch, and the watch resisted a lot of shocks. After that trial we figured out that this material was very durable, and we used it to build other cases for other watches.

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This year we wanted to build a very resistant watch that would showcase the beautiful movements on the inside. So we developed a very new system with sapphire glass, almost unbreakable. There are basically two glasses combined, and in between a thin “plastic layer” to keep them together and to avoid the glass going into the movement in case it breaks. The main challenge was to create an almost unbreakable Sapphire glass, in such a small size, and with a perfect transparency. This is the reason we are very close to our brand ambassador, because they live test the watches in very tough conditions. Take Nadal as an example; he didn’t want to wear a watch while playing tennis, because they were all too heavy and could play a role in equilibrium, and that is why we produced a watch that weighted only 20 grams without the bracelet. I feel that Richard Mille owners are part of a community, is that correct? Being a very niche brand, how do you reach your audience? Are you targeting a particular type of customer profile? Yes absolutely, when you spot someone on the plane wearing a Richard Mille like you, there is definitely something special happening, you feel you are part of a group, that you are different from everybody else. Our communication style has evolved with the modern media. A lot of our consumers are taking information from digital media. We don’t really have a customer profile, what we do have is a very young clientele, and one that is very interesting. How important is the Middle East market for Richard Mille? What are your next big plans for the region? Any limited editions for the region? Well it is still a developing market, we have a plan for a new boutique in Kuwait later this summer, we still have a lot of work to do connecting to other clients. The lady segment is our strongest segment in the middle east. 2017 was a great year. I am always surprised about the continuous growth. We haven’t had a year since the beginning in which we haven’t grown, and last year was particularly good with an increase in 43% in EMEA, with a solid contribution from the Middle East. We will have a few events in Dubai and Abu Dhabi, and we might move the location of the store in the Dubai Mall to a bigger one. We used to make regional limited edition, but we don’t do that anymore. What do you think well be the next biggest challenges for the brand in the near future? How we will expand our retail network, how many new stores, where we will build those stores, we are opening a new store in Istanbul this year, another one in Moscow in June. It will be very interesting for us to reconnect locally with those clients who usually buy Richard Mille in other countries.

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FOR HER · BEYOND JEWELS

BEYOND JEWELS During the preview of their latest collection at the One and Only Palm Jumeirah, Signe sat down with the namesake wizard behind the jewellery brand, Marco Bicego Hailing from a family of Italian goldsmiths from the city of Vicenza, Marco Bicego has single-handedly positioned a brand with old world Savoir-Faire onto the world map. With beautiful pieces featuring hand engraving and twisted coils, his brand of unique is something not easily replicated. This unique manufacturing technique paired with design excellence has won the hearts of millions world over. We caught up with the designer to learn more about his unique journey to becoming a global success. How did you get your start in this business? Our company started as a family business. I’m a second generation jewellery maker. My father established the company in 1958 where we still live just south of the Venice. Growing up, I did not think my future would be that of a jewellery designer. It came naturally. I had spent a couple of weeks during the summer holiday in the workshop, started understanding the business, and started making my prototypes. As the years passed, I discovered that I had a passion for it. My father taught me his techniques and instilled in me his passion. When I took over, I wanted to create something different. I knew that the quality of the jewellery is essential, I knew that ‘Made in Italy’ has immense value, but I also understood that branding is essential. By branding, I mean combining beautiful, high-quality jewellery with the right marketing and the right distribution. It is vital to communicate to

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the customer what the Marco Bicego brand is all about. Good or bad, we are unique. The brand, your design how do you define it? Honestly, I’m very lucky because everything came naturally to me. When I first started, I worked with yellow gold because my father, whose techniques I learned, also worked with yellow gold. It is part of the culture of the family. So for me, yellow gold is the DNA of my brand. From the beginning, I wanted to create something unique, something that reflected my lifestyle, something that is easy to read, something that is versatile enough to be worn every day for different occasions whether dressed up or dressed down. We also design one-of-a-kind customised jewellery for special customers, but mostly our jewellery is everyday jewellery. It has a discreet understatement, but with real value, and with a unique style. I receive a lot of compliments from women customers who say ‘I have a lot of jewellery, but the jewellery that I love to wear the most is Marco Bicego because it is easy.’ They enjoy playing with our jewellery in different combinations. People often ask me if I am first a designer or a businessman. I would say I am 40 percent designer and 60 percent businessman. If I were a designer first, then I would only focus on designing and on whether my design sold or not. If it sold then that means the customer liked my design, and if not, then they did not like it. But as a businessman I have

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to worry about the full package: not only the craftsmanship but also the quality, the price, our customer service, about our business partners and so on. If the customer likes the overall experience, they will return, and they will tell their family and friends about it. This brand not even 50 years old, it is growing and can grow a lot more. What are some of your standout offerings ? In addition to the yellow gold, we also have some white gold because some women prefer that. It’s not just plain gold; I love combining gold with precious stones, particularly multicolour gemstones, and in a unique way which renders each creation truly one-of-a-kind. I also like incorporating our signature hand-engraved pieces made with the traditional “Bulino,” which is an ancient tool for hand-carving gold. It gives the gold a fine, brushed texture. I did not invent this technique, but I brought it back into use. We also use gold spheres in our jewellery that are unique. I use a signature technique taught to me by my father whereby the spheres are not cast solid but are hollow. This technique allows us to incorporate large spheres into our designs while keeping them light and comfortable for the wearer. Our collections such as Jaipur, Africa, Marrakech, Masai, Paradise, Cairo [among others] are inspired by the traditions of different regions which are then combined with modern styles and techniques. I love combining modernity with my reinterpretations of different traditions. For me, our uniqueness comes from having a balance between them, and at the same time being wearable, timeless, and durable. Can you tell us about your business model and how it gives you an advantage? In the old days, we used to get one big order for a year from our regional customers, and that’s it. Now we receive orders monthly or

even weekly because now we have better feedback and we also use just-in-time techniques to manage our production process. We enjoy this flexibility because we are a fully vertically integrated company. We manage everything in-house, from the procurement of the bars to the melting, to the making of prototypes, to the manufacture, to marketing, and to delivery. This is what allows us to be flexible, and allows us to manufacture as per customer demands. We can make our designs based on our market information, and we can make customised jewellery as per our customers’ requirements. We are like a suit tailor who procures his raw materials and puts together a suit as per market trends, or he may make a customised suit as per the client’s requirements. Could you tell about your history in the GCC market and about your relationship with Damas? Our relationship with Damas began around 1995 when we were purely a wholesale business to retailers like Damas and others. Then in 2001, the Marco Bicego brand was born, but our relationship with Damas has continued to be strong. We have stayed together through the good times and through the bad times. I love having long-term relationships with our business partners because they allow us to build a strong understanding, they also give us the confidence to explore new opportunities together. Do you encourage visitors to your factory to see the manufacturing process? Yes! Always. We often organise visits for our partners to visit our facilities. We have a showroom, but I feel that the best showroom for our customers and our partners is to visit our production facility, for them to see the artisans at work, using their hands to produce the finest jewellery, and for them to see for themselves how we merge modern and traditional techniques.

