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Experience Emanuel Timber’s

Economic Impact

Shot Strange A

True

Southern Gentleman

ARTS & CULTURE | TALK OF THE TOWN | PROFILES

Fall 2018

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Fall 2018

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Whitney Farmer, Owner 119 Roger Shaw Street • Swainsboro, GA 30401 • 478-268-4762


ABOUT THE COVER Emanuel County is thriving - and the main reason is its people! On the cover are graduates of Leadership Emanuel, a program designed to bring together current and future leaders of our community who share valuable insight and gain information to be better prepared to ensure our continued success. Tiffany Thomas, Rocky Davis, Gail Ware, Dr. Willie Gibson, Eliza Noles, and Chris Stanford are standing downtown with the “Boneyard” behind them, a project spearheaded by past Leadership Emanuel graduates. Photography by Mark Williams Studio.

TABLE OF

CONTENTS FEATURES 9

TIMBER – EMANUEL COUNTY’S ECONOMIC DRIVER

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A UNIVERSAL WOMAN

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Timber plays a key role in the development and economy of Emanuel County.

From being the best in her profession, having a loving family, giving tirelessly to her community, and being a leader in all aspects of life, Kathy Palmer comes mighty close to being a “universal woman”.

EAST GEORGIA HEALTHCARE CENTER—QUALITY HEALTHCARE FOR 25 YEARS EGHS may be the region’s best kept secret for the past 25 years.

26 THE HISTORIC DIXIE THEATRE RISES AGAIN

The restored Historic Dixie Theatre will include offices for the Emanuel Arts Council, educational space, public event space, and an art gallery upon its completion.

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SHOWCASING YOUR COMMUNITY’S PERSONALITY

41 CRIDER FOODS—MARKET LEADER, HUMBLE BEGINNINGS

Products from Stillmore’s family owned business take flight across the globe.

46 DANNY WAYNE FAIRCLOTH HARD WORK PAYS OFF

Danny Faircloth and his family know no other way to success but through hard work and determination.

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SHOT STRANGE—A TRUE SOUTHERN GENTLEMAN

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EXPERIENCE EMANUEL

Though the humble gentleman can be shy in sharing some of his personal contributions to the community, those close to Shot Strange are happy to point out his generosity.

Offering a few of the best spots to visit in Emanuel County, a community rich in history and “roads less traveled.”


THE

KWIK SHOP of

SWAINSBORO

YOUR CONVENIENT ONE STOP SHOP SINCE 2009

There are a lot of reasons to visit The Kwik Shop:

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FOR BREAKFAST

Only the finest meats for your bread, biscuit, or grits! Add some cheese or throw on an egg for the finest breakfast experience in town. Sausage, Bacon, Chicken, Pork Chops or Ham on Sandwiches, Breakfast Platters and Breakfast Bowls. Then plan to stop by for lunch!

FOR EATING LUNCH

Lighter appetites opt for a hamburger or hot dog, but other meal options include Clubs, Philly Cheesesteaks, Chicken Sandwiches or Chicken Fingers. Add on fries, tots, onion rings or a side salad to make it a meal. Call for our daily lunch specials.

FOR FIREARMS OR AMMUNITION

We stock the finest firearms on the market, and can get almost anything within a couple of days. Special orders are no problem. Check out our website www.thekwikshop.com for up to the minute prices and availability. Rifles, Shotguns, Pistols, Optics, Ammunition, and Suppressors.

FOR FISHING

We stock a variety of tackle to meet your fishing needs including a wide selection of lures. Live bait such as crickets and worms are available year-round with seasonal availability for minnows and shiners. If you need a new rod or reel, we have several to choose from and can special order whatever you are looking for.

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FOR CANDY

We have the coolest candy aisle in town. A wide selection of chewing gum, chocolates, sweets or sours. If you have a sweet tooth, stop by and check out the selection.

FOR FUELING YOUR RIDE GAS AND DIESEL

Our Gas is all Ethanol Free. Our Diesel is exceptional. Branded Pure and provided by a local distributor; rest assured your engines, large and small, will like our gas best!

But the best reason of all……

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FOR THE EXPERIENCE CUSTOMER SERVICE

We strive for the best customer service experience around. When you shop at the Kwik Shop, you’re family and a friend. Hang out if you’d like, but if you’re in a hurry we’ll get you out quick!

{

THE KWIK SHOP 351 East Main Street Swainsboro, Georgia 30401

(478) 237-7596

www.thekwikshop.com kwikshop20@gmail.com

}


PROFILES 62

DIXIE YOUTH BASEBALL

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DOT FAGLER

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For over 50 years, Dot Fagler has led the Pink Ladies, Sunshine Volunteers, and EMC volunteers.

69 VISION 2020—HOPE FOR A FUTURE GENERATION

Started in 2015, the Vision 2020 program has seen over 100 young people participate with a 100 percent graduation rate among those finishing the program.

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EAST GEORGIA STATE COLLEGE

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CANDACE & KIDS SOAP COMPANY

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DESSE DAVIS - A ROLE MODEL FOR GIVING BACK AND INSPIRING OTHERS

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The AAA All-star team advanced to the Dixie Youth World Series this season for the second consecutive year, and the AA All-star team advanced to the World Series as well.

EGSC offers students affordable access to higher education and the opportunity to achieve their academic goals with minimum delay and expense.

Goat soap is a down-home cottage-business product of Candace & Kids Soap Co. in Swainsboro. Satisfied customers from coast-to- coast will testify to its many benefits.

Whether working in his church, tending to his farm, or speaking to young people in the community, Desse still works hard at whatever he does in an attempt to give back and inspire others.

ART & CULTURE 33

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ART & CULTURE

Art and culture abound in Emanuel County! From portrait painters Marielle Singletary and Twin City Mayor Eileen Dudley; author and jewelry designer Roseann Ettinger; and Alan Brasher who revisits the 1966 Battle of the Bands.

TALK OF THE TOWN 81

SHOWCASING YOUR COMMUNITY’S PERSONALITY

TALK OF THE TOWN

Showcasing Emanuel County’s People, Places, and Events.


EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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FROM THE PUBLISHER Editors and Publishers : John F. Riddle & Connie K. Riddle Showcase Publications, Inc. Content Manager: Candice McKinley Cover Photography: Mark Williams Studio Contributing Writers: Lynn Brinson, Candice McKinley, John Riddle, Connie Riddle, Nicole Davis, Derby Waters, Alan Brasher, Ken Warnock, Eliza Noles, Jacquie Brasher, Deanna Ryan

Eliza Noles, Daisy Reeves, and Connie Riddle at the annual Green Jacket Dinner

Welcome to the inaugural issue of Emanuel County Living! We truly enjoy the communities where we publish magazines, and Emanuel County is no exception. We fell in love with the strong sense of community, the energy that radiates from volunteers, the strong appreciation of history and heritage, and the passion to make Emanuel County the best it can be! There are so many wonderful stories to share about Emanuel County and the people who make it “the place to grow”. We can’t publish them all in one issue, but, we encourage you to take the time to read the ones in this issue. And, look forward to many more in future issues. A special thank you to the writers and photographers who have been such a vital part of putting together the inaugural issue of the magazine. We want to give a special thank you to the advertisers that make Emanuel County Living possible. We encourage you to visit these businesses and buy local. Emanuel County Living will be an annual publication that will showcase all the great aspects of the community. We are proud to partner with the Chamber of Commerce to bring you this inaugural issue and we look forward to many more to come.

