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ST3510 - october 18_Layout 1 10/18/13 9:55 AM Page 1

“Up North” acrylic on canvas by Bob Potier

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Vol. 35 No. 20

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october 18, 2013

SERVING BIXBY KNOLLS, CALIFORNIA HEIGHTS, LOS CERRITOS, WRIGLEY AND THE CITY OF SIGNAL HILL

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

With moratorium on funeral services about to expire, LB City Council initially passes new ordinance, changing rules on cremation

Cory Bilicko/Signal Tribune

CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune

The Belmont Heights Funeral Center displays sample designs of the caskets available for those who seek a traditional service to remember a loved one. CJ Dablo Staff Writer

Last Tuesday, in a first-reading vote, the Long Beach City Council passed a new ordinance governing how funeral businesses, including cemeteries, mortuaries and crematoriums, can operate. If finalized next week, the Council decision to approve the new ordinance will– among other changes to the codes– mean that two funeral businesses with existing crematoriums will be allowed to continue to operate in north and central Long Beach, but it will, however, also deny the opportunity for a new funeral center in Belmont Heights to offer on-site cremation services. A nine-month moratorium on the businesses that deal with the remains of the dearly departed is scheduled to end later this year. The most controversial aspect of the new ordinance deals with the cremation side of business. The moratorium initiated earlier this year prohibited current funeral-service businesses from expanding in the city and held off allowing new businesses to begin operating to allow

Former Long Beach Mayor Beverly O’Neill (far right) was on hand during a dinner on Oct. 14 to welcome Vice-Chairman of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region Bu Xiaolin (second from left), who was visiting the area to participate in negotiations on a film about Genghis Khan. Also pictured are Ben Ma of China Central Television (far left) and interpretor Sai Na (third from left).

Vice-Chairman of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region visits Long Beach

Bu Xiaolin makes trip here for Genghis Khan film-signing deal

Cory Bilicko

Managing Editor

During her visit this week to southern California that included lunch with Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and California Gov. Jerry Brown, Vice-Chairman of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region Bu Xiaolin made a final stop at Forbidden City restaurant in Long Beach for a dinner to celebrate a signing deal for a feature film about Genghis Khan, the 13th-Century leader of the Mongol Empire. (Bu Xiaolin denied an interview request by the Signal Tribune, despite the newspaper’s being invited to

Islamic center proposed in Signal Hill may get off ground again after years of delays see MORATORIUM page 18

Sean Belk Staff Writer

An Islamic center proposed in Signal Hill may finally become a reality next year. The Signal Hill City Council granted Long Beach Islamic Center (LBIC) a conditional-use permit (CUP) in a unanimous 5-0 vote at its Oct. 15 meeting, allowing the organization to revive construction of a 2,025-square-foot mosque on the northwest corner of California Avenue and 27th Street. But this isn’t the first time the City has issued building permits for

the Islamic center. The project has been delayed several years mainly because the Muslim organization couldn’t come up with enough funding to complete the one-story structure. The Council originally approved the project in 2007 along with conditions regulating operations at the site. Nearly a year later, the applicant was granted permit extensions, but in 2009, LBIC’s site plan and design review expired, with the applicant citing a lack of financing to begin construction. Later that year, the Signal Hill

Planning Commission reapproved a second site plan and design review, and construction began in 2010. However, the project stalled again due to insufficient funds, and building permits ultimately expired in May 2013. With the intention of completing the project, LBIC submitted new applications for building permits this year, however the organization was required to retest three oil wells on the site to document they were not leaking methane gas. At its Oct. 8 meeting, the Plan-

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

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Construction of a 2,025-square-foot mosque by the Long Beach Islamic Center (LBIC) at 995 27th St. in Signal Hill is expected to commence since the Signal Hill City Council approved a new conditional-use permit (CUP) for the project after LBIC’s previous CUP expired in May 2013. LBIC representatives said they expect the project to be finished in about a year.

Weekly Weather Forecast Friday

the dinner. Her interpreter indicated that the visit was intended as a low-profile trip and that she was not participating in interviews at that time.) Hosting the dinner was Michael Brausen, Forbidden City owner and international marketing director for the China-US Business Summit, an organization whose west-coast headquarters are located at One World Trade Center in Long Beach and whose mission is to build a platform for communication and cooperation between small and medium-sized enterprises in China and the US. Brausen coordinated the event with

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2 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

LBCC Board of Trustees to consider raising fees for high-demand intersession courses at Oct. 22 meeting

Sean Belk Staff Writer

Long Beach City College (LBCC) students may soon be able to take some high-demand courses during the winter and summer intersessions, but it won’t be cheap. Students may have to pay nearly five times more than the normal rate and equivalent to the college’s non-residential fee, according to college officials. The courses are offered through a controversial new selfsupporting pilot program being called an “experiment.” The feebased program is an effort to provide students with more access to classes after devastating state budget cuts have eviscerated academic programs, leaving some college campuses severely impacted. LBCC is one of six overcrowded community colleges eligible to develop pilot programs under state legislation known as AB 955, authored by Assemblymember Das Williams (D-Santa Barbara). Gov. Jerry Brown officially signed the bill into law on

Oct. 10 after it passed the California State Legislature. The LBCC Board of Trustees will consider a proposed fee structure at its Oct. 22 meeting, said Richard Garcia, spokesperson for LBCC. He said the structure would include a discounted rate for Board of Governor’s Fee Waiver (BOGFW) eligible students. LBCC also expects to provide scholarships to “help lessen the overall per-unit cost” for these students, Garcia said. The voluntary program that ends on Jan. 1, 2018 gives students the opportunity to take classes during the fast-paced winter and summer intersessions if they couldn’t enroll during fall and spring semesters in the past two academic years because of overcrowding. Garcia said LBCC officials are looking at charging $225 per unit ($900 for a four-unit class), which is equal to the non-residential fee. Low-income students who apply for and are granted BOGFW and scholarships, however, would pay less than $100 per unit, he said.

NEWS

OCTOBER 18, 2013

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Under AB 955, Long Beach City College is eligible to develop a pilot program in which students may be charged nearly five times more for some high-demand intersession courses in order to help students finish school sooner.

Generally, California community colleges charge about $46 a unit for intersession classes. Still, LBCC officials have yet to release a final fee structure, Garcia noted. “There is a lot of information out, but the fact remains no fee structure has been set as yet,” he said. “The goal is to enable students to obtain and enroll in high-

demand courses during the feebased extension term.” Garcia said a state-supported course schedule is currently being developed with enrollment/course descriptions expected to be available in November. “We expect a small number of high-demand courses to be offered through the newly established fee-based extension if approved by the

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Board of Trustees,” he said. So far, LBCC officials are optimistic, but they admit that it’s unknown whether students will be willing to pay more for courses in order to finish school faster. Winter intersession classes at LBCC are from Jan. 2 to Jan. 31, according to the college’s catalog. Jeff Kellogg, LBCC Board of Trustees president, said in a phone interview that other colleges might want to be included if the pilot program in fact proves to be a success. “If Long Beach City College is successful in addressing the needs, and it is received favorably by the students to help them, these other colleges are going to be scampering to be able to do what we’re doing in Long Beach,” he said. “I feel very optimistic that it will be a very positive opportunity for our students, and the other colleges are going to wonder why they didn’t get included as well.” Brown’s approval of the proposal went as far as his issuing a statement to the State Assembly, calling the program a “reasonable experiment,” and adding, “Why deny these campuses the opportunity to offer students access and financial assistance to courses not otherwise available?” But, leading up to the bill’s passage, students, faculty, administrators and lawmakers have been divided on the proposal, with some critics saying it creates a “two-tier” education system, “privatizes” public education and discriminates against poor students who can’t afford the higher fees. Earlier this year, LBCC student leaders staged a protest against the bill, and California Community Colleges Chancellor Brice Harris expressed opposition in a letter. Dean Murakami, president of the Faculty Association of California Community Colleges, referred to the legislation in a statement as a “toll-lane for the economically privileged,” which “runs counter to the very purpose of these institutions.” He also said the bill is “poorly constructed” and four of the six colleges listed are “either ineligible or uninterested in participating, with a fifth desiring to consult with faculty and students before moving forward.” Eloy Ortiz Oakley, LBCC superintendent-president, who worked with Williams on drafting the legislation, said in a statement that AB 955 is “an innovative and see AB 955 page 19


ST3510 - october 18_Layout 1 10/18/13 9:55 AM Page 3

NEWS

OCTOBER 18, 2013

Cultural festival still planned in LB’s Orizaba Park after teacher was fatally stabbed there in front of students

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

3

Sean Belk Staff Writer

A previously scheduled event may now become an opportunity for a community stricken by tragedy to unite in harmony. The first-ever Orizaba Cultural Festival is scheduled to take place this Saturday, Oct. 19 at Long Beach’s Orizaba Park, where just nearly a week prior a teacher from a nearby private elementary school was fatally stabbed in front of her students. Fourth District Long Beach City Councilmember Patrick O’Donnell said the festival had been planned by his office for months and is “not directly related� to the horrific incident. Nevertheless, the gathering aims to celebrate the community’s cultural diversity and “bring residents together,� according to a media advisory. “Now, more than ever, it’s important that we highlight the good that happens in the neighborhood and its rich and diverse history,� O’Donnell said. Kellye Taylor, 53, was supervising a group of children during recess at the park located at Spaulding Street and Orizaba Avenue last Friday, Oct. 11, when she was stabbed with a knife in the neck, according to law-enforcement officials. Police responded to a call at approximately 1:30pm. She later died at a nearby hospital. Suspect Steven Brown, 50, of Long Beach, was arrested at a nearby shopping center at the corner of Anaheim Street and Redondo Avenue, according

NEED A HEALTH KICK? What Women’s Health Symposium Who Long Beach Memorial Medical Center and the Women Network Where Long Beach Memorial Hospital, 2801 Atlantic Ave. When Friday, Oct. 18 from 8:30am to 1:30pm More Info The event will teach women how to live healthy, active lifestyles. Registration begins at 7:30am. Tickets are $20 and include lunch. RSVP at WomenNetwork.com/Event/WHSTix/ .

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

A memorial with candles, flowers and messages is set up on a table next to a playground to honor Kellye Taylor, a private elementary school teacher who was stabbed to death at Orizaba Park in Long Beach on Friday, Oct. 11 in front of her students.

to the Long Beach Police Department (LBPD). Brown appeared in court on Wednesday, Oct. 16 and was charged with capital murder. He faces a maximum sentence of life in prison without the possibility of parole or the death penalty, announced the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office. A decision to seek the death penalty will be made at a later date. Brown is being held without bail, and the LBPD is continuing its investigation of the incident. According to police, Brown

allegedly came up from behind and attacked Taylor, a teacher at Huntington Academy located across the street from the park, during noon recess. Teachers immediately responded by ushering the children to a safe area while one teacher remained with the victim to provide her with basic first-aid. The suspect did not attempt to harm the children or other teachers, according to police. Authorities state that Taylor is the grandmother of Brown’s children as the suspect was once in a relationship with see ORIZABA page 17

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HOME FOR DINNER What Homecoming Who American Legion Family of Lakewood Post #496 Where 5938 Parkcrest St. When Friday, Oct. 18 at 4:30pm More Info National Auxiliary President Nancy Brown-Park will speak at the event. Dinner will cost $15. Call (562) 425- 3879. HELP FIGHT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE What Candlelight walk Who WomenShelter of Long Beach Where Former Acres of Books location, 240 Long Beach Blvd. When Friday, Oct. 18 at 6pm More Info The walk will be held in honor of domestic-violence survivors. Participants are encouraged to wear purple, a color that represents domestic violence. Call Tatiana at (562) 437-7233 ex 27.

GET SOME LOCAL HISTORY What Trip to the Huntington Gardens and Museum Who The Signal Hill Historical Society Where Signal Hill City Hall, 2175 Cherry Ave. When Saturday, Oct. 19 from 8:30am to 4:30pm More Info The museum will feature an exhibit of Father Junipero Serra and the California missions. Lunch will be available on the grounds. Cost is $25 for members $35 for non-members and includes admission. The bus will leave from behind City Hall at 8:30am. Call Ellen at (562) 597-5963. GETTING BACK TO WORK What Getting Back To Work 2013: Summit on Good Job Creation and Small Business in Long Beach Who 9th District Councilmember Steven Neal Where Long Beach Convention Center, 200 E. Seaside Way When Saturday, Oct. 19 from 9am to 4pm More Info The summit will feature a full day of activities to benefit job seekers, small-business owners and general observers. The summit will include a welcome by Mayor Bob Foster, a series of workshops for small businesses and job seekers, and a networking mixer. Call (562) 570-6137 or email district9@longbeach.gov

JOIN THE WALK What 3rd Annual Walk to End Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Who Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Association Where Rainbow Lagoon Park, Shoreline Drive in downtown Long Beach When Saturday, Oct. 19 at 9am More Info In addition to the 5K walk, Walk to End Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s will include entertainment, food, awards and a family festival. Onsite registration will open at 7:30am. Visit alz.org/socal .