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ART & DESIGN · C ADILL AC X WARHOL

CADILLAC X WARHOL Dubai Design District becomes Andy Warhol’s home Art and automotive are two fields that intersect very often. As a matter of fact, some would say that cars are art pieces. Over the years, cars have been a source of inspiration for many artists, and art enthusiasts will always remember the close relationship Cadillac and Andy Warhol had. In fact, the Pittsburgh native has always been fascinated by the curves and look of the American icon. To celebrate this relationship as well as the impact Warhol had in the art world, Cadillac, in association with the Andy Warhol Museum, has put together an art installation. Located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the place of Andy Warhol’s birth, The Andy Warhol Museum holds the most extensive collection of Warhol’s artwork and archival materials and is one of the most comprehensive single-artist museums in the world. “When Andy Warhol died in New York City, his estate formed the Andy Warhol Foundation. The foundation wondered what it should do with all of these artworks. Because Warhol was born in Pittsburgh, the foundation decided that they could have

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a huge impact on the city of Pittsburgh if they established a museum in Pittsburgh. So, they worked with something called the Carnegie Institute and said we would give you this huge collection of artworks if you establish a museum in Pittsburgh. So all of the artworks that are in our collection actually came from Warhol’s estate. And so our collection directly came from Andy, and we have examples of really everything that Andy created. From the time he was a child until his death,” explained Patrick Moore, the director of The Andy Warhol Museum. Titled ‘Letters to Andy Warhol’, the exhibition showcases letters and artwork from the archives of The Andy Warhol Museum. “Cadillac’s collaboration with The Andy Warhol Museum is the perfect platform to demonstrate Cadillac’s heritage in popular American culture. We are proud to host such iconic works and to perpetuate Cadillac’s efforts on a global level to act as a catalyst for innovation and inspiration”, said Christian Soemmer, Managing Director of Cadillac Middle East. The artwork exhibited, highlights Warhol’s love for iconic American brands

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and features some of Cadillac’s well-known models as well as five pieces by Warhol. ‘Letters to Andy Warhol’ is an exhibition that showcases the close relationship the artist had with the worlds of fashion, music, media, and art. It also houses pieces by six contemporary artists that used the content of the exhibition to reflect on how the American artist inspired them. “The exhibition, which was showcased in the Middle East for the very first time, is an outstanding opportunity for us to showcase Warhol’s life and artwork to a whole new demographic. By partnering with Cadillac, a brand that is the epitome of the American dream, we are sharing Warhol’s legacy. Cars are among the comparatively unknown and unexamined subjects of Warhol’s diverse and vast body of work, but he drew and painted a range of Cadillac models,” explained Patrick Moore, the director of The Andy Warhol Museum. The piece de resistance of this exhibition is, more than the artworks themselves, the letters Warhol received from icons like Yves Saint Laurent and Mick Jagger or institutions like the Museum of Modern Art, the New York State Department of Public Works.


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ART & DESIGN · C ADILL AC X WARHOL

“ I like to be the right thing in the wrong place and the wrong thing in the right place. Being the right thing in the wrong place and the wrong thing in the right place is worth it because something interesting always happens.” A N D Y WA R H O L

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The letters bring to light different stages of the artist’s life, from the time he was rejected by the MoMA or when he was praised by Yves Saint Laurent for his work. “It talks about the friendship between these two very famous men who still need to reassure each other. They’re still vulnerable. They’re still friends. They still have something inside of them that needs that little kernel of reassurance,” Moore said about Saint Laurent’s letter to Warhol. The letter was sent in the 1970s after rumors saying that the French designer did not like Warhol’s multicolored portraits of him. To set the record straight, Saint Laurent sent a letter to Warhol saying that the rumors were untrue and that he really liked the piece. “I love them; I admire you; I am your friend” Saint Laurent wrote in the message, mailed from Paris on July 31, 1974. Each letter has inspired artistic contributions and experiences from a roster of talent including Aimee Mullins, Brian Atwood, Chiara Clemente, Derek Blasberg, David LaChapelle, Francesco Clemente, J.J. Martin, Nick Rhodes, Sean Lennon, Sienna Miller and Zac Posen.

“Andy Warhol painted a portrait of American life. The Warhol’s partnership with Cadillac, an iconic American brand that appears in Warhol’s work, feels completely right to us,” says Patrick Moore, The Warhol’s interim director. “We’re excited to be part of an exhibition that examines the continuing influence of Warhol on contemporary culture through the lens of some of today’s most influential tastemakers.” Cadillac as a brand has always been a major actor of the American cultural scene; from apparition in movies, paintings, and pictures to sponsoring art exhibitions, the brand has been very active in the last years with New York City as a focus; a theme that comes back with this exhibition. “Cadillac wanted to talk about New York City, and they associated Warhol with New York City but not just New York City in general; New York City at a moment when it was about innovation, about hope, optimism. We could have just done the exhibition with artworks from our collection in which Warhol literally painted drew and photographed Cadillac

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cars but the curators wanted to go deeper, and that is why we included the letters,” added Moore. Design is an essential discipline that Cadillac has been promoting in the recent years, but the manufacturer’s involvement with this domain took a global turn in 2015 when the brand partnered with the hyped design house, Public School. This collaboration furthered Cadillac’s engagement with the fashion community, by supporting both emerging and established designers. Cadillac hosted Public School’s spring 2016 fashion show at its new global headquarters in SoHo. “This is a new way for two American brands to join forces, share a passion for design and grow globally,” said Andrew Smith, Cadillac executive director of Global Design. “For Cadillac, it gives new meaning to being a patron of the arts.” The brand also sponsored New York Men’s Day and has a multi-season partnership with the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA), which included support of the first-ever New York Fashion Week: Men’s.

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ART & DESIGN · THE ONE

THE ONE With no more than 300 units to be built and track performance specs on par with Formula 1, the Mercedes-AMG Project ONE is the closest one can get to driving a race car on the street. We had the opportunity to travel to Los Angeles and shoot the extremely rare Mercedes-AMG Project ONE in the company of lifestyle photographer Jonathan Glynn-Smith. Location: Los Angeles Photography: Jonathan Glynn-Smith Ever since the early days of motorsport, engineers have dreamed of bringing motor racing technology to the road. Mercedes-AMG is now making this dream a reality at the very highest level. “Motorsport is not an end in itself for us. Faced with intense competition, we develop technologies from which our production vehicles also subsequently benefit. We are drawing on our experiences and successes from three constructors’ and drivers’ world championships to bring Formula 1 technology to the road for the first time: in MercedesAMG Project ONE”, says Dr Dieter Zetsche, Chairman of the Board of Management of Daimler AG and Head of Mercedes-Benz Cars.

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The high-performance plug-in hybrid drive system of the MercedesAMG Project ONE comes directly from Formula 1, and was realised in close cooperation with the motorsport experts of Mercedes-AMG HighPerformance Powertrains in Brixworth. It consists of a highly integrated and intelligently networked unit comprising one hybrid, turbocharged combustion engine with a total of four electric motors. One has been integrated into the turbocharger, another has been installed directly on the combustion engine with a link to the crankcase, and the two remaining motors drive the front wheels.

The 1.6-litre V6 hybrid petrol engine with direct injection and electrically assisted single turbocharging comes directly from the Mercedes-AMG Petronas Formula 1 racing car. To achieve high engine speeds, the mechanical valve springs have been replaced by pneumatic valve springs. The vehicle is mid-engined (ahead of the rear axle), and it can easily reach speeds of 11,000 rpm, which is currently unique for a roadgoing vehicle. However, for higher longevity and the use of commercially available Super Plus petrol instead of racing fuel, it remains significantly below the F1 engine speed limit.

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ART & DESIGN · RESURRECTION OF A LEGEND

RESURRECTION OF A LEGEND

On the fifteenth of November 2017, the art world was shaken and stirred by the recordbreaking bid of $ 400 million for a painting; the Salvador Mundi by Leonardo Da Vinci. We take a closer look at the art, the artist, and the key events ’Salvator Mundi’ is a Latin phrase, and it means ‘savior of the world.’ It is part of Christian iconography and depicts Jesus giving a benediction (blessing) with his raised right hand with three of the fingers unfolded symbolising the Trinity. In the left hand, he is depicted holding a divine object such as a bible, as in some earlier and eastern depictions, or an orb symbolising the created Universe. Leonardo da Vinci was not the first to paint a ‘Salvator Mundi,’ and he was certainly not the last. So what makes his so highly valued? The answer has much to do with the artist himself. Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci was considered one of the greatest, if not the greatest example of a Renaissance polymath; or the archetypal Renaissance-man if you will. His insatiable quest for knowledge led him into a broad spectrum of inquiry such as mathematics, engineering, anatomy, botany, geology, cartography, astronomy, history, literature, and music. He is also considered a pioneer in the fields of palaeontology, ichnology, and architecture. But his raison d’être was unquestionably his painting.

