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S erving B ixBy K nollS , C alifornia H eigHtS , l oS C erritoS , W rigley Vol. 32 No. 19

Staff Writer

As the population of Southern California continues to grow and the cost of imported water continues to rise, maintaining an adequate supply of locally produced groundwater be-

comes more and more critical. On Oct. 7, the Water Replenishment District of Southern California (WRD) hosted its second annual “State of the District” presentation. About 50 people attended the event, which took place at WRD headquarters, at 4040 Paramount Blvd., in Lakewood.

Nick Diamantides/Signal Tribune

WRD Board President Sergio Calderon said a dramatic rise in Southern California’s population has caused a sharp increase in water consumption.

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S ignal H ill october 15, 2010

SH Police Chief Sonoff resigns to head La Habra’s department

Courtesy SHPD

see WrD page 12

Tom Sonoff relocated from the Whittier Police Department to Signal Hill’s department in 2001 as police captain and was promoted to chief in 2006.

Nick Diamantides Staff Writer

see forum page 12

C ity

WRD Board President Sergio Calderon and WRD General Manager Robb Whitaker presented local water agency officials and members of the public with an overview of south Los Angeles County’s groundwater condition and highlighted WRD’s smartwater programs, projects and partnerships aimed at conserving water while increasing the amount stored in underground aquifers. “Fifty years ago, 2.5 million people lived in the District’s service area, which encompasses 420 square miles,” Calderon said. “Today there are four million people in 43 cities.” He noted that in 1960, agriculture was the single largest land use in the region and small dairy farmers constituted the majority of pumpers in the Central Basin (one of the sections of territory overseen by WRD). He explained that, while the agricultural land has been replaced by housing, the dramatic increase in population has caused a sharp increase in water consumption. “Fifty years ago, there were no legal limits on pumping in the Central Basin, and pumping in the West Basin (the other territory overseen by WRD)

Richardson, Dibs face off at CSULB candidate forum Many university students don’t have the time to attend a candidates forum, which often means that they feel alienated from the political process. On Tuesday (Oct. 12) a political forum came to the students at California State University Long Beach. About 250 students attended the event, which took place from about 11am to 2pm in the ballroom of the Student Union building. Two candidates for California’s 37th Congressional District– incumbent Democrat Laura Richardson and Independent Nick Dibs– spoke during the forum’s first session. Republican candidate Star Parker was not in atten-

and tHe

Your Weekly Community Newspaper

At ‘State of the District’ presentation, WRD reps explain their mission, methods and problems Nick Diamantides

Hilltop Park palms

Nick Diamantides/Signal Tribune

Incumbent Laura Richardson (left) and Independent Nick Dibs (right) are vying for California’s 37th District for the U.S. House of Representatives. Republican Star Parker is also a candidate for the seat.

Signal Hill Chief of Police Tom Sonoff has resigned to accept the position as chief of police for the City of La Habra. Sonoff, who is a La Habra resident, will begin his new position on Monday, Nov. 8. The City of La Habra is approximately 7.3 square miles with a population of about 65,000. Its police department has 70 sworn officers and a total of 105 personnel. The total budget for the La Habra Police Department is $14.2 million. Sonoff began his career with the Whittier Police Department and quickly worked his way up to the rank of sergeant. He relocated to Signal Hill in 2001 as police captain and was promoted to chief in 2006. Sonoff has a strong background in building community relationships. During his tenure, he hired four additional police officers, re-

organized the department to allow for greater promotional opportunities, was a member of the city’s Blue Ribbon Committee to plan the new Signal Hill Police Station, and was a major advisor in planning that new station, which is scheduled to break ground on Nov. 4. “I have absolutely enjoyed my time as a member of the Signal Hill community,” Sonoff said. “It has been a privilege to serve as the chief of police of such a fine organization. As I look forward to the next chapter in my career, I will never forget the many friends I have made in this community.” “The City Council, City staff and the entire community wishes Tom the best in his new position,” said Mayor Ed Wilson. “Chief Sonoff has been an excellent leader for our police department, and he will be very much missed.” ß


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COMMUnitY

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LBPD names Blair as golden Badge recipient Long Beach Police Department Sergeant Byron Blair will be honored with the Golden Badge Foundation’s Top Supervisor’s Award, which recognizes law-enforcement supervisors whose exceptional performance resulted in an improvement to officer safety, interdepartmental relations, and/or the agency’s public image. Blair began his career with the department as a civilian employee in 1996, working in the field of forensics for four-and-a-half years before becoming an officer. As an officer, he worked in the patrol division, recruitment, and as background investigator. In 2007, he was promoted to the rank of sergeant and worked in the patrol division and is currently an investigator

in the internal affairs division. “Part of my supervisory philosophy is to ensure that I take care of the little things first so I do not have to address major problems later,” Blair said. “Although the statement sounds simple, the actions are not. I take pride in being actively engaged, having a high level of trust and accountability between myself and the people I work with, and engaging in honest communication.” Blair will be honored along with other law-enforcement personnel at an award ceremony on Friday, Oct. 29 at 7pm at the Irvine Marriott, 18000 Von Karman Ave., in Irvine. To reserve attendance or get more information, visit goldenbadgefoundation.org or call (714) 785-3580. ß

Courtesy LBPD

Sergeant Byron Blair

Sponsors sought for LB’s 14th Veterans Day parade Long Beach will celebrate Veterans Day on Saturday, Nov. 6, beginning at 9am when the 14th Annual Long Beach Veterans Day Parade steps off at the corner of Atlantic Avenue and Harding Street. The line of march will head south on Atlantic to 56th Street, turn and proceed back to Houghton Park. Grand Marshal for this year’s event is World War II veteran Clarence Bramley, a North Long Beach native who served in the Air Force. While fighting with the Army in the Philippines, he was taken prisoner and was part of the infamous Bataan Death March. “Rosie the Riveter” will also be

honored in this year’s parade. “Rosie was the nickname used to describe the thousands of women who worked in the factories to produce the many products that made it possible for the United States to win WWII,” said Martha Thuente, coordinator of this year’s parade. Again this year, the public is invited to participate in the Freedom Walk to honor our troops. The Freedom Walk group is the last unit in the parade. Participants can sign up in advance or on the day of the parade at Houghton Park, at Atlantic and Harding. Post-parade activities at Houghton Park will include a brief ceremony hon-

oring veterans, followed by musical entertainment. An area for young children will offer free arts and crafts and face painting, as well as other activities. Sponsorships from private businesses are currently being sought. “The money that the City of Long Beach budgets for the event covers only the city services provided,” Thuente said. “We gladly accept donations.” To donate, email msthuente@hotmail.com. Additional information and/or participation applications for the parade, freedom walk and vendor’s fair can be found at lbveteransdayparade.com. ß

Assistance League’s auxiliary names its Woman of the Year Since 1953, Rick Rackers Auxiliary of Assistance League of Long Beach has honored one outstanding woman in the community with its prestigious Woman of the Year Award. On Oct. 8, Norma Marter, who has dedicated much time and energy supporting local philanthropic programs, was honored at the annual luncheon at the Hyatt Regency in Long Beach. At the age of 83, Marter still continues to devote her time to the Long Beach community with involvement in Assistance League of Long Beach, American Heart Association, Long Beach Day Nursery, LA County Grand Jury, Memorial Medical Center Board of Trustees and United Way, to name a few. In 1988, Norma assumed a yearlong position as a member of the Los Angeles County Grand Jury, which she found to be fascinating and educational. Being a member of the Grand Jury required her to be at the Criminal Courts building in Los Angeles four

Signal Hill accepting applications for Civil Service Commission The City of Signal Hill is seeking applications from residents who are interested in serving on the Signal Hill Civil Service Commission. This vacancy is to fill the unexpired term due to a mid-term resignation on the Commission. The term ends May 31, 2013. To serve as a Civil Service commissioner, one must be a US citizen, 18 years of age or older, a registered voter and resident of Signal Hill at least 29 days prior to the date of appointment. Commission members must continue to reside in the city for the duration of the term of office. Those interested in serving as a Civil Service commissioner may call (562) 989-7305 or visit cityofsignalhill.org for an application or for further information. Candidates who meet the minimum qualifications will be invited to verbally present their credentials to the Signal Hill City Council at the regular meeting on Tuesday, Nov. 2 at 7pm in the Council Chamber of City Hall, 2175 Cherry Ave. Applications will be accepted until Wednesday, Oct. 27 at 5:30pm. ß

Courtesy Assistance league

Norma Marter

days a week, which meant she had to put some of her local philanthropic activities on hold.

Upon completing her term, she quickly returned to her volunteer work, in particular attending her first meeting as a Board of Trustees member for Children’s Hospital of Memorial Medical Center of Long Beach. Her longtime affiliation with the hospital began as a member of Nightingales at Seaside Hospital, the forerunner of Long Beach Memorial Hospital, where she helped to stock the gift shop. While Marter is best known for her dedicated volunteerism, she and her husband Burt love to travel and have spent the last 40 years touring the globe. Their travels have taken them all over Europe. “I think we’ve been to just about every European nation,” she said. Other destinations have included: China; Kenya; a month of cruising the Scandinavian waters; Canada, where they attended Expo ’86; as well as their own country. They also enjoy golfing at Virginia Country Club, where they are members. ß

THE BIBLE, PRAYER, AND HEALING THE WORD OF GOD HEALS TODAY!

