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THE REFEREE

HUBLOT UN VEILS THE BIG BA NG REFEREE 2018 FIFA WORLD CUP RUSSIA

DAY & NIGHT

WE CAPTURE THE ESSENCE OF THE 2018 MASER ATI QUATTROPORTE

FAIR GOLD

CHOPARD TAKES A BOLD MOVE TOWARDS ETHICAL AND SUSTAINABLE SOURCING OF GOLD

MAN OF THE MOMENT Dieter Knechtel, the man tasked with the largest geographical markets for the world’s favourite marque, Ferrari


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BASELWORLD 2018 Baselworld is one of the best weeks of the year for watch lovers, when the industry descends on Basel, Switzerland, to see the major new releases from the industry. While the next edition of the largest watch fair is set to return on the 21st of March 2019, we bring you the highlights (p.51) from this year’s Baselworld. This edition we bring you two special features on Hublot and its contribution to the world of sports. We bring you an exclusive interview with Usain Bolt and his collaboration with Hublot (p.18), as well as a peek into the Hublot Big Bang Referee 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia, a watch purpose-built for the Soccer fan. To celebrate the unveiling of this exclusive watch in the region, Hublot, along with brand partners Ahmed Seddiqi and Sons, organized ‘The Match of Friendship’ at the Dubai Opera Hanging Garden at the base of the Burj Khalifa (p.101). A one-match, five-aside football game featuring some of the greatest names to tread on a football pitch. Our cover story (p.66) highlights an individual who handles the largest markets for the world’s favourite marque, Ferrari. With over two decades of being at the helm of the automobile industry, Dieter Knechtel now oversees the growth of Ferrari in the Far East and the Middle East markets. We bring you the essence of the 2018 Maserati Quattroporte (p.83) through a series of striking visual moments captured on location at the Bvlgari Hotels and Resorts, Dubai. Set against the backdrop of the Arabian Sea, the shoot captures the Maserati Man as he traverses between a life of being driven around to one where he is in the driver’s seat. Last but not the least, our philanthropy story (p.106) highlights the efforts industry leader Chopard has put into redefining the extent of its corporate social responsibility. Always staying ahead of the market requirements, Chopard’s tough decision to limit its gold supply to sustainable resources shows how good corporate stewardship can also be an outcome of management vision. As always, enjoy the read!

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Edition 30 Cover Illustration Nujoomi Denjypady

www.signemagazine.com EDITORIAL Publisher Daniel Giacometti Editor-in-Chief Sunaz Sharaf sunaz@signemagazine.com Art Director Nujoomi Denjypady Features Editor Shama Moosa Junior Editor Almas Salman Copy Editor Sameer Denzi Distribution Nidal Ziyad COMMERCIAL INQUIRIES sales@signemagazine.com PUBLISHED BY ALTA VERBA FZ LLC 17, The Iridium Building,Umm Suqeim Road, Al Barsha P.O.Box 391186, Dubai U.A.E Tel: +9714 360 3498 info@signemagazine.com ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE For advertising and advertising related enquiries: FIERCE INTERNATIONAL Business Central Tower A,
Dubai Media City P.O.Box 502979, Dubai U.A.E Tel: +9714 421 5455 Tarek@fierce-international.com Published under licensing from

All rights reserved. No part of the material protected by this copyright notice may be reproduced or utilised in any form or by any means, without written permission from the Publisher. SIGNÉ does not take any responsibilities for incorrect information. The advertising appearing within this publication reflects the opinion and attitudes of their respective brands and not necessarily those of the Publisher or SIGNÉ.

ISSN 2410-4523


Hugh Jackman and the new TimeWalker Chronograph The new TimeWalker Chronograph is inspired by performance and the spirit of racing. montblanc.com/timewalker Crafted for New Heights.


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THE GENTLEMAN

We remember the finer qualities and unique achievements of Hubert Givenchy

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THE 7 SANDS COLLECTION

A NEW CASHMERE

TOD group launches its new store at the Dubai mall with a UAE inspired celebratory collection

Yak Wool, a sustainable alternative to high-end animal fibres

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BULL RUN

THE ART OF CERAMICS

Signe meets the CEO of Lamborghini and his team charged with steering the automotive legend

A look into Rolex’s pioneering manufacturing process of coloured ceramic bezels

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Usain Bolt talks to Signe about his partnership with Hublot at Baselworld 2018

Behind the scenes of what goes into the creation of Bentley’s exclusive veneers

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LVHM hires Virgil Abloh as Louis Vuitton’s Artistic Director

Montblanc announces the release of a new Limited Edition pen inspired by Ibn Sina

VIRGIL’S QUEST

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Tommy Hilfiger announces Lewis Hamilton as its new global brand ambassador

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MIDDAY-TO-MIDNIGHT

BENTLEY’S AMBER

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CHAMPIONSHIP GEAR

Eau de citron noir – a new addition to Hermes Cologne collection

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SIGNE SELECTIONS BASELWORLD 2018

A PEN FOR IBN SINA

Signe lists down some of its favourite timepieces from the much awaited Baselworld 2018

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FLAVORS OF THE SILK ROAD

The popular Afghani dumpling, Mantu, is the signature dish at Kishmish, the newest Afghani restaurant in town. We tell you more about the dish and what makes it so special at Kishmish

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THE REFEREE

Hublot unveils the official referee’s smartwatch for the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia

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MAN OF THE MOMENT

We chat with Dieter Knechtel, the man tasked with the largest geographical markets for Ferrari

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PRIZED CRAFT

The Loewe Foundation announces the finalists for its Loewe Craft Prize

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A NEW SHADE OF YOU

Signe talks to the Regional Colour and Creative Manager at Jotun about how they pick their color of the year

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FAIR GOLD

Signe takes a look at Chopard’s journey towards ethicality and sustainability

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VAN GOGH SPECIAL

Signe tells you more about Vincent van Gogh’s admiration for Japanese art and the extraordinary Van Gogh suites by The Conservatorium luxury hotel to commemorate the Vincent Van Gogh Museum’s “Van Gogh & Japan” exhibit.

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THE GYPSY CHEF

DAY & NIGHT

Signe captures the essence of the 2018 Maserati Quattroporte through an exclusive photoshoot done at the Bvlgari Hotels and Resorts, Dubai

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Signe catches up with the celebrated restaurateur and Michelin-starred chef David Myers to know more about his global culinary journey and his restaurants in Dubai

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A CITY ESCAPE

The Ritz Carlton, DIFC, introduced Flair No. 5 for an ultimate escape from the busy city life

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THE FRIDAY EXPERIENCE Masti - Cocktails and Cuisine invites you for a weekend indulgence

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A CRAB AFFAIR

Crab Market open its doors to diners at DIFC

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BODY AND SOUL

Soul Wellness & Spa by Sheraton – Food for not just face and body but mind and soul too

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THE JAZZ LOUNGE SPA The ultimate grooming destination for men in town

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SCHOLARS · THE GENTLEMAN

THE GENTLEMAN Hubert Givenchy passed away on March 10, 2018. We remember his finer qualities and unique achievements Simple, elegant and charming was the man, as were his creations. Inspired by his celebrated muse, he gave us the “little black dress.” Inspired and guided by one of the greats, his haute couture salon was distinguished and fresh. Dana Thomas once wrote: “Givenchy has long been a classicist, one of the last of the old school of haute couture, where gorgeous clothes were made for a woman to live in, not to decorate her, and design, however elaborate, always bowed to function. His clothes moved with a woman’s body, rather than restricted it.” Count Hubert James Marcel Taffin de Givenchy was born in 1927, to an aristocratic family that traces its roots to Venice, Italy. His father died when he was just two years old and was raised by his mother and maternal grandparents. His maternal grandfather, Jules Badin, was the director of the historic Gobelins and Beauvais tapestry workshops in Paris. These were the two most historically important tapestry factories in France. Badin’s father and grandfather were also renowned set designers. Badin instilled in his grandson a passion for textiles arts so much that by the age of ten, he had decided that it would be his vocation. He enrolled at the acclaimed École des Beaux-Arts in Paris at the age of seventeen. His plan was to work with and learn from one of his idols, the Paris based couturier Cristóbal Balenciaga. However, when the young Givenchy went to meet Balenciaga, he was rudely turned away by the establishment’s directrice. His career then began with short stints at Jacques Fath, Robert Piguet, and Lucien Lelong. Then came a four-year appointment with Elsa Schiaparelli which proved fruitful

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as he met many of his future clients there, and also began experimenting with ‘separates,’ which would become one of his creative hallmarks. Today Givenchy is appropriately considered a classicist, but in his youth, he was distinguished by his innovations that, at times, seemed risqué. Armed with a growing loyal clientele and with a growing reputation, Givenchy took the bold step in 1952, of starting his own haute couture salon. He was bold in his choice of location and in what he offered in his debut collection as well. While the other notable couturiers were to be found on the Avenue Montaigne and the Rue de la Paix, Givenchy chose a nineteenthcentury mansion in the genteel residential district of Parc Monceau. He based his debut collection on separates, and on the generous use of white cotton. The separates made individual pieces offered interchangeable whereby the clientele could pick and choose as they pleased, and the use of cotton made them economical, and more importantly, offered something fresh. Then in 1953, two events occurred that would profoundly change the course of Givenchy’s life; personally and professionally. These two events also illustrate the magnetism in his personality. One was his chance meeting with his idol Balenciaga at a social event. After which, they not only became close friends quickly but also developed a paternalistic tutorstudent relationship. While Balenciaga’s style was more conservative and statelier, Givenchy’s was more youthful and experimental, but they had common tastes with regards to silhouettes, fabrics, and embellishments. Such was their bond that when Balenciaga closed shop in 1968, he

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forwarded his clientele to Givenchy, who had by then moved to his new salon across the road from Balenciaga. The other meeting of 1953 was with Audrey Hepburn. This meeting resulted in a whirlwind that elevated both of them to new levels of professional fame and fortune. Like with Balenciaga, this relationship was at its core, a personal one; “It was a kind of marriage” Givenchy told Drusilla Beyfus in 2015. “Little by little, our friendship grew and with it a confidence in each other. There was never any criticism of the other person, no upsets... I always respected Audrey’s taste. She was not like other movie stars in that she liked simplicity.” It was a “marriage” that produced some of the most storied dresses in cinematographic history; and turned Hepburn into a fashion icon. Over the years, his clientele has induced Jacqueline Kennedy, Empress Farah Pahlavi, Ingrid Bergman, Countess Mona von Bismarck, Marlene Dietrich, Greta Garbo, Gloria and Dolores Guinness, Grace Kelly, Princess Salimah Aga Khan, and Baroness Pauline de Rothschild among others. Givenchy was honoured with the Chevalier de la Légion d’honneur in 1983, and with the Medal of l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres in 1992, over many other industry and peer recognition awards. It seems appropriate to give the last words to Givenchy’s great muse Audrey Hepburn: “Hubert is like a tree. Tall and straight and beautiful; in spring, summer, fall and winter creating and recreating loveliness. The roots of his friendship always deep and strong, the wide branches of his affection sheltering those he loves.”


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SCHOLARS · BULL RUN

BULL RUN We met up with the CEO of Lamborghini, Stefano Domenicali, and his team charged with steering the Sant’Agata based legend Automobili Lamborghini, founded by the charismatic Ferruccio Lamborghini as a result of an infamous snub from Enzo Ferrari, is a marque that does not shy away from daring to think different and daring to look different. Under the VW group, Lamborghini has experienced a renaissance in terms of the quality of the build as well as commercial growth and strength. Under the stewardship of Stephan Winkelmann, Lamborghini’s CEO from 2005 to 2016, the marque crossed the 2,000 units sold mark for the first time, weathered the severe dip post-2008 financial crisis, and recovered to go well past the 3,000 mark. Another important legacy of the Winkelmann era is the realisation of the Urus SUV concept. Quite a legacy to live up to for his successor, who took over the reins in March 2016. Stefano Domenicali is no stranger to success, or to the challenges of managing a high-profile marque, or to the passion permeating the DNA of an Italian automotive legend such as Lamborghini. Domenicali was born in Imola and was, not surprisingly, infected with the “scarlet” fever at an early age. He used to volunteer at the Imola race track as a boy, and then went on to become the Director of Scuderia Ferrari’s Formula One team. He was listed as one of Top Gear’s “Men of the Year 2012” for keeping the Scuderia competitive under difficult circumstances. So, how does the former Scuderia man define the brand he is now responsible for? “Lamborghini for me is a brand that has been able, since 1963, to produce unique cars that were very different from anything else. Cars that are characterised by a design language that is very cutting edge, by bright colours, and by technological innovation. It is seen as a unique product with a big and strong personality”, Domenicali told us during his visit to the world’s largest Lamborghini showroom on Sheikh Zayed Road.

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SCHOLARS · BULL RUN

Domenicali’s first great responsibility at Lamborghini was overseeing the global launch of Urus. The second is managing its sales, which is now projected to double Lamborghini’s output to over 7,000 units in 2019, thanks to Urus. What is the reasoning behind this departure from known pastures? “The Automotive industry is a very evolving market”, Domenicali explains. “It was clear when the decision was taken that there was a big opportunity in terms of the new potential market segment of SUVs”. However, “it was essential that our product be distinct from the other products, and that it would be able to stay on top of a certain niche in this segment”. Supersport SUV is the niche segment in which Lamborghini want to place their SUV because firstly, the Urus “is a synthesis of the Miura, the Countach, and the LM002”; the latter being Lamborghini’s first SUV. Add to this its top-of-class performance figures, and you have the ingredients for a supersport SUV. The problem, however, is that “this segment is brand new. So what would be the right dimension in terms of being exclusive in this segment does not exist” says Domenicali. “And because this segment is totally new we need to make sure that we find the

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right trade-off between what we offer and the demand. That has always been a very important aspect specific of Lamborghini”. Valuation is one area that Lamborghini has managed well. “Today if you look at the market, the residual value of all the cars on the street is very high because I do believe that Lamborghini was able to have a strong offer, put in a new model at the right time, and making sure that there was one car less than what the market was demanding, that was the key to our success”. While supply side may not seem well defined, the demand side looks promising according to Domenicali. “Normally an SUV or supersport SUV is very polarising, you either love it or you don’t love it, that’s part of the game. What for me is striking is the fact that despite the polarising effect of an SUV, and above that, an SUV from a supersport car brand, the general response of this car is extremely positive. And therefore I do believe that we have the right approach”. Another reason for optimism is that the company sees the Urus as a gateway model; an everyday car with a thoroughbred pedigree. “Because of Urus, a lot of people are coming from other brands that were not customers of Lamborghini, not only

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in terms of cars owned in the garage but also women who are not typical Lamborghini customers. Currently, 5 or 6 percent of our customers are women”, according to Fredrico Foschini, Lamborghini’s Chief Commercial Officer. Lamborghini has the right person in the right place to deal with the expected influx of women into the brand. Katia Bassi is the newly appointed Chief Marketing Officer and is also the first woman ever to join the Lamborghini board. Formerly with Aston Martin, Bassi outlined what she understood to be the Urus’ appeal to women: It is “in reality a super SUV, and it is a Lamborghini”, which the women drivers will find “not that much intimidating in terms of design, and in terms of power”. They will also find that “these cars can be used on a daily basis as there is ample room for kids, and for shopping”. Furthermore, Lamborghini “have convened a female advisory board, in different countries, with no less than 150 selfempowered women such as entrepreneurs or professionals. It includes existing customers, as well as prospective women customers. It is like a feedback group, but we don’t just talk about automotive issues. We also talk about the challenges we

have in our positions and how best we can contribute to the changes, in particular, the changes in the automotive world. Because of this communication, we believe our percentage of women customers will increase”. With all this talk of SUVs, and focus on women, Domenicali is adamant that Lamborghini “will keep on investing in supersport cars in the future. We will make sure that we are not distracted by the success of Urus”. In terms of power, “hybrid will be the electrified answer of the near future for Lamborghini, in the models that will come in the next couple of years. But at the center will be the V12, for example, as in the future Aventador replacement. We believe that hybrid is a must considering all the limitations, regulations, emissions, and legislation”. Another area of focus will be Lamborghini’s classic cars because “the value of our classic car is growing. Therefore we want to keep working on our in-house certification of older Lamborghinis. This adds to the higher value for these cars, and we will be able to better regulate the market for these cars. The residual value of the Lamborghini cars today is the highest in this sector”.