Sincerely,

John & Connie Riddle

info@showcasepublicationsga.com

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SHOWCASING YOUR COMMUNITY’S PERSONALITY

Contributing Photographers: Mark Williams Studio Gambrell Photography Cal Avery John Riddle Chamber of Commerce Frank Ordonez Designers: Stacey Nichols, Russ Hutto, Robin Harrison

Emanuel County Living is published annually by Showcase Publications, Inc. For information on advertising, submitting articles, or to subscribe: (912)-559-2045 – P.O. Box 391 Jesup, GA 31598 info@showcasepublicationsga.com Subscription rates in the U.S. are $14.00 annually. showcasepublicationsga.com All rights reserved. Copies or reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is strictly prohibited without expressed written authorization from the publisher. Every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained herein. Advertising is subject to omission, errors and other changes without notice. The opinions expressed by the writers are not necessarily those of the publisher. Other magazines published by Showcase Publications: Jeff Davis Living • Okefenokee Living Valdosta Magazine• Wayne County Magazine• Traditions Highway Magazine & Travel Guide • Brooks County Living• Mitchell County Living


QUALITY CARE, CLOSE TO HOME.

478-289-1100

117 Kite Road • Swainsboro, GA 30401 emanuelmedical.org

EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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START HERE. GO FAR. For more than 50 years, Interfor has been making quality lumber products, providing meaningful and safe jobs for employees, and supporting communities. Our Swainsboro Division is one of Georgia's top lumber mills. Interfor invests in our people. We help bring out the best in all our employees by offeringlongterm, competitive jobs supported by training, education, and great benefi ts. Our employees work with the latest technologies in clean, safe and modern mills alongside people who care about their success. Interfor is one of the largest, most diverse lumber companies in the world and we’re growing in exciting directions. Come be a part of our success.

For more information, visit interfor.com/careers

INTERFOR AT A GLANCE 50+ 50 + YEARS YEARS SERVING SERVING GLOBAL GLOBAL MARKETS

MARKETS

3,100 3,100

EMPLOYEES EMPLOYEES USA: 1900+

USA: 1900+ CANADA: 1100+ CANADA: 1100+

18 18 MILLS MILLS

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DISTINCT MANUFACTURING REGIONS BC INTERIOR BC COAST US NORTHWEST US SOUTH

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SHOWCASING YOUR COMMUNITY’S PERSONALITY


Timber

Then and Now Plays a key role in the development and economy of Emanuel County

B

S T O R Y B Y D E R B Y WAT E R S

efore the people, there was the land. And the land was covered with vast forests of majestic longleaf pine trees. And it was the pine trees that provided the material for the earliest houses and barns in Emanuel County. And from those earliest days down to today, the vast wealth of timber has been an essential part of the growth and development of Emanuel County. As the Creek Indians were removed from the area in 1773 and again in 1783, their lands were acquired by white settlers in a land lottery. Soon the pine lands provided not only lumber

for buildings but became an integral part of the economy for those who lived here. Some accounts say the timber was harvested and sent to the port at Savannah. Other writings indicate that most of the pines were sent to the Ogeechee and Altamaha rivers and down to Darien for the export market in Europe. “Forest-related industries soon joined agriculture as an economic mainstay, with the longleaf pine forests providing raw material for sawmills, turpentine stills and cabinetmakers,� notes the New Georgia Encyclopedia in a section on Emanuel County. The importance of the timber industry, and, in EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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F. Bennett Whitfield, a multiple generational farmer with over 20 years-experience in containerized pine seedlings and nearly 40 years of row crop farming.

It All Starts Here… Whitfield Nursery – Leader in Longleaf Pine Seedlings

Emanuel County is well-known for its majestic pines that grace the more than 300,000 acres of timberland in its borders. But, it is also known as being home of the largest growers of containerized Longleaf pine seedlings in the Southeast. Whitfield Farms & Nursery in Twin City boasts a 20-year record of experience growing containerized pines with a state-of-the-art growing process with a consistently high survival rate of their trees. Their seed is sourced from established pine forests allowing them to produce top quality seedlings. Whitfield Nursery has developed a deeper tray (six-feet fiveinches deep) that they say, “…give our seedlings a better head start.” Also, “…gives the seedlings more room to grow…and develop larger root systems and collar diameters,” giving the seedlings a much better survival rate compared to those with shorter plugs.

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SHOWCASING YOUR COMMUNITY’S PERSONALITY

particular, the pine tree in those early years was pointed out by Bill Rogers Sr. in Emanuel Memories 1776-1976. “To follow the history of the mills is to follow Emanuel County’s early history,” he wrote of the number of gristmills and sawmills. The names of those mills reflect the families involved in the timber industry back then, with some mills remaining to this day. Ellison & Coleman Lumber Company at Roundtree was perhaps the largest and best known. James A. “Tobe” Coleman returned from the civil war to begin that enterprise with James Elison. Coleman’s sons, James, Jr. and Randolph, continued the business, cutting trees with axes and floating the timber 190 miles down the Ogeechee River and to the port at Darien. Other early sawmills include Garbutt’s Mill near Summertown, George M. Brinson’s operation at Stillmore, Garbutt’s Mill at Oak Park, E. A. “Sherman” Edenfield near Nunez, Capt. James’ Mill at Adrian and Steven’s Mill near Coleman’s Lake. In fact, in many other areas of the county, almost anywhere there was a creek with sufficient flow to turn a water wheel, there was another mill of one kind or another. Rogers noted that it was the importance of timber that led to the earliest introduction of the railroad in the county. It was to serve a lumber operation, he recalled, that led to the Central of Georgia being developed near Midville around 1840. The harvested timber that had been moved by water began to be transported by rail, and more rail lines were laid across the county. The role of the timber industry in the early settlement of Emanuel County was pointed out in Emanuel County Georgia History from: The Story of Georgia and the Georgia People 1732 to 1860


