Issuu on Google+

T

R

I

B

U

N

E

November Sunset

Photo by Julian Rothen

S erving B ixBy K nollS , C alifornia H eigHtS , l oS C erritoS , W rigley Vol. 32 No. 23

and tHe

C ity

of

S ignal H ill

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

Injunction puts N. Long Beach street gangs on LBPD’s radar

November 12, 2010

Signal Hill Petroleum seeks to address residents’ concerns over seismic trucks Nick Diamantides Staff Writer

Last week the Signal Tribune published an article describing a recent Wrigley Association meeting during which several residents expressed anger at Signal Hill Petroleum (SHP) over tests the company is conducting to search for possible undiscovered deposits of crude oil or natural gas in Long Beach and Signal Hill. On Tuesday, Nov. 9, this reporter sat down with SHP officials to discuss their perspective on statements published in last week’s article. Dave Slater, chief operating officer (COO) and executive vice president of Signal Hill Petroleum, began

the discussion by noting that more than four years ago SHP stopped the geophysical survey being conducted by Texas-based Dawson Geophysical because of residents’ concerns over how the survey was being conducted. Slater, however, insists that no significant damages resulted from the survey and, except for items that had fallen off shelves, even minor damages– such as cracks in drywall– could not be absolutely attributed to the vibrations coming from the trucks. “In 2006, when we used Dawson Geophysical, we did receive a number of homeowner complaints of damage to their homes, consisting primarily of see SeiSmiC page 11

Julian Rothen/Signal Tribune

Lt. Alex Avila, Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster, Officer Chris Zamora, Police Chief Jim McDonnell, Seventh District City Councilmember James Johnson, and Long Beach City Prosecutor Doug Haubert at Monday’s press conference detailing the North Side Longo and Sureño Gang Injunction. Nick Diamantides Staff Writer

A recently issued court injunction now makes it possible for the Long Beach Police Department (LBPD) to arrest certain gang members in North Long Beach for simply demonstrating their gang affiliation publicly. On Monday afternoon, city officials had a press conference at the downtown LBPD headquarters to publicize the injunction and outline some of its terms. The conference began with comments from Mayor Bob Foster, who praised the LBPD and City Prosecutor’s Office for the hard work they put into obtaining the injunction. “We expect, and people deserve and demand, that they can walk around Long Beach, that they can work, play, visit our parks, go to work, go to school without fear of being victim-

ized by one of the most violent and notorious criminal street gangs in this area,” the mayor said. “We will not tolerate criminals who target innocent people.” Expanding on Foster’s comments, Police Chief Jim McDonnell explained that gang activity in the city is far more organized and complex than most people realize. He noted that a gang known as the Sureños acts as an umbrella group linking most Hispanic gangs in Southern California to the Mexican Mafia. McDonnell noted that while the Sureño name is not familiar to most citizens, their criminal activity is– including murder and the distribution of illegal drugs and firearms, among other crimes. A gang injunction is a court order that typically names specific members of a particular gang, restricting their activities to a specific area

known as a safety zone. The injunction makes it a misdemeanor offense for a gang member named in that injunction to associate in public with other known gang members and sets a curfew for those named gang members. It also increases the potential for a gang member to be charged with other crimes, resulting in longer prison sentences. McDonnell noted that the new injunction specifically targets members of two gangs, North Side Longo and Sureño, but it has a broader approach than most other injunctions because it takes into account the organized and hierarchal nature of Hispanic gangs. He explained that, if compared to a corporation, the Mexican Mafia would be the board of directors and the Sureños would be the employees that conduct the see injunCtion page 12

File Photo

File photo showing the seismic truck demonstrated by Signal Hill Petroleum during the May 19, 2009 Signal Hill Council meeting

India’s purchase of Boeing C-17s expected to save thousands of LB jobs Rep. Laura Richardson (D–37th District) extended congratulations Thursday to the Boeing Company and its 5,000 employees at the Long Beach plant following the announcement by President Barack Obama which indicated a preliminary agreement for India to purchase ten C-17 Globemaster III military transport aircraft had been reached. “I am extremely encouraged by

the purchase of these 10 aircraft to India and the possibility of six more to follow,” Richardson said. “This agreement will preserve employment positions that are critical to the economic growth in the 37th District. More important is that 5,000 families will continue to keep a roof over their head, food on their tables see C-17 page 7


2 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

COMMUNITY

NOVEMBER 12, 2010

As more parents turn to private schools to educate their children, those institutions are offering help with tuition Brett Ashley Hawkins Editorial Intern

ART WORK The main branch of the Long Beach Public Library, 101 Pacific Ave., will present selected monoprints by Patty Grau in the Miller Room through December. Grau feels that "the very physical effort of hand-cranking the press to complete the transfer of the original image to the 'print' is as visceral as sculpting…the end result can be as visually stimulating as a well-designed poster– and thrilling and so satisfying." The exhibit will be open Tuesday through Saturday from 1pm to 5pm. Call (562) 570-7500. ONCE ON THIS ISLAND Tickets are on sale now for Renaissance High School for the Arts’s upcoming musical, Once On This Island. The production runs Friday, Nov. 12 and Saturday, Nov. 13 at 7:30pm at the Long Beach Performing Arts Center, 300 E. Ocean Blvd. Tickets can be purchased at the Center Theater Box Office, at ticketmaster.com, or by calling (562) 436-3661. RUMMAGE SALE Kiwanis’s annual rummage sale will be held on Saturday, Nov. 13 from 8am to 3pm at Orozco’s Auto Service, 3619 Atlantic Ave. There will be a wide variety of items for sale including clothing, kitchenware, books, and plenty of unique finds. Donations can be dropped off at Orozco’s Auto Service in the morning Thursday, Nov. 11 through Saturday, Nov. 13. Call (562) 508-1707 or visit bknlbkiwanis.org. CLEAN UP YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD The Wrigley Area Neighborhood Alliance (WANA) will host its quarterly cleanup Saturday, Nov. 13, from 9am to noon. Registration will be at Cressa Park at Pacific Coast Highway and the Riverbed Bike Path. Communityservice credits will be given to students. Tools, gloves, water and chips will be provided. Call (562) 599-1822 or email jhill2075@verizon.net. NATIVE PLANTS FOR SALE Rare and unusual California and Southwest native plants will be available for sale at the El Dorado Nature Center, 7550 E Spring St., on Saturday, Nov. 13 from 9am until all plants are sold. All proceeds support habitat restoration at the Nature Center. Plants available include California buckwheat, island snapdragon, California mountain lilac, Baja fairy duster, Toyon and many more. The plant species available are suited to Southern California’s dry climate and require minimal watering once established. Many have fragrant foliage and vivid flowers that attract native butterflies and birds. Call (562) 570-1745. HELP OUR FURRY FRIENDS The City of Long Beach will officially kick off its Low Cost Pet Clinics on Saturday, Nov. 13 from 10am to 1pm at the Lincoln Park Dog Park, located at City Hall on Pacific Avenue and Broadway. Residents of Long Beach and surrounding communities can receive pet vaccinations and licenses. Vice Mayor Suja Lowenthal will deliver remarks, and dog training specialist Carley Hovis will be available to answer questions and provide training demonstrations. Activities will include education on the humane treatment of animals, coloring for kids, spay and neuter vouchers, and giveaways. Call (562) 570-PETS. NOVEL DISCUSSION On Saturday, Nov. 13 at 10am, the Los Altos Neighborhood Library Book Group will discuss Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese, a sweeping novel that moves from India to Ethiopia to a Bronx hospital, while revealing the intertwined lives of twin brothers. New members are always welcome. The library is located at 5614 E. Britton Dr. Call (562) 570-1045. READING RIGHTIES On Saturday, Nov. 13, the Long Beach Republican Women Federated will visit the Nixon Library in Yorba Linda. The docent tour starts at 10am and includes lunch at the library. Reservations are required and the cost is $25. Email dkla1@verizon.net or call (562) 439-9390. ONE’S TRASH IS ANOTHER’S TREASURE The Brewitt Neighborhood Library will present an Upcycled Eco Art Class for teens and adults on Saturday, Nov. 13 at 11am in the Brewitt Neighborhood Library Community Room, 4036 E. Anaheim St. Micaela Salatino, supporting artist at Long Beach Depot for Creative ReUse, will show how to make three art projects from recycled materials. Create coasters from computer disks, mini books from scrap paper, and a fabric basket from plastic. This event is free. All recycled materials will be supplied. Contact Julianna Robbins at (562) 5701040 or julianna.robbins@lbpl.org. RECESS! Newcomb K-8 Academy, East Long Beach is hosting a "Run Like It's Recess 5K" run/walk, 1K kids’ run/walk and 50-yard Toddler Run family event on Sunday, Nov. 14. Runners will dash through El Dorado Park East. Top three finishers will receive medals. Registration is $33. Sponsors are welcome and goodybags will be given out to the first 500 registrants. Registration available at teamtrax.net/runlikeitsrecess5k. Contact newcomb5k@verizon.net or call (562) 355-1776. GUIDED TOURS FOR YOUTH Rancho Los Cerritos is again offering specialized tours for youth groups. Given by teen docents, these tours include hands-on games and activities. Rancho Los Cerritos’s Adventure Program will meet every Thursday afternoon through May, from 4:15pm to 5:45pm, at Rancho Los Cerritos Historic Site, 4600 Virginia Rd., located northwest of the intersection of San Antonio Dr. and Long Beach Blvd. Cost is $3 per participant. Advance reservations are required. Call (562) 570-1755. SHOP ‘TIL YOU DROP California Heights United Methodist Church will offer an "Alternative Christmas Market" on Sunday, Nov. 14, from 9am to 1pm at 3759 Orange Ave. This market provides an opportunity to buy handcrafted items such as clothing, home décor, ornaments, handbags, toys, jewelry and more from non-profit cooperatives which will directly support artisans and craftspeople in Guatemala, Kenya, and Tanzania, as well as from the Red Bird Mission in Kentucky. Donations can be made to Habitat for Humanity, Heifer International, Church World Service and the United Methodist Committee on Relief. Visit calheightsumc.org or call (562) 595-1996. CALLING ALL EARLY BIRDS Shoppers will get a head start on their holiday gift-buying with a relaxed evening at the Rancho Los Alamitos gift shop, Nov. 16 from 4pm to 7pm. Everyone is welcome to this exclusive shopping event and a 15-percent discount will be extended to RLA Members at the Barn Raiser ($100) level or higher. Visitors will find unique gifts, from decorative tiles and Bauerware pottery to jewelry and apparel as well as items created onsite in the blacksmith’s shop. The gift shop carries books on local history, gardening, and cooking. Wine and cheese will be served on the patio, compliments of Teak Catering. Parking at the Rancho is limited. Carpooling is encouraged and admission is free. Call (562) 570-1755.

With the budget crisis that has been hitting several branches of California’s state system, especially that of education, parents have been seeking an answer to a burning question: Is it better to send their child to a struggling public school for little cost, or to a private school with a heavy tuition that offers all the amenities a proper school needs? Private schools in Long Beach and adjacent cities have lately seen an increase in inquiries and applications as results of the cutbacks taking place, and, in an effort to assist families who are struggling financially, several private schools are offering various financial-aid and scholarship opportunities. Private schools retain the right to choose their student body and are funded wholly or partly by the tuition of their students instead of relying on government funding. “We’re in the middle of a recession,” said Claudia Schou, whose daughter currently attends a private school. “There’s been a lot of cutbacks at public schools across the nation. Classroom [population] sizes are getting larger. Parents are concerned about this. My husband and I couldn’t send our kid [to private school] if it weren’t for the scholarship help.” Annual tuition fees at K– 12 schools can cost up to at least $40,000 at some Los Angeles

County academies. Westerly School in Long Beach offers several financialaid opportunities provided by School & Student Services (SSS) through the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS). Parents can inquire online and fill out the financial-aid forms on the NAIS website. On the site, parents can enter their W-2 information, assets and debt, and the online formula generates how much a family may earn through financial aid. “Admissions are based on the state of the child, their family, their willingness to volunteer in a certain capacity, what they’ve given back to the campus, and what we can afford as a school,” said Kalim Rayburn, assistant head of school at Westerly. “Up to 50 percent of our tuition can be afforded if the parents’ financial aid is successful.” Different schools offer different motives to parents to help them lower their education costs. Some schools feature a foreignexchange program. If a parent hosts a child from another country for at least a year, schools will generally lower the tuition cost for the child that the parent is sending to school. Scholarship programs are offered through the Southern California Children’s Scholarship Fund (SCCSF). Though scholarships are limited, the SCCSF sponsors nearly 2,000 students a year (more than 1,000 being in Los Angeles County).