DINNER AND A PARTY What Networking brunch Who Rossmoor/Los Alamitos Republican Women Federated Where Marriott Courtyard, 5865 Katella Ave. in Cypress When Saturday, Oct. 19 from 9:45am to noon More Info Steve Moeller will be the speaker, and guests will have an opportunity to network and socialize. Cost will be $20. Call (562) 857-3962.

MOMS COMING TOGETHER What Open house Who Moms Offering Moms Support (MOMS) Where Wardlow Park: 3457 Stanbridge Ave. When Saturday, Oct. 19 from 3:30pm to 5:30pm More Info Attendees and their families will have an opportunity to learn about the club. Event will include food and drinks, a costume parade and a craft table. Children are encouraged to wear a costume. MOMS is an international, nonprofit, non-denominational organization that is designed for the stay-at-home or part-time working mother of today.

WHO ARE YOU? What Monthly meeting Who Questing Heirs Genealogical Society Where Resurrection Lutheran Church Parish Hall, 1900 E. Carson St. When Sunday, Oct. 20 at 1pm More Info The meeting will feature a talk by speaker Cele Moore, who will talk about DNA testing for genealogy. Visit qhgs.info or call (562) 598-3027.

JUST KIDDING What Kidical Mass Zombie Neighborhood Bike Ride Who Hosted by the Bixby Knolls Business Improvement Association (BKBIA) Where Georgieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Place, 3850 Atlantic Ave. When Sunday, Oct. 20 from 1pm to 3pm More Info Children and adults will bike for roughly four and a half miles, beginning and ending at Georgie's Place. Participants are encouraged to attend dressed as zombies. Face painting will be available for those who arrive early. Email krista@bixbyknollsinfo.com, visit bixbyknollsinfo.com/kidicalmass.html or call (562) 595-0081.

CELEBRATING 105 SEASONS What Long Beach Municipal Band fundraising campaign Who Partners of Parks Where Bliss Restaurant, 525 E. Broadway When Sunday, Oct. 20 from 5pm to 8pm More Info Larry Curtis will lead the Municipal Band as they play live during the event, which offers hors dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;oeuvres, a no-host bar and a silent auction. Tickets cost $65. Call (562) 570-3209 or email jtourn@partnersofparks.org .


ST3510 - october 18_Layout 1 10/18/13 9:55 AM Page 4

4 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Council

60 percent of the funds needed and they plan to finish construction of the continued from page 1 mosque within a year. Letters submitted to the City by ning Commission unanimously approved the proposed site plan and LBIC indicate that about $200,000 is design review in a 5-0 vote and recom- needed to complete the project. The letmended the Council approve the new ters also state that LBIC’s Board of CUP. There was no spoken opposition Directors previously relied primarily on volunteers to manage the project and during public comment. This time, however, LBIC is organize fundraisers, leading to “irregrequired to complete the project within ular donation periods and frequent 540 days under a new city ordinance changes in project managers.” Howpassed this year that sets time limits for ever, a professional event planner is construction projects, said Scott Char- expected to schedule fundraisers on a ney, Signal Hill director of community regular basis. The next fundraisers are scheduled for Dec. 7 and in March and development. He said the City’s ordinance doesn’t June of next year. Tarek Mohamed, chairman of the have specific provisions for partially constructed projects, but LBIC has Islamic center’s board and the group’s demonstrated to staff and the Planning worship leader, or imam, expressed Commission a “viable strategy to move appreciation to the Council for reconforward” by hiring both a project man- sidering the building permits. He also ager and an event planner, responsible confirmed that the organization plans to for raising funds for the project’s com- finish construction before the City’s pletion. Charney said officials for LBIC required deadline. “Thank you for giving me the indicated they have already raised about opportunity to again apply and continue our project,” Mohamed said. “We are a nonprofit organization… We work according to the amount of money, but right now we have over 60 percent. We have a financial plan to get the money very, very soon… Our community is very excited to have the approval.” The mosque, proposed on a 13,000Sean Belk/Signal Tribune square-foot parcel of Signal Hill Mayor Michael Noll, far right, shakes hands land at 995 27th St. with Jonathan Arakaki, a new maintenance worker for that has 18 off-street the City’s public works department, during the Oct. 15 parking spaces, is meeting of the City Council. Also in attendance is Public Works Director Steve Myrter, center.

NEWS

planned to include an office, conference room, assembly room, washrooms and restrooms, according to staff reports. The building’s southern entry is expected to include an arcade with three arches supported by four columns finished in stucco. Currently, an exterior frame of the building has been erected, and a dome sits on the ground. According to a Signal Tribune article published in 2007, a neighboring property owner had once expressed concerns about “audible calls to prayer, or Adhan,” referring to an Islamic tradition in which there are prayers five times a day. Mohamed assured the Council, however, that all Adhans would be indoors. Morning prayer sessions would be from 6am to 6:30am and an evening prayer session would be from 7pm to 7:30pm. The property is expected to be open from noon to 4pm for general office hours and public visitations on weekdays and open on Saturdays for special lectures. Long Beach Islamic Center, which was established in 2004 and currently operates out of a temporary mosque at 1525 Long Beach Blvd., is responsible for $12,798 in development impact fees. Since the building in Signal Hill is a religious facility, it is exempt from general property taxes.

Other Council highlights: Presentations and introductions Mayor Michael Noll and Signal Hill Public Works Deputy Director Rick Olson introduced Jonathan Arakaki, a new maintenance worker for the public works department, who is a native of the Hawaiian island of Kauai. Noll also presented a proclamation to Dr. George M. Jayatilaka to recognize his work with the Accountable Health Care Independent Physician Association.

OPINION

houghts from the Publisher T by Neena Strichart

Although the lyrics of Billy Joel’s song “I Go to Extremes” are a bit dark and apologetic, I certainly relate to the title of the ditty. My life is full of extremes. One day I may be taking out the trash while wearing my bathrobe, while the next I am dressed in all my finery going to a theatre premiere. I could find myself seated in my car eating Taco Bell offerings for lunch on one occasion and then later that day be out enjoying dinner at a deluxe restaurant. Steve and I love our crazy lives of extremes. One of our favorite examples took place during a trip we made to Las Vegas nearly 20 years ago. We were only going to be able to stay for one night, so I planned ahead and made reservations for us for a Saturday night at the then very prestigious Mirage Hotel. As a special birthday treat, I had even made arrangements for us to see the Sigfried and Roy stage show for the same night. Several days before we were to head to “Sin City,” I was informed that I could have an extra day off from work and would be able to head out for our trip a day early. Quickly calling the hotel and attempting to reserve our room for two nights instead of just one was met with disappointment. There were no rooms available for that particular night at the Mirage. I then scrambled trying to find a room, any room. I eventually settled on the local Motel 6. Back then, the Motel 6 was a bare-bones type of establishment. One paid extra for television, and all outgoing calls were made from the pay phone in the lobby. So, the first night of our trip we pretty much participated in my version of camping– a hotel stay without

Mea culpa

In the Oct. 11, 2013 article “Affordable-housing advocates push for citywide policies in LB planning document” the name of the Long Beach resident featured in the documentary film by Housing Long Beach should have been spelled Mary Zendejas. PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Neena R. Strichart

w w w. s i g na ltr i b un e . c om

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Daniel Adams Vicki Paris Goodman Gregory Spooner

Police-officer position The Council unanimously authorized the city manager to accept $125,000 in federal grant funding through the 2013 Community Oriented Policing (COPS) Hiring Program to pay for one policeCourtesy City of SH officer position. The grant An elevation shows what the proposed 2,025 square-foot requires the City mosque at 995 27th St. in Signal Hill would look like upon match $187,735 completion of construction by the Long Beach Islamic Center. in asset-forfeiture funds, according to a staff until four years from the approval. report. Years two and three of the grant will be appropriated during the The next Signal Hill Council meeting normal budget process. There is no will be in the Council Chamber on financial impact to the General Fund Tuesday, Nov. 5 at 7pm.

To r e a d p r e v i o u s i ss u e s o f t h e S i g n a l Tr i b u n e , v i s i t

MANAGING EDITOR

Cory Bilicko

DESIGN EDITOR/PRODUCTION MANAGER

Leighanna Nierle

ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS

STAFF WRITERS

CULTURE WRITERS

Dr. George M. Jayatilaka, far left, is presented with a proclamation by Mayor Michael Noll, far right, to recognize the doctor’s work with the Accountable Health Care Independent Physician Association. Also in attendance is Dr. Drew Jayatilaka, center.

a refrigerator or terrycloth robes, while drinking soda from cans we bought near the laundry room. Night two, we stayed in a beautiful suite on the famous Las Vegas strip sipping champagne and admiring the view. The past few days have indeed been an exercise in extremes. Saturday evening Mom and I had the honor of attending the VIP grand opening of Signal Hill’s new Applebee’s Restaurant. As the event’s title promised, it certainly was fit for VIPs. The food was lovely, and the service was superb. We are so lucky to have such a stellar establishment invest in our little city. On Sunday, I attended the monthly meeting of my Daughters of the American Revolution chapter, Susan B. Anthony. Those in attendance were treated to a program given by a woman who explained the history of the apron. Later that evening, I spent two hours in a tattooist’s chair getting part two of my new tattoo (parts three and four are yet to come). Monday evening’s festivities, not to be outdone by Sunday’s apron program (although it most certainly did), included an over-the-top experience of dining at Forbidden City restaurant in Long Beach with dozens of people representing China, including Bu Xiaolin, the Vice-Chairman of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. Also attending were film-development people from Los Angeles who were there promoting their newest project, a movie depicting the life of Genghis Khan. (I will share more about the experience with you in my column next week). Tuesday evening I went to a rather non-eventful, although informative meeting of the Signal Hill City Council. In my opinion, it was a welcome rest after the events of the previous night. Wednesday night was spent visiting and dining with Mom at Bixby Knolls Towers, and yesterday I enjoyed the 3rd annual We Can Do It! Luncheon & Awards sponsored by the Long Beach Rosie the Riveter Foundation. There I had the opportunity to rub elbows with honorees such as Martha Thuente, Doris Topsy-Elvord, Mary Lynn Sophiea and Elinor Otto. Keep in mind that I am not complaining or bragging about my busy and extremely diverse schedule but merely sharing with you, my gentle readers, of what I consider to be anything but a boring life. I am truly blessed! How was your week?

Stephen M. Strichart

CJ Dablo Sean Belk

OCTOBER 18, 2013

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/WEBSITE MANAGER

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Barbie Ellisen Ashley Goodsell COLUMNISTS

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The Signal Tribune welcomes letters to the editor, which should be signed, dated and include a phone number to verify authenticity. Letters are due by noon on the Tuesday before desired publication date. The Signal Tribune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The Signal Tribune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications or otherwise presented in a public forum. Letters to the editor and commentaries are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the Signal Tribune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, letters to the editor and commentaries are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. Letter-writers will be identified by their professional titles or affiliations when, and only when, the editorial staff deems it relevant and/or to provide context to the letter. We do not run letters to the editor submitted by individuals who have declared their candidacies for public office in upcoming races. This policy was put in place because, to be fair, if we publish one, we would have to publish all letters submitted by all candidates. The volume would no doubt eliminate space for letters submitted by other readers. Instead, we agree to interview candidates and print stories about political races in an objective manner and offer very reasonable advertising rates for those candidates who wish to purchase ads. The Signal Tribune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $50.

