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BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE

Thesis Candidate: Alex Siekierski, Assoc. AIA siekierski.alex@gmail.com

Submission Date: 01.04.2013 | Master’s Thesis Book |

Degree to be awarded by the BAC: Master of Architecture

Thesis Rep:

ART + SCIENCE + MANUFACTURING + BUSINESS = INNOVATION

Robert Hsiung, FAIA robert@hsiung,net

Thesis Advisor: Richard Peake rpeake.bac@gmail.com

Thesis Director: Ian F. Taberner, AIA ian.taberner@the-bac.edu

engaging space

Architecture which can stimulate social interaction Supported by collaboration and inspired by Montessori education [1]


COPYRIGHT Š 2010-2012 ALEX JEFFREY SIEKIERSKI All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic, mechanical, photocoping, or otherwise, without the prior permission of the author.

[2]


“Tell me and I forget. Show me and I remember. Involve me and I understand.� - Chinese Proverb

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Executive Summary INITIAL THESIS STATEMENT

program diagrams

Can the engaging of multiple professions yield an environment for enhanced exchanging of information via collaboration and digital media? My thesis is about creating an environment for education, communication, technology, active learning, and collaboration. Key components of collaboration regard adaptability, visual connectivity, integration of nature, order, transformative spaces, layering of program, and the de-standardization of space types. With the standardization of building uses come restraints on adaptability and functionality within spaces. In order for sharing of ideas and problem solving to occur, standard space types are no longer a determining factor for the success for the program. My over arching investigation is to create a resource center which can attract minds from different professions and trades. As a result I am providing an environment which can overlap the artists, mathematicians, philosophers, scientists, doctors and historians, to facilitate the birth of new ideas and provides the tools essential to bring them to life, all within a mutual environment that is safe for communicating ideas freely.

traditional classroom

montessori classroom

collaborative classroom

CONCLUSIONS The role of my thesis on a larger scale relates to constraints on human resources. Not in regards to vital resources at large but resources which support business development and the creation of something new. In cities where vast numbers of people work in close proximity, I feel that the city itself can support its residences better. Libraries and courthouses are not of great value in today’s fast paced world. Similar to Zip Car where everyone pays a small fee to utilize a common needed resource, I envision that my new learning typology can be implemented on any site and at any scale. Space is limited within dense cities and if there is a way for the public to have additional / temporary access to “space� then the city is serving a greater purpose for the benefit of its people. Because information is at our fingertips and very accessible it is now more important that we rely on others trades to get a common goal complete. The term Think-Tank is a great way to assimilate my goals. The only difference is that my building is providing rent-able space for the long and short term. It also houses an online database of exchanged/ shared professional resources (Time Bank). These systems could be accommodated by our government and maintained as a way of supporting education at a professional level, rather than simply funding singular parties to prosper. This idea/ concept would open doors for all person equally while providing a close connection and space for growth within its local communities.

innovative classroom (1)

innovative classroom (2)

innovative classroom (3)

The South Boston Public Innovative Design Center

BUILDING SITE & TYPOLOGY 244 A street in South Boston is currently a large flat parking lot. I find the site to a great area for investigating my thesis idea of engaging because of its connectedness to many means of transportation, adjacent views of downtown, Boston Harbour inlet, Harbour Walk and Convention Center. I am planning on incoporating my design into the 100 year master plan for South Boston. Building Typology and Approximate Size | Innovative Resource Center; 85,000 SF [4]


Section One PRE-THESIS INVESTIGATIONS

4 7-15

Section Two THE THESIS PROPOSAL

16-76

Section Three THESIS PROPOSAL EXHIBITION

77-79

Section Four INTRODUCTORY REVIEW

80-89

Section Five PRELIMINARY REVIEW

90-100

Section Six SCHEMATIC REVIEW

101-114

Section Seven SCHEMATIC INTERIM REVIEW

115-125

Section Eight LIGHT SPACE WORKSHOP

126-135

Section Nine DESIGN DEVELOPMENT REVIEW

136-147

Section Ten DESIGN DEVELOPMENT II REVIEW

148-157

Section Eleven FINAL THESIS REVIEW

158-181

Section Twelve THESIS PANEL & ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

182-196

Section Thirteen CLOSING STATEMENT & REGARDS

197-202

Enclosed Contents

Executive Summary

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ALEX JEFFREY SIEKIERSKI, ASSOC. AIA

siekierski.alex@gmail.com | linkedin.com/in/alexsiekierski | 617.894.0664| 670 E Sixth Street #3, South Boston, MA 02127

EDUCATION Fall 2008 Fall 2012

Boston Architectural College, Boston, MA Candidate Master of Architecture | Master Thesis: “Architecture which can stimulate social interaction”

Summer 2008

Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany Semester Abroad Program | Focusing on Urban Transportation Design and Sustainable Technologies

Fall 2006 Spring 2008

University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA Bachelor of Fine Art | Architectural Design

Fall 2003 Spring

Springfield Technical Community College, Springfield, MA Associates in Architectural Technology & Certificate in Construction Management |

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE June 2010 - Present

NELSON, Boston, MA | Architectural Designer Responsible for preparing complete and comprehensive architectural construction drawings Biogen B1 300,000 SF, Google ITA 100,000 SF, 540 W. Madison 45,000 SF, Biogen B17 90,000 SF

January 2010 - Present

Alex Siekierski + Partners, South Boston, MA | Owner/Principal Responsible for project management, meeting client objectives, coordination of contract employees Longhollow Tenant Building 10,000 SF, NH Residence Addition 2,000 SF,

March 2010 - June 2010

3/3d Studio, LLC, Lynnfield, MA | Contract Employee Project support from schematic through CD production using Autodesk Revit Litle & Co. Fitout 6,200 SF

January 2010 - June 2010

Division of Capitol Asset Management, Boston, MA | Architectural Programming Assistant Responsible for aiding in various programming projects for UMass Boston Master Plan responsible for conducting revit seminars and design of internal marketing material

January 2009 - July 2009

Urbanica, Boston, MA | Project Coordinator Drafting construction documents, producing marketing graphics, product research and cost analysis URBANICA 691 30,000 SF

Jan 2008 - April 2008

The Dennis Group, Springfield, MA | Architectural Drafter (Intern) Assisting in various aspects of the production of construction documents Malt-O-Meal CO. 350,000 SF

June 2007 - Jan 2008

Architectural Insights, Palmer, MA | Architectural Drafter Drafting of construction documents, legal/condo documents and existing conditions verification Haymarket Square Facade Restoration 20,000 LF, Warehouse Extention 15,000 SF

SKILLS 3D & CAD

Proficient in Revit Architecture 2012, AutoCAD 2007, AutoCAD WS, Sketchup Pro 8, Artlantis 3, ArchiCAD 13, 3DSMax 2011, Vasari, Ecotect2010, Sketchbook Pro, Podium, MoI

Graphics & Standards

Proficient in Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign (CS5), MS Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Outlook (2010) Newforma, & Knowledgable of LEED N.C. 3.0, ADA, IBC 8th Edition & Architectural Programming

COMPETITION EXPERIENCE Miami Beach Hotel Competition - February 2010 ACSA/AISC Steel Design Competition - May 2010 ACSA/AISC Steel Design Competition - May 2009 The Venice Architecture Biennale - July 2008

TRAVEL EXPERIENCE Dubai, Bilbao, London, Paris, Amsterdam, Brussels, Dublin, Cork, Barcelona, Rome, Florence, Vienna, Zürich, Prague, Istanbul, Majorca, Jerusalem, Oslo, Stockholm, Riga, Krakow, Warsaw, Zakopane, Ostralenka, Mazury

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My intentions for the pre-thesis graduate research and writing class was to focus on utilizing the class criteria and research as a direct springboard for my thesis process. Prior to this writing class I began thinking about what I wanted to study for the next year and a half. This began with the development of a 33 page portfolio consisting of every studio project I have done allowing me to identify programs and typologies I have experience with, along side various typologies I am interested in improving the quality of. After this I began archiving a series of case studies which helped me to develop what kind of materials/aesthetics I enjoy in architecture as well as popular types of form. This small brainstorming portfolio was really the origin of my process. Soon after as part of the grad writing class I began thinking about learning and how information is now exchanged from one person to another. I have always wanted to design something related to education and I, myself have been very invested and passionate about higher education. My initial idea came from the current problem we have in education in America mostly which is based upon a “fast-food� model. I wanted to figure out how to take higher-ed learning principals and implement them into the built form which could then utilize Architecture as an additional means of increasing the quality and retention of what we may learn.

1

PRE-THESIS PRE-THESIS INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS [ 7]


FREE & FULL OF ORDER MONTESSORI LEARNING METHODS APPLIED TO HIGHER EDUCATION GRADUATE RESEARCH & WRITING THEORY Alex Jeffrey Siekierski Graduate Research + Writing (AS 7229) Michael Davis & Joshua White Boston Architectural College Spring/Summer 2011

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THE PROBLEM

Robinson identifies the belief that the downfall in creativity and innovation, to have begun just after industrialism. Coincidentally during the same time Maria Montessori (who I will speak upon later) began implementing her

line process of teaching that could

Figure 3: Typical Classroom in the 1950’s (http://www.topfoto.co.uk/gallery/ClassicStock/ ppages/ppage25.html)

accommodate the massive increase

As education itself developed standards, so did

new teaching methods. This was when education began its own assembly Figure 1: Portrait of Sir Ken Robinson (Google image results)

in attending students. The curriculum

So many adults today do not understand what their true capabilities are and nor do they understand their true talents . High school gears its

at this time only focused on subjects that were most relevant to working life : Math, Language and Science. It was the beginning of prioritizing subject

students for college, which is then

matter and as a result the creative arts

supposed to prepare the student for their professional career. Sir Ken Robinson (figure 1), one of the most

such as painting, theatre, music, and performance art all fell to the wayside.

the spaces in which they lectured in. Desks all facing the front of the room where everyone was instructed to only listen to the teacher. As the population of students increased this “formal” classroom setting had to grow much larger at the university level. By doing so it mearly maintained its original standard and simply extrapolated on it. In higher education,

influential leaders in the current

It has been Sir Robinson’s assertion

this could be applied in a similar way that

educational crisis, is an author, speaker

that education is currently on a “fast

office workstations are currently arranged in an

and international advisor on education.

food” model ; meaning that education

open environment but are enclosed enough

He has claimed that the current

currently guarantees a level of poor

to protect from noise and visual disturbances.

quality, 100% of the time and is

Another excellent example of a well done

aimed at delivering this guarantee

academic space is the “Plug & Show Computer

for rapid production. Due to this

Presentation Seminar Rooms” (figure 6) which

model, Sir Robinson states that, “a

are an adaptable space driven by technology for

time of revolution is when things are

a medium sized lecture.

educational systems have failed at assisting every individual in finding their true capabilities, by not allowing for the individual’s creative spirit to develop and flourish. It is not the curriculum which will allow this spirit to develop but the vehicle in which the student is taking that should promote an environment which assists

happening that upset all the things we take for granted.” Resulting in the idea that education needs a revolution rather than mere reform.

The built environment can be a primary contributor to the educational institutions around the world, by allowing its students to explore learning in a multitude of ways suited to

and facilities in the development of

the individual’s needs. This cannot occur merely

the individuals creative spirit. Due

at the elementary levels but throughout the

to the college graduate inflation, Sir

entire educational journey, no matter what age.

Ken Robinson theorizes that a “college

Architects can add value to education through

degree is no longer a passport to a job;

their buildings which can assist in facilitating and

at best it’s a visa.” Due to this crisis of

influencing change and personal growth for the

a de-valued education, Architecture

creative spirit to develop.

should be serving as a means for adding value back into the educational institutions. INNOVATION

400 Person Lecture Hall 1996 (Academic Design : sharing lessons learned by William Ammentorp)

Over the last 50 years education has tried to adapt itself to accommodate and prepare its students for the changes in various professions. Robinson suggests that the small educational shifts in curriculum are not adequate in creating

KEN ROBINSON

Educational system started during industrialism(focus on math, english and sciences) Human EcologyUnknown future to prepare forFast Food modelCREATIVITY Revolution not reformLife is not linear but organic3yr old does not = 1/2 of a 6yr oldtradition = conformity-

a better learning process for students to grow. It is the delivery and receptiveness of the material that education provides, that is critical for the student to flourish.

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HYBRID OF TEACHING

MARIA MONTESSORI

- Exercise, nature experiences, cleanliness, fresh air, nutritious food - Focus on children between 3-6 years of age - Free and Full of Order = prepared environment

Figure 2: Portrait of Maria Montessori

CREATIVITY

COLLABORATION

In the late 1950’s, Maria Montessori (figure 2), began exploring her unique teaching approach, beginning in Italy. It was a revolutionary method at the time which focused on having a teacher directed approach and a child directed approach. Montessori’s educational process primarily focused on the development of children from the ages of three to six years. She felt this was the most influential time of a child’s life where they were most receptive and

Montessori believed that architecture at the academic installation must “promote freedom, order, beauty and atmosphere, didactic materials, community life, and reality and nature .” These were the overall concepts of her curriculum that still remain in practice today. Montessori felt in order to promote openness in the “prepared environment.”

creative. Just because history has

The layout of activity spaces should

shown her methods to be effective in

be based on the modified open plan

an environment with children, does

facility, where the children can observe

not mean they will not be-able to

what is going on from any part of the

help in a similar way with adults.

school in other words the “modified

One large disconnect that Robinson emphasizes, is that somewhere is the educational journey children are creative and believe they are creative, while the majority of adults do not believe they are creative and have no idea of their true potentials. Somewhere during the transition from

with smaller enclosed spaces . Additionally this space is open enough to see all activities but enclosed enough to protect from noise and visual distractions.

educational system.

tional crisis at the primary level while

The role of higher education must be to create an educational experience which will allow the individual to continually develop into adulthood at his or her own pace.

nature experiences, cleanliness, fresh air, and nutritious food. This set of criteria Montessori developed has been historically proven to be a critical part in allowing the creative mind to flourish. “Emphasis must be placed on visibility between activity areas in order to permit observation by the teacher, and activity areas in order to permit observation by the teacher and between the

For Montessori, visibility promoted freedom

phies, with a mixture of open areas

sori had tried to answer the educa-

cepts into higher educational practices.

must allow for teachings in the areas of exercise,

best of both open and close philoso-

In the early 1950’s Maria Montes-

easier to incorporate some of her con-

curriculum and the spaces they are taught in,

children.”

spirit becomes diluted within the

principles and theory it may actually be

nurture the learner, Montessori believed that the

open space” is a space which allows the

childhood to adulthood; the creative

While learning about the Montessori’s

In order to create an environment which can

similarly, today Robinson argues that “to meet the challenges ahead, we must redesign schools to nurture the

space can be visually minimized and the use can be adaptable, then architecture can begin to facilitate collaboration within a larger mass of people.

promote freedom, order, beauty and atmosphere, didatic materials, community life, and reality and nature. These concepts determined as the criteria of the Montessori approach are critical in allowing the creative mind to flourish.

MARIA MONTESSORI

creative capacity in all of us.” This was

one of Montessori’s goals as she began to implement her teaching methods in the late 1950’s.

and the inclination that if the boundaries of a

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THE SOLUTION THEORY

Similar to Robinson’s current take on education, Montessori determined that schooling Architecture at the academic needed a revolution; which installation must promote occured toward the end of her freedom, order, beauty and career, in the early 1950’s. She atmosphere, didatic materials, concluded that it must include community life, and reality “recognition of the goals, & nature. These concepts directions, and powers or determined as the criteria characteristics pertinent to of the Montessori teaching approach are critical in allowing each” student because we all have different capacities and the creative mind to flourish. feel them in different ways. The Architecture in some manner education revolution needed or another must allow for this to be built upon the basic criteria to be explored at its responses of human beings, maximum potential, not just which can be made possible, at the elementary level but by their complete development through higher education and and adaptation to their professionally.. environment.

PROPOSED IDEA The inclination is that if the separation of spaces can be minimized, resulting in an increase of freedom within the space. Then Architecture will allow for the masses to collaborate and learn at a higher degree. This exploration might also begin with removal of fixed seating and barriers within a space.

The primary connection between Montessori and Robinson is that 60 years ago a large number of students began attending primary schools as a result of World War II and Industrialism. This was the first generation of family members who attended a “new” formal style of education (figure 3). Montessori took into consideration the problem occurring with such a high volume of students globally and created a solution for teaching geared toward the learners needs. Similarly, two academic generations later we find One of the most recent a parallel problem where masses of educational design feature people from all ages are going to which can stimulate all higher education. Just as Montessori minds a like is the use of set the foundation for rebirth in technology into the spaces an educational crisis 60 years ago, as mentioned in the plug and Robinson is trying to create a new play rooms. It is best to use solution for the crisis during the technology that can enhance technological era. He claims that the the experiental qualities of pedagogy needs to adapt with the the learning environment. curriculum, not just to allow for the The better technology can curriculum to change and be given assist in creating real world situations, the increased chance through the same methods, which were the primary problems during that students will attain the Montessori’s era. knowledge of solving these almost authentic cituations. ANNE MEEK Architecture can facilitate culture Stimulating & varied physical environments are best- (Taylot & Vlasto’s 1983)

DOLECE + NORRIS - Information age - Learner driven - Increase number of older students = change - Industrial age (focus on output not outcome) - Change does not = transformation - Learning has to occur @ time, place & pace of the individual learner driven self pace personal best simulation create barrier-free, pepetual learning open access network of experts traditional + hydrib disciplines just in time learning perpetual learning automated learning system learning experiences by learners needs [11]

Montessori has been known for promoting some of the best creative learning environments simply by implementating and maintaing her academic design guidelines. Even though these guidelines were developed to serve a space for children. Some of the examples listed indicate that they can be applied for adults, focusing on higher education. The components of her educational guideline, become the summation of elements (openness, visibility, nature, and atmosphere) which create Montessori’s comprehensive environment, that promotes learning and creativity (figure 16).


A poor example which comes to mind is a typical large scale 300 person lecture hall (figure 4) (4,200 SF, 65FT x 65FT, 14SF per person), with 20 foot high ceilings in the front angled to a 10 foot ceiling in the back, became the best means for housing students in a classroom environment during the 1950’s when population growth was high. Even though this type of space meets some of Montessori’s requirements, it does not allow for openness as a means of a flexible space. Yes these types of spaces have been designed to achieve a high degree of visibility and acoustical soundness (figure 6), but this simply has grown into a traditional theatre where students watch education in a 21 inch wide seat with a fold down table, rather than experience education. Montessori would not agree with the arrangement of furnishings being fixed because they eliminate the flexibility needed for a “learner driven” environment. A more adequate space being utilitized in higher education is the, “Plug & Show Computer Presentation Seminar Rooms” (figure 7) (500 SF, 18FT x 27FT, 25SF per person), which is an adaptable space that is driven by technology. These spaces can also serve as a working area for collaboration or a medium sized lecture environment. The flexibilty of furniture and arrangement of technology allows for the space to become a hybrid and support more than one type of use.

Figure 7: The Plug & Show Seminar Room

Figure 8: The ROC Aventus building in Apeldoorn – work areas

These examples of medium sized types of academic spaces are driven toward adaptable use by allowing furniture, technology, lighting levels (dimmable, zones) and acoustical qualities of the space (partial height walls) to all be adapted to the users immediate needs. It is questionable that the 20 person seminar room has undergone many changes to meet the present needs of technology, but it seems that at a larger scale these efforts of adaptability and individuality fall to the wayside in the large scale lecture rooms intended to service groups of 300+ persons.

The ROC Aventus building in Apeldoorn, (figure 8) where the open work areas for the students is divided by partial height walls help stop noise and visual distractions while allowing for wall space to be used collaboratively. Montessori also felt that freedom by flexibility should also include, visual flexibility and awareness. Collaboration and its results for creative learning along with adaptable spaces which became known as “open classrooms” (figure 9) in the 1960’s, freed the teacher from traditional methods allowing for more attention to be placed on the individual learner. This process created a more conducive, caring, relaxing and joyful educational environment. This approach was an early effort to balance freedom with responsibility, in education.

In order for the Architecture to facilitate some of these ideologies it is critical that it allow for a “barrier free, perpetual learning environment which can give access to a network of experts, in a naturally self-paced, open access model.” Rather than an outward focused lecture space the role should be inverted to support Figure 9: 1960’s New Open Classroom inward collaboration. Groupings of 20 Environment person sections can take place within In higher education, this could an overall large lecture space suited for 300 persons with whiteboards facing be applied in a similar way the instructor for their view rather than that office workstations are the other way around. currently arranged in an open environment but are enclosed enough to protect from noise and visual disturbances. Another excellent example of a well done academic space is the “Plug & Show Computer Presentation Seminar Rooms” (figure 6) which are an adaptable space driven by technology for a medium sized lecture. [12]

openness QUALITY 1


QUALITY 2 visibility

ROTTERDAM SHIPPING & TRANSPORTATION COLLEGE

This can be done both horizontally and vertically by the use of partial height walls, glass fronts, and terracing/ bi-leveling of the adjacent program.

Figure 10: Corlaer College 2, in Nijkerk

Indeed, the large scale lecture hall has been designed to achieve a high degree of visibility and acoustical soundness, but this simply has grown into a traditional theatre where students watch education in a 21 inch wide seat with a fold down surface, rather than experience education. This is a primary example of a failed space in the eyes of Montessori principals. Montessori would not agree with the arrangement of furnishings being fixed because they eliminate the flexibility needed for a “learner driven” environment. Visibility in the lecture hall has been used inadequately according to Montessori’s standards. This element of visibility that she emphasized can be applied to higher education by opening boundaries beyond the immediate space where learning is held.

An example of this is done in a unique application at Corlaer College 2, in Nijkerk (figure 10) where bi leveling is the primary means of visual connection throughout the overlapping of spaces and there uses. The space takes advantage of the skylight atrium by having glass fronts on the classrooms allowing the light to enter and for visual openness to occur. Even the circulation space can be used as a classroom setting and created additional microscopic areas for social interactions. Similar to auditorium spaces which have specific uses for performances and keynote speakers, the focus is on higher educational lecture spaces, which immediately eliminates the collaborative process. One example of a large scale space which promotes collaboration through visually connecting spaces occurs at the Shipping and Transport College in Rotterdam (figure 11).

Figure 11: Shipping and Transport College in Rotterdam

The Shipping and Transport College also provides training to all professions in the world of shipping, ports, port related industry, intermodal and multimodal transport and logistics. About 3,500 full-time students attend daytime classes; in addition, hundreds of professionals from the business world participate in short- or longterm refresher courses each year.

The schools teaching approach indicates it‘s receptiveness to the changes in the transportation industry and as a result is reflected into a very dynamic looking building, where the architecture speaks the language of transportation. The main eating and gathering area in this building labelled the “canteen“ (figure 12) displays Designed by Neutelings Riedijk great potential for collaboration. The Architects in 2000, is the only space is closely connected to nature education and training institute by directing its audiance toward catering to the entire transport the waterfront and arranging its sector and for the port-related furnishings by terracing them down oil and chemical industry. It is toward the glass facade. Interviews the global leader in the area of show that the students prefer working education for operational and together in the canteen“ over the management positions in the library because of the stunning views, transport chains. close proximity to food and beverage and the flexible arrangement of dining hall furniture. If the higher educational system cannot begin to quickly change and adapt its process toward the type of learning necessary for the future then why not allow the architecture to take the lead in, influencing and facilitating the growth of the creative spirit through academic change.

Figure 12: Shipping and Transport College in Rotterdam - “canteen“

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Didactic materials are something Montessori uses as a physical learning tool. These materials have a special function in her education as they are the props in which the student learns. These props all have a place with in the environment and so does all the belongings of the individual students. Similarly, Montessori also used nature as one of the biggest learning tools by connecting it to the environment and sometimes making it the environment. This inspiration by nature can be tied into the role of “community” in higher education, by engaging the natural environment into the academic buildings as much as possible. This opens itself for a large scale social interaction and a great example of this is in Washington State, at the Islandwood School (figure 13) which has created an institute for helping children and adults develop a community where all its members incorporate a lifelong commitment to learning. The school creates this atmosphere by engaging the different age groups in something they find similarly attractive, such as the natural environment and sustainable influences. In a similar way, Montessori insisted on bringing nature closer to the learner and the learner closer to nature. One of her last elements relates to the atmosphere of her “prepared” environment, which can be conceived as the balanced combination of openness, visibility, natural connection and atmosphere.