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S C HOL A RS · U S A I N ’S H U BL OT

USAIN’S HUBLOT A synopsis of Signe’s meeting with Usain Bolt at Baselworld 2018 Prior to the start of the 200m men’s final at the 2013 IAAF World Championships in Moscow, the athletes were a study in concentration, not allowing themselves to be distracted by the crowd, or by the cameramen trying to get their close-ups. All except one. Usain Bolt removed his warmers and placed them in a basket being held by a young female track-assistant. But unlike others, Bolt was relaxed, gave the young girl a smile and a fist-bump before turning to face the track. This was not the only time Bolt had done something like that. In fact, one might say that is his hallmark. He has never let his stardom or the gravity of an occasion like the final of a major track event stop him from having a lighthearted humanist moment. Bolt told the BBC, in an interview before the 2016 Rio Olympics that, “he wants to be thought of among ‘the greatest’ with Muhammad Ali and Pele.” To be considered among the greatest, one must possess an abundance of titles and the accolades, in addition to possessing an extraordinary charisma. Bolt certainly has both in abundance. The list of achievements is bewildering. The first man to achieve the ‘triple-triple;’ three gold medals in three consecutive Olympics - Beijing, London and Rio. He won eleven titles at the IAAF world championships in Berlin, Moscow, Beijing and Daegu. He is the world record holder in the 100m, 200m, and the 4x100m. He is the holder of 19 Guinness World Records, has won the Laureus World Sportsman of the Year 4 times, IAAF World Athlete of the Year six times, and at least nine awards from major media entities such as Track & Field, the BBC and L’Équipe. Now that he has retired, few would argue that he is among ‘the greatest.’ The medals and the titles may have stopped, but the humanist in him is as strong as ever, and he is determined to use his fame to help others less fortunate. He started the Usain Bolt

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Foundation which aims “to enhance the character of children through educational and cultural development, as they live their dreams.” The foundation regularly gives generous donations of money and equipment to schools and orphanages and organises events which are often attended by Bolt himself. When Bolt agreed to become a brand ambassador for Hublot in 2010, their mutual commitment to charitable causes was a contributing factor in clinching the deal. A statement by Hublot at the time stated: “Usain is not only an outstanding sportsman, but also a man with a naturally sunny disposition,whoshareshisgiftswithhumility.LikeBolt,Hublotisdedicatedtothe value of sharing, and is committed to sharing the company’s own success and making a contribution to support those who are less fortunate. Usain, for his part, is personally involved in a number of children’s foundations, particular in Jamaica.” The latest charitable contribution by the partnership is their participation in the ‘Only Watch’ auction organised by Christie’s in November 2017. ‘Only Watch’ is a biennial charity auction of one-off timepieces to raise funds for the research on myopathy, a disease which causes muscle weakness. The Monaco based Association Monegasque Contre Les Myopathies was the beneficiary and would thus receive 99% of the funds raised from the action. Hublot offered the Usain Bolt inspired timepiece titled: ‘Big Bang Unico Sapphire Usain Bolt.’ Based on one of Bolt’s favourite models, it is made from sapphire, one of the most difficult materials to machine. It also features a yellow gold plated skeleton in honour of the many ‘golds’ won by Bolt over his glittering career. It was expected to raise between CHF 50,000 to 80,000, but like its inspiration, it far exceeded expectations by raising CHF 150,000.

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S C HOL A RS · U S A I N ’S H U BL OT

Usain Bolt was kind enough to give an interview to Signe during his appearance at Baselworld 2018, regarding his charitable work, about his ambassadorship of Hublot, and about his plans. How did this collaboration with Hublot come about? Hublot is a very exclusive brand. Their image and their products are a good match for me; their watches are amazing. On top of that, Hublot is very active in charity, which is very important for me. Is Hublot involved in your foundation? Yes absolutely, Hublot helps me raise money for my foundation. It is part of our collaboration contract. Their contribution is just as important for me as it is for Hublot. We do a lot of work together. They support my projects for new hospitals and schools in Jamaica. My charitable foundation focuses primarily on the well-being of children. How much are you involved in the making of a watch? I always give my inputs during the design stage, particularly in terms of the choice of colours. During the design of the last watch [the Big Bang

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Unico Sapphire Usain Bolt], I told them I wanted the watch to really pop out, and that is why they used yellow gold. Sometimes, they present me with different options, and I will choose between the propositions. It is important to me that the watch that bears my name represents me. Are you passionate about watches? Do you wear a watch while you do sports? Actually, my mother is a real watch person. That’s how I became interested in the world of watches. When I am on the track I prefer not to wear a watch, I don’t want to damage it or accidentally hurt anyone. What’s your next big plan? Apart from my charity work, I am looking into football as a career reconversion. It is something I am really serious about. In fact, tomorrow I am leaving for Dortmund (Germany), to train with the main team of Borussia Dortmund, to understand where I stand, what my actual level is. I achieved so much on track in athletics, that now I feel I have to challenge myself and try something new.

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S C HOL A RS · V I RG I L’S Q U E S T

VIRGIL’S QUEST We look into the business sense behind the decision by LVHM to hire Virgil Abloh as Louis Vuitton’s Artistic Director Louis Vuitton is the world’s most valuable luxury lifestyle brand according to Forbes magazine, valued at over $28 billion. Its sales figures hover around the $10 billion mark with profit margins exceeding 30 percent. So, when it was announced recently that Virgil Abloh would be the new Men’s Artistic Director at Louis Vuitton, its parent LVHM made a bold statement that may have far-reaching consequences throughout the Industry. The First African-American to hold the post, Virgil Abloh said: “It is an honor for me to accept the position of Men’s Artistic Director for Louis Vuitton. I find the heritage and creative integrity of the House to be the key inspirations and will look to reference them both while drawing parallels to modern times.” Abloh replaces the much liked Kim Jones who, according to Louis Vuitton injected his own vibrant mix of High fashion and street style into classic English menswear. Jones’ tenure had notable success, particularly his collaborations with artists Dinos and Jake Chapman, and most notably with the streetwear label Supreme. Streetwear is street fashion that grew out of the Californian surf and skate culture which now incorporates elements of hip-hop, Japanese street, and modern haute couture fashion. Stussy is credited with inventing the genre, while A Bathing Ape and Supreme are largely credited with taking it to the locales of exclusivity. Luxury brands are collaborating with streetwear because, according to The Business Of Fashion, “High-end streetwear helped boost global sales of luxury personal goods by 5 percent this year [2017] to an estimated €263 bil-

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lion ($309 billion)... There is a big market of €2.5 million for luxury T-shirts, for example that is growing very fast. And a half-a-billion-euro market for rubber sliders.” So when Louis Vuitton announced the locations of six pop-up shops that, for a limited time, would carry the luxury megabrand’s Autumn/Winter 2017 collaboration with cult streetwear label Supreme, the excitement on social media was palpable. The following morning, 7,500 people in Tokyo, 2,000 people in London and 1,500 people in Sydney lined up for a chance to buy pieces from the collection. Hours later, pieces from the partnership were being resold for thousands of dollars. In his seven years at Vuitton, Jones turned the men’s division into one of the fastest growing segments of the company by tapping into streetwear trends, most spectacularly via his collaboration with Supreme last year. Streetwear is very much the foundation of Abloh’s Off-White, and he’s just about the most prolific collaborator fashion has going. Hailing from the greater Chicago area, he is a second generation Ghanian-American. His mother was a seamstress who trained him in the craft. He then went on to get a degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Wisconsin Madison and a Master’s Degree in Architecture from the Illinois Institute of Technology. His master’s curriculum not only introduced him to modernist design principles but also to the concept of multidisciplinary working. Then in 2009, Abloh, along with his friend Kanye West, became interns at Fendi in Rome where Michael Burke was chairman and CEO. Burke, who is the current Chairman & CEO of Louis Vuitton said: “Having followed with

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great interest Virgil’s ascent since he worked with me at Fendi in 2006, I am thrilled to see how his innate creativity and disruptive approach have made him so relevant, not just in the world of fashion but in popular culture today. His sensibility towards luxury and savoirfaire will be instrumental in taking Louis Vuitton’s menswear into the future” In the interim period between his internship with Fendi and his hiring by LVHM, Abloh experienced a meteoritic rise. In 2010, he became Creative Director of Donda, West’s creative agency. In 2011, he was nominated for a Grammy as the art director of the Jay-Z and Kanye West collaborative album “Watch the Throne.” Though Abloh did not win, he gained a lot of social media traction from it. The following year he launched the Pyrex Vision brand and closed it shortly thereafter. In 2013, Abloh launched the successful multi-platform Off-White brand based in Milan. Abloh defines the brand as “the grey area between black and white, as the color OffWhite.” At Off-white, he applied the ethos of streetwear and luxury to clothes, accessories, art, music and even furniture. By 2015, OffWhite was being worn by celebrities, and Abloh was a named a finalist for the LVMH Prize. The highlight year thus far was 2017. It witnessed the release of his first song. He collaborated with Takashi Murakami, Warby Parker, Jacob the Jeweler, and Jimmy Choo. There was the highly popular “The Ten” sneakers partnership with Nike. He also received the British Fashion Award for Urban Luxe and the International Designer of the Year award from GQ.


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S AV O I R FA I R E · A N E W C A S H M E R E

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A NEW CASHMERE Yak wool is set to rival cashmere, merino or vicuna; maybe even outdo them There has been a growing unease within the fashion industry about the ecological impact of the ever-growing demand for high-end animal fibres, in particular cashmere. This growing demand has been a major contributing factor in the growth of livestock numbers that produce the fibres. A report in Conservation Biology, published in 2013, states that the demand for cashmere encourages herders to increase livestock production in these remote, arid ecosystems. As a result, across 7 study areas in Mongolia, India, and China’s Tibetan Plateau, the population of native mammals had reduced to less than five percent to that of domesticated species. The native mammals threatened include, among many others, the Bactrian camel, snow leopard and wild yak. The overgrazing has also led to the rapid desertification of several of these areas. Alarmed by these developments, yak wool is now being promoted as a more sustainable alternative. Since yaks naturally shed their winter fur every spring, the wool is simply combed off and not sheared off. Since they are a native species, they are part of

the native ecology, and their natural grazing patterns can help in the reversing of the desertification process in the affected regions. More importantly, the leading organisations, such as the Londonbased Tengri, Norlha textiles, and Italian brands mYak and Maeko Tessuti, involved in the procurement and manufacturing of yak wool are committed proponents of the ‘fair share’ business model. However, the ecological and ethical considerations are not yak wool’s unique selling points. It is the fibre itself. The fibres are as soft as cashmere, warmer than merino wool, light and breathable, resistant to pilling, water and odours, hypoallergenic, with the strength and durability associated with cervelt, red deer down. Khangai yak fibres are rarer than vicuña as well. The world’s softest, rarest yak fibres can be hand-combed only once – from Baby Khangai yaks, when they shed their first winter coats. To get a better understanding of the Savoir Faire of the yak wool manufacturing process, Tengri and the Norlha provide good contrasting examples.

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S AV O I R FA I R E · A N E W C A S H M E R E

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Tengri, was founded by Nancy Johnston as a social business. They pay premium prices to Mongolian herders for the fibres collected from them, as well as sharing the profits with them as part of their fairshare business model. The entire supply chain is completely transparent and traceable. Every spring, the wool is hand-combed off the yak by the nomadic herdsmen in the traditional manner causing no harm to the animal. This process produces only 100 grammes of precious Khangai yak fibres. These are hand-sorted into four natural colours: cocoa, tan, and the rare, extremely valuable silver and platinum. The fibres are then separated into different grades, washed and dried before being spun into ‘Tengri Noble’ Yarns. The yarns are spun and woven into fabric in Yorkshire, at a family-owned mill where skills are passed from one generation to the next, and where textile manufacturing dates back to 1777. The knitwear is manufactured in the Scottish Borders – a region world-famous for producing the finest quality woollens for hundreds of years – washing every garment in the purity of local water that brings out the natural softness of Tengri Noble Yarns. Tengri’s fabrics are now being stocked at some of Savile Row finest tailors. Norlha, as well as mYak and Maeko Tessuti, source their yak wool from the highlands of Tibet. Conceived and founded

by the mother-daughter team of Kim and Dechen Yeshi, the atelier is at the heart of this organisation. It adapts innovation to tradition to weave and felt yak khullu in a sustainable process that brings the best out of this exquisite fiber while respecting the local culture from which it comes. Tibetan nomadic women are traditionally skilled at a variety of crafts such as felting, weaving, tailoring and spinning; having spent generations making all their clothes and the other necessities of nomadic life. The innovations introduced may seem antiquated to us, but to this once isolated nomadic community, they are a great step forward without being too disruptive; innovations such as the handloom imported from India for weaving, sewing machines as an addition to hand sewing, charkas imported from India which are ideal for spinning the short fibre yak wool. Knitting is a newly acquired skill which the women have mastered quickly. Norlah textiles operate an online store, norlhatextiles.com, which ships directly from their Tibetan atelier. There is a growing awareness and trend in the luxury fashion industry towards greater sustainability while not compromising on quality. Yak wool and the organisations that promote this remarkable fibre are the finest examples of innovation, sustainability and accountability coming together to create a new way of doing business.