• Explore how to unlock the healing power of the Bible and discover your gifts. • Hear about healings of a tumor, abscessed tooth, unemployment and more along with examples of healing Bible verses and effective ways to pray.

Sunday, October 17th, 2010 at 3:30pm “the Healing Power of the Bible” the Long Beach Petroleum Club

3636 Linden Avenue, Long Beach, CA 90807 Elise Moore has been in the Christian healing ministry for 25 years. Fluent in Spanish, Moore has been featured in radio, tv & internet programs in both English & Spanish. She has spoken at convention centers, universities, prisons, and for civic, church & youth groups in over 275 cities in 13 countries. She has organized interfaith conferences & served as chaplain for homeless agencies. She also teaches classes in Christian Science healing.

Please Bring Your BIBLE! This talk is sponsored by First and Fourth Churches of Christ, Scientist 3629 Atlantic Ave. long Beach • East of the 710 Freeway just North of the 405 Freeway For more information please call: 562-427-6061 or 562-424-5562 www.elisemoore.com • www.1stchurchcslb.org

HeY, LADieS! The nonprofit Community Action Team is seeking contestants for the Little Miss, Teen, Miss and Mrs. Southern California and Long Beach pageants and will be conducting orientations at 6pm on Sunday, Oct. 17 and Sunday, Oct. 24. at The Grand Long Beach Events Center, 4101 E. Willow Ave. The pageants will take place Sunday, Nov. 7. The entry fee is half-price until Sunday, Oct. 24. Visit MissSouthernCalifornia.com or email Justin@JustinRudd.com. HeLP FOR HUngeR Sixth District Councilmember Dee Andrews will offer a “Sixth District Food Distribution” at Ernest S. McBride Park, 1550 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., on Friday, Oct. 15, beginning at 9am until all the food is disbursed. Call (562) 570-6816. ALL eARS The Hearing Loss Association of Long Beach/Lakewood will sponsor the monthly Rocky Stone Hearing Device Exhibit on Friday, Oct. 15, at the Weingart Senior Center, 5220 Oliva Ave., in Lakewood, from 10:30am to noon in the craft room. The free exhibit will be a hands-on display of a variety of devices that help enhance the quality of life for the hearing impaired. Provided will be information on devices that help in hearing conversations in restaurants, televisions, doorbells, alarm clocks, smoke and fire alarms, telephone conversations and more. Call (562) 425-5651. gOt A gReen tHUMB? Rancho Los Alamitos, 6400 East Bixby Hill Rd., will present its 2010 Garden Series on “Perennials and Bulbs: A Marriage Made in the Garden” from 9:30am to 5pm on Saturday, Oct. 16. Landscape architect John Schoustra will give a lecture at 10am, followed by an art exhibit by the Botanical Artists Guild of Southern California and a live plant and art sale. Admisson is $15, $10 for Rancho members. JAiLHOUSe tALK The League of Women Voters, Long Beach Area, will examine the Los Angeles County jail system at its meeting on Saturday, Oct. 16 from 10am to noon at the Los Altos Library, 5614 E. Britton Dr. As part of an ongoing study, the League will present a first-hand look at jails from the perspective of a former inmate who has experienced incarceration at many levels, both as a juvenile and as an adult. Jail Study Committee members will share their experiences touring various county facilities and will comment about areas of the study, copies of which will be available for the audience to review. The event is free and open to the public, and ample street parking is available. Call (562) 432-5822. WRite RigHt The California Writers Club of Long Beach will host a presentation by Doug Drummond entitled “Plotting a Mystery Set in Long Beach” on Saturday, Oct. 16 from 3pm to 5pm at the Los Altos Public Library, 5614 Britton Dr. Published and aspiring writers of all genres are welcome to attend. Drummond, former commander in the Long Beach Police Department and former vice mayor of Long Beach, has published two novels set in Long Beach: Cyclone Racer and What Goes Around Comes Around. The free monthly meetings of the California Writers Club of Long Beach are open to the public. Visit calwriters.org or calwriterslongbeach.org, or call (562) 595-2114. FALL CLeAning The City of Signal Hill and Signal Hill Disposal will help make the chore of fall cleaning a bit easier for residents of Signal Hill. Free of charge, during the week of Oct. 18–22, residents will be able to set out bulky items at the curb for collection. Bulky items include items that are too large or too heavy to set out on regular trash-collection days, but electronic waste, such as computer monitors, printers and cell phones, and household hazardous waste, like household cleaners, automotive fluids/batteries and lawn-care products, will not be accepted. Residents living in apartment or condominium communities can take part by calling Signal Hill Disposal at (562) 597-0608 to schedule a special pick-up. eXPUngeMent eXPLAineD The City of Long Beach will present an Expungement Education Workshop on Monday, Oct. 18 from 4pm to 5pm at the Center for Working Families, 1900 Atlantic Ave. Participants will receive pertinent information from subject-matter experts on certificate of rehabilitation, information on expungement of adult convictions and sealing of juvenile records, and assistance with completing required expungement forms. Call (562) 570-WORK. tO YOUR HeALtH! The City of Signal Hill will offer a free Cholesterol Management and Screening presentation from 9:30am to 11:30am on Tuesday, Oct. 19 at the Signal Hill Park Community Center, 1780 E. Hill St. Presented by St. Mary Medical Center’s 4th Street Clinic, the event will feature a licensed pharmacist who will discuss medications and conduct screenings. Call (562) 989-7330. KiDS’ CHRISTMAS CAROL CASting CALL The Long Beach Shakespeare Company will conduct auditions for boys and girls age 8 to 17 for its upcoming production of A Christmas Carol on Tuesday, Oct. 19 and Wednesday, Oct. 20 at the Expo Backroom Theatre, 4321 Atlantic Ave., between 4pm and 7pm both days. Bring a snapshot. Kids will sing a holiday song of their choice and read from the script (no phone calls). Visit lbshakespeare.org. it tAKeS A COMMUnitY Long Beach residents are invited to the Anaheim Street Community Police Center’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 19 from 5pm to 6:30pm at the Mark Twain Neighborhood Library, 1401 E. Anaheim St. in the Community Room. Free parking is available in library parking lot. Translation provided in Khmer and Spanish. Lt. Kenneth Schack (Ret.) of the Long Beach Police Department will give an overview of general prevention procedures. Call (562) 570-1691. eMPOWeR StUDentS POWER 4 Youth, a Long Beach academic mentoring program for struggling middle- and high-school youth, will celebrate the new school year with an open house on Wednesday, Oct. 20 from 5pm to 7pm at First United Presbyterian Church, 600 E. 5th St. Call (562) 435-2352. eDUCAtiOn inFORMAtiOn Area middle-school students and their parents are invited to attend “High School Decision 2011” on Thursday, Oct. 21 at Westerly School, 2950 E. 29th St., from 3pm to 5pm to hear 20 representatives from Long Beach, Orange County and Los Angeles private, public and charter high schools talk about their programs in breakout sessions. The event is open to all and free with a reservation by calling (562) 981-3151.


OPiniOn

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Thoughts from the Publisher

PUBLiSHeR/eDitOR in CHieF

NEENA R. STRICHART ASSOCiAte PUBLiSHeR

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the Signal tribune adheres to the following policies The SIgnAL TRIbune welcomes LetteRS tO tHe eDitOR. Letters should be signed, dated and include a phone number in order to verify authenticity. The SIgnAL TRIbune reserves the right to edit letters for grammar, language and space requirements. The SIgnAL TRIbune does not print letters that refer substantially to articles in other publications and might not print those that have recently been printed in other publications. LetteRS tO tHe eDitOR & COMMentARieS are the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the SIgnAL TRIbune or its staff. Although the editorial staff will attempt to verify and/or correct information when possible, please remember that LetteRS tO tHe eDitOR & COMMentARieS are opinions, and readers should not assume that they are statements of fact. The SIgnAL TRIbune is published each Friday with a circulation of 25,000. Yearly subscriptions are available for $45.

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This week we received more than our usual number of commentaries and letters to the editor. With only a finite amount of space available, we quickly filled the page for this issue. When I saw one of the letters that would have to wait until next week to run, I decided to give up my space for the week and run the letter instead…see below. The missing American flag that once flew proudly over Marine Stadium has been replaced. A group of patriotic Long Beach citizens recently restored “Old Glory” to its rightful place atop the staff located at the South end of Marine Stadium, which was erected by the US Olympic committee during the 1968 Olympic rowing trials. Hopefully whoever removed the flag several months ago will not do such an insensitive, disrespectful, un-American thing again. For those unaware, the United States Flag Code, Title 4, states: “The flag represents a living country and is itself considered a living thing” and “No disrespect should be shown to the flag of the United States of America.”