939 E. 27th St., Signal Hill, CA 90755 (562) 595-7900 www.signaltribune.com newspaper@signaltribune.com


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NEWS

Federal government ends 16-day shutdown with 11th-hour deal

After a negotiation led by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) to put an end to a 16-day political standoff that suspended federal programs, President Barack Obama signed a Congressapproved deal on Oct. 16 that ended the shutdown. Congressmember Alan Lowenthal (Dâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Long Beach) voted â&#x20AC;&#x153;yeaâ&#x20AC;? on the Reid-McConnell bill to re-open the government and temporarily raise the debt ceiling. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am glad that this irresponsible shutdown has ended, and the full faith and credit of our country remains, for the moment, intact,â&#x20AC;? Lowenthal said in a press release emailed on Wednesday night. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tonightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vote proved that even after all other possibilities were exhausted, the majority of Congress did the right thing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I cannot say that I am proud of some of my colleagues for

allowing this to go until the 11th hour, but I can say that I am undoubtedly relieved. This shutdown, which could have been avoided, cost the U.S. $24 billion. My hope is that cool heads will prevail from here on out so as to ensure this folly does not happen again, especially as we renew efforts to reverse the across-the-board sequestration cuts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Reid-McConnell bill was a clear sign of bipartisan leadership from our friends in the Senate, and I commend Speaker Boehner for allowing the House to vote on it. Now, those 800,000 furloughed government employeesâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; including over 30,000 in Southern Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; can come back to work with the peace of mind that they will be able to pay their bills, put food on the table, and get back to work for the American people.â&#x20AC;? Source: Alan Lowenthalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office

After agreement, Long Beach becomes largest city in CalPERS to achieve full pension reform

The City of Long Beach announced on Oct. 14 that agreements had been made that day with the last four remaining bargaining units in the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; engineers, lifeguards, confidential and management. With these final agreements, Long Beach has achieved full pension reform, with all City employees paying their full share of pension costs, making Long Beach the largest California Public Employeesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Retirement System (CalPERS) city to achieve this milestone, according to a press release issued by the City. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What some believed was not possible has now been accomplished for Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest CalPERS city,â&#x20AC;? said Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Long Beach has achieved full pension reform with lower and more sustainable benefits for new employees and full employee participation for all employees.â&#x20AC;? The agreements use the same methodology as the previous agreements with the Police, Fire and International Association of Machinists (IAM) associations to achieve pension reform. The agreements will result in existing employees paying the full 8 percent (9 percent for safety) of salary towards their pension costs. Additionally, it will provide the equivalent salary increase

The California Nurses Association have endorsed Patrick Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnell in his campaign to represent the 70th District in the State Assembly, according to Brian Mineghino, Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaign manager. â&#x20AC;˘ State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson, LBUSD Superintendent Chris Steinhauser and Long Beach Unified Board Members Diana Craighead, Jon Meyer, Mary Stanton and Felton Williams have endorsed James Johnson for Long Beach City Attorney, according to an emailed announcement from Johnson. â&#x20AC;˘ First District Long Beach City Council candidate Lena Gonzalez announced on Oct. 10 that she has received the endorsements of the

of 1.3 percent per year when averaged from FY 09 to FY 15, less than the average 2.1 percent inflation rate since FY 09, according to the press release. The Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s engineers, lifeguards, confidential and management groups have not been awarded any salary increase for five years, a first in the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history (with the sole exception of 3 percent for confidential in 2009). During the challenging years from FY 09 to FY 13, these four groups saved an estimated $6 million in the General Fund and $26 million in all funds by forgoing increases. The agreements will also help with issues of compression and inequity by replicating the same agreements offered to other employee organizations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Long Beach has become a smaller, more nimble organization, reducing management in city manager departments by 28 percent and eliminating 786 total positions since 2007,â&#x20AC;? Foster said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But we needed to address an issue of inequality in the City organization and compensate our remaining employees fairly. We ask a tremendous amount of these employees and will continue to do so as we trust them with the management of the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s improving finances. Without these agreements,

The Campaign Trail

International Longshore & Warehouse Union Locals 13, 63 and 94. â&#x20AC;˘ James K. Lewis, Stephen C. Bello and Lionel Gatley have all entered the race for the 3rd District Long Beach council seat, according to the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Potential Candidate Primary Nominating Election webpage. â&#x20AC;˘ Joan Greenwood has entered the race for the 7th District Council seat, according to the City of Long Beachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Potential Candidate Primary Nominating Election webpage. â&#x20AC;˘ International Longshore & Warehouse Union Locals 13, 63 and 94 have endorsed Roberto Uranga to represent Long Beachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 7th District on the City Council, according to an email from

LB City Council approves speed-limit changes The following are areas where speed-limit changes have been approved by the Long Beach City Council, according to an email from 5th District Councilmember Gerrie Schipske:

Stearns Avenue Redondo Avenue to Clark Avenueâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 30 mph Clark Avenue to Marwick Avenueâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 30 mph Palo Verde Avenue to Studebaker Roadâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 35 mph

Termino Avenue Seventh Street to Anaheim Streetâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 25 mph Anaheim Street to Hathaway Avenueâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 25 mph

Conant Street Lakewood Boulevard to Clark Avenueâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 30 mph Heinemann Avenue to Lakewood Boulevardâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 35 mph

Lakewood Boulevard North city limits to Carson Streetâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 40 mph Carson Street to a point 710 feet south of Conant Streetâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 45 mph A point 710 feet north of Willow Streetâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 45 mph A point 560 feet north of Willow Street to Los Alamitos traffic circleâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 40 mph

Cover Street Westreet city limit to Lakewood Boulevardâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 30 mph

Worsham Avenue Carson Street to Conant Streetâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; 30 mph

Long Beach may just become a training ground for other citiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; a city that cannot attract or retain talent yet grows talent for other cities. If that happens, this will not be the city we all want it to be.â&#x20AC;? Due to Long Beachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s improved financial position and the strengthening economy, the cost of the agreements will be addressed through anticipated stronger-than-budgeted revenues, according to city officials. It is expected that the City will maintain the $3.5-million surplus projected in FY 14 with these agreements. Together with previous pension reform agreed to by these four groups and pension reform achieved with police, fire, IAM and other bargaining units, the City expects full pension reform to save a minimum of $250-million for all funds, including more than $130 million in the General Fund, from FY 14 to FY 24, according to the press release. These units represent approximately 800 positions, or 14 percent of the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s workforce. The agreements will be brought to the City Council in open session on Oct. 22 for consideration. Source: City of LB

Sergio Carrillo of Carrillo Strategies campaign-consulting firm. â&#x20AC;˘ Ninth District Long Beach Council candidate Rex Richardson will host a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Young Professionals and Progressives for Rex Richardson Mixerâ&#x20AC;? on Wednesday, Oct. 23 from 6:30pm to 8:30pm at Hotel Maya, 700 Queensway Dr. â&#x20AC;˘ Marshall Blesofsky has announced his candidacy for the Long Beach City College Board of Trustees to represent District 1, according to an emailed statement by the candidate.

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Metro Briefs

GATEWAY CITIES

More Mobile Fly through tra;c with the help of Metroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s free mobile app. With bus and rail routes, schedules and real-time arrival information, the app puts all the resources you need to go Metro in the palm of your hand. Download the app for iPhone at the Apple App Store and for Android at Google Play.

Upgrades Coming to Metro Blue Line Metro is committing more than $190 million over the next two years to rehabilitate and modernize the nearly 25-year-old Metro Blue Line, one of the most heavily-used light rail systems in the nation. In addition, Metro is considering the purchase of 69 new rail cars for the line at a cost of $262 million.

Metro Co-Sponsors Economic Summit Learn about Metro employment and contracting opportunities at the Crenshaw/LAX Business Opportunities Summit, October 28 from 9am to 3pm at the California African American Museum. The Los Angeles Sentinel and Crenshaw Leadership Council are co-sponsors of the event. Register at metro.net/deod.

Help Metro Prevent Suicides Metro asks for the publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s help in preventing suicides on the tracks. Metro has partnered with the Didi Hirsch Suicide Prevention Center to post information on a 24-hour suicide crisis line in all rail stations. If you know or see anyone who may be at risk, please contact the crisis line at 877.727.4747.

Metro Launches Freeway Beauti>cation Program Cleaner and greener freeways are in LAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future. Metroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Freeway Beauti>cation Program will improve landscaping at several key freeway intersections, planting more than 150,000 drought resistant plants and installing some 24,000 feet of irrigation pipe and 900 sprinklers. More about Metro freeway projects at metro.net.

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14-0601ps_gat-ne-14-004 Š2013 lacmta

OCTOBER 18, 2013


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6 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

BUSINESS

Applebee’s opens with family, sports fanfare in Signal Hill Sean Belk Staff Writer

With a scenic view of the coastline, a family-friendly atmosphere and more than a dozen TV screens for watching sports, a new Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill & Bar at 899 E. Spring St. in Signal Hill officially opened for business on Monday, Oct. 14. Local residents and city officials got a chance to sample menu items and drinks last Saturday for lunch and dinner as part of a “training exercise” for the restaurant’s staff of 150 employees. Some diners said they were elated to see a new sit-down restaurant in the local area. Amanda Guevara of Long Beach said she normally has to drive to Cerritos, downtown Long Beach or Lakewood to find a restaurant. After having dinner with friends at the Signal Hill restaurant, said the food was “good” and the she Photos by Sean Belk/Signal Tribune eatery had “great service,” adding that it A server takes an order during a special preview-dinner event last Saturday, Oct. was her first time trying an Applebee’s. 12 at the new Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill & Bar in Signal Hill.

“A Gourmet Gifting & Baking Company”

OCTOBER 18, 2013

Joseph Abraham, the restaurant’s general manager, said hundreds of people came through the doors during the preview event and that the response was positive. “Everybody loved the food,” he said. “They loved the ambience. They loved Signal Hill Mayor Michael Noll attends the preview-dinner the service. So, event last Saturday, Oct. 12 at the new Applebee’s Neighborwe’ve had some hood Grill & Bar in Signal Hill. The mayor had dinner in front great responses, of a wall mural dedicated to the City of Signal Hill. and we’re very have 15 TV monitors that people can proud of it.” The restaurant, located amongst nod- watch sports, and we think we’ll be very ding oil pumps in the Signal Hill Gate- successful as a neighborhood restaurant.” Damasio Alvarez, director of operaway Center, is now one of 442 locations in the country that are operated by Apple tions for Apple American Group, said the American Group, the largest Applebee’s restaurant plans to stay involved in the franchise, which, according to company community, whether it’s through supofficials, is looking to expand its pres- porting sports, city or school programs. He said the company offers a Flapjack ence in the Los Angeles County area. Abraham said he expects the family- Fundraiser in which 50 percent of ticket style restaurant to fit right into the com- sales for breakfast on Saturdays and Sundays are donated to a specific local charmunity. “It’s a place where people will come ity or organization. “Instead of having a to naturally,” he said. “We have the right car-wash event, you’re able to invite environment. We have happy hour. We see APPLEBEE’S page 19

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NEWS

OCTOBER 18, 2013

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Governor signs LB-sponsored bill that grants cities power to sell RDA properties at ‘fair-reuse’ value Sean Belk Staff Writer

The State enacted a bill sponsored by the City of Long Beach that gives some power back to local governments on how former redevelopment properties can be sold. On Oct. 8, Gov. Jerry Brown signed SB 470, authored by Sen. Roderick Wright (D-Inglewood) and Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal (D-Long Beach), that grants cities and counties the authority to place certain conditions on former redevelopment parcels and establish what’s called “fair-reuse” value. This essentially allows local governments to sell the properties at a price that is less than fair-market value in order for cities and counties to require conditions set forth by former redevelopment agencies (RDAs) while allowing buyers to reap the same returns on investments if properties were sold at “best and highest use,” said Mike Conway, Long Beach’s business and property development director, in a phone interview. Redevelopment once used property-tax increment money mainly to fix up blighted areas and spur economic development. But a decision by the State Legislature in 2011 to abolish redevelopment to fill a budget gap ordered RDAs

to wind down operations, stripping local governments of powers that redevelopment once provided. Long Beach Deputy City Manager Tom Modica said current state law makes the redevelopment property dissolution process “cumbersome” and the new bill gives cities more “flexibility” to place conditions on the properties at the benefit of the community. “For example, you can say we want to sell this property for retail use, but we don’t want to sell it for a liquor store,” he said. “The proposals that come in can only [fit] the conditions that you have placed on the property.” An analysis of the bill by Sen. Wright’s office, states that giving cities and counties the power to sell land based at fair-reuse value enables local governments to “negotiate for the use that best fits the community,” unlike fair-market value, which bases property value on market conditions without any pressures put on a developer or the seller. The analysis adds that reinstating this power to local governments would have “no fiscal impact on the State, school district or other taxing entities,” since it would only be used for land owned by cities or counties without using any property-tax increment.