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S AV O I R FA I R E · T H E A RT O F C E R A M I C S

THE ART OF CERAMICS A look into the pioneering and painstaking process of manufacturing Rolex’s coloured ceramic bezels The history of Rolex is not just a catalogue of exquisite timepieces, but also of innovation. Rolex was the first watchmaker to produce a wristwatch with a chronometer certification and is today the largest manufacturer of Swiss certified chronometers. The Oyster of 1926, was the world’s first waterproof watch. The Datejust of 1945 was the first wristwatch with an automatically changing date. The Oyster Perpetual Submariner of 1953 was the first wristwatch that was waterproof up to 100m. The GMT Master of 1954, developed specifically for aviators, was the first to show two time zones simultaneously. The Day-Date of 1956 was the first with an automatically changing date and time. A Rolex Explorer was on the wrist of Sir Edmund Hillary as he stood on Mount Everest, and a Rolex was attached to the Trieste as she reached the bottom of the Mariana Trench. Rolex is also an innovator in the use of new and exotic materials in the manufacturing of their watches. An exceptional example of this is the use of coloured ceramics for the manufacture of bezels and inserts. Ceramic is one of the most difficult materials to work with, and to colour. Rolex have perfected and patented a technique to produce coloured bezels and inserts, which they have trademarked as ‘Cerachrom’. Rolex engineers decided to use ceramic as a material for bezels and inserts because their position on the watch exposes them to more abrasions than any other component. A material as tough as ceramic would be able to endure such abuse unscathed. However, the challenge was to give it a finish and colour worthy of a Rolex. Normal machining and a coat of paint just would not do. The craft of manufacturing ceramics predate ancient Egypt and today covers a broad range of products from bathroom tiles to the Space Shuttle’s thermal insulation tiles. Advanced or technical ceramics, like those used on Rolex watches, are crystallised inorganic solid minerals which originally exist in powder form. They are then transformed into a single solid structure when exposed to extremely high temperatures. The resulting materials are some of the toughest in existence with very high resistance to heat, are virtually indestructible, and are impervious to scratches. The aerospace and the medical industries are credited with pioneering this technology. The watchmaking industry began using ceramics in the 1980 but was restricted to the natural colours of the materials which were either white or black. Until Rolex produced the first coloured ceramics. The ceramic used by Rolex is based on zirconium dioxide, a compound which is derived from zircon, a hard, natural mineral. To colour the ceramic, other mineral compounds that function as pigments are mixed while the zirconia is still in powder form. This sounds a lot simpler than it is. Engineers and researchers at Rolex spent a

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“ It is not with low prices-but on the contrary-it is with improved quality that we cannot only hold the market but also improve it” HANS WILSDORF

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lot of time and effort to find the right mineral that could not just bind, but also produce the right colour without compromising on the characteristics of the base compound. To the above mixture, binding agents are added. The mixture is then heated to a molten state and injected into moulds at high pressure to imprint the numerals, graduations and inscriptions. It is then put through another heating process known as debinding to remove the binding agents. Then comes sintering; the main event and the most delicate part of the process. The component is heated to very high temperatures, up to 1,600 degrees centigrade, to harden the ceramic thus giving it resistance and durability; and to achieve the desired colour. The process takes about 24 hours and reduces the volume of the component by approximately 25 to 30 percent. The art is in ensuring that the whole component hardens and shrinks evenly. If not, the component will be compromised. The components that pass the inspection process are then machined with diamond tools to ensure that each feature of the component is of precise shape and size to be friction fitted properly during assembly onto the middle case as a bezel. Then comes the process known as Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD) to colour the bezel’s moulded numerals, graduations and inscriptions. The process begins with completely coating the ceramic bezel with a one-micron-thick layer of precious metal vapour; either yellow or pink gold or platinum depending on the model of the watch. The binding of the metal vapours with the ceramic takes place at the molecular level. The Bezel is then put through a final polish to remove the metal from the ceramic and give it a smooth, shiny finish while leaving the indented numerals, graduations and inscriptions with

the metallic coat; and making them distinct from the coloured ceramic. The whole process of manufacturing a coloured ceramic bezel or insert, from powder to polish takes more than 40 hours. The first model with a ceramic bezel debuted in 2005. The Oyster Perpetual GMT-Master II in 18-carat yellow gold had a black ceramic bezel with gold covered indentation. The first coloured component under the Cerachrom brand appeared on the 2007 Oyster Perpetual Yacht-Master II; a blue ceramic bezel. In 2010, Oyster Perpetual Submariner Date featured a green ceramic bezel for the first time. In 2013, came another technological milestone in coloured ceramics. The Oyster Perpetual GMT-Master II featured a two-colour ceramic insert; half blue and half black. That year also saw the introduction of the first ceramic bezel in chestnut brown on the Oyster Perpetual Cosmograph Daytona. In 2014, the GMT-Master II featured a red and blue ceramic insert. This was another milestone achieved by the researcher at Rolex because red was a particularly difficult colour to achieve as there are no natural stable mineral pigments that can be used to colour zirconia red. Therefore, instead of zirconia, they used alumina as a base alternative which they then mixed with chromium oxide, magnesium oxide and a rare earth oxide to produce the red ceramic colour whose mechanical properties were up to Rolex’s specifications. Baselworld 2018, was treated to the latest Cerachrom innovation from Rolex; the brown and black ceramic insert on two versions of the GMT-Master II. One crafted entirely from 18 ct Everose gold, and the other, an Everose Rolesor with a combination of Oystersteel and 18 ct Everose gold.

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S AV O I R FA I R E · BE N T L E Y ’S A M BE R

BENTLEY’S AMBER A look behind the scenes at what goes into the creation of Bentley’s exclusive veneers “Bentley began with a straightforward philosophy: the relentless pursuit of both luxury and performance” states the Bentley Motors website. It is not surprising then that Bentley is a name now synonymous with luxury, refinement, and performance. A brand whose value is not built on the back of Wslick marketing, but rather, on the achievements of its world-class engineers and artisans who collectively and continuously challenge the limits of what is possible, and who are uncompromising in their art. Metal, wood, leather, glass and other materials, each of the highest standard, are shaped by these masters to become part of something extraordinary. Wood, along with leather, has always been an essential ingredient in the creation of Bentley’s interior space. These days, wood is largely represented by the exclusively created veneer that adorns the front dashboard and door panels. Of all the bespoke materials used by Bentley, the wood veneer is more than likely to be underappreciated by the casual observer in terms of the effort that goes into producing one to Bentley’s exacting standards. A closer look at how these wood veneers are sourced, processed and finished exemplifies Bentley’s obsession with perfection. Bentley has a collection of seven exclusive veneers not offered by any other manufacturer. These veneers are produced from special woods that are sourced from countries as far apart as Canada and China. The responsibility of discovering and sourcing these woods falls on the shoulders of Bentley’s in-house team of veneer hunters led by Alex Groh. He is a man driven by passion. “Wood is my life”, he says. “For almost four decades, I’ve been searching the world for it. Certain species exist in only one spot on Earth. And sometimes, even within that spot, [some areas have] better conditions and [where the trees] grow best”. Wood from a particular source is chosen only if it meets Bentley’s demanding standards for ethical sourcing and sustainability. If it does, then it is put through rigorous testing and verification to ensure that the wood meets Bentley’s exacting durability and quality control standards. The collection of exclusive veneers that have made the cut now include the finest specimens of walnut, eucalyptus,

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madrona, vavona, ash and their new find, the American Red Gum. Also known as American Sweet Gum tree, it is Bentley’s first new veneer offering in five years. This time gap should give some idea of the work involved in discovering and sourcing these unique specimens. The American Red Gum tree is a native of the Mississippi wetlands, where the soil is rich and moist, and the forests are dense and vast. Red Gum wood has a distinct perfumed scent which was the inspiration for the name of its veneer: Red Amber. Stephen Stanforth, Bentley’s designer for Colour & Trim, explains the process of selecting a new veneer from a designer’s perspective: “We look at thousands of veneers to start with when we are looking for a new veneer. Liquid Amber or Red Gum, in Mississippi, is some of the best in the world, and it has the most amount of muscle and flesh through the grain”. The selection of Red Amber also fulfills Bentley’s commitment to sustainable sourcing of raw-materials as explained by Marine Godot, manager, Material Development: “There are areas of the world that we will avoid for ethical reasons. So, going to America, for example, is a great opportunity because this is a vast land and there is a lot of forests, and different climates, and different soils”. In spite of the abundance, Red Amber ve-

neers are harvested only twice a year due to restricted access to the forest where it grows. Once the wood is sourced, it is cut into rough veneer and given its prerequisite treatment. In the case of the Red Amber, it is put through a natural slow smoking process which takes several weeks to complete. This smoking process gives the Red Amber a deep, rich brown lustre while retaining its original warm red hue. The red Amber is then shipped to the Bentley workshop at Crew. At the workshop, each rough cut of veneer is methodically scrutinised. As an example, 20,000 square metres of walnut material may take up to two weeks to find and remove any defects, thus rejecting anywhere between 30 and 70 percent of the material offered. For any material to pass the inspection, it must have a high-burr density, minimal sapwood (the living layer) and feature no bark growth or structural defects. The rough veneer that makes the grade is cut to a precise 0.6 mm layer, put through stability tests, and UV stabilizer is added to prevent bleaching, and to preserve their natural beauty for decades. The exquisite finishing touches and polish are then added. The whole process from tree to exclusive Bentley veneer takes at the least eighteen months.

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S AV O I R FA I R E · A P E N F O R I BN S I N A

A PEN FOR IBN SINA Montblanc recently announced the release of a new Limited Edition pen inspired by Ibn Sina

Maison Montblanc was founded in 1906, in Hamburg Germany, and was renowned in the earlier part of the last century as a manufacturer of innovative fountain pens featuring breakthrough technology. Today, the brand is synonymous with the finest writing instruments, watches, jewellery and leather goods. All of which are hand-made to the highest exacting standards of craftsmanship and refinement. Even in this rarefied atmosphere, there is something rarer for the discerning collector; Montblanc’s “Special Edition” and the even rarer “Limited Edition” pens. Each offering is based on a design theme featuring precious metals, gemstones and other rare materials. Each edition is limited by a predetermined number in connection with the theme; themes such as the “Writers Edition” honouring renowned writers such as William Shakespeare, Leo Tolstoy, Daniel Defoe, and Antoine SaintExupéry among others. The “Great Characters” edition features the Beatles, Andy Warhol, John F. Kennedy, Johann Strauss, and others. The “The Patron of the Art” edition, features such names as Scipione Borghese, Luciano Pavarotti, Henry E. Steinway and Duke of Milan. Recently Montblanc paid homage to Ibn Sina with the Avicenna Limited Edition 65. Born in 980, in a village near Bukhara, Uzbekistan, Ibn Sina is better known to the western world as Avicenna. He is one of the greatest polymaths of history contributing to the fields of medicine, chemistry, pharmacology, psychology, geology, physics, astronomy and philosophy. He contributed greatly to the advancement of medicine and had an immeasurable influence on the European Renaissance. Ibn Sina had memorised the Quran by the age of ten. He had learned arithmetic from an Indian grocer, learned Islamic jurisprudence (Fiqh) under the guidance of a renowned scholar, and learned the methods of practical medicine from wandering dervishes. He had unravelled the Metaphysics of Aristotle through contemplation, prayer and by reading the commentary on it by AlFarabi. All this before he had turned 18. Young Ibn Sina turned out to be such a good healer that he was appointed an official physician to the emir. This and other court appointments that followed brought him close to the political elite and proved to be a double-edged sword hanging over him throughout his life. A scholar by nature, he had an insatiable

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appetite for learning, writing, and teaching. But the constant upheavals in the political landscape meant that he was often alternating between being a royal physician or a wazir, and being a wanted man or a prisoner. In spite of these constant disruptions, he studied and wrote extensively on various subjects. But his greatest work was his Canon of Medicine (Al-Qanun fi’t-Tibb) published in 1025. It is a medical encyclopedia and was a standard text for medicine in much of the world up to the eighteenth century. Regarding his contribution to philosophy, the Encyclopedia of Philosophy (iep. utm.edu) states: “he is probably the most significant philosopher in the Islamic tradition and arguably the most influential philosopher of the pre-modern era”. The limited edition pen by Montblanc honouring Ibn Sina, the rarest of intellectuals, may itself prove to be the rarest of collectibles. The shape of the barrel and cone draws inspiration from the mausoleum of Ibn Sina and is covered with black mother of pearl. This is a tribute to Ibn Sina’s Canon of Medicine which elucidated on the medicinal properties of the powdered form of this extremely rare substance. Not only is the black mother of pearl very rare, but it is also very difficult to work with. “We have entered a completely new territory to work with in terms of materials and shapes...” admits Roberta Severin, Manager of Client Relation and High Artistry at Montblanc International, about working with the black mother of pearl. “It is very difficult to source and to shape it into the form we need. It is sourced from a shell, cut into predetermined pieces, attached to the body of the barrel using adhesives and then polished. The really tricky part is curving the material to fit the curve the barrel. A lot of materials are difficult to shape into a barrel form, as compared to the flat dial on a watch, because of the curve. The material has to be evenly thin and should be bendable and not break; then it has to be mountable on the barrel. The final product is the result of a lot of experimentation”. Furthermore, the black mother of pearl has to be of the right shade, “it has to have the right mix of the purple and greenish hues”. Since this is a natural material, “Montblanc, as a policy, avoids where possible, covering natural materials with lacquer. This policy also holds true for the black mother of pearl. It is given a special polish to bring out its unique beauty”.

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The cap and the band on the barrel features an intricate interplay of colours dominated coral which is then interspersed with solid yellow gold to form a floral-like pattern. The cap and the barrel band also integrate, as ornamental pieces, small turquoise stones. There is also a large 1.1 karat turquoise stone at the cone end of the barrel. The coral and turquoise combination was inspired by the red and green found in one of Ibn Sina’s famous portraits. Turquoise is also a reference to the Middle-East and CentralAsia region. The graphic on the cap draws inspiration from the drawings found in the Canon of Medicine. The grip is finished in polished gold with an engraving of the signature of Ibn Sina in flowing Arabic script. The nib, as in all limited editions, is solid gold. The nib is a part “we pay special attention to” adds Severin. “Each nib always has a particular finish and a specific image that is in line with the details and the design story of the writing instrument”. In the Avicenna Limited Edition, it is a portrait of the man himself. “The portrait is stamped on the nib while it is still flat. It is not an engraving. So a unique stamp has to be produced which is then used to impress the portrait using several tons of pressure. This is particularly challenging because you have to calculate beforehand how it will appear after the curving”. The manufacturing of the nib “is such a unique area of expertise that we have a separate department of more than 35 individuals who learn their skills at Montblanc. The skill then often is passed on from one generation to the next”. The nib also features two rubies set on the eyes of the nib. The process of sourcing extremely rare, natural materials and then painstakingly assembling them by hand is a time-

consuming process. Just as time-consuming and painstaking is the planning and design stage that comes before it. “The entire design process is done by our in-house designers in Hamburg in collaboration with our artisans, our marketing team, and our research and development team. For the Limited Editions, the whole process can take two or three years on an average”, states Franck Juhel, President Montblanc, Middle East India and Africa. The Avicenna Limited Edition 65 “took three years: from an idea, to production, to market. The production part itself took six months”. The Limited editions although individually unique “cannot be counted as bespoke one-offs but are created by the same team of about 60 specialist artisans that also produces bespoke pieces. They work in a separate atelier and are a completely independent unit doing their own design, their own testing, and their own construction”. With regards to the creative process of the Avicenna Limited Edition, Severin adds: “at headquarters, we got very strong requests from the regional collectors for a special edition. In response, we proposed this theme which is a local story but is a name that speaks to global collectors. We are open, we listen, and we then integrate those ideas into our programs”. The Avicenna Limited Edition 65 by Montblanc is limited to only 65 pieces worldwide in reference to the 650 compound drugs listed in the Canon of Medicine. The book written by Ibn Sina makes it one of the earliest references in history to compound drugs. The Avicenna Limited Edition pen crafted by Montblanc makes it one of the rarest in history.

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SELECTIONS · THE 7 SANDS COLLECTION

THE 7 SANDS COLLECTION To mark the launch of the new Tod’s store in The Dubai Mall, the brand has created seven pairs of shoes to match the seven Emirates. Inaugurated on the 10th of April by Mr. Diego Della Valle, Chairman and CEO of TOD’S Group and Mr. Andrea Della Valle, Vice Chairman of TOD’S Group, the new TOD’S boutique is located in Dubai Mall’s dazzling new fashion extension. The unique Gommini in soft washed denim have been carefully paired with the shades of the seven sands. Each shade of sand is attributed to an Emirate: Ras Al Khaimah’s sand is white, Ajman’s is cream, Sharjah has a pale-yellow shade, while Abu Dhabi’s sand takes an ochre yellow, and Dubai a rust red. Umm al-Quwain has an ocean blue hue, and finally, the darkest black sand is from Fujairah. The celebratory collection is limited and available exclusively in the Dubai Mall Boutique.