by George Gillman Smith, which was originally published around 1901. “There was much about Emanuel County and all these pine-barren counties to attract men of small property who loved a free and independent life. The first settlers were mainly cattleranchers. In the latter days they were timber-ranchers, sending their fine timber to the Savannah market. They spent the summer in harvesting logs for their rafts, and in the winter floated them to the Ogeechee Canal and to Savannah. They had few wants, and the money they received for their timber was, much of it, laid aside for future use…The railroads penetrated the county in search of timber for the mills, and the turpentine farmer leased the land and bled the trees and set up his (turpentine) still.” All those early sawmills and turpentine stills provided the jobs that attracted early settlers to the county and contributed not only to the local economy but to the national wealth as well. In fact, it was the small turpentine farmer that contributed to the flow of Georgia turpentine, which was preferred over that of Europe, that led to Georgia becoming the world’s leading producer of naval store by the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Today, timber from Emanuel County provides a steady supply for the lumber market and paper and cellulose mills across the area. Pine straw had added another product from the pine forests. The importance of timber today is reflected in the fact that the number of acres of forestland in Georgia continues to increase. Approximately 69 percent of Emanuel County is covered in forests, comprising more than 300,000 acres grown strictly for timber. And, Emanuel ranks third in the state for timber production.

Photo by Frank Ordonez

A Time for Harvest

While there isn’t anything much more beautiful than a mature stand of pines, harvest must come. When it does, environmentally safe methods must be used to ensure success of reforestation that allows the cycle to repeat again and again. Perhaps no one in Emanuel County is more familiar with sustainable forestry methods and best management practices than H.G. Yeomans. With deep roots in the forestry industry, Yeomans, who has “…been around pulpwood trucks all my life,” helped his Dad run a farm and pulpwood company before starting a full-time timber business in the early 1970’s with his Father. His son, Russ Yeomans, now runs the company. Sustainability is a hallmark of their success. Part of their mission is, “to procure quality forest products in an environmentally safe and cost-effective manner, while adhering to all sustainable forestry initiatives and best management practices.” Harvesting more than 1.25 million tons annually, Yeomans Wood and Timber is part of an industry that is second among Georgia’s leading manufacturing employers with over 144,000 direct and indirect jobs from the forest industry, according to the Georgia Forestry Association. Yeomans has served on the board of both the Georgia Forestry Association and the Georgia Forestry Commission.

The Finished Product Known as the strongest, most versatile species of wood, Southern Pine products are some of the most widely sought-after wood products. Two of Emanuel’s leading companies producing these products are Interfor and LJR Forest Products. Interfor employs over 150 people with an annual payroll of $11.4 million and produces lumber used nationally and internationally in the construction industry. LJR Forest Products owns and operates a pellet plant capable of producing 3,000 tons of pellets weekly, which brings international clientele to Swainsboro to purchase pellets used predominantly in Europe.. Emanuel County is part of the epi-center in Georgia for developing pine products used around the world.

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THE INTERFOR WAY: Investing in People to Become One of the World's Largest Lumber Companies STORY BY JOHN RIDDLE | PHOTOGRAPHY SUPPLIED BY INTERFOR

Interfor is the largest producer of southern yellow pine in Georgia and has emerged as one of the world's largest lumber companies.

I Intefor seeks to offer long-term, competitive jobs supported by training, education, and great benefits. Their maintenance apprenticeship program is a three-year program where they train current employees while they are on the job to become US Department of Labor Certified Millwrights/Journeymen. (Jeremy Rogers, apprentice, (left) with his mentor, Johnny “Brad” Williams.)

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SHOWCASING YOUR COMMUNITY’S PERSONALITY

f you ask Steve Metz, Interfor’s Mill Manager, to explain Interfor, he'll tell you "we take round logs and make rectangular things out of them." Wood comes in and is processed through the sawmill which makes raw boards. It is then dried in kilns, finished in the planer mill, and then shipped on truck and rail to wholesale customers. In fact, Interfor is the largest producer of southern yellow pine in Georgia and has emerged as one of the world's largest lumber companies. Since 2013, Interfor has grown and expanded – primarily in the Southern United States. They have nine mills in Georgia, South Carolina, and Arkansas, with their regional headquarters in Peachtree City, and nearly 1400 employees across the region. In Swainsboro, they have 150 employees with an annual payroll of $11.4 million. But, Steve also knows better than anyone, that there is much


more to the story. Interfor is about people. Investing in those people and helping them realize their dreams while making "rectangular things out of round logs," is the "Interfor way." "Our story is about people. We want people to have careers, not just jobs," Metz says. He is very people driven. "When we hire new folks, I spend a couple of hours talking about our Core Values. As you live our values, you show you have the potential to grow into new opportunities. Without people, we're just a pile of steel." Keeping their people safe is a top priority and one of their Core Values. Proper training is an essential aspect of that. They have a robust training and awareness program, which includes sending employees to other plants and bringing in instructors, trying to ensure that people have the knowledge and tools and understand their responsibility to manage their safety. "We want everyone to go home every day as well as when they came to work," Steve emphasizes. Another core value is community involvement. That is one area where employees can show they have adopted the "Interfor Way." A group of employees go out into the community and participate in activities through their partnerships with community groups. Donations include blankets to local nursing homes, Christmas gifts to needy families, and contributions of food for the hungry. Steve also takes great pride in being a part of Nunez, where they are located, making donations to the local volunteer fire department which services them. They also support local merchants like Hooks Grocery which supplies many of their meal functions – sometimes feeding as many as 150 for safety celebrations. Perhaps one of the things that Steve has been most impressed with in the community is the Pine Tree Festival. “The first time I went to the Pine Tree Festival parade I was blown away. The way the community comes out is amazing.” Interfor participates every year with a float built by their employees. Steve has even been one of the "Pinetree Sitters," community leaders who sit for 24 hours in the "tree house" set up in the boneyard for 30 days leading up to the festival. "We feel like we're part of the community and the community is part of us." So, yes, Interfor "takes round logs and makes rectangular things out of them." But, they're not "your grandfather's sawmill." Recently, Interfor announced a $305 million capital investment plan to grow their southern yellow pine production. Some of the first investments from that plan were made in the Swainsboro sawmill. “At Interfor, we are working with the industry’s latest technology. Our modern mills are clean and safe; they set the foundation for continued strategic growth and success,” Steve explained. Couple that with their people-driven focus to offer longterm, competitive jobs supported by training and education. For example, Interfor’s Millwright Apprenticeship Program, a three-year program where they train current employees on-the-job to become US Department of Labor Certified Millwrights/Journeymen. It’s easy to conclude that Interfor’s future has never looked brighter. And that’s a good thing for Swainsboro.

“OUR STORY IS ABOUT PEOPLE. WE WANT PEOPLE TO HAVE CAREERS, NOT JUST JOBS.” - STEVE METZ, MILL MANAGER

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Since 1900, The Citizens Bank of Swainsboro has provided quality banking services to the citizens of Swainsboro and Emanuel County. We’ve stood the test of time.