A subsection of private schools involves religiously affiliated and denominational schools such as Grace Christian Schools in Long Beach and Huntington Beach. Grace Brethren Elementary School’s tuition varies from its middleschool and high-school tuitions. “Sixth grade is the most expensive, as it has more field trips to places such as Rawhide Ranch or Catalina,” said Tricia Peacock, whose sons both attended Grace Christian Schools. “There are many kids at Grace Christian who are scholarship-funded. It’s on an individual basis and not on their performance at all. It’s based on need. The school board tries to work with those parents that can’t completely afford tuition and want to pay what they can to get their child the smaller learning classrooms, individual attention, and chapel sessions. It’s the learning environment that many parents want their children to have.” Peacock also noted that elementary tuition for Grace schools costs roughly $400 per month and increases to about $750 per month for middle school. On the flip side, other schools do not offer any kind of financial aid or scholarships, solely on the principle that they are exclusive to families who can afford a private education. Stephanie McDaniel, admissions director of Parkridge Private School, noted that such is that school’s current admissions policy. ß

SH begins nomination period for its general municipal election The nomination period for the City of Signal Hill’s March 1, 2011 general municipal election is now open. Offices on the ballot will be two members of the city council, one city clerk, and one city treasurer, each elected for a full term of four years.

WHY IS THE lIVING TRUST So IMPoRTANT? Living trusts are an efficient and effective way to transfer property, at your death, to the relatives, friends or charities you've chosen. Essentially, a living trust performs the same function as a will, with the important difference that property left by a will must go through the probate court process. In probate, a public court proceeding, the deceased’s debts are paid and usually after a year or more and tremendous expense to your heirs, the remaining property is finally distributed to them. By contrast, property left by a living trust can go promptly, privately and directly to your heirs. Living trusts are created while you're alive and are "revocable." You can revoke or change them at any time, for any reason. You can abolish the trust, alter its terms or change the beneficiaries. As the original trustee, you can do whatever you wish with your assets - manage them, sell them, or give them away. Upon your death, the successor trustee takes over the estate immediately without going through probate, then distributes the assets and terminates the trust.

ELIZABETH ARNETT VOZZELLA Attorney at Law

(562) 426-9876

The nomination period will be open until Friday, Dec. 3. If nomination papers for an incumbent officer are not filed by this date, the voters shall have until Wednesday, Dec. 8 to nominate candidates other than the persons

who are the incumbents. This extension is not applicable to the incumbents. Nomination petitions and other documents are available in the Signal Hill City Clerk’s office of City Hall, 2175 Cherry Ave. ß

Local drug, alcohol abuse to be discussed at CSULB townhall meeting A&E Network; Charter Communications; The National Council of Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. (NCADD); and The Salvation Army have joined forces to host a special townhall meeting– the first of its kind– at California State University, Long Beach on Thursday, Nov. 18 that will tackle the topic of drug and alcohol abuse in the area. In a recent survey by The California Healthy Kids Long Beach, 19 percent of 11th graders and 16 percent of 9th graders have admitted to binge drinking. In addition, 34 percent of 9th graders and 29 percent of 11th graders have reported getting high on drugs.

Feed 30 people breakfast for

$45? Yep!

Cater your breakfast meeting for $1.50 per person! Includes scrambled eggs and home fried potatoes. Pick-up only. Call for details. 8-2 daily

1538 E. BROADWAY

Long Beach • (562) 495-2323

Invited community members, students and parents, elected officials, treatment center providers and law-enforcement experts will be in attendance to learn more about this topic from a panel of experts and to watch a screening of A&E’s Emmy Award-winning series Intervention. The forum will be taped for broadcast on Charter On Demand beginning Wednesday, Dec. 15. The event is open to public on a first-come, first-served basis. RSVP to Meelene.Diep@chartercom.com or (626) 430-3495. Panelists will include: Candy Finnigan of A&E’s Intervention; Jim McDonnell, Long Beach Chief of Police; Michael Ballue, executive director of NCADD South Bay; and Dr. Dennis Fisher, director of CSULB’s Center for Behavioral Research & Services. Moderator will be Brad Pomerance, anchor of Charter Local Edition and Charter Special Edition. Special guests will be: Suja Lowenthal, Vice Mayor of Long Beach; and F. King Alexander, CSULB president. A reception will take place at 5pm, and the program is scheduled for 6pm to 7:30pm at CSULB’s Studio Theater, 1250 Bellflower Blvd. Free parking available in Lot 7 located off 7th Street and East Campus Dr. ß


NOVEMBER 12, 2010

GIVING THANKS

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

3

Volunteers sought for Thanksgiving meal delivery program The nonprofit group Faith in Action/Volunteer Action for Aging is seeking volunteers for this year’s Thanksgiving meal delivery program for older and disabled adults who have minimal resources and opportunities for holiday celebrations with family and friends. The undertaking has been a local tradition for more than 18 years.

On Thanksgiving Day, volunteers deliver one or more meals to recipients in the areas of greater Long Beach, Lakewood, Signal Hill, South Los Angeles and surrounding cities. Last year, with the assistance of volunteers and donations, FIA/VAA provided 1,000 meals to those less fortunate. The goal this year is to deliver 1,200 meals with Human Serv-

ices Association preparing them. On Thanksgiving Day, volunteers are to arrive at 9am at SCAN Health Plan’s Headquarters parking lot, 3800 Kilroy Airport Way, Suite 100. Between 9:30am and noon, deliveries will be made. Those interested in volunteering should call (562) 6377103 or email tnieto@scanhealthplan.com by Monday, Nov. 22. ß

HoURS: Monday-Saturday 8:30am-10:30pm Sunday 8:30am-9pm

Order your

5

$ 00 OFF holiday tamales now! when you purchase

Before filling up on Thanksgiving, locals may run it off The Community Action Team’s eighth annual 5K/10K Thanksgiving Day Turkey Trot will take place on Thursday, Nov. 25 at the Belmont Pool in Belmont Shore, two blocks east of the Belmont Pier. Packet pickup is Wednesday, Nov. 24 from 2pm to 8pm at the start/finish line or 30 minutes before each race begins. At least 400 holiday pies will be given to random finishers. There are different runs/walks and courses available for various ages and abilities, and the first race will begin at 7:30am. ----------------------------------------MORE INFORMATION turkeytrot.us

2 Dinner Plates 2 Drinks

Choose from beef, chicken, pork, pineapple, sweet corn, or cheese with jalapeños Only $15 a dozen!

3626 Atlantic Ave, Bixby Knolls • 562-426-7547

Courtesy Justin Rudd

More than 6,000 runners and walkers are expected for the 8th annual Turkey Trot.

Sixth District to offer its 3rd annual free Thanksgiving meal to residents Sixth District Councilman Dee Andrews will present the 3rd annual “Serving With A Thankful Heart” Thanksgiving luncheon and dinner on Monday, Nov. 22 at Ernest S. McBride Park, 1550 Martin Luther King, Jr. Ave. Lunch will be served from 11:30am to 2pm and dinner from 5pm to 7:30pm. Andrews, along with community partners Long Beach Convention & Visitors Bureau, Hilton Hotels, Hyatt Hotels, and the Long Beach Yellow Cab Company, will once again host a Thanksgiving banquet. This is the third year that attendees will enjoy a free traditional Thanksgiving meal with all the trimmings served by more than 100 volunteers, including special guest servers such as City Manager Pat West and Long Beach Convention & Visitors Bureau President Steve Goodling. “During this special holiday, I try to make sure that no one goes without a proper Thanksgiving meal,” Andrews said. “It is truly great to come together as a community and fellowship with one another in a family-style gathering. Instead of a turkey give-away, I will

be feeding as many people as I possibly can. It is a blessing to provide this banquet.” Last year’s event fed more than 1200 people. Although this is a free function,

those interested in attending must RSVP before Friday, Nov. 19, at Ernest S. McBride Park or by calling Andrews’s office at (562) 570-6816.

Thanksgiving Day Special

0 grams tranS fat!

November thru December Holiday Special

$2.00

11am-8pm

SPECIAL

Turkey, Ham, Roasted leg of lamb or Fresh Salmon Steak

$13

.95

Soup or salad, vegetable, stuffing or yams, potatoes, cornbread or rolls, & beverage Add a slice of apple, cherry or pumpkin pie for just $1 more!

3900 atlantic ave. • Bixby Knolls (562) 427-2233

regular, decaf, Strong, french roast, Kona, Hawaiian Hazelnut

r  Order yoivuing Thanksg OW! donuts N

16oz. coffee + 2 donuts (cake or raised)

offer Good Daily 10am-8pm

OPEN DAILY 5am-8pm

Made Fresh Daily!

THRIFTY ICE CREAM • BREAKFAST CROISSANTS • MUFFINS • CUPCAKES • BAGELS • REAL FRUIT SMOOTHIES • BOBA TEA • PROTEIN SHAKES • FLAVORED COFFEE • ICED COFFEE • ESPRESSO

3401 Cherry Ave. @ Wardlow Rd.

Regular menu also served 7am-9pm

long Beach • (562) 427-1318

Society of St.Vincent de Paul Thrift Store

Frequent Buyer’s Card $ave$ YOU More Money! Our everyday low prices just got lower! e more you shop, the more you’ll save for your family. Visit our store today to receive your frequent buyer’s card! 2750 Pacific Coast Highway, Long Beach 562-494-9955 • 9:30am - 6:30pm, Monday - Saturday • 10am - 6:30pm, Sunday


OPINION

4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

CO M M EN TA RY PUBLISHER/EDITOR IN CHIEF

NEENA R. STRICHART ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

STEPHEN M. STRICHART PRODUCTION/DESIGN EDITOR

KELLY NIELSEN MANAGING EDITOR

CORY BILICKO STAFF WRITERS

NICK DIAMANTIDES RACHAEL RIFKIN COLUMNISTS

CAROL BERG SLOAN, RD JENNIFER E. BEAVER ENTERTAINMENT WRITER

VICKI PARIS GOODMAN ADVERTISING CONSULTANT

BARBIE ELLISEN ADVERTISING DESIGNER

LEIGHANNA NIERLE EDITORIAL INTERNS

BRETT HAWKINS STEVEN PIPER INTERNS

TANYA PAz JULIAN ROTHEN –––––––––––––

The Signal Tribune adheres to the following policies The SigNal TribuNe welcomes LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. Letters should be signed, dated and include a phone number in order to verify authenticity. The SigNal TribuNe reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The SigNal TribuNe does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR & COMMENTARIES are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the SigNal TribuNe or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, please remember that LETTERS TO THE EDITOR & COMMENTARIES are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. The SigNal TribuNe is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $45.

The Signal Tribune can be contacted at:

939 E. 27th Street Signal Hill, CA 90755 Phone: (562) 595-7900 www.signaltribune.com newspaper@signaltribune.com

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL NEWSPAPER Sign up for your annual voluntary subscription! __________________ naMe

__________________ addreSS

__________________ City

__________________ State, ZiP

No Paper Will Be Mailed. I already receive the Signal Tribune at my home. Please accept this voluntary subscription of:

$45

other:_________

Signal TriBune 939 E. 27th Street Signal Hill, CA 90755

Speech Therapy Gets the Royal Treatment Submitted by The Stuttering Foundation of America With the release of the new movie, The King’s Speech, starring Colin Firth and Geoffrey Rush, it is most timely to highlight the plight of those who stutter and the resources that are available to them. This incredibly complex disorder affects more than three million people in this country alone. The movie deals solely with King George VI’s debilitating stutter and his relationship with Lionel Logue, the Australian speech therapist retained to help him overcome his disability. “I am delighted that The King’s Speech will introduce a new generation of young people to the inspiring story of King George VI,” noted Jane Fraser, president of The Stuttering Foundation. “He continues to be a powerful role model whose broadcasts of hope kept the spirits of the British people alive during the dark days of World

War II. He even inspired my father, Malcolm Fraser, who founded The Stuttering Foundation.” Malcolm Fraser felt the same dread of speaking in public that the King experienced in the 1940s. Fraser, a successful businessman, went on to establish and endow the 64-year-old nonprofit in 1947. “While the film will be viewed as entertainment by the movie-going public, it will particularly resonate for people who struggle with stuttering on a daily basis,” Fraser added. Today’s research shows that stuttering does indeed have a biological cause and can be treated effectively. There are speech-language pathologists worldwide who can help, and the Foundation provides a free list of these specialists at stutteringhelp.org or at (800) 992-9392.