Breaking Free From Domestic Violence By Richard N. Waldman, MD

Domestic violence affects two million women in the US each year. It affects women from all social, racial, ethnic, and economic backgrounds. Domestic violence is the cause of more than one-third of emergency room visits by women and accounts for 22 percent of all violent crimes against women. Abused women are subjected to intentional, often repeated physical, sexual, or emotional harm from a current or former intimate partner. They may be slapped, hit, kicked, beaten, or threatened or attacked with weapons. Sexual violence, such as rape and other sexual assault, may occur and their partners may sabotage the use of birth control or refuse to follow safer sex practices. Women may also be psychologically or emotionally abused through: name calling; humiliation; social isolation from family, friends, and work; and deprivation of food, money, transportation, medications, and access to health care. Many times, the abuse escalates during pregnancy. Domestic violence can cause a number of physical ailments in women, such as chronic and unexplained pelvic pain, sexual dysfunction, breast and genital trauma due to sexual assaults, and STDs from partner infidelity. The stress of living in an abusive relationship can trigger posttraumatic stress disorder or battered woman syndrome, which can lead to depression, anxiety disorders, substance abuse, physical problems, and suicide. Abused pregnant women have a

higher risk of miscarriage, vaginal bleeding, fetal injury, and delivering a low-birth-weight infant. Roughly half of children who live in violent households are abused, and children who witness abuse are much more likely to become abusers or be abused themselves in adulthood. In many cases, the violence against women and children becomes more frequent and severe over time. If you are being abused, tell someone you trust– your doctor, a counselor, close friend, or family member. He or she can assist you in escaping a dangerous situation. Make a plan that can be used to get yourself and any children to safety quickly. Pack a suitcase with a change of clothes and an extra set of keys and store it with a friend or neighbor. Keep prescription medications, identification, extra cash, your checkbook, and other special items handy so you can take them with you on short notice. If you are in immediate danger, call 9-1-1. If you are hurt, call your doctor or go to the emergency room and get a police report and a copy of your medical record so you can file charges if you wish. For help and information any time, call the National Domestic Violence Hotline (800-799-SAFE/7233) or the National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline (866-331-9474). Richard N. Waldman, MD is president of The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

By Debra Bowen California Secretary of State

Steve Beatty Ron Reinart Don gray Mike Kowal

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

I am writing to ask for your vote on an important proposition I’ve proposed which will be on this November’s ballot in Long Beach– Measure C. The men and women of our armed forces risk their lives every day to keep us safe and free, and they deserve all our support when they come home. That’s why I proposed a voter initiative for the November ballot that would enhance the support we extend to veterans returning to the civilian workforce, and to their families. Currently, veterans receive 10 additional points on civil service exams when they apply for jobs working for the City of Long Beach City and at the Port of Long Beach. Spouses of veterans can also receive ten points, if the veteran is unable to work due to service-related injuries. I’ve proposed that we increase the point benefit to 15 points for disabled veterans. I’ve also proposed we extend this benefit to more veterans. Currently, a veteran must have a 30-percent disability to qualify as disabled. I have proposed lowering that threshold to 10 percent, thereby extending the benefit to more veterans and more spouses. These two changes can not only strengthen our economy by supporting

C O M M E N TA RY

Don’t Sit on the Sidelines this Election Day: Vote!

Long may She wave.

Supporting troops via ballot

OCtOBeR 15, 2010

veterans in their transition to civilian life but will make it clear to everyone that the City of Long Beach supports our vets 100 percent. Let’s show our veterans how grateful we are for their service. Please vote yes on C this November in Long Beach. Robert garcia Long Beach Councilmember First District

Protecting Pets A friend and I were taking our usual walk around Wrigley. We had just finished talking about the reports of coyotes and the dead cats in our area. As we came upon two other neighbors talking, we found out that they were looking at a cat head and other body parts that were on the lawn. Traumatic, very. Four cats have had similar deaths in the past week in Wrigley. What to do? Please do not leave pet food out. Ask your neighbors to do the same. And keep your pets in at night. Coyotes will also attack dogs and have been known to jump fences nine feet high. This means that your pets are not safe, even in your back yard. Shoshanah Siegel Wrigley

The November 2 General Election is right around the corner, but it’s not too late to register to vote in this election. The deadline is October 18. Last month, I reported that 72 percent of eligible Californians are currently registered to vote. While that is good, it’s not good enough. I believe our democracy will be stronger if all eligible Californians are participating in elections. In November, you will have the opportunity to choose local, legislative, congressional and statewide leaders who will represent you, as well as make decisions on many ballot measures related to taxes, the environment, and more. If you’re not one of the nearly 17 million people who are registered to participate in this crucial election, please take a few moments to register to vote. You can pick up a voter registration form at any county elections office, public library or US post office, or you can fill out a form online at sos.ca.gov, then print, sign and mail it. To help you make your decisions, I have created an Official Voter Information Guide that contains impartial analyses of the proposed laws and potential costs to taxpayers, arguments

in favor of and against ballot measures prepared by proponents and opponents, text of the proposed laws, and other useful information. The guide is available by mail and online, at voterguide.sos.ca.gov, as well as at every public library and county elections office. As a voter, you have the option to go to the polls on Election Day or use a vote-by-mail ballot, which gives you the flexibility to vote when it is convenient for you. To request a voteby-mail ballot, use the application printed on the sample ballot booklet mailed by your county elections office or go to sos.ca.gov. The last day to request a vote-by-mail ballot is October 26. This election is too important to sit on the sidelines and let others make the decisions. Some contests really are decided by just a few votes. Whether you cast your ballot at a polling place or by mail, I encourage you to take the time to carefully read about each candidate and ballot measure– and to know your voting rights. If you have any questions about registering to vote or voting, please call my voter hotline at (800) 345VOTE (8683).

Under construction

For the next two weeks, expect delays on Atlantic between 52nd and San Antonio with one lane of traffic remaining open for north- and southbound travel. San Antonio remains clear for east and west travel.

The heavy work for the Atlantic repaving project, between 52nd and San Antonio, got underway Wednesday. The curb, gutter, and concrete work is complete and now begins the cold milling and repaving with rubberized asphalt.

Blair Cohn executive Director Bixby Knolls Business improvement Association


OCtOBeR 15, 2010

COMMUnitY

Garden Variety

October: a rare month for plants Jennifer E. Beaver Columnist

The title of this week’s column is adapted from one of my favorite books, Bradbury’s Ray Something Wicked This Way Comes. “First of all, it was October, a rare month for boys,” writes Bradbury in his prologue. The novel is full of light and shadow, cold and heat– all the things that also make up an October planting season in southern California. One brisk day last week, I made soup and chili and traded my sandals for boots. By Halloween, the Santa Ana winds will scorch jack o’ lanterns left grinning on front steps.

Despite these contrasts– or perhaps because of them– October is indeed a rare month for plants. It’s when we put finishing touches on winter vegetable gardens envied by those who live east of the Rockies. And it’s when we plant perennials and ornamental grasses so they develop strong root systems thanks to winter rain. My raised bed will certainly include kale, a vegetable with a mysteriously ardent fan club. Whenever I mention this leafy cabbage relative, someone yells, “I love kale!” They must appreciate its immune-boosting power and its affinity for garlic in soups, sautés and salads. I’m also yearning for broccolini, a slender cross between broccoli and kale that shows up on menus swathed in olive oil or tossed with pasta. I’m hunting

for broccolini plants because I’m too lazy to grow it from seed. I’m a sucker for ornamental grasses and planted them along the new decomposed granite path that winds through my front yard. They’re part of the drought-tolerant palette favored by the Long Beach Water Department. On one side of the path, there’s Mexican feather grass, a twofoot-high confection of spring green and maize-y yellow; on the other, mop-top fescue with its foot-high blue-green leaves. What’s not to love? Ornamental grasses are idiot proof, resist bugs, wave in the breeze, and always look great as long as you chop them down once or twice a year. That’s my kind of plant. Got fruit trees? Cleaning up dropped fruit will discourage insects

Helping others help themselves is mission of new LB nonprofit A new nonprofit named America Lends a Hand is now in the forming stage and will kick off with a benefit brunch on Sunday, Dec. 5. America Lends a Hand will be a 501.c3 organization which will distribute funds to community-level organizations to support their projects and programs, and it will be volunteer led. Long Beach resident Brad Shore is the founder and president of the organization. “I see an incredible need to help others help themselves,” he said. “When we

come together as a community, as a nation, to help, we all benefit.” The issues on which America Lends a Hand will focus will be determined locally because of the diversity of the communities to be served. However, the main focus areas will involve three primary areas: mental health, education and “Research4Cures.” “I am thrilled to get this off the ground and have been wanting to do so for a long time,” Shore said. “My goal is to get this going at the local level and eventually have it spread across the country.”

The kick-off champagne potluck brunch will benefit local Long Beach foster kids and will take place at a private Long Beach residence from 11:30am to 2:30pm. For more information about ‘America Lends A Hand’ or the brunch, or to volunteer, contact Shore at (562) 225-6548 or email AmericaLendsA Hand@gmail.com.