The bank has occupied three locations since being chartered in 1900, and is the oldest financial institution in Emanuel County. We now have banking offices in Dublin and Statesboro to serve our growing customer base. At The Citizens Bank of Swainsboro our “Prime Interest” is you. 

121 North Main Street • Swainsboro, GA 30401 14

SHOWCASING YOUR COMMUNITY’S PERSONALITY

(478) 237-7001 • cbs-lc.com


A UNIVERSAL Woman

Chief Superior Court Judge Kathy Palmer PHOTO BY JOHN RIDDLE | STORY BY CONNIE RIDDLE

“I long to accomplish a great and noble task, but it is my chief duty to accomplish small tasks as if they were great and noble.” - Helen Keller

T

his quote by Helen Keller is not only one of Kathy Palmer’s favorites – it’s one she lives by. She seems to have never met a task that she didn’t attack as if it were “great and noble.” Combine that commitment with her many talents, diverse interests, and leadership abilities and you come pretty close to the definition of a “universal woman.” Once you read the list of Kathy’s professional

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“Kathy is certainly the lady you want in your corner. She puts her heart and soul into all she does from being the best judge possible, to preparing delicious meals at the church, to creating decadent desserts for local fundraising events, to working at the local thrift shop and most importantly to being a tremendous positive influence on our area young people through her lifetime work with 4-H and her service as a mentor.”

At the annual Sunshine House Auction, Kathy personally bakes each dessert for over 200 people that includes cakes, pies, cheesecakes, and old-fashion banana pudding.

-Jennie Wren Denmark accomplishments and numerous honors, you will be amazed! However, after talking with Kathy for just a short while, it becomes apparent that she was taught the value of hard work and the importance of not only of achieving but surpassing all goals…all with a big dose of humility. Born and raised in Johnson County, Kathy was one of four girls. Her father was a factory worker, but they also ran a family farm that grew tobacco and row crops. Growing up on the farm, Kathy had instilled in her at an early age the importance of a strong work ethic. “You worked, there were no excuses,” she explained. Even at a young age her diverse interests began to show. She developed a love of baking at the age of nine. She was an avid 4-H’er and even won the Southeast 4-H Chocolate Chip Cookie baking contest in the 6th grade. She went on to become a Master 4-H’er. But, she was also an excellent basketball player. One of the more unique influences in her life was from her exposure to the core values of the Dale Carnegie course: “teach people to master the communication skills necessary to strengthen interpersonal relationships; develop a commanding attitude; instill confidence and enthusiasm in the workplace; and how to win friends and influence people.” Her dad attended the courses and brought home the materials, taught them to her, and had her read them. Kathy must have paid close attention, because she has applied those lessons throughout her life. After graduation, Kathy attended the University of Georgia, as her sisters had done. While she majored in Home Economics

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SHOWCASING YOUR COMMUNITY’S PERSONALITY

following the path of one of her sisters, she set her own course by surprising her parents and eloping the summer after her freshman year to her high school sweetheart, Danny Palmer. Danny and Kathy supported themselves financially. She did her part by holding various jobs including being a campus cop and working in the registrar’s office. The added responsibility of being married and helping support them didn’t deter her. She graduated Magna Cum Laude from UGA in 1976 with a degree in Home Economics. But, what’s even more impressive is her decision to pursue her life-long dream of becoming a lawyer. She wrote an essay for law school admittance on the need for family law attorneys and became the first Home Economics major ever admitted into the UGA School of Law. In 1987, Kathy and Danny moved to Swainsboro with their two boys, Kirk and Kyle. Kathy practiced family law and criminal defense. As if practicing law, being married, raising two boys and volunteering in the community was not enough, Kathy decided to run for Superior Court Judge in 2000 against a sitting District Attorney who had been in that position for 18 years. But, Kathy “ran to win” and win she did…against all odds and those in her profession who thought it was not possible. As Superior Court Judge, Kathy was elected by her fellow judges to serve as Administrative Judge of the 8th Administrative District. As the Administrative Judge, she represented all the Superior Court Judges of the 8th District on the Judicial Council of Georgia. Later, she was elected a state officer for the Council of Superior Court


Professional & Civic Achievements

Kathy has been married to Robert Daniel “Danny” Palmer for 47 years and they have two sons Kyle (pictured) and Kirk. They love spending time with their two grandsons, Braxton, age 3, and Rhett, age 1.

• Donor of the Year (2017) - Sunshine House Regional Child Advocacy Center • Jack Turner Award - Lifetime Achievement in Family Law (2016) by the State Bar of Georgia • Past Chair Georgia 4-H Foundation Board of Trustees • Past President - Swainsboro/Emanuel County Chamber of Commerce • Swainsboro Jaycees Outstanding Citizen Award (1995) • Young Achiever Award, Ga. Assoc. of Family & Consumer Science (1985) • Past President – UGA College of Agricultural/ Environmental Sciences State Advisory Council • Executive Board - UGA Alumni Association (2010-2012) • Vice President - Emanuel County 4-H Foundation (2009-present) • Emanuel County Volunteer 4-H Leaders, 1987 present, President 1990 -1991 • Chair – East Ga. Healthcare Center Board of Directors (1996-2002) • Pro Bono Honor Roll – State Bar of Ga. (1999) • Graduate of Leadership Emanuel • Chair - Swainsboro Area Vocation Technical School Business Department Advisory Board (1991-2002) • Alumni Service Award - UGA College of FACS (2012) • Professional Achievement Award - UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences Alumni Association (1999) • Rotary Club of Swainsboro (1989-2000) • President – Ga. Council of Superior Court Judges • Member – Board of Governors, State Bar of Georgia

Kathy with Zach & Leah Frye at their daughter’s dedication at First United Methodist Church. Kathy started preparing meals for families after baby dedications over 18 years ago.

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Each Wednesday night, Kathy oversees the meal preparation for the weekly family night supper at First United Methodist Church of Swainsboro.

Kathy graduated from the University of Georgia and remains an avid Bulldog fan. She and her sister have coordinated the tailgate gatherings for the College of Family and Consumer Sciences. People love stopping to see all the fabulous food they have prepared and the beautiful flower arrangement made from fresh flowers from Kathy’s yard.