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He was born out of wedlock in 1452, to a notary attorney and a peasant woman in a village near Vinci, then on the outskirts of Florence in Tuscany. When he was about five, his mother married, and he was sent to live on his father’s family estate. His uncle, who possessed an appreciation for nature, helped raise Leonardo, and had the greatest influence on him in those formative years. His father provided him with basic education which consisted of reading, writing, and maths. His father’s most telling contribution to his son’s life was that at the age of fifteen, he got him an apprenticeship under the famed Florentine master sculptor, painter, and goldsmith Andrea del Verrocchio. Leonardo spent the next decade learning and fine-tuning his skills as a painter and sculptor until he became a master in his own right in 1478. By this time he had already produced two masterpieces; ‘The Annunciation’ and ‘Ginevra de’ Benci.’ About four years later, Leonardo left for Milan to work for the ruling Sforza as a painter, sculptor, architect, and designer of events. His stay in Milan lasted for about seventeen years and were some of his most productive. It gave

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us ‘The Last Supper,’ one of Leonardo’s most admired and studied works. It also gave us ‘The Virgin of the Rocks,’ ‘Portrait of a Musician,’ and the Portraits of ‘Cecilia Gallerani’ and ‘La Belle Ferroniere.’ With the fall of the Milan Duchy in 1499, he returned to Florence and stayed for about seven years. This period gave us ‘Saint John the Baptist’, ‘The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne’ and of course the ‘Mona Lisa’; his other greatly admired and studied work. In this period, he also began work on the ‘Salvator Mundi.’ In 1506, Leonardo returned to Milan for the second time and stayed for about seven years, then to have to leave again. This time he went to Rome. Then in 1516, the king of France, Francis I offered him the title of ‘Premier Painter, Engineer and Architect to the King.’ Although he now had the time to work in leisure, he did not produce any artistic work of significance. He breathed his last in 1519 at the age of 67. Leonardo da Vinci did not produce many completed works in his lifetime, to begin with, primarily because of his obsession with


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perfection, which meant he took a long time to complete a project. Of the paintings he did complete, and those that have survived are true masterpieces of his age. Here are some of his landmark works. ‘The Annunciation’ (1472) on display at the Uffizi, Florence, depicts the announcement by the angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary that she would conceive and become the mother of Jesus. It has all the trademarks that would later become synonymous with da Vinci; the dreamy background, the detailing on the vegetation, and the attention to the drapery. The objects which seem to have gotten exceptional attention were the wings of Gabriel. A hint of his later fascination with flight maybe? The portrait of ‘Ginevra de Benci’ (147478) on display at the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC. It is a portrait that added greatly to his reputation. It is exceptional in the way da Vinci uses light and shade to give depth to facial features. Then there is the detailing of the eyes and lips to create a haunting expression. Many see this as the prelude to the ‘Mona Lisa.’ The two versions of ‘The Virgin of the

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Rocks.’ The older one (1483-85) is displayed at the Louvre in Paris, and the second (149199 and 1506-08) at the National Gallery, London. The first is considered more of a da Vinci because it was all his brushwork, and his original and unconventional rendering of Christian convention. But it was considered too heretical by the clerical sponsors of the painting. So he had to make a second one, which was a compromise to please them. The ‘Portrait of a Musician’ (1486-87) is admired for the detailing and visual depth given to the young male subject’s brownish eyes and his curly locks. Two portraits, one of ‘Cecilia Gallerani’ (1489-90) and one of ‘La Belle Ferroniere’ (1493-94) are both exceptional in the way facial detailing is used to convey the subjects’ personality. Gallerani comes off as a lively free-spirit who is barely contained by the frame. Ferroniere, on the other hand, is intense and mysterious. The Last Supper (1490-98) is a giant fresco-like painting on a wall at the Santa Maria delle Grazie monastery in Milan. Probably the most studied and copied of all da Vinci’s works, but also the most damaged. It

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was highly innovative for its day and gives an almost cinematic feel when viewed; as though one has paused a moment in a complex dramatic scene. The ‘Mona Lisa’ The most recognisable and enigmatic of da Vinci’s paintings. Volumes have been written on it, but no word can capture the subtle beauty of that smile, nor can they unlock the secrets well-guarded by those eyes. Then, of course, we have the ‘Salvator Mundi’ like the subject it depicts, the story of the painting has also gone through a similar sequence of ups and downs. An exalted beginning, a disappearance into the wilderness, a reappearance and a final resurrection once again to exalted heights. The story begins with Louis XII of France commissioning da Vinci to paint the image of Jesus giving the benediction. By 1625 it was in the possession of Henrietta Maria, and it came with her to England when she married Charles I of England. It was on display in her private chambers in Greenwich. When Charles I was executed in 1649 at the end of the English Civil War, all of the royal possessions came under the English Commonwealth, including the ‘Salvator Mundi.’


In 1650, Wenceslaus Hollar a renowned printmaker publishes what he calls ‘Leonardus da Vinci pinxit’ and claims it is a print of what later came to be known as da Vinci’s ‘Salvator Mundi.’ It was also listed in the Royal inventory and valued at £30. It was sold to John Stone in 1651, a Mason, to settle his debts. When the monarchy was restored in 1660, the painting was returned to the new king Charles II and was included in the inventory of his possessions at the Palace of Whitehall. His successor James II of England inherited it and was then passed on to a succession of royal relatives until Sir Charles Herbert Sheffield auctioned the painting in 1763. The painting then disappears from the record for over a hundred and thirty years. It re-emerged in 1900 and was purchased by a collector named Francis Cook for an unknown amount. The painting by now had been damaged by poor restoration attempts and as a result was attributed to Bernardino Luini, a student of da Vinci. A black and white photograph from this period, now well publicised, show the extent of the damage done to the painting. Then in 1958, Francis Cook’s

great-grandson auctioned it off for £45. By now the painting was attributed to another of da Vinci’s pupils - Giovanni Antonio Boltraffio. This attribution remained until 2011. In 2005, the painting was again put on the auction block. This time in New Orleans. It was purchased by a consortium of art dealers that included Robert Simon, a specialist in Old Masters. This event marks the turning point in the history of the painting. It was the beginning of its resurrection. The members of the consortium came to believe that there was a possibility of it being the lost ‘Salvator Mundi’ of da Vinci. They handed the painting to Dianne Dwyer Modestini, Senior Research Fellow, and Conservator of the Kress Program in Paintings Conservation at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, for a long and painstaking restoration, followed by an authentication process. Like most high-value works of art, particularly a da Vinci, the ‘Salvator Mundi’ was bound to have its share of controversy and entranced differences of opinions. To begin with, several reports have claimed that the ‘Salvator Mundi’ was the last Leonardo in private hands. The Duke of Buccleuch owns

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da Vinci’s ‘Madonna of the Yarnwinder.’ With regards to the ‘Salvator Mundi’ itself, there are two main areas of contention. The first is with regards to how much damage has been done and how much of da Vinci still remains in the painting. The Christie’s website states that according to Modestini, “the original walnut panel on which Leonardo, who was known for his use of experimental material, executed ‘Salvator Mundi’ contained a knot which had split early in its history. However, she concludes that important parts of the painting are remarkably well-preserved and close to their original state. These include both of Christ’s hands, the exquisitely rendered curls of his hair, the orb, and much of his drapery... With regards to the face... the discrete losses, the flesh tones of the face retain their entire layer structure, including the final scumbles and glazes. These passages have not suffered from abrasion; if they had, I wouldn’t have been able to reconstruct the losses.” The second point of contention is with regards to a claim by a rival painting to be the real ‘Salvator Mundi.’ Once again, according

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ART & DESIGN · RESURRECTION OF A LEGEND

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to Christie’s website, in 2008 “the painting is taken to The National Gallery, London, where it is studied in direct comparison with ‘The Virgin of the Rocks’, Leonardo’s painting of approximately the same date. David Allan Brown (Curator of Italian Painting, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.), Maria Teresa Fiorio (Raccolta Vinciana, Milan), Luke Syson, the Curator of Italian Paintings at The National Gallery, Martin Kemp (University of Oxford), Pietro C. Marani (Professor of Art History at the Politecnico di Milano), and Carmen Bambach of the Metropolitan Museum of Art are among those invited to study the two paintings together. Later, the authenticity of the piece as an autograph work by Leonardo was confirmed by Vincent Delieuvin at the Louvre, Paris.” Then in 2010 “the painting is again examined in New York by several of the above, as well as by David Ekserdjian (University of Leicester) and a broad consensus is reached that the Salvator Mundi was painted by Leonardo da Vinci, and that it is the single original painting from which the many copies and student versions depend.” Then in 2011, the resurrection of the ‘Salvator Mundi’ was complete. It is unveiled at The National Gallery in London as a painting by the Master Leonardo da Vinci. However, not all are convinced, and detractors remain, and will remain.