7

Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

This 16,000-square-foot vacant lot at 1827 Pacific Ave. is one of 259 properties once owned by the former Long Beach Redevelopment Agency that are now required to be disposed of in accordance with the State’s redevelopment-dissolution process. The property was purchased in 2009 for $1.6 million, however the estimated current value is yet to be determined.

LBPD arrests second suspect in Oct. 7 murder of 23-year-old see RDA page 17

A second arrest has been made in the Oct. 7, 2013 murder of 23year-old Jesus Escapite Jr. of Long Beach, and charges have been filed, according to a press release issued by the Long Beach Police Department (LBPD). Homicide detectives, continuing with the investigation, arrested 20-year-old Jesse Rodriguez of Long Beach, in the area of Hardwick Street and Rose Avenue in Long Beach, on Oct. 9. The case was presented to the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office on Oct. 11, and one count of murder was filed against both Jesse Rodriguez and Gustavo Alejandre, who had been previously arrested for the murder.

The incident was determined to be gang-related, and both Rodriguez and Alejandre are documented gang members, who, at press time, continue to be held on $2-million bail. Their next scheduled court appearance is set for Oct. 31. The original incident was reported on Monday, Oct. 7, at approximately 3:05pm. Officers responded to the area of Long Beach Boulevard and Plymouth Street regarding a “shots fired” call. When they arrived, they located a male adult who had sustained a gunshot wound to the upper torso. Long Beach Fire Department personnel transported the victim to a local hospital, where he was pronounced

deceased. The victim was identified as Escapite. The preliminary investigation led detectives to believe a blue four-door vehicle was possibly involved. The incident was investigated as gang-related and remained ongoing. Homicide detectives worked with North Division patrol officers to identify a suspect. Their investigation led them to 25-yearold Alejandre of Long Beach, who was arrested by North Division Directed Enforcement Officers shortly after the murder on an unrelated charge. On Tuesday evening, Oct. 8, officers booked Alejandre for the murder.

Gov. Jerry Brown signed AB 1217 by Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal (D-Long Beach) on Oct. 13, establishing landmark consumer protections in the home-care industry for vulnerable Californians, according to a press release issued by Lowenthal’s office. “This is about public safety, plain and simple,” said Lowenthal. “We place a lot of trust in these caregivers. AB 1217 ensures that they’ve earned that trust.” AB 1217 establishes a licensing program for home-care organizations and requires background checks, basic training, and tuberculosis screening for the aides that they employ. The bill also includes a registry run by the Department of Social Services that will allow consumers to verify that the caregiver working in their home has passed a background check. “Right now, I can check the license status of an air-conditioning repair person, but if I need to hire someone to help bathe a loved one, I’m at a loss,” Lowenthal said. “Consumers have the right to know if the person they let into their home is safe. Finally, state law will ensure that.” Under existing law, all agencies and individuals that provide skilled nursing services must be licensed, complete with training requirements and background checks. However, for entities and individuals that provide non-medical, in-home personal care services like grooming, meal preparation, bathing, and assistance with other basic living tasks, only the publicly funded services require caregivers to pass a background check or meet basic

training standards. In contrast, approximately 1,200 privately funded home-care organizations operate in California with nothing more than a business license, according to Lowenthal’s office. An unknown number of independent homecare aides provide services without any oversight or regulation, Lowenthal states. “As California’s population ages and home-care services are in even greater demand, it’s essential that we have the protections of AB 1217 in place,” said Gary Passmore, executive direc-

tor of the Congress of California Seniors. The bill was sponsored by the Congress of California Seniors and supported by a coalition of consumer-advocacy and publicsafety groups, including the Los Angeles District Attorney’s Office, California Commission on Aging, AARP and SEIU. Home-care organizations and aides will have until Jan. 1, 2015 to comply with the new licensing and background check requirements.

Home-Care Services Consumer Protection Act signed into law

Source: Bonnie Lowenthal’s office

Those with information regarding this incident are asked to contact Long Beach Police Homicide Detectives Todd Johnson and Roger Zottneck at (562) 5707244. Those wishing to remain anonymous may call 1-800-222TIPS (8477), text TIPLA plus the tip to 274637 (CRIMES), or visit LACrimeStoppers.org .

Source: LBPD

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8 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

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continued from page 1

his business partner, Gao Yan. “Ge Jian from the Shi Qi Group, LTD. of Inner Mongolia and Gao Yan and I have been collaborating on the film for eight years,” Brausen said. “We have been to Inner Mongolia eight times, and Ge Jian has been here five times, all for the cause of working on the project Genghis Khan, the feature film. The celebration dinner was to commemorate the signing of the contract between the US and China to coproduce the film.” Brausen said that, in their eight trips to Inner Mongolia, he and Gao Yan have studied with more than 600 scholars, historians and professors on the life of Genghis Khan, and he has rather

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high expectations for the success of the film. “[Considering] the size of China and the US, Genghis Khan could very well be the biggest-grossing film in the history of the industry,” he said. Anthony Ditton, chief executive officer for Film Development Group, said this film will differ from others about Genghis Khan through its characterization of the Mongolian leader. “It will not be an exploitive movie about a man who was a murdering, rampaging bull,” Ditton said. “This was a man who had a heart, so when conquering a country, he would give the country back to its rulers and let them rule as they saw fit. He was an amazing humanitarian.” The only other media outlet invited was China Central Television. Two of the network’s members, Cathy Chen and Ben Ma, who are based in Los Angeles and produce news packages about west-coast US for broadcast in China, were in attendance Monday evening. The initial tone of the celebration was formal and reserved. Appearing on short notice, 13 of the 26 members of the Long Beach Junior Concert Band performed a welcoming fanfare for the visiting dignitary when her car arrived, and she quickly made her way into the

E

NEWS

restaurant. Former Long Beach Mayor Beverly O’Neill made an appearance at the beginning of the event, and she was introduced to Bu Xiaolin. The two spoke for several minutes through interpretor Sai Na. Soon thereafter, Brausen took to a microphone near the sushi bar and welcomed the crowd of about 65 people. Then Ge Jian from the Shi Qi Group, LTD. of Inner Mongolia addressed the group, extending appreciation and congratulations to all involved in the film deal. His address, which was being translated into English on the intercom, ended with, “Let the party begin,” and the mood soon changed to a more festive one. Platters and bowls of food were delivered to the various tables. The meal included Peking duck, a fish soup, a variety of sushi rolls, fried rice, Mongolian beef, a spicy tomato and cucumber salad, and about six other dishes. One special spirit that was served in tiny glasses, probably because of its 38-percent alcohol content, was a clear liquor from the Inner Mongolia Genghis Khan Brewery. Thanks to a live band in Hawaiian shirts performing classic hits, including

OCTOBER 18, 2013

some by The Beach Boys, Elvis Presley and Billy Idol, even Vice-Chairman Bu Xiaolin was persuaded to get up and join the group of party-goers who were dancing. Also in attendance was John Goya, a candidate for the 70th Assembly District. Goya, a frequent patron of Forbidden City, said he became acquainted with partners Michael Brausen and Gao Yan through his numerous visits to their restaurant. “I frequented the place often with clients and attended many political functions there,” Goya said. “After meeting Michael and Gao Yan, I quickly realized that these two are not just good business people but are also community activists. They are involved with bringing enterprise to Southern California and The Oct. 19 dinner celebration at Long Beach work to provide a good quality restaurant Forbidden City included 65 guests, of life for our local residents.” according to the establishment’s owner, Part of that enterprise-build- Michael Brausen. ing is in keeping the film indusBeach by having the signing of this try in this region, Goya said. “We must stop the exodus of film- movie deal at Forbidden City. They, makers leaving California to produce with others, enticed the Chinese govfilms in Canada and on the east coast,” ernment to bring a $100-million film to Goya said. “Michael and Gao Yan may California. This is an historical event have just ‘turned the tide’ for Long for us all.” ß

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Historical Downtown Garden Grove

Photos by Cory Bilicko/Signal Tribune

On short notice, about half the members of the Long Beach Junior Concert Band were able to show up and welcome Vice-Chairman of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region Bu Xiaolin during her visit to Forbidden City restaurant in Long Beach on Oct. 14.

BIG

12911 Main Street

BIG

Crooner’s Lounge open until 2am!

Investors from China and representatives from Beverly Hills-based Film Development Group gather during a dinner on Oct. 19 to celebrate a movie deal for a feature about Genghis Khan. Pictured, from left, are: Ar Lar Tan from Inner Mongolia; Yang Yang from Inner Mongolia; two unidentified representatives from Film Development Group (FDG); Ge Jian from the Shi Qi Group, LTD, of Inner Mongolia; Aziz Alaoui, chief operating officer at FDG; an unidentified FDG representative; and Lun Tung Fong, president of overseas operations at FDG.

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OCTOBER 18, 2013

CULTURE

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Several local homes to be open to public during Cal Heights tour

9

John Royce

CHNA President

The California Heights Home and Garden Tours have become a local tradition. Sunday’s tour marks the 14th edition since they began in 1997, established to fund ambitious neighborhood improvement projects and demonstrate both the financial and intrinsic value that maintaining the neighborhood’s historic fabric and sense of place offers. The tours and the ongoing projects they fund earned California Heights the Neighborhoods, USA First Place and Grand Prize finish as 2012 Neighborhood of the Year. California Heights Neighborhood Association board members, volunteers and generous homeowners are busy putting the final pieces in order. This year’s tour represents the homes that have become synonymous with Cal Heights. Despite the fact that several types of homes populate the historic district– charming craftsman, Tudor and other period revival bungalows, storybook and neo-traditional cottages– it’s the Spanish Colonial Revival bungalows that readily come to mind when one mentions Cal Heights. No less than five beautiful examples shine for Sunday’s tour. While not typically grand in size, the warm, sculptured stucco lines, painted wood and picture windows and red clay tile roofs so popular in the 1920s ooze character and remain sought-after by many Southern California homebuyers. With so much character, owners often can’t resist the temptation for dramatic landscaping– a good thing, since the style lends itself so well to fanciful tropical and drought-tolerant schemes alike. A 1937 Mission Revival bungalow makes its second appearance on the Cal Heights tour. A close relative of its Spanish Colonial cousin, the current owner has brought the kitchen back to its original roots with periodcorrect touches and materials, including real linoleum flooring and a fully restored O’Keefe & Merritt stove. A stunningly remodeled bath, beautiful original French doors and other period details preserve this home’s original splendor. Sure to puzzle some tour guests, a unique 1954 Mid-Century California Ranch actually tells a tale of how the neighborhood was built out west-toeast over time, the oldest homes between Atlantic and Walnut avenues, and generally newer homes, many built during and after WWII, to the east between Walnut and Cherry avenues. A few vacant lots even remained into the 1950s, allowing for the occasional eclectic juxtaposition. But this home’s trim lines and lowpitch roof still fit in well with the scale of the neighborhood’s original fabric. Also telling of the west-to-east development pattern is the absence of the vintage lampposts that the tour’s proceeds have been so successful in helping to restore. Since much of the development on the east side occurred during the war years, metal was in short supply, dedicated to the manufacture of military might. As a result,

Mission Revival-style home

Mid-Century Modern California ranch-style home

the sculptured metal lampposts that tion will begin at 10am; homes and characterize the older streets were gardens will be open from 11am to never installed east of Walnut. 4pm. Twenty-dollar pre-sale tickets The loving attention lavished on are available online through Oct. 18, these homes and gardens by their own- and $25 day-of tickets will be availers truly demonstrates the value of pride able at 3800 Olive Ave., from 9:30am of ownership, preservation and restoration. The extra attention bestowed upon them for the tour shows them off. Participating homeowners complete their honeydo lists, accented with lovely floral arrangements donated by Bixby Knolls Florist, pleasantly plumped pillows, well-made beds and perfectly displayed pieces for a charming and inviting home and garden tour experience! The tour will take place Sunday, Oct. 20 from 10am to 4pm. The guest-speaker presenta- Classic Spanish Colonial Revival-style home

to 1:30pm. For more information, visit calheights.org or facebook.com/calheights .

All illustrations by ellen Kirk

John Royce is the president of the California Heights Neighborhood Association (CHNA).