Judges moving from Secretary-Treasurer to Vice President, then President of the Council, thus serving as leader for all Superior Court Judges. She is currently the Immediate Past President and still involved in all matters of administration including legislative initiatives. Legislation is one area which she is most interested, having worked on legislative matters as a volunteer for 4-H for years. She has spent many hours under the gold dome following legislation and speaking both on behalf of and against proposed legislation on matters of interest to her professionally and as a citizen. Kathy not only has a successful legal career, she wears many other hats that have a big impact in the community and with her family. She has been named “the family grandmother” of her extended family. This title brings the responsibility of coordinating a weekend reunion for 80+ family members. The reunion is held Easter weekend and includes the boiling and dying hundreds of eggs for the egg hunt, a covered dish picnic, and a hay ride pulled by the old family tractor. This is what Kathy refers to as, “creating memories for generations to come.” Kathy’s cooking expertise also has her in charge of the weekly Wednesday night meal at First United Methodist Church for a number of years. She also started a ministry that provides lunch to family members and visiting guests for baby dedications. “I remember when my children were being dedicated and how difficult it was to prepare lunch for all the family and friends and get the baby and family ready for church,” she explained. The first lunch was 18 years ago, and the program continues as a ministry to young families even today. She even bakes a special cake for each family. Her love of 4-H never diminished. As a lifetime 4-H’er, she is past chair of the Georgia 4-H Foundation and currently serves as vice-chair of the Emanuel County 4-H Foundation. She is also a past member of the Executive Committee of the UGA Alumni Association. Judge Kathy Palmer is an example of what each person should strive to be. From being the best in her profession, having a loving family, giving tirelessly to her community, and being a leader in all aspects of life, she is, indeed, a “universal woman”.

"Kathy Palmer is a true friend that possesses the unique capability of being able to relate to all people no matter what their circumstance. So many, especially in our local community, have directly benefited from her friendship and talents." 18

SHOWCASING YOUR COMMUNITY’S PERSONALITY

- Connie Thurman


At Daniels Chevrolet in Swainsboro, we have been a family owned and operated new and pre-owned dealership in Emanuel County since 1926. We have a large selection of new & pre-owned vehicles for you to choose from and our team is dedicated to providing an exceptional customer service experience to those in Statesboro, Waynesboro, and the surrounding areas. We provide excellent certified used vehicles that have undergone many quality checks. These vehicles also come with warranty and certified history. We believe that customer is king and thus customer satisfaction is our ultimate goal.

DANIELS CHEVROLET 365 E Main Street Swainsboro GA 30401 SALES (478) 268-4898 | SERVICE (478) 268-4900

d a n i e l s c h e v. c o m

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LOCALLY OWNED, LOCAL DECISIONS, YOUR LOCAL HOMETOWN BANK

Since 1935

111 North Railroad Ave. Twin City 478-763-2121

318 South Main St. Swainsboro 478-237-2121

900 South Lewis St. Metter 912-685-2265

815 Highway 25 North Millen 478-249-1221

www.durdenbc.com Member FDIC • Equal Housing Lender Convenient ATM Locations in Twin City, Swainsboro, Metter, Millen, and East Georgia College Campus 20

SHOWCASING YOUR COMMUNITY’S PERSONALITY


EAST GEORGIA

HEALTHCARE CENTER Championing quality healthcare for

S

ometimes, it seems like East Georgia Healthcare Center may be the best kept secret in the region. The staff has been working ­diligently behind the scenes, helping thousands of people with their healthcare needs, every day, for the last 25 years.

25 years

Back in 1993, CEO Jennie Wren Denmark started out with just three employees.

STORY BY JACQUIE BASHER PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK WILLIAMS STUDIO

EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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Kyle Cannady, FNP-BC examines Mitch Hall, patient

No hoopla, no flashbulbs, no grandstanding—just hands-on, attentive, and meticulous care. Its mission? “To help all people live healthy lives by providing quality, primary and preventive health services.” The facility is a community-owned, nonprofit, Federally Qualified Health Center that serves any patient in need of quality healthcare throughout their 12 county service area. Back in 1993, CEO Jennie Wren Denmark started out with just three employees. All three of those employees, by the way, are still with her. It’s a testament to the close-knit, familial nature of this nonprofit business. Today, the facility has expanded to a jaw-dropping 130 full-time employees, seeing 18,200 patients in eleven cities in southeast Georgia—Baxley, Claxton, Metter, Mt. Vernon, Reidsville, Soperton, Statesboro, Swainsboro, Millen, Vidalia, and Wadley. The company employs over 50 people in Swainsboro alone, where its corporate headquarters is located. The company is governed by a locally assembled board of directors, which help provide oversite and guidance to the management team.

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In 2017, EGHC logged a total of 45,000 visits from patients at its facilities. Also last year, EGHC attained the National Committee of Quality Assurance’s (NCQA) highest level of certification, which acknowledges the facility’s use of all resources available and that it puts its patients’ needs first. As early adapters of cutting edge technology, EGHC has been fully integrated on electronic medical records and has been a leader in that field. “We have a private practice feel, but with all the advantages of a big clinic setting,” said Peyton Frye, practice manager. Also in 2017, EGHC opened its Jenkins County clinic in Millen with seven full-time staff. “The clinic could not have opened without the help of Representative Butch Parrish, and Senators Jack Hill and Jesse Stone,” said Frye.  Chief Medical Officer Daryl McCartney, M.D., has been with EGHC for 5 years, and as participates in many rural health initiatives, including helping Emanuel Medical Center in Swainsboro to help share weekend calls. The Swainsboro medical staff also includeds Dr. Loretta Duggan of Central Georgia, Dr. Loy D. Cowart, originally of Twin City, and Kyle Cannady, nurse practitioner, who is a graduate of David Emanuel Academy in Stillmore. The Swainsboro clinic also


boasts a pediatric practice staffed by pediatrician Dr. Claudio Machado, and pediatric nurse practitioner Delisha Taylor. EGHC now owns two state-of-the-art mobile units, medically equipped and efficient. These units travel to various locations to offer medical assistance and counseling to a wide variety of the population, including out to the farms of southeast Georgia to treat its agricultural workers. During the summer months and peak growing seasons, medical personnel often work afterhours in these mobile units to treat the workers who are leaving after a hard day’s work in the fields. EGHC has provided this service for the last 15 years, and farmers now reap the benefits of a temporary workforce that receives healthcare on a regular basis. The units also visit area shelters, public housing, and local school systems. This outreach program remains one of the crucial components of EGHC’s mission to provide healthcare to everyone in all walks of life.

Chief Medical Officer-Daryl McCartney, MD, FAAFP and East Georgia Community Pharmacy-Pharmacy Manager, Michael Wells, RPh

EACH HEALTHCARE FACILITY HAS AT LEAST ONE STAFF MEMBER WHO IS BILINGUAL. THESE PERSONNEL ARE AN IMPORTANT PART OF GETTING HELP TO AN UNDERSERVED MINORITY IN ITS ELEVEN CITIES.

Each healthcare facility has at least one staff member who is bilingual. These personnel are an important part of getting help to an underserved minority in its eleven cities. It is a great source of pride among the staff that the agricultural community knows it can depend on EGHC to convey vital information in EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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THE FUTURE FOR EGHC LOOKS INCREDIBLY POSITIVE. THE FACILITY IS ALREADY A PRACTICING PILOT PROGRAM IN THE MENTAL HEALTH FIELD. EMANUEL COUNTY IS ONE OF ONLY TWO COUNTIES IN GEORGIA TO RECEIVE THIS GROUNDBREAKING PROGRAM.

