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68 56 Cover photography Matthew Shave Styling Michelle Duguid On the cover The Graff Sweethearts, 51.53ct and 50.76ct heart shape D Flawless diamonds set as earrings with pear shape and round diamonds. 56.15ct Heart shape D Internally Flawless diamond ring. Dress by Carlos Miele. Flowers by Maison de Fleurs, maisondefleurs.co.uk

MATTHEW SHAVE; ANDY BARTER; GRAEME MoNTGoMERY; MICKY HoYLE; ALAMY

Published for Graff by Show Media Ltd 1-2 Ravey Street, London EC2A 4QP +44 (0) 20 3222 0101; www.showmedia.net Editor Joanne Glasbey Creative Director Ian Pendleton Art Director Dominic Bell Managing Editor Zai Shamis Chief Copy Editor Chris Madigan Picture Editor Juliette Hedoin Copy Editors Sarah Evans, Cate Langmuir, Gill Wing Managing Director Peter Howarth For Graff Katherine Roach, Joanne Hill, Lily Liebel, Adam Norton, Jessica Lansley, Charlotte Dauphin, Holly Howe Advertising Penny Weatherall, Joanne Hill and Katherine Roach at Graff; +44 (0)20 7584 8571; graffiti@graffdiamonds.com Colour reproduction by FMG; www.wearefmg.com Printing by Taylor Bloxham; www.taylorbloxham.co.uk

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CONTENTS

16 A FINE BALANCE Famous for

44 GOLDEN HARVEST Fast

62 PRIME TIME The face of things

his monumental mobile sculptures, Alexander Calder’s legacy lives on in the foundation set up his name to promote contemporary art

becoming one of South Africa’s premier cellars, the latest vintage from the Delaire Graff Estate looks set to be another award-winner

to come is most elegantly captured in Graff’s new collection of beautifully crafted wristwatches for discerning connoisseurs of haute horology

24 RISE AND SHINE In Botswana a new diamond centre has become a force for good, bringing the skilful art of diamond polishing home to the place where

50 FRUITS OF THE EARTH The most flawless of gems are fruitfully fashioned into exquisitely tasteful brooches, bracelets, necklaces, earrings and rings

68 DESERT ROSE From coastal villages to cosmopolitan economies, the Gulf states have catapulted to dizzying commercial, and now cultural and sporting, heights

58 THE WILD ONE Sought after by the fashion elite for his superior store designs, innovative architect Peter Marino does everything but follow the trendsetting pack

76 A WORD WITH... Michel Pitteloud. The CEO of Graff Luxury Watches tells the story behind Graff’s incomparable new timepiece, the MasterGraff Skeleton Automatic

30 THE DREAM The natural beauty of exquisite stones is set off to bewitching perfection against a background of lush leafery, tropical creatures and glamorous gowns

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t Graff Diamonds we pride ourselves on our vision, from sourcing the best quality, beautiful and rare stones by eye, to leading the way in design excellence and craftsmanship, and using our expert understanding to help steer the future path of our industry. Botswana is the world’s largest producer of diamonds and is now being developed into a nation that will experience huge benefits from being the home of nature’s most precious stones. In this issue, Sarah Carpin discovers the new Graff Diamond Technology Park where Graff’s diamond polishers use the world’s most advanced technology to unleash the full potential in every rough diamond. It takes real expertise to look into a rough diamond and see how this can be achieved. The artist Alexander Calder not only created great visual spectacles with his remarkable mobiles but also crafted a sculptural language that was international in its scope; George Pendle discusses the artist’s lexicon and legacy with Calder’s grandson Alexander Rower, who set up the Calder Foundation. Having great vision is a necessity in an architect. The maverick Peter Marino creates grand retail theatre from lines on a blueprint, with a particular skill for coding a brand’s DNA into the design. Here, Marino talks context and contemporary art with Nick Compton. Vision is what has led the FACET Foundation, by partnering with local charities in sub-Saharan Africa, to help transform lives. The perseverance and energy poured in by the project leaders, to run initiatives that really do change the course of young people’s futures, is inspiring. We feature the story of one perceptive 22-year-old who dreamt of becoming a nurse but had little means or hope originally to achieve his goal. After participating in a Graff Leadership Centre programme, he has not only been offered a place on a nursing course, but is a peer mentor at the Centre. Giving back is so important. I hope you enjoy this issue, and also invite you to explore our new website and discover the jewels and watches of Graff in all their beautiful detail at www.graffdiamonds.com

Laurence Graff Chairman of Graff Diamonds


alPiNE PEak On 27 December 2011, guests gathered for a festive cocktail party in the opulent setting of the the five-star Grand Hotel Park (4) – recently refurbished to create one of Switzerland’s most stylish destinations – to celebrate the opening of the first Graff store in Gstaad. Among the guests were Aida Hersham & Anne Marie Graff (5); Mr & Mrs Hans-Peter Kortlepel (6); Baroness Edmonde Labbe, Johannes Niederhauser & HRH Prince Victor Emmanuel of Savoy (7)

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SOCIAL DIARY

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ElEctric atMosPhErE A collaboration between Graff and electric supercar maker Tesla created a stir in Tokyo in February. Guests included Ai Matsuzawa, Kevin Yu & Catherine Kabayashi (1); Mr & Mrs Koichi Nezu with Graff salesperson Hiroe Hatakeyama (2); and Ken Takahashi (3)

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hEart oF saN FraNcisco In November 2011, Graff Diamonds hosted the opening party for its new flagship San Francisco store on Post Street, Graff’s first in California. The evening raised money for the UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital. Guests included Elizabeth Thieriot (8); Bita Daryabari (9); Lynne Benioff & Mark Laret, CEO of the UCSF Medical Center (10); Marissa Mayer, with Laurence Graff (11); and Yurie and Carl Pascarella (12)


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Florida PriMary In January, Graff hosted a dinner, prepared by chef Todd English (21, with Henri Barguirdjian, President & CEO of Graff USA) at the Henry Morrison Flagler Museum in Palm Beach, Florida. It was attended by VIPs including Robert Cuillo (17, with Graff assistant manager Diana Salandra), as well as Graff models (18); and served as the curtain-raiser for the Cavallino Car Classic, the convention for Ferrari owners at The Breakers, Palm Beach (19), where guests such as Mr & Mrs Timothy Rooney (20) enjoyed the hospitality of the Graff tent

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16 20 23 harbour lights The Villa by Barton G was the exclusive venue for a special client dinner to celebrate the opening of the new Graff store in Bal Harbour, Florida in April. Among the guests were Marco & Vanessa Selva, Graff New York MD Peter Kairis, Jill Viner & Barton G Weiss (13); Roberto Knibel, Mrs Lindeman, Count & Countess von Montgelas & Mr Lindeman (14); Graff Bal Harbour store manager Susan Pullin, Thomas & Katia Bates (15); and Mr & Mrs Milstein (16)

hollywood royalty As the official jeweller of the 18th annual Screen Actors Guild awards and sponsor of the Green Room, at the Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles, at the end of January, Graff welcomed a number of movie stars, who mingled with VIP guests among the jewellery cases. They included actresses Jo Beth Williams & Sofia Vergara (22, with Karen Kovacs, publisher of People magazine, and Lisa Paulsen of the Entertainment Industry Foundation); Marianne Lafiteau & Henri Barguirdjian, Robert & Sheryl Goldstein, John & Alex Goldstein (23)


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hong kong highlight The luxurious Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Hong Kong was the most elegant venue of the enchanting wedding of Mr Stephen Hung to Ms Deborah Valdez on 11 January this year. The Diamond Ballroom provided a beautiful backdrop to the nuptials, which were attended by the island’s most illustrious and distinguished individuals. Mr and Mrs Hung and their notable guests enjoyed a night of great entertainment and fine dining to celebrate the joyful occasion. Hong Kong’s tallest hotel, the Ritz-Carlton – soon to be the home of the highest jewellery store in the world, with the opening of the new Graff store later this summer – decorated the location in fabulous style befitting such a wonderful event. We wish Mr and Mrs Hung a very happy marriage.

a wonderful day The bride and groom, Mr & Mrs Hung, far left. Centre, from top: the bride with her bridesmaids, Michelle Chen, Kay Lim, and Alona Alvarez; the Ritz-Carlton’s Diamond Ballroom; the groom joins in the dancing; Mrs Deborah Hung, née Valdez, modelling exquisite Graff jewellery. Above, from top: Mr Stephen Hung, wearing a MasterGraff Diamond Tourbillon; The arrival of the beautiful Graff wedding bands; the beautiful bride


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a fine balance

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ven someone who’s never been to an art museum in their life will have seen them. They crouch in corporate plazas like long-limbed metallic insects, or twist in the foyers of cultural centres like filigree spider webs. Starkly silhouetted on park hills and university campuses, they jaggedly fuse together ground and sky like massive steel sutures. It’s uncanny, but wherever you go in the world, from India to Italy, from Cuba to China, the sculptures of Alexander Calder seem to have got there first. Long before today’s global art scene existed, Calder was bestriding the world undaunted by distance or local tastes. Indeed, his creation of a sculptural language that was seemingly international in its scope prefigured by half a

century the borderless range of today’s ‘superartists’ such as Takashi Murakami and Olafur Eliasson. However, Calder’s global popularity has been something of a double-edged sword. While the near-universal love for his public-art projects has allowed him to avoid the fights that surrounded, say, Richard Serra’s 1981 New York sculpture, ‘Tilted Arc’, which was destroyed after an outcry, it’s also meant it has been somewhat ignored by recent critics. Alexander S C Rower, the artist’s grandson, has made it his life’s work to change this. In 1987, he set up the Calder Foundation, in part, to re-educate the critical establishment. ‘I was disappointed that curators and other smart people didn’t understand my grandfather’s work.’ A puckish 48 years old, Rower is discussing the foundation’s work from its breathtaking new exhibition space in midtown New York. ‘In 1931, Calder has his very first show of abstract work in Paris. The artist Fernand Léger