The record-breaking sale then added another layer of controversy. Prior to the auction, most experts had put a valuation for the painting at, or just over, the $100 million mark. The final price bid before the hammer came down, left everyone astonished. Once senses were regained, opinions started flying thick and fast. The museums lamented how they are being priced out of the market. The political left used it as proof of the disproportionate distribution of wealth. Some simply lamented or mocked that the buyer has bid too much. Other simply speculated who the mystery buyer was. The New York Times in a Dec 8, 2017, article (online) stated that it “reviewed documents related to the sale that identified the previously anonymous winner of the auction as Prince Bader bin Abdullah bin Mohammed bin Farhan al-Saud, a descendant of an outer branch of the royal family. He has no publicly known history as a major art collector, and no publicly known source of great wealth. But he is a contemporary, long-time friend and a close associate of the crown prince, and prominent Saudi royals have been known to make highprofile purchases through straw buyers”. The Saudi Embassy said in a statement that Prince Bader “acted as an agent for the ministry of culture of Abu Dhabi”. The Times was not convinced with this explanation because “American officials familiar with intelligence reports on the matter, and Arabs familiar with

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the details of the sale, both reiterated on Friday (Dec. 8) that the crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman, was the true buyer at the time of the auction”. Whatever the truth may be, the fact of the matter is that the painting is coming to the Louvre Abu Dhabi. Conceived by architect Jean Nouvel, it is a stunning piece of architecture finished in white with water features. Its signature piece being a ‘floating’ web-patterned dome which allows sunlight to pass through. Located on the Saadiyat Island’s Cultural District, it has a total floor space of about 24,000 square meters, of which about 8,000 square meters are for gallantries. According to its website, it aims to be “a universal museum in the Arab world” which means “focusing on what unites us: the stories of human creativity that transcend individual cultures or civilisations, times or places. This ethos guides the museum in everything it does: from its foundation as a collaboration between two cultures to the dazzling architecture that combines French design with Arabic heritage”. By becoming a home to the newly resurrected ‘Salvator Mundi’, the museum has taken a giant stride in its walk towards fulfilling its stated objective. The ‘Salvator Mundi’ once again bears its Master’s name, has patronage from royalty and will soon have pride of a place in an architectural jewel in the desert. A resurrection indeed.

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OBSESSION · ON THE TRACK

ON THE TRACK During the 2017 Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, Signé had the opportunity to experience the last race of the year alongside the Renault Formula One team. From the team’s villa to its garage we’ve been everywhere and seen everything, here is our report. When you attend an F1 race, you don’t realize how many people are involved and how much work is done before the race. An average team travels with 100 people, ranging from technicians, mechanics, and even chefs; these people, on top of the drivers and executive team, travel around the world to the 21 countries where the races take place. A bit of background The Renault Formula One team made its return to the competition in 2016 after several years of absence. “Renault had two options: to come back at 100 percent or leave. After a detailed study, I have decided that Renault will be in Formula 1, starting 2016. The final details supplied by F1’s main stakeholders gave us the confidence to accept this new challenge. Our ambition is to win--even if it will take some time,” said Carlos Ghosn, Chairman, and CEO, Renault. The team planned to start earning points in the 2017 championship and compete for the title in the next four years. They are not stranger to winning trophies in Formula One, with iconic drivers like Alain Prost

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or Gilles Villeneuve; the team earned several trophies and successes in the 80’s before retiring as a motorist. The team came back stronger than ever to win the World Championship 2 years in a row in 2005 and 2006. “Renault’s decision to continue its involvement in Formula 1 is confirmation that it sees motorsport as an essential part of the brand’s identity. Formula 1 is the ultimate symbol of the passion for automobiles. Passion defines Renault as expressed by its brand signature, ‘Passion for Life.’ In addition to attracting many customers, Formula 1 also fuels employee motivation. As the pinnacle of motorsport, Formula 1 demands technological and operational excellence. The championship serves as a showcase for the technical expertise that Renault dials into its products for the benefit of its customers,” added Renault in a statement. The team has several partners to achieve its goal one of them is Infiniti; the manufacturer is Renault’s technical partner. Infiniti uses its cutting-edge engineering knowledge to push the limits of what can be achieved. 
Following the successful debut of the INFINITI

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“We launched our first performance hybrid car in 2011 and we were the first car manufacturer to use this technology to boost performance rather than to reduce consumption”

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OBSESSION · ON THE TRACK

and Renault Sports Racing collaboration in 2016, the newly launched R.S.17 introduced the INFINITI co-developed second generation Energy Recovery System (ERS). 
 This new generation ERS has been developed by the team together with a group of INFINITI Performance Hybrid technology engineers based at the Renault Sports Racing powertrain R&D facilities in Very-Châtillon (France) and has been in use during the 2017 season. 
 “Performance Hybrid technology is one of INFINITI’s major strengths. We launched our first performance hybrid car in 2011 and we were the first car manufacturer to use this technology to boost performance rather than to reduce consumption; so when the Renault Sport Formula One Team decided to develop their ERS technology in-house, INFINITI emerged as the perfect partner to support them, as part of the Renault-Nissan Alliance. We are gaining invaluable experience in Performance Hybrid technology as a result of the collaboration with the Team, and this experience is being transferred back to our core business to improve future technology,” said Tommaso Volpe, INFINITI Global Motorsport Director.

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On the track During a Grand Prix, the team is divided into three sections, the villa, the garage and the side of the track. The villa hosts the catering team, the engineering team who follows the car’s performance in real time and the technology partners who track everything happening on and around the track throughout the weekend. The Garage is home to the race cars as well as the mechanics and the pneumatic team which handles the tires and makes sure that everything is in order. “Pirelli produce five specifications of the dry-weather tire, each with a distinguishing sidewall color – ultrasoft (purple), supersoft (red), soft (yellow), medium (white), hard (orange). At each race, the teams have access to three specifications (or compounds) of these dryweather tires,” explains the FIA in a statement. On the side of the track, the team principal and his assistants monitor the race and communicate with the drivers to make sure they drive most efficiently and quickly possible. Our Experience We had, thanks to Infiniti Middle East and Bell & Ross, an allaccess pass to the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix. We lived the weekend

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with the team and were able to attend the qualifiers and the race in the team’s garage. We saw F1 legends such as Alain Prost and Nikki Lauda while the silver arrows were fighting for the World Championship. The most impressive thing is not the cars, the drivers or the speed; it is the pressure. The teams cannot make mistakes, they have to be on point and accurate, or things can get very dangerous very fast. There is no room for error and every millisecond counts as it can mean the difference between winning and losing. The Team’s Watch Partner At the beginning of the 2016 F1 season, Bell & Ross had announced a partnership with the French Formula One team, Renault Sport. “We are honored to release this exciting news: Bell & Ross enters Formula 1 in pole position! Our collaboration with Renault Sports Formula One Team marks a new milestone for Bell & Ross, the result of an encounter that gave us the desire to work together,” said Bell & Ross CEO Carlos Rosillo, in a release. It is not the first time that Bell & Ross has expressed its interest in the world of cars. The brand has collaborated in 2010 with Peugeot and has been a partner of the International Festival of Automobile for the past ten years.

This partnership consolidates the brand’s project to enter the automobile world. In October 2015, the brand released a driver’s watch, the Vintage BR GT model. Today, Bell & Ross is stepping into the world of supercars by becoming a partner and official timekeeper of the team Renault Sports Formula One. As part of the agreement, the watchmaker’s logo will be present on the Renault Formula One car and the team will wear Bell & Ross timepieces. Entering the high-tech world of Formula 1 is a good thing for the brand. The BRX-01 is a high-end timepiece boasting technical and virile features matching correctly the image of this prestigious sport. Pushing the boundaries, always go faster and be better are values both parties share. “Our two companies are passionate about mechanics, and it is clear that we are both working with the ongoing pursuit of innovation, precision, and performance. We hope this will be a lucky partnership on both sides and that we will make people dream and arouse our fans’ passion for beautiful mechanics,” concluded Rosillo. Now that the team is back and the second year is over, it can only get better for the Renault Formula One Team.