LEFT TO RIGHT: Jill Sorrells, CFO, Peyton Frye, Practice Manager, Jennie Wren Denmark, CEO, Daryl McCartney, MD. CMO, Linda Braswell, Business Manager

the language in which they are more comfortable. In fact, there are times, said Frye, “when patients will show up at centers just to find out where the laundromat is.” This invaluable service does not go unnoticed; in 2017, Emanuel County resident Johanna Gay, EGHC’s Outreach Coordinator, was the recipient of the Curtis Cooper Award by the Georgia Primary Care Association (GPCA), an organization that includes all healthcare centers in Georgia. Ms. Gay’s work with community leaders, activists, churches, and farmers has been exemplary. EGHC has a full-time pharmacy that offers discounts to the uninsured as well as their own patients. The convenience of the pharmacy “encourages patients to access their medications,” said Denmark. As she has seen in the past, not all patients have access to pharmacies—having one on site ensures the patient

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SHOWCASING YOUR COMMUNITY’S PERSONALITY

receives the required medication immediately. The pharmacy also offers education of all medications and how to manage them. The recent addition of Michael Wells, Pharmacy Director, brings many years of hometown healthcare and pharmaceutical experience to the Swainsboro office and pharmacy. The future for EGHC looks incredibly positive. The company was recently awarded funds to develop a pilot mental health program to better deliver services to those in need. Emanuel County is one of only two counties in Georgia to receive this groundbreaking program. Telemedicine is also a vital component of operations—all centers in eleven counties are connected electronically over 5,000 square miles, with virtual staff meetings conducted regularly. The center in Swainsboro is already looking to expand further, utilizing more building space with offices and programs. More locations are also expected to open up in the coming year. Despite its rapid growth, however, EGHC remains a close, tightly-knit organization. As Denmark says, “This is truly a work family.”


SERVING EMANUEL AND SURROUNDING COUNTIES. CALL US TODAY FOR ALL OF YOUR PEST CONTROL NEEDS AND SERVICES. 125 WEST MAIN ADRIAN, GA 31002

478-668-3351 EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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ABOVE: As a destination for class field trips, The Dixie Theatre was where many citizens first experienced films that went on to become cinema classics.

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RIGHT: With the slogan, “Where Amusement Costs So Little,” The Dixie Theatre was a popular attraction for children, teenagers, and adults countywide.

SHOWCASING YOUR COMMUNITY’S PERSONALITY


then THE

Historic

Dixie THEATRE… THE SEQUEL S T O R Y B Y LY N N B R I N S O N PHOTOGRAPHY BY EMANUEL COALITION F O R C U LT U R A L & E C O N O M I C D E V E L O P M E N T

D

OWNTOWN SWAINSBORO’S DIXIE THEATRE opened to an audience of approximately 1,500 over two showings of The Richest Girl in the World on Nov. 19, 1934. At the time, The Dixie Theatre was considered the largest and most modern small town theater in the area.

The art deco structure, built by W.M. Karrh, became the flagship location of the Dixie Amusement Company, which grew to include 14 drive-ins and cinemas reaching as far as Louisiana. In addition to major motion pictures, the theater also featured a variety of vaudeville attractions, beauty pageants, recitals, battle of the bands, and other entertainment acts. “When I was in elementary school, they let us out of Adrian School to see The Wizard of Oz and The Ten Commandments,” remembers Kemp Jones. With the slogan, “Where Amusement Costs So Little,” The Dixie Theatre was a popular attraction for children, teenagers, and adults countywide. Many recall spending their childhood weekends with friends at the theater, watching Saturday morning cartoons, afternoon westerns, and evening features. They would often spend all day in the theater and then visit Lucille’s Café across the street for a hamburger and soft drink before heading home on their bicycles.

LEFT: The memories of Ada Walden in the ticket booth still ring strong for many theater regulars.

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now

The “Fine Time for a Dime” features attracted teenagers to the theater on Wednesday nights, when admission was just 10 cents. The chance to spin the prize wheel for free concessions or movie tickets was an added bonus. The memories of Ada Walden in the ticket booth still ring strong for many theater regulars. As manager of The Dixie Theatre for many years, Walden ensured the youngsters attending shows at the theater were on their best behavior. Some recall the embarrassment of having “Miss Ada” approach their groups for getting too loud during the productions.

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Walden received an international award in 1945 for “good management and supervision” during the run of the film Mom and Dad. Placing sixth out of 837 contestants, she was awarded $1,000 cash, which equals more than $12,000 in today’s economy. Walden was the only female and the only person from Georgia to receive such an honor. According to Shirley Proctor Twiss, “Miss Ada literally ran the show. She was in the lobby or walking the aisles at every feature.” Though originally constructed with the latest amenities, the theater received

SHOWCASING YOUR COMMUNITY’S PERSONALITY

a number of upgrades in 1950 and 1951, including air conditioning, new projection equipment, and an ice-maker for the concession counter. It was during this time that the lobby was widened and stone veneer was added to the façade. With the continued rise in popularity of home television, The Dixie Theatre, like many hometown theaters, closed its doors in the late 1960s and was subsequently modified for retail use. After housing the children’s department and snack bar of the Delores & Woody’s shops for more than 30 years, and later a thrift shop, the building sat vacant for approximately five years before Karrh’s


TOP RIGHT: A reproduction of the theater’s 1960s-era marquee is included in the construction plans. MIDDLE RIGHT: The renovation of the theater began with the creation of the Emanuel Coalition for Cultural & Economic Development, a 501 (c) 3 charitable organization focused on the restoration and operation of The Barbara & Tobe Karrh Community Arts Center featuring The Historic Dixie Theatre. The organization, with the support of the City of Swainsboro, Emanuel County Commissioners, and other community groups, has led the project through its ongoing fundraising, planning and construction efforts. BOTTOM RIGHT: Rendering of the lobby inside The Barbara & Tobe Karrh Community Arts Center featuring The Historic Dixie Theatre. LEFT: The renovated Historic Dixie Theatre will boast cutting edge audio and video projection technologies and modern comforts, while maintaining its historic character. With just over 280 seats spanning the main level and balcony, the theater will not only show newly released films but it will also host stage shows, plays, concerts, and more.