getty images

Renowned foR his mobile sculptuRes, he was one of the 20th centuRy’s most impoRtant aRtists. today, the foundation set up in alexandeR caldeR’s name not only pReseRves his legacy but also pRomotes contempoRaRy aRtists, explains GeorGe Pendle


wrote the text for the catalogue and compared him to Erik Satie and Marcel Duchamp. But, by 1971, he’s not being compared to anyone.’ This was not entirely the fault of the critics – by the end of Calder’s life, his artistic reach and influence was so broad, it was almost impossible to see him clearly. Born into an artistic family in Philadelphia in 1898 – his mother was a portrait painter, his father and grandfather were sculptors – as a child, Calder would search out what he termed, ‘all the prettiest stuff in the garbage can’. He made wire jewellery for his sister’s dolls and gave notice of his burgeoning talent when, on Christmas Day in 1909, he gave his parents a tiny dog and duck made from a brass sheet. The metal had been skillfully cut and bent so the dog stood on four legs and the brass duck rocked to and fro when tapped. It was his first moving sculpture. Calder studied mechanical engineering at school and seemed set on a path to become a hydraulics or automotive engineer. But, by 1923, the family trade had called him back and he had moved to New York to join the Art Students League. He was soon drawing illustrations for the pages of the National Police Gazette, and it was while covering a story on the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus that he found one of his earliest, and most famous, inspirations. The wire and canvas frame of the big top, the suspension of the trapeze artists in mid-air and the tightrope walker balanced implausibly above the horned swoop of the safety net, provided him with a quiver of motifs he would draw on for years. ‘I was fond of the spatial relations,’ he would say, And ‘I love the space of the circus.’ It would spark the creation of the ‘Cirque Calder’ (1926-31) – a collection of hundreds of tiny sculptural elements depicting jugglers, chariots, high-wire walkers, and trapeze artists made from wire, rubber tubing, cork and pipe cleaners. In 1926, Calder moved to Paris and began to put on performances of his circus. Crouching behind his little big top, he would solemnly move his cantilevered creations around the ring, creating an absorbing silent narrative. But the circus was something other than just a complex miniature. It was also a form of performance art. ‘The pieces at the Whitney Museum [where the ‘Cirque Calder’ now resides] were the tools to perform the art,’ explains Rower. ‘But they’re not the work of art. Watching him perform is the art. His performance was highly regarded. It wasn’t for kids.’ Word quickly spread to the leading lights of the Paris art scene, and the circus was soon visited by Jean Cocteau, Joan Miró, Piet Mondrian and Léger. The success of the circus opened up the world of the avant-garde to Calder. Invited to Mondrian’s studio in 1930, he cheekily suggested


Calder Foundation, new York/art resourCe, nY; © Condé nast arChive/Corbis; Gianni daGli orti/the art arChive at art resourCe, nY

‘Why must art be static? the next step in sculpture is motion’ the coloured rectangles of paper on the wall could be improved if they were made ‘to oscillate in different directions and at different amplitudes’. Mondrian did not agree, yet the question stayed with Calder. ‘Why must art be static?’ he wrote in 1932. ‘You look at an abstraction, sculpted or painted, and it is an entirely exciting arrangement of planes, spheres, nuclei, but entirely without meaning. It’s perfect, but always still. The next step in sculpture is motion.’ Calder’s first steps towards applying motion to his sculptures can be seen in the offices of the Calder Foundation, where a wire sculpture of his wife – Rower’s grandmother – hangs from the ceiling. Rower blows on it to get it moving. ‘The idea that you could have sculpture that was immaterial was really, really radical,’ he says. ‘Now we totally recognise it as a sculpture, but, in those days, the view was, it’s not sculpture as it has no mass, but it’s not drawing, so what the hell is it?’ The sculpture twists in the air like a wisp of smoke and, as it turns towards the viewer, it resolves momentarily into the powerful gaze of Louisa Calder. For a moment, the viewer’s eyes are locked on a visage that has more weight, more reality, than you could think possible from a single piece of twisted wire, but before you know it the sculpture has moved on, the face losing narrative sense, becoming a lyrical cloud of abstract lines once more. Suddenly, there seems to be one fewer person in the room. One of Rower’s main aims with the foundation is to reassert the experiential quality of Calder’s work, most notably present in what Duchamp labelled his ‘mobiles’. These are perhaps Calder’s most famous works – kinetic abstract sculptures the articulated arms of which delicately pivot on fulcrums while pendulum-like appendages dexterously dangle brass balls and wire loops. Motion is the essence of these sculptures, whether it is provided by electric motor, hand crank or a simple breeze. They exist open-endedly, their multitudinous limbs moving in the air like a flock of swallows branching out and coalescing, but never repeating the same pattern. Jean-Paul Sartre once wrote of Calder’s mobiles that, ‘they feed on air, they breathe, they borrow life from the vague life of the atmosphere.’ These words are equally true of his ‘stabiles’, or static sculptural works – despite their sometimes

poetry in motion Alexander Calder in his studio, c1951, previous page. ‘Man’ (1967), opposite, now in Montreal. A Museum of Modern Art installation, 1944, left. The cover of the catalogue for the exhibition Alexander Calder: Mobiles, Stabiles, Constellations, 1946, below. ‘Le Soleil sur la Montagne’, 1975, Ville de Passy, France, bottom

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enormous bulk – some are more than 60ft tall and weigh nearly 35 tons – they, too, carry with them a sense of airiness, as if Calder were trying to break the sculpture free from the ground itself. Like the high-wire antics of his circus folk, these works often seem less joined to the ground than the result of the air itself solidifying into shape. ‘What I would have liked to have done,’ Calder once wrote wistfully, ‘would have been to suspend a sphere without any means of support, but I couldn’t do it.’ But there is more to the Calder experience than movement. Rower is, by now, standing in front of ‘Untitled’ (1934). It is a large black metal hoop in the middle of which hangs a tree of thin wire arms, each holding smaller coloured hoops. Rower moves towards one of the dangling arms and sets it in

motion. The result is a chiming, clanging symphony as the hoops clash against the work’s frame and each other, providing a uniquely atonal gong music, like a wind chime designed by Satie himself. ‘I bought this at Christie’s last year,’ says Rower, ‘and I guarantee not one other person I was bidding against realised it was a musical instrument. It’s surprising. There are so many works by Calder that include some sort of sound, some sort of tone, some sort of thing to wake you up, or bring you into the present. Your head’s full of stuff and then this thing makes a noise and suddenly,’ he snaps his fingers, ‘you’re present.’ The foundation holds more than 600 of Calder’s sculptures, as well as thousands of examples of his paintings, toys and jewellery, but Rower seeks

to expand the foundation’s horizons far beyond being just an archive of his grandfather’s work. Since 2005, the foundation has awarded a biannual $50,000 Calder Prize to a living artist, which includes a six-month residency at Atelier Calder, the sculptor’s former studio in Saché, France. ‘It’s a way of giving back,’ says Rower. Even further afield is the creation of the four-season, ‘beyond organic’ Calder Farm, on Calder’s former estate in Connecticut. Indeed, Rower has even mooted the idea of a Calder Foundation retirement home being established on the land one day. Like one of his grandfather’s mobiles, he seems determined never to go in the direction you quite expect of him. www.calder.org

Calder Foundation, new York/art resourCe, nY

a new artistic movement Calder’s ‘Red and Yellow Vane’ sculpture, 1934, left. ‘Peacock’, from 1941, below. ‘Moluscs’ painting, 1955, bottom

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CRAFTING BEAUTY A young Batswana diamond polisher adds the finishing touches to the polished stone that will bring out the maximum brilliance and fire. The training process is rigorous and only a talented few, opposite, will have the privilege of working on the world’s most fabulous diamonds


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RISE AND SHINE Botswana’s diamond technology park Brings home the skilful art of polishing, while Benefitting the nation, discovers sarah carpin photography Micky Hoyle


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or hundreds of years, the most precious of diamonds that were mined in Africa were assessed, sold, cut and polished by a multitude of organisations around the globe. A diamond sitting in a store window in Mayfair or Manhattan may have travelled thousands of air miles from Africa to Europe to Asia and on to the Middle East, before arriving in its final, glitteringly perfect condition. But all this is now changing. The African landlocked country of Botswana is the world’s largest producer of diamonds and is now being developed into a nation that will experience huge benefits from being the home to nature’s most spectacular and precious stones. By the end of next year, the international system of sorting and selling Africa’s rough diamonds by De Beers’ trading arm, the DTC, will all be moved here after a hundred years of being based in London. And the process of building up a globally important diamond industry within Botswana has already started, spearheaded by Graff. The first stage of this shift back to Africa is to be found in an area that, only a few years ago, was scrubland on the edges of the capital, Gaborone. The Diamond Technology Park is a modern state of the art complex that is home to Graff’s diamond polishing and procurement division, Safdico (South African Diamond Corporation). Safdico has been instrumental in the development of this African diamond hub. Its managing director, Ilan Kaplan, tells me that the company saw the potential for Botswana around seven years ago, and had the vision to bring the very specialised skills of diamond cutting and polishing to Africa. ‘There were no guarantees at that time,’ Kaplan recalls. ‘And we didn’t just want to set up a factory for our own benefit. We had a bigger vision than that.’ Graff bought the land and soon developed the new Diamond Technology Park that is home not only to Graff’s polishing and procurement division but also other diamondrelated businesses. ‘It’s a wonderful success story,’ he says, with justifiable pride in his voice. But this is no ordinary sleek looking, high-tech business park. Alongside the ultramodern diamond cutting and polishing centre, housing some of the most sophisticated technology on the planet, zebras quietly graze – the unusual decision to add an enclosure for them a reminder of its proud African identity, for the zebra is Botswana’s national animal as well as being a symbol of individuality. And it is this realisation of the unique individuality of every diamond that passes through Graff’s workshops here that makes this particular African park unique.