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OBSESSION · WASH & GO

WASH & GO Just in time for Spring Summer 2018, Z ZEGNA introduces the latest innovation in Techmerino, the natural high-performance Merino wool fabric that ensures maximum comfort even in dynamic situations. With the unveiling of its new Techmerino Wash & Go project, Z ZEGNA has created summer suiting that can be domestically machine washed while maintaining its comfort, performance and naturally casual fit. Lightweight and extremely soft, Techmerino Wash & Go suiting offers

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unrestrained freedom and breathability with the added benefit of easy maintenance. Made exclusively with Techmerino fabric, the construction and materials allow these garments to be gentle washed at a temperature of 30°C without altering the wearability, performance or quality standards. This means that both the suit jacket and trousers can be laundered at home any time they need to be cleaned or freshened. Techmerino Wash & Go suits can be gentle washed and worn immediately thereafter, or lightly ironed as needed. In

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addition, every Techmerino Wash & Go suit comes with a dedicated case that is used during washing to ensure optimal results. Techmerino is made from pure Merino wool that has been treated with special finishing techniques to ensure maximum comfort and perfect thermo-regulation, thereby keeping the skin dry and the body temperature constant. Not only do Techmerino fabrics offer greater resistance to wear, their natural lightness and excellent elasticity deliver a constant fit that can easily facilitate the movement of the body.


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H E R I TA G E · A D I S C R E E T R E V O LU T I O N

A DISCREET REVOLUTION Maison Moynat has been accumulating a loyal band of followers across the globe without much fanfare. We explore the Maison Moynat story of the past and the present

Revolutions are often a loud, messy affair. But on rare occasions, a revolution can be a very discreet affair, so subtle that it causes hardly a ripple in the aether of our collective consciousness. One such affair has been taking place in the luxury fashion accessories universe since 2010 when the fashion and luxury goods powerhouse LVMH Moët Hennessy - Louis Vuitton gained ownership of the Moynat brand. Since then, LVHM has very discreetly gone about resurrecting the once celebrated legend of the leather goods industry. The Moynat story began in 1849, before that of Louis Vuitton and Goyard, when Pauline Moynat partnered with the husband and wife team of Octavie and François Coulembier to establish Maison Moynat. Their 300 square metres boutique was located at Number 1, Avenue de l’Opéra at the heart of Baron Haussmann’s redesigned Paris. The boutique went on to become a Parisian institution for over a hundred years until it went into hibernation in 1976. In that time, Moynat was not just another leather goods and luggage maker; it was a trendsetter; even revolutionary at times.

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To begin with, Moynat was named after and helmed by a woman, at a time and in an industry where women did not tread. Their first notable innovation was the use of the then newly discovered vegetal gum sourced from Indonesia called gutta-percha to waterproof luggage. Then came the innovation that put Moynat on the proverbial map. The much sought after “English Trunk” had wicker frames with varnished canvas and leather trimming. The result was a lightweight but sturdy luggage. They designed and produced in-house their patented latch bolt locks. Their luggage was studded every seven millimetres instead of the industry standard sixteen millimetres. These features combined with metal banding ensured added strength and security to their trunks. By 1910, the house of Moynat had a fourstorey factory in the Montmartre suburb of Paris where over 200 specialised artisans produced trunks and leather goods. It was the first to integrate into one location all the specialist skills involved in producing the finest luggage and leather goods. The rise in popularity of the automobile among the elite for travelling and exploring resulted in new product innovations at Moynat

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that catered to this growing market. In 1902 they introduced their trademark Limousine trunk with an arched bottom, strengthened by metal bands, and finished in varnished canvas. It fit snugly on the curved roofs of the automobiles and thus became another favourite of the connoisseurs. By 1910, they were producing their patented lightweight “unbreakable” trunk models. This idea was taken further with the introduction of side and rear trunks that perfectly fit the car’s curves, as well as being finished in the same colour as the car. These innovations greatly contributed to the brand’s popularity and reputation among the automotive chic. So much so that they even took part in the Paris Motor Show of 1905. Being helmed by a woman meant that Moynat was innovative in catering to the needs of women as well. Moynat was a pioneer in the development of the ladies handbags. In 1878, they introduced the “Mignon,” made in chamois leather, which was followed by the highly popular “shoe bag.” Pauline Moynat was well known among the elite of the Parisian performing scene. One, in particular, the wellknown globe-trotter Gabrielle Réjane became a life-long friend of madam Moynat. She was the inspiration for several customised


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creations of Moynat, including some of their pioneering handbags. Credit for the success of the brand also has to be given to Henri Rapin, the longserving Creative Director at Moynat From 1905 to 1930. He designed their logos and illustrated their catalogues. In 1920, he designed Moynat’s distinguished and elegant monogram which was a concatenation of the letter “M.” He also designed some of their most iconic creations. His pièce de résistance has to be the trunk covered in red Moroccan leather and Art Deco florals which won the Diplôme d’Honneur at the 1925 Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels. Moynat’s products also won several gold, silver and bronze medals at this and other world fairs. When Bernard Arnault, the Chairman and CEO of LVMH acquired the rights to the Moynat brand through his Groupe Arnault holding company in 2010, he did not want it to be just another brand, but rather, to resurrect the spirit of Maison Moynat. So he handpicked Ramesh Nair to be the Creative Director and charged him with bringing the Moynat name out of its hibernation. He was given two broad briefs: stay true to the core

values of Maison Moynat while reinterpreting them for a chic modern clientele. The Indian born designer was Educated at the National Institute of Fashion Technology (NIFT) at New Delhi, and at the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT), New York. He then trained at the Institut Français de la Mode, Paris. His first professional experience was with Yohji Yamamoto. This was followed by a stint with his own brand “Rain,” based in New Delhi, and then with Christian Lacroix. His next move was to the big leagues with Hermès as a senior designer in the early 2000s where he worked alongside Martin Margiela and Jean-Paul Gaultier. His unconventional thinking, obsession with detail and skilful execution made him standout when LVHM came looking for a new Creative Director to steer their Moynat vessel in the right direction. Ramesh Nair has gone on to prove himself to be the right person for the task. He is the personification of understatement and likes to keep it that way. He shuns the limelight but is openly critical of those in the fashion industry who tend to focus more on bringing attention to themselves rather than on the product. He had high aspirations to

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work with the best names in the industry but was never willing to compromise just to fit into the crowd. Always dresses in simple t-shirts and trousers because shirts and ties make him feel restricted. He once politely declined an invitation to the Singapore Cricket Club because they had a strict shirtand-tie dress code policy. What did interest him in Singapore was the Defu Lane reptile skin tannery who count among their clients Christian Dior and Prada. This is where Nair likes to experiment because they are open to exploring new ideas. Before he could settle on his design language, he had to first research what Maison Moynat was all about. This was quite a difficult task as very little material from its illustrious past remained. Nair had to go to yard sales and put up fliers at vintage car shows to find Moynat items. Even finding the codes of the brand was a major task. What he could find he bought. About this adventure, he told The Hindu newspaper “Moynat is a unique story: it is a brand that had a huge presence and was very successful, but then disappeared from collective memory. So I started by looking for the story of Moynat. I went beyond the blank canvas to what lay

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behind the canvas. It was a once-in-alifetime opportunity.” Painstakingly he was finally able to put together a design language for the resurrected Maison Moynat. It is a language that is innovative and luxurious yet understated; it is staying true to the Moynat heritage while being modern chic. He carefully assembled a team of skilful artisans to bring his designs to life in the company’s workshop, where every wooden frame is built, leather tanned to exact specifications, and details like hinges and latches are created from scratch. Nothing in the workshop is hurried or compromised. Some one-off or customised items may take up to a year to finish. Nair has also incorporated the difficult techniques of marquetry to leather as a pictorial technique and offered à la carte as part of a design motif, or as a customised optional accessory. The technique has been so highly refined by Moynat’s artisans that the individual pieces “become undetectable to both the eye and the touch.” While the technique itself requires the highest skills and seriousness, the themes and images they depict are light-hearted. This is in a way, an honorarium to Henri Rapin who often infused light-heartedness or humour into his designs. It was a quality that became almost synonymous with Maison