grandsons donated the property for renovation as The Barbara & Tobe Karrh Community Arts Center. Named after the son and daughter-in-law of proprietor W.M. Karrh, the arts center will feature the restored Historic Dixie Theatre, home offices of the Emanuel Arts Council, educational space, public event space, and an art gallery upon its completion. Long-range plans include the addition of upper-story apartments. Project leaders look forward to working with local schools and colleges in supporting their curricula and providing cultural and educational opportunities EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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Sean Moxley, President, Garbutt Construction; Charles Schwabe, Mayor, City of Swainsboro; Rusty Lane, Emanuel County Commissioner; Kristin Hall, ­­ Co-Chair, Emanuel Coalition of Cultural & Economic Development (ECCED); Leigh Burns, Director, Fox Theatre Institute; Bobby Reeves, Co-Chair, ECCED; Guy Singletary, Emanuel County Administrator; Lynn Brinson, Director of Downtown Development; Bill Rogers, Past Chair, ECCED

for students through the arts center. In addition, the Emanuel Arts Council will utilize the space for visual and performing arts programming. “In the last several years, the Emanuel Arts Council has served as an outlet— sometimes the only outlet—for art education,” said Jacquie Brasher, Emanuel Arts Council’s executive director. “However, we have had to utilize other venues in order to facilitate these activities which significantly reduces the number of activities we offer. The arts council has had a long history of hosting very successful ‘town and gown’ events that involved the community. We are hoping to revive that tradition in the new Barbara & Tobe Karrh Community Arts Center.” The new center will also serve as a venue for workshops and classes in art, theater, and arts and crafts.

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“We are looking forward to the day when we can host these events ourselves. Our past community theater performances were very popular and drew a wide variety of residents from the county,” added Brasher. Along with community theater productions, the EAC will also be programming art exhibitions by local and regional artists in the new art gallery at The Historic Dixie Theatre. Restoration progress includes the installation of a new roof and roofing system, structural improvements, hazardous materials assessment and abatement, and a sensitive demolition to remove alterations to the original structure. The arts center also now showcases a newly renovated façade including new stucco, doors, and hardware thanks to assistance from a Fox Theatre Institute Preservation Grant. The building’s original windows were restored and a new plaza has been added in front of the theater to provide gathering space outside of the building.

SHOWCASING YOUR COMMUNITY’S PERSONALITY

Construction will continue with the renovation of the building’s interior which will include the addition of new electrical, HVAC, and plumbing systems, a stage, seating, concession stand, and projection, lighting, and sound equipment Response to the project has been overwhelming, with support coming in the form of personal donations, grants, and corporate sponsorships. The project’s fundraising campaign offers the opportunity to make a donation or purchase a seat in honor or memory of a loved one. Seats purchased as part of the campaign will feature a plaque that can be inscribed with a special message or the names of the honoree(s). Contributions are tax-deductible and may be made at Swainsboro City Hall or on the theater’s website. For more information or to follow the progress of the theater’s restoration, visit historicdixietheatre. com or like The Historic Dixie Theatre on Facebook.


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Arts

& CULTURE

S

ince childhood, Marielle Singletary believed that she would grow up to become an Artist. Watching her parents, professional photographers Mark and Andrea Williams, take portrait photographs inspired a desire in Marielle to learn to paint people’s portraits. “The first chance I had to stretch my wings was in college and portraiture was what I wanted to learn," she said. “I have continued to find my preferences and voice through my painting. I try to work in a way that allows me to create a likeness, but also give the painting its own unique touches of artistic discretion.” The featured painting is an oil on canvas (20” x 24”) portrait of Milly James Farmer, daughter of Whitney and Jason Farmer. For this work of art, Marielle used the wet-on-wet painting technique. “This allows for more flexibility as I work with the features and the tones within the painting.” To see more of Marielle’s work, visit mariellewsingletary.markwilliamsstudio.com, or view her work on Instagram at instagram.com/ mariellesingletaryportraits/. For more talented artists in Emanuel County like portrait painter Eileen Dudley and author/jewelry designer Roseann Ettinger, continue reading.

Portrait of a

Young Lady STORY BY CANDICE MCKINLEY A R T W O R K B Y M A R I E L L E S I N G L E TA R Y

EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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Arts

& CULTURE

DOWN to a

Fine Art STORY BY CANDICE MCKINLEY PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN RIDDLE

E

ILEEN DUDLEY'S PASSION FOR ART came at a young age. When she was five, her mother hung large swathes of butcher paper in the basement of their house which became Eileen’s studio for creating Crayola mural masterpieces. Encouragement did not end with her parents. Along the way, Eileen’s grade school teachers encouraged her to get formal training, so during her sixth grade year, she began formal training at the Baum School of Art in Allentown, Pennsylvania. Private lessons followed with Margaret Smith Hiatt, a fellow of the American Watercolor Society, then in 1967 Eileen began studies at Syracuse University School of Fine Art. After a year and a half at Syracuse, Eileen left frustrated, unable to find the instruction she was longing for, but she was well grounded in the traditional techniques by her earlier training and able to work independently. Eileen worked in galleries, taught, participated in regional shows, and began collecting awards for her work. She has had one-woman exhibits in Chicago

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Eileen began to blossom as an artist when she was a young child. Since then, she has developed a mastery over portraiture painting.


TOP LEFT: Eileen typically works in oils. Here she has been working on a floral study in pastel. TOP MIDDLE: A look inside Kythe Studio, Eileen’s studio located on Fifth Avenue in Twin City. TOP RIGHT: A painting from Eileen’s series “Child’s Play,” which depicts paintings that are inspired by children’s art.

and St. Louis, and has enjoyed many awards for her work in shows and festivals in Pennsylvania, Virginia, North Carolina and Florida. Then, in the mid ‘80s, she had the good fortune of apprenticing for three years under JoElen Macon, a master portrait artist whose work is well known in the Southeast. It was in painting portraiture that Eileen found her passion. Eileen’s style is primarily American Impressionism, which is characterized by loose brushwork and bright colors. This style is evident in portraits such as “Mary” and “Girl in Chair,” which can be viewed on her website www.eileendudley.com. Recently, Eileen has been filling in gaps in her training by studying Classical Realism, an artistic movement that began in the late 20th and early 21st century, and which has continued to gain in popularity. Classical Realism places a high value upon skill and beauty, and is a revival of elements of 19th century art. The movement is founded on the practice of the student spending time in the Atelier, or artist’s studio, where the student-painter studies under a master artist. Eileen has attended atelier-style workshops led by current leaders in Classical Realism such as Michael Grimaldi, Jordan Sokol and Marc Chatov. When asked about the creative process, Eileen said having mastery over technique goes hand-in-hand with having the freedom to explore different concepts, but there needs to be a balance. “The danger of too much training is not wanting to take any risks at all,” she said. An example of Eileen’s exploration is her series “Child’s Play,” paintings that are inspired by children’s art which allow her to simply explore the creative process. In contrast, another series “Faces and Places,” was comprised of close to 30 oil portrait sketches of individuals from Emanuel County; this series employed a lifetime of Eileen’s technical mastery over portraiture, the subject about which she is most passionate. Eileen considers her greatest accomplishment the ability to achieve likeness, and her greatest trait persistence. For fun, she paints landscapes, “which is like recess to me.” In addition to spending time in her studio, Eileen also serves as Mayor of Twin City, and she has great aspirations for her town. As a high school student, Eileen saw the fall of the steel industry impact her once thriving hometown of Bethlehem, PA. Years later, she also witnessed how Bethlehem reinvented