ALCHEMIST AT MIT

It’s called “Alchemist” by Spanish artist Jaume Plensa and it was placed there in celebration of the university’s 150th birthday. Alchemist was installed on the grassy lawn area in front of the Stratton Student Center facing Massachusetts Avenue. Constructed by Spanish contemporary artist Jaume Plensa and commissioned specifically for the sesquicentennial celebration by an anonymous donor, the sculpture consists of mathematical symbols in the shape of a human form.

Just as nature was a large influence in Montessori’s educational process, she focused on the use of Didactic materials, which were used, in the design of a space as the central component for hands on experiential learning. The use and location of these didactic materials were heavily incorporated into the architecture where each had a particular function. This all relates to the atmosphere of her learning spaces which pay attention to all levels of detail. Montessori: Provides areas in where the child can retire to and observe which activity they would want to participate in. These spaces must be cozy and semiprivate, allowing two or so children to observe their surroundings. In the example of the large lecture hall and the plug in play room, areas within these spaces currently do not exist for students to retire to and use independently and as a result, there is no intermediate spaces for individuals and/or small groups to interact. Due to the one dimensional qualities of the large lecture hall; it serves as a poor solution for promoting a collaborative environment. The non-flexible nature of the large lecture hall and the lack of individual amenities the plug in play room all serve as bad examples of spaces for separating individual and group learning needs.

Plensa’s number-inspired work for MIT is an obvious homage to all of the researchers and scientists spawned from the Institute who continue to contribute to the international scientific and mathematical community. The sculpture is lit up at night and visitors are allowed to walk inside of the piece to get a different perspective of the MIT campus from the inside out.

Figure 13: The Islandwood School

nature QUALITY 3 [14]


QUALITY 4 atmosphere This design feature takes full consideration of its users needs and incoporates them into the space adding to the overall quality of the space.

Let’s revisit the 300 person lecture hall, which has not been exemplified as an excellent example of an atmosphere conducive to collaboration and creative learning. If we begin to image this space as an atmosphere designed with Montessori’s four elements Figure 14: Biogen Collaborative Open as a guideline; it can begin Area to add value to the future Presently some excellent spaces of educational institutions. Because this has become the in higher education that are suitable places of engagement primary example of a failed space in our educational are cafeterias, intermediate system, architecture can begin spaces, collaborative areas, huddle rooms, media rooms & to re-evaluate the intentions of this particular space and how it studio spaces. Professionally, collaborative spaces are utilized can be adapted to an organic educational process, while in an open environment keeping in mind the needs of suitable for semi-private the individual user. interaction. A great example is at a biotechnical company in the town of Weston, MA. Where open workstations might allow for some audial discomfort therefore small partitioned areas (figure 14) were created near the circulation paths around the open areas for individual to collaborate while not All of Montessori’s goals disturbing others. This is a space not used as a conference expressed by the type of educational atmosphere all room nor an office, or even a of her schools provided each huddle room, but an informal student. In higher education small space to serve as an some of the spaces begin intermediate space for people to touch on a similar type to interact. Most importantly of atmosphere Montessori these spaces were set up to have a comfortable and casual perused, but they do not create a whole, rather bits atmosphere, very much like and pieces. Just because the a home (figure 15). A similar plug in play room has an open installation is used in, the Robert Jungk secondary school arrangement because of its flexibility in furniture, does not in Berlin, Germany where mean it properly allows for the every piece of furniture has necessary visual connections a compartment for personal necessary in the space. Even belongings. the most technological lecture hall, still may not promote the ideal learning environment if it does not allow for openness, visibility, nature, and atmosphere, to work together equally. Figure 15: Divided open area for social interaction

The ultimate goal is to create a suitable learning environment which promotes comfort for all of its users. The openness and flexibility of the space needs to work with the visual openness of that space with its surroundings. In higher education, the various numbers in specified academic areas of studies and career opportunities, clearly become evidence that the curriculums in education have been doing a reasonable job keeping current with the continual changes in the world. It is not the curriculum that is failing at the college level but possibly the delivery of the information and dialogue between the information and the learners. As a result, if the Architecture does not continue to develop, such as the types of education has begun to, than the spaces in which learning occurs will not adequately support and allow for users to develop and flourish. If the education curricula and the Architectural Environment can develop and evolve together, then there is furthur opportunity for learners to engage with the Architecture, enabling a higher level of learning which has not yet been fully explored.

Figure 16: Typical Montessori School Plan

CONCLUSION

[15]


The thesis proposal is the first large document submitted as part of the thesis process. This document involves a series of studies which is evaluated by the thesis committee. At the end of the committees assessment they elect a representative to the thesis who is most likely well interested in the topic. As a result Robert Hsiung, FAIA became appointed as my thesis representative. My proposal was formatted to incorporate my thesis studio work (taking abstract ideas into 3D form) & my thesis seminar work (site proposal and programming selection). The combination of courses within the curriculum helped create a very intensive narrative which highlights & identifies potential user interviews, architectural case studies, programmatic case studies, site photographs, demographics, circulation, solar studies, proposed program statement, local code and zoning studies, terms of criticism, the abstract idea & overall thesis statement. All of the information above became the bases of my future architectural investigations.

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THE THESIS THE THESIS PROPOSAL PROPOSAL [16]


Abstract THE IDEA This thesis is about exploring the qualities of learning environments which help facilitate collaboration. It then becomes a method which can be furthur utilized to spawn innovation. THE THESIS The thesis will present a new service typology which lends itself to creativity and innovation. This means that the idea of problem solving will be framed within the context of engaging and collaborative spaces working together to attract different minds. The thesis will look directly at methods of collaboration such as Montessori Principals, with forms of experiential and active learning. SITE The chosen site is 244 A Street in South Boston. This perticular location will serve as a destination point for problem solving and the safe expression of ideas. The site is ideal because of the close proximity to many modes of transportation. Secondly the site is connect with water as well as green space. Lastly, the proposed 100 year master plan will be taken into consideration due to its naturalistic qualities. All of thesis site attributes will allow me to explore was of engaging the users with eachother and their built environment. THESIS PROPOSAL This thesis proposal will be the foundation for future investigations involving the creation of built environment which can support the birth and intervention of ideas through the interaction of unlike minds. [17]


THESIS STATEMENT Can the engaging of multiple learning processes yield an environment for enhanced exchanging of information via collaboration and digital media? My thesis is about creating an environment for education, communication, technology, active learning, and collaboration. Key components of collaboration regard adaptability, visual connectivity, integration of nature, order, trans formative spaces, layering of program, and the de-standardization of space types. With the standardization of building uses comes restraints on adaptability and functionality within spaces. In order for sharing of ideas to occur, standard space types are no longer a determining factor for the success for the program. Standardization does not account for Lifelong Learning in a long-term perspective. The more

pMontessori Space Diagram

Spatial Overlapping through the senses This Diagram is intended to show the relationships between spaces. The more interactions the spaces can have the better opportunity for engaging the users. This can be done through materiality, visual awareness (no boundaries), influences by connections with nature, and combinations of spaces which can be used in conjunction with another or independently.

adaptable and flexible a series of spaces becomes further enhances the ability for the environment to provide adequate services which can assist in the exchanging of information. One methodology I first researched was focused upon questioning the standardization of learning process in the early 1910’s. Maria Montessori, is an example of engagement of the users in innovative processes, which assist in exercising collaboration within her students. Her antitraditional methods helped to develop a new process for exchanging information. Her method was primarily driven around “bringing in nature into the environment; creating an atmosphere adaptable and suitable for her learners; the breaking down of visual boundaries to promote openness, and utilizing the environment as a learning instrument.” In truth, Montessori’s aspirations were a large contributor to the process of Lifelong Learning. LLL “is the continuous pursuit of skills and knowledge throughout the life of an individual for personal or professional reasons. It occurs through experiential learning (both formal and informal) encountered in the course of a lifetime.” I feel that Montessori’s primary component of her methodology became the integration of the creative arts into the learning environment. This allowed for the learners right brain to become equally present as its formal left side. Lifelong Learning acknowledges that we all are continuously learning at any given moment throughout our lives. With the uncertainties of where the future is headed I feel that it is critical for forms of learning to incorporate both sides of the brain equally within the process. Innovation, I feel comes from the joining of both sides of the brain. Which is why Architecture has great social responsibilities for fostering new breakthroughs in science and technology. The act of innovating usually results from [18]


implementing innovative methods to a traditional process meaning that in order to move forward there is a reflection of the past that then becomes manipulated. This reflection process is where current trends in collaborative environments occur. This thesis will not solely reiterate the current trends in active learning and professional collaboration, it will focus on extending the range in which these spaces and activates can become larger cohesive network. The objective of this thesis is to study different educational processes and strategies that influence collaboration. The design intent is to develop an Architecture that engages the user’s with their surroundings in hope to induce creative moments where innovation can be explored. The goal of my thesis is to create an environment that provides services for technology and collaboration which evoke creative outcomes. Thus heightening the chances for innovation to occur and help the continuation of Lifelong Learning.

pTraditional Stand & Deliver Classroom - image courtesy of google This is my anti-precedent for the type of learning I would like to occur within the context of my thesis. The type of scenario I am trying to create with regards to integration artists and scientists within a cooperative space is to promote social engagement between the two users. The image above is not widely practice that much anymore but still stands true to the fact that this method is no longer suitable for societies needs within the context of learning. [19]

pThe Space Between Implied areas of bounded space within a Piston

pThesis Concept Diagram Based upon a typical Montessori Classroom layout. The Diagram displays the overlapping of the senses. There is visual connections between all the spaces as well as the circulation between them. The connection to nature is brought into the space. Delineations are implied through the selection of materials. These elements are critical components to the design of my thesis moving forward. “Scientific observation has established that education is not what the teacher gives; education is a natural process spontaneously carried out by the human individual, and is acquired not by listening to words but by experiences upon the environment. The task of the teacher becomes that of preparing a series of motives of cultural activity, spread over a specially prepared environment, and then refraining from obtrusive interference. Human teachers can only help the great work that is being done, as servants help the master. Doing so, they will be witnesses to the unfolding of the human soul and to the rising of a New Man who will not be a victim of events, but will have the clarity of vision to direct and shape the future of human society� -Maria Montessori


METHODS OF INQUIRY

Resources in which I am referencing, pertain to active learning and collaboration along with engaging environments. Due to the wide variety of spaces types in which these processes occur, my research and precedents include: assembly spaces, exhibition installations, institutional, public spaces, operas, and libraries. These project types/spaces all act in supporting both new trends in learning as well as brining large groups of people together. Both tie back to my concept relating to integration of active learning within a collaborative environment, which can support innovative solutions.

Diagram and trace overlay new Montessori buildings in order to gain insight on the process of designing these types of schools. It also might help me find a common design and programming thread within this type. This lends itself for gaining knowledge in the types of adjacencies these schools have programmatically.

Read into current day Learning processes and institutional design which describes how the curriculum effects the learner’s emotions and brain activity. This will help justify my thesis ideas by providing contextual research evidence.

After determining a specific building typology. Research appropriate case studies so that I can understand methods of design. This will allow me to begin introducing my thesis idea into the typology. At this time it might also be appropriate to get someone on my thesis panel which specializes in this typology to ask them about excellent case studies and programming ideas.

How can architectural form, spatial relationships and visual openness of programmed elements facilitate and environment which alters the sensory receptors for an ideal learning atmosphere. I might try to answer this question by investigating space types which facilitate learning in a non-academic function. This will help me find references which I can explore beyond implementation in Universities.

After my collection of case studies and precedents I am planning on continuously analyzing and sketching through diagrams the critical components of the case studies design in order to further develop design knowledge for the appropriate space I will be exploring in my thesis.

Can a built environment based on academic principals look like a typology that is non-academic? This research will be explored in the library and on-line, in order to further find new curriculums and typologies in which I might not know about. This will ensure that I am implementing my ideas into the appropriate program.

Can a service center provide the projected tools for future problem solving?

Does this new typology allow for learning to take place between different users as well as allowing for public involvement?

pStudio Sketch - The engaging of pistons within one another and the abstract forms which are created by their voids

pHands-On Learning at a San Diego Highschool - Image from • http://www.edutopia.org/

Will the idea of cross-pollinating professional disciples and age groups within the same space create improved problem solving that can achieve innovation. [20]


TERMS OF CRITICISM •

Does the environment created allow for customization for the respected users, promote freedom through visual awareness between multiple spaces, use the architecture as part of the learning, bring in nature into the environment and bring the environment out into nature.

Does the building encourage social interaction and engagement between various users.

Will the building showcase the concept of active learning and engagement?

Does it provide an open and inviting environment?

Are the spaces arranged in a non-standard method that caters to a variety of learning styles which can be adaptive and flexible.

Does the building showcase multiple styles of learning in a completely new type of application.

Does the building facilitate collaboration in both a physical and digital way.

pStudio

Sketch of Engaging Pistons This sketch indicated the inplied boundaries of the pistons and there dependency upon one another. pCase

Study of an Engaging Environment State Park Welcome Center, Rheden, Netherlands The case study above displays critical elements which assist in the learing process through the engagement of the users both physical and mental. To the right of this page is a diagram emphasising all the essential elements which can provide engageing environments. This can become a helpful item for programming spaces and adjacencies for my typology. [21]


ARCHITECTURAL PRECEDENT 1

OSLO OPERA HOUSE BJØRVIKA, OSLO, NORWAY Project Architect

SNOHETTA OSLO, NORWAY

Project Owner/Client

MINISTRY OF CHURCH AN CULTURAL AFFAIRS

Type of Project

OPERA HOUSE

Year of Competition

2003

Completion

2007

Gross Square Meters

38.500sqm

Assembly Section displays areas of density

Architect’s Description:

Three diagrams, explain the building’s basic concept. “The wave wall” - The dividing line between the ground ‘here’ and the water ‘there’is both a real and a symbolic threshold. This threshold is realised as a large wall on the line of the meeting between land and sea, Norway and the world, art and everyday life. This is the threshold where the public meet the art. “The Factory” - This factory should be both functional and flexible during the planning phase as well as in later use. “The Carpet”-The building is split in two by a corridor running north-south, the ‘opera street’. To the west of this line are located all the public areas and stage areas. The eastern part of the building houses the production areas which are simpler in form and finish. Thesis Connection:

Mid Level showing exterior elements with interior program

Playful Architecture sloping interior/exterior

I choose this precedent due to the connections in which the building form creates with different user groups. The form of the building works together with the site in order to allow circulation paths to overlap and engage one another. The edge condition of the site, located adjacent to the downtown district and waterfront, assist in attracting various types of user groups. View from Approach alex siekierski summer 2008 [22]


User Engagement section through edge condition

Building Form three distinct materials indicate use

Layering of Users public, semi-private & private The diagram above shows how the circulation and program designation of use begin to overlap one another and start to create moments where different users can engage one enother. This engagement may be directly with the architecture it self or with the contex of the site as well as eachother.

Heierarchy Geometric Relationships

Natural Light Penetration long section through central assembly space [23]


ARCHITECTURAL PRECEDENT 2

PALAU DE LAS ARTES VALENCIA, SPAIN Project Architect

SANTIAGO CALATRAVA Project Owner/Client

MINISTRY OF CHURCH AN CULTURAL AFFAIRS

Type of Project

OPERA HOUSE

Year of Competition

2003

Completion

2007

Gross Square Meters

38.500sqm

Structure & Form perspective from approach

Architect’s Description:

“Located within his fames city of Arts and Science, the Opera House was designed as a series of apparentl random volumes which become unified through their enclosure within two symmetrical cut-away concrete shells. The resulting structure defines the identity of the opera house and enhances its symbolic and dynamic effect within the landscape. The central core is occupied by a 1700-seat ausitorium, as well as a smaller assembly space, concieved mainly for chamber music concerts. Calatrava has dedicated this enique ensemble of facilities to the fostering of musical talent and performance.”

Section Model showing form and internal seperations

Thesis Connection:

I choose this precedent due to the geometric relationships which assist in attracting various users as well as provide order and function to the building. I also was drawn to the use of structural elements which help ground the architecture and become an attractive aestetic entity which can assist in engaging the users with the built environment. The presence of the building at night is also something which helps define the sculptural qualities and integration of natural elements, such as the reflection and sounds of water.

Flexibility seasonal changes to the buildings facade

Main Floor Plan gives overall shape and circulation patterns [24]


Visual Circulation scale and the perceotion of space The diagram above shows how program circulation at many different scales can begin to become visible and overlap. The section shows voided spaces with vertical circulation on top of an enclosed assembly space with directed linear circulation. The use of materials and shapes all add to the hierarchy of the architectural elements. The scale of these shapes all the users to experience different moments within the same space through visual awareness to the adjacent elements of the space.

Form and Material heaviness and ground connection

Structural Engagement human scale

Flexible Facade operable building enclosure [25]


ARCHITECTURAL PRECEDENT 3

BEZOEKERSCENTRUM VELUWEZOOM RHEDEN (GELDERLAND), NETHERLANDS Project Architect

KOSSMAN DEJONG

Project Owner/Client

VERENIGING NATUURMONUMENTEN

Type of Project

WELCOME EXHIBITION

Completion

2007 Gross Square Meters

250sqm

Architect’s Description:

“In this information center, visitors can orient themselves on a visit to the nearby national park. A newly built corridor, which includes several new and existing barns connects all functions of this center in an architectural gesture together. This abstract tree, lined with wood from the immediate area around the visitor center, his stories about the elements that make this area special: the vastness, topography and wildlife. The stories are presented in different ways, so that both adults and children are catered for. In a specially designed pit, children can enjoy themselves like pigs wallow.”

Openess simplicity in materials and visual openess

Thesis Connection:

This public information center is an excellent example of the type of space I am looking to create. The space engages its users with the architecture and allows the environment to teach the visitors about the context of the surrounding area. The space is intended to appeal toward different user age groups creating a friendly and warm atmosphere. Cutouts in the floor and exhibit areas create unique moments for active learning.

Engaging Activities cut-outs in the floor for interactive learning

Primary Floor Plan with emphasis on “the tree” [26]


The Tree architectural objects used to house interactive learning The diagrams on this page show users interacting with a sculptural element within the welcoming center of the national park. This feature houses interactive elements which can teach the visitors about what is going on in nature outside within the national park. This elements becomes very successful because it is visually and textually appealing to both children and adults.

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ARCHITECTURAL PRECEDENT 4 FUJI KINDERGARTEN TOKYO, JAPAN Project Architect

TEZUKA ARCHITECTS Project Owner/Client

VERENIGING NATUURMONUMENTEN

Type of Project

SCHOOL

Completion

2007

Gross Square Meters

site area: 4791sqm footprint: 1699sqm floor space: 1094sqm Architect’s Description:

“We definitely wanted to make a space without dead ends. One day, we suddenly drew an oval that avoided the trees, and seeing how much better it was, we used it unchanged as the shape. In this kindergarten, there are no distinctions between the children. The building has no hidden places where the problems in schools over recent years, including bullying, basically start. What occurs in closed spaces is unknown. The children have no refuge. Teachers and pupils in closed spaces don’t know what is occurring in the adjacent spaces. The spaces in this kindergarten are in full view of each other.”

Main Floor Plan displaying bisectors of the oval

Roof-top Activity showing the engaging of trees with the form

Thesis Connection:

The restraints of the site allowed for a circular building form to evolve providing paths connecting to the existing structures on the site. The form of the building provided visual connections in 360 degrees. The operable walls around the inner courtyard provide adaptability for interior/ exterior connections. The key components from this case study are that the form/shape provides minimal impact on the site while allowing the most opportunity for interior / exterior activities for learning and interaction to take place within in a secure area.

Scale and Context showing the functionality of the shape

View from Classroom displaying flexibility within the facade [28]


Connections carving into the shape

Structure maintaining the designs goals

Nature preservation of trees to become a learning tool

Connectedness & Security visual awareness for both students and teachers [29]


Single Surface Manipulation

NATURAL INSPIRATION Thesis sketches are the analysis of palm leaves and the weaving of them. I was fascinated by the idea of taking a singular element/surface and manipulate it into another form. This process lead to my discovery of inside vs outside space and the weaving in which can take place between them. This process also created moments where tension and compression have to occur.

Surface Diagram as a Integrated System

Connections Abstraction of Palm into a 2D Form

Path Transforms into a Boundary

MECHANICAL INSPIRATION Pistons were explored through the sketches on the right. I was inspired by there simply form yet complexity when observed as an entire entity of party. The Piston relies upon another in order to function. The sketches begin to reveal the implied and voided boundaries when two gears of a piston engage one another and become dependant of the entire system.

Implied Spaces between Gears [30]


Exploring Scale with Gears

Exploring types of Gears

Combinations into a 2D Element

Folding Diagram

Spacial Folding Diagram and Section Sketches

Conceptual Model of Combination

COMBINING BOTH NATURAL + MECHANICAL The idea of taking and folding a singular surface (palm leaf) with the context of ia large network which is depend upon the individual components (gears of a piston) became transfused in order to utilize both methods within a single framework. This process lead to further exploration with physical models in the Studio Sketch Problem which was previously shown. [31]


THESIS SKETCH PROBLEM THREE WALLS AND THREE OPENINGS

User Engagement section through edge condition

My sketch problem became a continuation of my combined natural + mechanical process of folding from within a singular surface. The orange part of the diagram to the right is what I used to fold and create the process model to the left. This model began to shape what could be interpreted as architectural space. From this model I began to inform myself about the influence the that the surface has on the form when folded. Through the series of 18 mini models above I developed a language and process for erecting shapes from the surface cut direction. The relationship of the cut at the base is almost mirrored in 3-Dimensions when folded upon itself. The increased number of folds and directions of the folds helps create unique geometry that can engage one another. The three models below are toward the final stages of my sketch problem process which I began folding three walls so that they correspond to the one adjacent to it.

[32]


The image to the left is of my final mini process model which captures all the elements of folding, cutting, engaging, overlapping, with implied and voided spaces. The culmination of the process strictly related to the breaking down of the surfaces planes and then segmenting them into other portions which correspond to the adjacent shape, size and cut direction for they all imply circulation within spaces through the lens of a 3-dimensional surface which creates voided areas of complexity around two “walls.�

The four b/w images were photographed from my final sketch problem model. This model shows the sloping of walls and angular shapes which can give height to spacial elements that correspond to spaces which are lower in scale. The engaging of one or more surfaces creates moments for programmed spaces and circulation to merge.

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SITE REQUIREMENTS The site should be in an urban setting located in a mixed-use residential area with light commercial. An already established community close to the city with easy access to transit. A site on the edge of water. Mixed demographic Based on those characteristics, the South Boston neighborhood does offer such opportunities for my program to flourish. The cultural context of South Boston does welcome the idea to bring more integration into the neighborhood. As the Seaport site becomes more and more developed with vibrant businesses and entertainment, being able to provide housing to all will be beneficial to the diverse group of residents that makes Topography of South Boston up the neighborhood. The placement of my building by the primarily flat around site location bay will be beneficial in serving the surrounding residential * Image Courtesy of Google Maps buildings and operates as a gateway between its residents and that of the city of Boston.

SOUTH BOSTON

Primarily a residential, heavily Irish neighborhood, South Boston enjoys a substantial amount of ocean frontage of which facilities such as Castle Island Park, Carson Beach and the L Street Bathhouse make full use. Very much part of a “neighborhood” atmosphere, South Boston’s population consists of many families. Although close to downtown Boston, the neighborhood will augment its existing shopping facilities in the near future with the construction of a new mall off Route 93. - cityofboston.gov

Existing Building Uses * Image Courtesy of the Boston Redevelopment Authority [35]


100 Acre Master Plan existing and proposed buildings/parks * Image Courtesy of Fort Point District 100 Acres 11-22-06

100 ACRE MASTER PLAN

This thesis will adopt “The For Point District - 100 Acres Master Plan� for South Boston. The Master Plan will be used as a vehicle to test the validity of my thesis concept. Moving forward I am using the 100 Acre Plan to allow for future considerations which can assist in my analysis of the site as well as aid my design intent. After reviewing the proposed conditions of the surrounding context of the site I can begin to imagine my building engaging the new harborwalk as well as the green artery that will connect to the existing convention center. The introduction of new infrustrure will also add additional access points to my site with various means of travel. In additon to the infrustrure the intent of the Master Plan is to attract biotech companies to the innovation district as well as, developing residential plots for the surrounding artist community. These proposed intentions yeild great opportunity for my concept which directly relates to the engagement of different user types within a shared environment that can allow for an interaction with nature. [36]


* all statistical information was generated from Autodesk Ecotect

This chart is a useful and convenient way to understand some of the interrelationships of the thermal conditions of the environment. It graphs the mass of water vapor in a unit mass of dry air at various temperatures. Most importantly this allows us to design within the Thermal Comfort Zone (ASHREA 55 standard).