Each individual glittering diamond in a finished Graff masterpiece is the result of a fascinating partnership between the mysteries of the earth’s natural forces, man’s dedication to the highest forms of craftsmanship and the adaptation of science towards the dedication of perfection. And all of these forces are now being brought together in Botswana. The creation of the perfect diamond is a delicate balance between science and art. ‘We have invested in the most technologically advanced processes that are currently available in our pursuit of perfection,’ reveals Kaplan. ‘But alongside all of this science, there is no substitute for the skills of a highly trained diamond polisher. And that is a God-given talent. Just as some people make great artists or musicians, so others are born with the talent to make diamonds shine.’ Within the Diamond Technology Park, a team of young Motswana artisans is polishing

CENTRE OF EXCELLENCE A group of Botswana rough diamonds waiting to be laser sawn, left. At the time of purchase a digital gauge, above, measures the potential size of the polished diamond. The Diamond Technology Park entrance, top right. Zebras Dee and Gem in their enclosure, bottom right


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there is no substitute for the skills of a highly trained diamond polisher, that is a god-given talent diamonds of spectacular value and rarity. ‘Four and a half years ago, we built these headquarters out of nowhere and had the task of training young people to be expert diamond polishers. We had to begin by explaining diamonds – they’d never seen or touched one,’ remarks. Kaplan. ‘We’ve come a long way in a very short time, and we’ve been fortunate to discover some very talented people.’ The first step towards creating the perfect diamond is in the hands of the rough diamond experts, who first assess the stones as they arrive. In the rough, diamonds look rather disappointing to the untrained eye, but to an expert these humble looking opaque stones contain a miracle waiting to happen. ‘When we purchase rough stones, we already have a good idea of the potential that can be unleashed in each and every diamond,’ Kaplan explains. ‘This is enhanced when we use all the technology at our disposal.’

‘What is important to us is that every piece of rough that passes through our hands gets our full attention so that it can achieve its maximum potential. So whether it is a 2ct stone or a 20ct stone, it will get our undivided attention, as if it is the only diamond in production.’ The dedication to achieving this level of perfection is clear in the painstaking care and hours of detailed work that go into ensuring that all the stones that pass through the park are individually transformed to bring out their true, individual splendour. Any piece of rough can be cut in a myriad ways. A large stone may be cut down into several smaller stones or may be kept as a single diamond, depending on the quality of its colour, its clarity and the size and shape of diamonds that customers around the world are particularly looking for. The first step in the process is for every diamond to be scanned. The scans look into the rough stones and map a 3D image on a computer. Software can then take these images and assess the best way to cut each stone. ‘We invested in this technology four years ago when it was first available and we have since adapted and developed it for our own needs,’ Kaplan says.


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Graff has 120 expert cutters and polishers in Botswana and while the computer can map out each stone and offer the best ways to cut and polish, it cannot do the actual work. As Kaplan says, ‘That is when the challenge begins, to achieve perfection.’ Graff diamonds are renowned for their superiority and the excellence of the craftsmanship that has gone into making the finished diamond. This does not happen by coincidence, but is the result of a scrupulously long process of working each diamond to ensure it reveals its individual miracle of transformation. Sometimes, the experts at Graff have to make difficult decisions in the quest for perfection. While some might opt to cut the biggest diamond possible from a single piece of rough, for Graff, it is more important to have a single stone that may be considerably smaller than when it first came out of the ground, but will end up being graded as a perfect diamond. This means gaining a Triple X international GIA certificate, meaning it has been independently graded as excellent in its cut, polish and symmetry. After a computer has assessed a rough stone, it gives the polishers a range of options to choose from, including a variety of diamond cuts, from round stones to square, marquise, heart or pear shapes. The computer maps the diamond and the way in which it refracts the light to assess

LINE drawINg Diamond scanning technology, above left, yields the best combination of polished diamonds from each piece of rough, such as the primary round stone and two secondary stones in this scan, above right what would be the perfect cut and to make the most of the diamond’s natural characteristics. The software’s calculations and the cutter’s expert eyes both play a part in making the final decision. Once the cut has been decided upon, the stone is then marked by a laser, which shows the exact lines and angles by which the stone should be cut. It is then sent to another high tech gadget: the green laser saw. Traditionally, at this stage, the large rough stone would be ‘cleaved’ by cutting it with another diamond. It is one of the hardest substances on earth but a diamond can also be very brittle. When the stone is very large and valuable, the cleaving is a most critical process, because a mistake by the cleaver can shatter the stone and render it worthless. This is no task for the faint-hearted. Indeed, there is a famous story that in 1908, the renowned Dutch diamond cutter Joseph Asscher fainted clean away after his first cleave of what was then the world’s largest diamond, the Cullinan stone. Asscher would, no doubt, have been astounded to see how technology has changed the way in which diamonds are now worked and

the new green laser saw has been found to be the safest way to cleave a rough stone with the minimum of risk to the stone – along with the possibility of fainting. Once the diamond has been safely cut, it is then polished by more sophisticated machinery. The polishing machines can polish much faster than a traditional craftsman, but they can’t finish the diamond to the strict parameters of perfection that a Graff diamond requires. And this is where the God-given talents of Botswana’s young diamond polishers come back into the picture. Their meticulous work ensures that each and every diamond is precisely symmetrical and perfectly refracts the light that enters it to achieve the ultimate scintillation, fire and sparkle. It is only then that the true beauty of the diamond is revealed. Each polished stone is then meticulously checked under laboratory conditions with twenty times magnification. And it is only when a diamond has been stamped with the final approval from Graff that the diamond will then leave its African homeland, flying out to the master craftsmen in Graff’s jewellery workshop in London. Hundreds more hours of work and dedication will then transform these African stones into the most sublimely beautiful and sought after Graff masterpieces.


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the dream in a lush, mesmerising world of the imagination, nature’s bounty is revealed in jewellery that is the essence of fantasy PhotograPhy Matthew Shave | styling Michelle Duguid


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Pear shape diamond three-strand earrings (Diamonds 27.85cts). Multishape diamond necklace (Diamonds 71.81cts). 19.23ct Pear shape D Internally Flawless diamond ring with pear shape diamond shoulders. Round and marquise diamond bracelet (Diamonds 33.26cts). Dress by Maria Grachvogel Multishape sapphire and diamond Scroll Motif necklace (Sapphires 156.60cts, Diamonds 101.96cts). 19.99ct Cushion cut sapphire ring with trilliant cut diamond shoulders. Silver dress by Suzie Turner 17ct Marquise D Internally Flawless diamond ring with trilliant cut diamond shoulders. Marquise and pear shape diamond bracelet (Diamonds 81.02cts) Multishape yellow and white diamond Scroll Motif earrings (Diamonds 26.87cts). Multishape yellow and white diamond Scroll Motif necklace (Diamonds 131.12cts). 20.14ct Cushion cut Fancy Vivid Yellow diamond ring with trilliant cut diamond shoulders. Dress by Amanda Wakeley. Shoes by Osman for Rupert Sanderson 35.03ct Emerald cut D Flawless diamond ring with tapered baguette diamond shoulders. Emerald cut and round diamond wave bracelet (Diamonds 83.64cts) Round and marquise diamond butterfly brooch (Diamonds 43.38cts). Round, pear shape and marquise diamond Scroll Motif medallion necklace (Diamonds 68.88cts). 10.12ct Round D Flawless diamond ring with pear shape diamond shoulders. Round and pear shape diamond wave bracelet (Diamonds 88.65cts). Dress by Issa. Scarf by Duppoini Round emerald and pear shape diamond Bombé earrings (Emeralds 21.41cts, Diamonds 10.90cts).

Round emerald and round and pear shape diamond Bombé necklace (Emeralds 13.83cts, Diamonds 16.40cts). Round emerald and diamond Bombé ring (Emeralds 9.02cts, Diamonds 4.55cts). Jumpsuit by Carlos Miele Multishape diamond chandelier earrings (Diamonds 38.40cts). Multishape diamond necklace (Diamonds 108.09cts). 19.23ct Pear shape D Internally Flawless diamond ring with pear shape diamond shoulders. Pear shape and round diamond bracelet (Diamonds 38.10cts). Dress by Luisa Beccaria Pear shape ruby and round and pear shape diamond earrings (Rubies 35.18cts, Diamonds 6.12cts). Pear shape and heart shape ruby and pear shape and round diamond necklace (Rubies 108.10cts, Diamonds 69.40cts). 10.12ct Round D Flawless diamond ring with pear shape diamond shoulders. Oval ruby and diamond line bracelet (Rubies 37.68cts, Diamonds 13.14cts). Dress by Luisa Beccaria Photographer’s assistants Jo O’Hanlon, Chantelle King Stylist’s assistant Grace Joel Hair Peter Beckett Make-up Kirstin Piggott Make-up assistant Molly Aitken Nails Lucie Pickavance Model Sandrah Hellberg at Next Models Retouching Mark Arnold Wildlife Amazing Animals


Pear shape diamond three-strand earrings (Diamonds 27.85cts). Multishape diamond necklace (Diamonds 71.81cts). 19.23ct Pear shape D Internally Flawless diamond ring with pear shape diamond shoulders. Round and marquise diamond bracelet (Diamonds 33.26cts). Dress by Maria Grachvogel Multishape sapphire and diamond Scroll Motif necklace (Sapphires 156.60cts, Diamonds 101.96cts). 19.99ct Cushion cut sapphire ring with trilliant cut diamond shoulders. Silver dress by Suzie Turner 17ct Marquise D Internally Flawless diamond ring with trilliant cut diamond shoulders. Marquise and pear shape diamond bracelet (Diamonds 81.02cts) Multishape yellow and white diamond Scroll Motif earrings (Diamonds 26.87cts). Multishape yellow and white diamond Scroll Motif necklace (Diamonds 131.12cts). 20.14ct Cushion cut Fancy Vivid Yellow diamond ring with trilliant cut diamond shoulders. Dress by Amanda Wakeley. Shoes by Osman for Rupert Sanderson 35.03ct Emerald cut D Flawless diamond ring with tapered baguette diamond shoulders. Emerald cut and round diamond wave bracelet (Diamonds 83.64cts) Round and marquise diamond butterfly brooch (Diamonds 43.38cts). Round, pear shape and marquise diamond Scroll Motif medallion necklace (Diamonds 68.88cts). 10.12ct Round D Flawless diamond ring with pear shape diamond shoulders. Round and pear shape diamond wave bracelet (Diamonds 88.65cts). Dress by Issa. Scarf by Duppoini Round emerald and pear shape diamond Bombé earrings (Emeralds 21.41cts, Diamonds 10.90cts).