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SELECTIONS · CHAMPIONSHIP GEAR

CHAMPIONSHIP GEAR Tommy Hilfiger, recently announced that British Formula One racing driver and four-time Formula One World Champion Lewis Hamilton will appear as the new global brand ambassador for TOMMY HILFIGER starting Spring 2018. Lewis Hamilton’s career accomplishments have put him in an elite group of global athletes, and he is admired as one of the greatest Formula One drivers in history. He holds the record for all-time most pole positions, career points and most wins at different circuits. He has won at least one Grand Prix in every season he has competed in.

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The Spring 2018 TOMMY HILFIGER men’s collection celebrates Tommy Hilfiger’s love of motorsports, where speed and immediacy fuse with a touch of vintage nostalgia. The collection, which premiered at TOMMYNOW “DRIVE” during Milan Fashion Week, gives nod to the Formula One racing pit crew, with heritage workwear and a strong focus on denim.

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Tommy Hilfiger has a history with Formula One, most recently announcing a multi-year strategic partnership as the Official Apparel Partner for the four-time World Champions MercedesAMG Petronas Motorsport. The brand previously sponsored the Lotus Formula One team from 1991 to 1994, and was the first nonautomotive brand to sponsor Ferrari’s Formula One team, including uniforms created by the designer himself, in 1998.

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SELECTIONS · MIDDAY TO MIDNIGHT

MIDDAY TO MIDNIGHT Eau de citron noir Inspired by the universal appeal of Eau d’orange verte, the original Hermès Cologne, Christine Nagel wanted to bring a contemporary, vibrant and elegant note to the classic theme of Cologne, in a stylistic exercise that would require outstanding virtuosity on the part of any perfumer. Starting with the original hesperidium, the citrus fruit, she has created a crystalline yet enduring freshness. The result is Eau de citron noir, as paradoxical as the name of the fruit that distinguishes it. Christine Nagel recreates the tension that captivated her, combining the striking and explosive vitality of citrus fruits with the depth of subtle smoky and woody notes of black lime. This new note is expressed in a contrast of light and shadow, in a crisp and radical dark blue, a deep and sophisticated hue in the rainbow of Hermès Colognes.

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SIGNÉ SELECTIONS BASELWORLD 2018

BASELWORLD 2018


ROLEX COSMOGRAPH DAYTONA Rolex is introducing a scintillant gem-set version of the Oyster Perpetual Cosmograph Daytona. Created in 1963, this watch has established an extraordinary track record in the world of motor sport, rising to the rank of an icon. On this new 18ct Everose gold version, in lieu of the emblematic tachymetric scale, the bezel is set with a gradation of sapphires in rainbow hues. The case is adorned with 56 brilliant-cut diamonds set into the lugs and crown guard, and the dial features 11 baguette-

cut sapphire hour markers, each of which matches the colour of the corresponding point on the bezel. The chronograph counters are in pink Gold Crystals, a material with a particular shimmer effect, created during the crystallization of a pink gold alloy by means of a special process developed by Rolex . Like all Rolex watches, the new Cosmograph Daytona carries the Superlative Chronometer certification, which ensures excellent performance on the wrist.

BASELWORLD 2018


ROLEX OYSTER PERPETUAL GMT MASTER II Rolex is extending its GMT-Master II range with a new version in Oystersteel, equipped with a bidirectional rotatable bezel and a 24-hour graduated two-colour Cerachrom insert in red and blue ceramic. The lugs and sides of its Oyster case have been redesigned, and the watch is fitted on a five-link Jubilee bracelet. Two other versions of the GMT-Master II introduce 18 ct Everose gold to the range for the very first time. The first is crafted entirely from this refined, exclusive alloy, and the second is available in an Everose Rolesor version, combining Oystersteel and 18 ct Everose gold. On the dials of both watches, the name “GMT-Master II� is inscribed

in powdered rose. The bezels are fitted with two-colour Cerachrom inserts in a black and newly developed brown ceramic. These new versions are equipped with the new-generation calibre 3285, at the forefront of watchmaking technology. With 10 patent applications filed over the course of its development, the movement is equipped with a Chronergy escapement and guarantees a power reserve of approximately 70 hours. Like all Rolex watches, the new versions of the GMT-Master II carry the Superlative Chronometer certification, which ensures excellent performance on the wrist.

BASELWORLD 2018


BLANCPAIN VILLERET TOURBILLON VOLANT HEURE SAUTANTE MINUTE RÉTROGRADE

ARNOLD & SON THE GLOBETROTTER Arnold & Son has created a timepiece for the modern-day navigator, always on the move from one time zone to the next: The Globetrotter. At 45 mm wide and 17.23 mm at its highest point, the Globetrotter features one of the world’s largest rotating 3D world-time display on a wristwatch.

Blancpain is reinterpreting this year its flying tourbillon, which was the first of its kind to equip a wristwatch at the time of its launch in 1989. At Baselworld 2018, the Manufacture is pairing it with new complications – jump hours and retrograde minutes – in the Villeret Tourbillon Volant Heure Sautante Minute Rétrograde model. In addition, this new launch is distinguished by an entirely decorated movement and a grand feu enamel dial handcrafted in the Blancpain workshops.

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BREGUET MARINE 5547

Breguet is enriching its new generation of Marine watches with a creation housing no less than three horological complications. In addition to an alarm, the Marine Alarme Musicale 5547 displays a second time zone as well as wthe date.

Breguet is enriching its new generation of Marine watches with a creation housing no less than three horological complications. In addition to an alarm, the Marine Alarme Musicale 5547 displays a second time zone as well as wthe date.

BASELWORLD 2018


BVLGARI OCTO FINISSIMO TOURBILLON AUTOMATIC

CARL F BUCHERER MANERO TOURBILLON DOUBLE PERIPHERAL

At just 3.95mm thick, Octo Finissimo Tourbillon Automatic claims a new watch industry record for the fourth time. Octo Finissimo Automatic returns to centre stage with two new interpretations in rose gold and rhodium-plated steel. The sandblasting technique ensures that the rose gold is warm without glinting, luminous yet not dazzling. Rhodium-plated steel also takes on elegant and silkily shimmering shades.

Carl F Bucherer presents the new Manero Tourbillon Double Peripheral; an elegant and exclusive timepiece that truly lives up to its name. The watch’s precise function is ensured by a tourbillon, which is mounted peripherally and thus appears to float inside the watch. With a diameter of 43 millimeters, the case made from 18-karat rose gold has a classic round shape with a slight protuberance at the crown.

FERDINAND BERTHOUD

CHRONOMÈTRE FERDINAND BERTHOUD FB 1R.6 With its original regulator-type display and its ultra-resistant carburised Stainless steel case, the Chronomètre FB-1R.6-1 enriches the Chronométrie Ferdinand Berthoud collection. Its FB-T.FC.R tourbillon calibre with fusee-and-chain transmission can be admired through a sapphire crystal case-back and two lateral portholes, offering a unique view inside this outstanding chronometer. It is a 44 mm-diameter watch, featuring a less than 14 mm-thick case that sits naturally and comfortably on the wrist.

CHRONOSWISS FLYING REGULATOR NIGHT DAY The Flying Regulator Night and Day mastered 3D with the Flying Regulator and is now Showcasing multi-level dials and complex movement modifications in true, inimitable Chronoswiss style

BASELWORLD 2018


CHOPARD L.U.C QUATTRO Chopard introduces a new interpretation of the emblematic L.U.C Quattro watch, a stellar member of the L.U.C collection family. Driven by a L.U.C movement with a nine-day power reserve, COSC-certified L.U.C Calibre 98.01-L, it is synonymous with contemporary elegance. The new vertical silver-toned dial makes a chic match with the 18-carat rose gold case. Complete with new calfskin leather straps, its distinguished style disrupts conventions and offers a modern take on aesthetic purity through subtle details creating an edgy, sophisticated and distinctive appeal. The L.U.C Quattro welcomes two pared-down dials entirely in tune with the times. The first is silver-toned and vertical satinbrushed across its entire surface, swept over by a set of blued hands. This timepiece features the signature L.U.C Quattro 6

o’clock subdial, containing both small seconds and a pointer-type date indication. Its graduations have been refined and simplified. Exactly opposite, at 12 o’clock, sits the nine-day power-reserve display also emblematic of the L.U.C Quattro, shaped like a fan unfurled over a 180° angle. The minute circle is punctuated by two large 3 and 9 o’clock Arabic numerals, and by blued applied hour-markers. The case of the L.U.C Quattro measures 43 mm in diameter. At the heart of the L.U.C Quattro beats one of the original movements by Chopard, the Calibre 98.01-L. Its two pairs of stacked barrels endow this certified chronometer with a maximum 216 hours of autonomy, while keeping it surprisingly slim at just 3.7 mm thick. This in turn gives the L.U.C Quattro a peerlessly slender and elegant profile.

BASELWORLD 2018


CHOPARD MILLE MIGLIA RACING COLOURS Rosso Corsa, Speed Silver, British Racing Green, Vintage Blue and Speed Yellow were the colours allocated to the various nations competing in the world of motor racing. To celebrate the 30th anniversary of the partnership between Chopard and Mille Miglia, the Maison presents a new collection composed of five Mille Miglia Racing Colours watches. They pay tribute to the heyday of motorsports and to an exclusive race, the Mille Miglia, widely referred to as “la corsa la più bella del mondo”. This collection offering five different colours symbolises their owners’ authentic passion for racing and classic cars: a passion that a true gentleman driver will never relinquish.

These Mille Miglia Racing Colours are finely crafted 42 mm chronographs assembled in 300-piece limited series for each dial colour. Their calibre beats at 28,800 vibrations per hour and is COSCcertified, ensuring chronometer-worthy precision throughout the 42 hours of its power reserve. The dials display optimal legibility thanks to broad Arabic numerals that are luminescent at night, as are the hands. The slim cursive fonts, as well as the counters, are inspired by the typical dashboards of the late 1920s and stand out by their silver-toned colour. The sweep-seconds hand features a bright red tip to tick off the precious seconds of the race. The arrow-shaped Mille Miglia logo appears at 12 o’clock in the heart of the dial. In addition, this watch has 50-metre water resistance.

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CLAUDE MEYLAN MANGA’CH First and next to the open work of the decorated mechanical movement, a superposition of cut and painted dials represent the subjects of the MANGA’CH adventure. Drawings are lively and powerful, the rendering is subtle and suggestive. The drawing is affixed on three different levels and its three-dimensionality encourages us to enjoy and dream. Represented in black and white, faithful to the Manga signature, the strength of the scene awakens our senses and our imagination! The watch has a 42 mm diameter with a leather strap.

CORUM BUBBLE 47 CENTRAL TOURBILLON Corum, unveiled the new Bubble Central Tourbillon. This piece is generously proportioned. The Bubble’s 47 mm provide ample space for the tourbillon to fully express itself. Water resistance is guaranteed to 100 metres, another rarity for a piece with a tourbillon, providing the Bubble Central Tourbillon with an urban, sporty and contemporary character

DE GRISOGONO NEW RETRO POWER RESERVE CZAPEK & CIE FAUBOURG DE CRACOVIE Czapek & Cie unveils a new collection for its growing portfolio of elegant timepieces. The Faubourg de Cracovie combines traditional refinement with the sportive twist of a chronograph function. The watch comes with three different dials that illustrate the outstanding quality of Swiss craftsmanship.

New Retro is elegantly and soberly paired with this ‘form’ movement specifically developed to equip its rectangular case. The in-line calibre is naturally skeletonised so as to reveal the exquisite delicacy of its finishing. This sophisticated mechanism can be admired through the open working, held by stylised anthracite rhodium-plated bridges with a structure subtly reminiscent of the radiator grilles on vintage cars.

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JAQUET DROZ

THE GRANDE SECONDE MOON BLACK ENAMEL

HARRY WINSTON HISTOIRE DE TOURBILLON 9

The Grande Seconde Moon Black Enamel features a black enamel dial and acknowledges the significance of the lunar cycle to watchmakers and pays homage to the mysterious and complex choreography that links Earth to Sun and Moon to Earth. The lunar spectacle of the double-level dial in black Grand Feu enamel – with its applied satin-finish ring, 18-carat red gold star appliques, and 22-carat gold moon crowning a black onyx moon disk – houses an extraordinary treasure of watchmaking.

With a diameter of 46.5 mm, Histoire de Tourbillon 9 is the most compact watch in the Histoire de Tourbillon series. Histoire de Tourbillon 9 uses layers of transparency to create an artistic effect. The strap in black alligator leather is stitched with thread made of precious metal – 18-karat rose gold thread was used on the version with a rose gold case, while the stitching on the white gold model is done in platinum.

JACOB & CO TWIN TURBO FURIOUS The new model, which is an extension of the brand’s celebrated “Twin Turbo” line, reaches unprecedented heights in terms of captivating design and technical complexity. Destined to be an iconic piece, it boasts with an intricate combination of a twin accelerated triple axis sequential tourbillon, a minute repeater and a monopusher chronograph. This solution, which is as aesthetically-pleasing as it is technically efficient, will inevitably delight motor sports fans.

FREDERIQUE CONSTANT HYBRID MANUFACTURE The new Hybrid Manufacture by Frederique Constant combines Swiss Made fine Mechanical watchmaking with Smartwatch functionality. The Hybrid Manufacture is delivered into a luxurious wooden winder box offering: 1) a removable charger for the electronical Smartwatch functionality and 2) a winder rotating box that charges the barrel in the mechanical caliber

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HUBLOT BIG BANG REFEREE 2018 FIFA WORLD CUP RUSSIATM 2018 means the FIFA World CupTM! For its 3rd participation as a Branded Licensee, Hublot has created the watch that all football fans and Hublot fans have been waiting for! A smart watch that will instantly connect you to every decisive second of the matches being played at the 2018 FIFA World Cup™. A much-anticipated innovation that could not have been imagined by any other watch brand, given the extent to which Hublot and Football are as one. Not only is the footballing world going to march to the beat of the watchmaker, but now the pulse of the matches will reach its peak on your wrist! It was a specific need expressed by FIFA, and Hublot brought it to life! Wanting a customised watch for the referees, FIFA asked Hublot to conceive the perfect watch to accompany them on the pitches during the matches. Hublot designed this connected watch, its first, for the footballing universe: the Big Bang Referee 2018 FIFA World Cup RussiaTM. It is a unique edition that is limited to 2018 pieces. It has all the attributes of the iconic Big Bang. Its emblematic architecture cut out of the lightness of titanium, its bezel decorated with 6 H-shaped screws, its Kevlar insert. Even the display on its analogue mode dial could pass for the same aesthetic as that of the automatic models. In terms of size, its 49-mm case is what makes the first difference, then its motor, which, for the first time, is driven by technology connected to digital intelligence. It is certainly a connected watch, but it is first and foremost a Hublot watch!

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HUBLOT BIG BANG MP-11 Hublot, the alchemist of high tech materials, presents its new Big Bang MP-11 in 3D carbon. This ultra-light material has been reinforced with three-dimensional fibre woven resin, shaped into a case inspired by a race engine. Equipped with 7 seriescoupled barrels providing 2 weeks of autonomy, this mechanical architecture reveals the in-line cylinders within a 3D case with sides in smoking black. As a leader in the shaping and industrialisation of materials, Hublot breaks the glass ceiling with its new 3D carbon case, composed of polymer matrix with three-dimensional fibres, previously not used in watchmaking. The new Big Bang MP-11, streamlined in 3D carbon offers a spectacular view of the 7 series-coupled barrels and the in-line power reserve indicator. A masterstroke. The hour and minute display are driven by a vertical geartrain, which posed an additional challenge for the designers. The force of the barrels is tilted on a perpendicular plane by a transmission system very rarely employed in watchmaking: a 90-degree helical worm gear. The balance is transposed to the dial side to create symmetry

with the helical gear. Vibrating at 4 Hz, it also features a newly patented index-assembly system. The “All Black” Big Bang has been created from a polymer matrix composite reinforced by three-dimensional weave. The lightness and resistance is unparalleled – with the bracelet included, the watch only weighs 90 grams. The threedimensional structure of the carbon creates unique facets and reflections. This version, with smoked composite sides, allows the black PVD-treated mechanism to be admired with its polymer matrix composite case. The 45mm openwork case reveals the engine inspired architecture. Echoing the mechanical design, the crown and the lined white rubber strap reflect the helical structure of a worm gear. The absolute transparency of the new Big Bang MP-11, limited to 200 pieces, is juxtaposed with its chromatic backside, shaped from transparent sapphire crystal. As remarkable as the engine it contains the sapphire crystal case bulges to create a loupe effect over the power reserve indicator. Absolute clarity or hypnotic blackness, each the Big Bang MP-11 reveals exceptional engineering.