[37]


* Diagram Courtesy of Degree Project Studio

CLIMATIC CONCLUSIONS It was most useful to analyze climatic data for Boston annually. I learned that the average wind speeds are relatively high due to the coastal conditions. [38]


EXISTING SITE SHADING

After doing a site visit and analyzing the property and site boundaries I realized that it is pretty much an open lot except for the northeast area consisting of some 4-5 story structures. There are minimal overcast shadows from these adjacent structures but it does not develop and cast onto the site more than 20%. Due to the edge condition of the water the southwest portion of the site is always exposed to solar gain. * This solar study includes the 100 Acre Master Plan

January 12th at 7:50am

January 12th at 1:00pm

January 12th at 4:35pm

March 20th at 8:00am

March 20th at 12:30pm

March 20th at 5:00pm

July 29th at 7:30am

July 29th at 12:45pm

July 29th at 5:30pm

November 4th at 8:15am

November 4th at 1:00pm

November 4th at 4:30pm

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A: View of Site from US Postal Service

SITE PHOTOGRAPHS 244 A STREET SOUTH BOSTON Views of surrounding context

B: View of Site from A Street

C: View from Convention Center

D: View at Summer Street Bridge

E: Ariel View from 14th Floor of Independence Wharf [40]


Analytical Site Drawing - “Stirring� Diagram

THESIS CONCEPT ANALYTICAL SITE SKETCH

In response to my thesis studio design process I have analyzed my site in South Boston through the lens of gears working together and cuts on a surface that influence folding. When layering these ideas on top of one another I unveiled some additional information about my site that was not visible before. In the above diagram I began identifying the large cuts thought the South Boston which were dependant upon some of the primary vehicular paths (both above and below ground). Looking deeper at the surface context I began to identify districts within the larger area as well as zoning. This lead to small overlaps where the districts bled beyond its zoning. Amongst this process I began using these diagrams as a lens for viewing boundaries within my site. These boundaries also help me identify gears (orange) which are dependant upon the cuts through the larger area that help divide up the districts.

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PROGRAM STATEMENT My thesis is about creating an environment for education, communication, technology, active learning, and the sharing of ideas and information. While these concepts can all be found in forms of institutional applications I am looking to explore them in a professional application with an emphasis on utilizing the processes in which information is exchanged as a service to the public. This is about staying up to date on mainstream technology while creating an environment that endues various users to interact on a social level in order to achieve innovative ideas for our future development as a global network. Similar to a specialized building types where individuals and groups of people gather for a common activity. I am looking to develop a new typology that provides all the necessary services so that individuals and groups of people can come with a common goal, regarding problem solving and innovation. The users of this new typology can be broken down into two types: One is young professionals which are advancing technology and have an understanding on societies needs and potential aspirations for future needs. The other is older experienced professionals, such as CEO’s and senior leadership who have a broad knowledge of core processes for development but may not have younger innovative dynamics. In creating an environment that creates connections with these two different types of users with the public, I am expecting further development of ideas and concepts to occur. Similar to a “think-tank� the space houses the tools necessary for individuals and corporations that are developing new technologies. The objective was to design a melting-pot that would encourage interaction and reflect innovation within the products the users are developing. SPACE ATTRIBUTES

Internet access, electronic media, computer technology, and other forms of modern-day advancements have a profound effect on the function and design of innovative collaborative. As a result, active learning must engage its users and therefore as a space type design, must be flexible enough to take into account these types of integrated technologies as well as to properly store, handle, and circulate other means of mixed media types. Collaborative spaces must be designed to accommodate large audiences. As such, they tend to have wide spans and are multiple-stories high in order to accommodate seating, sightline, and acoustical requirements. Raised stage floors and special lighting equipment are often required as well. There are seven broad types of spacial requirements needed for a collaborative spaces: 1. Collection space 2. Public workstation space 3. User seating space 4. Staff work space 5. Meeting space 6. Special use space 7. Non-assignable space (including mechanical space) [42]


PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Public Spaces | 25% - Library Services - Scheduling - Bull Pen - Canteen/ Eatery/Wi-fi Lounge - Courtyard - Garrita - Rest Rooms Semi-Private Spaces | 60% - 1-1/1-20 - Hoteling - Huddle Room - Imaginarium - Touchdown Hub - Teaming Space - Collaboration - 20-50 - Training Resources - 50-250 - Mega Training - Large Assembly - Theatre - Digital Media Services - Small Lecture - Time Share Services Private Spaces | 15% - Offices - Information Technology - Facilities & Systems - Security

Throughout seeking a program I found difficulties finding a building typology which can be represented by a state organization. I want to promote a public building which can reflect upon the surrounding community. The building type must support an innovative enviroment which is based upon social interaction and active learning processes within all of the spacial environements. This presence is aimed at almost create an active work community. I am primarily focusing on spaces which consist of assembly, meeting, group area, and collaboration spaces. This type of space will end up being the pivitol element in which my building operates around. These spacial types also will relate to the users on a variety of scales from large to small. I am currently beginning to analyze what type of adjacent spaces are needed in order to support the larger programmatic elements in which my building uses as primary.

OVERVIEW A collaborative space type may include both open and closed moments for meeting space. This may be achieved by movable partitions. Other spaces needed may include storage systems and moveable shelving systems. Breakout areas are assumed to be general purpose, and may include display spaces and reading, meeting, and electronic workstations.The Auditorium space types are areas for large meetings, presentations, and performances. Assembly space type facilities may include meeting halls, exhibit halls, auditoriums, and theaters. Assembly space types may include such features as sound reinforcement systems, audiovisual systems and projection screens, food service facilities, proscenium stages with heights greater than 50’- 0� or fly gallery, orchestra pits, revolving or hydraulic stage platforms, flying balconies, movable seating, or billboard systems.

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PROGRAMMING CASE STUDY 1

LÁZARO CARRETER BIBLIOTECA, VILLANUEVA DE LA CAÑADA, MADRID, SPAIN

Project Architect

CHURTICHAGA+QUADRASALCEDO ARQUITECTOS

Project Owner/Client

VERENIGING NATUURMONUMENTEN

Type of Project

LIBRARY

Project Cost

1380000 (EUROS)

Main Floor Plan displaying density of load bearing walls

Completion

2002

Gross Square Meters

1100sqm

Architect’s Description:

“The Library has been understood as a hub of communication, research, and knowledge gathering. whole knot of encounters with a variety of uses and demands are spatially resolved by linking their applications to a “spiral” upward of books through a system of ramps that twist, will distribute and step according to their spaces that are distributed around it. As you ascend, the uses associated with different levels correspond to specific tasks, more complex, and more dependent on external communication. The ceramic structure is armed, seen leaving the interior walls and whitewashed, while industrial floors will be oak flooring throughout the building, pursuing continuous spaces without visual interference.”

Interior Images the use of minimal materials & natural lighting

Thesis Connection:

The building form placed the reading material around a centralized core which ramps up and leads users around the different programmed spaces. The circulation was decorated with wood while the rest of the structure was primarily constructed of brick masonry. Due to the structural installation of the masonry this structure became vaulted with two large skylights allowing this core to distribute the natural light. The Architect‘s used local materials as a structural element in order to achieve their design intentions.

Short Section displays core void & programmed edges

View from Approach Lázaro Carreter Biblioteca [44]


Parti Diagram circulation

Short Section entrance of naural light The diagram above shows how the shape of the roof in section can allow for natural light to enter the building. The key here was to allow the structure of the roof to span a large distance to create the openness needed to allow enough light in. The choice of material was non-distracting and provided extra emphasis on the lighting.

Cantilever reinforced masonry walls

Vertical Circulation the core which holds the library stacks

Long Section displays the division of the childrens wing [45]


PROGRAMMING CASE STUDY 2

PREPARATORY ACADEMY ENERGY LABORATORY, KAMUELA, HAWAII

Project Architect

FLANSBURGH ARCHITECTS

Project Owner/Client

HAWAII PREPARATORY ACADEMY

Type of Project

LABORATORY

Project Cost

$650/sf

Completion

2010

Gross Square Feet

6100sqf

Architect’s Description:

“A building dedicated to the study of alternative energy, functions as a zero-net-energy, building. The project’s fundamental goal is that of educating the next generation of students in the understanding of environmentally conscious, sustainable living systems. The lab currently acts as a living laboratory, furthering its educational goals as a functioning example of sustainability. The building’s configuration facilitates scientific study both indoors and out, linking interior spaces with the surrounding landscape. Students are surrounded by the systems that they study, and constantly reminded of their methods.”

Night Perspective displays the overall atmosphere

Main Floor Plan displays the amount of outside to inside program

Thesis Connection:

Similiar to Montessori, this school eliminates visual boundaries and opens up all spaces into a centralized space. This central areas is utilized in many different ways depending on the needs of the students. Sedcondly the integration/ preservation of nature in this project is something to incoporate into my thesis. The paths and connections to the existing context is also inportant in allowing this new structure to survive and support the entire entitiy.

Interior Image students learning in an open environment [46]


Buildings Mass & Orientation conditioned vs non-conditioned The diagram above shows the amount of massed conditioned area with its supporting unconditioned areas on the exterior. The orientation of the structure allows it to take advantage of the wind for additional cooling.

Flexibility the facade can be movable depending on the needs of the class and weather conditions

Natural Light Penetration long section through central working spaces [47]


PROGRAMMING CASE STUDY 3

LULU CHOW WANG CAMPUS CENTER AND DAVIS GARAGE WELLESLEY, MA, USA Project Architect

MACK SCOGIN MERRILL ELAM ARCHITECTS

Project Owner/Client

WELLESLEY COLLEGE

Type of Project

CAMPUS CENTER

Completion

2005

Gross Square Feet

74,000 sqf

Architect’s Description:

“Claimed as the best loved building within the Wellesley community having aesthetic properties which blend with those of the landscape. The new Wellesley College campus center was derived from the values which were embedded in the landscape. To become successful architecture, it must be more than a “composition in conformity with topographic conditions;” it must materialize the principles which have guided Wellesley since its inception. The new campus center celebrates those principles and values which have grounded the school and have contributed to its unique character. It is a microcosm of the campus itself, allowing individuals to flourish with the greater collective.”

Night Perspective illuminated geometries

Mid Level showing exterior elements with interior program Informal Gathering small informal spaces infill the building areas

Thesis Connection:

Acting as a campus center, the function of the building is to house many different users with the support of different space types. The unique shapes both interior and exterior, create a unique way to allow the building to accept light during the day and emit light at night. These unique shapes and intricate vertical circulation paths all allow the interior environment to respect and welcome the exterior context of the buildings surroundings. As a central part of the overall campus this building is a great example for creating a place for social interaction.

Main Floor Plan irregular shapes

Long Building Section displays the irregular atrium spaces [48]


Natural Light Penetration long section through central assembly space

Geometry playful building facade

Natural Connection open terraces

Visibility the use of glass to provide connections

Wellesley University is known for it’s lush landscapes and the building utilizes its surrounding context to respond outward. The use of extruded shapes and glazing help connect the users with the sites natural surroundings. Also exterior terraces provide a heightened space for students to work and collaborate.

[49]


PROGRAMMING CASE STUDY 4

GENZYME CENTER 500 KENDALL STREET CAMBRIDGE, MA 02142

Project Architect

BEHNISH, BEHNISH & PARTNER, INC.

Project Owner/Client

GENZYME GENETICS Type of Project

Concept Sketch displays the integration of natural elements

COMMERCIAL (12 STORIES)

Project Cost

140 MIL (TOTAL) 107 CONST Completion

2003

Gross Square Feet

•344,000 ft2 (32,000 m2)

Architect’s Description:

“Genzyme Center is the corporate headquarters for a biotechnology company, with offices, an employee cafeteria, a library, gardens, training rooms, a conference center, cafes, and public retail space. Genzyme Center was created as a symbol of progress to represent a point of identification for the company, its employees, and visitors. The goal of the design was to develop a building from the inside out, from the individual working environment to the overall complex structure of the building. Largely due to the collaboration of the design team, developer, client, and construction team, this led to an environmentally friendly, highly communicative, and innovative signature building.”

Atrium Section showing exterior elements with interior program

Thesis Connection:

The division of solid and void is particularly a special feature which allows the internal voids to emit light into all the office spaces through an open atrium. The integration of vegetated spaces on the interior and exterior of the building add a sense of connectedness for the users to experience. Circulation was a large factor of the central atrium space which connects programmed areas via bridges, ramps and stairs. Also controlled heating and cooling is allowed through a stack effect by the central atrium.

Genzyme Center photo credit: Anton Grassl [50]


Second Floor Plan displays core, floorplate, bridges, nature, voided space

Atrium Section shows vertical light well and vegetation

Building Section how the building breaths

Internal Atrium perspective displaying circulation and structure [51]


THE CONTEXT OF CULTURE

The background for any project is the Context presented by the Historic, the Architectural, Social, Political, Economic, Historical, and Demographic forces. Without understanding the society, the people, the beliefs, and their history, one will design “blind”. qWormwood Factory Building, 1898

HISTORIC CONTEXT The Fort Point Channel Landmark District (FPCLD) encompasses roughly 55 acres across the Fort Point Channel from downtown Boston. Developed in the 1830s by the Boston Wharf Company and owned by the company until the early 2000s, the Fort Point Channel area is Boston’s largest, most cohesive, and most significant collection of late 19th and early 20th century industrial loft buildings.

Development of the Fort Point Channel area began in 1836 and continued until 1882. The Boston Wharf Company was entirely responsible for the development of the area; they laid out and constructed streets (which they named for company officers and prominent tenants), parceled out lots, and erected nearly all of the buildings in the FPCLD from the designs of their own staff architects. The primary purposes for the buildings were manufacturing and warehousing, with a variety of goods being produced and stored there. The Boston Wharf Company initially specialized in the storage of sugar and molasses, and gradually expanded its interests to become a major developer of industrial and warehouse properties served by ships docking in Boston Harbor, and by the railroad. Among the chief industries located in the Fort Point Channel area was the wool trade. During the 19th and early 20th centuries, Boston was the principal marketplace for wool for apparel and fabrics in the United States. After warehousing and manufacturing uses declined in the 20th century, artists moved into the abandoned lofts and created what is now New England’s largest artist enclave. The Fort Point Channel district is marked by an exceptional degree of visual uniformity. The buildings in the area are, with few exceptions, loft structures built between the 1880s and 1920s by the Boston Wharf Company, and represent an unusually coherent and well-preserved collection of late 19th and early 20th century lofts that reflect a critical period of social, economic, and physical development in the City and the region. The loft buildings are generally masonry, with simple volumes and flat roofs. Buildings are elegantly proportioned, with classically inspired details concentrated at entrances and cornices. Following 1976 the once industrial district started changing. Artist community looking for affordable studio space moved into vacant buildings bringing new life to the area and reclaiming the neighborhood. In 1980 the Fort Point Arts Community was formed and its 1st open studios were held. Between 1980s and 1990’s area became the largest artist community in New England. Though post Big Dig construction has driven up the value of these properties, the Arts community had been able to preserve more than 100 live/work studios at 249 A Street, Midway Studios (which is 40% affordable housing) and The Artists Building at 300 Summer Street. -History courtesy of Degree Project Studio [52]

-History courtesy of City of Boston.gov

pGillette Razor Company plant on Dorechester Avenue between West First Street and West Second Street in 1920‘s


pSouth Boston Convention Center

pInstitute of Contemporary Art

ARCHITECTURAL CONTEXT

After walking through the site from South Station your senses are heightened by the openness of the bridge and then the presence of the children’s museum on the left and Boston Harbour to the far left. After making a right after the bridge and walking down a small enclosed boardwalk I felt insecure and congested. I immediately after exiting the boardwalk I became enlightened by the presence of the Channel and a small boat dock directly in front of my site. The buildings adjacent to the site are from the late 1890’s mill factory days. They are rich in character and add some vernacular context to the overall atmosphere. Walking a couple blocks into South Boston I needed to take a small stair up pSouth Boston Children’s Museum to the street level above called Summer Street. The procession down this street toward the cantilever of the convention center was very unappealing until prompted with open views toward the ICA and harbour to the left.

A Street Facade 2001 (top) Canal Center Street Facade 2001 (bottom) * Image Courtesy of Fort Point District 100 Acres 11-22-06

pHistoric Mill Bridges

pCobblestone Roads [53]

pArtists for Humanity Building


DEMOGRAPHIC INFORMATION

The estimated population of South Boston is 29,938, an increase of 1.42% from the 2000 Census. The median household income is $40,311. The cost of living is 9.81% higher than the national average. The population density is 9,564.9/sqmi, about 15% lower than the citywide average of 12,172.3. The most common age group is 24-44. South Boston, is increasingly expanding it’s connection to Downtown Boston, through additional bussiness and residential developments. It currently is a mixed use neighborhood, of young professionals and low income housing, though many of its traditional residents remain, many of whom are immigrants from Russia, East Asia, and South America, particularly Brazil and Colombia, and Poland.

CULTURAL CONTEXT CONCLUSIONS

In the 1990s, census figures indicated that 42.6% of its population was aged 20-34 (as compared to 33% for the city of Boston as a whole), an indication of the strong student and “twentysomething” presence. That presence has created tension between some long-time residents and the young professional population.

After reviewing the cultural context of the neighborhood which is urban and gregarious, I feel strongly that a convenient innovative resource center will contribute to this location for many reasons. First, it would help the economy and increase the aestetic of the waterfront. Second, social activity would contribute to cultural, as well as economic development, and neighborhood cohesiveness and pride. Third, visitors could appreciate the history and Museums within South Boston. [54]


BY-PRODUCTS OF USE

MISSING TRACES

The use of auto detailing through an exit only loading door on a prominant side street.

South Boston has a rich amount of history during the harboring days in which Mill’s created a vast amount of products for trade. Above shows Terkelsen Building (Machine Company) from the late 1920’s.

PHYSICAL TRACES

This was a difficult area to research because it focuses on studying areas in which functionality and use are not working together and result in a type of non-use or mix-use.

THE CONTEXT OF EVIDENCE

What effect does the evidence of the adaptation of the surrounding area have in relation to the site you have chosen? Use your critical eye and experience to forcast how the environment will effect your building program.

LEFTOVERS

Old Mill Building bridges which are no longer in functioning use. [55]


THE CONTEXT OF BEHAVIOR

Casual Observation is to get the big picture. It consists of watching, identifing potential issues, finding out the story of a place, identifying the qualitative aspects. As an observer you must be unobtrusive. It is often done as part of the site analysis. You note what’s happening that should be encouraged, what could happen, what’s missing. What issues need to be addressed. It is a time to ask questions and test assumptons. DENSITY/CROWDING

This category is not entirely related to people but can been seen near the site at central vehicular nodes. This promotes a center and crowding of vehicles.

STRESSORS

This category relates to any type of external forces which prohibit our daily needs and functions. In this case WIND is a large factor that disrupts workers commuting to the office with no protection to the elements along the waterfront.

ORIENTATION/WAYFINDING

The Boston Wharf Area is something hard to miss being parallel to the waterfront and if you know where you are in relation to the river I think you will be able to orient yourself in the correct direction!

CONCLUSIONS I found that through the behavioral research, my site is not a welcoming location. People walk haphazardly throughout the environment and parking lots filter a large portion of a visitors visual perception. The construction that is taking place shows steps in the right direction which will hopefully bring back business and residences. [56]


MILITARY DEVELOPMENT

Asphalt islands cover the majority of the Seaport District and provide competition for developers.

The location of the national guard and training facilities is located next to the convention center.

PROTESTING

Groups from Occupy Boston have been camping out in Dewey Square for months.

PRIVILEGES

Local PYC yacht club for local bussiness persons and residences.

POLITICAL ISSUES

South Boston has been undergoing some radical changes in it’s seaport district. This provides a lot of competition for developers to gain political trust within the city. In other areas of South Boston, housing has become a political problem where developers are providing improvements which are increasing the rents and forcing the minorities out into low income housing near Dorechester.

NEEDS

Local food stand plastered with wanted adds and postings.

ECONOMIC ISSUES

South Boston is taking many financial cuts like the rest of the United States. During the recession a lot of business could not afford the rents and moved elsewhere. Currently South Boston‘s Fort Point is 35% vacant. Efforts have been made to turn these Mill Buildings into artist lofts.

VACANCIES

The older mill buildings in South Boston are all in need of tenants. [57]


DISPLAYS OF SELF

This is an area similiar to public messages, except that they are promoting something about an individual or group, in a public setting.

SEPERATIONS

Parking lots fill the majority of South Boston’s Seaport District. This is primarily due to the vast amount of cars which come in to the World Trade Center and Convention Center. These lots are not inviting and provide a boundary toward Downtown Boston.

IDENTITY

Local Artist’s Cafe providing is entrance with some sculptural definition.

PUBLIC MESSAGES

These consist primarily of different types messages that are public either professionally or unannounced. Some examples are church bullitin boards, business signs, for sale signs, and politial campaign signs.

EROSIONS

Old delapitated bridge connection Downtown to South Boston has been turned into a foot bridge.

OFFICIAL

Bussiness signage is not prodominant around the site but it is something that is displayed professionally trying to get tenant’s.

PERSONALIZATION

UNOFFICIAL

Artist installation on a street light help add personal identities to the surrounding artist’s community.

Q R Code taped to a random post on the bridge.