Utility tractor rig driver was self-taught musician active in local groups By Vivian J.Malauulu The harbor area waterfront was changed forever during the early hours of the morning on Thursday, Nov. 4 when Bert Tufele became the first longshore worker of Samoan descent to die on the job at the Stevedore Services of America (SSA) Marine Terminal on Pier A in Long Beach. At approximately 2:30am, Tufele was driving along the highline adjacent to the vessel to and from which he was moving cargo containers on Berth 94, when the front of his UTR (utility tractor rig) clipped the bombcart hooked up to another UTR in front of him. He was ejected from his UTR on impact and run over by its tires, causing him instant fatal injuries. Within an hour, the terminal was overwhelmed with fellow longshore workers, most of whom were Polynesian, who arrived to pay respect to their fallen brother and his wife, who is also a longshore worker and had been working at a nearby terminal. Tufele’s wife, who had gotten off work at 3am, had just pulled  up in her driveway when she received the phone call that changed her life. The mood was extremely somber, yet there was a calm camaraderie as Polynesian dock workers waited in the parking lot to comfort their sister upon her arrival. From the main gate, bus loads of workers who had either just ended their shift or had left their homes upon news of the accident were transported to the scene.  In an unprecedented act of solidarity and support for the deceased and his family, more than 100 union officials, company personnel, and other dock workers waited while authorities completed their investigation and the body was released to the coroner. Just prior to Tufele’s remains being taken away, the entire group gathered in a prayer led by members of clergy from Tufele’s church who had been admitted into the terminal in what may possibly have been the very first mass prayer gathering on any terminal in the harbor  area.  Several ILWU officers and SSA managers remarked that they had never seen anything like this upon the death of a dock worker. Usually, one or two family members arrive to say farewell to the deceased, but never had so many fellow union members arrived so  quickly.  This exceptional show of solidarity, especially since it was during pre-dawn hours, transcended beyond the union tenet that “an injury to one is an injury to all“ because Tufele was more than just a

union brother, he was an uso, which means a Samoan brother. Of all the ties that bind, that connection carries the most weight in the hearts of Polynesians. While there have been numerous other longshore deaths on the docks, this is the first death involving a UTR driver, also known as a yard hustler, that was not caused by faulty equipment or another party. Previous deaths included longshore workers performing duties in other job classifications, such as forklift operators, swing men, signal men, hatch bosses, lashers, and clerking. There have been other driverrelated deaths involving outside, nonlongshore truck drivers. UTR driving, which is considered a Skill II occupation and requires UTR-certification training, constitutes the majority of the workers dispatched out of ILWU Local 13. During any given shift, there are more UTR drivers on a terminal than any other type of worker. A typical vessel gang consists of two foremen, two crane operators, four swing men, one dock signal, and as many as 10 UTR drivers. There have been numerous UTR-related accidents. UTR drivers are cautioned to inspect their vehicles prior to the start of the shift, maintain safe speed, and wear seatbelts while operating their vehicles. However, most UTRs do not have speedometers and many have mechanical defects, including missing or malfunctioning seatbelts. Tufele’s accident occurred just prior to the end of his shift, which ran from 6pm to 3am. Tufele was born on January 26, 1955, in Utulei, American Samoa. He is survived by: his wife, Vailili; three sons, Maze, Angelo, and Drake; his daughters,  Jazmin and Jade; and three grandsons, Jared, Trent, and Jordan. He was a career truck driver working for several import/export companies transporting cargo across the continental United States for more than 20 years until he became a  casual longshore worker in 2004, and then a registered Class B member of Local 13 in 2007. Tufele was a self-taught musician actively involved in both a performing group, Island Royalty, which he created with his family, as well as the worship team of  his church, The B.L.O.C.K. (Building Levels on Christ’s Kingdom). He was an accomplished guitarist and lead vocalist, and he had recently produced a self-titled CD featuring his original songs. He rededicated his life to the Lord in 2008,

NOVEMBER 12, 2010

Thoughts from the

Publisher

by Neena Strichart Steve and I have found ourselves in computer hell. Wednesday morning we started getting phone calls from friends and family members who were worried about emails they were receiving from our two separate personal hotmail accounts. The message they received with the subject line of MY PLIGHT!!!!!! is below: I’m writing this with tears in my eyes, my family and I came down here to Scotland, United Kingdom for a short vacation unfortunately we got mugged at the park of the hotel where we stayed, all cash, credit card and cell were stolen from us but luckily for us we still have our passports with us. We’ve been to the embassy and the Police here but they’re not helping issues at all and our flight leaves in less than hours from now but having problems settling the hotel bills and the hotel manager won’t let us leave until we settle the bills, I’m freaked out at the moment. Cordially, Neena Strichart/Publisher, Signal Tribune new work phone # (562) 595-7900 Luckily for us, most of those who contacted us are computer savvy enough to know that the messages were probably a scam, but they still picked up the phone and called us just to make sure we were okay. Besides all of our email contacts being annoyed by the bogus messages,

we are now locked out of our hotmail accounts– accounts we have had for nearly a decade and a half. All of our email contacts are beyond reach and I don’t know if I will ever be able to retrieve messages I had hung on to for safe keeping. The ones I fear losing the most are messages I received from friends and family who have passed away. Yes, I am an email hoarder– or I guess I should say now a recovering email hoarder. I should have printed out all those messages I had been saving and put them in a folder for posterity instead of relying on my free hotmail email account to store it for me. With all the horror stories we’ve heard about computer viruses, scams, spasms and whatever else can befall us with our high-tech ways, you would think I would have been more careful to protect my information. I guess we all feel that whatever bad happens to the other guy couldn’t possibly happen to us. Please be careful if you should receive a message like the one above. Check it out before you reply, and for goodness sakes never send your credit card information over the Internet without thoroughly checking out the situation. So, the bottom line is, I apologize to all of my relatives and pals who were sent the goofy message above and I thank you for caring enough to call and check on us.

Bert Tufele had recently produced a self-titled CD featuring his original songs.

and his family is comforted by the memory of his ocean water baptism just two months ago. Funeral services for Tufele will take place Sunday, Nov. 14 and Monday, Nov. 15.  The viewing will be on Sunday, Nov. 14 from 3pm to 4pm, followed by a memorial service from 4pm to 8pm at First Christian Church, 444 E. Lomita Blvd. in Wilmington. The funeral service will be Monday,

Nov. 15 at 10am at the same church, followed by burial services at Green Hills Cemetery in San Pedro. In lieu of flowers, the family is requesting financial contributions  to the Bert Tufele Memorial Fund in care of the ILWU Credit Union in Wilmington. Vivian J. Malauulu is a freelance writer and a registered longshore worker with Local 13.


COMMUNITY

NOVEMBER 12, 2010

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

5

CSULB alumnus who served as chief White House photographer to speak at journalism event Eric Draper, a California State University, Long Beach (CSULB) journalism alumnus who served as chief photographer for President George W. Bush from 2001 to 2009, will speak about his experiences and show photos from his tenure in the White House on Friday, Nov. 12, from 5pm to 6:30pm in the Pyramid Annex Conference Room on the CSULB campus. A former newspaper photographer, Draper began working for the Associated Press in 1993 and won numerous national photojournalism awards. He joined the Bush administration in January 2001 and later brought along two other CSULB alumni: Paul Morse, to serve as an assistant photographer for the president;

and David Bohrer, to become photographer for Vice President Dick Cheney. All three had worked for CSULB’s Daily 49er newspaper, and Morse and Bohrer were photographers with the Los Angeles Times. All three are now freelance photographers. The event, sponsored by the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication, is open to alumni, the university and the community. Tickets are $5 for CSULB students and $10 for the campus community and public. ------------------------------------MORE INFORMATION csulb.edu/journalism (562) 985-4981

Courtesy Eric Draper/CSUlB

Eric Draper, pictured above with President George W. Bush, was the chief photographer for the White House from 2001 to 2009.

Arts Council for Long Beach announces 2010-2011 grant recipients The Arts Council for Long Beach has announced grant awards totaling more than $175,000 to 33 arts organizations and four professional artists for this year’s 2010-2011 grant programs. “This was a highly competitive process with many exceptional applicants,” said Craig Watson, executive director of the Arts Council for Long Beach. “In the current economic climate, access to funding is increasingly challenging, yet at the same time we’re seeing increased need in the arts community. Long Beach youth need critical arts services such as after-school programs and sum-

mer workshops. Long Beach residents need affordable access to performing arts, music and the visual arts.” “I thank all 2010-2011 grant panelists and the Arts Council for Long Beach Board of Directors Grant Allocations Committee for volunteering their time toward this challenging selection process,” said Watson. “We thank the City of Long Beach for supporting the arts with this grant funding.” New this year, the Arts Council for Long Beach has announced it will also issue at least $14,000 this upcoming year in new micro grants,

CSULB professor to discuss promising research into new treatment of Alzheimer’s The degenerative brain condition of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) currently affects more than 5.3 million Americans and could occur in more than 25 million people worldwide by 2025, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. Alzheimer’s researcher Vasanthy Narayanaswami, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at California State University, Long Beach (CSULB), is among scientists who are examining a promising correlation between lifetime consumption of curcumin, a bioflavonoid found in the curry spice turmeric, and a significantly lower incidence of AD in Southeast Asian populations. However, the brain has defense mechanisms, referred to as the blood-brain barrier, that prevent many medications from effectively reaching it. Narayanaswami is working on developing a nanovehicle disguised as high density lipoprotein (HDL) or “good cholesterol” that has the potential to carry therapeutic concentrations of curcumin across the blood-brain barrier to treat Alzheimer’s and will discuss her research regarding the development of the nanovehicle during the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics (CNSM) Fellows Colloquium at 7:30am on Tuesday, Nov. 16, in CSULB’s Pyramid Annex conference room. Narayanaswami studies the role of a protein called apolipoprotein E in relation to cholesterol transport in the vascular and the central nervous system, particularly in cardiovascular and age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s. She received her doctorate from the Indian Institute

of Technology in Madras and was a research scientist at Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute prior to joining CSULB. She is a member of the Alzheimer’s Association Scientific Review Committee and was a recipient of the Alzheimer’s Association’s T.L.L. Temple Discovery Award as well as the Pfizer International HDL Research Award. The program is free to members of the CNSM Fellows as well as CNSM students, and $10 for non-members. For reservations and more information, visit beach-chemistry.com or call (562) 985-7446. ß

SElf-SErviCE WaSh tOO!

Expert Care • Gentle Grooming

2Off Self-Service Pet Wash

$

Not valid with any other offer. Expires 12/3/10. One per customer. BK store only.

10Off full-Service Grooming

$

On first visit or $3 off next visit. $25 min. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 12/3/10. One per customer. BK store only.