Cal Heights garden

Approved Watering Sched-

Watering is approved on the following days:

Monday, Thursday, and Saturday before 9:00 am and after 4:00 pm

For more information, call the Water Conservation Hotline: 562-989-7350


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CULTURE

10 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

OCTOBER 18, 2013

14 questions for local artist Bob Potier Imitating Life

Cory Bilicko

In 100 words or less, what do Managing Editor

you do as an artist? I paint on canvas using acrylics and often incorporate hand-dyed fabric pieces. The dye process is

similar to tie-dying, common in the 1960s. It’s a painstaking process, but dye gives incredibly beautiful textures and patterns that can’t be achieved with paint. I creatively combine the two, sometimes totally abstract and sometimes showing subject matter in subtle ways. What motivates you to create art? I create art mainly for the personal pleasure and sense of accomplishment it gives me. When I finish a painting, it’s usually a source of wonderment to me. The process is like a meditation.

Bob Potier

How has your practice changed over time? Time always brings changes in numerous areas such as production or change of medium. I’m not the type to develop a style and then stick with it forever. I just can’t do it.

Do you ever get artist’s block? If so, how do you combat it? Nope, I don’t recall ever having artist’s block. Maybe the answer is to take an aspirin and see your shrink the next morning.

What do you think your life would be like if, for some reason, you could no longer create art? If I could no longer produce art, I’d survive. I’d fill in the empty spaces with other interests. I’m reminded of that disco diva singing, “I will survive.” So would I.

What role does the artist have in society? The artist presents the world with messages– usually that of beauty and sometimes social commentary. Art can be part of a person’s re-generative process. Art balances a society. How do you feel when people ask you to explain the meaning of your art? Never in my memory has a person asked me to explain my art. Are my paintings self-explanatory or is the viewer either stunned or put in a state of grace? Hmm, guess I better ponder that!

Have you ever been banned or censored to any degree as an artist? If so, how did you react? If not, how do you think you would react in that situation? Back in the turbulent 1960s and 1970s, I was doing Pop Art with

“Red Dawn,” acrylic on canvas

the subject of social commentary. The paintings dealt with politics, sex, the flag, etc. I encountered publicity I wasn’t expecting and was too naive to use to my benefit. For example, I was juried into a show at the Laguna Beach Art Museum. The painting was in a hard-edge style and depicted an American flag coming out of a faucet. This enraged some people, who caused the painting to be moved to a less prominent location in the museum. I was singled out and asked to write an explanation of the painting which was posted next to the painting. And the Orlando Gallery in the Valley will probably never forget when they were anonymously told to take my painting out of their front window or a rock would be thrown through the window. All is calm now. My paintings no longer scare kids or horses.

Does your artistic life ever get lonely? If so, what do you do to counteract it? Lonely? No.

What do you hope to achieve with your art? I once hoped to achieve a huge remuneration from my art. I’ve grown up since then. Don’t all artists? I really only hope to achieve personal satisfaction.

What are one or two primary areas of fear for you as an artist? I have no fear as an artist. Since I no longer do social commentary, I don’t have to fear repercussions or dodge tomatoes thrown at me. And since I don’t rely on painting to earn my living, there’s no financial fear.

What are one or two factors that, when they’re in place, enable you to really flourish artistically? Artistically, I flourish more when there’s a special reason, such as a studio art tour.

What jobs have you had other than being an artist? Jobwise, my husband and myself own a small company (Studio Dynamics) that does hand-painted backdrops for portrait photographers. As a matter of fact, Studio Dynamics began in Signal Hill and is now in Paramount. I've also taught high-school art. While attending the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, I had one of my more memorable part-time jobs. I was a security guard at the Field Museum and spent many stress-filled hours preventing kids from tugging on a stuffed elephant’s tail. What’s your favorite color? St. Francis Hotel Faun. Yes, it really exists. We just painted our home that color.

“Ramble Tamble,” acrylic on canvas

“Up North,” acrylic on canvas

To see more of Potier’s work, visit robertpotiergallery.com .


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CULTURE

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Brass-rubbing center to return for its 27th year

OCTOBER 18, 2013

The Brass Rubbing Medieval Arts Center in Long Beach will open Wednesday, Oct. 23 and run through Saturday, Nov. 16, and is celebrating its 27th year. Tucked inside a make-shift castle at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 525 E 7th St., the center offers visitors the opportunity to use gold, silver and copper wax sticks that, when vigorously raked atop etched markers, release their metallic content onto paper to produce shiny images. The collection has been updated to accommodate 21st century tastes and touchstones– some fun, some solemn. New pieces delve into the lives of the Mayans and Celts or reflect Chinese symbols, Indonesian tapestries and Day of the Dead traditions. The center’s collection also includes a chain-mail vest, and, promised this year from the Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, a reproduction suit of armor to be named in memory of a long-time brass-rubbing volunteer. A broad sword will also be thrown into the mix. Docents are on hand to bring old tales to life. Cost for materials is $5 and up. During its run, the center will offer traditional English teas, complete with sweets and savories, to accompany group reservations. Public hours are Thursday to Saturday, 11am to 4pm, and groups, by reservation, can schedule sessions Wednesdays through Saturdays, from 9:30am to 3:30pm. Groups of eight or more can be accommodated on Sundays, from 1:30pm to 3:30pm. The email address for reservations and information is brass.rubbing.lb@gmail.com . Source: St. Luke’s

11

File photo

The Brass Rubbing Medieval Arts Center offers visitors the opportunity to use gold, silver and copper wax sticks that, when vigorously raked onto etched markers, release their metallic content onto paper to produce shiny images.

Beauty through the ages

Circa B.C.

Circa 1950s

Circa 2013

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COMMUNITY

12 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

City of LB co-hosting Disability Employment Awareness event

The community is invited to join the City of Long Beach and the Citizens’ Advisory Commission on Disabilities (CACoD) in a celebration recognizing October as Disability Employment Awareness Month. The celebration will be Friday, Oct. 25 from noon to 3pm at the Long Beach Convention Center, Promenade Ballroom. “Removing employment barriers will help improve the lives and livelihoods of many of our neighbors who want nothing more than to use their skills in the workplace,” Mayor Bob Foster said. “Everybody should have the right to be as self-sufficient as possible, which also contributes to the overall vitality of our community.” Numerous agencies that work with people with disabilities will be at the celebration, including: City of Long Beach Multi Service Center; Long Beach Public Library’s Information Center for People with Disabilities; Pacific Gateway Workforce Investment Network; Access Services; Braille Institute; Ability First; Californians for Disability Rights; ARC; Long Beach Transit; Pathpoint; and Disabled Resources Center. This year’s event will include blood pressure and glucose screenings. Free parking is available off Seaside Way, near South Pine Avenue. The City of Long Beach intends to provide reasonable accommodations in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. For more information or to request a special accommodation, call Kathy Bussi at (562) 570-6803. Source: City of LB

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& Detail Center

OCTOBER 18, 2013

Signal Hill Petroleum a finalist for Oil, Gas Award

Signal Hill Petroleum, Inc. (SHP) has been selected as a finalist for the 2013 West Coast Oil and Gas Award in the Corporate Social Responsibility Initiative category. According to the company, its entry outlined SHP’s ongoing philanthropic efforts, including the sponsorship of various recreational and educational programs, and it recently donated $250,000 to California State University Long Beach (CSULB) for the development of an environmental geochemistry laboratory. It has also invested more than halfa-million dollars and countless hours of volunteer and company time to supporting community organizations and events including schools, hospitals, chambers of commerce and nonprofit organizations, according to SHP. “We are committed to serving our community through investing in education, community programs and philanthropic initiatives with the cities of Long

Beach and Signal Hill,” said Dave Slater, chief operations officer and executive vice president of SHP. “We are proud to be a supporter of the university and investing in our community.” The Oil and Gas Awards recognizes the advancements made by upstream- and midstream-sector companies of the oil and gas industries in the areas of environmental stewardship, efficiency, innovation, corporate social responsibility and health and safety. Winners will be announced at the inaugural 2013 West Coast Oil & Gas Awards gala dinner in the Marriott Hotel Grand Ballroom in Bakersfield on Oct. 24. The complete list of finalists can be viewed at oilandgasawards.com . The judges, made up of a panel of 52 industry executives, reviewed more than 400 entries from 250 companies in 19 categories. Source: SHP

Largest SoCal sailboat show returning to Shoreline Village

Courtesy NMMA

The four-day Progressive Insurance Strictly Sail Long Beach boat show will feature dozens of sailboats of various shapes, sizes and price points.

The National Marine Manufacturers Association (NMMA) will present the largest sailing event in Southern California when the Progressive Insurance Strictly Sail Long Beach boat show returns to Shoreline Village in Rainbow Harbor, 401 Shoreline Village Dr. Thursday, Oct. 24 through Sunday, Oct. 27. The four-day event will feature dozens of sailboats of various shapes, sizes and price points, as well as new sailing accessories and gadgets and a series of educational seminars.

Admission to Strictly Sail Long Beach is $10 for adults; youth 15 and younger accompanied by an adult and active military with ID will be admitted free of charge. Tickets can be purchased in advance online at strictlysaillongbeach.com or at the box office (cash only). Show hours will be: Thursday and Friday, noon to 7pm; Saturday, 10am to 7pm; and Sunday, 10am to 6pm. For more information call (714) 633-7581 or visit nmma.org . Source: NMMA

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OCTOBER 18, 2013

COMMUNITY

SIGNAL TRIBUNE

13

30 local women under age of 30 honored by Lowenthal

Courtesy Bonnie Lowenthal’s office

Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal (D–Long Beach) hosted the third annual “30 under 30” recognition event on Oct. 9 at Keesal, Young & Logan law firm to honor 30 local women for accomplishments in business, the arts, volunteerism and sports. “In each of these young women we see what makes California great,” said Lowenthal, chair of the Legislative Women’s Caucus. “They’re our future leaders and innovators that will blaze new trails and build stronger communities for us all.” Each year, Lowenthal solicits nominations from community leaders, businesses and constituents from across the district. This year, several of the nominees were nominated by prior honorees. “It’s great to see this event grow and evolve,” Lowenthal said. “Not only is it a chance for us to recognize their accomplishments, it’s a chance for each of them to build networks that will shape their careers for years to come.” The 2013 honorees are: Tokotah Skye Ashcraft, Madaly Alcala, Amanda Barto Kilpatrick, Ana Bonilla, Alyson Bryant, Sophya Chum, Victoria Chung, Joanna Concepcion, Salina Crespin, Meghan Daniels, Amanda Em, Alexandria Escobar, Whitney Graves, Agatha Gucyski, Tiffany Howard, Ashley Jones, Allyson Joy, Alexandra Macias, Delia Martinez, Marissa Martinez, Jamie McLaughlin, Laura Merryfield, Alicia Morales, Teresa Orozco, Monica Samreth, Somatra Sean, Samantha Sears, Susana Sngiem, Alicia Virani, Thao Vo and Alexandra Weiss.

Assemblymember Bonnie Lowenthal honored 30 young women under the age of 30 on Oct 9 for their accomplishments in business, the arts, volunteerism and sports. Source: Bonnie Lowenthal’s office

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EYE ON CRIME Crimes reported by SHPD Citywide Thursday, Oct. 10 Forgery 2:39am– Obispo Ave./E. 17th St. Friday, Oct. 11 Violating parks/hours of overnight closure 1:20am– 3300 block Gundry Ave. Non-injury hit-and-run 12:18pm– 1700 block E. Willow St.

Saturday, Oct. 12 Disorderly conduct, under the influence 2:32am– 1800 block Gladys Ave. Non-injury hit-and-run 1:13pm– Orange Ave./E. Burnett St.

Residential burglary 3:30pm– 2100 block E. 21st St.

Sunday, Oct. 13 DUI 12:12am– Cherry Ave./E. 29th St.

Commercial burglary 1:09am– 2500 block Cherry Ave.

Recovered stolen vehicle 3:17pm– E. 33rd St./Cherry Ave.

Auto burglary 7pm– E. Hill St./Redondo Ave. DUI 7:17pm– E. Burnett St./California Ave.

Auto burglary 8pm– 900 block E. 33rd St.

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Monday, Oct. 14 Unauthorized use of ID to obtain credit/goods 7:45am– 2200 block Gaviota Ave.

Shop, compare and save on: Ê UÊ iÜÊEÊLÀœŽiÀ>}iiÊÃ>ˆLœ>ÌÃ Ê UÊ ->ˆˆ˜}Ê}i>À]ÊÀˆ}}ˆ˜}ÊEÊ>VViÃÜÀˆiÃ Ê UÊ …>ÀÌiÀÃ]]ÊÌÀ>ÛiÊ>˜˜`ÊÃiÀۈViÃ

Tuesday, Oct. 15 Possession of burglary tools 3:16am– Walnut Ave./E. Burnett St.