[58]


SPIRIT OF PLACE GOAL

#1

This goal is aimed at engaging the entire site for uses of outside activities, leisurely play, domestic areas, business spaces, entertainment and nightlife to all converge together and create a “spirit of place�. It is the mixing pot for the beauty of the Harbor walk development and the 100 Acre Master Plan of South Boston (Fort Point Community). The goal of my thesis is to produce a building which can truly impact the community and create a neighborhood that can celebrate a higher quality of life. qPERFORMACE

REQUIREMENT 1.1

Over the 393,106 sf site will incorporate landscape elements around all exterior circulation paths, such as: pedestrian pathways, bike routes, and primary/secondary vehicular circulation ways. Separating the different types of exterior circulation will allow for a number of different experiences to take place dependant on, if the pedestrian is walking, biking, or diving to and around the site. A PLACE OF COMFORT GOAL

#2

This goal is aimed at creating a place that can feel safe and comfortable to all inhabitants day or night. The site is located between two communities which are safe and suspect. I place that feels comfortable is a place that allows itself to be enjoyable to its full potential. When a development engages many different function into one area it can create an increased amount of opportunities for security risks. uPERFORMACE

REQUIREMENT 2.1

Vehicular Access Routes primary and secondary * Image Courtesy of Fort Point District 100 Acres 11-22-06

Security is both needed indoor and outdoor. For the exterior spaces surrounding parks especially as well as other circulation around the built structures, many different forms of lighting will be considered to illuminate paths and areas to decrease the amount of crime. [59]


ACCESSIBILITY FROM ALL TRANSPORTATION GOAL

#3

This goal is aimed at creating a place that is welcoming and easily accessible for all visitors to the site. Public transportation is one things that incorporates an urban planning approach to help promote easy access for those who rely on other means of transportation. Other forms to consider leading into the site is highway accessibility, bike ways and sidewalks. Accessibility also relates to functionality in my view and I feel that visitor parking is also something that should be considered as being something convenient. tPERFORMACE

REQUIREMENT 3.1

A proposed extension of the existing infrastructure of South Boston, will help increase accessibility to and around the site, as well as a plan to adjust the location of bus stops so that their routes can bisect the site and link with some of the main artery roads and transit stations in order to promote a great amount of increased public transport accessibility. * Image Courtesy of Seaport Public Realm Plan Feb 1999

BUILDING SYSTEMS INTEGRATION & TECHNOLOGY LIST OF ITEMS •

• • • • • •

Special Lighting: Some building technology concerns I am beginning to consider are connectedness between flexible open spaces. This can begin to look at the details of the top and bottom connections of walls. Also within a flexible space may come changes in air temperature and changes control and how it might be difficult to maintain in a flexible space. With air control also comes concerns of acoustical awareness and comfort control. Sloping Surfaces: These types of design features might include challenges of constructability depending on the type of material being used. They also provide ADA code challenges and trigger life safety awareness. Acoustic and Visual Privacy: Library space types will typically include reading and private work/study areas that require acoustic and visual separation from general circulation and collaborative group areas. Integrated Technology: Begin the design process with a thorough pGenzyme Center understanding of the technological requirements of the spaces, including anticipated future needs. Future Infrastructure: The Master Plan for Fort Point has very specific design strategies that fall within my site context. It is very important that I pay attention to the future state of the surrounding context and utilize them for the longevity of the buildings life cycle. Integration of nature: Concerns of structural stability and organic envelope maintenance. How does a vegetated area within the interior and exterior of the structure effect the immediate context. Building Envelope: The users should be able to understand the meaning of space and transition between spaces from the spatial experience. Visual perception and the breaking down of boundaries is important. The building skin is also something I might consider implementing in my design as a learning tool for the users and would need to figure out particular elements of that assembly. Increased Cooling Capacity: HVAC systems for large gathering spaces are sized and zoned to accommodate varying internal loads. How can these systems be controlled in spaces where program is being overlap and flexible. The creation of solid and voided areas within a shell, creates a challenge when dealing with heating and cooling. Raised Floor: The recommended system for distribution of HVAC in auditorium spaces is duct supplied through floor vents with duct ceiling return air vents in auditorium and lobby. In other spaces, the vent ceiling supply with return air ceiling plenum is recommended. This design strategy can be challenging if the building is organic in shape and/or is stepped in levels. [60]


ENGAGING SPACE Problem Solving through Social Exchange 244 A Street, South Boston, Massachusetts

“Before planting one prepares for best results by analyzing the soil and adding the prescribed nutients. Progamming is analogous: research and analysis results in the information describing what the site and program require. The Program prescribes the nutrients. If followed, good architecture has a good chance.” -Will Melcher Analogy

SITE SELECTION STATEMENT The edge condition of 244 A Street in South Boston promotes the greatest opportunity for my thesis due to the diversity of user groups which can access the site. The numerous means of public transportation, residences, visitors of conventions, tourists, and museum / artist community all could utilize the site. The engagement of the site with the harbor walk and waterfront also adds additional external means of connectedness which can contribute to my thesis exploration. Also located within the “innovation district” of Boston the site adds future opportunity to develop within a larger urban plan that can assist in maturing the thesis concept at a micro and macro level. [61]


PATHS

The district chosen should be easy to navigate from major pathways, including interstate highways coming from the east, west, north, and south, bus routes, and the south subway (green line). This accessible form of transportation is the furthest in reach from the proposed site. Taxi cab frequency is prodominant along western, river, and cambridge streets.

LANDMARKS

The Shopping Center should be a community Landmark amounst many other landmarks confined by Harvar University and adjacent Allston sites. The current site is not utilizing it’s importance as an edge that borders the Charlkes River which is the break between Allston and Cambridge.

EDGES

Streets, waterways, districts, and highway edges help a person visualize and appreciate the differences and advantages of the site as compared with its surroundings. The primary edges being the Boston Harbor Channel and A Street are also visual guides for pedestrian orientation.

DISTRICTS

Districts converging at the site unite a diverse group of people at once for the truest culture of western Boston. The districts consist of the Backbay (southeast) Brighton (West) Cambridge (North) Brookline (South).

BOUNDARIES

The North Allston district is well defined by many different forms of Boundaries, that visitors unfamiliar to the area would be able to identify with, when entering and leaving a neighborhood. While the Charles River is the most identifiable boundary to the district, the area is also contained by western avenue and river street.

NODES

The location of the Shopping Center should also be within a node of activity for easy access to public transportation, taxis, authorities, and commercial establishments. The location is currently near vehicular nodes as well as public community nodes that are formed by the paths.

LYNCH ANALYSIS 5 ELEMENTS 244 A STREET SOUTH BOSTON, MA

This proposed site encompasses all five elements of Kevin Lynch’s “image of the city.” It is situated in a way that can be used for a mixture of programs. Landmarks are all spread out through the site. Large edges help aid vehicles and pedestrians with visual direction. These edges include Western Avenue, the Charles River, Mass Pike and secondary highways. The flat site is located between two pedestrian and vehicular nodes. Located just south of Summer Street provides an opportunity for further development and community connectivity between my proposed building and the 100 Acre Master Plan.

[62]


MISSION & GOALS The mission is to create an active learning environment which cultivates innovation through social exchange. It is essentially to have the site working as part of this mission to support collaboration both within the building and outside within the surrounding context. The mission of my thesis is to create a melting-pot where education, culture, community, and nature are all working together to create a place for spending as well as leisure, and outdoor activities to take place. Ultimately I envision the thesis building type to become a part of the urban fabric in which it can create moments which had not occurred. In lesser of a word; the intention is to create an engaging architecture which a focus on natural integration both for experiencing open space and for the fostering of collaboration.

Parking Lots of South Boston * Image Courtesy of Fort Point District 100 Acres 11-22-06

Proposed Lanscape Plan for South Boston * Image Courtesy of Fort Point District 100 Acres 11-22-06 [63]


THE PURPOSE of the program is to provide collaborative spaces where problems may be solved. This involves the combination of different types of people who will need to socially interact. The benefit of adding a “think tank� work center is that the site is known to be in the innovation district which immediately applies to the idea of preserving innovation. Currently there is no structure in the area which can hotel users of the community in order to corroboratively work on ideas. The convention center does something similar at a larger corporate level. I am trying to have a more intimate setting that suits the needs of the immediate users. In large the South Boston district will benefit as well as the overall Boston proper and extents from the rail users. The opportunities become definite with the implementation of the building type in this location.

100 Acre Master Plan * Image Courtesy of Fort Point District 100 Acres 11-22-06

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS

The site was located near the canal of Boston’s Fort Point area. I found that from previous knowledge about the community that there is a revitalized effort being placed on the immediate site context. This initiative by the redevelopment authority is aimed at bringing green space into the desolate asphault islands that currently exist. The iniqueness of the present edge condition allows me to further enforece my concept of collaboration due to the diversity of existing building types in the area. There is a mixture of large industrial, loft mills, artist housing, highend residential, coporate entities, convention centers, bars, restaurants, and boutiques. All of these ammenities are very excellent during the working week as there is a large sense of community. Also the different modes of transportation that are in close proximity to the site help to bring in many different users from a large context of areas. To sum up the primary physical elements of the site which help enforce my thesis involve: the connection of green spaces diversity of building types within a close context large amount of transportation nodes around the site [64]


Fort Point Area Landmark District Boundary * Image Courtesy of Fort Point District 100 Acres 11-22-06

p10 Minute Walking Radius to Landmarks * Image Courtesy of Fort Point District 100 Acres 11-22-06 [65]


Existing Transit & Bus Routes * Image Courtesy of Fort Point District 100 Acres 11-22-06

Proposed Transit & Bus Routes * Image Courtesy of Seaport Public Realm Plan Feb 1999 [66]


pProposed Green Spaces * Image Courtesy of Fort Point District 100 Acres 11-22-06 As part of the master plan the above image displays context for additional green spaces surrounding my site. The the essence of the channel and green space, I feel that they will assist in referencing their natural elements within the architecture in order to result in a heightened atmosphere.

pProposed Open Space & Pedestrian System * Image Courtesy of Fort Point District 100 Acres 11-22-06 [67]


pProposed Street Hierarchy * Image Courtesy of Fort Point District 100 Acres 11-22-06

pProjected Open Space vs Built-out * Image Courtesy of Fort Point District 100 Acres 11-22-06 [68]


Site Section Characteristics * Image Courtesy of Fort Point District 100 Acres 11-22-06

Site Section Location * Image Courtesy of Degree Project Studio [69]


pProjected South Boston Buildout * Image Courtesy of Fort Point District 100 Acres 11-22-06

THE VISION OF INNOVATION PLACE THE INTENT OF THE PROJECT IS TO PROMOTE A GREATOR SENSE OF COMMUNITY IN SOUTH BOSTON, WHILE ALLOWING ARTISTS, AND LOCAL BUSINESSES TO GROW. A SHOPPING COMPLEX IN THE FORM OF MATCHING THE RESIDENTIAL GRID WILL ALLOW REVENUE TO INCREASE AND PROMOTE A HEALTHIER LIFE STYLE THROUGH AN INCREASE IN OUTDOOR PUBLIC SPACES FOR ENGAGEMENT AND ACTIVITIES TO OCCUR.

pFort Point Avenue Corridor * Image Courtesy of Fort Point District 100 Acres 11-22-06 [70]


244 A STREET

SOUTH BOSTON, MA PARCEL ID NUMBER: 0601165010 LAND OWNER: GILLETTE COMPANY, DELAWARE CORP. LAND VALUE: $6,923,462.00 EXISTING BUILDING VALUE: $18,051,397.00 FY2011 PRELIMINARY(ESTIMATED) TOTAL TAX DUE: FIRST HALF: $387,609.81 ARCHEOLOGICAL DATA: NONE FORMER SITE USE: COMMERCIAL

LAND COST TOTALS FY2011 Building value: $18,051,397.00 FY2011 Land Value: $6,923,462.00 FY2011 Total Value: $24,974,462.00 FY2011 Tax Rates: Residential: $12.79 Commercial: $31.04 FY2012 Preliminary Total Tax Due:First Half: $387,609.81

Site Restrictions waterway zone * Image Courtesy of Fort Point District 100 Acres 11-22-06

Site Restrictions building height zones * Image Courtesy of Fort Point District 100 Acres 11-22-06 [71]


CODE WORKSHEET Project Name: March Thesis Project Address: 244 A Street, South Boston, MA Lot Size: 393,160 sf

Frontage: 436ft Lot Width: 646ft

Zoning Information: Applicable Zoning Regulations: Waterways, Commercial, Mixed-Use Zoning Designation: M-2 / M-4

Special District Designation: Waterway, Atrium, & Parking Garage

Zoning Use(s): Commercial Land

Dimensional Restrictions: FY none | SY none | RY none | FAR 4.0 Building Code Information: Applicable Building Code: MA State Building Code, 8th Edition Use Group(s): A-1, A-5, B, E, I, M, U Building Area: 42,000sf

Building Height (st/ft): 65ft Max

% Perimeter Access: 150%

Sprinklered: Yes

Proposed Construction Type (circle one): IA IB IIA IIB IIIA IIIB IV VA VB Allowed Height and Area: 3 storeys / 16, 5000sf Sprinkler increase (Height and Area): 95ft / 78,000sf Sprinkler increase (Height and Area): 200% = 78.000sf / 95ft Area Increase for Perimeter Access: 150% = 39,000sf Max. allowed area: 16,500 x 3 = 49,500sf +/Height and Area:

Allowed: 65ft / 49,500sf Actual: 55ft / 104,000sf

Fire Separation Distance:

N 30 ft | S 30ft | E 30ft | W 30ft

Percentage of Allowed Openings: N- UL | S - UL | E - UL | W - UL

CODE SUMMARY

three storeys or 65 feet high, which ever results in less than 16,5000sf for the building footprint. Total Building Square Footage = 49,500sf +/-

[72]


Site Restrictions setbacks and building heights * Image Courtesy of Fort Point District 100 Acres 11-22-06

COST ESTIMATE ANALYSIS A B C D

Building Cost $49,500 x $97.25 Fixed Equipment (8% of A) Site Development (15% of A) Total Construction Cost = A+B+C

$4,813,875.00 $385,110.00 $722,081.25 $5,921,066.25

E F G H I J

Site Acquisition Moveable Equipment (8% of A) Professional Fees (6% of D) Contingencies (10% of D) Administrative Costs (1%of D) Total Budget Estimate = (D+E+F+G+H+I)=J

$6,923,462.00 $385,110.00 $355,263.97 $592,106.63 $59,210.66 $14,236,219.51

Note: I did not factor in the value of the existing buildings currently on the site

CODE CONCLUSIONS

The primary restrictions of my site have to do with the maximum number of storeys, the zoning designation and setback requirements. Even though the site is zoned as Commercial Land it still falls into the Waterway Designation for the future development of the 100 Acre Master Plan. There are additional restrictions due to the waterway acts and will have to be explored further to see which codes have authority over the other. In result, this will effect my buildings overall area or by means of a variance.

[73]


USER PROFILE DESCRIPTIONS

WHO I ENVISION WILL BE USING MY PROPOSED BUILDING The intent is to provide a service building for the community at large as well as different forms of the arts and sciences professions. With that said I can imagine that the building will accommodate numerous types of users on different levels and amounts. HIGH USAGE: Individuals and groups who will be utilizing the building extensively my be local artists in the Boston community who have rented studio space and might be on site regularly for classes. Biotech professionals are another intended user who will have small satellite research and discussion centers which could be rented out as long-term. The last high usage group would be the buildings personnel. NORMAL USAGE: This user group could be daily visitors who include high school or college students who are utilizing the building for professional resources. Other groups may be surrounding business groups who want to come and have a small function for the company or utilize some of the meeting spaces. LOW USAGE: This user group could be for the travelers who are visiting the nearby convention center. They might come into the building briefly to utilize touchdown space in order to get some work complete or to lounge and meeting other people at the buildings public amenities. Because of the artists integration I can imagine a larger variety of users who come in periodically to exhibit art and interact with the designers.

INTERVIEW 1: USER October 8th 2011 2:20 pm

LOCAL ARTIST WITHIN THE SOUTH BOSTON COMMUNITY Q: Where do you primarily produce your artwork? A: Typically I produce my work out on my deck during the summer. This is because my apartment is relatively small and it is hard to work within the tight space. During the winter I sometime use a friends loft to produce some of my bigger paintings. Q: How often do you go out for art related purposes such as visiting an exhibit? A: Boston has an excellent artist community. I work at a local gallery so I am always visiting exhibits to see what the latest trends and installations are. Q: What types of resources do you feel are lacking in the South Boston Artist’s Community? A: I feel that art supply stores are something that could be needed in the South Boston area. It is usually a longer trip away to visit Utrecht, Blick or smaller supply stores in the Back Bay or Cambridge. Q: Where would you say is the least safe place around the Fort Point Channel area? A: Well in the late evenings I sometimes go to the lounges off of Congress/ A Street. This sometimes does not feel like the most safest of places. Q: Why do you feel this is an unsafe area? A: Well you are far away from the primary street and the lighting is not very bright. Q: Would you use a rentable art studio space if it was accessible and provided storage? A: Considering that my apartment is small and the rent in South Boston is pricey I would definitely consider using shared studio space. I know of some business people who share joint office spaces. Q: Would you take art classes/workshops at a studio if they offered a vast variety of options? A: I tend to travel once a year for an artist excursion in which I take workshops for a week. I wish there were more short term learning opportunities in the Boston area rather than full semester classes at the local universities. [74]


INTERVIEW 2: FACILITIES DIRECTOR October 27th 2009 9:45 am

AMY, OWNER OF SMALL RETAIL SHOP ON NEWBURY STREET Q: What are some of the challenges with managing a large convention center? A: Scheduling and coordinating the number of guests is always challenging. Then there is additional services which might need to be added after a function takes place. This sometimes is tricky depending on how many different venues we are holding. Q: Is your facility open 24hrs is requested? A: Typically some functions have gone as late as 3am but we have new had a client who needed the facility through the entire night. Q: Do you currently have any other amenities which might attract guests? A: The only amenities we have are locates in the Weston Hotel which is connected to the southeast portion of the main entry. The hotel provides a relaxing lobby, smaller conference rooms and two different restaurant/bars. Q: Is it safe to say that the local residences have no use for the convention center? A: Our clientèle is generally fortune 500 companies which have all hands parties or product showcasing here. So the local community is rarely involved in any of these shows. Sometime we have an Auto Show which is available to the public and attracts the local crowds. Q: What are some ab-normal requests you might have received from clients? A: We once had a request for a wedding party in our smaller grand ball room which would have been for 400 people. Q: Could there be any improvements if any, to the accessibility and accommodations? A: I feel that out location is in an up and coming area for investors and that the accessibility is very ideal for vehicles and public transportation. I would have to think a little further about the amenities part. Q: What is the most problematic area when trying to maintain this building? A: I think programming can be a problem because of its organic nature. One weekend we could have all spaces being used while other we are worrying about which areas the HVAC can be lowered in.

BCEC Convention Center in South Boston Image Courtesy of Google Images [75]


INTERVIEW 3: SCIENTIST November 13th 2009 12:00 pm

SENIOR SCIENTIST AT GENZYME CORPORATION Q: What type of trends do you see changing in the areas of research and development? A: Well I feel technology is an ever growing contributor the success of the industry. The amount of disciplines has also begun to increasingly grow where we have individuals testing chemicals, developing chemicals, analytical scientists, biologists, medicine experts, and numerous other individual parties which are all specialized but all hold a critical component to the success of development. Q: What type of spaces do you typically interact with individuals? A: Well I tend to migrate from my personal office to personal lab. From there I spend time in group lab research space where I can direct and observe what is going on. Other times I am travelling to meet other colleagues and learn what breakthroughs are developing. Conference rooms and webinars are also very typical within a weeks time. Coordination and technical efficiency are very critical to the effectiveness of the business. Q: How many hours do you work a week? A: My work week is always on flux but will always be well over 50hrs. Time frames and budgets need to be met and always require as much of a scientists time as needed. I enjoy the work and it does bother me when you are developing drugs which can cure rare diseases. 12 hours days are very typical for me while I am conducting lab research. Q: Because of your long hours would you enjoy spaces for lounging and sleeping within the work environment? A: I know of some colleagues of mine who would utilize such space but personally I feel that if I had those spaces I would never go home. Q: Are there any other ways in which you develop inspiration ? A: Well during my free time I enjoy activities such as hiking, biking, kayaking etc... Mostly outdoor activities. Most likely because I am working indoors all day. Q: Your new Genzyme Center brings a lot of natural elements into the building, do you find those elements helpful for the users well being? A: When I head over to the center for conferences I always take my time while walking through the atrium space. I feel that the office building does an excellent job bringing the outside into the building. I do wish that lab space could have those qualities. Q:: How could we incorporate those qualities into a lab space? A: I feel that any natural element could not engage the lab space directly due to the process in which we work under controlled conditions. But I feel that the approach to a lab and even the adjacent areas could resemble a lot of the elements from the newer office building. I feel it would certainly add a pleasant atmosphere to the working environment.

NTERVIEW CONCLUSIONS I found that these interviews confirmed much of what I learned during the site analysis portion of the project. Nearly every person interviewed spoke of the need for smaller service spaces, the integration of nature and interaction with others. I found it particularly interesting how different yet similar the individual needs of each interviewed person had. They had things they enjoyed and things they felt could be done better. I would like to further investigate potential users of my thesis building so I can connected some common threads which can lead me to an appropriate program. [76]


The thesis proposal exhibition is a gallery exhibit open to the public at the BAC and is a way for the thesis students to present there thesis statement multiple times to members of the thesis committee most importantly. This part of the thesis process was a great way to summary my work the first semester and get numerous amounts of feedback during the exhibit. The thesis proposal document, talked about in section one, is finalized soon after the exhibition therefore all feedback and be incorporated into strengthening the overall proposal.

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THESIS PROPOSAL THESIS PROPOSAL EXHIBITION EXHIBITION [77]


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pThesis Proposal Exhibit Alex Siekierski recieving comments from Bob Hsiung

  

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



pCasieri Hall 2nd Floor Boston Architectural College [79]


The introductory review was an opportunity to introduce my thesis proposal/idea to my thesis panel members. I decided to summarize my investigations in regards to the regional site context and thesis program requirements along with studio works and case study analysis. The largest goal of this review was to finalize a site location. I had proposed two site located within close proximity of one another in South Boston. In conjunction with each site I also did some schematic planning and massing designs which corresponded to the process I used during my thesis studio investigations.

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INTRODUCTORY INTRODUCTORY REVIEW REVIEW [80]


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Programmatic Breakdown this was an early breakdown of space types in which I intended to use in my thesis building. The colors represent public vs. private space. [86]


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As a result of my Introductory Review it was a collective agreement that Site Option 1 would be the move valuable place to investigate my thesis idea. The majority of the feedback I received was in two parts. One being program and the other being concept. Programmatic concerns involved controlling movement through space/site both horizontally and vertically. Additional comments involved the buildings adaptation into the 100 Acre Master Plan and how it could adapt to the phases it may under-go. How can the building itself make people/users want to learn? How can it connect different users possibly through public spaces and travel paths. How does this relate directly to enhancing the process of learning and innovation.... This may involve a combination of environmental awareness, scientific exploration and artistic discovery. Moving forward I must develop a large site context physical model along with the delineation of theoretical vs. conceptual items within the thesis. Also how does the site context directly relate to my building mass and also in correspondence with the over arching thesis idea. Another way of driving meaning onto my design idea is to use more specific historical context from my proposal.

[89]


The Preliminary Thesis Review was a way for me to address additional site research that was lacking in the previous review. Additional investigations included three different design approaches to my thesis: SCHEME 1: SEA-TRADE & TALL SHIPS After looking back on the history and development of South Boston I choose to analyse sea trade. The trading of goods played a vital role in the economic development of Boston in the mid-late 1800’s. I thought it might be interesting to base my conceptual design around tall ships. SCHEME 2: MANUFACTURING Another piece of Boston’s economic history after its separation from the British became manufacturing. With the development of the first railway, raw material and goods were able to be transported to the Boston harbour and manufactured. Leather, pipe fittings, sugar, tea were just some of the goods created and traded at large during the late 1800’s to early 1900’s. Looking at the manufacturing process as a system I began to notice that all the components were separated out while connected by one thread, the railway. This was the notion I based my second scheme upon. SCHEME 3: FORTIFICATION & SECURITY The idea of fortification came along while researching the history of Boston. Rebuilt in 1812 Fort Independence at Boston’s Castle Island was an area of defence for our harbour. The second part being security came from the ? of what users would need in order to freely share their innovative ideas. One idea I had was comfort and security. To add tension to the design process I choose to use corrections facilities as inspiration for what security means through design at an extreme. After further analysing these facilities I began to notice commonalities with them.

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PRELIMINARY PRELIMINARY REVIEW REVIEW [90]


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As a result of my Preliminary Review my thesis panel seemed to enjoy Scheme 2: design a campus which utilizes the spaces in between to enhance collaboration/innovation. The idea of designing for density also arose during the review and is something that needs to be addressed. Because this is about innovation, the materials I use as well as the form I choose must reflect those concepts. The idea of program should somehow incorporate non-profit, for-profit & local artists working and learning from each-other. The buildings connection to the surrounding context (ex. Waterfront) must be evident in drawing form as the design gets further developed. Because fortification is very different than security it is good to identify what experience I am looking to achieve and is it for personal or public? Or individual or group? Because this can vary depending on the user group it is a beneficial to develop the program in conjunction with the architecture. Is it going to be corporate, scientific or artistic?

[100]


The largest efforts made in my Schematic Review consisted of researching the zoning/setbacks/ height regulations around my proposed site. This brought me to the overall maximum massing volume that was allowable on the site. SCHEME 2: MANUFACTURING + SCHEME 3: FORTIFICATION & SECURITY •Separation / compartmenting of goods within a system•The analogy of using paths of travel and flow as lines and connections of railway•Areas for social interaction are surrounded by smaller independent areas•The importance of inbetweeness of space. •One critical component is the control point which rises up over ALL spaces of interaction. This combination of schemes is what allowed me to program the maximum footprint as a test which justified the program is sized adequately. At the same time I was also able to use my case studies and drive the design through the performance of materials.

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SCHEMATIC SCHEMATIC REVIEW REVIEW [101]


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Overall my process at a schematic level was too defined with not enough supporting context. My process at this point had gone from to much concept toward not enough concept. Also the design needed to be supportive of innovation and not a programming exercise based upon the maximum volume of space allowed. The thesis has become heavily weighted by the program and needs to fit the concept with the program. This means moving forward I intent to develop more conceptual ideas based upon form and concept. The form must reflect the plan and display the thesis idea through interior spaces as well. Innovation does not have to be technology alone but can be sustainability, availability to public, spacial activities, people response & feelings (smell, sight, touch). The concept is about common space and the horizontal + vertical paths therefore moving forward I must design around this concept and diagram it well. This can occur through a more defined Architecture that is at an appropriate scale.