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as well as more serious predators: coyotes. In Wrigley, at least five cats have been killed by coyotes in the past two weeks. Coyotes are attracted by any kind of food, including fruit, pet food left outside, and stray animals.

with Pat Andersen Sunday, 10/17 @ 1:30pm

Belly Dance — Sunday, Oct. 24 at 4pm

3910 Atlantic Ave.• Bixby Knolls Parking & entrance in back

(562) 989-9959 • www.freespirityoga.com

EvEry Thursday 3pm - 6:30pm • 46th and atlantic

in Bixby Knolls - Just South of Del Amo

AREA R O B R A H

Jennifer E. Beaver, a Wrigley resident, is a master gardener and author of Container Gardening for California. ß

Port offering grant to help health facilities limit air pollution The Port of Long Beach is seeking applicants for a new $5-million community grant program designed to help medical centers, senior facilities and health organizations improve health by limiting exposure to air pollution and increasing health awareness in areas of Long Beach closest to the Port and its trade corridors. In this second round of Port Grant Programs, the Port is reaching out to medical centers, convalescent homes and other health-care sites to reduce indoor air pollution. Health organizations and agencies would also be invited to seek funding for outreach and screening programs that address respiratory and cardiopulmonary issues. The first round of the Port’s community grants

recently announced nearly $5 million in aid to local schools and day-care facilities. The applications for the program are now available, and a series of three workshops to help the public apply for grants will be • Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2pm to 3:30pm, Cesar Chavez Park, 401 Golden Ave. • Thursday, Oct. 21, 6pm to7:30pm, Miller Family Health Education Center, 3820 Cherry Ave. • Thursday, Oct. 28, 6pm to 7:30pm, Mark Twain Library, 1401 E. Anaheim St. ----------------------------------------MORE INFORMATION polb.com/healthgrants 1-888-789-GRANT (4726)

pected to start in summer 2011. Since 2004, the City of Long Beach has worked to gain public support, secure funding, coordinate with Los Angeles County and prepare construction plans for the project. Other funds that have been secured include: a $2.5 million California Resources Agency grant announced last month; $1,217,593 from the California Coastal Conservancy; and $2.5 million from Los Angeles County Prop A River Fund/Los Angeles County Supervisor Don Knabe. ß

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“I would like to thank the board of the San Gabriel and Lower Los Angeles Rivers and Mountains Conservancy for authorizing this funding. This wonderful partnership will have a positive impact on this area for many years to come,” said 8th District Councilwoman Rae Gabelich. “Our community will be thrilled to know that we now have the ability to move forward with this very exciting project,” said 9th District Long Beach City Councilmember Steven Neal. “Residents for generations to come will be able to enjoy the beauty and recreational amenities of this restored wetlands area.” The DeForest Wetlands are located along the lower Los Angeles River, south of DeForest Park to Del Amo Boulevard and are bisected by Long Beach Boulevard. The project design is 60-percent complete, with construction ex-

Animal Care Services has named Wrigley as a Wildlife Watch Designation and will be coming through the neighborhood to tell us how to discourage coyotes and keep pets safe. ß

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DeForest Wetlands Restoration project receives final grant needed for its completion The DeForest Wetlands Restoration secured the last piece of funding needed to complete the project when the Board of the San Gabriel and Lower Los Angeles Rivers and Mountains Conservancy (RMC) authorized a $1 million grant in September. The grant secures the total project funding of $7 million required to restore the 34-acre flooddetention basin through planting native flora and creating trails, overlooks and interpretive displays. The project will improve water quality while retaining flood-control properties to create a river parkway along the lower Los Angeles River. In addition, the project will connect the Dominguez Gap Wetlands project to the south and DeForest Park to the north, providing more than 90 acres and direct public access to the 51-mile Lower Los Angeles River Parkway Bike Trail.

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CULtURe O 15, 2010 Comedy event to benefit MLK Walkers raise $210,000 for cancer parade, inner-city mentoring program support at Long Beach Memorial 6 SignAL tRiBUne

More than 1,000 people, including cancer survivors with their family members and supporters, walked the streets of Long Beach at the 11th Annual Team Spirit 10K Walk. Set at the Long Beach Yacht Club, the walk raised $210,000 to support the treatment and research efforts of breast and ovarian cancers at the MemorialCare Todd Cancer Institute at Long Beach Memorial. Participants walked for those fighting cancer and for those who have lost their battle. Team Spirit was founded on the belief that everyone can do more to help fight and raise awareness of breast and ovarian cancers in the local community. The vision and commitment of Team Spirit is to enable Long Beach Memorial to offer the latest in patient care and psychosocial support, such as peer mentoring programs for gynecological and breast cancers. “The 11th Annual Team Spirit Breast and Ovarian Cancer 10K Walk was a huge success thanks to the community and their philanthropic support,” said Jim Nor-

CtOBeR

Photo by gloria Boza

The walk raised $210,000 to support the treatment and research efforts of breast and ovarian cancers at the MemorialCare Todd Cancer Institute at Long Beach Memorial.

mandin, president of Memorial Medical Center Foundation, at the event. “On behalf of Long Beach Memorial, thank you. Your philan-

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thropy provides funding for our breast and ovarian cancer patient support programs. It was wonderful to see more than a thousand people walk the streets of Naples and Belmont Shore to help raise funds and awareness.” ß

Combining a blend of improvisation and stand-up comedy sets, Laughin’ Large is a collaborative event to raise funds to benefit the I Am S.H.A.N.T.E Foundation and the 23rd Martin Luther King, Jr. Peace & Unity Parade Celebration. Shante Broadus, wife of rapper Snoop Dogg, founded the I Am S.H.AN.T.E (Seeking Her Ambition Necessary To Excel) Foundation as a mentoring program that seeks to help inner-city girls by teaching them the essentials of being a young woman and developing qualities of working as a team, health and fitness, etiquette, and the importance of being environmentally conscious. “Long Beach is my home town, and it is so wonderful to have the opportunity to give back to the community while helping these young girls aspire to be bigger and better in life,” Broadus said. The event will also benefit the annual City of Long Beach Martin Luther King, Jr. Peace & Unity Parade Celebration that brings thou-

sands of people together. The Office of Sixth District Councilman Dee Andrews produces the annual community event and is in need of additional sponsorship due to the reduced funding of more than 50 percent from the past three years. “It is always a pleasure to see one of our Long Beach family members step up to give back to the community,” Andrews said. “I have known Mrs. Broadus for many years, and I am very pleased to partner with her on this very special occasion to support these two important causes.” Laughin’ Large will take place at 7pm on Thursday, Oct. 21 at The Laugh Factory, 151 S. Pine Ave. Tickets for the red-carpet fundraising event are $25, with VIP tickets available at $50, which includes a “meet and greet” with Broadus. There is a two-drink minimum, and valet parking is available. --------------------------------------MORE INFORMATION (562) 570-6147 longbeach.gov/District6

Rather than raising money, group’s walk-a-thon tries to create compassion Be The Cause, a community of individuals that creates enriching opportunities of service, hosts its annual Walk for Hope to help create more compassion in the world and raise awareness about various local and global humanitarian causes. The Walk for Hope is unlike any other walk-a-thon in that its main purpose is to unite the community by spreading more compassion in the world.

The entire 2.2-mile route is graced with hundreds of inspirational hand-crafted quotes representing the best of modern and ancient wisdom, with interactive activity stations along the route that promote global consciousness coupled with “be the change” action. Local organizations set up booths at the starting and ending locations to represent heartfelt causes throughout the world. The

event also features live international entertainment, a complimentary commemorative t-shirt and more. The Walk can also be optionally used as a vehicle for raising community awareness about a favorite nonprofit group. This event, which is free to the public, will be Saturday, Oct. 16, from 9am to noon at El Dorado Park, 7550 E. Spring St. Walkers may register at bethecause.org. ß

CSULB’s Chinese film, culture fest to kickoff animation competition California State University, Long Beach (CSULB) is hosting the 2010 Chinese Film and Culture Festival now through Thursday, Oct. 21. The weeklong series of events features Chinese dignitaries, screenings of recent Chinese films, and a cultural heritage and craft exhibit. The festival will also serve as the kickoff to the Chinese and American College Student Animation Competition. The goal of the festival is to improve communication and understanding between China and the United States through cultural and artistic exchange. The event is open to the public.