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LOUIS MOINET SPACEWALKER “SpaceWalker” is an exceptional contemporary creation dedicated to Alexey Leonov. The timepiece features an outsize tourbillon at 12 o’clock, representing Alexey Leonov’s spaceship on his Voskhod 2 mission. A diamond revolves around the tourbillon, representing Alexey Leonov himself, floating in space outside his spacecraft. The SpaceWalker dial makes use of an exclusive, secret graphic composition, depicting an artistic view of the starry heavens. Also visible is a nebula – a collection of interstellar dust and gases, its exceptional colours providing a unique backdrop for the SpaceWalker.

RADO DIAMASTER In the new Rado DiaMaster models, the unique multi-level dial displays the elements of time – hours, minutes, seconds and date – in decentralised, intersecting circles. Each is connected to the other, but also exists independently. On the dial, the separate elements come together to form a harmonious whole.

TAG HEUER MONACO BAMFORD

SPEAKE-MARIN LONDON CHRONOGRAPH After the success of the first London Chronograph edition, SpeakeMarin presents a new limited edition of 15 pieces, which revives the mythic Valjoux 92 Calibre. The London Chronograph has a special heart: the rare Valjoux 92 calibre and is housed in a 42mm titanium case with a threedimensional white dial.

The brand new model unveiled at Baselworld by the Swiss watchmaker is the iconic Monaco with a solid carbon case, an elegant full black dial and aqua blue chronograph counters. This new version boasts a case made from incredibly lightweight and highly resistant carbon – the ideal material for watchmakers. The dial and the case-back are engraved with "Monaco Bamford" as a reminder of the partners in this collaboration.

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OMEGA SEAMASTER 1948 LIMITED EDITIONS Omega is releasing two Limited Edition models in the spirit of the 1948 classics. Driven by Master Chronometer movements 8804 and 8806 respectively, these watches have been battle-tested at the watch industry's highest level. A stainless steel case, polished bezel, opaline silvery domed dial and polished crown, embossed with vintage Ω are common to both watches; but a closer look at the diamond polished 18K white gold hands reveals subtle differences between the two.

ZENITH DEFY ZERO G The first embodiment of futuristic Haute Horlogerie, the new Defy Zero G defies the laws of gravity with its downsized and optimised gyroscopic “Gravity Control” module. Fitted with a sturdy 44mmdiameter case in titanium or pink gold, the Defy Zero G teams its stellar architecture with a supple and ergonomic metal bracelet.

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PATEK PHILIPPE CALATRAVA PILOT TRAVEL TIME As a feminine interpretation of the Calatrava Pilot Travel Time, which in 2015 was launched as a men’s wristwatch in a white-gold case with a blue dial, the Ref. 7234R-001 combines a rose-gold case with a brown dial and a subtle black gradation toward the periphery. With a second time zone and a local-time date, this watch is also the first self-winding Travel Time model in Patek Philippe’s collection for women. Reflecting Patek Philippe’s tradition in aviator’s watches, the dial is superbly legible. It features applied, sculpted rosegold numerals with a white luminous coating as well as broad luminous baton-style hands. The orange “1” of the analog date on the subsidiary dial at 6 o’clock is decidedly prominent. The selfwinding caliber 324 S C FUS provides a very easily adjustable display of the second time zone. All it takes is the actuation of one of the two pushers in the left-hand case flank to move the luminous

local-time hour hand clockwise (with the pusher at 8 o’clock) or counterclockwise (with the pusher at 10 o’clock) in one-hour increments without affecting the precise rate of the watch. The pierced hour hand keeps track of home time. The two time zones are complemented with day/night indicators in apertures at 9 and 3 o’clock. As long as the owner is not on the go, the two hour hands are superposed. The two time-zone pushers are equipped with a patented safety lock that prevents unintended adjustments of the local time setting. The new Ref. 7234R-001 Calatrava Pilot Travel Time comes with a vintage brown calfskin strap secured with a rose-gold clevis prong buckle. It is reminiscent of the harnesses that allowed pilots to keep their survival kits readily deployable. The watch is also available in a men’s version with the new Ref. 5524R-001.

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PATEK PHILIPPE MINUTE REPEATER CHRONOGRAPH PERPETUAL The Triple Complication Ref. 5208 was launched in 2011. It is the only Patek Philippe watch that combines a minute repeater, a chronograph, and an instantaneous perpetual calendar with aperture displays. Accordingly, it is highly appreciated by watch connoisseurs and collectors of extraordinary timepieces. Additionally it is one of the rare ultracomplicated watches with a self-winding movement. As a sibling to the platinum model with a charcoal sunburst dial, Patek Philippe is now presenting the watch in a rose-gold version with an ebony black sunburst dial featuring applied hour markers and Dauphine hands in rose gold. The round three-part case (bezel, caseband, back) between two screws clamps is a design that allows generous skeletonization of the lugs. The minute repeater tells the time with two classic gongs that generate crystal-clear sounds as soon as the slide in the lefthand case flank is actuated. Endowed with a column wheel and a horizontal clutch, this model features a monopusher chronograph:

a single pusher at 2 o’clock consecutively controls the start, stop, and reset functions. Excellent legibility is assured by the chronograph displays (large chronograph hand, 60-minute counter at 3 o’clock, 12-hour counter at 9 o’clock) with white hands that contrast well against the hour, minute, and subsidiary seconds indications. Arranged along an arc at the top of the dial, the aperture displays of the perpetual calendar switch simultaneously and instantaneously at midnight, thanks to an elaborate mechanism. The architecture and finissage of the 719part caliber R CH 27 PS QI movement can be admired through a sapphire-crystal case back. The watch is delivered with an additional interchangeable solid back in rose gold. The new Ref. 5208R-001 is worn on a matte black handstitched alligator strap with square scales. It is secured with a rose-gold fold-over clasp. This watch replaces the predecessor model in platinum.

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COVER STORY · MAN OF THE MOMENT

MAN OF THE MOMENT A one-on-one chat with Dieter Knechtel, the man tasked with the largest geographical markets for the world’s favourite marque, Ferrari. On the tails of its 70th anniversary, we sat down with the Austrian born CEO of Ferrari Far East and the Middle East Hub, Mr Dieter Knechtel, to discuss his role and the Ferrari ethos. Through his office, Dieter oversees the largest geographical market for Ferrari, the Asia Pacific Region, which covers North East Asia (Japan, South Korea), South East Asia (ASEAN countries) and Australasia (Australia and New Zealand), and the Middle East as well. Following his graduation in Master of Marketing and Bachelor of Science from the Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration, Dieter started off his career in the automobile industry at Citroën Österreich in 1995 as the Controller in Vienna, Austria. He subsequently moved to Renault S.A., starting his role as a business manager for Renault Nissan Österreich in 1998 to manage the Austrian dealer network before he rose to his position as Senior Brand Manager in 2000. His first foray into Asia was through his role as the Marketing Manager in 2003 where, out of Tokyo Regional Headquarters, he was strategically aligned to build a stronghold for the brand in Asia Pacific, before he moved back to the French Headquarters in Paris to take up strategic roles in central product marketing. In his last position before joining Ferrari, Mr Knechtel was the Brand Division President of Porsche Holding where he managed the China-wide operations of the largest Porsche retail sales organisation in the world, achieving over US $900M in annual sales. How long have you been with Ferrari as the CEO of the Far East and the Middle East, and what does the role encompass? I have been with Ferrari since April 2015. Prior to Ferrari, I was handling the Far East markets within the automotive industry and have extensive experience in the region. I was honoured to be asked to handle not just the Far East but also the Middle East and Indian markets from May 2017. Within Ferrari we are responsible for the largest geographical area of coverage. My office handles 17 markets in which Ferrari operates, from Japan to India, Lebanon to New Zealand. We deal with a very diverse market with customers who represent very diverse requirements. Japan is an established market where we have been for over 50 years. In the Middle East we have been here for only about 30 years, but a lot of our top clients are based out of the Gulf. Our offices across these regions handle sales, shipment, marketing, racing, events and even ownership experience. While our responsibilities are quite varied our primary responsibilities focus on commercial activities. Additionally, the responsibility of each office varies from local, to national to even regional at

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times. In Dubai we are handing the importers and dealers in the region. In Tokyo we have our own subsidiary through whom we import into the Japanese market. The same is true for our office in Sydney through which we import cars for the Australia and Pacific markets. We have an office in Singapore from where we oversee the regions mentions as well as the Asian and South Korean markets. Do you work only with commercial partners or do you also deal directly with clients? We do work with clients in different ways and we facilitate the Ferrari ownership experience via different platforms at various levels. We handle after-sales and other issues that clients may have. We oversee parts management, ordering parts and other such parts and service related issues. For clients who have issues that need immediate attention, we also provide support on the spot with our flight doctors some of whom are based out of Singapore. As part of our role we connect our clients with the racing experience. We are responsible for the Ferrari Challenge within the markets we handle. It is important to Ferrari that we make the events attractive enough for our clients and to have as many drivers as possible, committed to joining the racing series because it’s an important element of Ferrari. With regards to Formula 1, we are not directly in charge of activities related to it because it is managed independently by Scuderia Ferrari. Our responsibility in this case is to connect our clients with the topic of F1 and to support Scuderia with clients who want to experience the garage. What would you say are the key accomplishments at Ferrari in the last 70 years. Would you say the founders vision has been accomplished? Ferrari is today the result of a grand vision and the sum of all the achievements. The story has it that Enzo Ferrari dreamt of building the most attractive and iconic super luxury sports car brand in the world. When you look at all the developments from Ferrari in the past 70 years you can see that we have built some of the most soughtafter cars in the world. The first car built in 1947 was the first of its series of very iconic cars delivered to clients. Even in those days, these cars were a leap forward in terms of quality, technology and exclusivity. These are values that we have never given up on. These are values that were true 70 years ago and still hold true today which distinguish us from our competitors within the industry. There is a consistency since the beginning in how we do things, and this provides security to our clients. They understand that when

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they buy a Ferrari, we are continuously working to protect the value of the product. This is the most important accomplishment for us. From the very beginning, racing was always the ultimate target. Racing was always an important element and of course commercial cars were developed to facilitate the passion for racing. Therefore, we have a long history in racing, and we are also proud of the fact that we are the only brand involved in F1 since the beginning in 1960. F1 is very much linked to Ferrari and vice versa. What percentage of the investment that goes into racing technology is transferred into the production of commercial cars? Its difficult to say as a percentage that there is a fixed amount of technology transferred from F1 to commercial cars. First and foremost, our objective is that F1 is self-sustaining and that all the activities of F1 including the research should finance itself. At the same time, we want to put the bespoke technology we develop into our commercial cars as this is one of our strong points. Research for F1 is quite a complex topic and therefore why not see what commercial benefits can be derived from it? One example with Ferrari is the commercialization of the Hybrid engine technology developed for F1. Performance and power are important but also are support systems which benefit commercial clients. I think much more is likely to come into commercial cars in the future based on these aspects. These include support system constructions, monitoring systems, differentials and other control functions, all these are derived from F1 technology. F1 technology is not only about power, it is also about safety because we have a serious responsibility here. An individual driving a Ferrari should feel safe and in control of the car.

What is the thought process behind maintaining exclusivity by limiting production and the access of certain type of cars to select clients? We don’t limit our production to a fixed number of cars today. At the same time, we also must manage our growth consistently. The growth should be moderate, incremental and well financed. We plan production based on finance, which means our cars are made to order and we have cars to display in showrooms because we need to have functional stock to project our range of vehicles at the point of sales. This philosophy and business model are not going to change. We want to grow based on the attractiveness of our products and by cultivating a demand for it. Its important to create products that help us reach new client segments or to reach prospects that we could not get through with our message previously. We would rather examine the possibility of expanding our market with a new product that helps us reach a clientele that has not been represented well in the past. When it comes to limited edition models or special edition cars, its true we have scarcity of product. We have different levels of exclusivity and at those levels, we adhere to the requirements of our loyal customers. For Ferrari, customer loyalty is utmost important. There are clients who have invested substantially in Ferrari, with many cars at home or maybe even a collection of Ferraris. These are individuals who are supporting us at various levels over the time and give our brand a lot of stability. They represent the core base of our clientele and from time to time we feel happy to give something back to such clients. So, in instances when we have only a limited number of cars available, we present it to the most deserving of those customers. As a brand that’s what we do.

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ART & DESIGN · PRIZED CRAFT

PRIZED CRAFT The Loewe Foundation recently announced the finalists for its Loewe Craft Prize. We take a closer look at the decision makers, the participants, and their creations In 2016, The Loewe Foundation instituted the Loewe Craft Prize to “showcase and celebrate the work of exceptionally talented artisans working in a range of craft-based professions.” The main driving force behind this initiative is the baby-faced creative director at Loewe, Jonathan Anderson, who explained: “Craft is the essence of Loewe. As a house, we are about craft in the purest sense of the word. That is where our modernity lies, and it will always be relevant.” Loewe began life as a collaborative workshop of some of the finest leather craftsmen in the heart of Madrid, Spain, in 1846; making it one of the oldest luxury fashion houses in the world. The Loewe name became associated with the organisation in 1872, when German artisan and entrepreneur, Enrique Loewe Roessberg consolidated the workshop under the E Loewe name. Then in 1905, while under the leadership of Enrique Loewe Hinton, King Alfonso XIII of Spain awarded Loewe the title of Purveyor of the Royal Household. Members of the Spanish Royal family have been Loewe’s clientele from the early days. In 1910, Loewe opened its first store in Barcelona, which marked the beginning of a gradual expansion

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within Spain, and then in 1963 its first international store in London. In the 1950s and 60s, Loewe’s stores, as well as their offices, were given a make-over by renowned architect Javier Carvajal who incorporated progressive international design elements to revolutionise Loewe’s store space. He even designed some of the furniture and products. “He looked at the brand with a different viewpoint. He looked at architecture, he looked at furniture, he looked at how leather goods fit into culture.” Anderson says about Carvajal’s contributions. Leather goods such as handbags, leather apparel, leather picture frames and leather boxes have been at the core of Loewe’s identity since its founding. Then in the 1960s, Loewe added readyto-wear clothing to their portfolio. In the 1970s their first perfumes debuted, of them, L by Loewe, Loewe pour homme, and Aire became best sellers. In 1996, the LVHM group took over the ownership of the brand, and there was a refocus at strengthening the core areas of leatherbased artifacts. Jonathan Anderson, Loewe’s Creative Director since 2013, has been given the responsibility of reinvigorating the 150-plus-year-old brand and making it