Round emerald and round and pear shape diamond Bombé necklace (Emeralds 13.83cts, Diamonds 16.40cts). Round emerald and diamond Bombé ring (Emeralds 9.02cts, Diamonds 4.55cts). Jumpsuit by Carlos Miele Multishape diamond chandelier earrings (Diamonds 38.40cts). Multishape diamond necklace (Diamonds 108.09cts). 19.23ct Pear shape D Internally Flawless diamond ring with pear shape diamond shoulders. Pear shape and round diamond bracelet (Diamonds 38.10cts). Dress by Luisa Beccaria Pear shape ruby and round and pear shape diamond earrings (Rubies 35.18cts, Diamonds 6.12cts). Pear shape and heart shape ruby and pear shape and round diamond necklace (Rubies 108.10cts, Diamonds 69.40cts). 10.12ct Round D Flawless diamond ring with pear shape diamond shoulders. Oval ruby and diamond line bracelet (Rubies 37.68cts, Diamonds 13.14cts). Dress by Luisa Beccaria Photographer’s assistants Jo O’Hanlon, Chantelle King Stylist’s assistant Grace Joel Hair Peter Beckett Make-up Kirstin Piggott Make-up assistant Molly Aitken Nails Lucie Pickavance Model Sandrah Hellberg at Next Models Retouching Mark Arnold Wildlife Amazing Animals


GRAPE of Good hoPE Harvest time – between February and April – on the Delaire Graff Estate is a time of expectation and excitement. Winemaker Morné Vrey calls it ‘the best time of year’


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GOLDEN HARVEST AS thiS yeAr’S grApeS Are picked on the delAire grAff eStAte, christian eedes meetS the winemAker looking forwArd to creAting more AwArd-winning wineS photogrAphy Micky Hoyle

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visit to Stellenbosch estate Delaire in the middle of February 2012 finds winemaker Morné Vrey prowling the cellar like the proverbial caged tiger. So far this year, he’s received just under 30 tons of grapes out of an expected total of 280. Harvest in South Africa typically runs from the beginning of February until as late as mid-April (as opposed to late August to early October in the northern hemisphere) and Vrey is itching for things to get into full swing. Delaire sits atop a pass called Helshoogte with views stretching back to Table Mountain. It was acquired by Laurence Graff in 2003 and under his custodianship is fast becoming one of South Africa’s premier cellars. Vrey, now 33 years old, has been at Delaire since late 2007 and brings work experience in France, Germany and New Zealand to his role. ‘Harvest is the best time of the year,’ Vrey says, despite the challenges he faces. One of the biggest is logistics. There are now some 20 hectares of vineyard on Delaire itself but Vrey also utilises grapes from selected sites scattered around the Cape Winelands, a further 30ha in total. Deciding on which blocks of vineyard to pick when sees him and viticulturist Kallie Fernhout doing a lot of mileage in the short space of time that is harvest. Unlike France’s Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée system for administering the origin of


‘Despite all the late hours, harvest is an enormous amount of fun. we’re a well-oileD operation

DEVOTION TO DETAILWhether destined for white or red wine, the grapes are handled with supreme care, above. When the delivery trucks arrive at the cellar, 20 tons of grapes are offloaded in 30 minutes, before being bunch-sorted, opposite, to remove sub-standard fruit

its wines, South African vine-growing regulations are not unduly restrictive – it’s the producer rather than any official body that gets to determine which variety is most appropriate to a particular location. In addition, while South Africa does indeed have a well-established Wine of Origin scheme, production areas range from the small and tightly defined to the large and somewhat meaningless – the largest of these allowing for multi-regional blends, parcels of grapes from divergent sites being used to make a composite wine. Delaire, however, is using the South Africa’s wine laws to best advantage. ‘If you plant 20 different varieties on a 50ha property, very few will be outstanding,’ says Vrey. ‘What sets us apart is our focus on the vineyards. Our Stellenbosch site is suited to some but not all varieties. Where we can get better quality from elsewhere, I won’t hesitate to buy in that fruit.’ The Delaire range is relatively wide and Vrey is adamant that everything should be of similar high quality. Vrey operates out of a 300-ton capacity cellar designed by top local architect Gerard de Villiers and completed in 2008. A typical day during harvest begins at 5am and might finish at 1am the following morning, with him catching a few hours of sleep on the sofa in his office. At a state-of-the-art cellar like Delaire, winemaking cannot be considered a particularly romantic process. Intellectually taxing, for sure, but not romantic. It begins with grapes being received at the cellar (Vrey says that his team’s current record for unloading 20 tons of grapes off the delivery truck is 30 minutes and all involved are keen to improve on that time) before these are processed in order to remove the juice from the skins. White wine juice will go in settling tanks to clarify before fermentation begins; red wine juice will be left on the skins before and after fermentation to facilitate the extraction of colour, flavour and tannic structure. According to Vrey, winemaking is all about ‘playing the right cards at the right time’ to end up with something great and he employs all sorts of techniques along the way aimed at raising quality a notch or two higher. For one thing, grapes are subject to bunchsorting upon arrival to remove sub-standard fruit. For another, he is able to deploy all of four different types of press depending on the ultimate style of wine he is making – he’s particularly excited about


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a new nitrogen press for Sauvignon Blanc and Sauvignon Rosé, which allows juice extraction under a controlled atmosphere of inert nitrogen, preventing exposure to air and possible oxidation, which would strip aroma and flavour. When it comes to Chardonnay, Chenin Blanc and Sémillon, meanwhile, he eschews the usual crushing and destemming for whole bunch pressing which results in juice low in harsh-tasting phenolics and high in quality. In the case of red varieties, Vrey notes a tendency in much of South African winemaking to ‘over-work’ the grapes in the cellar and he is at pains to avoid this, applying a whole berry fermentation and basket press in order to retain fruit integrity and freshness. During red wine fermentation, a layer of grape solids floats on the liquid surface and this cap must be broken up to encourage extraction but, as far as Vrey is concerned, the more gently this can be done, the better for the wine in the long run. Hence, rather than with mechanical pumpovers, this is achieved with manual punch-downs.


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‘It’s tough on those of us in the cellar but the end result can’t be beat,’ Vrey explains. Fermentation, of course, is the conversion of grape sugar by yeast into alcohol and carbon dioxide, wine yeasts capable of producing alcohol by volume of 15 per cent and over but Vrey’s whites typically sit at about 13 per cent and his reds at 14 per cent. Depending on variety, some wines will be matured in oak barrels after fermentation to add complexity. Barrels are a significant annual investment – Vrey buys 150 new every year and there will be 450 in use at any one time. Once fermentation is complete, the wine undergoes an optional time of contact with the lees (the dregs, consisting of spent yeast cells and fragments of grape matter), which can impart complexity. Then it will be stabilised and fined, processes that aim to ensure the wine will not form hazes, clouds or unwanted deposits once it is bottled. Every vintage is different: mid-February in 2012, the summer has been milder than usual and Vrey hopes this will continue facilitating a more drawn-out harvest and, in turn, better flavour development in the grapes. A sudden heatwave, however, and what was looking a very promising year might end up no more than average. In the cellar, there’s always the possibility of minor snags such as burst pipes or mechanical equipment which breaks down. Winemaking isn’t

BARRELS Of fun The state-of-the-art cellar at Delaire Graff Estate, designed by architect Gerard de Villiers, has the capacity for 300 tons of wine, above. A worker prevents picked grapes from drying out, top left. Winemaker Morné Vrey stands proudly amid his hi-tech equipment, top

entirely joyless toil, however: ‘Despite all the late hours, harvest is an enormous amount of fun,’ Vrey says. ‘This is my fifth vintage and we’re a pretty well oiled operation. It’s not all hard work – we braai [barbecue] a lot.’ The Delaire portfolio is diverse – Vrey has an irrepressible enthusiasm and wants to try his hand at everything in winemaking. The overall quality is extraordinarily high but it is perhaps Delaire’s two examples of Sauvignon Blanc which have caused the biggest stir to date: the standard label 2009 placed among the winners in South Africa’s Sauvignon Blanc Top 10 competition of the same year; the Coastal Cuvée 2010 won best in class at the 2011 Old Mutual Trophy Wine Show (arguably the most prestigious wine competition locally); while the 2011 again came up trumps in the 2011 Top 10 competition. Sauvignon Blanc is at the foundation of the Delaire range, making up around 40 per cent of all the grapes to be processed during harvest. Vrey sources from a wide array of appellations to ensure the most complex end-wine possible. The standard label is typically styled to be lighter and more towards the herbaceous end of the flavour spectrum, while the Coastal Cuvée is intended to be richer and fuller. At the top of the range, meanwhile, are two Reserve wines, consisting of a white blend and a Cabernet Sauvignon. The vintage of the white blend available at the time of writing is the 2009, comprising 60 per cent Sémillon and 40 per cent Sauvignon Blanc, fermented and matured in French oak, 80 per cent new, for five months and then returned to tank for 12 months. It’s an immensely promising wine with layers of flavour, great palate weight and a very persistent finish. The current release of the Delaire Cabernet Sauvignon Reserve is the 2008, a wine that secured a maximum five-star rating in the 2011 edition of the highly respected Platter’s South African Wine Guide. What makes it so special? First, Stellenbosch, the district that is home to Delaire, is famed for its high-quality Cabernet Sauvignon and the Delaire version is made exclusively from grapes grown on the property. Second, Vrey’s approach in the cellar, as described, is a key factor. The wine shows perfectly delineated dark fruit and the very finest tannins. It’s relatively light and fresh and a welcome departure from many a modern-day Cab which can be excessively rich and powerful. Our tasting finished, Vrey returns to planning for harvest 2012. He’s checked equipment numerous times already, but he can’t help checking again. Soon the grapes will be arriving and then he won’t have a spare moment.