Ten films exploring how Chinese media producers envision their society for domestic and international audiences will screen in the Beach Auditorium-University Student Union, Room 115. A panel discussion with film producers, directors and actors will follow each film, and there will be an opportunity for questions from the audience. A special-event screening of New Kangding Love Song will be part of the festival but won’t be shown until Tuesday, Oct. 26 at 6pm in the William Link Theatre. This screening will also feature a panel discussion with di-

rector Jiang Ping and China Film Group’s vice president. Through Monday, Oct. 18, a cultural heritage and craft exhibit in the University Student Union Ballroom will feature artists demonstrating traditional Chinese handicrafts, including fabric and paper cutting art, leaf vein painting, calligraphy and more. The exhibit will also include detailed models of Hakka Tulou (earth buildings) from the Yongding, Fujian Province. -------------------------------------MORE INFORMATION ccpe.csulb.edu/ChineseFCF (800) 963-2250, ext. 54060

Found theatre to donate all proceeds of its Chavez performance to ASD The Found Theatre, 599 Long Beach Blvd., will dedicate a special performance of its current show, Fred Blanco’s The Stories of Cesar Chavez, as a fundraiser for its arts partner, Long Beach-based Arts & Services for Disabled (ASD), on Sunday, Oct. 24 at 7pm. The primary mission of ASD is to provide life-long learning, community service, and career opportunities through the creative arts for people with disabilities in an environment of warmth, en-

couragement and respect. The group offers full-time arts programming for adults with developmental disabilities at four program sites in the South Bay area. Onehundred percent of proceeds from ticket and refreshment sales will go to ASD. The Stories of Cesar Chavez, written and performed by Fred Blanco, is a dramatic look at the real-life civil-rights leader as he builds a union and creates a movement through his philosophy

of peace and hope. Historically accurate and as timely as today’s headlines, Blanco’s one-man show returns to The Found after a critically acclaimed national tour, during which it was named “Best of the San Francisco Fringe Festival 2010.” Tickets for the fundraiser are $25. Call (562) 433-3363 or email info@foundtheatre.org. -------------------------------------MORE INFORMATION artsandservices.org


OCtOBeR 15, 2010

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Community Action team seeking artists, sponsors for chalk-art contest Several dozen artists will use chalk as their medium and the sidewalks of 2nd Street as their backdrop for the 7th Annual $1,000 Belmont Shore Sidewalk ChalkArt Contest, organized by the Community Action Team (CAT). This year the contest is being held in conjunction with the Belmont Shore Art Walk. The contest is free to enter in advance when artists submit the entry form available at JustinRudd.com/chalk.html. Entry, pastels, drawing paper, snacks, and a pizza lunch will be free for the first 100 registrants, aged 17 and older, and just $10 for all others. Those under age 17 are welcome as nonjuried participants for $10. A 12color set of non-toxic pastels and a 38” x 50” white sheet of premium artist’s paper will be provided to all

LB transit’s CeO retiring after 30 years

Long Beach Transit’s (LBT) chief operating officer, Guy Heston, has announced his retirement, and filling his position are LBT staff members Marcelle Epley and Robyn Peterson, who have assumed the leadership roles of chief administrative officer/senior vice president and chief operating officer/senior vice president, respectively. Heston will stay with the organization for the remainder of the year to mentor and coach Epley and Peterson and work directly with Larry Jackson, LBT president and chief executive officer. Heston’s departure after a successful 30-year career with Long Beach Transit represents the end of an era. “Guy has served as the heart and conscience of Long Beach Transit,” said Jackson. “He is the anchor for hundreds of employees. Most of the improvements we have achieved over the years are directly linked to the strategic vision that Guy continually pushes us to set. Personally and professionally, I will miss him a great deal.” Heston’s contributions to LBT have been meaningful for the transit agency, its customers and the community. Having been the visionary force behind providing a convenient and accessible location for customers to get transit information, LBT opened the new Transit and Visitor Information Center in 2009. He spearheaded efforts to incorporate public art at transit bus stops and has set quality standards throughout the organization that serve as a model for transit agencies nationwide. Heston has been actively involved with Leadership Long Beach and Young Horizons. He served as past chair of the board of directors for the California State University, Long Beach Alumni Association and currently serves as President-Elect of the CSU Alumni Council. ß

registered artists. Artists will draw on paper that will be affixed to the sidewalk with masking tape. Artists are free to take home their artwork after the judging and/or to sell their art. First-place prize is $350, second place wins $250, and third prize is $150. Five awards of merit will be given, at $50 each. To defray event costs, CAT is encouraging businesses, clubs, organizations and individuals to sponsor an artist’s space for the day. For $25, the name of the sponsoring business or individual will be featured on a small sign on the ground at an artist’s work area. --------------------------------MORE INFORMATION (562) 439-3316 JustinRudd.com Courtesy Justin Rudd

Chalk artist Cecilia Linayao from San Diego works on her sidewalk creation at last year’s contest in Belmont Shore.


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OCtOBeR 15, 2010

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OCtOBeR 15, 2010

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California community colleges and California State University have announced a joint task force charged with the implementation of SB 1440, the Student Transfer Achievement Act, which was signed into law by Governor Schwarzenegger and goes into effect in fall 2011. The statute establishes a transfer associate degree (A.A.) for those students who have completed 60 transferrable units that include general education and major preparation courses. Community college students that obtain the associate degree designated for transfer will be admitted to the CSU with junior standing. “I am delighted to serve on the committee that will deliver a clear transfer pathway for community college students to a California State University,” said Eloy Oakley, president of

Long Beach City College. “As a community college transfer student myself, I know first-hand how frustrating it can be. I look forward to implementing this new law that promises to help students achieve a college degree and transition into the workforce in a shorter period of time.” Committee member Douglas Freer, vice president for student affairs at Cal Poly Pomona, said the group hopes to move quickly through the process in order to be ready for fall 2011. “With more than 60 percent of CSU students coming from our community colleges, it is critical that we work to implement SB 1440 as soon as possible to ensure a smooth transition and help more students earn their bachelor’s degree.” An initial meeting of the task force is expected in the next few weeks. ß

CSULB student among winners of Minerva Scholarship Long Beach resident Patrice Collins, a student at California State University, Long Beach, is among the list of winners announced this week by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and First Lady Maria Shriver for the WE Educate 2010 Minerva Scholarships, which seek to meet the needs of dedicated college students and assist outstanding California women in their pursuit of higher education. WE Educate is a program of the Women’s Conference, the nation’s premier forum for women. Through this scholarship program, the Women’s Conference is able to honor women who exemplify the values of the Conference, continuing its work of empowering women 365 days a year to realize their potential.

“Since WE Educate began in 2005, we have awarded 48 Minerva Scholarships totaling $350,000,” said Shriver. “The impact of this scholarship program is extraordinary, and we are overjoyed to invest in these talented young women by expanding their educational opportunities with these scholarships.” “I am so pleased to honor these young women for their perseverance and determination to attain a higher education,” said Schwarzenegger. “They are true examples of what is possible, and they should take great pride in this fantastic achievement. -----------------------------------MORE INFORMATION WomensConference.org

” g n i r a h S e n i W “ Rubber Duck ! h c a e B g n o L f Tour o Sunday, November 14, 2010 5pm-6:30pm The Heart of delius restaurant ™ dave and louise Solzman ™ Food is a passion and an art for louise Solzman. She has been cooking as long as she can remember, and works to rave reviews as executive chef at delius restaurant in Signal Hill, that she operates with her husband, dave, the general manager/Sommelier. chef louise is inspired by tastes from all over the world and carefully plans the weekly menus with emphasis on foods in season as well as the changing trends in dining. She is assisted by an experienced and efficient staff. even though louise is usually busy in the kitchen, that doesn't mean you won’t see her popping out to visit with the guests every now and then to see what they think of the cuisine.

$25 per person (all-inclusive) reservations are required and space is limited. The Rubber Duck is an amphibious vehicle that gives tours of the Long Beach port by land and by sea. We will board the Duck at Delius and drive to downtown Long Beach. The Duck will then splash into the water and give an aquatic tour featuring an evening view of the downtown skyline and the Queen Mary. The tour will end back at Delius at roughly 6:30pm. To make these outings even better, I encourage you to bring a special

bottle of wine to share with your fellow adventurers. Now is the time to open that special bottle that you have been saving (unless it's a 20-year-old white. Keep that one to yourself, please). As another incentive, Chef Louise is coming along with us. We will provide cheese and crackers and will have a couple bottles of our own to share. Come tour with us, Dave Solzman

2951 cHerry avenue, Signal Hill 562.426.0694 • www.deliusrestaurant.com


OCtOBeR 15, 2010

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Formerly homeless CSULB student who took shelter in music rooms named Hearst/trustees’ Award recipient When Cal State Long Beach (CSULB) student Brian K. Smith found himself homeless, he didn’t give up on his dream of a university education. He found refuge in it…literally. The senior Spanish translation and music major used the CSULB music rooms as impromptu shelters when he lost his financial aid and student loans because of the limit on unit accumulation. As a result of not having financial support, Smith became homeless and took refuge in the practice rooms, determined to be the first male in his family to get a college degree. “I didn’t know what else to do,” Smith said. “Education is so important to me. I knew that I would eventually get over this hurdle.” Smith’s determination, perseverance and belief in himself has paid off in a big way this fall, as he was named a recipient of the 2010-11 William R. Hearst/CSU Trustees’ Award for Outstanding Achievement. The $3,000 award will allow him to complete his degrees at CSULB this year and more. “I was honored and grateful when

I heard that I had received the award. Since I had exhausted all financial resources, including financial aid, two loans, and the Jenkins Vocal Scholarship, I was faced with possibly not being able to continue my education,” Smith said. “Now that I received the Hearst Award, I am able to finish here at CSULB with my B.A. and B.M. degrees and focus on the next step– preparing for grad school.” Each year, the California State University (CSU) selects 23 students, one from each campus in the system, to receive the Hearst/CSU Trustees’ Award, which is among the system’s highest forms of recognition for student achievement. The award is given to students who have demonstrated financial need, experienced personal hardships, and have attributes such as superior academic performance, exemplary community service and significant personal achievements. “These extraordinary student scholars exemplify strength, perseverance through adversity, dedication to learning and commitment to others,” noted Ali C. Razi, CSU trustee emeritus. “The leadership through service

demonstrated by these scholars inspires deep respect on CSU campuses and within the community.” In addition to their strength and perseverance, Smith and his fellow awardees also have demonstrated academic achievement and a passion for learning. All of the scholars are either completing or looking toward a graduate degree– with half of the students planning to pursue a doctorate. “I am a McNair Scholar, and I am working on my research paper with my mentor Ray Briggs on ‘African Influence in the Music of Mexico’s Costa Chica Region.’ The paper is due to be published in spring 2011 in the CSULB McNair Journal,” Smith said. “The McNair Scholars Program is a federally funded program under the US Department of Education. It is designed to increase the number of students from underrepresented and disadvantaged backgrounds who have demonstrated strong, academic potential to go on to graduate study and, in particular, receive their Ph.D.s and later become faculty.” Smith plans to attend graduate school and then pursue a Ph.D. to ex-