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relevant to a new generation. “When I think of Spain, I think of being on a beach,” he told WWD magazine in 2014. “It’s not serious, if you know what I mean? Because I don’t think Spanish culture is serious in that way. It is not heavy. I think Loewe had become heavy, and I wanted it to be lightened up. I wanted it to feel fresher, sharper”. Furthermore, “when this brand started, they did not set out to make vintage bags. They went out to make modern bags. So, there always has to be the modernity, no matter what decade you’re in”. And how does apparel fit into this? “Fundamentally, readyto-wear is the character. If you do not believe in the character, you do not buy the bag — I 100 percent believe in that. You have to want to be that woman. It has to have global appeal, but it doesn’t have to have mass appeal.” Jonathan Anderson did not set out to become a fashion designer, he wanted to be an actor. Acting introduced him to costume designing, which lead to a degree in menswear design at the London College of Fashion in 2005. After a three year stint with Prada as a visual merchandiser, he debuted as a menswear designer under his own label J.W. Anderson. Then came 2010, Anderson’s breakout year when he


‘Mokume-gane Vase’ Ryuhei Sako, Japan

‘Shrouded Furnace 5’ Marie Janssen, Austria

‘Third time rainfall,’ Arko, Japan

Jennifer Lee, United Kingdom

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ART & DESIGN · PRIZED CRAFT

‘Qingbai gold bowl’ Takeshi Yasuda, United Kingdom ‘The Earthenware Ferrari’ series, Ann van Hoey, Belgium

‘Tears in the Sunset’ Joonyong Kim, Republic of Korea

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‘Folds of Memory’ Rita Soto Venturab, Chile

“Craft is the essence of Loewe. As a house, we are about craft in the purest sense of the word. That is where our modernity lies, and it will always be relevant”

‘Tea Bowl’ Takuro Kuwata, Japan

‘Homage to the tree’ Joe Hogan, Ireland

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‘Waterwork I’ Deirdre McLoughlin, Ireland

‘Croissance XL”XL Growth’ Simone Pheulpin, France

‘Barkskin’ Irina Razumovskaya, Russian Federation

‘Searching for solid ground’ Paul Adie, United Kingdom

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‘Scalaria Bifurca’ Mercedes Vicente, Spain

presented his first collection at the London Fashion Week thanks to a sponsorship from the British Fashion Council’s NewGen committee. In 2012, at British Fashion Awards, he won the Emerging Talent and New Establishment of the year. At the 2015 British Fashion Awards, he won two top prizes, the menswear and the womens wear designer of the year. Through all this talk of freshness and fashion, Anderson has stayed true to Loewe’s DNA; in particular, its origin as an artisan’s collaborative workshop. Craft is something that also connects with him on a personal level. “Craftsmanship has immense importance for me and is an immense source of inspiration. That’s why I wanted to create a platform to highlight what has been done by hand by potters, basket weavers, furniture designers, jewellers and other professionals who work quietly and are often underestimated. In fact, there is nothing more difficult than finding a way to create an object that has its own formula and is expressed in the same language of its creator, creating a dialogue that previously did not exist.” That platform became a reality in 2016 as the annual Loewe Craft Prize. It is organised by the Loewe Foundation which was established in 1988 by Enrique Loewe Lynch to “to promote creativity, support educational programs and safeguard heritage in the

fields of poetry, dance, photography, art, and craft.” The foundation’s dedication to its stated commitments earned it the Gold Medal for Merit in the Fine Arts, in 2002, the highest honour granted by the Spanish Government. According to the foundation, the Loewe Craft Prize “seeks to acknowledge and support international artisans ...who demonstrate an exceptional ability to create objects of superior aesthetic value. By identifying work that reinterprets existing knowledge to make it relevant today while reflecting its maker’s personal language and distinct hand, the Loewe Foundation aims to highlight the continuing contribution of craft to the culture of our time.” It is an open international competition whereby an individual artisan above the age of 18 of any gender, or a collective, from any nationality, may submit their creations. All entries must be original, one-of-a-kind, must be fully or partially handmade, must be innovative such that it updates traditional craft, and must have been made in the past five years. Since this is a Crafts competitions, all the entries must demonstrate artistic intent and fall within the discipline of applied arts such as ceramics, bookbinding, enamelwork, jewellery, lacquer, metal, furniture, leather, textiles, glass, paper, wood, etc. Additionally, the work of art

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submitted should not have won any prizes prior. The prize for the winning entry is 50,000 euros. All the entries are scrutinised by a panel of 11 experts who are highly accomplished in their respective fields such as artists, designers, architects, curators and so on. The experts then painstakingly whittle down the list of artisans to 30 finalists. Regarding this year’s selection process, Anatxu Zabalbeascoa, Executive Secretary of the LOEWE Craft Prize Experts Panel, stated: “This year the judging was harder than prior years, with the standard of applicants impressively high across every category. Our chosen works reflect an almost alchemical manipulation of each medium’s possibilities and reward those who have mastered traditional skills in order to transform them for the contemporary age. The selected finalists —who range in age from 26 to 76— are a multi generational snapshot of the utmost excellence in craft today.” The winner will be announced on May 3, 2018, and will be selected by a ten-person Jury comprising of leading figures from the world of design, as well as last year’s winner. The works of all the 30 finalists in the 2018 edition will be on display at the Design Museum, London from 4 May – 17 June 2018.

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ART & DESIGN · A NEW SHADE OF YOU

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A NEW SHADE OF YOU Those with wisdom tell us that when choosing a colour, the most important thing to remember is that you must first love the colour that surrounds you. Then you must be clear about the statement you want to make; be it subtle or bold. What then is your colour for the year? We find out how Jotun picks its colours for the year from Rana Khadra, Regional Colour and Creative Manager, Jotun Middle East India and Africa. ‘What colour to choose’ is often one of the most agonising parts of the decision-making process when designing a home or office, buying a new car, choosing a suit, or deciding which tie goes with which shirt and so on. The colour combination used on a product may attract us to one and repel us from another. For without colour, all we have are shades of grey. Countless hours of research have gone into the study of colour to learn how it affects consumer choices, to learn what combination of colours work and what does not, to learn what symbolism a particular colour has in a particular culture, and the list goes on. This is obviously not an exercise in futility because information of this nature can translate to setting the correct mood, the impression one wishes to make, and sometimes it may directly impact one’s fortunes of the financial variety. Colour conveys meaning to us in two primary ways. Firstly, it is through natural association and therefore, often tends to be universal. For example, lighter shades of blue are the colour of the cool waters and the open skies and therefore has a universal positive association. Then secondly, colour also conveys meaning through its association based on individual psychological experiences which may also translate to collective cultural experiences. The psychological impact of colour cannot be denied. Every time you walk into a room, its colour impacts you. Given the ever-increasing spectrum of colours available, it can be a daunting task to understand their language. The sensible approach here is to group them by the impact they tend to have. Pales or the light hues of most colours, like pink, lavender, or sky blue have a positive, uplifting impact while encouraging expression. Neutrals generally consist of greys and browns but may also include other earthy tones such as slate and clay. These colours can produce a warm or cool effect but mostly tend to transition well in shifting light. Whites are pure, complementary, versatile and timeless. They are

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like a blank canvas to express yourself on as they complement and contrast almost any colour. Deep hues are dramatic, create death, make bold statements and radiate energy. As a culmination of a yearlong design and lifestyle research, Jotun has revealed its annual colour card featuring 36 shades that will define global interior trends in 2018 and beyond. The Norwegian paint manufacturer is one of the world’s largest interior colour suppliers. A large part of its authority can be attributed to the forensic attention its colour specialists pay to the ever-evolving tastes and trends that shape contemporary life and style. Jotun is very involved in Norway’s creative scene, and this is also one reason why they can show such a brilliant realization of the 36 new colors, styled by the creative studio Kråkvik & D’Orazio and photographed by Line Klein. The three main color themes were shot in private homes all over Scandinavia, the new colors were perfectly translated into real-life interiors. The challenge of the set designers was to display the different colors and illustrate the need of the client, who has made clear distinctions between the three main color themes: in order to survive the busy city lives, ‘City Motions’; the contrasting need and want to surround ourselves with nature, ‘Lush Garden’; and finally the desire to create a relaxed surrounding of slow living, ‘Silent Serenity’. We find out the creative process behind these colors through a oneon-one interview with Rana Khadra, Regional Colour and Creative Manager, Jotun Middle East India and Africa.

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What was the process followed to arrive to the colour trends palette for 2018? At Jotun, we believe that trends are based on consumer behavior and the way people live today. We even draw our inspiration from technology, economy, innovation and sometimes even the entertainment business. What we do at Jotun is observe these different behaviors and changes, we look at the work of designers both new and established, we gather all this inspiration and come up with what we believe are the best colours for walls. We also believe that there isn’t one single colour that we select as the colour for the year; it is the whole collection of the year which illustrates the breadth of interior styles that Jotun can help create. Annually, there are trends with several colours highlighted each suiting a different person specially because we believe in personalization and trends chosen to suit each taste and as our Global Colour Manager, Lisbeth Larsen says, “After all, it’s your life. Make sure you live it in your colours.” Do you follow the same process, or do you have a different approach to it each year? We mostly follow a similar approach. Some things might change such as where we draw inspiration from, who are the people we talk to, maybe a certain country, space, person, or colour that inspired us differently this year but it’s pretty much a process of constant inspiration search even when we are not searching.

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Jotun 2017 colour trend was also based on travel inspirations like the 2018 colour trend, how did you decide which countries/cities you would be travelling to this year to find your inspirations? Choosing the cities that we get our inspiration from depends on our theme; we have visited some countries that were not on our initial inspiration plan. However, we found other elements that gave us inspiration and creativity such as the culture, lifestyle and the surroundings. This year’s colour card is our response to the changing trends we see in the world around us: three distinct rhythms for the contemporary home under the inspiration of “Rhythm of Life”. A new generation is finding inventive ways to reinvent the living spaces – City Motions captures these creative sanctuaries in blue-based shades. In desert hues and subtle shades of peach, Silent Serenity promises refined tranquility, inspired by remote lands. Lush Garden is a blue-green expression of the harmony we find in the tropics – a way to bring the restorative power of nature into the home. For instance, for City Motions theme and since it is all about cities and the industrial, artistic cool feel, we chose Copenhagen, London, New York and Dubai to be our cities of inspiration. We knew they would just work perfectly and inject us with limitless creativity. This doesn’t mean that other cities don’t fit this theme; many cities could apply within this theme. How do you come up with the themes for the colour trends every year? We travel, physically or online, and discover new places. The food we eat, the books we read, the fashion style we follow, the music we listen to, etc. all come from across the globe and inspire us. The themes that we come up with every year capture these tendencies in time. Are the names of colours in the palette based on the theme as well? If the colours are brand new, then yes. Just as the colours, the names

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too have a symbolic reference to how they fit into each palette. Often, we develop names that will resonate with the theme as well as give a creative expression to the hue itself while giving consumers another way to be intrigued by that specific tone they like. Specifically, in the cases where the colours announced are brand new, we put extra care into developing a name that translated some of the inspiration behind this hue. How does a shade reach from inspiration to the final palette in your labs? In our laboratories, experienced technicians develop unique recipes, combining base colours and additional colourants to create our nuanced spectrum of shades. Achieving the desired hue is a challenge. Every colour has to look pristine on large-scale surfaces and identical in all light sources. Achieving this and ensuring that every paint balances efficient coverage with the durability to withstand the wear and tear of everyday home living, requires months of rigorous testing. A Jotun paint only leaves the lab when we are convinced it is the very best it can be. Our colour specialists tap into design trends in global cities; pour through research reports that come in from their global network; look at the ways in which our lifestyles are changing with the modern world. Since every paint company comes out with a colour trend each year, how do you suggest people decide on which palette to go with? Creating and launching a handpicked and well-designed annual colour palette has become something Jotun is known for and is awaited by our consumers as well as experts in the industry for a number of years. My best advice is to always seek the hues that represent who you are and make you feel comfortable in your own interior space. Every year there are trends with several colours highlighted each suiting a different person. We believe in personalization and that trends are chosen to suit you.

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DAY & NIGHT Luxury, scale and space meet phenomenal dynamic capabilities in the Maserati Quattroporte and it’s all perfectly expressed by its stately yet dynamically intense exterior. The front is dominated by the grille bearing the iconic Trident. Inspired by the Alfieri concept, its deep-cut design creates a predatory shark-nose effect. The imposing presence is brought into even sharper focus by stylish new Adaptive full LED headlights. Other striking details include triple air vents in the wings, the Saetta logo in the C-pillars and frameless windows. To the rear, quad chrome tailpipes signpost the continent-crossing power. Car: 2018 Maserati Quattroporte Photography: Adam Browning Hill Art Direction: Sunaz Sharaf Styling: Farah Kabir Hair & Makeup: Katharina Brennan Model: Aron Marzetti Shot on location at Bvlgari Hotels & Resorts, Dubai

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Suit: Dsquared2 Shirt: Eton at Harvey Nichols Tie: Thomas Pink Shoes: Christian Louboutin Shades: Ermenegildo Zegna at Marcolin Eyewear Watch: Bvlgari Octo Maserati Watch, 41mm, Limited Edition

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Blazer: Paul Smith Shirt: Neil Barret at Harvey Nichols Trousers: COS Watch: Bvlgari Octo Roma Watch, 41mm, Middle East Exclusive Edition

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The Quattroporte features a remarkably exclusive interior, styled and crafted by Ermenegildo Zegna, one of Italy’s most celebrated fashion designer brands. The finest leathers are combined with Zegna’s mulberry silk inserts on the seats, door panels, roof lining and ceiling light fixture. The silk is embellished with a hand-stitched microchevron pattern, while the seating features a central silk insert with a macro-chevron weave. All this is available in three combinations of leather and silk with contrast stitching.

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Suit: Etro Shirt: Qasimi at Harvey Nichols Shades: Ermenegildo Zegna at Marcolin Eyewear

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Suit: Etro Shirt: Qasimi at Harvey Nichols Watch: Bvlgari Octo Maserati Watch, 41mm, Limited Edition

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Pullover: Alexander McQueen at Harvey Nichols Trousers: Hacquet Shoes: Christian Louboutin Shades: Tom Ford at Marcolin Eyewear

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Blazer: Ermenegildo Zegna Polo shirt: Paul Smith Trousers: Billionaire Watch: Bvlgari Octo Roma Watch, 41mm

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Jacket: Ermenigildo Zegna Shirt: Eton at Harvey Nichols Trousers: Billionaire Watch: Bvlgari Octo Finissimo Watch, 40mm

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Blazer: Montedoro at Harvey Nichols Shirt: Neil Barret at Harvey Nichols Trousers: Paul Smith Tie: COS Shoes: Louboutin Watch: Bvlgari Octo Finissimo Watch, 40mm

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THE REFEREE Hublot recently unveiled the official referee’s smartwatch for the world cup: The Big Bang Referee 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia, along with its limitededition fan variant.