[114]


After fully taking a few steps backwards and looking at my building form I decided to develop my massing through the overall site conditions and the future pedestrian paths both at a macro and micro scale. This help me to justify the overall building form. With a more unique form established I decided to fully develop my program into something more flexible which suited the over arching ideas behind my thesis. The program started by creating unique adjacencies between user groups. This was to allow for a visual connectedness through different space types in order to potentially spawn interaction. This method was not fully complementing to my thesis because of the lack of flexibility. My second program development was aimed at taking the larger assembly type program spaces and begin to develop public space which supported them. This idea began to promote flexibility within the program as well as make practical sense for the overall circulation. My third development was based off the second scheme with minor reconfigurations. Overall the extensive amount of program refinement was a benefit that allowed my thesis to become supported by a more generalized program consisting of core circulation, common amenities as well as public and private rooms which are all common among business.

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SCHEMATIC INTERIM SCHEMATIC INTERIM REVIEW REVIEW [115]


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Transparency in the form - the use of angular glazed facades and tall atrium spaces was used to show the public a view of the internal elements of the building both during the day and night usage. [121]


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Developing the Street Scape - one primary design feature was to develop protected outdoor space for public pedestrian use. Because the building can open in the summer this gives opportunity to integrate the interior space with activities along the harbor walk. [123]


[124]


The diagrammatic quality of this review is something that needs to be taken into hard-lined drawing format for the following review. The comments I received pertained to tectonic aspects of the architecture such as structural components & systems via detailed building sections and material selections. These details and sections are necessary to justify that the form of the building being primarily angular, can actually be buildable. Another way to validate my massing moving forward is to show all surrounding site context and work out the plan in an appropriate scale. The design of the interior space should be focused around the common “paths” within the building. These paths also need to be clearly presented diagrammatically moving forward. As of right now my destinations are defined but my paths need to be executed. During this process I must think about what is solid and transparent, what will a wall physically do to the space along the “path.” Additional comments I received as feedback were to centralize the main entry and make is well inviting and include a public amenity (such as store or cafe) at ground level to attract the public inside. Simplification is also another way of developing clarity within design and this may be something to take a look at moving forward.

[125]


I would like to extend a big thank you to the Designer’s Lighting Forum of New England for awarding me the 2012 traveling scholarship. Lighting is something I feel all designer’s need a basic knowledge of. It allows us to perceive space and as a result experience it visually. My passion for lighting began in 2008 during my adventures throughout Europe and the Middle East. It was very eye opening to see how international design firms incorporated lighting to accentuate the Architecture. Currently, it has been about two months now sense my return from Light + Building, located in Frankfurt Germany. My week long lighting experience there was like no other industry related event I have ever attended. It was a thrill to see miles and miles of lighting fixtures which were all the latest and greatest from manufactures around the globe. The convention itself was a great resource for me; I was able to ask technical questions about the technologies used for the products as well as understand ideal applications for them. I was able to learn a lot about the industry from meeting the local Boston Designer’s, local reps, regional distributors and the manufacturers themselves. Another lasting impression I will have from this experience would be the ERCO factory tour. The tour along with the presentation of the company’s history and light lab was truly a remarkable educational experience that I will have forever. Back in Boston I am now beginning to see my involvement in the lighting community taking off. I am able to participate in lighting design a little more at the office, with the guidance of our inhouse lighting designer as well as interact with local reps, while attending functions and lectures. I feel that without this opportunity I would not have had such a wonderful jump-start into the local lighting community!

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LIGHTLIGHT | SPACE | SPACE WORKSHOP WORKSHOP [126]


LIGHTING CONCEPT

Architecture which can stimulate innovation through social interaction. Supported by collaboration and inspired by Montessori principles INTRODUCTION: The project is an 5,200sf café located on the sixth floor of a newly developed, Public Innovation Resource Center. This 18 hour operation is Located within Boston’s Fort Point Channel district along the channel. GENERAL CONCEPT: qSchematic Sketch The general lighting concept intends to compliment the buildings program and mission. The Canteen is a place for social interaction amongst the buildings users as well as the public. This mission helps imply many different means of lighting the space in order to emphasize social interaction. In order to achieve the design aims to create contrasts within the space in an effort to develop “zones” of social interaction. Another layer of design was to treat the ceiling conditions as illuminated sculptural objects to provide an environment which is aesthetically pleasing. This idea was taken forward by the use of stepping soffits, indirect lighting as well as creating cove lights. The most private isolated areas will be highlighted with red lighting and shorter ceiling heights to create an intimate and identifiable space. The coffee bar is the largest destination on the floor plan which will have many varieties of lighting strategies in order to accommodate general lighting as well as task lighting because the intent is for this to also be a working environment for persons to explore ideas. From an external perspective the client wanted to display the function of the building from a far. The façade materials of the building lend itself to shield the interior of the building from over exposure to light while at night allowing the inside to be illuminated through transparency. Suspended light tubes along with the use of cool general lighting will allow for visual consistency allowing full view of the interior usages in the evening.

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SPACIAL INSPIRATION

Aesthetics case study sample images

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Framework core and shell building

Developing the Layout understanding the spaces function via furniture layout [129]


Preliminary Lighting distribution diagram [130]


SPACIAL INSPIRATION Alex Jeffrey Siekierski 617.894.0664 siekierski.alex@gmail.com LIGHT + SPACE WORKSHOP 244 A Street, Boston, MA Key Plan

iBAR CANTEEN 6TH FLOOR INNOVATION RESOURCE CENTER DATE:10/29/12

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CONTINUOUS ROW OF FLUOR. COVE FIXTURE, BUTT FIXTURE BODIES END TO END, SEE ELEC. DWGS. FOR FIXTURE TYPE 6" AXIOM CHANNEL TRIM, PAINT OUT EDGE TO MATCH

CONTINUOUS ROW OF FLUOR. COVE FIXTURE, BUTT FIXTURE BODIES END TO END, SEE ELEC. DWGS. FOR FIXTURE TYPE

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BLOCKING AS REQUIRED

BLOCKING AS REQUIRED

1/2" PLYWOOD SUBSTRATE

1/2" PLYWOOD SUBSTRATE

3" SOUND ATTENUATION BLANKET

3" SOUND ATTENUATION BLANKET

5/8" GYP. BOARD

5/8" GYP. BOARD

CEILING HEIGHT REFER TO RCP AXIOM BOTTOM DRYWALL TRIM 5/8" GYP. BOARD

8

WOODEN CEILING SECTION AT FIXTURE 3" = 1'-0"

7

CEILING CLOUD DETAIL CEILING CLOUD DETAIL 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

6

[ ]

CEILING COVE DETAIL CEILING COVE DETAIL 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

9

[ ]

TYPICAL LIGHT SHELF 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

10 LIGHT SHELF WITH GLAZING 1 1/2" = 1'-0"

[ ]

[ ]

LIGHT FIXTURE LEGEND STRIP LIGHTING L1

WALL WASHING

4FT LED MODULE LIGHT STRIP

PENDANT LIGHTING

4FT LED RECESSED WALL SLOT

P1

MINI LED PENDANT

4FT LED RECESSED LINEAR WALL WASHER

P2

4" CYLINDER PENDANT WITH DOWNLIGHT

SUSPENDED LIGHTS SUSPENDED 4''x48'' LENSED LINEAR LED FIXTURE

S1

DOWNIGHTS R-1

RECESSED 6" DIAMETER WIDE LED DOWNLIGHT

R-2

RECESSED 6" DIAMETER MEDIUM LED WALLWASHER DOWNLIGHT

WS1

L2

3FT LED MODULE LIGHT STRIP LWW1

L3

iBAR CANTEEN 6TH FLOOR INNOVATIVE RESOURCE CENTER

SEEYOND STRIP LED MODULES (AS PART OF ENCLOSURE)

COVE LIGHTING C2

3' LONG INDIRECT LED COVE

SM1

SURFACE MOUNTED 4''x48'' LENSED LINEAR LED FIXTURE

SM2

SURFACE MOUNTED VERTICAL 2''x48'' LENSED LINEAR LED FIXTURE

COMPACT FLOURESCENT PENDANT P3

4' LONG INDIRECT LED COVE C1

SURFACE MOUNTED

LARGE BUBBLE LED PENDANT

R-3

RECESSED 6" DIAMETER DIMMABLE LED DOWNLIGHT

P4

N

DATE:10/28/12

[131]

Alex Jeffrey Siekierski 617.894.0664 siekierski.alex@gmail.com LIGHT + SPACE WORKSHOP 244 A Street, Boston, MA Key Plan

4

BUILDING KEY 1" = 80'-0"


7

SECTION AT OPEN BENCH AREA

6

SECTION AT LARGED GLAZED AREA

1/4" = 1'-0"

CANTEEN COFFEE BAR

1

Level 6 71' - 0"

1/4" = 1'-0"

B

R2 9 P3

P4

P3

P3

A102

SM2

Level 6 71' - 0"

9

3D AXO WITH LIGHT SOURCES 2

2

6TH FLOOR INNOVATIVE RESOURCE CENTER

3

PRIVATE SOCIAL SPACE

3

5

Type Mark Description C1

C2

L1

L2

LWW1

P1

P2

P3

P4

R1

R2

S1

SM1

5

7

1/4" = 1'-0"

OPEN LOUNGE AREA

iBAR CANTEEN 6TH FLOOR INNOVATIVE RESOURCE CENTER

SM2

Concealed Cove Asymmetric Indirect Concealed Cove Asymmetric Indirect Surface Mounted Linear with inline driver Surface Mounted Linear with inline driver GWB Recessed Direct Linear Wall Washer Xacara Mini Pendant 4" CFL Cylinder with Downlight Option Rocket I Specular Industrial Pendant Bubble 3D Low Profile Pendant Recessed 6 inch Round Downlight Recessed 6 inch Round Wallwasher Pendant/Su spended-M ounted Direct Surface-Mo unted Direct

Lightplane Linear 2" Profile WS1 Wall Slot 6000 Recessed Perimeter Grand total: 108

Manufactur er

Catalog Number

Count

Lamp

Lighting Fixture Schedule Wattage Individual Wattage

Litecontrol

CC-AL-L15 21 04MO35KC WMD10

LED

8W

168 W

C1 Fixtures at half height walls are to get a Lens to protect against dust

Litecontrol

CC-AL-L15 5 03MO35KC WMD10

LED

8W

40 W

C2 Fixtures at half height walls are to get a Lens to protect against dust

Bartco Lighting

E5-CB

8

LED

6W

48 W

Offset Fixture 18" from Cloud outside edge

Bartco Lighting

E5-CB

5

LED

5W

23 W

Offset Fixture 18" from Cloud outside edge

Litecontrol

3 MOD 44 / R-WWD-44 0

T5

21 W

63 W

Offset fixture 2ft from wall to center line

LED

15 W

165 W

All P1 fixtures should all be 7'4" from finish floor

T5

79 W

711 W

Heights and rough locations will be determined in the field

11 Beta-Calco 50 1003 WD MS TS5 Delray 6309CWB4 9 Lighting MR16BDIM -WHITEBT RAXWBLA CRB Delray 7714232UE 4 Lighting D9

Beta-Calco BCBT501L P 150A031VE Zumtobel BR6DLED3 0WK30MS5 5D Zumtobel BR6WLED3 0WK30WS 55D Litecontrol P-D-L4404 SGLMOD1 035K Litecontrol

Arch Lighting Works Litecontrol

CF

32 W

128 W

All P3 fixtures should all be 7'4" from finish floor

1

LED

1002 W

1002 W

6ft above finish floor

2

LED

30 W

60 W

4

LED

30 W

120 W

18

LED

7W

131 W

LED

7W

65 W

LED

7W

21 W

LED

4W

S-D-L4404 9 SGLMOD1 035K WLPVERT4 3 HP7LED-DI M120WDAL WS-L6004L 5 O30KCWM DPD10LCD 108

1

Comments 6

4

PERSPECTIVE KEY

8

SEEYOND ENCLOSURE DETAILS

1" = 40'-0"

Hand S1 fixture 16" below ceiling height.

1 1/2" = 1'-0"

Alex Jeffrey Siekierski 617.894.0664 siekierski.alex@gmail.com LIGHT + SPACE WORKSHOP 244 A Street, Boston, MA Key Plan

Recess all SM2 fixture 5ft above finish floor to CL

20 W

2764 W

DATE:10/30/12

Alex Jeffrey Siekierski 617.894.0664 siekierski.alex@gmail.com LIGHT + SPACE WORKSHOP 244 A Street, Boston, MA Key Plan

iBAR CANTEEN AGI32 Renderings & Calculation Points

N

DATE:12/04/12

[132]

9


Generated by COMcheck-Web Software

Interior Lighting Compliance Certificate 2009 IECC Section 1: Project Information Project Type: New Construction Project Title : South Boston Innovation Resource Center Cafe Construction Site:

Owner/Agent:

Designer/Contractor:

Section 2: Interior Lighting and Power Calculation A Area Category

B Floor Area (ft2)

Canteen (Dining: Bar Lounge/Leisure)

C Allowed Watts / ft2

5200

D Allowed Watts (B x C)

1.3

6760

Total Allowed Watts =

6760

Section 3: Interior Lighting Fixture Schedule A Fixture ID : Description / Lamp / Wattage Per Lamp / Ballast Canteen (Dining: Bar Lounge/Leisure, 5200 sq.ft.) Concealed Cove Asymmetric Indirect: C1: CC-AL-L1504MO35KCWMD10 / Other / Electronic Concealed Cove Asymmetric Indirect: C2: CC-AL-L1503MO35KCWMD10 / Other / Electronic Surface Mounted Linear with inline driver: L1: E5-CB / Other / Electronic Surface Mounted Linear with inline driver: L2: E5-CB / Other / Electronic GWB Recessed Direct Linear Wall Washer: LWW1: MOD 44 / R-WWD-440 / Other / Electronic Xacara Mini Pendant: P1: 50 1003 WD MS TS5 / Other / Electronic Wall Slot 6000 Recessed Perimeter: WS1: WS-L6004LO30KCWMDPD10LCD / Other / Electronic 4" CFL Cylinder with Downlight Option: P2: 6309CWB4MR16BDIM-WHITEBTRAXWBLA / Other / Electronic Rocket I Specular Industrial Pendant: P3: 7714232UED9 / Other / Electronic Bubble 3D Low Profile Pendant: P4: BCBT501LP 150A031VE / Other / Electronic Recessed 6 inch Round Downlight: R1: BR6DLED30WK30MS55D / Other / Electronic Recessed 6 inch Round Wallwasher: R2: BR6WLED30WK30WS55D / Other / Electronic Pendant/Suspended-Mounted Direct: S1: P-D-L4404SGLMOD1035K / Other / Electronic Surface-Mounted Direct: SM1: S-D-L4404SGLMOD1035K / Other / Electronic Lightplane Linear 2" Profile: SM2: WLPVERT4HP7LED-DIM120WDAL / Other / Electronic

B C D Lamps/ # of Fixture Fixture Fixtures Watt.

E (C X D)

1

21

8

168

1

5

8

40

1 1 2

8 5 4

6 5 21

48 25 84

1 1

11 5

15 4

165 20

2

9

79

711

2 1 1 1 1 1 1

4 1 2 4 18 9 3

32 1002 30 30 7 7 7

128 1002 60 120 126 63 21

Total Proposed Watts =

2781

Section 4: Requirements Checklist Interior Lighting PASSES: Design 59% better than code.

Lighting Wattage:

â?‘

1. Total proposed watts must be less than or equal to total allowed watts.

Project Title: South Boston Innovation Resource Center Cafe Data filename:

[133]

Report date: 11/03/12 Page 2 of 7


Open Seating Areas LIGHT FIXTURE LEGEND

L-2

L-5

3FT FLUORESCENT LIGHT STRIP

4FT FLUORESCENT LIGHT STRIP

4FT FLUORESCENT STRIP (2) LAMP

WALL WASHING WW-1

WALL MOUNTED 26" LONG FLUORESCENT MIRROR LIGHT A.D.A.COMPLIANT

WS-1

WALL MOUNTED 26" LONG FLUORESCENT MIRROR LIGHT A.D.A.COMPLIANT

SPECIALTY LIGHTING L-1

PENDANT LIGHTING

SUSPENDED LIGHTS

PENDANT 12' LONG FLUORESCENT L-15 P-1

PENDANT 8' LONG INDIRECT FLUORESCENT

L-19-4

DOWNIGHTS

RECESSED 4''x48'' LENSED LINEAR FLUORESCENT

R-1

RECESSED 6" DIAMETER WIDE LED DOWNLIGHT

RECESSED 4''x48'' LENSED DIRECT LINEAR FLUORESCENT W/ ACRYLIC LENS

R-2

RECESSED 6" DIAMETER MEDIUM LED WALLWASHER DOWNLIGHT

P-2

PENDANT 14' LONG INDIRECT FLUORESCENT

COVE LIGHTING

P-3

SEEYOND STRIP LED

R-3

RECESSED 6" DIAMETER DIMMABLE LED DOWNLIGHT

4' LONG INDIRECT FLUORESCENT COVE

L-4

1/4"

1' - 0" 6 1/2"

GYP. BOARD GRID SYSTEM

12" MIN. 3 1/4"

CONTINUOUS ROW OF FLUOR. COVE FIXTURE, BUTT FIXTURE BODIES END TO END, SEE ELEC. DWGS. FOR FIXTURE TYPE

5/8" GYP. BOARD

WALL HEIGHT 7'-0" A.F.F.

BLOCKING AS REQUIRED 1/2" PLYWOOD SUBSTRATE

CEILING HEIGHT REFER TO RCP

9 3/8"

VARIES

L-1

REFER TO RCP

UTILITY STRIP LIGHTING

5/8" GYP. BOARD

3" SOUND ATTENUATION BLANKET

CONTINUOUS ROW OF FLUOR. COVE FIXTURE, BUTT FIXTURE BODIES END TO END, SEE ELEC. DWGS. FOR FIXTURE TYPE

5/8" GYP. BOARD

6" AXIOM CHANNEL TRIM, PAINT OUT EDGE TO MATCH

CEILING HEIGHT REFER TO RCP AXIOM BOTTOM DRYWALL TRIM

Ceiling Cove Detail

Concealed Accent Wall Light Shelf

5/8" GYP. BOARD

CEILING COVE DETAIL [ ]

[ ]

Overall Perspective of the Canteen Workbar Area Colored Stepped Soffits for Task Lighting [134]


CONCLUSIONS & AGI32

The overall knowledge I gained from this course was very comprehensive, where I learned the science behind lighting along with the technology, how to select lamps and fixture, how to calculate lighting footcandles & lastly how to detail and render your designs. The integration of lighting within my thesis has been to create unique environments which support collaboration. For the canteen space I choose to use light as a way for leading users throughout the space. Secondly the use of light would be for branding and marketing of the idea. This can be done by the style of fixtures you select. In my project I choose to try and conceal the majority of lighting fixtures which exposing the structural members of the architecture. With the use of AGI32 & ComCheck I was able to calculate my lighting power density and come in 59% better than code due to the percentage LED fixtures throughout the space. AGI32 was a very difficult program to use but in the end it displayed the intent of the design.

[135]


The primary deliverables of this review were all necessary to be in scale. Before this review the majority of the process was research with supporting speculative design iterations that conveyed the overall ideas. I chose to layout my boards so that I touched upon the structural integrity of my design through case study/ reference details as well as material references which have been implemented in the local region of my proposed site. Overall it was important to show the overall building in relation to the urban fabric and then convey the internal circulation routes and program adjacencies. All these design investigations were intended to benefit and support the overall thesis idea of bringing people together to learn from each other and collaborate. One good objective I set was to always refer back to my preliminary vignettes which were designed with particular case studies in mind and merely idealized the thesis topic in a spacial moment. It was great that I had the supporting gestures to validate some of the internal conditions within my larger programmed space.

9

DESIGN DESIGN DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT REVIEW REVIEW [136]


Metal Mesh Panel System & Kickers

Corrugated Panel System

STRUCTURAL DETAILING

after meeting with my structural consultant, I began to have a few ideas about different types of systems I could potentially use to support my building. The details on this page are references that I used in my Design Development Review. These details allowed me to envision the tectonic systems which could make up my building as well as support the aesthetics I was aiming toward.

Curtainwall Reinforcement

Landscape Detail

Sloped Structural Insulated Panels

Circular Skylight at Ground Level [137]


Ariel Perspective of Proposed Building

Keyplan Section Diagram of Building Program

Perspective Down Proposed Pedestrian Bridge

[138]


engaging spaces

proposal addendum 1. The original site was zoned for 1.5 million square feet with a FAR of 4.

My solution was to select a portion of the original proposed site. The location is closest to the channel containing an approximate area of 28,000 square feet. The smaller site consists of using two adjacent buildings areas which were proposed with the 100 Acre Master Plan. In addition to decrease the site area I also increased my proposed program to roughly 130,000 square feet. My program is subject to change slightly depending on the direction and exploration of scale within the selected site.

thesis statement

Architecture which can stimulate innovation through social interaction Supported by collaboration and inspired by Montessori principles Can the engaging of multiple learning processes yield an environment for enhanced exchanging of information via collaboration and digital media? My thesis is about creating an environment for education, communication, technology, active learning, and collaboration. Key components of collaboration regard adaptability, visual connectivity, integration of nature, order, transformative spaces, layering of program, and the de-standardization of space types. With the standardization of building uses comes restraints on adaptability and functionality within spaces. In order for sharing of ideas to occur, standard space types are no longer a determining factor for the success for the program. Standardization does not account for Lifelong Learning in a long-term perspective. The more adaptable and exible a series of spaces becomes further enhances the ability for the environment to provide adequate services which can assist in the exchanging of information.

montessori

Montessori believed that the curriculum and the spaces they are taught in, must promote freedom, order, beauty and atmosphere, didactic materials, community life, and reality and nature. These concepts determined as the criteria of the Montessori approach which Montessori Design Attributes: became critical in allowing 1. Openness within a space. the creative mind to ourish.. 2. Clear visibility between adjacent spaces with adequate lighting. “Emphasis must be placed on 3. Integrate nature within the context of the classroom. visibility between activity areas 4. The atmosphere must compliment the use. in order to permit observation by the teacher, and activity areas in order to permit observation by the teacher and between the children.” For Montessori, visibility promoted freedom and the inclination that if the boundaries of a space can be minimized and the use can be adaptable, then architecture can begin to facilitate collaboration.

terms of criticism engaging to occupy the attention or efforts of (a person or persons): to occupy oneself; become involved:

collaboration

to work within a group towards a common goal: to bring together unlike minds in order to troubleshoot problems and generate new ideas:

active learning

is an approach to instruction in which students engage the material they study through engage in activities, such as reading, writing, discussion, or problem solving that promote analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of class content. Active learning stands in contrast to “standard” modes of instruction in which teachers do most of the talking and are passive.

nonstandard

1. Does the environment created allow for customization for the respected users, promote freedom through visual awareness between multiple spaces, use the architecture as part of the learning, bring in nature into the environment and bring the environment out into nature. 2. Does the building encourage social interaction and engagement between various users. 3. Will the building showcase the concept of active learning and engagement? 4. Does it provide an open and inviting environment? 5. Are the spaces arranged in a non-standard method that caters to a variety of learning styles which can be adaptive and exible. 6. Does the building showcase multiple styles of learning in a completely new type of application. 7. Does the building facilitate collaboration in both a physical and digital way.

not conforming to traditional architectural programming strategies adhering to a specic building typology.

timebanking

is a pattern of reciprocal service exchange that uses units of time as currency.

skillshare

is a community marketplace to learn anything from anyone. We believe that everyone has something they want to learn and something they can teach to others. This means our communities are really the greatest universities. Our platform helps make the exchange of knowledge easy, enriching, and fun.