Where can you ďŹ nd a 1,026 sq ft one bedroom apartment that includes an 18 seater private cinema and a 21m ozone swimming pool?

By private appointment only +44 (0)20 7590 2340 | info@onehydepark.com | www.onehydepark.com


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FRUITS OF THE EARTH be tempted by a veritable garden of delight, abundant in desirable rare diamonds that are perfectly ripe for the picking photography Graeme Montgomery | styling Annette Masterman


Radiant cut yellow and round white diamond bracelet (Diamonds 125.42cts) 22.52ct Oval D Flawless diamond ring with heart shape diamond shoulders. 22.03ct Heart shape D Flawless diamond ring with tapered baguette diamond shoulders. 35.03ct Emerald cut D Flawless diamond ring with tapered baguette diamond shoulders Multishape chandelier Scroll Motif diamond earrings (Diamonds 23.06cts) Round, marquise and oval diamond dragonfly brooch (Diamonds 40.46cts) Multishape diamond strand earrings with 40ct pear shape D Flawless diamond drops (Diamonds 88.06cts) Round and pear shape diamond feather motif necklace (Diamonds 25.62cts). Round, pear shape and marquise diamond feather motif earrings (Diamonds 9.25cts) Photographer’s assistants Richard Keech and Grant Smith Stylist’s assistant Alexander Heathcote Retouching Matthew Arnold Fruit courtesy of Harrods Food Hall; harrods.com


THE WILD ONE

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sk anyone who knows anything about store design and contemporary retail architecture and they will tell you that New York-based architect Peter Marino is the perfect man for the job. Marino doesn’t talk like an architect. Not for him the academese of volumes and voids that can make architects a difficult bunch to engage with. He doesn’t look much like an architect, either. Architects wear black polo necks and serious black-rimmed spectacles. They are design-minded duotone intellectuals and tend to drive sober but well-engineered European cars such as Audis or Saabs. Not Peter Marino. Marino rides a Harley. Or perhaps a Ducati or Triumph, depending on his mood. Or which of his homes he’s at. And he wears leathers to match. Not those Italian racing leathers with their internal architecture; Marino wears leathers like the young Marlon Brando wears in The Wild One. He is the only ‘starchitect’ – as the A-list are known – who actually looks like a star. Peter Marino looks nothing like an architect. And in conversation he comes off like one of those English rock stars of a certain age – he is now 61 and uses a sort-of English accent, even though he was born in Manhattan and raised in Queens – whose rich experience has left them wise, warm, funny and utterly engaging as well

as prone to using words like ‘dude’ and ‘chick’. Of course, if Marino’s name has ever blipped on your radar, you know a good deal of this. Marino has developed a character, a persona that works like a brand. And it’s hard to know whether his leather daywear, which replaced more conventional architect gear a decade ago, is a deliberate branding exercise. But it can obscure the real story: that he is one of the most feted and in-demand architects in the world. He designs and builds stores like no one else. No one has a better sense of the strange mix of high drama and domesticity, art and commerce, that makes for grand retail theatre. He has worked with Graff, Chanel, Christian Dior and Louis Vuitton, among others, and you can see his stores on New Bond Street, Place Vendôme, Madison Avenue, Rodeo Drive, Ginza and in the best parts of Beijing and Shanghai. (He also has a sideline in designing private residences, from Aspen to St Moritz.) When Graff decided that the time was right for a new retail push, Marino was called in. There was history. Marino was behind the design of the Madison Avenue store, which opened in 2008, and the San Francisco store, which opened late last year, part of a new surge eastwards, with openings planned in Hangzhou, Hong Kong, Macau and Shanghai. Marino studied architecture at Cornell and then joined Skidmore Owings & Merrill, the most solidly and stolidly blue chip of American

douglass friedman/trunk archive

HE MAY DRESS LIKE A REBEL BUT WHEN IT COMES TO RETAIL DESIGN, PETER MARINO, THE ARCHITECT BEHIND SOME OF GRAFF’S MOST HIGH-PROFILE STORES, IS, ACCORDING TO nick compton, THE LEADER OF THE PACK


private view Peter Marino, in signature leathers, proudly displays a few personal favourites from his collection of Renaissance and Baroque bronze sculptures, a particular passion of the architect for the past two decades


retail PalaCeS Walnut lines Marino’s New York store for Graff. Brass cases in Graff’s Hong Kong store by Marino, top right. Marino’s ceiling for Louis Vuitton, London, bottom right. Marino’s interior at Zegna, Paris, far right


retail PalaCeS Walnut lines Marino’s New York store for Graff. Brass cases in Graff’s Hong Kong store by Marino, top right. Marino’s ceiling for Louis Vuitton, London, bottom right. Marino’s interior at Zegna, Paris, far right


marino’s skill is in pulling at a particular strand of a brand’s dna and coding it into a space or a building

architecture firms. He moved on to work with George Nelson and I M Pei before going his own way in 1978. And he immediately got a lucky break. A girlfriend at the time was a secretary for Andy Warhol, who asked him to design his apartment. Warhol became a friend and introduced him to the Studio 54 set of New York socialites and in-town notables. Marino became their designer of choice. His second job was an apartment for Yves Saint Laurent, his next a pied-á-terre for legendary Fiat chief Gianni Agnelli and his wife. Marino’s next move, work on the Barneys store in New York, pulled him into the circle of another set of clients: the leading European and American fashion designers, and the chiefs of luxury goods groups who pay their wages. Marino understood what these brands wanted; more than that, he understood what these brands needed, in retail terms at least, before they did. His skill is in pulling at a particular strand of a brand’s DNA and coding that into a space or a building. For Graff’s stores, a mix of brass, limestone and walnut creates the perfect setting for their very serious stones. He painted the Dior store in 56 shades of grey, the colour of Dior. He covered the Chanel Tower in the Ginza district of Tokyo with thousands of computer-controlled LEDs that recalled Chanel tweed. But Marino’s architecture is about details rather than grand statements. His experience in interior design makes him unique among big name contemporary architects. He starts with the materials and works from there. ‘I’m not someone who sits down with a blank piece of paper with a grand vision. I sit down with materials, stacks of samples, and mush them all up until something feels right. I’m very much a materialist in that way.’ Getting the base materials right is just the start of the design process. And Marino admits that the Graff stores have their own challenges. ‘Well, with diamonds you have a lot of lighting concerns and you have to be really careful with the ambient colours – you need that very cold light when you are looking at diamonds.’ These details matter to Marino because his stores have to somehow match high drama with domesticity. The people who are going to do the consuming at these stores have to feel literally at home.

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A serious and long-term art collector (and not just fashionable contemporary and conceptual art. He has a world class collection of Baroque and Renaissance bronzes that was shown at The Wallace Collection in London in 2010), Marino has been credited with making quality contemporary art an essential fixture of the luxury retail temple. He often commissions young and established artists to create art specifically for his stores. Every new store is an effort to create a new vision of the perfect home. ‘Every time we do a store, we up the total package; the budget on art, on carpets, on furniture, everything. We have to make it look like the places their clients actually live in, but more beautiful. To make it relaxed and comfortable and appropriate. That isn’t so easy.’

Marino is scathing about what he sees as a tendency in contemporary architecture to pay little attention to where buildings will actually live, their context. Not that he’s down on all contemporary architects. He is a big fan of Herzog & de Meuron, the team behind the Tate Modern conversion. And he is the first to admit that he has a complex relationship with a contemporary star system that recognises those who produce grandstanding public buildings such as Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim in Bilbao, but ignore those who are involved with commerce. In some ways, Marino’s leathers represent an irreverent gesture towards this star system. But while his outfits recognise his outsider status, the quality, success and scale of his work insists that Marino is an architect like no other.


marino’s skill is in pulling at a particular strand of a brand’s dna and coding it into a space or a building

architecture firms. He moved on to work with George Nelson and I M Pei before going his own way in 1978. And he immediately got a lucky break. A girlfriend at the time was a secretary for Andy Warhol, who asked him to design his apartment. Warhol became a friend and introduced him to the Studio 54 set of New York socialites and in-town notables. Marino became their designer of choice. His second job was an apartment for Yves Saint Laurent, his next a pied-á-terre for legendary Fiat chief Gianni Agnelli and his wife. Marino’s next move, work on the Barneys store in New York, pulled him into the circle of another set of clients: the leading European and American fashion designers, and the chiefs of luxury goods groups who pay their wages. Marino understood what these brands wanted; more than that, he understood what these brands needed, in retail terms at least, before they did. His skill is in pulling at a particular strand of a brand’s DNA and coding that into a space or a building. For Graff’s stores, a mix of brass, limestone and walnut creates the perfect setting for their very serious stones. He painted the Dior store in 56 shades of grey, the colour of Dior. He covered the Chanel Tower in the Ginza district of Tokyo with thousands of computer-controlled LEDs that recalled Chanel tweed. But Marino’s architecture is about details rather than grand statements. His experience in interior design makes him unique among big name contemporary architects. He starts with the materials and works from there. ‘I’m not someone who sits down with a blank piece of paper with a grand vision. I sit down with materials, stacks of samples, and mush them all up until something feels right. I’m very much a materialist in that way.’ Getting the base materials right is just the start of the design process. And Marino admits that the Graff stores have their own challenges. ‘Well, with diamonds you have a lot of lighting concerns and you have to be really careful with the ambient colours – you need that very cold light when you are looking at diamonds.’ These details matter to Marino because his stores have to somehow match high drama with domesticity. The people who are going to do the consuming at these stores have to feel literally at home.

61

A serious and long-term art collector (and not just fashionable contemporary and conceptual art. He has a world class collection of Baroque and Renaissance bronzes that was shown at The Wallace Collection in London in 2010), Marino has been credited with making quality contemporary art an essential fixture of the luxury retail temple. He often commissions young and established artists to create art specifically for his stores. Every new store is an effort to create a new vision of the perfect home. ‘Every time we do a store, we up the total package; the budget on art, on carpets, on furniture, everything. We have to make it look like the places their clients actually live in, but more beautiful. To make it relaxed and comfortable and appropriate. That isn’t so easy.’