The Hublot brand has a long association with sports and sportspersons; Usain Bolt and Scuderia Ferrari are two prime examples. Hublot also has a strong association with football which began in 2006, when they became the first luxury brand to sponsor a national football team; the Swiss team. Then in 2008, they elevated their commitment to the continental level by becoming the official watch of the UEFA Euro championships in 2008, 2012, and 2016. At club level, Hublot has been the official timekeeper for such illustrious names as Juventus, Bayern München, Paris SaintGermain, and Chelsea among others. Hublot is the official watch of the UEFA Champions League and UEFA Europa League. Hublot has also been the official timekeeper for the FIFA World Cup since 2010 in South Africa, as well as the 2018 FIFA world cup to be held in Russia. To celebrate this relationship, Hublot has launched a limited-edition smartwatch called the ‘Big Bang Referee 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia.’ It was developed as the referees’ watch to fulfil the specific needs expressed by FIFA for the 2018

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tournament. It will be the first FIFA World Cup where the referees will be supported in their decision making by video assist. The watch worn by the referees will be connected to the ‘goal-line technology;’ a video-based electronic assistance system for the referees. The watch has already undergone real-world testing during the 2017 FIFA Confederations Cup and the FIFA Club World Cup. “The launch of the Big Bang Referee 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia is a perfect illustration of Hublot’s ability to combine tradition, expert knowledge and innovation. The 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia will provide the perfect platform for this amazing watch to showcase its full potential,” said Philippe Le Floc’h, FIFA CCO Hublot has also made a fan version of the Big Bang Referee 2018 and is fittingly limited to just 2018 units. It will be released worldwide on May 1, 2018. It is available in analogue or digital versions. It features a selection of 34 dials inspired by the flags of the 32 participating nations, plus two neutral designs. It has three easily interchangeable patented “One Click” straps: a cuff strap in a sponge, a black lined natural rubber strap, and a third in the colours of one of the 32 countries.

The Hublot Big Bang Referee 2018 goes beyond any other watch that came before it, in its ability to connect the fan to his or her team. With the swipe of a finger, one can select a team or closely follow a competitor. The watch can announce the kick-off of a match 15 minutes before it. During a match, every time a goal is scored, it will vibrate and display the word ‘Goal’ instantly. It will also announce every yellow and red card, player changes, and match statistics such as the score, number of cards, names of goal-scorers, player substitutions and the match time. Running on a Wear OS by Google platform it benefits from the Android ecosystem, which means access to thousands of additional downloadable applications. It can synchronise seamlessly with all mobile phones which use Android 4.4 and above or iOS 9 and above platforms. For charging, the watch needs to be placed on a contact charger for one and a half hours. “The Big Bang Referee 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia offers all the usual features of a smartwatch of course, but that’s not where Hublot has applied its innovation and audacity. It brings together everything that inspires the passion of football lovers! The FIFA World Cup is the Holy

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Grail of emotions for football fans, so just imagine what an object such as a watch that captures each and every one of its moments, its turning points and its stakes; could suddenly represent? The football aficionados from among the brand’s friends have been waiting for this watch for a long time!” said Ricardo Guadalupe, CEO of Hublot. To celebrate this remarkable watch, Hublot joined hands with its U.A.E. partner, Ahmed Seddiqi and Sons to organise ‘The Match of Friendship’ at the Dubai Opera Hanging Garden at the base of the Burj Khalifa. It was a one-match, five-a-side football game featuring some of the greatest names to have treaded on a football pitch. One team was coached by none other than Pelé himself and featured Dida, Robbie Keane, Serginho, Marcel Desailly, and Majed Hassan. The opposing team was coached by Marcello Lippi and featured Marco Amelia, Marco Materazzi, Gianluca Zambrotta, Christian Karembeu, and Michel Salgado. The referee obviously wore a Big Bang Referee 2018 which gave the referee notifications from Goal Line Technology live throughout the match. This unique experience was topped by a cocktail reception at the same iconic location, where guests mingled with the players.

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FAIR GOLD What was the motivation behind Chopard’s commitment to using 100 percent ethical gold, and is it feasible? “We are incredibly proud of being able to say that from July 2018 all of our gold will be purchased from responsible sources. It is a bold commitment, but one that we must pursue if we are to make a difference to the lives of people who make our business possible.” Karl-Friedrich Scheufele, Co-President of Chopard said at an eagerly awaited and packed event at Baselworld Watch and Jewellery Fair in March 2018. The event was specially organised by Chopard to announce that “by July 2018, Chopard will use 100% Ethical Gold in its jewellery and watch creations.” This announcement was not the beginning of a journey, but the latest and boldest chapter thus far in a long-standing commitment to philanthropy, ethicality, and to the sustainable management of resources. In 1991, the Scheufele family helped the José Carreras Leukaemia Foundation open their Swiss branch, and Karl Scheufele has been the president ever since. Then in 1995, they also helped the foundation open their branch in Munich. A project dear to Caroline Scheufele, Chopard’s Co-President and Artistic Director, is the Happy Hearts Fund which works to rebuild schools and children’s lives after natural disasters. Active in seven countries, they have rebuilt over 80 schools and kindergartens, benefiting more than 45,000 children directly. Chopard’s Geneva head office, constructed in 2010, was the first building to comply with Switzerland’s rigorous eco-friendly construction standard known as Minergie. It is a model of low-resource consumption and energy efficiency. For example, the air conditioning system reduces power consumption by re-using the cooled air from the restaurant, where efficiency is further improved with the use of double isolation envelopes. The gardens are watered with stored rainwater. Then in 2013, Chopard’s Fleurier Ebauches building, a state-of-the-art facility where movements for Chopard watches are produced, also underwent five years of renovation to comply with Minergie norms, featuring among other things, a ground floor insulation that is 120cm wide to ensure natural ventilation in the summer and heat recovery in the winter. So, the insistence on using ethically sourced gold is not just a marketing gimmick but part of a greater vision of the current brother-sister co-presidents of the familyowned company. Furthermore, it also addresses a serious problem that affects people’s lives and the environment in the worst ways imaginable. Mining for Gold results in numerous direct, indirect, short-term and long-term environmental damage. Mining in ecologically sensitive areas such as the Amazon has led to deforestation and ravaging of the landscape. Highly toxic substances such as mercury and cyanide are used in the extraction process which results in a toxic sludge which is often discharged directly into rivers or other water bodies. Some mines collect their waste

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PH PP Y Y· F GO DL D H IILLAAN NTTHHRROO · AFIARI R GLO

behind dams which results in the toxic waste seeping into the groundwater. Quite often these dams are poorly constructed and maintained, and eventually burst, resulting in a massive discharge of toxic waste into the environment. One of the worst examples of this being the 2014 Mount Polley gold mine disaster in British Columbia, Canada, which discharged about 25 million cubic meters of cyanide-laden waste into nearby rivers and lakes; poisoning water supplies, killing fish, and harming local tourism. The use of mercury, cyanide and other toxic substances does not spare the miners either. The numbers of people killed or disabled by mercury are impossible to nail down, but tests on miners found mercury levels up to 50 times above World Health Organization limits. On top of this, they have to deal exploitative mine owners or middlemen, extreme poverty due to meager earnings, and hazardous working condition. Then there is the social cost. Gold mines have caused civil wars or have been the target of armies in a conflict as they are seen as an easy means of financing arms procurement. Furthermore, the presence of gold in the ground has resulted in the unlawful displacement of indigenous and tribal people, widespread and large-scale systemic corruption, the proliferation of organised crime, and the wholesale pillaging of mineral resources whereby the rightful owners of the minerals get little or no benefit from its sale. This is just the tip of the proverbial iceberg when one looks at the vast and complex issues connected with unethical gold mining, and likewise, with the mining of the precious metals and gems. Therefore, for Chopard, “as a family run business, sustainability has always been a core value, and today [March 22, 2018] sees the culmination of a vision started more than 30 years ago.” read a statement issued by Chopard. The culmination is the commitment

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to use 100 percent Ethical Gold in its jewellery and watches. Ethical Gold is defined as gold acquired from responsible sources, verified as having met international best practice environmental and social standards. Whereby, Chopard’s gold will be sourced from one of two traceable options: One is the artisanal freshly mined gold from small-scale mines participating in the Swiss Better Gold Association (SBGA), Fairmined and Fairtrade schemes. The second, is through Chopard’s partnership with RJC-certified refineries. The Responsible Jewellery Council or RJC is a whole-of-supply chain standards initiative for the jewellery supply chain, from mine to retail. It is unique in its participation of organisations at every step in the value chain, each bringing a commitment to a responsible supply chain and implementation of responsible business practices. At the Baselworld 2018 event, Caroline Scheufele stated: “As a family run business, ethics have always been an important part of our family philosophy. Naturally, we have always put ethics at the heart of the values of Chopard... True luxury comes only when you know the handprint of your supply chain and I am very proud of our gold sourcing programme. As Creative Director of the brand, I am so proud to share the stories behind each beautiful piece to our customers and know they will wear these stories with pride” Karl-Friedrich Scheufele added, “We have been able to achieve this because more than 30 years ago, we developed a vertically integrated in-house production, and invested in mastering all crafts internally, from creating a rare in-house gold foundry as early as 1978, to the skills of high jewellery artisans and expert watchmakers... Since the launch of The Journey to Sustainable Luxury, we have been improving the sustainability performance

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“It is not an easy Journey, but it is the right one.” CAROLINE SCHEUFELE

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“ It is wonderful to have an ethical choice. I can feel good about what I am wearing and by wearing it, tell a story about responsible business choices ” JULIANNE MOORE

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Coodmilla Mine

Iquira Mine Landscape

of our production processes, building responsible supply chains, and playing our part to catalyse positive change for the communities and people touched by our business and products.” ‘The Journey to Sustainable Luxury’ initiative at Chopard was launched in 2013 at Cannes. It is a long-term commitment to improving the lives of the small-scale artisanal miners by sourcing gold through a partnership such as the Alliance for Responsible Mining (ARM). The latter work with and grant ‘Fairmined’ certification to the artisanal mining communities who use sustainable mining methods, and who are given fair compensation for their goods, thus ensuring traceability. According to Fairtrade International, about 100 million people worldwide earn a living from artisanal and small-scale mining. Although artisanal miners produce only about 10 percent of the world’s gold each year, they make up about 90 percent of the workforce in gold mining, providing important financial support for their families. In 2014, the first of the creations using Fairmined gold and RJC supplied diamonds made their debuts. Cate Blanchett wore a pair of handcrafted earnings to the Golden Globe where she won the best actress award. The ‘L.U.C Tourbillon QF Fairmined’ Haute Horlogerie watch became a world first. And most famously the Palme d’Or debuted in Fairmined gold. In 2015, Chopard committed to supporting a new artisanal gold mine in Bolivia. At Cannes, the Palme Verte collection crafted with Fairmined 18ct yellow gold and inspired by the Palme d’Or made its debut. Chopard then partnered with Swiss refiner, Precinox to establish the world’s first secure commercial export route for Fairmined gold between Bolivia and Europe.

In 2016, Chopard partnered with Gemfields, one of the world’s leading supplier of responsibly sourced coloured gemstones, whose gems were incorporated into their Green Carpet creations. In 2017, Chopard honoured its suppliers who “share the same social and environmental values, with the Chopard GCC Award for Commitment to Sustainability and Social Justice.” Chopard suspended all sourcing from Burma in light of the Rohingya crisis. They also joined the Small Business Growth Alliance (SBGA) to further their commitment to improving the lives of artisanal miners. In the 2018 Baselworld announcement, Karl-Friedrich and Caroline Scheufele were joined by their long-term friends and supporters who were all praise of the initiative. Among them was Livia Firth, who is the Founder and Creative Director of Eco Age, is an Oxfam Global Ambassador, a founding member of the powerful women’s advocacy group ‘The Circle,’ and a UN Leader of Change. She said: “Today, thanks to [UN’s] Global Goals, we have a 17 point plan laying out social and natural capital goals – and no one should be exempt from these. Connecting citizens with what has been called one of the most critical initiatives of our times is absolutely essential and exciting, if we wish to see a path to a more sustainable and just future. It is exciting to have Chopard share this vision and at Eco-Age we look forward to working with them to achieve this”. Her husband, Colin Firth added: “This commitment to ethical gold and to the continuing support of artisanal gold will really make a difference to the people at the beginning of the gold supply chain - people who are often forgotten.” Will Chopard’s journey towards ethicality and sustainability bear fruit? “It is not an easy Journey, but it is the right one,” says Caroline Scheufele.

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VAN GOGH SPECIAL The Conservatorium luxury hotel in Amsterdam has unveiled an extraordinary package to commemorate the Vincent Van Gogh Museum’s “Van Gogh & Japan” exhibit. Vincent van Gogh or his masterpieces need no introduction, but the influence that Japanese art had on him, and his philosophy of art is not as commonly known as one might expect. It is to highlight this aspect of Van Gogh’s life that the Vincent van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam is painstakingly organising ‘Van Gogh & Japan’ exhibit. It features exceptional loans from museums and private collections from all over the world, including the ‘Self-Portrait with Bandaged Ear’, 1889 from the Courtauld Gallery, London; a fragile work that has not left the UK since 1955 and has not been in The Netherlands since 1930. Just how big was the Japanese influence on Van Gogh? In a letter dated 15 July 1888, he wrote to his brother Theo from Arles: “All my work is based to some extent on Japanese art.” In another letter, he added: “we love Japanese painting, we’ve experienced its influence — all the Impressionists have that in common.” Going by the Post-Impressionist master’s words, the Japanese influence was great indeed, not just on him, but on the whole art scene at the time. In the Paris of the second half of the nineteenth century, there was huge admiration for all things Japanese. This surge began thanks to the Japanese exhibits at the World Fairs in London (1862) and Paris (1867). Japanese art and household goods like kimonos, fans, parasols, lacquerware and screens that were virtually unknown until then became a craze among the European public. Into this Japanese obsessed Paris enters Van Gogh, and himself begins to accumulate a sizeable collection of Japanese prints. He began to view them as more than a mild curiosity. He wrote to his brother Theo about them, saying: “Japanese art is something like the primitives, like the Greeks, like our old Dutchmen, Rembrandt, Potter, Hals, Vermeer, Ostade, Ruisdael. It doesn’t end.”

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Van Gogh even migrated to the south of France, in the hopes of finding an artists’ community in Arles along the lines of a Buddhist monastery. He chose the south of France because “we wouldn’t go to Japan, in other words, to what is the equivalent of Japan, the south [of France]? So I believe that the future of the new art still lies in the south after all.” Alas, only Paul Gauguin, his contemporary and close friend accompanied him, that too for a short while. Van Gogh degraded in mental health soon after. This is the first time that an exhibition highlighting Van Gogh’s admiration for Japanese art and the impact it had on his own work has been organised on such a scale. To celebrate this extraordinary and highly anticipated exhibition at the Van Gogh Museum, their neighbours, Amsterdam’s iconic luxury Conservatorium hotel has unveiled their dedicated Van Gogh Suites in collaboration with the Museum. These suites are available for the duration of the exhibit from March 23 through June 24. Guests who avail this package can customise their suites to an unprecedented level of personalisation, each of which celebrates the work of Van Gogh. The package enables guests to decorate the walls of their rooms with their choice of Van Gogh’s iconic works, including “Almost Blossom,” “Flowering Plum Orchard,” “Self-Portrait with Grey Felt Hat” or “Courtesan.” The Suites also feature specially-designed items such as pillows, teacups and teapots that were inspired by these works and are available for pur-

chase at the Van Gogh Museum shop next-door. Each room will have its own aquarelle set and guestbook, the first page of which will feature a painting by hotel General Manager and accomplished artist Roy Tomassen. The “Van Gogh Suite” package starts at €920 per night, and includes: One-night stay in the Van Gogh Suite (Junior Suite level), breakfast for two guests, ‘Van Gogh & Japan’ inspired afternoon tea in the Brasserie for two guests, direct and complimentary access to the ‘Van Gogh & Japan’ exhibition for two guests and a Welcome letter from Willem Van Gogh, nephew of Vincent Van Gogh whose grandfather was the founder of the Van Gogh Museum. The Conservatorium in Amsterdam is part of a trio of iconic hotels managed by The Set and includes the Hotel Café Royal in London and the soon to be opened, Lutetia in Paris. The neo-gothic facade of the Conservatorium stands proudly in the heart of Amsterdam’s famous museum district, opposite the Rijksmuseum, Van Gogh Museum and Stedelijk Museum; and is next to the P.C. Hooftstraat luxury shopping district. It has 129 luxury rooms and suites on eight floors. Popular with visitors and locals alike, the hotel features a Brasserie and Lounge adjacent to the lobby; Taiko, the contemporary Asian culinary gem; and Tunes Bar, the speciality cocktail destination. It also features the highly rated and state-of-the-art Akasha Holistic Wellbeing Centre.