Grooming Food Supplies 4102 Orange Ave #113 @Carson Tues–Sun • 562-427-2551

Walk-ins Welcome

* aS SPaCE PErmitS

technical assistance grants and professional development grants. Professional development grants help artists and arts organizations build life-long skills in business, leadership and fundraising. The Arts Council developed professional development grants last year and among other programs, provided scholarships to 16 Long Beach artists to attend the Business of Art Boot Camp at the Center for Cultural Innovation, scholarships for two current members of Leadership Long Beach, and covered the costs for two technical assistance workshops at Long Beach Non-profit Partnership. Micro grants, to be issued throughout the calendar year, help arts organizations and artists who need support for special projects or events. Micro grant awards will be

up to $1,000 per project, but are expected to average in the $500 to $750 range. 2010 Professional Artist Fellowship recipients are Carrie Yury, Rebecca Sittler Schrock, Jennifer Celio and Gordon Winiemko. Operating Grants Level I and II recipients are Long Beach Opera, Khmer Arts Academy, Musical Theatre West, Museum of Latin American Art, Long Beach Symphony Orchestra and International City Theatre. Community Project Grant recipients are: Homeland Cultural Center (Partners of Parks); Hmong Association of Long Beach, Inc.; Camerata Singers of Long Beach; The Garage Theatre; Long Beach Community Concerts Association; Downtown Associated Youth Services; 2nd City Council Art + Performance Space;

Carpenter Performing Arts Center; University Art Museum; Arts and Services for Disabled; The Found Theatre; Historical Society of Long Beach; Shoreline Symphonic Winds; Long Beach Chorale; South Coast Chorale, Inc.; and South Coast Dance Arts Alliance. Neighborhood Project Grant recipients are: Bethune Theatredanse; The Living Love Foundation; Sue Ann Robinson; Boys and Girls Clubs of Long Beach; Culture Shock LA; Primetime Players; Deborah Wallin/Weaving Baskets,Weaving Stories; Rogue Artists Ensemble; Art Exchange; Kenneth Walker Dance Project; and Leisure World Chorale. -----------------------------------More Information (562) 570-1930 artslb.org

Check out our Deal of the Day! MoNDAY/WEDNESDAY SPECIAl

$ 99

just

11

Save up to $17.50

Includes: • full-Service “Hand” Car Wash • Under-Chassis Wash & rust inhibitor • tire armor-guard or White Wall or Wheel rx

TUESDAY/THURSDAY SPECIAl

79 99

$ ju st

Includes: • full-Service Car Wash • Waxing & Polishing w/Carnauba Wax • Chrome Polishing • armor guard tire dressing Save up to • designer fragrance $25.99

not good with any other offer. Price of all services is subject to size and condition of vehicle.

not good with any other offer. Price of all services is subject to size and condition of vehicle.

Exp. November 30, 2010. SG41

Exp. November 30, 2010. SG42

We are environmentally sensitive and friendly. We reclaim our water. We installed energy-saving and low-noise-drying equipment. We use cleaning and waxing products that are best for the environment.

Car Wash Gift Cards now available!

Rd. Bixby Knolls 577 E.@Wardlow Atlantic Avenue Car Wash 1 block north of 405 Fwy & Detail Center

562-595-6666


6 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

VETERANS SALUTED

NOVEMBER 12, 2010

last Saturday’s long Beach Veterans Day Parade featured bands, military processionals, veterans groups, grand marshals, local dignitaries, children’s groups, law-enforcement vehicles and personnel as well as local businesses showing their appreciation for veterans. At the conclusion of the parade, crowds gathered at Houghton Park for a Veterans Day Ceremony and annual Craft and Vendors Fair, hosted by long Beach’s 9th District Councilperson Steven Neal. During the ceremony, Neal recognized World War II veteran Clarence Bramley as grand marshal, as well as Jeremy Boshnack and Nick Kalt as honorary grand marshals. Neal also presented 5th District Councilperson Gerrie Schipske a plaque of appreciation for her work as president of The Rosie the Riveter Foundation (right). Also saluted were local “Rosie the Riveters,” including Marjorie Grommé and Mary lou Millar (above right), who are both members of the Susan B. Anthony chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. “What an honor it was to be recognized as a former Rosie,” Grommé said. “It was a wonderful turnout for the parade on a simply gorgeous, sunny day.” “The Veterans parade designating Rosie the Riveter as Grand Marshal was a wonderful way to celebrate the memory and contributions of the women who worked on the homefront during World War II,” Schipske said. “I was so proud to ride with them and grateful that the city of long Beach and its residents were able in some small way to acknowledge how these women stepped up and did the jobs that helped win the war.” Also part of the festivities was pre-ceremony entertainment provided by Rock 4 Vets Chorus, a musical salute to Veterans by the long Beach Junior Concert Band, singing of the national anthem by Natoya Green and post-ceremony entertainment provided by the Jazz Angels. Photos by Neena Strichart


NOVEMBER 12, 2010

COMMUNITY

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

7

Nutrition

Cold weather comforts Carol Berg Sloan RD Nutritionist

Although we live in Long Beach (which most of the country thinks is in perpetual summer), fall is here, which in turn influences our palette to lean towards cold-weather comfort foods and seasonal, traditional favorites. First foods to my mind are: walnuts, which are being harvested now; pumpkins, which are sitting on most neighborhood porches; and apples, while offered year-round, taste most delicious in the fall. Walnuts are the only tree nuts that contain significant amounts of alpha linolenic acid (ALA), which is the plant-based form of omega-3 fatty acids. A mere handful contributes 2.5 grams of this essential fat to your diet. Studies have shown that ALA may help prevent chronic illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease. Walnuts add crunch and

versatility to many dishes– I threw some into chicken pot pie! Think beyond adding walnuts to baked goods and use them in trail mix, salads and pastas.

Pumpkin Smash Makes 8 servings ½ cup pumpkin mixture and four graham crackers per serving

Pumpkin is full of vitamin A and fiber, and it’s a hearty fruit. I wish more people would eat them instead of turning them into jack-o-lanterns. You can cut up your pumpkin and bake it, or you can purchase cans of pure pumpkin or pumpkin pie filling, which already contains the spices and sugar.

Preparation time: 5 minutes Ingredients 2 (15 ounce) cans pumpkin pie mix 1 (6 ounce) container of low-fat vanilla yogurt 32 graham crackers Preparation 1. Combine the pumpkin pie mix and yogurt in a large bowl and mix thoroughly. 2. Place 2 tablespoons of the mixture on each cracker. 3. Serve immediately.

Apples are an excellent source of fiber and are available in more than 2,500 varieties in the United States. Be sure to eat the peel, for that is where most of the fiber and antioxidants lie. My favorites are Honeycrisp, Red Delicious and Granny Smith. Honeycrisp make great desserts– cut into slices and served with melted caramel.

Nutrition information per serving: Calories 193, Carbohydrate 42 g, Dietary Fiber 3.5 g, Protein 3 g, Total Fat 2 g, Saturated Fat <1 g, Trans Fat 0g, Cholesterol 1 mg, Sodium 315 mg

Try this simple fall recipe as a fun snack or after-dinner treat for the whole family.

This recipe is from the Harvest of the Month recipe book, published by Network for a Healthy California.

Tending to Business

EvERy ThuRSday 3pm - 6:30pm • 46th and atlantic

in Bixby Knolls - Just South of Del Amo

Betty Karnette

AREA HARBOR

Columnist

C-17 continued from page 1

and contribute to the community businesses where they live.” The purchase of these vital cargo airplanes is expected to help secure the direct and indirect jobs of thousands of people who work at the Long Beach facility and in the neighboring community. The sale is worth approximately $4.1 billion, all of which is US export content, supporting an estimated 22,160 jobs. “This sale will help keep our facilities open and thus maintain our ability to produce future aircraft for our own military. The Air Force relies on the C-17 to assist US troops and our allies abroad in transporting and delivering the people and supplies when and where they are

ing @ 5pm Produce draw • free Weekly Congregational Church ics an rg o ng t firs includi uncil and the & vegetables Flowers t interfaith Co fresh fruits , Fresh Cut ds e South Coas th oo by G d ed re so Bak , Spon gs Eg ” s’ en Market! : Honey, H

Antiques and collectibles adorn the shelves

cause of their uniqueness and variety. Items are not taken on consignment. The owners rent the space month to month, which gives freedom to those who want to sell. Ages of the pieces range from the Victorian era to mid-century modern. Emily’s grandmother had an antique shop in Bakersfield, so they have the experience that leads to wise decision-making along with the understanding of the value of antiques. The only items that are not older than the young adults operating this establishment are the soy candles of which everyone is so proud. Why? Because a soy candle they created is “clean” and good for the environment. When you visit the shop, be sure to ask about this “specialty.” The owners and workers report that the people who spoke to them before they took over the corner really underestimated the community and its interest in this Wrigley neighborhood addition. Margaret Rose, who has a business called English Garden Floral Design,

provides fresh flowers every day for this establishment to help its delightful aura. Margaret, Emily, and Marshall live only five blocks away, and the entire neighborhood has been especially supportive. People are in and out all day, every day– in particular, the strollers and dog walkers. Furniture at the front door seems to call them into a shopping adventure. Additionally, online selling is available to all the dealers for one-of-a-kind items. History of objets d’art is there if one wants to research any of the offerings. The final statement from all the folks at Magnolia and Willow Antique Collective is “Antiques are a good way to go green!” Betty Karnette is a Wrigley resident as well as a retired California state assemblymember and state senator ---------------------------------------MORE INFORMATION (562) 988-8844

vores’ “The loca

Plus

We gladly accepT eBT Food STamp cardS

del amo

aT all our markeT locaTionS!

46th Street CvS 45th Way atlantic

When you walk in the door of the building on the southeast corner of Willow Street and Magnolia Avenue, you immediately feel like friendly people must be associated with the variety that meets your eye. It’s even difficult to tell the difference between the shopper and the person who’s there to help you find a hidden treasure. After all, this is an antique store. But somehow it has a feel of the present, even though it’s obvious that the items have been owned and admired by several generations. Emily Yep and her husband, Marshall, are the owners of the Magnolia and Willow Antique Collective Store at 490 West Willow St. The store opened on Oct. 4 and is now open Monday through Saturday from 10am to 5pm. However, November and December are especially important, so Sundays and later evening hours will be the norm for these two months Not only are the owners always busily greeting and talking with visitors, but two young women, Katie Weringer (Emily’s sister) and Lindsey Washburn, can give you any and all information that’s available on the various fascinating pieces in the store. These pieces may be tables, desks, chairs, dishes, jewelry, paintings, strange items from the recent past, etc. In fact, descriptions are difficult be-

vonS Sa

na

nto

nio

24-hour toll-free info: 1-866-GooD-VEG www.goodveg.org

Other Locations & Times fridayS: 10aM-4PM doWntoWn long BeaCH the Promenade @ 5th St.

SUndayS: 9aM-2PM SoUtHeaSt long BeaCH on Marina dr., just South of 2nd St.

2 Hours free Parking

at alamitos Bay Marina

“We identify the flag with almost everything we hold dear on Earth: peace, security, liberty, our family, our friends, our home. Every glory that we associate with it is the result of duty done.” –President Calvin Coolidge

needed most,” Richardson added. The purchase of the 10 C-17s is in addition to 10 approved by Congress and signed into law by Obama earlier this year. Additional foreign sales include six sold to the UAE, three sold to Qatar, seven planes to

the UK Royal Air Force, four planes to the Canadian Forces, and four planes to the Royal Australian Air Force. There are currently 212 C-17 planes in worldwide service, with 193 of those belonging to the United States. ß

With gratitude and thanks to our Veterans past and presently serving

CUSTOM CAREER APPAREL EMBROIDERY & SCREENPRINTING

562-426-8939


COMMUNITY

8 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

NOVEMBER 12, 2010

Artwork from healing workshops to be shared during Open Canvas exhibition The artwork of more than 22 Long Beach cancer patients, survivors, family members and caregivers from the local “Artist Within” watercolor workshop, along with that of 25 international cancer patients from the 2009 Lilly Oncology on Canvas: Expressions of Cancer Journey, will be exhibited in a show entitled Open Can-

vas on Saturday, Nov. 13 at 6pm at the St. Mary Physicians Building, 1043 Elm Ave, third floor. Hosted by Lyons Art Supply, the “Artist Within” workshops introduce visual arts as a vehicle for cancer patients to express their challenges and triumphs and begin their healing process. Pacific Shores Hematology-Oncology

Foundation offers eight- to 10week workshops for adult cancer patients in the community, their family and caregivers. “We are only scratching the surface of the lives we are empowering,” said Jann Buaiz, executive director of PSHOF. “I personally see and have experienced how artistic expression improves the

quality of life and heals in ways that are unimaginable. PSHOF plans to continue raising funds to sustain the program and eventually develop a merchandise line utilizing the artwork. ‘Artist Within’ program brings a unique quality and contributes positively to the diversity of the Long Beach art culture that is growing in leaps and bounds.” Invited guests for the event are community leaders, com-

munity members and cancer patients and their families and friends. A $25 entrance donation will be accepted at the event or in advance at pacificshoresfoundation.org. Light hors d’oeuvres will be served. In addition to a silent auction, there will be a PSHOF presentation at 7:30pm. Complimentary parking adjacent to the venue will be available. ß

LOUNGE | BAR | GRILL

NOW OPEN! Serving Lunch & Dinner Angus Burgers • NY Strip Steak • Appetizers • Chicken • Sandwiches • Salads • Soups • Full Bar • Pool Table • Music Become a fan on Facebook!