PROPOSED INNOVATION POD

SOUTH BOSTON INNOVATION RESOURCE CENTER 1 | Alex Jeffrey Siekierski | Masters Thesis Candidate | Architecture which can stimulate social interaction | Design Development Review |

2010 SOUTH BOSTON ZONING MAP 100 ACRE PLAN SITE SHADING

MASTER PLAN MAP

MASTER PLAN MASSING DIAGRAM

URBAN SITE SECTION 1:100 SKETCH RENDERING

fort point channel

After doing a site visit and analyzing the property and site boundaries I realized that it is pretty much an open lot except for the northeast area consisting of some 4-5 story structures. There are minimal overcast shadows from these adjacent structures but it does not develop and cast onto the site more than 20%. Due to the edge condition of the water the southwest portion of the site is always exposed to solar gain. * This solar study includes the 100 Acre Master Plan

January 12th at 7:50am

January 12th at 1:00pm

January 12th at 4:35pm

March 20th at 8:00am

March 20th at 12:30pm

March 20th at 5:00pm

July 29th at 7:30am

July 29th at 12:45pm

July 29th at 5:30pm

November 4th at 8:15am

November 4th at 1:00pm

November 4th at 4:30pm

SITE CONTEXT SOUTH BOSTON INNOVATION RESOURCE CENTER 2 | Alex Jeffrey Siekierski | Masters Thesis Candidate | Architecture which can stimulate social interaction | Design Development Review |

Site Context this potion of my presentation boards is to show the proposed building in its site context. Solar awareness and the adaptation of the 100 Acre plan have all been considered as important in understanding the larger impacts of the buildings presence. [139]


FAR MODEL

CANOPY & PUBLIC ENTRIES

NORTH MASSING CENTRALIZED CIRCULATION CONNECTION TO WATERS EDGE SCULPTURAL REFINING & SKYLIGHTS

REFINEMENT CONNECTOR BRIDGE GLASS ATRIUM METAL MESH SKIN

VERTICAL CIRCULATION & BOAT DOCK ACCESS

MASSING ITERATION PROCESS SOUTH BOSTON INNOVATION RESOURCE CENTER 3 | Alex Jeffrey Siekierski | Masters Thesis Candidate | Architecture which can stimulate social interaction | Design Development Review |

ON THE GO DESIGN SKETCHES SOUTH BOSTON INNOVATION RESOURCE CENTER 4 | Alex Jeffrey Siekierski | Masters Thesis Candidate | Architecture which can stimulate social interaction | Design Development Review |

My Design Process - throughout y thesis I began utilizing my ipad as a means of getting quick and easy sketches done in a collective place. This process was ideal for me as I was always on the go. Also the use of my ipad came in handy when doing quick research on materials, details, and case studies. [140]


REF.

WASTE REMOVAL

SPRINKLER 222 SF DN

BREAK ROOM 752 SF

DN UP

UP

ELECTRICAL ROOM 432 SF

WOMENS 235 SF

LIBRARY

MEMBERSHIP SERVICES 661 SF

WOMENS 297 SF

DN LOADING

DOCK IN PR

ADMIN CONFERENCE 312 SF

UP

DN

ELEVATOR LOBBY

SMALL MEETING 174 SF

DN KIOSKS

UP

MAIN ENTRY & ATRIUM

FACILITIES DIRECTOR 171 SF

RECEPTION 194 SF

DN DN

UP

LONG-TERM START UP 382 SF

PRIVATE TOUCHDOWN STATIONS

WAITING AREA

UP

MENS 264 SF

SHIPPING/RECEIVING 559 SF

TOUCHDOWN BENCH

STORAGE 236 SF

RS TE

PHONE HUDDLE 49 SF 49 SF

HCT 71 SF

FORUM 798 SF

DN UP

ADMIN WAR ROOM 438 SF

MENS 151 SF

SECURITY 354 SF

UP DN

TEL DATA 548 SF

DN

ACCESSIBLE RAMP FACILITIES 881 SF

ACCESSIBLE DROP-OFF POST BOXES 439 SF DN

DN

UP

UP

PUBLIC GALLERY/ BOUTIQUE STORE 3845 SF

PUBLIC DOCK 1631 SF

STOCK/ STORAGE ROOM 210 SF

MULTI-USE CLASSROOM 1029 SF

STORAGE 96 SF

UP UP

DN

DN

UP

SCULPTURAL (RAMP) LAWN

MULTI-USE CLASSROOM 615 SF

ENTRANCE LEVEL(S) | 0’-0” & + 4’-0”

SUB-LEVEL | -13’-0”

SECOND LEVEL | + 16’-2”

SOUTH BOSTON INNOVATION RESOURCE CENTER 5 | Alex Jeffrey Siekierski | Masters Thesis Candidate | Architecture which can stimulate social interaction | Design Development Review |

GREEN ROOM 300 SF

COLLABORATIVE LOUNGE 379 SF DN

DN

LOUNGE / OPEN WORK SPACE 862 SF

STORAGE 91 SF

AT IA ST

WOMENS 254 SF

IONS

PHONE 49 SF PHONE 49 SF

DN

TELEPRESENCE 442 SF

TIME-BANK STATIONS 811 SF

MEDIA ROOM 586 SF

MENS 217 SF

SMALL WAR ROOM 203 SF

PRIVATE RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT 483 SF

PRESENTATION STAGE 521 SF

OPEN TO BELOW

DN

DN UP

UP

UP

MONITOR 169 SF

LONG -TERM STAT WORK IONS

OPEN TO BELOW

DN UP

DN

MESSAGE THERAPY 111 SF

OPEN SEATING 321 SF

CONNECTOR BRIDGE

MENS BUNK 344 SF

GARDEN TERRACE 662 SF

DN MEDIA WALL

OPEN WORK LAB

DN

POD DIRECTORY/ MAP

LONGTERM PRIVATE CUBICLE

HUDDLE 122 SF

WHITEBOARD DISPLAY/STORAGE

SMALL CONFERENCE 188 SF

WOMENS BUNK 351 SF

GAME ROOM 390 SF

TERS PRIN

MED

PRINTERS/COFFEE

OPEN TO BELOW

LARGE CONFERENCE 472 SF

GREEN TERRACE 949 SF

FILE STORAGE/ LAYOUT AREA

ACTIVE GROUP START-UPS 881 SF

UP

AV STORAGE 57 SF

MAIN. 48 SF

DW

KITCHEN 185 SF GREEN TERRACE 939 SF

DN

MULTIPURPOSE ROOM 753 SF

UP

PRODUCT DISPLAY/STORAGE

UP

COFFEE

MONITOR 190 SF

CONNECTOR BRIDGE

UP INDEPENDANT STATIONS SHORT-TERM

DN

LONGTERM RESEARCH 953 SF

RESEARCH LABORATORY 857 SF

MEDIA STATIONS 380 SF

CONFERENCE 203 SF

MEDIA

DN UP

DN

CHEM STORAGE 242 SF

WALL

TERS PRIN HUDDLE HUDDLE 49 SF 49 SF

LAB STORAGE 250 SF

EXTERIOR LAB RESOURCE & EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES 3082 SF OPEN RESEARCH LAB 2320 SF

THIRD-LEVEL | +28’-2”

FOURTH LEVEL | + 39’-0”

SOUTH BOSTON INNOVATION RESOURCE CENTER 6 | Alex Jeffrey Siekierski | Masters Thesis Candidate | Architecture which can stimulate social interaction | Design Development Review |

[141]

FIFTH LEVEL | + 51’-0”


VENDING 292 SF DN

DRY STORAGE 83 SF

UP

PUBLIC OUTDOOR TERRACE 1087 SF

WOMENS 280 SF

COFFEE BAR 368 SF

KITCHEN/ BACKERY 485 SF MENS 239 SF

HOSTESS

DN UP DN OPEN TO BELOW

DN

PROPOSED PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE

SIXTH LEVEL | +63’-0”

ROOF | + 75’-0” & + 85’-0”

PRELIMINARY INTERIOR PERSPECTIVES

SOUTH BOSTON INNOVATION RESOURCE CENTER 7 | Alex Jeffrey Siekierski | Masters Thesis Candidate | Architecture which can stimulate social interaction | Design Development Review |

NORTH ELEVATION

EAST ELEVATION

SOUTH BOSTON INNOVATION RESOURCE CENTER 8 | Alex Jeffrey Siekierski | Masters Thesis Candidate | Architecture which can stimulate social interaction | Design Development Review |

[142]


SOUTH ELEVATION

WEST ELEVATION

SOUTH BOSTON INNOVATION RESOURCE CENTER 9 | Alex Jeffrey Siekierski | Masters Thesis Candidate | Architecture which can stimulate social interaction | Design Development Review |

LONG SECTION KEYPLAN

SHORT SECTION

LONG SECTION

SOUTH BOSTON INNOVATION RESOURCE CENTER 10 | Alex Jeffrey Siekierski | Masters Thesis Candidate | Architecture which can stimulate social interaction | Design Development Review |

[143]


SKYLIGHT DETAIL

CURTAIN WALL SYSTEM

SECTION @ SLOPED GLAZING / GREEN ROOF SCULPTURAL RAMP/STAIR SECTION SPACE FRAME DETAILED CONNECTION

STRUCTURAL INSULATED PANEL

INTERIOR MESH SCREEN

ACCENT WALL DETAIL 1/4” = 1’-0”

REFERENCE DETAILS NTS

SPACE FRAME

SCREEN WALL 1/2” = 1’-0”

SLURRY WALL

MATERIALITY | INSPIRATION | DETAILING 1/4” = 1’-0” SOUTH BOSTON INNOVATION RESOURCE CENTER 11 | Alex Jeffrey Siekierski | Masters Thesis Candidate | Architecture which can stimulate social interaction | Design Development Review |

BUILDING ASSEMBLY SOUTH BOSTON INNOVATION RESOURCE CENTER 12 | Alex Jeffrey Siekierski | Masters Thesis Candidate | Architecture which can stimulate social interaction | Design Development Review |

[144]

TYPICAL WALL SECTION 1/4” = 1’-0”


CONNECTOR BRIDGE INTERIOR

TECH POD KITCHEN AREA TECH POD CONNECTOR STAIR

CONNECTOR BRIDGE INDEPENDENT WORK SPACES

PERSPECTIVES SOUTH BOSTON INNOVATION RESOURCE CENTER 13 | Alex Jeffrey Siekierski | Masters Thesis Candidate | Architecture which can stimulate social interaction | Design Development Review |

BUILDING INFORMATION MODEL SOUTH BOSTON INNOVATION RESOURCE CENTER 14 | Alex Jeffrey Siekierski | Masters Thesis Candidate | Architecture which can stimulate social interaction | Design Development Review |

[145]

RECEPTION

HARBORWALK


ACCESSIBLE DROP-OFF AREA

HARBORWALK VIEW SOUTHWARD

RENDERINGS SOUTH BOSTON INNOVATION RESOURCE CENTER 16 | Alex Jeffrey Siekierski | Masters Thesis Candidate | Architecture which can stimulate social interaction | Design Development Review |

ARIEL PERSPECTIVE MAIN ENTRANCE

RENDERINGS SOUTH BOSTON INNOVATION RESOURCE CENTER 15 | Alex Jeffrey Siekierski | Masters Thesis Candidate | Architecture which can stimulate social interaction | Design Development Review |

[146]

PROPOSED PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE


The overall Review in my opinion did not go well. I knew that panel members needed to leave early and I tried to explain to much to fast and got lost in the process. For those who stayed for the full duration of the review I was able to further explain in detail the overall developments made sense the previous review. The focus of this review revolved around my plans and that there needs to be an added layer of color in them that helps breakdown the intended spaces. This would also allow a clear readability toward the desired user path connection through each floor plate. A further level of detailing needed to be done, along with building systems incorporated into them. Actual sections and details pertaining to specific moments within my design needed to be explored further and therefore a second Design Development Review is needed.

[147]


The second Design Development Review was an excellent opportunity to dig further into how the building functions both with performance/ systems as well as through its usage. The development of hierarchy with in the program had become something that needed to be delivered in this review. A third & forth iteration of the internal public path allow adjustments within the architecture. After my Schematic Interim I finally found a way to design in a more linear manner. This involved merging many separate design processes I have used and merge them into something more balanced. While looking deeper into program internally, in tandem, I also zoomed out and analysed views away from the building, the buildings form and materiality and how they appear to visitors walking by from a far and within close proximity. This was a great breakthrough for me because it helped me simplify my building in a pragmatic way which functions at many different levels.

10

DESIGN DESIGN DEVELOPMENT II DEVELOPMENT II REVIEW REVIEW [148]


SITE CONTEXT

The external aesthetics of my form were intended to play off some of the local Fort Point Channel Landmarks. This consisted of large windows, brick, connector bridges for the mills, and urban connectivity to both road and railways. My proposed building is vertically massed to accommodate the surrounding buildings and not overwhelm the entire site. For Point in general does not have large exterior green space which is something I wanted to make part of my building. I wanted to create a public usable streetscape along the waterfront which also allowed for the buildings programmed space in the summer to be extended out beyond its enclosure in an effort to welcome people in and promote what is inside.

West Elevation

MATERIALITY The material I had chosen were in support of the thesis idea (open space with visual awareness) as well as compatible with the overall buildings form. The primary materials intended for this building are 1. Low-e structural curtainwalls 2. Insulated dense walls with a metal panel dri-design system on the outside finish 3. Lastly, the use of expanded metal mesh to provide solar protection and contrast between the buildings appearance during the day and in the evening. The metal mesh is there to allow for wind protection in the open air programmed areas within the upper levels of the building. It also was intended to create some unique views from within the interior of the building. Cast shadows and reflects may occur and provided a heightened sensory environment.

[149]

q1:20 Scale Site & Building Model


Defining what a space is that supports Innovation My final spacial iteration in regards to a “classroom� for innovation is diagrammed on this page. It displays the primary components being 1. a large open vertical space 2. a small open air outdoor space (maybe that can opened during adequate weather) 3. smaller support spaces surrounding the perimeter (a horseshoe) which is for rest rooms, kitchenette, sleeping space, private single users & larger semi-private spaces for meetings & collaboration. This concept is to allow work to be done in the open for all to see it and then for refinement and coordination to occur around the smaller spaces as needed.

Structural Refinement The decision was made to use one means of construction being steel. The sketches shown display my process for grid line spacing based upon unique areas within my typical plan. This process is later finalized in a full framing plan.

[150]


Sub Level 1

Level 1

LIFT3 WOMENS

MENS

LOCKERS

LIFT1

LIFT2 ATRIUM

HUDDLE PWS

PWS

TEAM PWS

PWS

PHONE

PWS

WELLNESS

DECK

OPEN COMMUNITY SUPPORTED GALLERY SPACE

OPEN SHARED WORK ZONE

PWS

PWS

OPEN COLLABORATION AREA

MONITOR

TEAM

Level 2

VERTICAL CIRCULATION

Floor Plan Development The floor plans above show my process of creating the common open spaces as part of program space (seen in the hand sketched keyplans in orange) by designing the paths of travel I had complete control over the users movement in the building. This allowed me to develop areas of concentration where I wanted users to slow down and see what is around them, as well as areas for direct connection to larger destinations. The case study of Montessori allowed for me to identify my destinations and provide open visual connectedness at all scales within the building. The elimination of corridors and blending of compartmentalized spaces into a common area was the overall supporting idea of my thesis. [151]


Level 3

Level 4

Level 5

Level 6 [152]


Large Composite Building Section This building section was developed to convey a large amount of my structural strategies, such as double height staggered scissor bracing the support the buildings cantilever. Also this view is toward downtown Boston and shows the waterfront connection and primary entrance in the building, conveying layers of transparency and depth into the building for the public to feel invited inside. [153]


Referring to the Past The sketch on this sheet is a diagram I developed before my thesis process began. It illustrates/highlights how railroads, primary vehicular arteries, concentrated nodes, and ocean influences all exist within the larger site context of South Boston. Not only do they exist buy they all work together both horizontally and vertically allowing for a merger of the past with the transportation of raw goods, to the development of the current trends in transportation. We no longer transport goods we transport people so that they can come together and innovate. I am looking to the past to develop design ideas on how to transport people to my site in order to active it for future development.

Fort Point Channel The 100 Acre future plan with my proposed Innovative Resource Center [154]


thesis statement Architecture which can stimulate innovation through social interaction Supported by collaboration and inspired by Montessori principles

engaging spaces

fort point channel

My thesis is about creating an environment for education, communication, technology, active learning, and collaboration. Key components of collaboration regard adaptability, visual connectivity, integration of nature, order, transformative spaces, layering of program, and the de-standardization of space types. With the standardization of building uses comes restraints on adaptability and functionality within spaces. In order for sharing of ideas to occur, standard space types are no longer a determining factor for the success for the program. Standardization does not account for Lifelong Learning in a long-term perspective. The more adaptable and flexible a series of spaces becomes further enhances the ability for the environment to provide adequate services which can assist in the exchanging of information. Alex Jeffrey Siekierski Can the engaging of multiple learning processes yield an environment siekierski.alex@gmail.com for enhanced exchanging of information via collaboration and digital media? DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 2 November 19th, 2012

PUBLIC TRANSIT PATHS

pSECOND FLOOR PLAN

pBASEMENT FLOOR PLAN

pFOURTH FLOOR PLAN

pFIFTH FLOOR PLAN

SITE ACCESS & CIRCULATION

FORT POINT MASTER PLAN: 1:80=1’0”

SITE ZONING

100 YEAR MASTER PLAN

The proposition based thesis that I am investigating relates to a enhancing the ways we transfer information through social means. The goal and plan of this South Boston site for the next 100 years is to attract science and technology companies and submerge them within a newly developed artist community. My thesis will be part of this 100 year plan so that it has future need beyond the immediate intent of the use. This will allow me to develop a fully integrated design that impart relates to the building’s function, site context, master plan and public sector.

pFIRST FLOOR PLAN

desiging the public path

pTHIRD FLOOR PLAN

PROPOSED BUILDING COLLAGE

pSIXTH SIXTH FLOOR PLAN

engaging collaboration active learning nonstandard timebanking skillshare pLIGHTING DESIGN FOR THE FIRST FLOOR CAFE

pEAST ELEVATION

pSOUTH ELEVATION

STRUCTUAL DETAILING

pENLARGED SITE PLAN 1/32” = 1’-0”

pWEST ELEVATION

pNORTH ELEVATION

pMETAL PANEL AT PARAPET CONDITION pFOURTH FLOOR TYPICAL STRUCTURAL FRAMING PLAN

pFORM & MASSING DIAGRAM

pSTRUCTURAL FRAMING SKETCHES

THE VISION OF INNOVATION PLACE THE INTENT OF THE PROJECT IS TO PROMOTE A GREATOR SENSE OF COMMUNITY IN ALLSTON, WHILE ALLOWING HARVAD UNIVERSITY, AND LOCAL BUSINESSES TO GROW. A SHOPPING COMPLEX IN THE FORM OF MATCHING THE RESIDENTIAL GRID WILL ALLOW REVENUE TO INCREASE AND PROMOTE A HEALTHIER LIFE STYLE THROUGH AN INCREASE IN OUTDOOR PUBLIC SPACES FOR ENGAGEMENT AND ACTIVITIES TO OCCUR.

pGREEN ROOF ASSEMBLY

pPRELIMINARY INTERIOR PERSPECTIVES

pNORTHERN PERSPECTIVE DOWN HARBORWALK

pEXPANDED METAL MESH KICKERS 3D BIM MODEL STRUCTURAL ASSEMBLY p3D

p”POD 1” PERSPECTIVE FROM LEVEL 3

pMETAL PANEL CONNECTION AT FOUNDATION WALL pENLARGED BUILDING SECTION 1/4” = 1’-0”

pSPACIAL DIAGRAM SECTION 1/16”=1’0”

pSHARED OPEN WORK ZONE

pENTRANCE PERSPECTIVE FROM RECEPTION AREA

[155]


Gears are Dependant on One Another to Function

Building Massing Diagram

Pre-thesis Diagram of Using the “Path” the Create Space

Referring to the Past When I began to get lost during my design process I always looked back to my thesis studio work for inspiration. The images on this page related to paths of traveled that I researched in regards to Historic South Boston. These diagrams and the idea that the building could be a gear for innovation and a “gateway” to new development in South Boston all lead to the development of my current massing shown above.

Railway Diagram to the Center of Proposed Building Site Path Diagram of a Historic Sugary Refinery [156]


In conclusion this review was very well received. The use of larger boards and color within my graphics helped convey the overall building ideas. Some feedback was given about the overall presentation and that all my graphics should be non-distracting and convey the thesis idea fully (specific examples were to display entourage in all renderings), additional items needed for my final review were mentioned as systems studies, building form diagrams/process and a final physical model at a larger scale. Additional goals for my final also include simplifying the Architecture to its bare essentials which support the thesis. This includes eliminating unnecessary program space as well as form. It also may be good to show the internal contents of the building because I have so much content in regards to the exterior. This can be best conveyed with a few more internal perspectives that will give a heightened sense of what it is like to be in the building looking outward. The renderings moving forward are to show proof that my thesis idea can work - being that the integration of many disciples within a shared working environment with shared amenities can contribute to a space which promotes innovation and life long learning between different aged user groups.

[157]


My Final Thesis Review was something I have been looking forward to for three semesters now. This was the culmination of almost two years of evolving research and development. With minor presentation graphic enhancements, floor plan tweaks, structural validation, and fully diagrammed processes, such as, the evolution of a typology, building massing and systems integration I felt more than prepared. Up to this point I have developed an entire cohesive building from concept through inception. It is the requirements of the Boston Architectural College that all students meet a minimum common knowledge and group of deliverables. It was now up to me to persuade my thesis panel that this building is supportive of my entire thesis, as well as, the building can conceivably be built and executed. THE IDEA This thesis is about exploring the qualities of learning environments which help facilitate collaboration. It then becomes a method which can be furthur utilized to spawn innovation. THE THESIS The thesis will present a new service typology which lends itself to creativity and innovation. This means that the idea of problem solving will be framed within the context of engaging and collaborative spaces working together to attract different minds. The thesis will look directly at methods of collaboration such as Montessori Principals, with forms of experiential and active learning.

11

FINAL THESIS FINAL THESIS REVIEW REVIEW [158]


SUMMARY OF PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT PROCESS The first diagram (traditional classroom) is what I first acknowledged as a problem in academia. It is a one directional means of information and does not allow for collaboration, nor self exploration. A better example (diagram 2) is Marie Montessori’s classroom which uses space and didactic material to help educate children by means of hand-on learning that is not forced upon the student. Her classroom also creates a central area for exploration with private areas surrounding it, all visible to each other, for the benefit of the teacher. My thesis began as an idea based around education and how can space influence life-long learning. How can space accommodate the needs of different age groups. This later took a turn in my thesis development and I found myself more interested in the ways we learn and develop from each other, specifically from other trades. This idea focused around innovation was based on the idea that innovation is not one directional but consists of many different components. These components primarily are related to manufacturing - business - art/design - science. Sometimes one may take precedences over the other but all are necessary in pushing ideas forward for the better good of human existence. Diagram 3 is an attempt in higher education currently to create spaces which have a common working area in between. An example of this idea at a large scale is to have a common open lounge area between chemistry and physics departments in efforts to have them work together. This idea is good for like minded trades and I feel it can be more useful if implemented for the connection of many different users within a collective space. My thesis attempt for sparking innovation can be seen in diagrams 3-6 where the primary components being 1. a large open vertical space 2. a small open air outdoor space (maybe that can opened during adequate weather) 3. smaller support spaces surrounding the perimeter (a horseshoe) which is for rest rooms, kitchenette, sleeping space, private single users & larger semi-private spaces for meetings & collaboration. This concept is to allow work to be done in the open for all to see it and then for refinement and coordination to occur around the smaller spaces as needed. The building section below was used as a diagram to show where my innovative classrooms are located within my building. I have three “POD� innovation rooms all typically identical in spacial qualities providing an additional layer of flexibility amongst potential users.

program diagrams

traditional classroom

montessori classroom

2

collaborative classroom

3

innovative classroom (1)

innovative classroom (2)

innovative classroom (3)

[159]

1

4

5

6


SPACIAL DESCRIPTION

qParti Diagram of the common path

The mission is to create an active learning environment which cultivates innovation through social exchange. It is essentially to have the site working as part of this mission to support collaboration both within the building and outside within the surrounding context. The mission of my thesis is to create a melting-pot where education, culture, community, and nature are all working together to create a place for spending as well as leisure, and outdoor activities to take place. The Purpose of the program is to provide collaborative spaces where problems may be solved. This involves the combination of different types of people who will need to socially interact. The use of natural light, exposed structure, open patios and vegetated areas all are an evolution of the Montessori classroom and is intended to have enough support for rentable space which accommodates a multitude of activities. The quality of space is intended for users to want to be there learning and the program is there to give the users enough resources and assistance that they feel they can do and explore anything. It is this notion that can spur life long learning within our communities.

pGillette Razor Company plant on Dorechester Avenue in 1920‘s [160]


MASSING PROCESS

The massing of my building started off as a very angular sculptural object. Sense my Schematic Interim Review I have begun looking back at how the building communicates outward and inward at a macro level. My thesis investigations in regards to site placement and gestures come from the notion of “form follows function.� Just as my internal program developed and changed throughout this process as did the overall building form in order to reflect and enhance the quality of space within to promote innovation. The series of diagram on this page display step by step the large gestures I made in response to my design process, with respect to the surrounding site constraints and context. 1 vacant site

2 setbacks

3 floor area extrusion

6 cantilever

8 throughway path

7 frontyard increase

9 excavation

4 vertical restrictions

5 streetscape

10 continuation of greenspace [161]


Sub Level 1

Level 1

Level 2

[162]


Level 3

Level 4

Level 5

Level 6 [163]


BUILDING SITE & TYPOLOGY 244 A street in South Boston is currently a large flat parking lot. I find the site to a great area for investigating my thesis idea of engaging because of its connectedness to many means of transportation, adjacent views of downtown, Boston Harbour inlet, Harbour Walk and Convention Center. I am planning on incoporating my design into the 100 acre master plan for South Boston. Building Typology and Approximate Size | Innovative Resource Center; 85,000 SF

[164]


LARGE SITE MODEL

My 1:40 scale large site context model was generated after my Introductory Review and became a part of my design process by checking massing models within it. This model incorporates the sites existing conditions in black and proposed 100 Acre Master Plan in grey.