Moynat. Each marquetry is, therefore “a nod to Maison’s steadfast belief in tradition and craftsmanship, while opening new possibilities full of inherent humour and lightness of spirit.” Since 2011, Nair and his team have quietly put together a range of products finished in the finest leather, for both men and women that fall into three distinct collections. The Bags collection consist of ladies handbags, clutches, shoulder bags, and travel bags. The Small Leather Goods collection consists of flat pouches, covers, cardholders, organisers, wallets and others. The Hardsided Luggage collection consists of trunks, briefcases, and vanity cases that have distinct concave bases inspired by the Limousine collection of old. The products in all three collections come in a variety of shapes, sizes, colours, and textures. Of all the products on offer, the one that must be given special mention is the Réjane range of handbags and clutches. It is a tribute to the skill and achievements of Pauline Moynat herself, as well as a rebirth of the collection of pioneering handbags first launched in 1903. They were inspired by and named after her good friend Gabrielle Réjane. The new Réjane takes about 20 hours to make. It has simple, uncomplicated lines and distinctively feminine curves on the outside and is

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voluminous on the inside. It features handles sculpted out of leather and a lock inspired by an original from the Art Deco period. It is available in “a range of natural and exotic leathers, in permanent and limited edition colours.” Gabrielle is another range of women’s handbags and clutches named after Gabrielle Réjane. This range, however, is more reflective of the personality of Réjane herself: “dramatic and flamboyant.” Its complex allleather construction is put together by a single artisan. The Mini Vanity has an unconventional cube shape that makes it stand out. It is also “the perfect canvas on which the House’s techniques can be expressed in full freedom.” The Limousine range of Hardsided Luggage is the perfect homage to the Moynat icon: patented wooden frame, concave arched bottom, and nails spaced 10 millimetres apart. It was never copied earlier and is unique even today. Without marketing gimmicks and with no compromises, the quiet revolution of the resurrected Maison Moynat has been spreading discreetly. Begining with its flagship boutique at the Rue Saint-Honore in Paris. It now has boutiques in London, New York City, Los Angeles, Tokyo, Seoul, Beijing, Chengdu, Hong Kong and soon Dubai.

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H E R I TA G E · S Y M BI O S I S O F F O R M & F U N C T I O N

SYMBIOSIS OF FORM & FUNCTION Aston Martin’s DB11 has been setting quality standards and breaking sales records. What is its winning formula? Grand Touring: a journey where the destination is not as important as the journey itself. A journey where the joy is not in arriving, but in driving on the open country roads as they meander through pastoral villages, through hills and valleys, through woodlands and coastlands, through mist and sunshine. Few cars have embodied this spirit in their DNA as have the DB line of Aston Martins; with the heart of a thoroughbred, enveloped with simple yet elegant lines on the outside, and while being comfortable enough inside to make long journeys a joyful experience. In 2016, Aston Martin unveiled the newest offspring of its illustrious DB bloodline. The DB11 is the perfect symbiosis between a beautiful design language and clever engineering to create a wonderful driving experience. No wonder then that at its premiere, over 1,400 DB11s were booked. By the end of 2017, Aston Martin was breaking sales records, thanks to the success of the DB11. The DB11 has the burden of spearheading Aston Martin’s ‘Second Century’ plan. Therefore the design language had to be bold, something new, yet unmistakably Aston Martin. So, as usual, the lines are uncomplicated yet elegant, flowing seamlessly from front to rear, and the poise is confident. But the overall design, the “clamshell bonnet,” the grille and the headlights are unmistakably new. The bonnet, sculpted from pressed aluminium is aesthetically pleasing while conforming to pedestrian safety regulations. The all-new all-LED headlights feature daytime running lights and low-speed cornering lights for the first time. The distinctive new roof is deceptive. It has a smooth, seamless, and simple curve, but requires a long and complex process to manufacture. Aerodynamics is an essential ingredient in the performance characteristics of the DB11, but it has been so seamlessly integrated into the design that they are mostly concealed. The clean surfaces and continuous flow lines are the foundation. The side strake, an ever-present design element on Aston Martins, now also forms part of the ‘Curlicue’ vent which extracts high-pressure air from

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the front wheel arch to reduce lift. The DB11 also debuts the “AeroBlade;” an innovative virtual spoiler. Air sucked in via discreet intakes at the base of the ‘C’ pillars are channelled via ducts to the exit slots in the rear deck lid to create a jet of disrupted air that reduces rear lift. These enhancements allowed the designers to do away with physical spoilers that hinder flow lines, but more importantly, they add immeasurably to the sense of confidence and joy one feels when going through the bends in a DB11. The symbiosis between form and function is carried into the interior as well. Like the DBs of the past, the interior space of the DB11 is generous and inviting. The old familiar features persist but have been tweaked to new levels. The finest materials have been finished to perfection by the hands of skilled craftsmen. Soft leather trim dominates the interior space, with some open-grain wood without the high-gloss finish, and metal surfaces with mostly mat finishing. The leather, with detailing features such as Nexus quilting and Celestial perforation along with ornate leatherwork, such as intricate brogue detailing create an interior space that feels inviting, intimate, and delightful. Throughout the interior, gentle lines flow into sensual curves and loops. The “Infotainment” system is contained in the central console that cascades from the dashboard down to the transmission tunnel. It features

an 8” TFT screen with an intuitive rotary control mechanism, as well as an optional touch screen control mechanism. Some other novel features include keyless entry and keyless go, parallel and bay park parking assistance, and a 360-degree camera. Aston Martin has also gone to great lengths to create a distinctive sonic identity which includes pretty much all the sound generated by the car: the many warning sounds, the click of the switch gears, the creaks of the leather upholstery and so on. Each sound is tuned such that it is unobtrusive and also to have harmony with all the other sounds produced by the car. This also includes the exhaust note made by the 600 bhp 5.2-litre V12 powerhouse which can vary from mellow to malevolent with the squeeze of the accelerator. A 503 bhp V8 version is also available. All the effort put in to create the symbiosis between form and function has resulted in a grand tourer that is par excellence. Jeremy Clarkson had this to say about the DB11 (The Sunday Times, 2016): “If you’re ever in Paris, at a party at 3 am, and suddenly remember you are playing in a tennis tournament in Monte Carlo the next afternoon, this is the car for the job. You’d arrive feeling like you’d just got out of the bath. It’s not just a pretty face. This is an extremely good car. Phenomenally good.”

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THE ALPHA BRAVO

For its Spring/Summer 2018 assortment, TUMI, the leading international brand of premium travel, business and lifestyle accessories, captures the imagination of intrepid individuals who seek both style and functionality for their lives on the move By working with a global influencer, Filmmaker, Ali F. Mostafa, TUMI has engaged its latest generation of inspiring individuals. The introduction of the new seasonal campaign coincides with the unveiling of the newly updated iconic Alpha Bravo collection. The refined Alpha Bravo collection features new styles and colours for a sleek, modern look, heightening the experience of global citizens on their personal journeys. From the UAE, filmmaker & producer Ali F. Mostafa has long been recognised throughout his career for invaluable contributions to Emirati cinema. As one of the pioneers of the Emirati film industry, Ali F. Mostafa gained recognition for his directorial talent with UAE box office hit, City of Life. Named ‘Best Emirati Filmmaker’ at the 2009 Dubai International Film Festival and ‘2010 Young Filmmaker of the Year’ by Digital Studio magazine. Ali F. Mostafa’s latest feature, The Worthy, premiered at the BFA London Film Festival and received a gala premiere at the Dubai Film Festival in 2016, opening to widespread critical acclaim. In continuously redefining the meaning of luxury and innovation, TUMI pairs design excellence with outstanding functionality. This season, TUMI takes inspiration from the dynamic lifestyle of the modern traveller as well as the laid-back culture and breathtaking landscapes of California. The result is a collection that excels in engineering and innovative design, with fresh, new colours and patterns, and a clean, contemporary aesthetic. For men, the iconic Alpha Bravo collection relaunches with exceptional refinements while maintaining the defining military-inspired edge and key functionality the range is known for. Designed with both function and attitude in mind, Alpha Bravo is reintroduced outfitted in black leather with stand-out gunmetal zipper highlights and major design updates including an integrated logo plaque, leather detail on the front face of the bags, and new black zippers and pulls. Available in TUMI’s durable Ballistic Nylon, Anthracite and Leather, seasonal colour pops of Green Camo, and Grey/Citron span the collection and add excitement to the existing core colour range.