1115 E. Wardlow Rd., Long Beach 562-426-4777 • www.roxanneslounge.com

Watercolor painting by Marilyn Low, participant in Pacific Shores Hematology-Oncology Foundation’s “Artist Within” workshop.

- This is a paid advertisement -

Workin’ at the Car Wash S

Photo by Julian rothen

hel and Sheldon Grossman have made a lot of changes since they returned to Bixby Knolls Car Wash in December of 2008, having originally sold the business in 2004 to retire. They’ve gone green with a water recycling and reclaiming system and participate in the WaterSavers Program, the International Car Wash Association’s recognition program to help professional car washes promote their environmentally responsible business practices. They also have a website now– bkcarwash.com– and are in the middle of becoming active in the social-media world. “We just have to become more and more innovative, keep growing and be really aware of what’s new. That’s why we are talking about social media now,” said Sheldon. In addition, they are looking into offering online coupons via a Groupon-like company. Of course, staying up to date means they’re always on

the lookout for green solutions as well. “We use waxes and solutions that are environmentally sensitive and do a good job. We are always looking for products that do the job and are safe for the environment,” said Shel. In an effort to keep growing and offer customers more options, they added windshield repair into the repertoire. “If you look at windshields closely, you’d be amazed at how many have little pits and cracks from rocks that hit them and so forth. We can actually repair that within minutes. And we do it right here,” said Sheldon. “It’s a great service because we catch it before it grows. And you don’t have to end up buying a whole new windshield. In most cases, insurance companies will pay for the repair.” There’s even something new in the self-service area. Last year at a car-wash convention they saw a special air chamois. “It’s a hand-held dryer that

lets you dry your car yourself. You can get behind the mirrors, the chrome, all kinds of things. People love it because they can dry little intricate parts that normally can’t be reached by drying off by hand,” said Sheldon. “We’re also looking into setting up stations for dogs. You would bring in your dog, hook him into a little stand, and then spray dog shampoo. So you could wash your car and your dog at the self-service car wash,” said Shel. With the Grossmans at the helm, there will always be something new on the horizon at Bixby Knolls Car Wash. “When I first came back, I was excited to see my old customers, and I still am,” said Sheldon. Bixby Knolls Car Wash is located at the northwest corner of Atlantic Avenue and Wardlow Road in Long Beach, just one block north of the 405 Freeway on Atlantic Avenue. by rachael rifkin

Bixby Knolls Car Wash & Detail Center 577 E. Wardlow Rd. • 562-595-6666 @ Atlantic Ave. • 1 block north of 405 Fwy


COMMUNITY

NOVEMBER 12, 2010

Garden Variety

My favorite idiot-proof plants Jennifer E. Beaver Staff Writer

I don’t have patience with fussy plants. If a plant needs coddling– something outside of appropriate sunlight and water and occasional fertilizer– it doesn’t last long in my yard. I make two exceptions: tomatoes, because I love them; and geraniums, because they remind me of my mother. But I also recall her saying, “I got rid of the geraniums because of those damn caterpillars.” Here are proven plants that perform well for me time and time again. Many tolerate drought and do well in containers and in the ground.

1. Lantana: People either love or hate lantana, but you can’t beat it as a garden workhorse. It flowers cheerfully through rain, heat and neglect, and bugs leave it alone. You’ll find it in purple, yellow, and a radiant mix of carnival colors. Just remember to read the plant tag and choose varieties based on how you want the lantana to perform. Some grow into huge shrubs; others trail into sturdy groundcovers. 2. Mandevilla: Want to attract attention? Put this adaptable shrub with its hot-colored trumpetshaped flowers in your front yard. Everyone who sees the vibrant crimson or pink flowers beckoning from a trellis or cascading fetchingly over the side of a con-

1 2

3

tainer wants a mandevilla of their very own. A Brazilian native, mandevilla blooms through the year, most heavily in spring and summer. 3. Pittosporum: There are many kinds, but my favorite is a tall shrub with the Latin moniker Pittosporum tenuifolium. Silver Sheen, one favorite variety, grows to 20 feet with an open, airy form

and tiny shimmering leaves that contrast beautifully with its thin black branches. Happy in sun or part shade, Silver Sheen is great as a border plant or used for height in a landscape. 4. Purple fountain grass: This carefree grass adds welcome height and movement to borders and large containers. Plumes sway and dance in the breeze; arching seed heads make every garden look graceful. In most locales, warm-season grasses such as this one go brown in the winter. Here, it looks good nearly year-round.

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

To revitalize, trim it back to a few inches. It will grow back better than ever. 5. Sweet pea bush: This undemanding shrub has perky springgreen leaves that look good all year. Frequently in flower, it has lovely lavender/pink and white blossoms that resemble sweet pea flowers. There are two sizes. Fullsize Polygala x dalmaisiana can grow five feet tall and wide and is bare at the base. I prefer the smaller Polygala fruticosa, which is more manageable at 3x3 feet. ß

Serving the communities of Bixby Knolls, Signal hill, Wrigley, virginia Country Club and California heights

321 East Willow

Northeast corner of Long Beach Blvd.

562-492-1025

(does not include white meat)

expires 12/31/10

2 Locations 3418 Long Beach Blvd. Long Beach near Wardlow Road

4

5

562-988-1767

9

(does not include white meat)

expires 12/31/10


CULTURE

10 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

NOVEMBER 12, 2010

Cunning royals vie for throne in The lion in Winter at Long Beach Playhouse Vicki Paris Goodman Culture Writer

Call me a product of contemporary American culture. I am guilty as charged, as I couldn’t help imagining Star Trek’s Kirk and Spock outsmarting opponent after wily opponent as I watched The Lion in Winter at the Long Beach Playhouse. A shocking examination of psychological jockeying for the coveted throne of England, the play is set in 1183 in the castle of King Henry II (of the Plantagenets, in case you were curious) and his imprisoned wife Eleanor of Aquitaine. Eleanor, portrayed to duplicitous perfection by Diane Benedict, lives a cozy enough existence in the castle’s dungeon for some prior offense not mentioned in the play. Benedict’s Eleanor is at once kind and conniving. She and the relatively benevolent Henry, played with a slightly too modern speaking style by Steven Biggs,

once loved each other, or Geoffrey, a classic not, and may still harbor example of middle-child a good deal of fondness syndrome, may be the for one another, or not. brainiest, but that hardly It’s frustratingly hard makes up for a childto tell who loves or hood of being disfavored loathes whom. And that and overlooked. The role is both the point and the of poor diss’d Geoffrey beauty of The Lion in is handled well by GreWinter. Start to finish, gory Spradlin. the play maintains an unRiggle Matthew certainty of alliance and might, in a less refined affection between family setting, solicit boos and members that keeps us tomatoes for his subtly guessing what’s what. As obnoxious and unpopusoon as we are conlar depiction of youngest vinced of a particular son John, whom Henry emotion’s existence beinexplicably favors to be tween two characters, his successor to the certainty is once again throne. Riggle skillfully ripped away when things Courtesy lBPH manages the spoiled, change on a dime. Diane Benedict (Eleanor) and Travis McHenry (Richard) in Long clumsy, and immature Three rather humor- Beach Playhouse’s The Lion in Winter character. less sons, who couldn’t Kate Woodruff Felbe more distinct in inclination and ap- plex, Henry and Eleanor have each ton ably delivers the part of the lovely titude, want no part of a shared reign at weighed in with strong opinions on the Alais– Henry’s mistress, Eleanor’s such future time that Henry should die. matter. And each has potent bargaining “foster child,” and possible future wife I suppose I would be humorless, too, if chips. to whichever son ultimately acquires I were constantly in danger of being A hunky, head-shaven Travis the throne. She is also the sister of stabbed in the back, both figuratively McHenry plays the warrior-like Philip, the sharp-minded young King and literally. Richard, Eleanor’s pick for the next of France, played admirably by Adam In any case, brave Richard (yes, the king. His intimidating demeanor Hale. Lionhearted one), cerebral Geoffrey, cloaks an emotional neediness that the Spot-on direction by Michael Ross and oafish John all desire to be heir ap- formidable McHenry somehow man- ensures that the play’s enigmatic familparent. To make matters more com- ages to convey. Bravo! ial bonds remain so, and that nothing

is overdone. James Goldman’s brilliant playwriting speaks for itself, and Ross clearly recognizes the fact. Set designer David Scaglione’s spare Gothic-arched dungeon is trueto-fantasy and functions beautifully given the limited stage footage. Scaglione’s faux-stone structure is made even more compelling by Andrew Vonderschmitt’s mood-enhancing lighting, which creates a chilling shadow effect of the three brothers at the play’s conclusion. Donna Fritsche’s costumes are, as usual, realistic and attractive. The Lion in Winter wholly captures the universality of family dysfunction while rendering its manifestations both recognizable and unrecognizable, the latter no doubt due to the more acceptable brutality of the place and time. A compelling story of game-changing manipulation and emotional exploitation, The Lion in Winter is one first-rate play. And the Long Beach Playhouse’s is one first-class production. The Lion in Winter continues in the Long Beach Playhouse Studio Theatre through Saturday, Dec. 11. General admission tickets are $22; $20 for seniors. Student tickets are $12 with valid student ID. Performances are Fridays and Saturdays at 8pm, and Sundays at 2pm. The Long Beach Playhouse is located at 5021 E. Anaheim St. Call (562) 494-1014 for reservations and information. Tickets are also available online at lbplayhouse.org. ß

Wine and Dine California Heights residents Jerry Schuman and Caryn Baumgartner (left) were on hand for cocktails and food at last Friday evening’s opening of Roxanne’s lounge/Bar/Grill at 1115 E. Wardlow Rd. The new establishment, located at the former site of Green Dog Grill, serves lunch and dinner as well as sporting a full bar, pool table, music and big-screen televisions. Contact the restaurant by calling (562) 426-4777 or see them online at roxanneslounge .com.

BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND!

A CHRISTMAS CAROL A delightfully dark production of Dickens’ holiday classic adapted by Denis McCourt. Full of lovely music, haunting ghosts, several surprises and a Joyous Holiday Experience.

December 1 thru 19

Expo Center, 4321 Atlantic Ave. BUY TICKETS NOW at lbshakespeare.org or call 562-997-1494

Pictured right is Sylvia Molina with young Penelope “Roxanne” Molina– the inspiration for the name of the restaurant.

WHO NEEDS GLASSES? Celebrating over 80 Years of 3D entertainment. The lion in Winter Will it be a family Christmas or a battlefield? november 5 - december 11 "Intrigue, murder attempts, and secret relationships all add up to a memorable Christmas weekend...The laughs are all in place, which makes the secret schemes that arise all the more effective.” -larry Blake, The Golden Rain

Art Theatre to host Paula Poundstone for benefit Comedian Paula Poundstone will bring her unique comedy to The Art Theatre, 2025 E 4th St., on Thursday, Dec. 16, for one night only as a benefit for Artful Thinking Organization, whose events benefit those touched by breast cancer and HIV/AIDS. There will be full availability of theatre concessions for purchase including beer, wine and champagne, before and dur-

ing the show. Tickets are now on sale at the Art Theatre box office or online for $40. There are no service fees for online or box office ticket purchases. ---------------------------------MORE INFORMATION paulapoundstone.com artfulthinking.org

Murder by the Book by Duncan Greenwood & Robert King

october 16 - november 20 is it possible to commit the perfect murder? Come and find out on the Mainstage! "...a zigging-&-zagging saga of murder, mistakes, misleading clues and enticing characters (tricky, vulnerable, nasty, even silly), wrapped in sharp humor. It's a fun, murderous treasure." -Joseph Sirota, Buena Park Independent Studio Nights at the long Beach Playhouse november 20, 2010 at 11pm Join us for a night of laughs and good times as you enjoy a late night at the Playhouse, our cash bar, and some groovin' tunes. Come experience it!