Mobile science-education laboratory gets new look

Courtesy CSUlB

Despite being homeless during part of his college studies, Brian K. Smith has maintained a 3.65 grade point average at CSULB while taking 18 to 20 units every semester

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pand his translating abilities. Transferring from Los Angeles City College summa cum laude and from Los Angeles Valley College cum

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laude, Smith has maintained a 3.65 grade point average at CSULB while taking 18 to 20 units every semester. And, despite his financial difficulties, he finds time to volunteer at Destiny House Ministries in Long Beach as a Spanish interpreter. He also helps other students with planning for their recitals as well as tutoring in Spanish, French and Italian. (He also speaks German, Portuguese and Japanese) Smith made special mention of Lily Salter with the CSULB McNair Program, who played a key role in finding Smith a place to live, and Erma Corona with the CSULB Educational Opportunity Program, who helped him become a candidate for the Hearst/Trustees’ Award. Smith also singled out two friends – Rebecca Lynn and Raul Lopez– giving thanks for their continuous support as well as Destiny House Ministries. ----------------------------------------MORE INFORMATION brianksmith.com

All libraries will now be open Tuesday through Saturday. Hours are:

Effective this week, the Long Beach Public Library has implemented standardized hours as follows. Four neighborhood libraries will be closed on Mondays: El Dorado Library, 2900 Studebaker Road; Bret Harte Library, 1595 W. Willow St.; Mark Twain Library, 1401 E. Anaheim St.; North Library, 5571 Orange Ave. “Despite these reductions, Long Beach Public Library is committed to providing excellent customer service to our Long Beach community,” said Library Director Glenda Williams.

Main Library Tuesday 10am–8pm Wednesday 10am–6pm Thursday 10am–6pm Friday 10am–5pm Saturday 10 am–5pm All neighborhood libraries Tuesday noon–7pm Wednesday noon–6pm Thursday noon–7pm Friday 10am–5pm Saturday 10am–5pm -------------------------------------MORE INFORMATION lbpl.org

Courtesy glACVCD

“The Bug Bus” is designed to engage students in learning about vector control and disease prevention through unique hands-on activities.

The Greater Los Angeles Mosquito and Vector Control Public Health and Educational Foundation and the Greater Los Angeles County Vector Control District (GLACVCD) have revealed a new look for their mobile science-education laboratory, the VecMobile, or what students in Los Angeles County call “The Bug Bus.” The redesign features eye-catching 12-foot-high mosquitoes in various stages of metamorphosis, magnified virus strands and a new logo. The lifelike images offer a glimpse into the unique, scientific curriculum laboratory offers to thousands of students throughout the county.

“I can’t wait to see the faces of students when they see our new ‘Bug Bus’ redesign,” said Education Program Coordinator LeShawn Simplis. “I anticipate lots of jaws dropping.” In April 2001, the 35-foot recreational vehicle was donated to the Foundation and retrofitted to become the mobile science laboratory that it is today. “The Bug Bus” is available at no cost to fifth graders at all public and private elementary schools within GLACVCD’s boundaries, a territory spanning 1,330 square miles and serving more than 6 million people. The program is designed to engage students in learning about vector control and disease prevention

through unique hands-on activities. Many of the youth benefiting from this educational program are innercity students who may not otherwise have access to such science education resources and learning technologies. Students are empowered to learn by reading and working in groups to solve scientific problems in their environments. Another goal of the program is to foster interest in students to pursue careers in the fields of entomology, biology and public health. For more information about the VecMobile or to schedule an educational experience for a school, call (562) 944-9656 or visit glacvcd.org. ß

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dance because of a scheduling conflict. Ken Arnold, Democratic candidate for California’s 46th Congressional District, which is mostly in Orange

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County, spoke during the second session. Incumbent Republican Dana Rohrabacher also did not attend the event. Anthropology Professor Ron Loew, who also helps lead The Center for Peace and Social Justice on campus, was the lead organizer of the forum. “It’s good for students to be able to hear candidates talking at length about topics instead of just hearing a 60-second sound bite in a political ad,” he said. “I am particularly interested in registering students to vote, and I think most of them will vote along the lines that I favor. Most of them will vote Democratic.” Communications Studies Professor Ann Johnson served as moderator of the forum, and she agreed with Loew on the importance of the event. “First of all, these are the districts where most

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of our students live, and they need to have the opportunity to see the people who are running to represent them,” she said. “It’s also valuable for our students to get a chance to ask questions and be vocal in the political process. Our students are busy, and we appreciate that some candidates are able to come to the heart of the campus in the middle of the day so our students can hear what they have to say.” She added that it is also important to give Independent candidates, like Dibs, a forum where they can express their views since they do not usually have the financial resources to publicize their views to the same level that mainstream candidates do. In his opening remarks, Dibs noted that the United States faces many crises and problems. “This is a very important election, and I am not bought and paid for by the lobbyists,” he said. “The question in this election is status quo versus positive change.” Dibs insisted that both the Democratic and Republican parties put the needs of the elite, the wealthy and the special interests above the needs of the people. “We need to send somebody to Washington to represent the needs of the people,” he said, adding that Richardson was a professional career politician. In her opening remarks, Richardson disputed that accusation. “I am not a career politician,” she said. “Like many of you, I had to work my way through school.” After giving a brief description of her education and employment background, she insisted that she has always been in touch with the common people of this region, and she is very aware of the challenges faced by average citizens, as well as business leaders. “It’s important to make decisions that will make sense for everybody, and that is what I focus on,” she said. After the candidates’ opening statements, Johnson asked a series of questions. She noted that, despite the federal stimulus dollars that have gone to California State University system, in the past two years, students at CSULB and state universities across the state have faced a string of tuition hikes, fee hikes, fewer courses to choose from, and dwindling student

OCtOBeR 15, 2010

The Campaign Trail The last day to register to vote in the November 2 General Election is Oct. 18. The last day to request a vote-by-mail ballot is Oct. 26. ——————————————Signal Hill Mayor Ed Wilson and Councilmembers Larry Forester, Tina Hansen, Michael Noll and Ellen Ward will host a luncheon in support of incumbent Congresswoman Laura Richardson (Democrat– 37th District) on Thursday, Oct. 21 from noon to 1:30pm at Delius Restaurant, 2951 Cherry Ave. For more information, call (562) 787-3131. —————————————With just two weeks left before the November 2 General Election, Secretary of State Debra Bowen is encouraging Californians to get involved in the electoral process by signing up to be a poll worker on Election Day. “Poll workers truly do make an important difference in our democracy,” Bowen said. “Each poll worker helps to protect voters’ rights, secure ballots and ensure polling place accessibility– all crucial to the success of an election.” The average stipend is $100 for the day’s work, though rates vary among counties. Interested people may call their county elections offices to sign up or visit sos.ca.gov/elections/pollworker.htm for more information. —————————————Voting system vendors will be required to notify the California Secretary of State about previously undisclosed flaws in their products thanks to landmark legislation sponsored by Secretary of State Debra Bowen and signed recently by the Governor. Senate Bill 1404 helps ensure the integrity of California’s voting process by requiring voting system vendors and ballot manufacturers to report product flaws they discover before and after the products are approved for use in California. In turn, the Secretary of State is required to submit a report of all disclosed problems to the US Election Assistance Commission (EAC), making it possible for voters and elections officials in all states to benefit from California’s transparency. Companies may be liable for civil penalties of up to $50,000 per violation for failing to disclose known product flaws.

support services. Johnson asked, “What support do you believe the federal government should give to the state universities and students?” “We need to do everything we can to help those who want to get an education,” Richardson replied. “The difference should not be that they cannot afford it. Cost should not be a prohibitive factor in getting an education.” She added that one of the mistakes made in the federal stimulus funding was that the money went to the governor first. “Our governor was too busy trying to use that money to plug the hole in our unbalanced state budget,” she said, adding that federal funds that were intended for universities were diverted to other state programs. Richardson also noted that she is currently fighting to make sure that federal money intended for colleges and universities is actually given to those institutions.