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“I am really pleased to be joining TUMI on this journey. Being able to represent a brand you already love and have travelled with for years is an amazing experience, and I look forward to the adventure ahead.” A L I F. M O S TA FA

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A COLONIAL TREASURE Anantara Kalutara Resort is a peacefully secluded coastal hideaway, connecting travellers to Sri Lanka’s colonial charms and sacred heritage, the vibrancy of island life and wild nature. Only ten minutes from the town of Kalutara and an hour from the buzz of the capital Colombo, Anantara Kalutara is set along Sri Lanka’s ruggedly beautiful southwest coast. The unique setting between the Indian Ocean and Kalu River boasts coastal, river and lagoon frontage, providing a tranquil retreat in between the array of enriching nearby adventures. The resort was originally designed by Sri Lanka’s most notable architect, the late Geoffrey Bawa, and is inspired by his vision of simplistic elegance and great craftsmanship, whilst showcasing the Kalu River and Indian Ocean. Blending effortlessly with the island’s tropical beauty and rich culture, the resort fuses natural luxury with colonial and Sri Lankan artistry. The main building has a Dutch colonial style, with a soaring gable roof. The reception’s free-flowing space ushers in the coastal breeze and overlooks the lagoon of the Kalu River estuary, creating a sense of destination on arrival. 141 guest rooms, suites and pool villas immerse guests in stunning views, with private balconies and terraces overlooking lush gardens, the ocean or lagoon. Guests return from exploring the area to relax in the comfort of their rooms, perhaps soaking in the bathtub with a bottle selected from the wine humidor. Extending the benefits are options for interconnecting, disabled and poolside guest rooms. Suites are set apart by an elegant lounge and the one-of-a-kind One Bedroom Presidential Suite boasts a private plunge pool and sundeck. Suites and villa guests can listen to music on Bose Bluetooth speakers, and special requests are seamlessly taken care of by the Villa Host. One and Two Bedroom Villas feature an enclosed garden terrace offering seclusion whilst swimming in the private pool, sunbathing on the deck and dining al fresco. For holidays with family and friends, some of the One Bedroom Garden Pool Villas feature interconnecting gardens. Leisure facilities coax relaxation and renew energy, whether for romance or quality family time. The Watersports Centre offers jet skiing, water skiing and banana ride thrills for all. Guests can work out in the gym whilst taking in the river view, or raise their game with a personal trainer. The ocean view pool offers a tranquil escape, while the lagoon-side pool with its Jacuzzi jets and children’s section is ideal for families. Dedicated to Geoffrey Bawa, the library is a quiet retreat showcasing drawings from his archive and some of his favourite designs in Batik.

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Rooted in Thailand, the essence of Anantara philosophy, ‘without end’, stems from ancient Sanskrit origins, and is beautifully expressed at Anantara Spa Kalutara. Surrounded by the majestic Indian Ocean and serene Kalu Ganga River, relaxation takes place in harmony with nature. Inspired by Sri Lanka’s ancient wellness wisdom, colonial times and a rich trading heritage, the extensive treatment menu is steeped in local culture and also takes guests on a journey, with highly skilled therapists offering their intuitive touch and personalised care. Anantara Spa is a serene double storey sanctuary, surrounded by a lotus pond. Ten luxurious treatment rooms include six for individuals and four for couples, including the option for Ayurvedic therapies. Soothing spa journeys draw on holistic Asian traditions and rejuvenating western spa wisdom, with an additional pavilion for yoga and meditation sessions. Paying tribute to Sri Lanka’s ancient wellness heritage, guests can experience the 5,000-year-old science of Ayurvedic healing. A range of traditional Ayurvedic therapies includes Pindasweda massage using local herbal oils and a warm herbal powder compress to loosen stiff

muscles, relieve stress and fatigue, and encourage the body to sweat to aid the removal of toxins. Deeply relaxing, in Sarvangadhara a steady stream of warm herbal oil is poured over and gently massaged into the entire body to strengthen immunity and liquefy toxins, lubricate the joints and increase flexibility. For Shirodhara, lukewarm herbal oil is poured in an even stream onto the forehead. This anti-ageing treatment is intensely rejuvenating, by improving memory and addressing neurological disorders, as well as normalising sleep patterns and blood pressure. A choice of three restaurants invites travellers to choose their dining pleasure – from international classics and spicy Sri Lanka specialities, to refined Italian tastes and the exotic diversity of Thai, Indian and Chinese cuisines. Spice Spoons cooking school ignites culinary passions with a glimpse into the market life and a cooking class with master chef tips. The Upper Deck Bar is a haven to relax over refreshments and light bites. Tailoring the ultimate in romance, Dining by Design offers a collection of connoisseur menus with a personal chef and butler, in intimate settings.

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THE HEAVENLY SPA The Heavenly Spa by Westin offers guests a number of experiences designed to satisfy the most discerning guests. From a state-of-theart gym, wellness spa facility and two trendy rooftop pools, there is somewhere for everyone to unwind and relax. Guests can expect to sink into a world of decadent priming and pampering the minute they enter its doors. Feeling rested and rejuvenated is taken seriously here, with special emphasis on the ingredients and products used in every treatment. All their products are made using natural ingredients. In fact, for the first time in the UAE, the spa has named Farm House Fresh as their signature product, a range internationally renowned for its natural and organic ingredients. They offer a diverse spa menu featuring over 20 signature treatments, all carefully curated to offer unique benefits to the body and mind. While the trendy spa holds dedicated female and male areas, couples looking for some decadent R&R can make use of the couple rooms that boast unrivalled views of the city skyline and iconic Burj Khalifa, making it the perfect place to unwind while soaking up the landmark view. Additional facilities include a sauna, steam room, dedicated couples section with generously sized suites to accommodate side-byside massages, duo hammam room, as well as a generous wet area with two hot tubs, two sensory showers and an array of heated loungers. The Heavenly Spa by Westin is as heavenly as its namesake. The Heavenly Spa, Westin Dubai, Booking: 04 381 1904

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THE IRIDIUM SPA Brought to life over two years ago, the Iridium Spa at The St. Regis Dubai has become a spa haven in the heart of the bustling city, where guests can embark on a decadent journey into a transcendental world where every moment is crafted to leave a lasting impression on them. Created exclusively from the DNA of the worldwide St. Regis brand, the Iridium Spa at The St. Regis Dubai provides guests with the rarest of luxuries: time dedicated to you. Whether for half an hour or half a day, the Iridium Spa is a specialized health and wellbeing destination that guides guests through a spectrum of moods, whether they wish to be energized or simply wind down, the Iridium spa offers a number of unique treatments and experiences that will leave the body and mind nourished and energized. Showcasing six luxuriously designed treatment rooms, Dubai’s exclusive Iridium Spa has been carefully designed to reflect the energy of its surroundings and create a sense of harmony from within. With designated male and female sections, each area features its own dedicated steam and sauna facilities, two hammam rooms, and a relaxing area known as The Iridium Room where guests can enjoy the ultimate pampering experience in a serene location. Keeping up with new spa trends, the bespoke menu offers guests a varied selection of personalized treatments ranging from authentic massages and bespoke facials to a variety of invigorating hammams and baths as well as a complete pampering ritual. The Iridium Spa, St. Regis Dubai, Bookings: +971 4 435 5500

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SPICE UP

From sunrise to sunset, BHAR will add a little spice to your life BHAR, the Arabic word for ‘spice’, is designed to awaken the senses, evoking a feeling of tradition in a contemporary Middle Eastern style brasserie. Welcome to an open plan kitchen where the team’s dedicated live cooking stations and expertise form an integral part of the dining experience. Incorporating playful and exotic elements associated with the region, a Modern Middle Eastern ambience is seen throughout BHAR, with all dishes and beverages served using plates, silverware and glassware that combine intricate designs and engravings. Located at the Renaissance Downtown Hotel, Business Bay, BHAR has unarguably some of the best views of the Dubai Creek from its open terraces. But the magnificent view is not the only highlight in a place where the dishes on the tables are just as playful as the restaurant’s colour palette, and guests are encouraged to come as they are. BHAR is a Middle Eastern-style brasserie with cuisine crafted by Chef Mohanad Alshamali, a place where the experience is a literal feast for the senses, particularly as the sun sets. After years as the chef in charge of some of Dubai’s finest restaurants, Chef Mohanad returns to the kitchen as the creative mastermind behind BHAR, where his traditional Syrian roots meet contemporary cooking techniques in the tastiest of manners.