[165]


THE VISION OF INNOVATION PLACE THE INTENT OF THE PROJECT IS TO PROMOTE A GREATOR SENSE OF COMMUNITY IN SOUTH BOSTON, WHILE ALLOWING ARTISTS, AND LOCAL BUSINESSES TO GROW. A SHOPPING COMPLEX IN THE FORM OF MATCHING THE RESIDENTIAL GRID WILL ALLOW REVENUE TO INCREASE AND PROMOTE A HEALTHIER LIFE STYLE THROUGH AN INCREASE IN OUTDOOR PUBLIC SPACES FOR ENGAGEMENT AND ACTIVITIES TO OCCUR.

[166]


1/16 PHYSICAL MODEL

As a requirement from my thesis representative, my final physical model was laser cut as 1/16 scale from my digital Revit model. This model over took around 50 hours of labor including the digital process work involved. Overall the quality of the building context is very symbolic of what could be built upon the site. The images on the next two pages are photographs of the finished model including the adjacent buildings, fort point channel and green spaces. I was very please to be able to have generated this model because it is very rare that continuing forward in the profession that this process will be required by a client.

[167]


[168]


West Elevation

Finish Elevations & Supporting Context The final elevation images on this sheet are intended to provide enough supporting context that the building fits into the surrounding community. The idea of a metal mesh screen is shown in light brown and gives some angular definition to the architectural form. The West elevation always parallel to Fort Point Channel is the most expansive and gestural elevation of my building. It has a sunken courtyard to allow daylight into the lower level of the building while providing a unique accessible outdoor space. The many different layers of transparency within the building internal functions respectively are communicated through the facade most efficiently in the evening.

North Elevation

South Elevation [169]


Composite Building Section My revised section demonstrates a higher level of transparency through the building. It also identifies different areas that users can inhabit with the addition of access to a green roof where classes and meetings can take place.

[170]


Typical Forth Floor Structural Framing Plan

[171]


8" MTL STUDS REFER ARCH'L

METAL PANEL WALL SYSTEM. REFER ARCH'L

PROVIDE #4 CONT. WITH 3 ROWS OF CHAIRS SPACED AT 3'-0" O.C.

ADDITIONAL #4 x 6'-0" AT 9" O.C. TOP CENTERED OVER GIRDERS

0' - 4"

1" CLR.

SEE ARCH'L FOR FINISH

THICKENED SLAB BEYOND SEE 4/S03.000

REINF. REFER PLAN

EDGE OF CONCRETE BLOCKOUT

4' - 0"

ROUGHEN SURFACE TO 1/4" MIN. AMPLITUDE TYP @ PILE CAP PERIMETER AND BELOW COLUMN

0"

3/4"

COLUMN

ADDED BARS PER 4S03.000, TYP

#5 @ 12"CC AROUND PERIMETER OF PILE CAP TYP 8"CC @ SLAB EDGE WHERE OCCURS 12"

GIRDER PROVIDE #4 CONT. WITH 3 ROWS OF CHAIRS SPACED AT 3'-0" O.C.

1" CLR.

ADDITIONAL #4 x 5'-0" AT 12" O.C. TOP CENTERED OVER BEAMS

3/4"

#4 @ 12"CC E.W. 10P TYP U.N.O.

0"

0' - 2"

0' - 4"

180째 HOOK @ 'A' PILES

REINF. REFER PLAN

Typical Beam & Girder

BOTTOM REINF PER PILE CAP DETAILS W/180" STD HOOK END. E.W., TYP HOOK NOT REQ'D. @ #14 BARS

TOP OF PILE

1' - 3"

3' - 0"

3' - 0"

1' - 3"

Typical Slurry Foundation Wall with Wooden Piles

3"

L 2x2x1/4 DIAGONAL EACH CORNER (COPE VERTICAL LEG)

TYP.

INTERIOR CONDITION SHOWN EXTERIOR CONDITION IS SIMILAR

Typical Beam to Girder Connection

Roof Connection at Monitor

Metal Mesh Kicker Supports

Metal Panel Condition at Parapet

[172]


Building Circulation

Building Mechanical Systems (heating & cooling)

Building Greenspace & Rain Harvesting

Building Larger Programmed Spaces [173]


Systems Integration The diagrams on the previous page give a general idea of the different systems I incorporating into my building design. The idea is that the building is serviced as two separate buildings therefore each side will have its own rooftop air handling unit for cooling and heating. Radiant floors will be used in the typical corridors on each floor. Power/tel/data will be services through the floor providing a cleaner look and flexibility within Maintaining the Urban Edges the spaces. Because of the two independent systems the other idea is that they can be switched from active in the winter to passive in the summer, driven by the needs of the users. The blending of indoor and outdoor space was something I wanted to include in the design as a means of flexibility and wellness for the buildings users. The mechanical systems intended are able to handle all of these conditions. The use of rain water harvesting and a green roof add to the idea of creating buildings which can be very environmentally friendly and sustainable.

Designing with Public Space

Ground Level Paths attracting users into the building The diagram above and below display primary pedestrian foot traffic around the proposed building. These paths were developed to maintain existing urban circulation as well as to re-direct users through the center of the building in an effort to have them experience the building without having to enter inside. The use of a gallery and retail store on the lower right and a 18 hour coffee bar on the lower left building are all placed as a way to integrate the building with the local community.

Site Access Circulation

[174]


thesis statement

Architecture which can stimulate innovation through social interaction Supported by collaboration and inspired by Montessori principles

engaging spaces

My thesis is about creating an environment for education, communication, technology, active learning, and collaboration. Key components of collaboration regard adaptability, visual connectivity, integration of nature, order, transformative spaces, layering of program, and the de-standardization of space types. With the standardization of building uses comes restraints on adaptability and functionality within spaces. In order for sharing of ideas to occur, standard space types are no longer a determining factor for the success for the program. Standardization does not account for Lifelong Learning in a long-term perspective. The more adaptable and flexible a series of spaces becomes further enhances the ability for the environment to provide adequate services which can assist in the exchanging of information.

fort point channel

Can the engaging of multiple learning processes yield an environment for enhanced exchanging of information via collaboration and digital media?

PUBLIC TRANSIT PATHS pBASEMENT FLOOR PLAN

Alex Jeffrey Siekierski FINAL THESIS REVIEW December 19th, 2012

100 YEAR MASTER PLAN

The proposition based thesis that I am investigating relates to a enhancing the ways we transfer information through social means. The goal and plan of this South Boston site for the next 100 years is to attract science and technology companies and submerge them within a newly developed artist community. My thesis will be part of this 100 year plan so that it has future need beyond the immediate intent of the use. This will allow me to develop a fully integrated design that impart relates to the building’s function, site context, master plan and public sector.

pSECOND FLOOR PLAN

pFOURTH FLOOR PLAN

pSIXTH FLOOR PLAN

SITE ACCESS & CIRCULATION

4

3

SITE ZONING

FORT POINT MASTER PLAN: 1:80=1’0”

engaging collaboration active learning nonstandard timebanking skillshare

engaging collaboration active learning nonstandard timebanking skillshare

southboston innovative resource center

1pSOUTH ELEVATION

1

pFIRST FLOOR PLAN

pTHIRD FLOOR PLAN

pFIFTH FLOOR PLAN

3

100 Acre Proposed Master Plan

pSPACIAL DIAGRAM SECTION 1/32”=1’0”

Existing Site Context

PROPOSED BUILDING WITH SITE CONTEXT

pSOUTHERN EXTERIOR SPACES

pPARTI DIAGRAM

2 pWEST ELEVATION

3pNORTH ELEVATION

pINTEGRATED URBAN PATHS

pEXTENSIONS OF F THE FORM

pSHADING DEVICE FOR BUILDING PERFORMANCE

4 pEAST ELEVATION

pSPACIAL DIAGRAM SECTION 1/16”=1’0”

THE VISION OF INNOVATION PLACE THE INTENT OF THE PROJECT IS TO PROMOTE A GREATOR SENSE OF COMMUNITY IN ALLSTON, WHILE ALLOWING HARVAD UNIVERSITY, AND LOCAL BUSINESSES TO GROW. A SHOPPING COMPLEX IN THE FORM OF MATCHING THE RESIDENTIAL GRID WILL ALLOW REVENUE TO INCREASE AND PROMOTE A HEALTHIER LIFE STYLE THROUGH AN INCREASE IN OUTDOOR PUBLIC SPACES FOR ENGAGEMENT AND ACTIVITIES TO OCCUR.

pFOURTH FLOOR TYPICAL STRUCTURAL FRAMING PLAN

pMETAL PANEL AT PARAPET CONDITION pGREEN GREEN ROOF EDGE

pEXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE DOWN NECCO PLAZA

pFOURTH FLOOR CONNECTOR BRIDGE PERSPECTIVE

pNORTHERN PERSPECTIVE TOWARD DOWNTOWN BOSTON

pENLARGED COMPOSITE BUILDING SECTION 1/4” = 1’-0”

STRUCTUAL DETAILING 3/4”=1’-0”

pGIRDER/BEAM GIRDER/BEAM TO COLUMN

pSLURRY WALL FOUNDATION WITH MATTE SLAB + PILES

RENDERING FILMSTRIP

pMETAL METAL MESH SUPPORTS

pMAIN ENTRANCE PERSPECTIVE TOWARD CANTEEN

pEXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE FROM SUMMER STREET BRIDGE

pSECOND FLOOR INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE

pTHIRD FLOOR MEZZANINE PERSPECTIVE

[175]


Preliminary Design Vignettes Where it all began

[176]


Second/Third Floor Innovation Lab - Open Work Space

Lobby Entrance (Canteen) & Atrium Staircase

[177]


Ariel Perspective (Hardlined)

Final Perspective Looking North Toward Downtown Boston

[178]


[179]


The Use of Building Information Modeling (via Revit) One technical learning experience I gained from the thesis process was how to push Autodesk Revit as a presentation tool. I have been using this program regularly over the last four years. Because of the uniqueness of my building and chosen materials I was able to learn a lot of new techniques and processes for three dimensional digital modeling. Rendering and presentation graphics were taken to a new level given some new features a tricks I picked up with Revit 2013. The images on this page, as well as on my final presentation boards and previous page, are all the result of digital modeling in Revit.

[180]


In concluding my Final Design Review I could not be more fulfilled with my academic career. With the support of my wife, the thesis panel and friends I could finally site back and breath - just a moment to take it all in! I was told that my thesis is a summary of my education and a starting point for moving forward with my career. In thinking about my future I am looking forward to taking some time off in order to spend quality time with my family and get my physical health on track by doing activities I did not have time for in the past due to academics. My future aspirations involve going through the liscensure process, where I am looking very forward to it because it will fill in the blanks between my professional experience and knowledge from my academics. In parallel I always have marketed myself independently as a sole practitioner and look forward to networking and business development. Lastly, because my heart is so intertwined with academia I also would like to pursue teaching part-time so that I can inspire students and pass a long the educational lesson I have learned. - Please refer to the end of my thesis book for my closing statement and proclaimed vision of my thesis idea on a grand scale.

[181]


I cannot express the respect and gratitude I have for my thesis panel. Before starting my thesis semester I began networking around for a wide range of members who could support me through this process. I wanted to have many different design critics from Interior Designers & Architects, as well as, a member from all the other supporting trades. I have been very fortunate to have had the opportunity to receive guidance and feedback from this vast amount of professionals. I truly appreciate all of there donated time and devotion to my thesis. The quality of the design and some of the decision made a long the way could not have been solved without the support of these individuals. A special thanks goes out to the primary members of my thesis panel for there additional devotion outside design reviews (Robert Hsiung, Richard Peake & Ellen Whittemore). A large thank you goes out to my thesis advisor Richard Peake who always pushed me forward, even at times when I felt most uncomfortable and lost. Richard focused on pushing my architectural theory & concept, making sure that I developed everything in support of the overall thesis. Thanks so much Rich!

12

THESIS PANEL THESIS PANEL & ANNOTATED & ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY BIBLIOGRAPHY [182]


ALEX JEFFREY SIEKIERSKI thesis candidate

Designer, Assoc. AIA 670 E Sixth St. #3 South Boston, MA 02127 siekierski.alex@gmail.com, 617.894.0664

Presently Alex am pursuing his Masters degree in Architecture at the Boston Architectural College. He is entering thesis in the Fall of 2011. Alex’s is able to find new thrills in Architecture through every academic & professional project he participates on. Currently Alex participates, as a member of the project team, in all aspects of preparing complete and comprehensive architectural construction drawings and specifications and coordination of documents with project consultants and contractors Essential Duties and Responsibilities: Participate with the Project Architect and/or Senior Designer, to understand the objectives including work plan, schedule and budget parameters. Research products and systems that accomplish the design intent. Assist in the preparation of conceptual design sketches that illustrate the architectural treatment of the project,develop concept statements and develop concept and presentation. During the construction phase assist in the preparation of document revisions such as addenda, bulletins and clarification sketches. Lastly, Alex’s motivation is fueled by the thought of graduation in January of 2013 and becoming a step further toward beginning the Architectural Registration Exams. PROJECT EXPERIENCE Atrius Health - South Shore Medical Center Interior Fit-out Norewell, MA - 80,000SF Currently Assisting with Post Construction Document Deliverables. Atrius Health - South Shore Medical Center Core & Shell Norewell, MA - 80,000SF Briefly Assisted team members with Production Foxrock Warehouse Renovation, Phase 1-4 Norewell, MA - 80,000SF Assisted in all Phases of the Design Process including Construction Administration. ITA Software by Google, Floors 5-10 Cambridge, MA 100,000 SF Biogen Idec, Inc. - Phase II Floors 3 & 4 Weston, MA 100,000 SF BAC 540 West Madison Flrs 9 & 21 Chicago, IL 45,000 SF Fresenius Medical Care -Taunton Home Therapies Taunton, MA 950 SF Belmont Power & Light Colliers-199 Rosewood Gazelle-25 Thomson Place 100 Federal Street, 27th Fl URBANICA 691 691 Mass Ave. Boston, MA 30,000 SF EDUCATION Boston Architectural College MArch, Architecture 2008 – Jan. 2013 [183]

The Technical University of Berlin Semester Abroad, Architecture + Urban Design Summer 2008 The University of Massachusetts Amherst B.F.A. Design, Architectural Design Focus 2006 – 2008 Springfield Technical Comm. College Assoc. Architectural Technology 2003 – 2006 PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Designer Steffian Bradley Architects November 2011 - Present Principal / Founder Alex Siekierski + Partners January 2010 – Present Designer NELSON June 2010 – October 2011 Architectural Programming Assistant Division of Capitol Assest Management January 2010 – June 2010 TEACHING EXPERIENCE Boston Architectural College, Boston, MA 2008-Present Student Ambassador, Tutor, Design Principals TA (3 semesters) & a Design Studio TA (1 semester). BIM/Revit Seminar Instructor 3 Sessions for DCAM Summer 2010


ROBERT Y. C. HSIUNG, FAIA

BAC Thesis Representative 95 Warren Street, Newton Centre, MA 02459rpeake. robert@hsiung,net, 617.969.4630

thesis representative Teaching at the Boston Architectural College spans five decades for Robert

Hsiung -- first at the then Boston Architectural Center from 1964 to 69, again from 2000 till present. In between, as the Design Principal at Jung/Brannen Associates, Architects, teaching was also one of his responsibilities.

“Bob Hsiung, FAIA, joined Jung/Brannen in 1972 as lead designer, and has been responsible for establishing the design aesthetic and reinforcing the firm’s commitment of that aesthetic on all Jung/Brannen projects. Mr. Hsiung’s resume mirrors the firm’s portfolio – from commercial office towers and mixed use development to facilities for education and research. His energy infuses the design team and client alike, and inspires a level of quality which has become the hall mark of the Jung/Brannen name.” – exerpt from Jung/Brannen’s Biography. Among his works are: - Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, Baltimore, MD; Poynter Institute, St. Petersburg, FL; Elizabeth van Huysen Meyer Campus Center, Tuft University Student, Summerville, MA; General Electric Plastic Business Technology Center, Pittsfield, MA; MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Lexington MA, Massachusetts Medical Society Headquarters, Waltham, MA, and two high-rise towers in Boston – One Post Office Square and Meridien Hotel and 125 Federal Street. Prior to Jung/Brannen, Hsiung was the lead designer at Anderson Beckwith and Haible, Architects, where he worked from 1962 to 72. He received his M Arch at MIT and B Arch at University of Illinois. Since his retirement in 2004, Hsiung splits his time between teaching, working on small and pro-bono architectural projects and painting watercolors. Award winner in all his professions, he is a member of the New England Watercolor Society and Rhode Island Watercolor Society. His artworks are frequently exhibited in regional, national, international and solo shows.

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RICHARD PEAKE

thesis advisor

Associate Principal 54 Chestnut Street North Reading, MA rpeake.home@gmail.com, 978.207.1471

Rich is an Associate Principal at ADD Inc and leads several projects in the office as a Senior Project Architect/Project Manager. In addition to ADD Inc, Rich currently teaches several lecture and studio classes at the New England Institute of Art. He also teaches Materials and Methods I and Architectural Detailing at the Boston Architectural College. Rich brings his passion for design, and real world experience into the classroom. In addition to ADD Inc, he has worked at several internationally recognized firms such as CBT, Wood+Zapata, The Stubbins Associates, Hoskins Scott & Partners and AiGroup Architects. With 21 years of experience, on a variety of project typologies, Rich’s focus has been developing the design intent for each project he’s been involved with from the early design through construction. He believes that all phases of a project should be treated with the same level of attentiveness to design. He understands how the technical challenges for each building is unique and should be addressed with creative solutions specific to the challenge. His design skills allow him to fulfill, enhance and deliver any design no matter its complexity or size, and his experience has evolved to encompass all aspects of a project. PROJECT EXPERIENCE Seaport Luxury Apartment Development, Boston MA New England Carpenters Center, Boston MA Venetian Casino/Resort, Las Vegas NV The New Soldier Field (Chicago Bears), Chicago IL The New Fenway Park (Boston Redsox), Boston MA Seaport Square - 6.5mil sf mixed-use, Boston MA Residence Halls - UMass Lowell, Curry College, Holy Cross Student Center - Framingham State College, Framingham MA The Kennedy Center for Performing Arts, Washington DC EDUCATION Boston Architectural College BArch, Architecture 1991 – 2005 Southern Polytechnic State University Environmental Development 1994 – 1995 Onondaga Community College AAS, Architectural Technology 1987 – 1990 PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Architecture Adjunct Boston Architectural College January 2009 – Present [185]

Associate Principal ADD Inc December 2005 – Present Adjunct Faculty The New England Institute of Art December 2005 – Present Associate / Project Architect CBT Architects 1999 – 2005 Designer Wood + Zapata Architectue April 2001 – February 2002 Job Captain / Designer The Stubbins Associates February 1996 – March 1999 Designer Hoskins Scott & Partners February 1995 – February 1996 Designer Ai Group January 1994 – February 1995 Architectural Draftsperson Stone & Webster Engineering Corp. September 1991 – August 1992


client representative

ELLEN WHITTEMORE

Deputy Director at Commonwealth of Massachusetts #47 16th Tee Street, Newbury, MA 01951 ellenwhittemore@yahoo.com, 617.823.5837

PROFESSIONAL BACKGROUND

Ellen Whittemore currently holds the position of Deputy Director of Programming for the Division of Capital Asset Management for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts where she is responsible for state funded building projects at the five University of Massachusetts campuses. Ms. Whittemore’s architectural career has focused on infusing practice with research.Teaching positions at Harvard, Yale, the University of Virginia, the Rhode Island School of Design and the BAC have acted as venues to investigate topics on urban form and sustainability at the scale of the campus and the city. Current research topics include “The Typology of Sustainability” and “The Dimensions of Inhabitation”. Also working with UNH on grant funding for a sustainable Equine Facility. Ms. Whittemore has 25 years of architectural experience on a wide array of building types located across the country.

EDUCATION

Bachelor of Fine Arts, Rhode Island School of Design 1975

New England College, ME Senior Architect - Master Plan

Bachelor Of Architecture, Rhode Island University of New Hampshire, Durham, N.H. Project Diretor. Master Plan School of Design 1976 Master of Architecture II, Harvard University Graduate School of Design 1986

Marblehead High School, Marblehead, MA Project Director - Conceptual Design

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Deputy Director of Programming at Commonwealth of Massachusetts and i.e. architectural research Feb 2010present

Billerica Elementary School, Billerica, MA Project Director - Programming, Design & Construction

Overseer at the Boston Architectural College 1994 - present Principle at i.e. Studio 2010-present Master Planning and Arch Consultant Sava Associates, Newburyport, MA 2002- Present Master Planning and Arch Consultant Tsoi Kobus & Associates, Cambridge, MA 2007-2008 Senior Associate SMMA, Cambridge, MA 1997-2002 PROJECT EXPERIENCE Universities & Public Schools University of Massachusetts Boston Harvard Studio Facilitator [186]

Hingham South Elementary School, Hingham, MA Project Architect 78,000sf COMPETITION S Foreign Service Institute, Arlington Hall, VA Designer- 500,000sf The Peak, Hong Kong Designer Bellevue City Park, Bellevue, WA Designer TEACHING EXPERIENCE Boston Architectural College On-line Thesis Instructor 2008-2010 University of Virginia - Associate Professor of Architecture. 1995-1996 Harvard GSD - Assistant Prof 1988-1994 RISD - Instructor in Architector Fall 20006


MICHAEL BOURQUE FIIDA, IFMA, NCIDQ Principal design critic

88 Wharf Street, Milton, MA 02186 michaelhbourque@gmail.com, 617.335.1951

Michael is an interior designer with broad experience in design, project management and innovative design / construction delivery systems. He has been an active participant in the design of office space for diverse business types, including corporate headquarters, financial service firms, law firms, and professional service firms. Other specialty expertise includes design for mission critical spaces, health and fitness facilities and the design of marketing centers and other spaces for brand enhancement and architectural messaging.Michael served as an advocate for sustainable design on the US Green Building Council’s LEED® Commercial Interiors Committee. Additionally, he served the interior design profession as the 1999-2001 Chair of the College of Fellows of the International Interior Design Association (IIDA) and previously as the National President of the Institute of Business Designers, the predecessor organization of IIDA.