Dibs said the biggest reason for the federal government’s failure to properly fund education is the amount spent on the military. “We spend billions and trillions of dollars on war,” he said. “Fifty-nine percent of the federal discretionary budget is going to the Pentagon. It’s a question of priorities. Education needs to be a national security issue. We need to bring our troops home from Iraq and Afghanistan in the near future and spend the money here at home. Without raising taxes, we can lower university tuitions and hire more teachers.” CSULB will host another candidate forum on Friday, Oct. 15 at the Walter Pyramid. Candidates for 54th District Assembly, including incumbent Bonnie Lowenthal and her opponent Martha Flores Gibson, have been invited to speak at 3pm. Richardson, Dibs and Parker are expected to speak at 4:15pm. ß

recently began on a pipeline that will connect two WRD water-spreading grounds, enabling the capture of an additional 1,300 acre-feet (423 million gallons) of storm water annually. “That project will be completed in time for the 2010-2011 storm season,” he said. Calderon also mentioned WRD’s goal of becoming free of imported water for replenishment and barrier injection by 2015. He explained that the WRD Board of Directors took steps toward that goal this year with a series of actions that laid the framework for the Groundwater Reliability Improvement Program (GRIP), a partnership with the Upper San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District and the county sanitation districts. The program will significantly increase the amount of recycled water used for replenishment. “GRIP will ultimately increase the local water supply by up to 21,000 acre-feet per year– over 6.8 billion gallons annually– for replenishment,” Calderon said. Underlining the importance of becoming free of imported water for replenishment and barrier injection, Whitaker told the audience that only in 11 of the past 30 years has California experienced normal or above-normal precipitation. “Deliveries of imported water from Northern California and the Colorado River to our area continue to be curtailed due to a combination of drought and judicial rulings,” he warned. “Plans to restore the ecosystem of the Bay-Delta may well result in permanent curtailment

of supplies to Southern California.” Whitaker stressed that the imported seasonal water available for replenishment for the first 47 years of WRD’s history has not been available for the past three consecutive years and will not be available on a reliable basis, if at all, in the future. He explained that, to make up for that shortfall, WRD must use more recycled water and capture more storm water for replenishment and barrier injection. “Local supply must completely replace imported supply,” Whitaker said. He added that a legally certain framework for groundwater storage must be developed in order to be able to store imported water in the years that it is available. “The 450,000 acrefeet of storage capacity available in the Central and West Coast Basins constitutes the single largest unused water resource asset in Southern California,” Whitaker said. “Efforts to put that capacity to good use have been stalled for decades by institutional and legal conflicts.” He explained that WRD is currently waiting for the California Court of Appeals to rule on a series of petitions and court hearings pertaining to water storage and extraction rights. Those rulings are expected sometime in 2011. “Without a final determination, our region will not be able to take advantage of storage opportunities during years of imported water surplus and state bond funding for the investments groundwater storage facilities require,” Whitaker said. ß

WRD continued from page 1

Honoring e Memory 

Frank raer e World’s Best Day, Husband, Grandfaer & Friend Frank was born February 25, 1926 in New Bedford, Massachusetts, to Frank and Marsha Thrasher (predeceased). He graduated from high school/college and later served in the United States Navy as a World War II radio man. He worked for Southern Pacific Pipelines for 47 years and then retired to spend time with his family. He was active in the grandchildren's school as a reader/mentor, the community and the grandchildren’s theater (OCCT). He enjoyed spending time with his family and pets, going to Crestline where he and his wife own

a cabin and taking trips to Catalina. He also enjoyed meeting and sharing life stories with everyone he met. He always told a good story and was a gentle man. He will be missed greatly by his family and everyone who knew him. Frank is survived by his wife, Linda Long; brother, Harrison Thrasher, Las Vegas, NV; sisters June (Waldyn) Benbenek, Conroe, TX; Dawn (Jack) VanVliet, Mansfield, MA; Doreen Spano, Columbus, MT; sons Lance Roth & Glen Thrasher; daughter, Denise Montgomery-Harley; son-in-law Mykel Harley; and grandchildren, Jennifer Thrasher, Michael Montgomery, Kayla Montgomery and Myles Harley.

Sunrise: Feuary 25, 1926 Sunset: Octor 5, 2010

was curtailed on a voluntary basis,” Calderon said. “By virtue of pumping more than could be naturally replaced, both basins were in danger of catastrophic collapse.” He added that the depletion of fresh water from the aquifers had also caused seawater to invade both basins, contaminating wells from El Segundo to Long Beach. Calderon noted that regulations and court rulings strictly define who can pump and how much water they can pump from groundwater supplies in both basins, and WRD makes up the difference between natural replenishment and the water that is legally pumped. “An elaborate system of barrier wells has also put a halt to seawater intrusion, although 650,000 acre-feet of brackish water remains trapped on the inland side of the barriers,” he explained. Calderon stressed that while WRD’s primary mission to replenish the basins remains the same, its methods have changed significantly in the last five decades. “In the beginning, the water we purchased for replenishment was exclusively imported water from the Colorado River,” he said, adding that in 1962, WRD and county sanitation districts began using recycled water for replenishment. “Steadily, over time, we have increased our use of recycled water for spreading and barrier injection,” Calderon said. “We have also increased the capture of storm water for replenishment.” He said construction


OCtOBeR 15, 2010 TST3548 trustee Sale no. Ca09001127-10-1 . loan no. 0015625577 title order no. 100401094-Ca-lPi aPn 7215-019-072 notiCe of truStee’S Sale you are in default under a deed of truSt dated 6/28/2006. unleSS you taKe aCtion to ProteCt your ProPerty, it May Be Sold at a PuBliC Sale. if you need an exPlanation of tHe nature of tHe ProCeedingS againSt you, you SHould ContaCt a laWyer. on 11/9/2010 at 10:30 aM, at the front entrance to the Pomona Superior Courts Building, 350 West Mission Blvd., Pomona, Ca MtC financial inc., dba trustee Corps, as the duly appointed trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain deed of trust recorded on 07/11/2006 as instrument no. 06 1522540 of official records in the office of the recorder of los angeles County, Ca, executed by: denise Miller, an unmarried woman, as trustor, in favor of lending 1st Mortgage, as Beneficiary, Will Sell at PuBliC auCtion to tHe HigHeSt Bidder, in lawful money of the united States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: as more fully described in said deed of trust the property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. the street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2101 eaSt 21St Street #308 , Signal Hill, Ca 90755 the undersigned trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said deed of trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the deed of trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the trustee and of the trusts created by said deed of trust. the total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the notice of trustee’s Sale is estimated to be $262,976.73 (estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. in addition to cash, the trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the trustee. in the event tender other than cash is accepted, the trustee may withhold the issuance of the trustee`s deed upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. the property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. if the trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. date: 10/15/2010 MtC financial inc dba trustee Corps tS no. Ca09001127-10-1 . 17100 gillette ave irvine, Ca 92614 949-252-8300 Clarisa gastelum, authorized Signature Sale inforMation Can Be oBtained on line at www.priorityposting.com autoMated SaleS inforMation PleaSe Call 714-573-1965 Compliance with California Civil Code Section 2924f: the Beneficiary or Beneficiary’s agent has indicated that the requirements of California Civil Code Section 2924f have been met. regarding the property that is the subject of this notice of sale, the “mortgage loan servicer” as defined in Civil Code § 2923.53(k)(3) declares that it has obtained from the Commissioner a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to Civil Code section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date this notice of sale is recorded. the time frame for giving a notice of sale specified in Civil Code Section 2923.52 subdivision (a) does not apply to this notice of sale pursuant to Civil Code Sections 2923.52. Clarisa gastelum, authorized Signature truStee CorPS iS a deBt ColleCtor. any inforMation oBtained Will Be uSed for tHat PurPoSe. P750176 10/15, 10/22, 10/29/2010 TST3560 NoTICE oF TRUSTEE’S SAlE trustee Sale no.: 20100028700967 title order no.: 100402567 you are in default fHa/va/PMi no.: under a deed of truSt, dated 09/26/05. unleSS you taKe aCtion to ProteCt your ProPerty, it May Be Sold at a PuBliC Sale. if you need an exPlanation of tHe nature of tHe ProCeeding againSt you, you SHould ContaCt a laWyer. NDEx West, llC, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to deed of trust recorded on 10/04/05, as instrument no. 05 2388743 of official records in the office of the County recorder of loS ANgElES County, State of California. exeCuted By: WIllIAM AllEN DAVIS, Will Sell at PuBliC auCtion to HigHeSt Bidder for CaSH, CaSHier’S CHeCK/CaSH eQuivalent or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the united States) DATE oF SAlE: November 4, 2010 TIME oF SAlE: 11:30 AM PlACE oF SAlE: At the front entrance to the Pomona Superior Courts Building, 350 W. Mission Blvd. Pomona, CA. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2119 RIDgEVIEW TERRACE DRIVE, SIgNAl HIll, CA 90806. APN# 7217-029-007 the undersigned trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said deed of trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said deed of trust, fees, charges and expenses of the trustee and of the trusts created by said deed of trust. the total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the notice of Sale is $1,050,965.71. the beneficiary under said deed of trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of default and demand for Sale, and a written notice of default and election to Sell. the undersigned caused said notice of default and election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. for truStee Sale inforMation PleaSe Call: nationWide PoSting & PuBliCation, inC. 5005 WindPlay drive, Suite 1, el dorado HillS, Ca 95762-9334 916-9390772, www.nationwideposting.com NDEx West l.l.C. MAY BE ACTINg AS A DEBT CollECToR ATTEMPTINg To CollECT A DEBT. ANY INFoRMATIoN oBTAINED WIll BE USED FoR THAT PURPoSE. NDEx West, l.l.C. as Trustee, By: ric Juarez dated: 10/10/10 nPP0166877 10/15/10, 10/22/10, 10/29/10