PLUS, a great line up of sailing education and entertainment, tainment, including free daily sailing seminars, paddleboarding and small boat sailing test rides and demos at Try Tr T It Cove, boat and motor DIY seminars at Fred’s Fred’s Shed, toy boat building for kids and MUCH more!

Injury hit-and-run 10:18am– E. 20th St./Cherry Ave.

Spousal abuse 12:55pm– 700 block E. Willow St.

Possession of substance similar to toluene 2:50pm– 1800 block Creston Ave. Wednesday, Oct. 16 Identity theft 11:22am– 2900 block Cherry Ave. Battery of cohabitant, date 8:45pm– 2300 block Lewis Ave.

Crimes reported by LBPD Council Districts 6, 7 & 8

Friday, Oct. 11 Garage/residential burglary 8:50am– 2100 block Magnolia Ave. Tuesday, Oct. 15 Battery 7pm– 1800 block Pine Ave.

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14 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

OCTOBER 18, 2013

the signal Hill Chamber of Commerce’s Monthly Membership Luncheon will be held Thursday, October 24, 2013, from 11:45am to 1:30pm at EDCO.  Doors open at 11:45am for networking, and the program starts at noon.  Enjoy a delicious lunch catered by Flame Broiler while mingling with other members of our business community, local officials, and legislative representatives.  non-members are welcome.  Cost is $25 per person but will be discounted to $15 for 2013-2014 dues-current members with advance non-refundable reservations made before noon on the day before the luncheon. Please make your reservations by e-mail to treasurer@signalHillChamber.com .

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Mats • Glass • Mirrors • Mounting • Prints • Posters for Sale • Museums & Conservation Framing • Graphics • Original Oils

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SIGNAL TRIBUNE

OCTOBER 18, 2013

Andazola’s Gallery, we salute you! Joe Andazola opened his gallery doors to the surrounding communities in 1975, initiating 37 successful years in the Long Beach and Signal Hill areas. Andazola’s gallery is a family-owned framing business focused on mat-cutting, speciality framing and shadow boxes. Andazola spent five years at his Long Beach location before moving to his current store, located on 28th Street in Signal Hill, where he has stayed for 33 years. He debuted the second shop in September of 1980 and has been comfortable there ever since. “i love what i do,” Andazola said. “it feels good to be in the business this long, and i never knew i would keep it this long; i don’t intend to retire for a while.” Andazola is also proud to mention that he offers a unique feature at his shop, known as conservation framing. Conservation framing is a technique that allows

Signal

37 yEArS OF BuSinESS

customers to bring in expensive photos, prints or paintings to frame, to preserve the appearance of the image, in efforts to prevent fading. in addition, Andazola’s gallery has done local work for recognizable places in the community such as: the Long Beach Convention and Visitors Bureau, Community Hospital of Long Beach, e ronald McDonald House, City of Signal Hill, Signal Hill Police Department and the Long Beach Chamber of Commerce. Andazola can sometimes be found working alongside his wife and two sons in the shop, making the family business tight-knit. ey say that it’s a great time to frame items for anksgiving and Christmas, and though they have customers out of the LA County area, they typically cater to those within a 10-mile radius. To learn more and preview gallery work, visit Andazola’s Gallery online: andazolasgallery.com .

1673 E. 28th St., Signal Hill (562) 427-3100

Chamber Spotlight Featuring long-time Signal Hill Chamber members— it could be you!

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(3) Fried fish tacos with cabbage slaw, cilantro aioli and spicy salsa $6

• Build-Your-Own Bruschetta Herbed toast points with goat cheese spread, roasted red bell pepper hummus and diced tomato and basil mix $7

• Asian Chicken Lettuce Wraps $8 • BBQ Pork Sliders (2) $6 • Kobe Beef Sliders Pretzel bread bun, pickled red onion, arugula, feta cheese, sriracha aioli $8

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16 SIGNAL TRIBUNE

TST4473 NoTICe oF TRUSTee'S SALe TS No. 120030652 Doc ID #0006110524322005N Title order No. 12-0055147 Investor/Insurer No. 137248089 APN No. 7217-025-001 YoU ARe IN DeFAULT UNDeR A DeeD oF TRUST, DATeD 05/19/2006. UNLeSS YoU TAKe ACTIoN To PRoTeCT YoUR PRoPeRTY, IT MAY Be SoLD AT A PUBLIC SALe. IF YoU NeeD AN exPLANATIoN oF THe NATURe oF THe PRoCeeDING AGAINST YoU, YoU SHoULD CoNTACT A LAwYeR. Notice is hereby given that ReCoNTRUST CoMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by ReGINA UGALDe, A SINGLe woMAN, dated 05/19/2006 and recorded 6/7/2006, as Instrument No. 061249550, in Book N/A, Page N/A, of official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 11/01/2013 at 11:00AM, By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2270 SARAH CoURT, SIGNAL HILL, CA, 907554048. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $866,882.31. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. NoTICe To PoTeNTIAL BIDDeRS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NoTICe To PRoPeRTY owNeR The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800-281-8219 or visit this Internet web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case TS No. 12-0030652. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone

PUBLIC NOTICES

information or on the Internet web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. DATeD: 07/18/2012 ReCoNTRUST CoMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI vALLeY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: - Trustee's Sale officer ReCoNTRUST CoMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. A-4418563 10/04/2013, 10/11/2013, 10/18/2013

TST4477 NoTICe oF TRUSTee'S SALe TS No. 120082164 Doc ID #0001619713752005N Title order No. 12-0146994 Investor/Insurer No. 1704156703 APN No. 7207-014-022 YoU ARe IN DeFAULT UNDeR A DeeD oF TRUST, DATeD 06/13/2007. UNLeSS YoU TAKe ACTIoN To PRoTeCT YoUR PRoPeRTY, IT MAY Be SoLD AT A PUBLIC SALe. IF YoU NeeD AN exPLANATIoN oF THe NATURe oF THe PRoCeeDING AGAINST YoU, YoU SHoULD CoNTACT A LAwYeR. Notice is hereby given that ReCoNTRUST CoMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by DAMoN NeLSoN, A SINGLe MAN, dated 06/13/2007 and recorded 6/20/2007, as Instrument No. 20071481881, in Book N/A, Page N/A, of official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 11/12/2013 at 11:00AM, By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2635 LIMe AveNUe # A, B, C and D, SIGNAL HILL, CA, 90755. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $393,634.25. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. NoTICe To PoTeNTIAL BIDDeRS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NoTICe To PRoPeRTY owNeR The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL TST4478 REQuEST FoR PRoPoSAlS

Notice is given that sealed proposals for “Custodial Maintenance of City Buildings” will be received at the office of the City Clerk, City of Signal Hill, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California 90755 until 10:00 A.M. on Tuesday, November 12, 2013. Proposal documents may be obtained at the office of the Director of Public works at the above address or mailed upon request by calling (562) 989-7351, Monday thru Thursday, 7:30 A.M. to 5:30 P.M. and Friday from 7:30 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. The RFP document will be made available on the City’s webpage at www.cityofsignalhill.org. Proposals will be evaluated on the basis of: the qualifications of the firm presenting proposal the bid price proposed overall proposal

A pre-bid mandatory job walk is required for all responsive bidders. The mandatory job walk will commence on wednesday, october 30, 2013 at 9:00am and will start at the Signal Hill Police Department facility located at 2745 walnut Avenue, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Please allow several hours for the walk-through and attendance is required from the start until the completion of the walk-through.

The City reserves the right to reject any and all proposals. The City is not obligated to award a contract. If awarded, the contract shall commence on or about January 26, 2014. ___/ss/________

Joshua Rosenbaum Management Analyst Public works Department

Published in the Signal Tribune: october 18, 2013 Posted at City Hall, City Library Discovery well Park and Reservoir Park: october 18, 2013

that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800-281-8219 or visit this Internet web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case TS No. 12-0082164. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. DATeD: 01/05/2013 ReCoNTRUST CoMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI vALLeY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: - Trustee's Sale officer ReCoNTRUST CoMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that A-FN4420867 10/18/2013, purpose. 10/25/2013, 11/01/2013

TST4471 APN: 7216-025-035 TS No: CA08000369-131  To No: 1446379  NoTICe oF TRUSTee'S SALe YoU ARe IN DeFAULT UNDeR A DeeD oF TRUST DATeD october 20, 2005. UNLeSS YoU TAKe ACTIoN To PRoTeCT YoUR PRoPeRTY, IT MAY Be SoLD AT A PUBLIC SALe.  IF YoU NeeD AN exPLANATIoN oF THe NATURe oF THe PRoCeeDINGS AGAINST YoU, YoU SHoULD CoNTACT A LAwYeR. on october 25, 2013 at 09:00 AM, Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA 91766, MTC FINANCIAL INC. dba TRUSTee CoRPS, as the duly Appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on october 31, 2005 as Instrument No. 05 2617105 of official records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by DevoN R. AUSTIN, AN UNMARRIeD woMAN, as Trustor(s), in favor of LeNDING CAPITAL, INC., A CALIFoRNIA CoRPoRATIoN as Beneficiary, wILL SeLL AT PUBLIC AUCTIoN To THe HIGHeST BIDDeR, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: AS MoRe FULLY DeSCRIBeD IN SAID DeeD oF TRUST  The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1865 STANLeY AveNUe UNIT #7, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said Note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee`s Sale is estimated to be $362,486.75 (estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the Trustee. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee`s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right.  The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Notice to Potential Bidders If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information.  If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same Lender may hold more than one mortgage or Deed of Trust on the property.  Notice to Property owner  The sale date shown on this Notice of Sale may be postponed one or more times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about Trustee Sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call Priority Posting and Publishing at 714-573-1965 for information regarding the Trustee's Sale or visit the Internet web site address on the previous page for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, CA0800036913-1. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale.  Date: September 23, 2013 TRUSTee CoRPS  TS No. CA08000369-13-1  17100 Gillette Ave, Irvine, CA 92614  949-2528300 Joseph Barragan, Authorized Signatory SALe INFoRMATIoN CAN Be oBTAINeD oN LINe AT www.priorityposting.com FoR AUToMATeD SALeS INFoRMATIoN PLeASe CALL: Priority Posting and Publishing at 714573-1965 TRUSTee CoRPS MAY Be ACTING AS A DeBT CoLLeCToR ATTeMPTING To CoLLeCT A DeBT.  ANY INFoRMATIoN oBTAINeD MAY Be USeD FoR THAT PURPoSe. P1061620 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2013

TST4472 NoTICe oF TRUSTee'S SALe TSG No.: 7301301706 TS No.: 2001-005906-F00 (THe FoLLowING ReFeReNCe To AN ATTACHeD SUMMARY IS APPLICABLe To THe NoTICe PRovIDeD To THe TRUSToR oNLY) NoTe: THeRe IS A SUMMARY oF THe INFoRMATIoN IN THIS DoCUMeNT ATTACHeD YoU ARe IN DeFAULT UNDeR A DeeD oF TRUST, DATeD July 27, 2009. UNLeSS YoU TAKe ACTIoN To PRoTeCT YoUR PRoPeRTY, IT MAY Be SoLD AT A PUBLIC SALe. IF YoU NeeD AN exPLANATIoN oF THe NATURe oF THe PRoCeeDING AGAINST YoU, YoU SHoULD CoNTACT A LAwYeR. on october 31, 2013, Sage Point Lender Services, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee wILL SeLL AT PUBLIC AUCTIoN To HIGHeST BIDDeR FoR CASH, CASHIeR'S CHeCK/CASH eQUIvALeNT drawn on a state or national bank, cashier's check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier's check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state, or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (Payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: AS MoRe FULLY DeSCRIBeD IN BeLow MeNTIoNeD DeeD oF TRUST executed by: DANIeL ANGULo, AN UNMARReD MAN Recorded on August 04, 2009, as Instrument No. 20091190766, of official Records, in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, California Date of Sale: october 31, 2013 at 09:00 AM Place of Sale: at the vineyard Ballroom of the Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2201 SAINT LoUIS AveNUe 104C, SIGNAL HILL, CA 90755 APN # 7215-017-021 The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Sale is $368,429.53. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to the return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NoTICe To PoTeNTIAL BIDDeRS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NoTICe To PRoPeRTY owNeR: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (800) 280-2832 or visit this Internet web site www.AUCTIoN.CoM, using the file number assigned to this case 2001-005906-F00. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: September 25, 2013 Sage Point Lender Services, LLC 400 exchange, Suite 110 Irvine, CA 92602 949-265-9940 Iuliia Calloway FoR TRUSTee'S SALe INFoRMATIoN PLeASe CALL (800) 280-2832 or visit www.AUCTIoN.CoM SAGe PoINT LeNDeR SeRvICeS, LLC MAY Be ACTING AS A DeBT CoLLeCToR ATTeMPTING To CoLLeCT A DeBT. ANY INFoRMATIoN oBTAINeD MAY Be USeD FoR THAT PURPoSe. A-4418346 10/04/2013, 10/11/2013, 10/18/2013 TST4467 / 2013 198745 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: HeART THe MoMeNT, 5308-B e. 2nd St., Long Beach, CA 90803. Registrant: JACoB'S MUSICAL CHIMeS, INC., 5308-B e. 2nd St., Long Beach, CA 90803. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Fern Solomon, President. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on June 1, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 20, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: September 27, & october 4, 11, 18, 2013.