Marino is scathing about what he sees as a tendency in contemporary architecture to pay little attention to where buildings will actually live, their context. Not that he’s down on all contemporary architects. He is a big fan of Herzog & de Meuron, the team behind the Tate Modern conversion. And he is the first to admit that he has a complex relationship with a contemporary star system that recognises those who produce grandstanding public buildings such as Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim in Bilbao, but ignore those who are involved with commerce. In some ways, Marino’s leathers represent an irreverent gesture towards this star system. But while his outfits recognise his outsider status, the quality, success and scale of his work insists that Marino is an architect like no other.


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PRIME TIME The laTesT waTches creaTed by graff’s crafTsmen are aT The pinnacle of boTh Technical experTise and aesTheTic excellence, simon de burton finds phoTography Andy Barter | sTyling Sam Logan

masTergraff diamond minuTe repeaTer Tourbillon Many watch connoisseurs will tell you the ultimate horological complication is the tourbillon, that micro-mechanical marvel in which the escapement is contained within a tiny, revolving cage in order to counteract the effects of gravity; others will choose the minute repeater, that equally admirable creation which enables a watch to sound the hours, quarter hours and minutes on a pair of perfectly tuned gongs. For those who can’t decide between the two, Graff has combined them in the MasterGraff Diamond Minute Repeater Tourbillon which features a mechanical, self-winding movement and a case and dial set with 334 diamonds weighing 30.6cts. Just 10 examples in both rose and white gold will be made. ‘MasterGraff Diamond Minute Repeater Tourbillon’ (Diamonds 30.60cts); Princess cut sapphire cufflinks (Sapphires 7.49cts), all by Graff. Cotton suit and cotton double-cuff shirt, both by Gieves and Hawkes

graff buTTerfly Graff’s master craftsmen could never be accused of lacking in creativity, but it is fair to say that they have excelled themselves in the design of the new Butterfly watch inspired by Graff’s celebrated butterfly motif jewellery collection. The watch features a small, 16mm dial encircled by a ring of butterflies, each formed from four, pear shaped diamonds. Further stones discreetly connect the butterflies while still more decorate the case of the watch, which carries 232 diamonds in all. In addition, the butterflies appear to float above a contrasting base of 78 sapphires, creating an enchanting, three-dimensional effect. ‘Graff Butterfly’ (Diamonds 7.39cts, Sapphires 2.93cts); Round, pear shape and marquise diamond butterfly earrings (Diamonds 6.29cts), all by Graff


Photographer’s assistant Angela Dennis Stylist’s assistants Nathalie Francis, Ianthe Wright Nails Lucie Pickavance Models Nina Taylor and Steve Gee at Hired Hands Retouching Stuart Calder


LadyGraff

(previous paGe) There was a time when it was deemed somewhat unseemly for a lady to need to know the time – a fact that led to the popularity of cocktail watches that appeared to be dazzling jewels rather than timepieces. Graff brings the cocktail watch up to date in this exquisite creation, incorporating 170 diamonds weighing a total of 43 carats. The intricate and cleverly articulated bracelet is made from no fewer than 109 dazzling brilliants in a remarkably time-consuming process which necessitates that there will just 20 examples of the LadyGraff. ‘LadyGraff’ (Diamonds 43cts); Round diamond stud earrings (Diamonds 16.36cts); 11.05ct Emerald cut Vivid Yellow diamond ring with tapered baguette diamond shoulders, all by Graff. ‘Celeste’ crystal martini glass by Ralph Lauren Home

Graffstar sLiM

(previous paGe) Looking equally at home beneath the cuff of a business suit or a tuxedo, the new GraffStar Slim features a delectably thin case which measures just 6.35mm from top to bottom. Crafted in either white or rose gold, the 43mm diameter case contains Graff’s specially designed Calibre 3 self-winding Swiss movement, behind a choice of black or white dials highlighted by the signature Graff emerald at 12 o’clock. Simple dagger hands, gold markers and a premium-quality alligator strap complete the sophisticated understatement. ‘GraffStar Slim’ in rose gold with brown alligator strap; rose gold love knot cufflinks set with round rubies (Rubies 3.96cts); rose gold fountain pen set with a black diamond (Diamonds 1.3cts), all by Graff. Wool suit and cotton double-cuff shirt by Hackett. ‘Dovetail’ paperweight by David Linley. ‘Icon’ notebook by Lanvin at Harrods

GyroGraff The words ‘radical’ and ‘ingenious’ spring to mind on first sight of the new GyroGraff, a manual-winding, double-axis tourbillon wristwatch which incorporates a three-dimensional moon phase indicator in the form of a gyrograph which tracks the waxing and waning of the moon throughout the month. Hand-made in rose gold and engraved to replicate lunar craters, this clever moon-phase forms part of a multi-level dial featuring an intricate guilloche pattern and enhanced by an indicator at 11 o’clock for monitoring the 60-hour power reserve. Waterproof to 3ATM, just 20 examples of this remarkable wristwatch will be available – 10 in rose gold, 10 in white gold. ‘GyroGraff’; white gold love knot cufflinks, all by Graff. Backgammon set by Ralph Lauren Home. Cotton shirt by Dunhill

Graffstar MicropavÉ Here, Graff has taken its elegant 38mm ladies’ watch and enhanced it with a micropavé setting which sees the case and dial almost entirely covered in diamonds. Although the distinctive Graff case shape remains, the GraffStar Micropavé is distinguished from the ‘regular’ 38mm model by hour markers comprised of individual, round emeralds which contrast beautifully with the white crocodile strap and diamond-set dial, behind which is a Swiss-made quartz movement. ‘GraffStar 38mm Micropavé’ (Diamonds 5.70cts); Emerald cut diamond eternity ring (Diamonds 7.85cts); 3.70ct Pear shape Fancy Vivid Blue diamond ring with pear shape diamond shoulders, all by Graff.


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DESERT ROSE From trading ports and homes to pearl Fishers, the Uae and its neighboUrs qatar and oman enjoyed a meteoric rise, thanks to oil wealth. now, while growth continUes apace, the gUlF states have developed as cUltUral centres too, reports Claire MalColM

O

ver the centuries, empirebuilders and invaders – Babylonian, Portuguese, Ottoman, British – have tried and failed to rule the proud, fiercely independent Khaleeji (Gulf) tribes. The entire region was once a hotbed of drama on the high seas (according to legend, Sinbad was born in the Omani city of Sohar), with Muscat in a key strategic position as the gateway to the Strait of Hormuz. The United Arab Emirates (or Trucial States as the area was referred to until 1971 when it ceased to be a British protectorate) also had a reputation for derring-do. In the 21st century, the ‘Pirate Coast’ has replaced offshore skirmishes with commercial risk-taking in the form of a penchant for iconic superstructures, fast cars and tranches of real estate in global gateway cities. The UAE was originally seven independent fiefdoms ruled by local tribal families. The emirate of Dubai was the first to latch onto the potential appeal of the area as a trade hub at the end of the 19th century, when it introduced a tax exemption for foreign traders. But even that was no indication of the warp-speed transformation a century later from a collection of individual sheikhdoms into the slick urban face of the Arabian Gulf. While the UAE is leading the cosmopolitan charge, a number of its neighbours, including Oman

and Qatar, are following suit as they embark on their own ambitious plans for economic diversification. In essence, Abu Dhabi and Dubai in the early 20th century were still sleepy coastal settlements populated by pearl fishers, canny local merchants and traders from India and Iran, as well as farming folk working the date palms. Even then, a taste for luxury was fuelling economic development through the pearling industry. This brutal way of life saw divers, rope haulers and ship captains disappear to offshore pearl banks for up to four months during the harsh summer. From sunrise to sunset, divers in Abu Dhabi, Dubai and Ras Al Khaimah would descend to seven metres – protected by just a nose clip, leather finger covers and sometimes a cotton shift – to fill a palm basket with oysters before being hauled back to the surface and repeating the process. It was a similar scene in Qatar, whose early fortunes were also intrinsically linked to the industry, and which saw it become a regional hub for pearl extraction by the mid-1800s. Gulf pearls were considered some of the world’s finest, and prices peaked in 1917 before being dealt a fatal blow in the Twenties due to the combined fallout of the Wall Street Crash and the invention of the artificial pearl by the Japanese, which effectively killed off the Gulf’s precious trade. The discovery of oil in Bahrain in the Thirties was the catalyst for the region’s multi-phased


transition from dusty desert outpost to an eclectic collection of high-profile destinations vying with one another to attract multinational companies, the tourist dollar and world-leading brands. Bahrain, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait were the first Gulf nations to begin oil production, followed by Qatar in the Forties, while the Trucial States entered the game relatively late, in the mid-Sixties. Oil revenues and a diversified economic base focused on trading and tourism, have helped fast-track the UAE’s development from Middle Eastern backwater to a high-profile, much-hyped international destination for HNWIs and expats representing over 200 nationalities. The gush of black gold into the local economy prompted a tidal wave of development, propelling the seven emirates into the 21st century and, for many, a lifestyle they could never have imagined, brought to life through the combined vision of their respective rulers. Oman had already waved the British farewell in the late Sixties when it declared itself an absolute monarchy, and Qatar became an independent sovereign state in September 1971. Meanwhile, Abu Dhabi’s Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, supported by Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Al Maktoum of Dubai – took the initiative to strengthen the commercial power of the emirates by forming a federation, which gave birth to the

the construction frenzy quickly gained momentum in the nineties and the skylines of the uae’s major cities continue to evolve United Arab Emirates on 2 December, 1971. In less than 75 years a brace of metropolises that even Fritz Lang would be agape at, has risen from the sand and, of late, pursued a roster of international cultural brands – from sporting events through to legends of the art world – to expand its appeal for future generations. In contrast, Oman – and its capital Muscat – has resisted the allure of warp-speed development until recently, preferring to focus on its stunning landscape and low-rise, low-key cityscape that makes it a welcome and relaxed alternative to Abu Dhabi and Dubai. But all that is about to change as the Sultanate pushes ahead with massive infrastructure development plans and unveils its first mixed-use multi-million dollar community and leisure development – The Wave. A love of the high life, and all the trappings of luxury has, nonetheless, been developing over the years – in the UAE at least. In the mid-Eighties, Ali Al Bawardi, owner of the Desert Palm Polo Club, built the region’s first grass polo field. Today,

top 10-goal international players such Adolfo Cambioso can be spotted at winter tournaments, including the Royal Salute UAE Nations Cup. Out on the blue water of the Gulf, blue-chip events such as the annual Dubai International Boat Show, which celebrated its 20th edition in March, reinforce the attraction of the country as a marine hotspot, reporting continued multi-million dollar sales for big ticket yachts in 2011, despite the global situation, and a rebound in demand for marina berthing spots around the Emirates. Retail has been another mainstay of the economy, ever since the UAE’s first shopping destination, the Al Ghurair Centre, opened in 1982. As well as luxury stores, such as Graff’s recent opening in the opulent Burj Al Arab Hotel, there are upscale department stores including Bloomingdale’s, Galeries Lafayette, Saks Fifth Avenue and Harvey Nichols. The sprawling Dubai Mall – the world’s largest shopping, leisure and entertainment destination and home to Graff’s second store in Dubai – recently announced plans to add a further million square feet of retail space, and upmarket malls are under development on both Dubai’s Palm Jumeirah and Yas Island, Abu Dhabi. Over the last 17 years, the UAE’s social and sporting calendar has grown to such an extent that special government departments have been created to manage the burgeoning list of