5021 E. Anaheim St., long Beach 562-494-1014 - www.lbplayhouse.org

Tickets can be purchased online or at the door

Courtesy Art Theatre

Paula Poundstone will perform at the Art Theatre as a one-night-only benefit for Artful Thinking Organization.


COMMUNITY

NOVEMBER 12, 2010

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

11

Pets to be included as beneficiaries of LB food drive

For 16th year, local disadvantaged children to ‘Shop with a Cop’ for school necessities

Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster, Food Finders, Friends of Long Beach Animals and We Love Long Beach are partnering up for this year’s Long Beach Community Food Drive with a goal to collect 100,000 pounds of food. Barrels will be placed in several locations throughout the city to collect canned or packaged food, as well as pet food to help out needy families and pets in the city. Donations will be accepted now through Jan. 31, 2011. “Long Beach residents and businesses have always responded generously to our request for donations,” said Foster. “This year’s food drive goal is to collect 100,000 pounds of

Seismic continued from page 1

cracks in drywall,” he said. “At that time, we retained a licensed civil engineer who specializes in seismic damage evaluation and claims.” Slater said the engineer conducted a thorough forensic engineering analysis of every house from which a complaint of damages came. According to Slater, the engineer concluded that, in almost every case, the cracks in the drywall had been there long before the geophysical survey was conducted. In a small number of homes, Slater acknowledged, the engineer found cracks that could not be absolutely proven to have occurred before the survey. “He (the engineer) told us, ‘I don’t think you did them, but I cannot absolutely prove that you did not do them,’” Slater said. “Where he could not give us his 100-percent professional opinion that the cracks were not preexisting, we negotiated with that homeowner for the costs of patching and repairing the cracks.” Slater said every such case involved very minor drywall cracks. “The project in 2006 was very highly publicized in the local media,” Slater said. “As a result, a lot of homeowners began looking for cracks, and, when they discovered cracks that they had not seen before, they assumed that they had been caused by the survey. But the civil engineer conclusively proved that was not the case in all but a very few homes with very minor cracks in their drywall.” Slater acknowledged that a small number of residents are still alleging that their homes were damaged by the 2006 survey. Slater also explained that the survey now being conducted by NodalSeismic results in ground-motion levels much lower than levels experienced almost five years ago when

food, which would provide three meals a day to approximately 2,547 families for a week.” “Many families won’t be able to have festive dinners or toys for the kids this year without our help,” said Arlene Mercer, Food Finders executive director. “Once again, we are asking for canned and packaged food, as well as pet food.” The Friends of Long Beach Animals will be collecting and distributing the donated pet food to owners who are finding it a challenge to provide for themselves and their pets. “It is a tragic reality that some pet owners are forced to consider the relinquishment of their pets due to the

lack of household funds needed to properly feed and care for their animals,” said John Gonzales, president of the Friends of Long Beach Animals. “We ask that everyone include a pet food item with their donation.” “The Long Beach Community Food Drive is the perfect chance for all of us to work together and make a difference in the lives of families and individuals throughout our city,” said Scott Jones, co-founder/director of We Love Long Beach. ------------------------------------MORE INFORMATION longbeach.gov/mayor

Celebrating its 16th year, “Shop with a Cop” will return on Saturday, Nov. 13 to the downtown Long Beach Wal-Mart as part of a partnership between the Long Beach Junior Chamber (LBJC) and the Long Beach Police Foundation (LBPF) that assists disadvantaged children with new school uniforms and supplies. Children are pre-selected through the Boys and Girls Club of Long Beach and are matched with a Long Beach Police Department officer and/or community service officer, a LBJC member or adult shopper volunteer to assist with their purchase of new clothing and supplies for school

needs– often the only new clothes these children receive all year. Breakfast will be provided by Hometown Buffet and, after shopping, the children will have a chance to enjoy an arts-and-crafts area. “Our goal is to provide this positive shopping experience to 100 children this year,” said Paige Fingerhut, LBJC president. “We are asking for the community’s support in the form of cash or in-kind donations.” All gifts are tax-deductible and checks should be made payable to the Long Beach Police Foundation. For more information on how to support the “Shop with a Cop” event, call (714) 348-0422. ß

Dawson Geophysical was conducting the survey. “There is some sensation of vibration in the vicinity of the seismic trucks, but it is not the sensation of an earthquake,” he said. “We also have a third-party company that has technicians with ground-motion monitors that record ground motion around the trucks to help us keep the ground motion below the limits that we have set.” Slater added that in 2006 SHP received numerous complaints about the measuring instruments Dawson Geophysical was using to gather data pertaining to underground strata. “Those measuring instruments were connected by cable to a remote recording device,” he said. “We had miles and miles of cable that was in parkways and sidewalks, and that was very troubling to the public.” He noted that the current measuring instruments use wireless technology, eliminating the need for cables. Getting back to the article that was published in the Signal Tribune last week, Slater said SHP has no record of an incident described by a woman at the Wrigley Association meeting. The woman claimed that a representative of the Long Beach Surgery Center had asked NodalSeismic to cease operations because the truck vibrations were putting patients at risk. “We believe that incident never happened,” Slater said. “We have independent monitors who respond to issues and complaints while the survey is being conducted and, after interviewing all of our monitors, we are convinced that the incident never happened.” SHP Land Manager Brady Barto added that, since July 2009, NodalSeismic has had approximately 100 days of operations and, during all that time, neither SHP nor NodalSeismic has received any substantiated complaints of damages to homes or drive-

ways. “There are a few cases of obvious fraud that we investigated immediately,” he said, adding that, when presented with the evidence, the people trying to obtain money from SHP withdrew their complaints. Slater said there is one case in which a homeowner is claiming that preexisting cracks in his driveway grew larger as a result of NodalSeismic operations, but that the civil engineer is still studying the case. Slater also acknowledged that, during one of the surveys, some items fell from shelves in a Long Beach curio shop and broke upon impact with the floor. “We immediately negotiated a reimbursement for the merchandise with the business owner,” Slater said. Slater said the purpose of the geophysical survey was to determine if there are any undiscovered deposits of crude oil or natural gas in the Long Beach-Signal Hill area, but he did not disclose the results of the survey so far. “That’s all under evaluation at this time,” he said. Slater said that NodalSeismic is currently working with representatives of the Wrigley Association to set up a demonstration of the seismic trucks in the Wrigley area prior to the

next round of surveys set to begin early next year. “Signal Hill Petroleum is committed to this community, and we work hard at being a good corporate citizen,” he said. “We want to keep the lines of communications open with residents in this area. We

want to get feedback from them and address their concerns.”

Steve Shaw

------------------------------------------MORE INFORMATION shpi.net (562) 595-6440


12 SIGNAL TRIBUNE Injunction continued from page 1

day-to-day activities. “This injunction targets Sureños committing crimes in the North Long Beach area, focusing on Hispanic gangs from all over Southern California, not just Long Beach-based gangs,” McDonnell said. “Members of some of the most violent and organized gangs from throughout LA County have been served on this injunction. Local Long Beach gang members, particularly from North Side Longo, are also targeted.” He noted that the North Side Longo and Sureño Gang Injunction was signed on Sept. 16 of this year in Los Angeles County Superior Court, but the work on the injunction began in 2008 after an increase in gang-related crime in the safety zone. “These crimes range from graffiti to hate crimes to narcotic sales, robberies, shootings and murders,” he said. McDonnell said that he and city officials believe the injunction is the first of its kind and on the cutting edge of gang suppression. “There are 107 gang members named, 53 have been served already with 54 pending service,” he said. “Nineteen of those are already in state prison.” He added that more gang members will be added to the list as the LBPD obtains documented evidence proving their gang membership. The chief noted that the gang injunction has resulted in two arrests so far. “We are determined to ensure the safety of the people of this city and particularly the residents of the community within the safety zone,” McDonnell said. “This is another tool that our department can use to combat crime and ensure that the community can feel safe from people who

COMMUNITY have a lifestyle of preying on others. City Prosecutor Doug Haubert, who spoke next, explained that this is the fourth gang injunction obtained by the city and perhaps the most significant one because it names the Sureños, a growing criminal organization that encompasses some of the most violent gangs in the region. Haubert told the audience that while violent and other serious crimes are not commonplace in Long Beach, gang criminal nuisance activities occur all too frequently in the city. These include graffiti, drinking in public, breaking into abandoned buildings, loitering in public places and intimidating the public. “Members of these gangs want to terrorize the neighborhoods and commercial districts where they operate,” he said. “They congregate outside schools, in parks, in alleyways and storefronts, trying to claim these areas as gang territories.” Haubert noted that gang injunctions have been repeatedly upheld by the courts because they target activity directly associated with criminal conduct or activity that amounts to a public nuisance. Haubert explained that a violation of any term of the injunction can result in a misdemeanor prosecution and a six-month sentence in Los Angeles County Jail and up to a $1,000 fine. He noted that, under the terms of the injunction, served gang members: may not possess an open container of alcohol while in public view; may not possess, sell or be under the influence of illegal drugs or be in the presence of someone who is; may not possess any deadly weapon, discharge a firearm or remain in the presence of someone who does; may not engage in graffiti activities or possess spray paint or other graffiti marking tools; may not

NOVEMBER 12, 2010

Display showing tattoos that identify gang members and items associated with gang activity.

obstruct the passage of a person or vehicle on a public right-of-way; may not loiter or display gang signs or flash gang symbols in public places. “North Long Beach belongs to the hard-working men and women who call it home,” Haubert said. “It belongs to the business owners whose investments are helping revitalize North Long Beach. It does not belong to gang members, and by our action today we are doing everything in our power to make sure it never does.” The area of the injunction’s safety zone runs north from Del Amo Boulevard and extends to the northern, eastern and western boundaries of Long Beach. ß

Julian Rothen/Signal Tribune

Map showing the area addressed by the gang injunction announced Monday


COMMUNITY

NOVEMBER 12, 2010

FIRST CoURSE Smoked Herring, Bitter Greens Salad, Tomato Spheres

SECoND CoURSE

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

13

e n g a p m a h C nner Di

Duck Prosciutto, Warm Artichoke-Cauliflower Relish

THIRD CoURSE

Friday, nov. 19, 2010

Baked Trout, Wild Mushrooms, Salsify, Pearl onion, Meyer lemon

7:15pm

$90 + tax & gratuity Price includes a glass of sparkling wine with each course

FoURTH CoURSE Mustard-crusted Veal loin, Potato Gnocchi, Brussels Sprouts, Pancetta-Sherry Reduction