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THE GYPSY CHEF We catch up with the celebrated American-born, Michelin-starred chef and restaurateur David Myers to figure out what makes him tick. Travel has always been at the heart of the unique culinary experiences crafted by global restaurateur and celebrity chef David Myers. He is as well-known for his gastronomic artistry and distinct flavours as he is for his insatiable wanderlust. With every new city explored, he discovers fresh, seasonal ingredients and techniques that influence his cooking style. After training in the kitchens of some of the most internationally-renowned chefs, opening several of his own restaurants across the world and receiving numerous accolades, the Michelin star chef now brings three exclusive dining and drinking experiences to the Renaissance Downtown Hotel, Dubai. We speak with him to know more about him, his culinary journey and his restaurants at the Renaissance Downtown Hotel, Dubai. We have read that you were a student of International business and never planned on becoming a chef or owning restaurants? How and why did you start cooking? I was studying International Business at University, but I found myself spending most of my time cooking for friends and reading about travel and different types of food from around the world. I began experimenting and learning in the kitchen instead of the classroom, and when one of my friends suggested that I should become a chef, I began to rethink what I wanted to do and decided that they were right! I dropped out of school and put all my attention into getting a job at the best restaurants. We hear you have been deeply inspired by Charlie Trotter? What was it like working for him? One of the most amazing cookbooks I ever had was by Charlie Trotter. He’s quoting Goethe, Dostoyevsky and Nietzsche while talking about how food and excellence in life come together. He was using all these crazy ingredients I’d never seen or heard of before, and there was never a cookbook done like that at the time. My career with him started when I went to Chicago and didn’t leave until he gave me a job. I learnt so much working for him, and he is one of the most important mentors throughout my career. He taught me a great deal about what is required to become a good

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chef, and he also showed me a pretty good time, flying me all over the place to host private dinners for celebrities. You are very well travelled, what makes you choose Dubai? I remember coming here several years ago to see the site that would become the Renaissance Downtown Hotel, Dubai. I was standing outside the back of the hotel on the waterfront, which was just a massive sand pit at the time and realizing that the original idea of one big restaurant wasn’t the way to go. I thought for such a unique hotel that is centred around creating experiences we needed to break it up. This is where the concepts of BASTA!, Bleu Blanc and Poppy were born. BASTA!, being the more casual type of restaurant where people can come by, grab a pizza, have a drink and hit the road. It’s also a place where you could come in for a long lunch and just watch as the world goes by. Bleu Blanc is definitely a bit more special in terms of being able to come out for a night on the town, or coming for a really nice lunch to celebrate a special occasion. It’s a place where you have an unbelievable view during the daytime, and in the evening it just becomes magical with all the candles lit. It’s a place that definitely creates an unbelievable experience and a memory - we are able to cultivate that perfect moment for you while you’re here. Poppy for us is really that final venue that kind of caps the evening off - or gets the evening going. From our Tokyo-style cocktails to the vinyl that’s playing to just the vibe alone, I mean it’s the perfect place to have a drink. Being a gypsy chef, something that you fondly call yourself, which cities would you recommend for people looking to travel in search of good food? My favorite place in the world when I travel and when I eat is Tokyo. Japan in general always holds my heart. I can get such an amazing array of dishes and types of cuisine, like French or Italian but really I stick with Japanese. Sushi or yakitori, tempura, and teppanyaki, all of these are my go-to favorites. Even soba at lunch makes me happy everyday.

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Also one of my favorite places is Sri Lanka, the cuisine is unbelievable. The way that the locals cook seafood with coconut and spices is incredible, very healthy and results in vibrant foods that are not to be missed. Argentina is another great place to explore steak. Their grass-fed focused beef is really great. Grassfed is a great movement right now and quite healthy as well. What is your general approach and inspiration when deciding menus for each of your restaurants? I think travel for me is a great source of inspiration for all of our restaurants. It has been the single biggest source of influence on the creation of ideas. All the restaurants I’ve created, aside from my very first one, have been borne out of travel and my love of travel to experience new cultures, trying new spices and types of cuisine as well as to understand how people eat. When creating the dishes for BASTA! And Bleu Blanc, I took the team with me on two separate trips to get inspiration for our menus. The Head Chef at BASTA! and I went to Rome to eat pasta, Florence for their renowned ‘Bistecca Fiorentina’ and Naples to sample those really thin and crispy pizzas that they are so famous for. We were literally writing the menu on the train between the cities! I then went on to take the team from Bleu Blanc with me to the south of France, as well as to northern Spain and the Basque country to experience incredible grilled meats prepared by some of the most legendary ‘asadores’, which is what a lot of our Grill Counter techniques are based on. Bringing that all into play between BASTA!, Bleu Blanc, and Poppy is simply just a combination of all my experiences, and I think - I’m hoping - that what people get is a small taste of those fabulous memories. What advice do you have for culinary students just getting started? You really have to be dedicated to the craft, and willing to spend hours and hours every day working in the background, and

continuously improving. It’s very tough. You need passion and the belief that after years of training and long hours, that one day you’ll be ready to open a restaurant of your own; that’s when all the learning begins again! When we hire chefs for our restaurants, passion is the most important factor, even more than experience. We can always train and develop our chefs, but to begin with you need that insatiable curiosity; someone who gets home from the restaurant after a particularly tough day and continues researching and cooking. For someone considering this as a profession, I would say if you have that passion, go for it, because you’ll succeed. Without it, it can make a tough business even tougher. What must-try dishes would you recommend from your restaurants Bleu Blanc and Basta in Dubai? BASTA! is all about the classic Roman pastas, the Neapolitan pizzas and the bistecca Fiorentina. We would love for you to try one of our classic traditional pastas, whether it is the cacio e pepe, the amatriciana or the carbonara. For the pizza, go classic and try our margarita, it’s insanely good! There is a lot of work that has gone into creating our pizza dough and making sure it’s perfectly thin and crispy. Then you should, of course, try our bistecca Fiorentina, or even the veal scaloppini Milanese, another classic Italian favourite. And try to save some space for our desserts, like our crème fraiche pannacotta with cherries, nothing beats a sweet ending to a meal! At Bleu Blanc, the steak tartar and kings crab legs have proven to be exceptionally popular. At Bleu Blanc, the dishes are designed to speak for themselves - the cooking style and simplicity of the meal which unleashes the flavour. Other seafood dishes such as the papillote, which is composed of red snapper and accented with fennel and lemon, and the ocean trout confit are also big hits, as are the lamb shoulder with celeriac remoulade, garlic and herbs, and our fantastic dry aged bone-in rib eye steak.

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L A D O L C E V I TA · F L AV O R S O F T H E S I L K R O A D

FLAVORS OF THE SILK ROAD Kishmish, Dubai’s choicest Afghani restaurant serves Mantu, the popular Afghani dumpling. For those who understand the concept of comfort food, the dumpling is without a doubt comfort food at its finest. Tender, doughy outsides surrounding a flavorful filling. Nearly every culture has its own version, or versions, of a dumpling. Some are sweet, like the Austrian and German apricot dumplings, or the Arabic Qatayef, a type of stuffed pancake, often filled with sweet cheese or cream. While some are savory, like the Polish pierogi, or the Argentine empanada. They come steamed, boiled, fried, baked, and even frozen. One particular dumpling, called Mantu, comes to us from Afghanistan. Afghanistan, located at the heart of the ancient Silk Road trading routes, has been influenced by the food cultures of the Far East, India, Persia, and the Mediterranean. Mantu, with their wonton wrappers, spiced meat filling, and seasoned yoghurt sauce, deliciously demonstrate how different food cultures can beautifully combine into heavenly dishes. Records of Mantu date back at least to the Turkic and Mongol horsemen of Central Asia, who are said to have carried frozen Mantu with them during cold winter journeys and boiled them in pots over campfires for a tasty and warming meal. Today, Mantu is extremely popular throughout Afghanistan; served on

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celebrations, special occasions and often during large gatherings. It can also be found in the markets and at street vendors, much like hotdog stands. Served either as a main or a side dish, it is usually stuffed with beef or lamb, and steamed in a multilayer steamer. It is usually served with chaka, a mixture of drained yoghurt, minced garlic, lemon, salt and a variety of sauces and toppings, including ground meat, mixed vegetable, chickpea, or even just cooked onions. Based in Dar Al Wasl mall, Jumeirah, Kishmish is a gourmet Afghan eatery that serves up authentic Afghan culinary experiences to the foodies of Dubai. Envisioned by family friends, Fatima, Iman and Homaira, Kishmish tells the tale of three patriotic Afghan women with a shared love for food, nostalgia for home, and a mutual dream: to share the riches and comforts of Afghan food with the world. Serving Afghan soul and street food, Kishmish emulates the streets of Kabul with its use of complex spices, authentic flavor profiles and traditional Afghan cooking techniques. The restaurant provides a relaxing, enjoyable dining experience in a friendly, family-oriented atmosphere. Kishmish serves up a heavenly plate of Mantu for those who want to soak up the flavors of the ancient Silk Road. Nooshe Jan!

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L A D O L C E V I TA · R E S TA U R A N T S

A CITY ESCAPE The Ritz Carlton, DIFC, introduced Flair No. 5 this February, an ode to Dubai’s curious spirit! A majestic, urban jungle set within a midnight apothecary of aromatic twists and creative combinations, at Flair no. 5 you will discover a vast variety of spirits that are home-crafted by a team of green-thumbed mixologists whose philosophy focuses on floral alchemy. Flair No.5 uses wondrously fresh ingredients for its theatrical bar menu focusing on simple, aromatic flavours, all of which are botanically influenced, composed of small bites and plates, designed for sharing, such as the Charred Rosemary Flatbread or Orange Blossom S’mores. Immerse yourself in their splendid

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garden space and pair your sharing platter with a “build your own” drink with a variety of fruits, herbs and spices. Escape to a hidden alcove in a pocket of wilderness and enjoy chilled lounge beats from the resident DJ, setting the mood for a night of plant-based tipples. Flair No.5, the enticing new outdoor bar and lounge, is your answer to the ultimate after work and dinner city escape.

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Flair No.5, The Ritz Carlton, DIFC, Dubai Reservations: +971 4372 2323, difcrestaurants@ritzcarlton.com


THE FRIDAY EXPERIENCE The Indian inspired, passionately different and deliciously naughty Masti - Cocktails and Cuisine invites guests to take a walk on the wild side, and experience the ultimate Friday brunch offering. Guests can relish a menu which infuses modern with tradition and colour with flavour, designed to be savoured amongst Masti’s lush and vibrant interiors. Highlights include the Edamame Bhel, a dish offered exclusively to brunch-goers, the Pulled Tandoori Chicken Bao - a grilled bao bun combined with melt in the mouth chicken and a compelling tamarind glaze. For a truly self-indulgent

finale, there is Masti’s delightful dessert station to satisfy your sweet tooth. Panoramic views of the Arabian Gulf provide an unequalled backdrop as the live DJ’s eclectic mix sets the vibe for an afternoon of mischief. Guests are treated to a choice of Masti’s alternatively tempting cocktails or bespoke concoctions from the distinctive gin trolley. Masti - Cocktails and Cuisine, South, La Mer, Dubai Reservations: 800 MASTI or 043444384

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L A D O L C E V I TA · R E S TA U R A N T S

CRAB MARKET TThe Dubai based Bulldozer Group in collaboration with White Rabbit Family have finally opened the doors to the much anticipated ‘Crab Market’, an elegant Seafood restaurant located in Dubai’s financial district at the Emirates Financial Towers, DIFC. The interior space is spacious, laid-back and draws inspiration from iconic fish markets around the world. The diverse menu focusing mainly on crab has been curated by the award-winning Russian Chef Vladimir Mukhin, who is #23 in the World’s 50 Best Chefs, and was most recently the subject of a one-hour episode of the popular Netflix series, Chef’s Table. Mukhin is the recipient of several prestigious awards including ‘Best Young Russian Chef’, in the Silver Triangle Awards 2013; ‘Best Chef 2016’ by GQ Conde Nast Russia. The seafood restaurant offers crab in all forms, cooked exactly to customer preferences and served alongside a selection

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of exquisite sauces. It features an ice market and fish tanks from which diners can choose their catch. The restaurant also features a special claw crane that dips into a large crab tank. Specialising in Kamchatka Crab imported directly from Russia, the casual chic restaurant provides a truly unique experience. This casual dining marvel offers fresh, delicious crab at the most affordable prices, served alongside stunning views of the Burj Khalifa and Dubai skyline. Connoisseur of fine cuisine in Dubai now have the opportunity to experience for themselves what Chef Vladimir Mukhin, the dynamic and much travelled Russian revolutionary brings to the table.

Crab Market, Emirates Financial Towers, DIFC, Dubai Reservations: reservations@crabmarket.com, +971 4 564 55 25

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L A D O L C E V I TA · S PA

BODY & SOUL Sheraton Grand Hotel, Dubai presents Soul Wellness & Spa – a brand-new holistic concept that balances mind, body and soul. The venue’s soothing decor is rich in earthy elements including verdant greens and the warm hues of bark, echoing the scent of Arabian sandalwood wafting through the air. Each treatment is followed by an optional complimentary 10-minute guided meditation experience designed to increase creativity and relaxation. Couples can celebrate special occasions in a treatment room made for two. VIP personalised couples’ experiences, priced from AED 1,500, can be arranged, with romantic flourishes such as French fizz, chocolates, a rose petal-filled Jacuzzi and even

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gourmet cuisine followed by the Soul Spa signature massage. In addition to the treatments, there are healthy food and drinks prepared by Sheraton chefs that are served at the venue, with refreshments included in some treatment packages. One of the spa’s quirkier offerings is its monthly mandalacolouring workshops. Mandalas are centuries-old circular patterns used as tools of contemplation. In line with the current vogue for grown-up colouring books, the venue provides paper printed with these intricate designs and art materials to shade them in. Soul Wellness & Spa, Sheraton Grand Hotel, Dubai Reservations: +971 4 503 4444

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L A D O L C E V I TA · S PA

THE JAZZ LOUNGE SPA Brother brand to the fashionable ladies’ salon and spa chain, Tips & Toes, the ultimate gents grooming destination Jazz Lounge Spa offers a range of professional and unique grooming services in a relaxing, contemporary environment in its latest location at Golden Mile Galleria, The Palm Jumeirah. It is your go-to place for grooming and rejuvenation offering an extensive treatment menu, which includes everything from nail care to facials, massages, and hair services catering to the modern man. There is even a private area for children and an exclusive VIP room for those who demand a first-class experience. With a spa menu brimming with massage options including the Hot Stone, Thai or the ever-popular Sports Massage. With soothing Facials and grooming services, Jazz Lounge Spa is the perfect place to unwind, recharge or simply set aside the hustle of your daily routine with some top-notch treatments. Jazz Lounge Spa, Golden Mile Galleria, The Palm Jumeirah Reservations: www.jazzloungespa.com or 04 241 1424.

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Signe Edition 30  

SIgne Magazine Edition 30 The Cover Story: MAN OF THE MOMENT A one-on-one chat with Dieter Knechtel, the man tasked with the largest geogra...

Signe Edition 30  

SIgne Magazine Edition 30 The Cover Story: MAN OF THE MOMENT A one-on-one chat with Dieter Knechtel, the man tasked with the largest geogra...

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