Getty ImaGes; al NIsr PublIshING/Gulf ImaGes; JodI Cobb/Getty ImaGes

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activities. Both the Dubai Shopping Festival and the Dubai World Cup – the world’s richest horse race, with 60,000 elegantly turned-out spectators and a prize purse on the day of US$35 million – were launched in 1996; and is an annual highlight. Vying for attention, however, is the Etihad Airways Abu Dhabi F1 Grand Prix, which debuted in 2009. Qatar is also eager to cement its own position as a destination of sporting note. Not content with with its 2022 FIFA World Cup coup, Qatar is also reportedly pitching to host the ceremonial first stage of the 2016 Tour de France. Stadia are being developed in sync with the government’s ambitious 15-year infrastructure vision. Fly in to the capital, Doha, and you’ll see a futuristic city blueprint already coming to life, from the 35-square kilometre Lusail district – a mini city in its own right – to fledgling plans for the US$2.7 billion Doha Metro and high-speed rail project. The skylines of the UAE’s major cities also continue to evolve. A phenomenon that began to take off in the late Nineties with the opening of the ‘seven-star’ Burj Al Arab Hotel on Dubai’s then relatively undeveloped beachfront, the construction frenzy quickly gained momentum. In 2005 Abu Dhabi added miles of gold leaf and marble to the hotel mix with the launch of the Emirates Palace. Then came the world’s tallest building Burj Khalifa, which officially opened in early 2010 with a handful

GULF TIMES Today’s skyscraper-lined main thoroughfare of Dubai, Sheikh Zayed Road, previous page; and as it was 40 years ago, viewed from the Trade Centre in 1982, opposite. The Burj Al Arab Hotel towers above older buildings on the Dubai beachfront, top. The new Graff store, above, which opened recently within the seven-star hotel, is one of two Graff stores in Dubai

of other Guinness world records to its credit. The tower houses ultra chic private residences, office space and the world’s highest viewing platform, as well as the coolly understated Armani Hotel Dubai. And the rags-to-riches fairytale story of the region hasn’t yet reached its final conclusion. Government investment and the pursuit of a long-term economic vision are laying out a new blueprint for the Emirates. Abu Dhabi has partnered with the big guns of the art world on its Saadiyat Island Cultural District, which in 2015 will see the first international outpost for France’s Louvre museum, joined by the Guggenheim in 2017. Next door, Doha’s IM Pei-designed Museum of Islamic Art set a cultural benchmark in 2008, and Muscat’s new Royal Opera House is a first for the region. Down the road, Dubai is looking to capitalise on the growing upscale cruise market with expansion of its cruise terminal; and luxury is taking on a new lease of life in the Northern Emirates with destination properties such as Ras Al Khaimah’s ultra-chic conservation reserve, Banyan Tree Al Wadi. These Gulf states have to be admired for their gutsy transformation into some of the world’s most popular locations for work, play or simply curiosity value. Graff can be found at the Burj Al Arab Hotel, the Dubai Mall and at seasonal exhibitions in Doha, Riyadh and Jeddah


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LOTUS BLOSSOM this delicate and stylish collection artfully celebrates the beautiful flower that holds so much significance in eastern culture PhotograPhy Andy Barter | words Joanne Glasbey From ancient times, the beautiful lotus flower has been a divine symbol in the traditions of Asia and has often been used as an example of divine beauty in Hindu iconography. In fact, most deities of Asian religions are depicted seated on a lotus flower, signifying purity of body, speech and mind. In Egyptian history, it was seen as a symbol of the sun, of creation and rebirth, as at night the flower closes and sinks underwater, rising and opening again at dawn. Throughout classical literature, the lotus represents elegance, beauty, perfection, purity and grace, often applied in poems and songs as an allegory for ideal feminine attributes. It is the graceful petals of the lotus flower which have inspired Graff’s new design. The timeless yet contemporary Lotus Collection features exquisite necklaces and earrings, each hand-set by Graff’s master craftsmen with the most perfect diamonds, emeralds, sapphires or rubies, linked together to create a graceful and fluid waterfall-like effect by invisible platinum wires. Evoking the petals of the lotus flower, pear shape, round and marquise gemstone drops radiate a tranquil beauty as every stone is set to catch the light and sparkle with the movement of the wearer – and endow the mystic flower’s qualities of elegance and beauty.


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A GEM OF AN IDEA Graff’s charity facEt offErs Ground-brEakinG, lifE-chanGinG proGrammEs for communitiEs in sub-saharan africa, and has Good causE to cElEbratE somE rEcEnt, siGnificant succEssEs Words Maria Yacoob photoGraphy Micky Hoyle

As Lionel Smit heard the auctioneer call lot number six, his pulse quickened and he felt faint. Smit’s larger than life-sized portrait of a Cape Malay woman, ‘Girl Submerged’, was about to go under the hammer. He looked around at the assembled crowd of South Africa’s most prominent art lovers and philanthropists, and hoped the painting would reach its reserve price. A few minutes later, ‘Girl Submerged’ fetched R190,000 (around $24,500). At four times the reserve bid, it was the highest price ever paid for Smit’s work in South Africa. He was elated. Yet the artist received no money at all from the sale. The painting, along with 14 other works by South Africa’s most collected and esteemed artists, was a donation to Laurence Graff’s charity, the FACET Foundation. The auction was the culmination of a fund-raising evening hosted at the Delaire Graff Estate, in Stellenbosch in the country’s Western Cape, an event that raised R1.4m (around $181,000) for FACET. ‘I was thrilled to take part in the FACET art auction,’ reveals Smit. ‘When art has the power to affect someone’s life, it is very rewarding.’ Smit’s father Anton, also a celebrated artist, donated a bronze, neo-tribal sculpture, ‘African Queen’. ‘FACET is doing fantastic work in South Africa, Lesotho and Botswana,’ he enthuses. ‘Its goals

of upliftment and empowerment are close to my heart. When I was asked to donate work to the auction, I immediately said yes.’ The money raised by the auction will go directly to FACET’s latest project in the Cape Winelands. There are many impoverished children in the region who are further disadvantaged and vulnerable due to alcohol. A shocking 12 per cent suffer from Foetal Alcohol Syndrome. FACET, in partnership with local charity The Pebbles Project, will build a Graff Leadership Centre in the Winelands. The building will provide a home for new projects and initiatives. Some of these will offer support and training to local children; others will establish after-school provision for the older children living in the region. The ways in which programmes at Graff Leadership Centres can change lives is known only too well by Mmoloki Segobaetso, a 22-yearold from Botswana. The young man dreamed of becoming a nurse, but, as a school drop-out, had little means or hope of achieving this. But then he had a chance introduction to the charity Stepping Stones International, FACET’s partner in Botswana, at a Youth Against HIV/AIDS event in the town of Mochudi. This led to an invitation for him to join the FACET-funded Finding the Leader Within programme, based at Mochudi’s Graff Leadership Centre, which opened last October.


bright future Mmoloki Segobaetso at work in Botswana’s Mochudi hospital, right. Children at the opening of the Graff Leadership Centre in Botswana, far right. Painting by Lionel Smit, bottom left, and sculpture by Gerhard Deetlefs, bottom right, at the FACET Foundation’s art auction. The new Graff Leadership Centre in Mochudi, opposite ‘I couldn’t wait to start,’ recalls Mmoloki. ‘My hard work paid off. I was offered a leadership position as a peer mentor and assisted with tutoring orphaned and vulnerable youth in the in-school programme. The income I earned from this enabled me to register to rewrite my school examinations.’ Soon after, he started his own initiative, the Kick Poverty Charitable Group, collecting second-hand clothes, food and other materials for those most in need. Through his participation in the programme Mmoloki was offered an internship and then a job at the city’s hospital. ‘My participation in the programme has opened doors I didn’t think possible at my young age,’ he says. ‘I’m proud to be working as a phlebotomist with the University of Botswana Research Department on a National Malaria Survey. It is my goal to have received an offer of admission to the University of Botswana nursing programme by the end of the year. Then I can contribute to saving lives, helping the sick, and bringing new lives into this world.’ Mmoloki was one of 67 students to enrol in the first year-long course at the Mochudi Graff Leadership Centre. Of those, five have already found jobs. These initial successes in Botswana are exciting news. The first Graff Leadership Centre in Lesotho has now completed its third annual Youth Development Leadership campaign, run by local charity Help Lesotho. For the 30 young men and women on this three-month programme, issues to do with gender, relationships and HIV came to the forefront. These subjects are not discussed openly in Basotho culture. Talking about them, and challenging culturally accepted beliefs, led to some revelations among the participants. One man who thought it was his duty to beat his wife when she disobeyed him later admitted he was wrong. A young woman began to understand how her sexual behaviour was putting her own health and life at risk. Another man with suicidal thoughts came to realise he was a worthwhile person. In a country where employment opportunities are scarce, and poverty and HIV/AIDS are widespread, the support and life skills offered by the leadership training have a significant impact. While Graff works with the most beautiful diamonds in the world, FACET is concerned with mining diamonds of a different type – the raw talent of South Africa, Lesotho and Botswana, which, with the charity’s help, can shine, too. www.facet-foundation.org