FIFTH CoURSE

Reservations recommended but not required

Dessert

2951 cherry avenue, Signal hill 562.426.0694 • www.deliusrestaurant.com TST3582 notiCe of trUStee’S Sale t.S. no.: 10-07169 loan no.: 7000008012 a.P.n.: 7148-007-018 yoU are in defaUlt Under a deed of trUSt dated 9/27/2006. UnleSS yoU taKe aCtion to ProteCt yoUr ProPerty, it May Be Sold at a PUBliC Sale. if yoU need an exPlanation of tHe natUre of tHe ProCeeding againSt yoU, yoU SHoUld ContaCt a laWyer. a public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a deed of trust described below. the sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the deed of trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the deed of trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. the amount may be greater on the day of sale. BenefiCiary May eleCt to Bid leSS tHan tHe total aMoUnt dUe. trustor: BarBara a Miller, an UnMarried WoMan and MegHan MCMaHon, a Single WoMan duly appointed trustee: atlantic & Pacific foreclosure Services, llC recorded 10/4/2006 as instrument no. 06 2210211 in book , page and rerecorded on —- as —- of official records in the office of the recorder of los angeles County, California, described as follows: as more fully described on said deed of trust. date of Sale: 12/8/2010 at 10:30 aM Place of Sale: at the west side of the los angeles County Courthouse, directly facing norwalk Blvd., 12720 norwalk Blvd., norwalk, California amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $644,846.24 (estimated) Street address or other common designation of real property: 3233 CerritoS avenUe Signal Hill, Ca 90755 a.P.n.: 7148-007-018 the undersigned trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. if no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this notice of Sale. Pursuant to California Civil Code 2923.54 the undersigned, on behalf of the beneficiary, loan servicer or authorized agent, declares as follows: the mortgage loan servicer has obtained from the commissioner a final order of exemption pursuant to Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the notice of sale is filed; and the timeframe for giving notice of sale specified in subdivision (a) of Section 2923.52 does not apply pursuant to Section 2923.52 or 2923.55. if the trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. if the sale is set aside for

any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. the Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s attorney. if you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder’s rights against the real property only. tHiS notiCe iS Sent for tHe PUrPoSe of ColleCting a deBt. tHiS firM iS atteMPting to ColleCt a deBt on BeHalf of tHe Holder and oWner of tHe note. any inforMation oBtained By or Provided to tHiS firM or tHe Creditor Will Be USed for tHat PUrPoSe. as required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. date: 11/03/2010 atlantic & Pacific foreclosure Services, llC 1610 e. Saint andrew Pl., Suite 150f Santa ana, Ca 92705 automated Sale information: 714-730-2727 or www.lpsasap.com for non-Sale information: 888-313-1969 tai alailima, Manager aSaP# 3803020 11/12/2010, 11/19/2010, 11/26/2010 TS3583 notiCe of trUStee’S Sale tS no. 090059946 title order no. 09-8-177939 investor/insurer no. 134974906 aPn no. 7216-014-060 yoU are in defaUlt Under a deed of trUSt, dated 05/19/2006. UnleSS yoU taKe aCtion to ProteCt yoUr ProPerty, it May Be Sold at a PUBliC Sale. if yoU need an exPlanation of tHe natUre of tHe ProCeeding againSt yoU, yoU SHoUld ContaCt a laWyer.” notice is hereby given that reContrUSt CoMPany, n.a., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the deed of trust executed by KeySHa griffin, a Single WoMan, dated 05/19/2006 and recorded 05/31/06, as instrument no. 06 1183179, in Book , Page ), of official records in the office of the County recorder of los angeles County, State of California, will sell on 12/10/2010 at 10:30aM, at the West side of the los angeles County Courthouse, directly facing norwalk Blvd., 12720 norwalk Blvd., norwalk, Ca 90650 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said deed of trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced deed of trust. the street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1936 CHerry ave, Signal Hill, Ca, 90755. the undersigned trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. the total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the notice of Sale is $544,213.21. it is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. in addition to cash, the trustee will accept cashier’s checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal sav-

ings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ‘’aS iS’’ condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said deed of trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the note secured by said deed of trust with interest thereon as provided in said note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the trustee and of the trusts created by said deed of trust. dated: 08/07/2009 reContrUSt CoMPany, n.a. 1800 tapo Canyon rd., Ca6-914-01-94 SiMi valley, Ca 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale information (626) 9274399 By:— trustee’s Sale officer reContrUSt CoMPany, n.a. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. any information obtained will be used for that purpose. aSaP# 3805600 11/12/2010, 11/19/2010, 11/26/2010 TST3581 notiCe of trUStee’S Sale tS no. 090050769 title order no. 09-8-154679 aPn no. 7211-026-168 yoU are in defaUlt Under a deed of trUSt, dated 01/11/2007. UnleSS yoU taKe aCtion to ProteCt yoUr ProPerty, it May Be Sold at a PUBliC Sale. if yoU need an exPlanation of tHe natUre of tHe ProCeeding againSt yoU, yoU SHoUld ContaCt a laWyer.” notice is hereby given that reContrUSt CoMPany, n.a., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the deed of trust executed by nady HeBiSH, a Married Man aS HiS Sole & SeParate ProPerty, dated 01/11/2007 and recorded 01/18/07, as instrument no. 20070096074, in Book , Page ), of official records in the office of the County recorder of los angeles County, State of California, will sell on 12/10/2010 at 1:00PM, at the front entrance to the Pomona Superior Courts Building, 350 West Mission Blvd., Pomona, los angeles, Ca at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said deed of trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced deed of trust. the street address and other common designation, if any of the real property described above is purported to be: 2532 gUndry ave, Signal Hill, Ca, 907553522. the undersigned trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. the total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the notice of Sale is $1,205,812.90. it is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. in addition to cash, the trustee will accept cashier’s checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an “aS iS” condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding

title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said deed of trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the note secured by said deed of trust with interest thereon as provided in said note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the trustee and of the trusts created by said deed of trust. if required by the provisions of section 2923.5 of the California Civil Code, the declaration from the mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent is at-

tached to the notice of trustee’s Sale duly recorded with the appropriate County recorder’s office. dated: 07/23/2009 reContrUSt CoMPany, n.a. 1800 tapo Canyon rd., Ca6-914-01-94 SiMi valley, Ca 93063 Phone/Sale information: (800) 281 8219 By: trustee’s Sale officer reContrUSt CoMPany, n.a. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. any information obtained will be used for that purpose. fei # 1006.118070 11/12, 11/19, 11/26/2010

PUBLIC NOTICES CITY OF SIGNAL HIULL TST3585 REQUEST FoR PRoPoSAlS notice is given that sealed proposals for “Custodial Maintenance of City Buildings” will be received at the office of the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, 2175 Cherry avenue, Signal Hill, California 90755 until 10:00 a.M. on Wednesday, december 15, 2010. Proposal documents may be obtained at the office of the director of Public Works at the above address or mailed upon request by calling (562) 9897351, Monday thru thursday, 7:30 a.M. to 5:30 P.M. and friday from 7:30 a.M. to 4:30 P.M. Proposals will be evaluated on the basis of: the qualifications of the firm presenting proposal the bid price proposed overall proposal A pre-bid mandatory job walk is required for all responsive bidders. the mandatory job walk will take place on tuesday, november 30, 2010 at 9:00am and will begin at Signal Hill City Hall located at 2175 Cherry avenue, Signal Hill, Ca 90755. the City reserves the right to reject any and all proposals. the City is not obligated to award a contract. if awarded, the contract shall commence around January 26, 2011 and terminate January 25, 2014. dated: november 12, 2010 advertised: november 12, 2010 ___/ss/________ Joshua rosenbaum Management analyst Public Works department


PUBLIC NOTICES

14 SIGNAL TRIBUNE CITY OF SIGNAL HIULL

A-1

TST3586 THE CITY oF SIGNAl HIll 2175 Cherry Avenue Signal Hill, California 90755 NoTICE INVITING BIDS Sealed bids will be received at the office of the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, California, until 2:00 p.m. on november 29, 2010, and on the same day shortly thereafter, they will be publicly opened and read for the “City Hall re-roof Project, no. 642” project, in accordance with the Specifications therefore. Bids must be made on the forms provided for this purpose, addressed to the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, marked "Bid for “, followed by the title of the project and the date and hour for submitting bids. Bids are required for the entire work as described in the Bid Schedule and the Specifications.

A-1 the work to be accomplished under this contract includes the removal of the existing roofing system down to the structural deck and installation of a 30-year, non-odor, environmentally friendly torch system (system is a two-ply, modified mineral surfaced roof system with a white, 90%+ reflective, title 24 coating) on the lower roof system, including all upgrades to the roof mounted equipment supports, and the repair to selected areas of the upper roof section. A-2

A-3

all work must be completed within thirty (30) working days after receipt by the Contractor of the notice to proceed from the City. the contract documents, which include the Specifications, may be obtained at the City of Signal Hill department of finance, for $20 or $25 if requested by mail. the documents are entitled “City Hall re-roof Project, no. 642.” Bids will not be received unless they are made on a proposal form furnished in the Contract documents by the City of Signal Hill. each bid must be accompanied by cash, certified check, cashier's check or bidder's bond, made payable to the City of Signal Hill for an amount equal to at least ten percent (10%) of the amount bid, such guarantee to be forfeited should the bidder to whom the contract is awarded fail to enter into the Contract.

A-4

all bids are to be compared on the basis of the lump sum or itemized bid items shown in the Bid Schedule(s). Bids will not be accepted from the Contractors who are not licensed in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 9, division iii of the Business and Professions Code of the State of California. the Contractor shall be required to possess a Class C-39 license at the time the contract is awarded.

A-5

attention is directed to the provision in Section 1777.5 of the labor Code concerning the employment of apprentices by the Contractor of any subcontractor under the Contractor.

A-6

Before a Contract is entered into with the successful bidder, the bidder shall present evidence in writing to the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, that he has a current combined single limit liability policy with aggregate limits for Bodily injury and Property damage in the amount of two million dollars ($2,000,000).

A-7

attention is directed to government Code Sections 4590 and 14402.5 permitting the substitution of specified and approved securities for contract retention of funds. all such securities shall be subject to the review and approval of the City attorney of the City of Signal Hill.

A-8

the successful bidder will be required to furnish a payment bond in an amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the contract price and a faithful performance bond in an amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the contract price, and said bonds shall be secured from a surety company satisfactory to the City attorney of the City of Signal Hill.

A-9

the City of Signal Hill reserves the right to reject any and all bids, or delete portions of any and all bids or waive any informality or irregularity in the bid or the bid procedures and shall be the sole judge of the bids received.

A-10

Mandatory Site visit: a mandatory pre-bid site visit is required of all prime bidders. the date and time for the required site visit has been established for november 18, 2010 at 8:00 a.m. Prompt attendance at this visit is required to be considered as a responsive bidder. no other date and time will qualify a bidder.

By order of the City of Signal Hill. Posted at Signal Hill City Hall on: november 12, 2010 Published in the Signal-tribune on: november 12 and 19, 2010

TST3584 notiCe of trUStee’S Sale tS no. 090050769 title order no. 09-8-154679 aPn no. 7211-026-168 yoU are in defaUlt Under a deed of trUSt, dated 01/11/2007. UnleSS yoU taKe aCtion to ProteCt yoUr ProPerty, it May Be Sold at a PUBliC Sale. if yoU need an exPlanation of tHe natUre of tHe ProCeeding againSt yoU, yoU SHoUld ContaCt a laWyer.” notice is hereby given that reContrUSt CoMPany, n.a., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the deed of trust executed by nady HeBiSH, a Married Man aS HiS Sole & SeParate ProPerty, dated 01/11/2007 and recorded 01/18/07, as instrument no. 20070096074, in Book , Page ), of official records in the office of the County recorder of los angeles County, State of California, will sell on 12/10/2010 at 1:00PM, at the front entrance to the Pomona Superior Courts Building, 350 West Mission Blvd., Pomona, los angeles, Ca at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said deed of trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced deed of trust. the street address and other common designation, if any of the real property described above is purported to be: 2532 gUndry ave, Signal Hill, Ca, 907553522. the undersigned trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. the total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the notice of Sale is $1,205,812.90. it is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. in ad-

dition to cash, the trustee will accept cashier’s checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an “aS iS” condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said deed of trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the note secured by said deed of trust with interest thereon as provided in said note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the trustee and of the trusts created by said deed of trust. if required by the provisions of section 2923.5 of the California Civil Code, the declaration from the mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent is attached to the notice of trustee’s Sale duly recorded with the appropriate County recorder’s office. dated: 07/23/2009 reContrUSt CoMPany, n.a. 1800 tapo Canyon rd., Ca6-914-01-94 SiMi valley, Ca 93063 Phone/Sale information: (800) 281 8219 By: trustee’s Sale officer reContrUSt CoMPany, n.a. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. any information obtained will be used for that purpose. fei # 1006.118070 11/12, 11/19, 11/26/2010 TST3576 notiCe of trUStee'S Sale tS # Ca-09322782-rt order # 090754498-Ca-dCo yoU are in defaUlt Under a deed of trUSt dated 8/1/2005. UnleSS yoU taKe aCtion to ProteCt yoUr ProPerty, it May Be Sold at a PUBliC Sale. if yoU need an exPlanation of tHe natUre of tHe ProCeeding againSt yoU, yoU SHoUld ContaCt a laWyer. a public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check

drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. the sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the deed of trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the deed of trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. the amount may be greater on the day of sale. BenefiCiary May eleCt to Bid leSS tHan tHe total aMoUnt dUe. trustor(s): CHantHa KHon , a Married WoMan aS Her Sole and SeParate ProPerty recorded: 8/19/2005 as instrument no. 05 1995099 in book xxx, page xxx of official records in the office of the recorder of loS angeleS County, California; date of Sale: 11/29/2010 at 10:30 aM Place of Sale: at the West side of the los angeles County Courthouse, directly facing norwalk Blvd., 12720 norwalk Blvd., norwalk, Ca 90650 amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $882,295.87 the purported property address is: 2001 oBiSPo ave Signal Hill, Ca 90755 assessors Parcel no. 7217-016-042 the undersigned trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. if no street address or other common designation is shown, please refer to the referenced legal description for property location. in the event no common address or common designation of the property is provided herein directions to the location of the property may be obtained within 10 days of the date of first publication of this notice of Sale by sending a written request to Select Portfolio Servicing, inc. 3815 S.W. temple Salt lake City Ut 84115-4412 Pursuant to California Civil Code 2923.54 the undersigned, on behalf of the beneficiary, loan servicer or authorized agent, declares as follows: [ 1 ] the mortgage loan servicer has obtained from the commissioner a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the notice of sale is filed; [ 2 ] the timeframe for giving notice of sale specified in subdivision (a) of Section 2923.52 does not apply pursuant to Section 2923.52 . if the trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. if the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. the Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's attorney. date: 11/1/2010 Quality loan Service Corp. 2141 5th avenue San diego, Ca 92101 619-645-7711 for non Sale information only Sale line: 714-730-2727 or login to: www.fidelityasap.com reinstatement line: 619645-7711 Quality loan Service, Corp. if you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. tHiS notiCe iS Sent for tHe PUrPoSe of ColleCting a deBt. tHiS firM iS atteMPting to ColleCt a deBt on BeHalf of tHe Holder and oWner of tHe note. any inforMation oBtained By or Provided to tHiS firM or tHe Creditor Will Be USed for tHat PUrPoSe. as required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. aSaP# 3797562 11/05/2010, 11/12/2010, 11/19/2010

information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Jorge flores. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 20, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 22, 29, & november 5, 12, 2010. TST3570 / 20101496100 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: traSHoUt and reCovery, 2669 Myrtle ave., Ste. 211, Signal Hill, Ca 90755. registrant: verna M. CHarleS, 2101 e. 21st St. #306, Signal Hill, Ca 90755. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: verna M. Charles. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was october 1, 2010. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 20, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 22, 29, & november 5, 12, 2010. TST3572 / 20101479530 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following persons are doing business as: frUit BatS and CatfiSH, 1835 e. florida St., long Beach, Ca 90802. registrant: 1. MiCHael Cole, 1835 e. florida ave., long Beach, Ca 90802, 2. gUStavo Caldron, 9 Barrington, aliso viejo, Ca 92656. this business is conducted by: a general Partnership. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Michael Cole. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was September 1, 2010. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 15, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 29, & november 5, 12, 19, 2010. TST3573 / 20101537238 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: ProJeCt ClotHing, 12626 e. 213th St., lakewood, Ca 90715. registrant: Brian allan BelCHer, 12626 e. 213th St., lakewood, Ca 90715. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Brian allan Belcher. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 27, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 29, & november 5, 12, 19, 2010.

TST3575 notiCe of trUStee'S Sale t.S. no. gM246164-C investor no. 9876489 loan no. 7439120635 yoU are in defaUlt Under a deed of trUSt dated 3/10/2005. UnleSS yoU taKe aCtion to ProteCt yoUr ProPerty, it May Be Sold at a PUBliC Sale. if yoU need an exPlanation of tHe natUre of tHe ProCeeding againSt yoU, yoU SHoUld ContaCt a laWyer. a public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by the duly appointed trustee. the sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation secured by said deed of trust. the undersigned trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. trUStor:CHarleS Santo CHinniCi, a Single Man recorded 3/16/2005 as instrument no. 05 0600901 in Book , page of official records in the office of the recorder of los angeles County, California, date of Sale:11/29/2010 at 10:30 aM Place of Sale: at the west side of the los angeles County Courthouse, directly facing norwalk Blvd., 12720 norwalk Blvd., norwalk, California Property address is purported to be: 2575 eaSt 19tH Street #28 Signal Hill, California 90755 aPn #: 7216-019-068 the total amount secured by said instrument as of the time of initial publication of this notice is $268,887.00, which includes the total amount of the unpaid balance (including accrued and unpaid interest) and reasonable estimated costs, expenses, and advances at the time of initial publication of this notice. Pursuant to California Civil Code 2923.54 the undersigned, on behalf of the beneficiary, loan servicer or authorized agent, declares as follows: [ 1 ] the mortgage loan servicer has obtained from the commissioner a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the notice of sale is filed; [ 2 ] the timeframe for giving notice of sale specified in subdivision (a) of Section 2923.52 does not apply pursuant to Section 2923.52 or 2923.55. etS Services, llC date: 10/27/2010 2255 north ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale line: 714730-2727 ileanna Petersen, trUStee Sale offiCer aSaP# 3793399 11/05/2010, 11/12/2010, 11/19/2010

TST3577 / 20101577553 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: JariMetia.CoM, 4067 Hardwick St. #290, lakewood, Ca 90712. registrant: MarK del rey, 480 e. Platt St., long Beach, Ca 90805. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Mark del rey. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on november 3, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: november 5, 12, 19, 26, 2010.

TST3569 / 20101496099 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: exeCUtive valet, 2012 7th ave., los angeles, Ca 90018. registrant: Jorge floreS, 2012 7th ave., los angeles, Ca 90018. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all

TST3580 / 20101464015 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: Bed BUddieZ, 809 e. 59th St., long Beach, Ca 908905. registrant: roBert ly, 809 e. 59th St., long Beach, Ca 90805. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all in-

TST3574 / 20101537239 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following persons are doing business as: aalaS diStriCt 8 2012, 6475 e. Pacific Coast Hwy. #323, long Beach, Ca 90803. registrant: 1. deniSe BreaZeal, 25924 Sandalia drive, valencia, Ca 91355, 2. elliot SCHWed, 1817 Knoxville ave., long Beach, Ca 90815. this business is conducted by: an Unincorporated association other than a Partnership. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: elliot Schwed. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 27, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 29, & november 5, 12, 19, 2010.

NOVEMBER 12, 2010 BUSINESS MACHINES COPIERS • FACSIMILES LASER PRINTERS SALES, SERVICE & SUPPLIES

S uperior C opier S ervice 562-867-7000 Fax: 562-616-1567

robert@superiorcopier.com

I N K & TO N E R

Declares WAR on high ink & toner prices!

reusing is the highest form of recycling. trade in your empties to We receive prices Deliver 30%-70% lower than across the street.

562-912-4657 InkPeace.com

Pet of the Week

Jake is licking his chops at the thought of the great meals and good times he could have in a forever home. Jake’s a male tan German shepherd who’s ready to be someone’s solid buddy— he wants you to know that his tongue’s made for kissin’, too! Ask for ID#A415536 at Companion Animal Village, 7700 East Spring St., (562) 570-PETS. Sponsored by:

formation in this statement is true and correct. Signed: robert ly. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was october 13, 2010. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 13, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: november 5, 12, 19, 26, 2010. TST3587 / 20101621086 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: 1. gallery exPo, 2. angel HoUSe garden gateS, 3. dMf landSCaPing, 4. ovC, 4321 atlantic ave., long Beach, Ca 90807. registrant: orr viSUal CoMMUniCationS, inC., 3758 olive ave., long Beach, Ca 90807. this business is conducted by: a Corporation. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: douglas C. orr, President. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was July 23, 2010. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on november 10, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: november 12, 19, 26, & december 10, 2010.


BUSINESSES & SERVICES

NOVEMBER 12, 2010

AI R CON DITION I NG / H EATI NG

AI R CON DITION I NG

Time's Running Out

Sunroof and Convertible Top headquarters

Contr.liC #168999

Family Owned & Operated Since 1966 Repair - Service - Installation We'll Treat You Fairly and always Stand behind Our Work! Proud members of Better Business Bureau and Signal Hill Chamber of Commerce

562-429-1546 • 2502 N. Palm Drive, Signal Hill Contractor's License No. 242528 / C10-C20

562-424-4985 We offer Service Specials, duct Cleaning & Free Estimates on installation !

ing brat Cele our

5e1ar! st

y

2517 Cerritos ave., Signal hill l o n g b e a c h a i r. c o m

B O O K K E E P I N G / TA X E S

• New installations • Annual sunroof servicing • Beautiful replacement tops • Authorized installer

Leather Care, Repair & Replacement Bud’S Auto Upholstery Call: 595-6370 Beach Cities Sunroofs 2637 St. Louis ave. Signal hill LAN D S CAP I N G

C A R P E T & U P H O L S T E RY

Commercial residential

certified QuickBooks pro advisors/Training

TRUST lANDSCAPE

Business & personal Bookkeeping

cambodian & Spanish Speaking cTBc registered Tax preparers

CallToday! 562-426-6174

PHONE: 562-283-0558 FAx: 562-283-0561

We guarantee it!

2669 Myrtle Ave, Ste 207

-Laura Burkhard, Owner

Signal Hill • www.madkatinc.com

l.burkhard@heavensbest.com

COMPUTER SERVICES

F LO O R I N G

Genus Computer Services LLC A Full-Service Computer Company - Home or Office • Computer Sales • Repair & Installation • Website Design & Hosting • Network Setup, Support, Cabling & Wireless • Internet Installation & Configuration • Remote Back-up & Data Recovery • Camera Surveillance Security Systems

4047 long Beach Blvd

LAN DSCAPE DES IG N ER

English Installation & Refinishing

GARDENS ...where your garden begins

Landscape & Garden

• Design • Installation • Maintenance

3677 Atlantic Avenue

562-988-8429

lic#794448

W W W. T H E T I L E Z O N E . C O M

MEDICINE

LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED State license C27 #642266

ALFORD’S

Ceramic & Porcelain Tiles Custom Design & Installation

562.989.4666

PAI NTI NG

HARDWOOD FLOORI NG

The

Tile Zone

• Complete Designing and layout • Tree trimming • “All concrete work” • Sprinkler systems • New lawns, trees, shrubs • Maintenance

562-422-3806

DRIES IN 1–4 HOURS, NOT DAYS!

Better Business Bureau

r Fix youseat! g saggin

your local leader in:

Bookkeeping & Tax Services

MEMBER

15

AUTOMOTIVE

Upgrade your Forced Air System for a $1500 Federal Tax Credit Expires 12/31/2010

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

562.997.4111

www.kathyalford.com PA R T Y F U N

PLUMBING

J&d

Put on an event they won’t forget!

plumbing &heating commercial • residential • industrial

“Your Neighborhood Painter”

MaKES a gREaT WEddiNg OR paRTy FavOR!

rent a Portable Photo booth for your next event

• Residential • Commercial • interiors • Exteriors • Woodworking Rich Ward • Faux Finishes CALIC 864357

562.528.6258 PIANO TU N I NG / REPAI R

TUNING & REPAIR

ChristineKay

(562)

208-1853 Call for a free estimate

PREMIUM ROOFING

“First in Service” H UNDREDS OF LOCAL REFERENCES O VER 35 YEARS ExPERIENCE B IxBY K NOLLS RESIDENT “A-rated” on angieslist.com Contractor’s License #629882

Recommended by many local music teachers Associate Member of the Piano Technicians Guild

• Includes portable booth, props and staff of two • 4 hours of unlimited photos and fun!

1806 Gaviota Ave.

CALL FOR DETAILS

lic. # 462161

877-FOTOSTRip PIANO LES SON S

Call Dennis bartlett:

(562) 427-0688

Drains & Sewers • Water Heaters • Copper Repiping • Disposers • Gas Piping • Video Sewer Inspection • Furnace Repairs/Installation • Electronic leak Detection

562-427-2555 www.jdplumb.com

24-Hour Emergency Service

ROOFING

Windward roofs

T O O L R E PA I R S

TOOLWORKS Tool Repairs, Sales and Service

Serving Wrigley District REPAIRS WELCOME

Free estimates 562-981-6644

www.windwardroofs.com

Phil Reno

License #783947

1431 28th St, Signal Hill (562) 988-9150

advERTiSE WiTh ThESE pROFESSiONaLS FOR aS LOW aS $20 pER WEEK CaLL SigNaL TRiBuNE aT 562-595-7900


16 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

NOVEMBER 12, 2010


Signal Tribune Issue ST3223