EDUCATION

Graduate Studies in Environmental / Interior Design, Pratt Institute Bachelor of Arts in Interior Design, American University, Washington, DC

PROJECT EXPERIENCE

Biogen Idec, Inc. Pre-lease Services, Standards and Design for Global Hdqrs, Weston, MA, 250,000 SF Design for Cafeteria, Conference & Training Ctrs, Cambridge, MA, 22,000 SF Tenant fit-up for Neurology SBU & Call Center, Wellesley, MA, 110,000 SF Verizon Customer Briefing Center Waltham, MA, 200,000 SF Co Space Services / InterNap Network Service Nation-wide roll-out of co-location facilities, 440,000 SF Wellington Management Headquarters Boston, MA, 75,000 SF Bank of America Tenant fit-up of floors 8 and 10 Boston, MA,110,000 SF Renovation of 99 Founders Plaza Hartford, CT, 185,000 SF Cabot Corporation Boston, MA Design for Headquarters Offices, Boston, MA, 66,000 SF Seyfarth Shaw [187]

Boston, MA, 66,000 SF Tenant fit-up of offices

LEED CERTIFIED PROJECTS

BANK OF AMERICA Tenant fit-up of floors 8 and 10, Boston, MA 110,000 SF Military Bank at Crosswinds San Antonio, TX, 195,000 SF Adaptive Building Re-use for • LEED® Bronze Certification My Work 10th Floor at 100 Federal Street, Boston, MA, 55,000 SF • LEED® Gold Certification 100 Federal Street Boston, MA, 55,000 SF Renovation of 8th Floor and 10th Floor • LEED® Gold Certification My Work Waltham, MA 14,000 SF • LEED® Silver Certification

YEARS OF EXPERIENCE 30+ AFFILIATIONS/REGISTRATIONS

International Interior Design Association Founding Member Institute of Business Designers National President 1987-1989 International Facilities Management Association Member since 1987 LEED® Accredited Professional NCIDQ - Certified #2637


STEPHEN A. MESSINGER, LEED AP BD+C design critic

Junior Designer & Digital Design Coordinator 55 MARMION STREET #3 JAMAICA PLAIN, MA 02130 S.MESSING@GMAIL.COM, 978.766.0092

I strive to improve the built environment for people.

EDUCATION

BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE Graduate: May 2011 Masters of Architecture — Boston, Massachusetts • BAC Board of Trustees member; Co-Chair of Student Development Committee; Project Director for Solar Decathlon • President, Past President, VP, & Treasurer of Atelier (BAC Student Gov’t) for 5 yrs; representing 1100+ students to administration & BAC Board • elected Secretary of Alumni Board for 3 year term, Fall 2011 PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE JUNIOR DESIGNER (’09 — Present) & DIGITAL DESIGN COORDINATOR (’06 — ’09) 2006-Present KlingStubbins — Cambridge, Massachusetts • Design, analyze, plan, research and document conceptual, schematic, DD, CD’s for a wide range of local & international projects • LEED AP BD+C; organize & teach LEED training program (assisted more than 50 employees to pass exam); Project Administrator • Firm leader facilitating growth of firm in implementation & use of BIM in practice & process; created company standards; trained employees PROJECT DIRECTOR 2007-2010 (house completed September 2009) curio (Team Boston’s entry into the 2009 Solar Decathlon) — Somerville, MA, Washington, DC, & Sandwich, Massachusetts [188]

• Co-directed $850K project from pre-design to completion of zero energy solar home including house design, construction, & operation. • Authored original proposal (20 teams selected), designed organizational/ functional structure of team, served as member of Governing Board • Raised funds & awareness through sponsorship; assisted marketing & website design efforts • Integral in planning, re-construction, public tours, & deconstruction of the house on the National Mall in Washington, DC CARPENTER’S APPRENTICE 2002-2005 Cataldo Carpentry — Westford, Massachusetts • Designed & constructed additions, kitchens, 3 & 4 season porches, fine furniture, cabinetry, & custom millwork; • Created cut lists, budgets, schedules, & scope of work documentation; Worked directly w/ clients on a daily basis; Designed & networked website; SKILLS Excellent leadership & communication skills. Known for taking leadership and responsibility oriented positions in group situations. Fluent in written & oral Spanish. Highly experienced & trained in ADSK Revit platform, Photoshop, InDesign; Proficient with SketchUp, Laser Cutters, AutoCAD,


Essa Ahmed, LEED AP Project Designer design critic

381 Broadway, Unit 3 - Cambridge, MA 02139 essa.ahmed@gmail.com, 617.515.0420

My previous experience allowed me to work on institutional, commercial, hospitality, transit, residential and retail projects. With their diverse requirements and different locations; these projects helped strengthen my creativity, improve my research skills, and my ability to prevent construction conflict and solve them if they occurred. In addition, my duties also included preparing and coordinating construction documents, creating project programs and studies, school building assessments, 3D modeling, and meeting with clients to discuss their requirements and help them with their decisions. Currently, I fulfilled my IDP requirements and I’m working towards licensure and professional development.

EDUCATION

Jan 07 – May 11 Master of Architecture / Boston Architectural College, Boston (USA) Sep 98 – Jul 03 B.Sc. in Architecture [Public Buildings] / Faculty of Engineering, Alexandria Uni. (Egypt) PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Project Designer Prellwitz Chilinski Associates, Cambridge, USA Dec 10 – Present Architectural Designer Lozano, Baskin, and Associates, Watertown, USA Jan 10 – Dec 10 Architectural Designer STV Incorporated, Boston, USA Jun 07 – Nov 09 Architect NHEC (Najeeb AlHumaidhi Engineering Consultancy), Kuwait Jan 04 – Dec 06 Architect HEADS (Salah Hareedy .PhD), Alexandria, Egypt Oct 2003 Intern Architect HEADS (Salah Hareedy .PhD), Alexandria, Egypt Summer 2002 Free-lance Saboor (Salah Hegab .PhD), Cairo, Egypt Free-lance Memphis, Kuwait/Canada TRAINING/CERTIFICATIONS Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED 2.1) Accredited Professional; (GBCI) (2009) Construction Safety & Health; Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) (2009) Project Management; Advanced Management Institute (AMI) for Architecture and Engineering (2008) [189]

Mastering 3-D Max R5; VAT Educational Center, Alexandria, Egypt (2003) TECHNICAL SKILLS Fulfilled NCARB/IDP requirements. Proficient in AutoCAD; 3Ds Max; Adobe Creative Suite; and Revit. MEMBERSHIPS American Society of Architects, Boston Society of Architects; Associate (3/08/#30492086) Egyptian Engineering Syndicate, (9/03 /#18/3544) Kuwait Society of Engineers (1/05/#1773) OTHER SKILLS & INTERESTS Other Languages : Arabic. Design Related Hobbies : Animation& Cinematography, web designing, photography and sketching. Hobbies : Swimming, hiking/camping/ mountaineering, rowing, traveling, violin, fishing, and skydiving.


KyleProject Tornow Architect

design critic

41 Hawthorne St. Roslindale MA. 02131 kyletornow@compositedesignstudio.com , 617.378.5354

Kyle Tornow has over 25 years of experience, leadership and extensive technical knowledge of difficult, large-scale construction projects. His combined experience in design and construction process allows his practice to provide solutions to complex design goals while meeting the means and methods of the construction process. His development of Quality Control and Quality Assurance standards for managing the design and construction administration process for several companies ensures a high standard of coordination during construction documentation and construction administration. Kyle received his undergraduate degree at Syracuse University and was invited back to Syracuse to teach and complete his Master degree in the March II program. His studies focused on commercial development and construction detailing.

EDUCATION

Syracuse University School of Architecture Masters of Architecture II 1991 Bachelor of Architecture 1989 PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE CBT Architects - Boston, Massachusetts May 2012 to present. Project Architect. Composite Design Studio - Providing Design, Technical Support and Business Consultancy services for Architects, General Contractors and Commercial, Retail, Residential clients Elkus Manfredi Architects – Boston, Massachusetts March 2006 - October 2008 Project Architect and Project Manager. Directed development of project data filing system. Prellwitz/Chilinski Associates Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts April 1999 - January 2006 Project Architect and Project Manager. Directed development of project data filing and CAD standards improving productivity by 10 to 15%. Payette Associates Architects – Boston, Massachusetts August 1995 - March 1999 Project Architect TRAINING/CERTIFICATIONS Boston Architectural College Academic Year 1995 - 1999 [190]

Instructor for A-2, B-1 and Core II Segment II architecture design studios Syracuse University Academic Year 1990 - 1991 Teaching Assistant for the freshmen design studio TECHNICAL SKILLS Completed State Agency’s Air sealing and weatherization course. Data organization. Business consulting. Perspective rendering; model building; Sketch-Up; Revit; AutoCAD 2008; AutoCAD Desktop 2007; Micro Station 4.0; Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, Bridge and In-Design; Microsoft Word and Excel MEMBERSHIPS American Society of Architects, Boston Society of Architects; Associate (3/08/#30492086) Egyptian Engineering Syndicate, (9/03 /#18/3544) Kuwait Society of Engineers (1/05/#1773) INTERESTS Travel: Extensive travel throughout the United States, Canada; United Kingdom, Europe, Eastern Europe, Turkey, Greece, Cyprus, Egypt, Jordan, Israel and Saudi Arabia. Arts: Exhibitions and awards for works in architecture, ceramics, wheel and hand built sculptures, drawing, oil painting and watercolor. Infinite Business Network (IBN) – President of network group.


JEFF FULLERTON

Director, Architectural Acoustics, INCE Bd. Cert., LEED AP acoustical 33 Moulton Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 jeff.fullerton@the-bac.edu, 617.499.8058 consultant Mr. Fullerton is an acoustician working with various projects involving institutional, commercial and residential facilities. His areas of concentration include architectural acoustics, mechanical systems noise and vibration control, and environmental acoustics. His experience includes a wide scale of facilities, ranging from performance facilities for musical organizations, classroom buildings for universities to exhibition spaces for museums to laboratories for pharmaceutical companies. He is a LEED Accredited Professional and has also contributed to the development of acoustical credits within the USGBC’s LEED 3.0 Commercial Interiors rating system. Mr. Fullerton has also served as an expert witness for several legal and public proceedings.

EDUCATION

M.S. Mechanical Engineering, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA, 1995 B.S. Mechanical Engineering, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA, 1994 B.A. German Studies, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA, 1994

PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS Acentech Incorporated, March 1997-present Adjunct Professor, Boston Architectural College, September 2009-present GESAC, Inc., August 1995 - March 1997

REPRESENTATIVE CONSULTING PROJECTS The Mandarin Oriental of Boston High-end Residences, Hotel and Mixed Uses Boston, MA Dartmouth Life Sciences Center Community Sound Estimates Hanover, NH US Federal Courthouse Acoustics and Mechanical System Noise Control Springfield, MA Raleigh Convention Center Acoustics and Mechanical System Noise Control Raleigh, NC Fall River Justice Center Acoustics and Mechanical System Noise Control Fall River, MA Harvard Biological Research Institute Mechanical System Noise Control Cambridge, MA Kroc Corps Community Center of [191]

Boston Acoustics and Mechanical System Noise Control Dorchester, MA ZUMIX Youth Cultural Organization for Music and Art Boston, MA Avid Headquarters Acoustics and Mechanical System Noise Control Burlington, MA Wake County Justice Center Acoustics and Mechanical System Noise Control Raleigh, NC Healtworks Fitness Center Noise and Vibration Control Brookline, MA Fidelity Investments Customer Service Branches Chicago, IL Century City, CA Wellington, FL Waltham Elementary Schools Whittemore and Fitzgerald Schools Waltham, MA Dartmouth College Alumni Gymnasium Renovation Hanover, NH

TEACHING EXPERIENCE Adjunct Professor Boston Architectural College Fall 2009 – Present Director, Arch. Acoustics Acentech May 2004 – Present

PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES

Member – Institute for Noise Control Engineering (since 2002) President – Greater Boston Chapter of the Acoustical Society of America (2000-2002) Member – Northeast Sustainable Energy Association Boston Chapter (since 2004) Tau Beta Pi – National Engineering Honor Society (since 1995)


structural consultant

AMIR S. MESGAR, PE

Senior Associate 101 Federal Street Suite 502 Boston, Massachusetts 02110 AMesgar@lafp.com, 617.948.5622 Project Responsibilities: • Project Management • Project Engineering • Project Coordination • Construction Administration

EDUCATION

Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, Iran B.S. Civil Engineering 1995 Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran, Iran M.S. Civil Engineering 1998 University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas M.E. Civil Engineering 2005 PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Sano Consulting Engineers, Iran, Tehran Design Engineer 1995 – 2000 L.A. Fuess Partners Inc., Dallas, Texas EIT 2000 – 2005 Project Engineer2005 – 2007 L.A. Fuess Partners Inc., Boston, Massachusetts Senior Project Engineer 2007 – 2008 Associate 2008 – Present PROJECT EXPERIENCE Chelsea Jewish Nursing Home Chelsea, Massachusetts Village on the Waterfront East Providence, Rhode Island Nantucket Memorial Airport, Airport Rescue and Firefighting Facility Nantucket, Massachusetts Hingham Shipyard Condominiums Hingham, Massachusetts Artesia Hotel and Convention Center Sulphur, Oklahoma Modular Services Company [192]

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma DFW International Terminal D Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, Texas OCU Dormitory Oklahoma Christian University, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma KISD Intermediate School Kingsville, Texas Westlake Municipal Complex Westlake, Texas Healthsouth, MOB Elizabethtown, Kentucky Heath MOB Heath, Texas San Diego MOB San Diego, California Rio Grande Regional Hospital Mcallen, Texas Jordan Valley Medical Center West Jordan, Utah Belo Pavilion Conference Facility Dallas, Texas San Diego Medical Office BuildingPhase II San Diego, California Granite Park Phase III Office Building Plano, Texas Rose Medical Centre Garage Denver, Colorado REGISTRATION State of Massachusetts, Texas PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES American Institute of Steel Construction CIVIC ACTIVITIES Instructor of Structures III / Boston Architectural College


JOSHUA WHITE

analytical consultant

Director, Academic Services 85 Strathmore Road #37, Brighton, MA 02135 Joshua.white@the-bac.edu, 617.838.2825 Joshua has a Master degree in Writing from Emerson College and has been teaching and tutoring writing and ESL for more than 15 years. He founded the BAC’s Writing Center in the fall of 1999, guided its development into the Learning Resource Center (LRC) , and now oversees all of Academic Services (Advising and the LRC) . At the BAC he teaches Graduate Research & Writing and works extensively with Thesis students. Josh is also a playwright with several local productions and has taught play writing to school-age children.

EDUCATION

Emerson College, Boston, MA 1990-1994 Master of Fine Arts in Writing (concentration in play writing) Brandeis University, Waltham, MA 1981-1985 Bachelor of Arts in Economics

TEACHING EXPERIENCE

Boston Architectural Center, Boston, MA 1997-Present Emerson College, Boston, MA 1991-2003 Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences, Boston, MA 1996-2000 Urban College, Boston, MA 1994-1995 Bentley College, Waltham, MA 1994,1995 PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Boston Architectural Center, Boston, MA Director, Academic Services 2009-Present Director, Writing & Learning Resource Center 2003-2009 Director, Writing Center 1999-2003 Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA Entrance Essay Grader Summers, 1996-2002 Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, Boston, MA Writing Tutor 1996-2000

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PUBLICATIONS/PLAY PRODUCTIONS When Donnatello Danced, Production by Shadowbox Cabaret as part of 10th Anniversary Show, SeptemberNovember, 2004. Production by Shadowbox Cabaret, Columbus, OH. August, 1997. When They Come, Production by Shadowboxing Workshop, Boston, MA, December 2002. Ho Ho Ho, Staged reading by American Concert Theatre as part of Holiday Tales, Philadelphia, PA, December 2002; production by CentaStage as part of X-Mas Files Christmas show, Boston MA, December 2001. The Spacemaker, Production by Boston Theatre Marathon, Boston, MA, April 2000; staged reading by Coyote Theatre, Boston, MA, November,1998. PUBLIC SERVICE Watertown Public Library, Watertown, MA, Volunteer English a Second Language Tutor 1994-1996 Tremont Street Project/Coyote Theatre, Boston, MA, Children’s Playwriting Instructor, 1998-2004


ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES Freed, Elaine. ARCHITECTURE AS TEACHER Packard Hall at Colorado College. Colorado: Colorado College Studies, 2007. This is a primary source which deals with current trends in education. It will give me insight to cultural effects, methods of implementation and specialized means. Garland, Paul. Integrating education. Boston: BAC Thesis Document (1679), 2009. In general, looking through past thesis books which relate to innovation, collaboration, and learning will give me additional resources and design precedent studies which may help me reinforce my thesis idea. Gombrich, H.H.. TOPICS OF OUR TIME Twentieth-century issues in learning and in art. California:Phaidon, 1991. This resource will give light to some of the issues surrounding my thesis idea and will help me frame my supportive evidence. Jesus, Raquel De. Design Guidelines for Montessori Schools. Center for Arch/Urban Planning Research: Milwaukee, 1987. This was the primary resource which helped me understand Montessori designs and cirriculum over view. It alowed me to determine a common thread amoungst Montessori schools which are critical for the sucess of the programs. This will allow me to incoporate some of her methodologies and intentions into my thesis as supportive context. Lillard, Paula Polk. Montessori Today: A Comprehensive Approach to Education from Birth to Adulthood. New York: Schoken, 1996. As a further extention of the Montessori Guidelines this reference will bring me up to speed on the development of Montessori to present standards in society. This will allow me to engage the most current understandings into my supportive context. Robinson, Ken. “Ken Robinson says schools kill creativity.” TED Ideas Worth Spreading, talk. Monterely. California. Feb. 2006. Robinson is one source in which I use to identify the global and cultural issues relating to my thesis idea. He has become most helpful in framing the cultural context of my ideas. Takiguchi, Noriko. Experimental spaces for new styles of learning – the Stanford Center for Innovations in Learning. Axis, no. 101, pp. 72-4, Jan – Feb. 2003. This source will help me to identify new means of learning processes which hopefully will not be limited to academic institutions. I am looking to implement learning in a newer capacity beyond acadmic institutions.

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DESIGN RESOURCES

Architectural Graphic Standards, 11th Edition by Charles Ramsey and Harold Sleeper. New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2007. In searching for a typology, the graphic standards might help me define spaces within building types in which I might need to better implement my thesis idea. Auditorium Acoustics 104 Acoustical awareness is going to be critical for spaces that have assembly and meeting areas which are flexible. I must be aware of the design issues within these spaces. Broekhuizen, Dolf and Ton Verstegen, Paul Groenendijk, Like Bijlsma. Contemporary Dutch School Architecture. Rotterdam, NL: NAi Publishers 2009. Dutch educational environments is going to be one design reference which will give light to new means of learning environments. This context will ensure that I am pushing the boundary of my design. Building Blocks for Planning Functional Library Space by Buildings and Equipment Section, Library Administration and Management Association (LAMA). Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press, 2001. Because I feel that the program of a library can be cross polinated within other types I feel it is going to important to have an understanding of how the spaces are arranged. Meek, Anne. Designing places for learning. Alexandria, Va.: Assoc. for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 1995. This source may give me more programmatic context that will support my thesis idea. OWP/P Architects + VS Furniture + Bruce Mau Design. The Third Teacher; 79 Ways You Can Use Design to Transform Teaching & Learning. New York: Abrams, 2010. This source is excellent for collecting case studies which relate to buildings that are currently pushing the boundaries of education and creating newly programmed buildings. I feel this reference will be a very helpful source as it explains current trends, identifies current issues in learning and gives examples of some present day solutions. This will be good for case studies, and analytical context which can support my thesis idea. Perkins, L. Bradford. Building Type Basics for Elementary and Secondary Schools. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2010. Perkins Eastman was a firm well known for designing schools and I feel that there book will be an excellent design resource. Taylor, Anne and Katherine Enggass. Linking Architecture and Education: Sustainable Design of Learning Environments. New Mexico: University of New Mexico Press, 2009. I am looking to learn how architecture can effect education and most importantly what are essential in creating this dialogue bewteen user and building. This understanding will better assist in enforcing my thesis concepts.

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MAPS

Boston Redevelopement Authority www.cityofboston.gov/bra Google Maps http://maps.google.com Topozone www.topozone Cityrating.com http://www.mapc.org/ http://htaindex.cnt.org/ http://www.radicalcartography.net/ http://www.bing.com/maps/ http://hubmaps1.cityofboston.gov http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Boston

SITE INFORMATION

it Bostonian Lofts Real Estate www.bostonianlofts.com Boston History www.bostonhistory.com City of Boston Assessment www.cityboston.gov/assessing City of Boston Parcel Info www.cityofboston.gov/website/map/parcel Sperling’s Best Places www.bestplaces.net The Mayor’s Youthline www.bostonyouthzone.com http://www.hdfgroup.org/hdf-java-html/hdfview/index.html http://www.esri.com/ http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=222 http://websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov http://apps1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/energyplus/cfm/weather_data.cfm

DATA RESOURCES

http://www.mass.gov/?pageID=eopsterminal&L=4&L0=Home&L1=Consumer+Protection+%26+Business +Licensing&L2=License+Type+by+Business+Area&L3=Architectural+Access+Board&sid=Eeops&b=termi nalcontent&f=dps_aab_regs_pdf_1&csid=Eeops http://www.reedconstructiondata.com/projects/1000524963/ Royal Street Website http://royal-street.com/ Chestnut Hill Reservoir/ Boston Water Supply History. www.mass.gov/dcr/parks/metroboston/chesHistory. htm http://maps.google.com/ http://www.flickr.com/ Chart of Boston Harbor and Massachusetts Bay with Map of Adjacent Country. Boston Police Department www.BPDNews.com http://www1.cie.nl/projects/architecture/residential/the-whale,-amsterdam.aspx http://www.rose-network.com/all-projects http://www.bostonindicators.org/IndicatorsProject/ http://www.data.gov/ http://www.southbostononline.com/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Boston http://www.cityofboston.gov/neighborhoods/southboston.asp http://www.cityofboston.gov/landmarks/historic/fpc.asp http://mirador.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/mirador/homepageAlt.pl?search=1&keyword=MOD12CM1&locatio n=Boston,%20populated%20place,%20%28Suffolk,%20Massachusetts,%20USA%29&startTime=1978-0101&endTime=2009-11-18%2023:59:59&CGISESSID=1206f812fc400a9669f17a3111bf1291 http://www.metrofuture.org/ http://www.bostonredevelopmentauthority.org/planning/PlanningInitsIndividual. asp?InitID=33&action=ViewInit http://www.innovationdistrict.org/ http://www.coolinfographics.com/ [196]


The role of my thesis on a larger scale relates to constraints on human resources. Not in regards to vital resources at large but resources which support business development and the creation of something new. In cities where vast numbers of people work in close proximity, I feel that the city itself can support its residences better. Libraries and courthouses are not of great value in today’s fast paced world. Similar to Zip Car where everyone pays a small fee to utilize a common needed resource, I envision that my new learning typology can be implemented on any site and at any scale. Space is limited within dense cities and if there is a way for the public to have additional / temporary access to “space” then the city is serving a greater purpose for the benefit of its people. Because information is at our fingertips and very accessible it is now more important that we rely on others trades to get a common goal complete. The term Think-Tank is a great way to assimilate my goals. The only difference is that my building is providing rent-able space for the long and short term. It also houses an online database of exchanged/ shared professional resources (Time Bank). These systems could be accommodated by our government and maintained as a way of supporting education at a professional level, rather than simply funding singular parties to prosper. This idea/ concept would open doors for all person equally while providing a close connection and space for growth within its local communities.

13

CLOSING CLOSING STATEMENT & STATEMENT & REGARDS REGARDS [197]


Joining me in the thesis studio on the weekends so that he would not be completely deprived of seeing me all week during the last few months of my thesis

OUR DOG KASEY

A BIG thanks to Arlen Stawasz, Seth Coleman, Hector Inirio & Nicholas Stipinovich for all of there support throughout the thesis process.

Me during the last 3 months of thesis vs. Me the day of my Final Presentation [198]


TO MY WIFE ANIA A special thanks to my wife who stood by me through the thick and thin during my career at the Boston Architectural College. She spent a lot of lonely nights while I worked very hard at the office and on my thesis. She maintained the home and took care of our dog and I cannot thank her enough for all she has done. It was hard for me to see in the moment but looking back I could not have done it without her patience and support during this long and rigorous process.

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BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE Submission Date: 01.04.2013 | Master’s Thesis Book | Thesis Graduate: Alex Siekierski 617.894.0664 siekierski.alexgmail.com [200]


Engaging Space | Masters Thesis Book