OCTOBER 18, 2013

TST4468 / 2013 198747 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as: 1. FAMILIeS FoR BIBLe MeMoRY ASSoCIATIoN, 2. FBMA, 11722 209th St., Lakewood, CA 90715. Registrant: 1. eRIC RAINSFoR ARMSTRoNG, 2. DARLeNe RoSe ARMSTRoNG, 11722 209th St., Lakewood, CA 90715. This business is conducted by: a Married Couple. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: eric R. Armstrong. The registrant have not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 20, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: September 27, & october 4, 11, 18, 2013.

TST4470 / 2013 199255 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: SHoRTCAKeS, 1746 Grand Ave., Unit 4, Long Beach, CA 90804. Registrant: CYNTHIA SHoRT, 1746 Grand Ave., Unit 4, Long Beach, CA 90804. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Cynthia Short. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on September 23, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: october 4, 11, 18, 25, 2013.

TST4476 / 2013 211465 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: FISHeR'S CATCH, 1025 1/2 Raymond Ave., Long Beach, CA 90804. Registrant: FISHeR'S CATCH, LLC, 1025 1/2 Raymond Ave., Long Beach, CA 90804. This business is conducted by: a Limited Liability Company. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Ma Belle Ammie Fisher. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on September 28, 2013. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on october 9, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: october 11, 18, 25, & November 1, 2013.

TST4481 / 2013 206077 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: FoRTUN INCoMe TAx SeRvICe, 5720 e. Imperial Hwy. Unit 1, South Gate, CA 90280. Registrant: GISeLLA LUCIA FoRTUN, 5720 e. Imperial Hwy. Unit 1, South Gate, CA 90280. This business is conducted by: an Individual. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Gisella Lucia Fortun. The registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on october 2, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: october 18, 25, & November 1, 8, 2013.

TST4482 / 2013 215372 FICTITIouS BuSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 1. ALoHI vACATIoNS, 2. PICS 4 MY PARTY, 3. RMS weDDINGS, 4. RMS eveNTS, 5. ADvoCATeS IN ACTIoN, 6. oUR CoFFee CoRNeR, 2510 e. willow St., Unit 101, Signal Hill, CA 90755. Registrant: ALoHI eNTeRPRISeS, INCoRPoRATeD, 2510 e. willow St., Unit 101, Signal Hill, CA 90755. This business is conducted by: a Corporation. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Kelly M. James, Secretary. The registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. The registrant began using this fictitious business name on April 15, 2007. This statement was filed with the county clerk of Los Angeles County on october 15, 2013. NoTICe: This fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. A new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. The Signal Tribune: october 18, 25, & November 1, 8, 2013.

FoR RENT

Banquet Room available for parties or events at Bellflower-LB elks Lodge, 16426 Bellflower Blvd. Call Steve at (562) 9255750 for details.


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OCTOBER 18, 2013

Orizaba

continued from page 3

the victim’s daughter. Local reports surfaced this week that the incident may be over a custody battle, however this information has yet to be confirmed by prosecutors as a possible motive. Brown, who was charged with one count of murder with a special circumstance of lying in wait, has four convictions out of Los Angeles County, including residential burglary, robbery and possession of a controlled substance, according to the criminal complaint. The alleged convictions occurred between 1986 and 1998. Since the ordeal, the school, which teaches kindergarten through 6th grade

Orizaba Park, located at Spaulding Street and Orizaba Avenue, has undergone several renovations in recent years, and a new community center is currently under construction.

RDA

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Conway said SB 470 is intended to be an “economic-development tool” that will help cities after the loss of redevelopment by providing a mechanism to “underwrite development and increase jobs.” He said the bill allows the City, acting as the Successor Agency to the Long Beach RDA, to negotiate deals with developers for property uses that were agreed upon by the community through former project-area committees (PACs). “Fair-reuse value is where we would go out and solicit a particular use of a property, and that use would then drive the market value of the land,” Conway said. “What we intend to do is pursue the goals and objectives of each project area as to the types of use the community has supported for those properties.” Conway said the bill only applies to 161 of the 259 properties formerly owned by Long Beach RDA, outlined in the City’s long-range property-management plan that awaits State approval after the Oversight Board of the Successor Agency signed off on it Oct. 7. This plan provides a framework for how the former RDA properties will be disposed or utilized for future governmental use, development, sale or the fulfillment of an enforceable obligation. Upon the bill’s passage, the City of Long Beach issued a press release in which Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster called the measure “a huge win for the City of Long Beach and the State of California.” Earlier versions of the measure planned to restore the Polanco Redevelopment Act for local government brownfield remediation, but the City opted to drop this provision, as the issue was addressed in AB 440, which Gov.

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at 2935 E. Spaulding St., has been closed. Counselors are expected to be at the school on Monday. Family members of the victim and members of the community gathered at the park for a vigil the day after the incident, and a memorial with candles, flowers and messages to Taylor are set up on a table next to a playground. In June, city officials broke ground on a 3,000-square-foot community center at Orizaba Park that was paid for through a $2.2-million state grant. The facility, expected to provide space for after-school programs, community meetings and events, is expected to resemble a train depot on the former Pacific Electric Right of Way to reflect the history of the location. The new community center is the second phase of the park’s renovation. The former Long Beach Redevelopment Agency had invested $3.7 million to acquire four adjacent blighted industrial properties to add 1.1 acres

Courtesy LBPD

Steven Brown

Brown also approved, according to the press release. SB 470 was also supported by several cities in addition to the Gateway Council of Governments, the League of California Cities, the County of Los Angeles, the California Contract Cities, the Port of Long Beach and the Western Center on Law and Poverty. Though Signal Hill is in a unique situation in that most of its former redevelopment properties (totaling 24 acres) are environmentally distressed because of oil wells causing many of the properties to be valued at historically low prices or even negative value, Signal Hill City Manager Ken Farfsing said any effort to reinstate powers to local governments in the redevelopment dissolution process is positive. “I think the bill is very reasonable,” he said. “It will restore some of the tools we had to do economic development. I think that’s good to help cities and put them all on the same level. Any step to repair the damage of the dissolution of redevelopment can really help the

Put on an event they won’t forget!

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SIGNAL TRIBUNE

Courtesy Huntington Academy

Kellye Taylor

to the park. The expanded space, including turf areas, landscaping, basketball courts, a skate park, walking paths and picnic tables, was officially opened last year. O’Donnell said he is confident that the park is safe and he doesn’t want the violent act to cast negative light on the park or the community. “I’m proud of the work that the community has done to improve the park,” he said. “Just last week the Council voted to create a community garden in the park, [and] we are in the middle of building a community center here. We are investing in this neighborhood, its business. This is a tragic, isolated incident.” O’Donnell added that the area is one where there has been “a strong public-safety presence and community policing successes,” and he expects that trend to continue. As for the festival, the event will include educational and information booths from community departments and organizations, live music and performances from local groups. Children will be able to participate in face paint-

cities.” Some critics of the bill, however, say the measure doesn’t provide enough oversight to ensure the public is involved in the redevelopment-dissolution process. Dan Pressburg, a longtime north Long Beach community activist, expressed concerns about the bill in an opinion piece published on LBReport.com, stating that SB 470 “fails to provide the public with serious checks and balances over how City Hall will spend public money from selling to developers– at below-market prices– properties acquired with public funds that were supposed to eliminate blight in our neighborhoods.” He added, “Instead of returning to the areas the funds were supposed to help, the money can be spent virtually anywhere in Long Beach for virtually anything that a Council majority accepts.” Conway, however, said he disagrees with this assertion. “I don’t think the bill

17

Photos by Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

Students from Huntington Academy private elementary school have written messages in honor of their teacher Kellye Taylor, who was murdered at Orizaba Park on Friday, Oct. 11.

ing, a moon bounce and other games and crafts, while the Long Beach Police Officers Association (LBPOA) is expected to provide hot dogs. The festival, which takes place from 11am to 3pm, is being organized by Councilmember O’Donnell’s Huntington Academy private elementary school at 2935 E. office, the Long Spaulding St. has been closed since Kellye Taylor, a teacher Beach Parks, at the school, was murdered at Orizaba Park across the street. Recreation and Counselors are expected to be at the school on Monday. Marine Department, the LBPOA, Latinos in Action, Viva Panama, Eggleston Youth Center, Islands Best, United Cambodian Center, the Cambodian American Association, Khmer Girls in Action and the FREE ESTIMATE! Temple Baptist Church. ß Provides fine quality care! talks at all about proceeds,” he said. “I don’t see how someone can read the bill and interpret that as it somehow moves money from one project to another.” Conway added that each property acquisition requires a public hearing at City Hall with two-weeks notice in a local periodical, adding that the process will be “extremely transparent and open.” ß

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Moratorium

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staff and city officials time to assess its regulations and potential health hazards. Citing concerns that burning remains at high temperatures in furnaces so close to homes and schools

Photos by CJ Dablo/Signal Tribune

The Belmont Heights Funeral Center showcases a sample urn to house final remains. Cremation is a more affordable choice for many of the center’s clients, according to the center’s spokesman.

would create a health risk and environmental pollution, some Long Beach residents have been speaking out against the Belmont Heights Funeral Center, which had proposed to retrofit its facility with a crematorium. Located at 3501 E. 7th St., the center currently offers cremation services offsite in an Anaheim facility. The center doesn’t perform funeral services onsite, but it does offer viewing services, according to its general manager, Jonathon Polk. He said that bodies are not embalmed there, but they may be dressed at that location. In an interview Tuesday, Polk acknowledged that residents had concerns about the potential health hazards associated with crematorium furnaces, but he pointed over to a gas station across the street and another gas station a few doors down. He said that there aren’t any studies that show that emissions from the crematorium furnaces are any more harmful than the pollution from gas stations on either side of the center. He added that he lives upstairs in the center’s building with his 5-year-old daughter. “If it’s a big hazard to somebody’s health,” Polk asked, “do you think I would have her here?” A report cited by the City’s Development Department said that there are chronic health hazards associated with crematorium operations, and the Planning Commission voted last month to

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TST4479 ReSoLUTIoN oF INTeNT To APPRove oF AND CoNSeNT To THe ASSIGNMeNT oF THe oIL PIPeLINe FRANCHISe IN oRDINANCe No. 2006-08-1363 FRoM ARCo TeRMINAL SeRvICeS CoRPoRATIoN (ATSC) To TeSoRo SoCAL PIPeLINe CoMPANY LLC

NoTICe IS HeReBY GIveN that the City Council of the City of Signal Hill adopted Resolution No. 2013-10-6044 at their meeting of Tuesday, october 15, 2013. A summary of the resolution is as follows: A ReSoLUTIoN oF THe CITY CoUNCIL oF THe CITY oF SIGNAL HILL, CALIFoRNIA, DeCLARING ITS INTeNTIoN To APPRove oF ANC CoNSeNT To THe ASSIGNMeNT oF THe oIL PIPeLINe FRANCHISe IN oRDINANCe No. 2006-08-1363 FRoM ARCo TeRMINAL SeRvICeS CoRPoRATIoN To TeSoRo SoCAL PIPeLINe CoMPANY LLC

A copy of the full text of the resolution is available in the City Clerk’s office and on the City’s website www.cityofsignalhill.org.

NoTICe IS FURTHeR GIveN that the 19th day of November 2013, at the hour of 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chamber of City Hall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California 90755, is hereby fixed as the time and place at which all persons interested in or objecting to the proposed transfer of pipelines under said franchise to Tesoro SoCal Pipeline Company LLC may appear and be heard. Kathleen L. Pacheco City Clerk

Published in the Signal-Tribune newspaper on october 18, 2013. Posted at City Hall, Library, Discovery well Park, and Reservoir Park on october 18, 2013.