A WORD WITH… CEO Of graff luxury watChEs MIChEl PIttElOuD describes to JAMes GUrNeY the iNcredible crAftsMANship ANd techNicAl chAlleNGes behiNd the eYecAtchiNG beAUtY of the New MAsterGrAff skeletoN AUtoMAtic

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raff’s entry into the world of haute horlogerie has been swift and distinctive. In 2008, Michel Pitteloud, then a consultant with over 30 years experience in the watch and jewellery industry, approached Laurence Graff, who asked him to develop a comprehensive watch collection. As the project completed its first year, Michel was named CEO of Graff Luxury Watches, and he continues to seek technical perfection and astonishing attention to detail. At this year’s BaselWorld he revealed the latest chapter in Graff’s adventure in haute horlogerie and explained some of the details involved. Michel describes the MasterGraff Skeleton Automatic as ‘a piece of jewellery. It’s a marriage between extremely difficult diamond work and a movement which is a premiere mondial. Skeleton watches like this we have already produced and sold. But if you turn the skeleton automatic upside down you will see the oscillating weight, which is in platinum and set on both sides – this has never existed. It’s like a balance is floating in nowhere, in the water or the air.’ The MasterGraff Skeleton Automatic floats and sparkles because light flashes through the movement, thanks largely to the transparent sapphire bridges on which the 150 movement components (and rotor) are suspended. This is something that is seen only rarely in watches and is incredibly costly. The hardness of sapphire means that specialist tools and even more specialist expertise are needed to machine the bridges, many of which have to be discarded during the manufacturing process – even the slightest crack around a drilling hole means rejection.

The same obsession with technical perfection applies to the way the diamonds are set into the case. As Michel details, the numbers are extraordinary: ‘We had to cut down 75 carats of diamond to reach the 22 that you have on the final watch. Imagine! And the 24 stones on top of the bezel are all certified and obviously of the highest quality. And another feature, something that is stunning, is the number of different cuts. There are 200 stones but 110 different cuts meaning that any second stone is always different from its neighbour. First of all you have to design the stones to fit in this watch. Second, you have to find the stone which is the closest match (but they are never exactly so).’ Then the stone is cut according to the space and finally set. Even then, he says, ‘It is always possible that the stone is not perfect within our tolerance (which is about 10 microns) and has


skeleton key Responding to a challenge from a client to create an impossible watch where ‘you could see sideways through the diamonds to the movement’, Graff’s master craftsmen created the MasterGraff Skeleton Automatic, where every surface is set with diamonds to create a similar effect

‘we asked our designers how we could make a special watch even more so’ to be recut. Finding the right stones is difficult. For the small stones, you can probably find stones on the market that you recut. For the large stones, such as the 9mm top stone it is harder. If the stone was square it would be a two carat emerald cut. Then you cut away the parts and you redo the faceting in the back, this is why you lose so much because it ends up as a 0.80 carat.’ Remember also that the stones have to shine from every one of over 7,000 facets without any dull spots. Although the hard work of designing the precise geometry of the setting has already been done (for the MasterGraff Diamond Tourbillon) and can, in principle, be repeated, each stone is a unique challenge in terms of cutting. ‘One of the new challenges for this watch was the width of the rotor. If you set on both sides, the stones have to be separated, otherwise it would be too thick.’ This, Michel proudly declares, ‘is knowledge we have developed in-house – no other house can match this.’ The watch only really came about by chance, by curiosity – the best sort of way, Michel recalls. ‘A client asked me, “What if you did a watch where you could see through the diamonds sideways, to the movement?” This is impossible, because you never see through a diamond, unless it is flat and has no reflection. But then I said yes, what we could do is set all of the surfaces, up, down, sideways, the lugs and everything… the idea is that this would be a huge diamond and the lugs are the claws to hold the diamond.’

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The Skeleton is not the only story for Graff watches. The GyroGraff is another world first (see p66). The watch is a double-axis tourbillon with a threedimensional moonphase in gold. Though both rare, neither complication is unique in itself. This, however, is the first watch to combine both ideas. ‘Making a premiere mondial is important to Graff; it shows our capacity to make things like this. It shows the position of our brand that we are able to do extremely complicated watches. The idea came from asking our watch designers how we could make a special watch even more so. One nice touch is that the tourbillon has a beautiful counter-weight you can see as it turns. And, although the movement is quite tall, the watch is not too big and the tourbillon comes so close to the glass.’

Graff clients expect something exceptional, and the movements in Graff watches – including the MasterGraff Double Tourbillon GMT and the MasterGraff Diamond Minute Repeater (see p62) – deliver beyond all expectations. ‘The MasterGraff Double Tourbillon GMT has two separate movements, which means you can set them totally differently, so in some time zones where you have a half an hour difference you could show that,’ Michel explains. The MasterGraff Diamond Minute Repeater sounds with an astonishingly clear tone, another example of what happens when remarkable technical achievements, great horological tradition, and beautiful, innovative design are in perfect harmony – and when the Graff insistence on perfection is thrown in for good measure.


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GRAFF stoRes woRldwide EUROPE UK London UK Flagship store 6–8 New Bond Street London W1S 3SJ Tel: +44 20 7584 8571 11 Sloane Street London SW1X 9LE Tel: +44 20 7201 4120 Monaco Monte carlo Hôtel de Paris Place du Casino Monte Carlo 98000 Tel: +377 97 70 43 10 Visit the Graff Rare Jewels Exhibition at the Hôtel de Paris from 20 July to 19 August

rUSSia Moscow Tretiakovsky Proezd, 6 109012 Moscow Tel: +7 495 933 3385

Palm Beach 221 Worth Avenue Palm Beach Florida 33480 Tel: +1 561 355 9292

Luxury Village Barvikha 143083 Moscow Tel: +7 495 933 3385

San Francisco 237 Post Street San Francisco California 94108 Tel: +1 415 926 7000

TSUM department store 2 ul. Petrovka 125009 Moscow Tel: +7 495 933 3399 UKraine Kiev 12/2/3 Gorodetskogo Street 01001 Kiev Tel: +38 044 278 7557

NORTH AMERICA

France courchevel Rue du Rocher 73120 Courchevel 1850 Tel: +33 479 24 59 12

new York 710 Madison Avenue New York New York 10065 Tel: +1 212 355 9292

Also at: Hôtel Les Airelles Chalet de Pierres Hôtel Palace des Neiges Tel: +33 680 86 20 39

Bal Harbour 9700 Collins Avenue Bal Harbour Florida 33154 Tel: +1 305 993 1212

SwitzerLand Geneva 29 Rue du Rhône 1204 Geneva Tel: +41 22 819 6060

chicago 103 East Oak Street Chicago Illinois 60611 Tel: +1 312 604 1000

Gstaad Grand Hotel Park 29 Wispilenstrasse CH 3780 Gstaad Tel: +41 22 819 6060

Las Vegas Wynn Las Vegas 3131 Las Vegas Blvd South Las Vegas Nevada 89109 Tel: +1 702 940 1000

in selected SaKS stores: SAKS 5th Avenue, New York Beverly Hills, California Naples, Florida Tyson’s Corner, Virginia

AFRICA SoUtH aFrica Stellenbosch Delaire Graff Estate Helshoogte Pass Banhoek Valley Stellenbosch 7600 Tel: +27 021 885 8160

THE MIDDLE EAST dUBai The Burj Al Arab Dubai Tel: +9714 330 7717 The Dubai Mall Dubai Tel: +9714 339 9795

ASIA cHina Beijing The Peninsula Beijing 8 Goldfish Lane Wangfujing Beijing 100006 Tel: +86 10 6513 6690 Hong Kong The Peninsula Hong Kong Salisbury Road Kowloon Hong Kong SAR Tel: +852 2735 7666 Shanghai The Peninsula Shanghai Shop L1 O 32 Zhongshan Dong Yi Road The Bund Shanghai 200002 Tel: +86 21 6321 6660 JaPan tokyo The Peninsula Tokyo 1-8-1 Yurakucho Chiyoda-ku Tokyo 100-0006 Tel: +81 3 6267 0811 taiwan taipei The Grand Formosa Regent Taipei 2nd Floor 41 Chung Shan North Road Section 2 Taipei Tel: +886 2511 5865

OPENING SOON Hubin Mall, Hangzhou, China Wynn Macau, China Ritz-Carlton, Hong Kong, China IFC Pudong, Shanghai, China Isetan, Tokyo, Japan

GRAFF, CHINA The new Graff store will open at the hubin mall in hangzhou later this year


DESIGN

AuctIoN 15 JuNE 2012 NEW YoRK

EmilE-JACQuEs ruhlmANN Pair of ‘Gonse’ armchairs, circa 1930–32 Sold for $1,426,500 New York, December 2011 Sale enquiries Alexander Payne apayne@phillispdepury.com +1 212 940 1200 Phillips de Pury & Company 450 Park Avenue New York 10022 Enquiries +44 20 7318 4010 Catalogues +44 20 7318 4039 / +1 212 940 1240 PhilliPsdEPury.Com


coNtEMPoRARY ARt

EvENING AuctIoN 28 JuNE 2012 | DAY AuctIoN 29 JuNE 2012 LoNDoN

ANdy WArhol Princess Diana, 1982 Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas. 127 x 107 cm (50 x 46 in) Estimate £900,000 – 1,200,000 Sale enquiries Peter Sumner psumner@phillispdepury.com +44 207318 4010 Phillips de Pury & Company Howick Place London SW1P 1BB Enquiries +44 20 7318 4010 Catalogues +44 20 7318 4039 / +1 212 940 1240 PhilliPsdEPury.Com

Graffiti Magazine SS12  

Magazine for Graff Diamonds