PUBLiC nOtiCeS TST3540 / 20101305030 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENt the following persons are doing business as: SoCal furniture outlet, 22031 Main St. #37, Carson, Ca 90745. registrant: 1. Juan CarloS gutierreZ, 1037 W. fiat St., torrance, Ca 90502 2. Juan Manuel gutierreZ, 22031 Main St., #37, Carson, Ca 90745. this business is conducted by: a general Partnership. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Juan Carlos gutierrez. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on September 15, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: September 24, & october 1, 8, 15, 2010. TST3541 / 20101343265 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following persons are doing business as: M.C.d. ProPertieS, 1132 S. grand ave., glendora, Ca 91740. registrant: 1. MiCHael SCott doWnard, 2. Carol lee doWnard, 118 Crescent glen dr., glendora, Ca 91741. this business is conducted by: a Husband and Wife. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Carol l. downard. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on September 22, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: September 24, & october 1, 8, 15, 2010. TST3542 / 20101343266 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: Kuito CaSHing CHeCKS, 4402 long Beach Blvd., long Beach, Ca 90807. registrant: MarCo e. CaBeZaS, 4402 long Beach Blvd., long Beach, Ca 90807. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Marco e. Cabezas. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on September 22, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: September 24, & october 1, 8, 15, 2010. TST3546 / 20101380573 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: tHe BooKKeePer, 160 Covina ave., long Beach, Ca 90803. registrant: KiM JoSePH oniSKo, 160 Covina ave., long Beach, Ca 90803. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Kim Joseph onisko. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was September 29, 2010. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on September 28, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 1, 8, 15, 22, 2010. TST3547 / 20101385485 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: Jr'S landSCaPing, 197 e. Hullett St., long Beach, Ca 90805. registrant: fernando Carrillo, 197 e. Hullett St., long Beach, Ca 90805. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: fernando Carrillo. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on September 29, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 1, 8, 15, 22, 2010. TST3557 / 20101347666 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: WilloW run enterPriSeS, 388 e. ocean Blvd. #1106, long Beach, Ca 90802. registrant: tHoMaS H. Buffington, 388 e. ocean Blvd. #1106, long Beach, Ca 90802. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: thomas H. Buffington. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on September 22, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 8, 15, 22, 29, 2010. TST3558 / 20101425067 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: CaMBodian exPreSS ServiCe, 843 e. anaheim St., long Beach, Ca 90813. registrant: KuntHie PiCH, 5450 Paramount Blvd. #44, long Beach, Ca 90805. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: Kunthie Pich. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 6, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business

name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 8, 15, 22, 29, 2010.

SignAL tRiBUne ciTy oF Signal Hill tSt3566

TST3559 / 20101425068 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: 1. dyMaMiC glaSS, 2. dynaMiC glaSS By dyana, 3. glaSS By dyana, 3305 Brayton ave., Signal Hill, Ca 90755. registrant: dyana duPeray anderSen, 3305 Brayton ave., Signal Hill, Ca 90755. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: dyana andersen. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was april, 2005. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 6, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 8, 15, 22, 29, 2010. TST3561 / 20101457590 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: King CaMeran foundation, 6186 atlantic ave., long Beach, Ca 90805. registrant: folloWerS of tHe Way MiniStrieS, 6186 atlantic ave., long Beach, Ca 90805. this business is conducted by: a Corporation. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: William Jones, President. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 13, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 15, 22, 29, & november 5, 2010. TST3562 / 20101457591 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: green Corner, 4103 viking Way #B, long Beach, Ca 90808. registrant: HeMPeror'S neW ClotHeS, 4103 viking Way #B, long Beach, Ca 90808. this business is conducted by: a limited liability Partnership. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: lawrence King. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 13, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 15, 22, 29, & november 5, 2010. TST3563 / 20101457592 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: rendeZvouS toBaCSundi reCordS, 11400 W. olympic Blvd. #1510, los angeles, Ca 90064. registrant: g.a. CaBot, 11400 W. olympic Blvd. #1510, los angeles, Ca 90064. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: g.a. Cabot. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was January 12, 2005. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 13, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 15, 22, 29, & november 5, 2010. TST3564 / 20101457593 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following persons are doing business as: roSSMont HoMeoWnerS aSSoCiatgion, 2135 florida St., long Beach, Ca 90814. registrant: 1. deBra t. Bennett-JoneS, 5599 olive ave., long Beach, Ca 90805, 2. viCtoria l. WeSt, 80 Park ave., long Beach, Ca 90803. this business is conducted by: an unincorporated association other than a Partnership. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: debra t. Bennett-Jones. the registrant has not begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 13, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 15, 22, 29, & november 5, 2010. TST3565 / 20101436454 FICTITIoUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT the following person is doing business as: CHill Coffee lounge and Cafe, 510 e. Broadway, long Beach, Ca 90802. registrant: alex KotoyantZ, 4324 gardenia ave, long Beach, Ca 90807. this business is conducted by: an individual. i declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Signed: alex Kotoyantz. the registrant has begun to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. date started business was october 1, 2010. this statement was filed with the county clerk of los angeles County on october 7, 2010. notiCe: this fictitious business name statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the office of the county clerk. a new fictitious business name statement must be filed prior to that date. the filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a fictitious business name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). Pub. the Signal tribune: october 15, 22, 29, & november 5, 2010.

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TRUST lANDSCAPE • Complete Designing and layout • Tree trimming • “All concrete work” • Sprinkler systems • New lawns, trees, shrubs • Maintenance

562-422-3806

A Full-Service Computer Company - Home or Office • Computer Sales • Repair & Installation • Website Design & Hosting • Network Setup, Support, Cabling & Wireless • Internet Installation & Configuration • Remote Back-up & Data Recovery • Camera Surveillance Security Systems MEMBER

Better Business Bureau

LAN DSCAPE DES IG N ER

PAI NTI NG

ALFORD’S

English

gARDenS

“Your Neighborhood Painter”

...where your garden begins

Landscape & Garden

• Design • Installation • Maintenance 562.997.4111

LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED State license C27 #642266

www.kathyalford.com

PA R T Y F U N

PLUMBING

Put on an event they won’t forget!

562.989.4666

4047 long Beach Blvd

J&d

plumbing &heating

• residential • Commercial • interiors • Exteriors • Woodworking Rich Ward • Faux Finishes CALIC 864357

562.528.6258 PIANO TU N I NG / REPAI R

tUning & RePAiR

ChristineKay

commercial • residential • industrial MakEs a grEaT WEdding or parTy Favor!

Rent a Portable Photo booth for your next event • Includes portable booth, props and staff of two • 4 hours of unlimited photos and fun!

1806 gaviota Ave.

CALL FOR DETAILS

lic. # 462161

877-FoTosTrip PIANO LES SON S

PREMIUM ROOFING

“First in Service” H UnDReDS OF LOCAL ReFeRenCeS O VeR 35 YeARS eXPeRienCe B iXBY K nOLLS ReSiDent “A-rated” on angieslist.com Contractor’s License #629882

Call Dennis bartlett:

(562) 427-0688

Drains & Sewers • Water Heaters • Copper Repiping • Disposers • gas Piping • Video Sewer Inspection • Furnace Repairs/Installation • Electronic leak Detection

ROOFING

Windward Roofs

562-427-2555 www.jdplumb.com

24-Hour Emergency Service

License #783947

Recommended by many local music teachers Associate Member of the Piano Technicians Guild

FoR RENT

TOOLWORKS

Banquet room available for parties or events at 16426 Bellflower Blvd. in Bellflower. Call Steve at (562) 925-5750 for details.

Tool Repairs, Sales and Service

FoR RENT

Free estimates 562-981-6644 Phil Reno

208-1853 Call for a free estimate

T O O L R E PA I R S

Serving Wrigley District RePAiRS WeLCOMe

www.windwardroofs.com

(562)

1431 28th St, Signal Hill (562) 988-9150

2 bedroom 1 bath apt. in Signal Hill with laundry hook-ups in Kitchen. Private Patio with City views. Carport for 2 cars. Close to City Hall, SH Police dept , Park and Schools. $1100.00 per mo. plus Security. good Credit and id's a must. Call for appt. 562-597-4148

advErTisE WiTh ThEsE proFEssionaLs For as LoW as $20 pEr WEEk CaLL signaL TriBunE aT 562-595-7900


OCtOBeR 15, 2010

SignAL tRiBUne

15

thank You Once again, we would like to thank Patricia’s for donating food for the Lydia House. this facility is part of the Long Beach Rescue Mission, a safe haven for women and their children. David has very kindly (and with great generosity) donated a delicious meal for everyone at the Lydia House to enjoy. Patricia’s homemade food is a treat to Lydia House residents— they enjoy their meal and are very appreciative! We invite everyone in the community to help the Long Beach Rescue Mission! Let’s get together and make a difference in someone else’s life. We are currently collecting canned food and non-perishables at our facility to help for the upcoming holidays. if anyone would like to help, please drop off your donation(s) at one of our facilities.


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OCtOBeR 15, 2010

Signal Tribune Issue 3219  

Signal Tribune 3219

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