NEWS

support a recommendation which required new funeral and crematory businesses to go through an administrative-use permit process. New crematoriums would only be allowed in two industrial zones. Gregory Bradley, executive director of Stricklin Snively Mortuary, also disputes the conclusions drawn by the Development Department’s report on the health risk. Although he declined an interview this week, Bradley sent a statement that described what he told City officials to reassure them that his operation posed no danger to the community. “We basically explained that some of the information in the Department of Development Services’ Recommendation Report does not accurately reflect our crematory operation,” he said in his e-mailed statement. “For example, the report’s recommendations to amortize certain crematoriums are based on, among other things, that crematoriums operate for 15 hours per day, 365 days per year. The total amount of time we operate our crematory is exponentially less. We rarely operate on weekends, are closed on holidays and do not operate for 15 hours in a single day.” Located at 1952 Long Beach Blvd., Stricklin Snively Mortuary has been operating in the City since 1915 and has offered on-site cremation services since 1983, according to Bradley. This mortuary, along with another competing business, Simpson’s Family Mortuary, located at 5443 Long Beach Blvd., are the only two businesses that offer on-site cremation services in the city. Originally, the City’s Planning Commission had recommended in September to allow cremation services only in certain industrial zones. It had also recommended a distance requirement for these businesses to operate at least 600 feet away from residences and schools. The two existing funeral homes with crematoriums did not meet this distance requirement, and the Planning Commission recommended an amortization clause in the ordinance, essentially requiring them to comply with the new regulations in 10 years. The new rules would have required Stricklin Snively and Simpson’s Family Mortuaries to shut down the crematories altogether by 2023. Bradley staunchly opposed this possibility. “There simply is no evidence that the operation of Stricklin Snively’s crematorium poses any health risk to the public whatsoever,” Bradley wrote. “And, therefore, the proposed amortization of the facility is not appropriate.” Third District Councilmember Gary DeLong agreed. He recommended to remove that key amortization clause in the ordinance at the Oct. 15 Council meeting. The Council agreed to the

OCTOBER 18, 2013

change and voted 8-0 to pass the modified ordinance. Second District Councilmember Suja Lowenthal was absent from the vote. No members of the public commented on the ordinance modification, and little discussion was made about the key change that would essentially give Stricklin Snively and Simpson’s Family Mortuaries an edge over any competitors in city with more than 461,000 residents. Under this change, new competitors will be required to follow the administrative-use permit process and locate their crematoriums in the designated industrial areas. Headstones mark a number of historic grave sites at There are only four the Long Beach Municipal Cemetery. There are only cemeteries in the city, four cemeteries within the city of Long Beach. The and Polk says that creoption to cremate is becoming a more popular choice mation is becoming a for families who are making critical end-of-life decimore popular choice for sions, according to the general manager for the Belfamilies due to its affordmont Heights Funeral Center. ability. The Belmont Heights Funeral Center’s general man- ther in existing businesses unless ager did not understand the logic behind there’s a reason not to, and we didn’t offering an advantage to the two funeral hear from anybody in the community homes that had crematorium furnaces around that mortuary crematorium [Stricklin Snively] that said that they in residential areas. “You won’t let us have one furnace felt that it would negatively impact in this part of town,” Polk said of his their quality of life, so…there’s no proposed operation in Belmont reason to put them out of business in Heights. During an interview before 10 years. They were providing a servthe Council meeting, he specifically ice that the community was taking blasted the City’s willingness to allow advantage of.” Addressing the potential risk if the Stricklin Snively to operate in a poorer urban neighborhood if the City claims City allowed any crematoriums to there is any health risk. “So what’s the operate near homes and schools, difference?” he asked. “Are you saying DeLong added that he didn’t think the people over here are better than the evidence absolutely determines crepeople over there? The quality of their matoriums are really a health hazard. “We might learn that they are perlife [is] better over here than the quality of their life over there? That makes fectly compatible,” DeLong said. “We might learn that they are not. At this no sense to me.” DeLong explained in a phone point, I don’t think the evidence is interview Wednesday his reasons for clear either way.” Douglas Domingo-Forasté, a Belthe change to the ordinance, which effectively protected the businesses mont Heights resident who lives about that had been established. The 3rd-dis- five blocks away from the center, said trict councilmember says that there that he isn’t opposed to a funeral home were residents from the neighborhood in his neighborhood. The professor of association for the Cambodian com- classics at California State University munity who said they supported Long Beach also isn’t opposed to havStricklin Snively’s businesses. He also ing crematoriums in the city either, but noted the Belmont Heights residents he acknowledged that there is another in his district who strongly opposed a aspect to the pollution issue. “I didn’t think it was right to export new crematorium because it was moving into an established residential our pollution to other poorer cities,” Domingo-Forasté said in a Monday community. “Residents did not want cremato- phone interview, “but I did want our riums so close to their homes,” crematoriums to be located away DeLong said, “and particularly they from residential areas and schools.” Belmont Heights resident William didn’t want new ones that close to their home. But we currently grandfa- Snipes lives next door to the funeral center at the heart of the debate. In an interview at his home, Snipes acknowledged his personal ongoing tension with the funeral-center operators. He criticized the operation’s curTST4480 ReSoLUTIoN oF INTeNT To APPRove oF AND CoNSeNT To rent protocol whereby residents and THe ASSIGNMeNT oF THe oIL PIPeLINe FRANCHISe IN oRDIkids can see the remains transported NANCe No. 2006-08-1363 FRoM ARCo TeRMINAL SeRvICeS to and from the center. He is also conCoRPoRATIoN (ATSC) To TeSoRo SoCAL PIPeLINe CoMPANY cerned about a more practical element LLC of living close to this funeral home. He tried to sell his house last year, he NoTICe IS HeReBY GIveN that the City Council of the City of Signal Hill adopted Resolution No. 2013-10-6044 at their meeting of said, but on the last day of escrow closTuesday, october 15, 2013. A summary of the resolution is as foling, the buyer withdrew her offer when lows: she saw that there was a body transported into the funeral home. A ReSoLUTIoN oF THe CITY CoUNCIL oF THe CITY oF SIGNAL “This is not about dead bodies,” HILL, CALIFoRNIA, DeCLARING ITS INTeNTIoN To APPRove oF Snipes said. “It’s about the value of my AND CoNSeNT To THe ASSIGNMeNT oF THe oIL PIPeLINe FRANCHISe IN oRDINANCe No. 2006-08-1363 FRoM ARCo TeRhouse.” MINAL SeRvICeS CoRPoRATIoN To TeSoRo SoCAL PIPeLINe Polk acknowledges that there are CoMPANY LLC problems with his next-door neighbor. He and the center’s owner say that they A copy of the full text of the resolution is available in the will look elsewhere to build a crematoCity Clerk’s office and on the City’s website www.cityofsignalhill.org. rium and that they will keep the funeral NoTICe IS FURTHeR GIveN that the 19th day of Novemcenter at its current location. While the ber 2013, at the hour of 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chamber of City proposed ordinance will allow cremaHall, 2175 Cherry Avenue, Signal Hill, California 90755, is hereby toriums to operate in some industrial fixed as the time and place at which all persons interested in or zones, Polk says that most funeral objecting to the proposed transfer of pipelines under said franchise to homes and cremation businesses operTesoro SoCal Pipeline Company LLC may appear and be heard. ate in residential areas. He half-jokKathleen L. Pacheco ingly offered one possibility for a new City Clerk crematorium location– Signal Hill. The ordinance still needs to be Published in the Signal-Tribune newspaper on october 18, 2013. passed in a second reading scheduled Posted at City Hall, Library, Discovery well Park, and Reservoir Park for Tuesday, Oct. 22. ß on october 18, 2013.

CITY OF SIGNAL HILL


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OCTOBER 18, 2013

AB 955

continued from page 2

progressive approach” to addressing reduced access caused by “years of funding cuts to community colleges.” The Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) reported in March that course offerings have declined by 21 percent since 2008, which is a loss of 86,000 course sections. PPIC also estimates that 600,000 students have been turned away from community colleges in the past five years, and another 500,000 students were on waiting lists for fall 2012 courses. At the beginning of the fall semester at LBCC this year, there were 14,000 students on waitlists, according to college officials. Oak-

Applebee’s

ley said the program would help expand opportunities for LBCC students to reach their educational goals and allow students to move forward in their college careers with more “expediency.” The proposal also allows military veterans to fully utilize their GI Bill benefits to cover housing and educational costs, preventing the loss of coverage due to lack of enrollment status, he noted. Kellogg said he understands why some full-time faculty members have raised concerns since the program is “different” than how classes are typically funded. But he said some colleges that have indicated they may back out are just getting “political cold feet.” The notion that AB 955 “privatizes” public education is a “political

NEWS

catchphrase” and doesn’t hold any real substance, Kellogg added. “I think that’s just more of a word that’s being thrown around that has no real bearing on this issue,” he said. “It’s being used more for political reasons than realistic reasons.” Kellogg noted that, even though voters passed Proposition 30, the tax-increasing measure is only a “temporary fix” and LBCC is still “underfunded” from 2007 levels. “It’s still a challenge,” he said. “There’s no easy answer anymore.” Community colleges eligible to start the pilot program other than LBCC include College of the Canyons, Crafton Hills College, Oxnard College, Pasadena City College and Solano Community College. ß

continued from page 6

Photos by Sean Belk/Signal Tribune

A line forms outside the new Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill & Bar in Signal Hill last Saturday, Oct. 12 during an event in which local residents were invited to sample menu items and drinks to prepare employees for the restaurant’s official opening on Monday, Oct. 14.

[people] to come in and have breakfast, and the organization runs the show,” Alvarez said. The new restaurant also brings new jobs. After nearly 2,000 people applied for positions, the 150 employees hired to be hosts, servers, bartenders and cooks went through a week of training leading up to the restaurant’s opening. Heather Hallahan, a single-mom from Long Beach, said she was excited to be hired as a bartender after looking for a second job for nearly two years. “The restaurant industry is something I’ve been trying to get into,” she said. “It was cool that they were willing to hire pretty much on personality.” Signal Hill city officials and community members said the new jobs are also a boost for the local economy. “They hired 150 employees, and that’s great for the Signal Hill and Long Beach area,” said Signal Hill Mayor Michael Noll, who attended the previewdinner event. Also in attendance was Vice Mayor Ed Wilson, who said the restaurant’s opening is a “reflection of the desire to live, work and play in Signal Hill.” Though he had cast the lone dissenting vote against the Applebee’s request for a building permit because the restaurant would not include a south-facing patio with a view, Wilson said he would like to see more restaurants coming to Signal Hill. “I would like to see many more restaurants,” he said. “We’ll have to figure out how Joseph Abraham is the general manager of the new to do that, but I think Applebee’s Neighborhood Grill & Bar in Signal Hill. that would work well for the city… If you have more choices, more people come.” Terry Rogers, president of the Signal Hill Chamber of Commerce, pointed out that the restaurant is in close proximity to Long Beach Memorial Medical Center and the industrial area and will bring a new “healthy” restaurant option for local employees, visitors and residents. “We need another family restaurant for diversity,” she said. “Their menus are fantastic. They bring revenue and created jobs, so I’m excited about Applebee’s being here. I like their management, and I love their restaurant.” Wilson said he expects the restaurant will likely be a hit with sports fans to catch games during the fall season. “People will have a great time,” he said. “You can come in and watch football games and basketball… I think it’s going to be great.” ß

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Gov. Jerry Brown has signed AB 955 into law, giving Long Beach City College and five other colleges the right to start a fee-based pilot program that aims to increase high-demand course offerings during the intersession at a higher cost to students.


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SIGNAL TRIBUNE

OCTOBER 18, 2013

NEW BRIDGE. NEW JOBS. NEW HEIGHTS. The new Gerald Desmond Bridge—now under construction through a partnership between the Port and other agencies—was designed and engineered to be a stunning addition to our skyline. It will also add thousands of jobs to the economy, expand a world-renowned bicycle infrastructure, and improve safety for all who cross it. Because we’re not just taking in the view, we’re looking to the future. polb.com/GeraldDesmondBridge

Thinking outside the docks

Suzanne Plezia Deputy Chief Harbor Engineer Port of Long Beach © Port of Long Beach

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