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From fattoush and falafel to labneh and lamb chops, Chef Mohanad has added his signature flair to every item on the menu. With modern techniques infused into traditional classics and contemporary twists on Middle Eastern family recipes, BHAR takes you on a culinary journey across the region and across time. Menu highlights include Chef Mohanad’s trademark dish, black cod syadieh, as well as other culinary creations such as crispy soft-shell crab saj with garlic mayonnaise and harissa and duck fat chips. As the sun sets over Dubai Water Canal, the atmosphere heats up, and it’s time to kick back and relax at the BHAR Lounge. Enjoy the spectacular Dubai sunset views, live entertainment, shisha and masterful mixology. Vibrant local entertainment is accompanied by a refreshing selection of house-brewed traditional and international teas flavoured with indigenous Levantine ingredients. Karkadeh iced tea anyone? The playful twists on traditional flavours, authentic service and seamless blending of old and new tastes will charm the BHAR guest at every turn. BHAR, Renaissance Downtown Hotel, Business Bay, Dubai, Reservations: +9714 512 5511

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A PERSONAL TOUCH Scalini, the much-anticipated Italian restaurant and bar from London has opened its doors to diners at the Four Seasons Jumeirah. Inspired by a love for Italy’s coastal cuisine, award-winning Chef Monserrato Marini’s bespoke menu honours the traditions of classic Italian cooking and culture, while infusing them with an upscale, urban taste. Chef Marini and his culinary brigade unveil a carefully curated menu, highlighted

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by signature dishes including Spaghetti Lobster, Grilled Langoustines, Veal Milanese, Risotto di Mare and Tiramisu. Offering a hearty and decadent selection of homemade pasta, guests can choose from classic recipes prepared with a contemporary twist. A personal touch is key at Scalini where delightful dishes are brought to life with an exquisite theatrical presentation at the table – pasta prepared in the Parmigiana cheese wheel, banana flambés, homemade desserts

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and sorbets are all made in front of diners. Established in London in 1988, Scalini played an influential role in the rise of Italian trattorias throughout the UK and won the hearts of several renowned celebrities, including Rolling Stones’ Ronny Wood, Ringo Star from The Beetles, Tom Cruise, Simon Cowell, Dustin Hoffman and Vin Diesel to name a few. Scalini, Four Seasons Jumeirah, Reservations: 04 349 0068


AN ITALIAN FEAST Those hungry for a laid-back alternative to the typical Friday lunch are in luck, thanks to an exciting new offering from The Artisan by Enoteca Pinchiorri. Every Friday, The Artisan celebrates Italian generosity with a set of offerings, reminiscent of a rustic Italian feast. After a relaxing welcome drink, diners are offered a choice of two antipasti – ranging from mouth-watering wagyu carpaccio with bagna cauda sauce, chives and tangy

lemon to a creamy bruschetta burrata with basil pesto, anchovies and cherry tomato. Next comes a delightfully comforting helping of homemade agnolotti pasta, oozing with sweet pumpkin and a butter sage sauce. In true Italian style, this is followed by a choice of classic cuts and staple dishes, such as a juicy lamb rack with bold bronte pistachio and aubergine cream, or a sensational sea salt-crusted seabream with

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vierge sauce, shared with loved ones. If that wasn’t enough, there are also plenty of mashed potatoes with Parmesan, and peperoni al forno, marinated with cappers, mint and garlic, to go around. The Artisan’s La Dolce Vita Friday menu is available from 12 pm to 4 pm starting Dhs295 per person. The Artisan by Enoteca Pinchiorri, Burj Daman Building, Level P5, DIFC, Reservations: 04 338 8133

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ECD BY NIGHT Following in the footsteps of it’s Ibiza sister, El Chringuito Dubai launches ‘ECD BY NIGHT’. A laid back, Ibiza-esque, affair, drenched in nothing but Dubai’s city lights and candlelight, on the newly built beach terrace, a few steps from the water’s edge. As the sun goes down, the focus moves towards the purpose-built grill and barbecue, where trust us the aroma of slow-roasted

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succulent cuts of meat will have your taste buds in overdrive. Fear not, there’s fresh fish of the day, vegetarian risotto and an array of roasted vegetables to name a few if meat isn’t your thing. With dishes like grill roasted smoked aubergine served with homemade hummus and pesto, Tuna tartare with coriander and avocado puré to start, followed by

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wood-fired black Angus filet mignon, sea bass in salt with fennel jus and roasted potatoes – the question is will you have room for dessert? Blankets, outdoor heaters, laidback grooves and plenty of love await you and your loved ones every Wednesday and Thursday. El Chiringuito, Rixos The Palm Dubai, Reservations: 054 449 6464


UNDER THE STARS The Mediterranean haven in the heart of Jumeirah Beach Walk, Riviera Seafood Grill in Rixos Premium Dubai launches a premier mid-week dining event Riviera BBQ Under the Stars. From 7 pm on Tuesday 27 February and every Tuesday throughout March, let Riviera take you to the white-washed shores of Greece, the vineyards of Italy and the French Riviera, with a delectable BBQ Under the Stars at

Riviera Seafood Grill’s garden and terrace overlooking the Arabian Gulf. Riviera’s BBQ Under the Stars offers a wide selection from red snapper and sea bass fillets to our classic Angus beef burger, chorizo sausage, skirt steak, tuna burger, and king prawns amongst other delicacies. Add to that delicious sides such as salted padron peppers, baked potatoes, and chili butter corn on the cob, as well as

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a selection of salsas and sauces, and you’ll be licking your lips from the first flame until the last morsel. Cooked over live flames and embers, BBQ Under the Stars is the perfect poolside mid-week vacation on the lawns of Riviera Seafood Grill for just AED 245 per person. Riviera Seafood Grill, Rixos Premium Dubai, Reservations: reservations@ riviera-grill.com

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LUXURY AT ZERO GRAVITY A ‘game changer’ is the phrase one often hears when any discussion takes place about the new First Class suite on Emirates Airlines’ new Boeing 777-300ER, and for a good reason Each flight offers only six fully enclosed private suites in a spacious 1+1+1 configuration. Each suite offers 40 square feet of cabin space and a floor to ceiling sliding door to give the guest complete privacy. Its pièce de résistance is a seat setting known as the ‘zero-gravity.’ This reclined seating position is based on research done by NASA to find the optimum launch position for their astronauts. Their findings have been incorporated into these seats to impart a sense of weightlessness by alleviating pressure on the elbows, back, and neck. The seat also reclines seamlessly in a flatbed. And all this state-of-the-art technology is enveloped with the most luxurious beige “buttery” soft leather. To enhance the slumber experience, the suite comes with a soft pillow, a memory foam mattress, a fluffy blanket, and a duvet. There is also a pair of state-of-the-art active noise cancelling headphones created exclusively for Emirates by the world-renowned Bowers & Wilkins. They were designed to optimise the quality of the sound in an aircraft environment.

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It has the largest HD digital touch screen TV in the world on any aircraft. The enhanced complimentary “inspiration” vanity kit, has been put together in collaboration with Swedish fragrance company Byredo. Rolled away beneath the vanity kit and in front of the seat is the largest dining table in the air. There is also a smaller roll away cocktail table on the side of the seat to enjoy the on-demand custom-made cocktails prepared by the cabin crew who are trained mixologists. For those suites in the middle, and which do not have their own window to look out of, Emirates has teamed up with Boeing to offer something truly unique: “Virtual windows.” These are real-time projections of the exterior on flat-screen displays set behind mock window openings. They create the illusion of actually viewing the exterior while being in the middle of the plane.

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Signe Edition 29  

Signe Magazine Lifestyle Magazine Cover Story: RESURRECTION OF A LEGEND We follow the Salvator Mundi to the Louvre Abu Dhabi Other Featu...

Signe Edition 29  

Signe Magazine Lifestyle Magazine Cover Story: RESURRECTION OF A LEGEND We follow the Salvator Mundi to the Louvre Abu Dhabi Other Featu...

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