itself based on its rich history as a means of economic revival. After researching the history on her own house in Emanuel County and ultimately attain its listing on the National Register of Historic Places, Eileen was asked by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources to do the work to nominate Twin City for recognition as a Historic District. The DNR had already documented that the city had 184 historic resources, but they needed someone willing to do the archival research and fill out the nomination. With the endorsement of the City Council, Eileen did the research, and two years later, in 2012, Twin City was listed as a Georgia Historic District, and as a National Register Historic District two years after that. In the course of her research, Eileen became aware of the Main Street program and with the City Council’s blessing, applied for Twin City to enter the program. Upon acceptance into Main Street, Eileen was hired as the Main Street Manager for the city’s Better Hometown Program, what was then the entry level for Main Street cities. “Just like Bethlehem, PA, Twin City has an amazing history,” Eileen said. And as it was true for her old hometown, Eileen realized that Twin City could draw on the “revitalization through preservation” strategy that has worked so well for many communities nationwide. Community members liked the new things they saw happening in Twin City and many asked Eileen to consider running for Mayor. Political ambition was not the driving factor for Eileen, but rather her passion for all she sees the community has to offer. Perhaps her community is simply a larger canvas on which to paint. When Eileen is not in her office, she can be found at Kythe Studio on Fifth Avenue in Twin City. Kythe is a Scottish word used in the novel “A Wrinkle in Time,” by Madaleine L’Engle which is where Eileen first encountered it; kythe means “to make known.” “That’s what artists do,” said Eileen, “We make known. People are often not aware of all there is to see about themselves, which is why I like to paint from life—there is something in us that you can’t capture working from a photograph. Painting from life gives you a glimpse into that spirit.” For more information, or to view Eileen’s artwork, visit her at Kythe Studio on Fifth Avenue in Twin City, or visit her website at www.eileendudley.com. EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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Arts

Treasures PAST F

& CULTURE

FROM THE STORY BY CANDICE MCKINLEY P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y J O H N F. R I D D L E

OR ALMOST FOUR DECADES, Roseann Ettinger has had a fascination with finding treasure from the past. The kinds of treasure reflecting societies and eras gone-by, allowing the savvy enthusiast a glimpse at momentous events of the times. The uninitiated may call it “old stuff ”, but Roseann has a love of that old stuff, and for almost 40 years, she has specialized in antique and period jewelry, vintage clothing and accessories. She has supplied costumers with period clothing for movies, TV shows and the theatre. Roseann has owned vintage stores across the country since 1979 and in September of this year, she will be opening 5th Avenue Vintage & Antiques in Twin City. And one does not develop a deep passion for a subject without equal passion and hunger for the knowledge of that subject. Roseann is an expert in her field. She has 16 published books on the subjects of vintage jewelry, clothing and accessories, including her first book, published in 1989, Popular Jewelry 1840-1940 and Handbags (now in its 4th Edition). Some of her other titles include 20th Century Neckties, Compacts & Smoking Accessories, Popular Jewelry of the 60s, 70s & 80s, Dresser Sets, 50s Popular Fashions for Men, Women, Boys & Girls and her latest book entitled Signature Prints, Jet Set Glamour of the 60s & 70s. In addition to being a successful retail business owner and authoress, she is an eBay and Etsy seller, a jewelry designer, and wife and mother of four.

Roseann Ettinger opened 5th Avenue Vintage & Antiques this Summer after having owned several successful vintage retail shops across the United States.

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Roseann said that her children have always been a part of her love of old things. “All four of my kids were the models in two of my books on fashion”, she said. “I started making jewelry in the 80s in Kentucky, taking apart old jewelry and making it into something new. My daughter Amber was three years old at the time and my first line of jewelry was called ‘Inspired by Amber’. I took some samples to a buyer at a local department store, and she loved them! I had to have 144 pair ready by the next week!” Amber grew up to earn a degree in fashion design from Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) in New York


City. In 2006, while working in New York as a model and actress, the mother-daughter duo have ­­­re-established “Inspired by Amber” (IBA) again. Another of Roseann’s daughters, Alexandra, also an FIT graduate with a degree in Direct and Interactive Marketing, helped her to create two successful online shops on Etsy, rememberwhenemporium  and thepopularjewelry, named after the series of books she had written. Visitors to the site will find hundreds of vintage items including jewelry, handbags, compacts, vintage clothing, mens neckties, cufflinks, perfume bottles in addition to handcrafted oneof- a- kind jewelry creations by Roseann. Her brick & mortar store in Twin City will have even more to offer. Art glass, pottery, old photographs, prints, postcards, books, linens, kitchen collectibles, silver serving pieces in addition to the large selection of jewelry, vintage clothing and accessories. Roseann’s youngest daughter, Sabrina, just graduated from University of Georgia in Athens and recently accepted a job in New York City’s financial district. Her eldest child, a son named Clint, has been teaching English at Shue Yan University in Hong Kong for the last 10 years. Raised in Hazleton, Pennsylvania, Roseann graduated from Bloomsburg University and took graduate studies at East Stroudsburg University. The wife of Terry, a retired Army major, Roseann has traveled extensively throughout the United States. She has owned and operated antique jewelry and vintage clothing boutiques in Virginia, Kentucky, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and now Twin City, Georgia. 5th Avenue Vintage & Antiques is located at 603 S. Railroad Avenue. Initial store hours are Thursday, Friday and Saturday from noon until 5 pm.  For further information please call (570)436-3240.

5th Avenue Vintage & Antiques can be found on Railroad Avenue in Twin City.

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Arts

The Regents Four playing November 3, 1965. Members Ernie Willis, Danny Lamb, Bill Kell, and Charles Scwabe played at the Vann Community House after a Swainsboro High School football game. PHOTO COURTESY OF SWAINSBORO FOREST-BLADE.

& CULTURE

High Noon in Swainsboro

It

The Birth of Local Rock-Band Culture

is somewhat ironic that Terry Lamb’s clearest memory of Swainsboro’s first “Battle of the Bands” is Donnie McNeely of the Four Plys playing Dick Dale’s surf guitar classic “Misirlou.” After all, Terry went to the battle to support the Regents Four—the band his brother Danny played bass and saxophone with. By most accounts, the Four Plys had the better of the night. In hindsight, the August 1966 battle reads almost like a passing of the torch from Swainsboro’s first electric rock band to the band that would continue into the seventies claiming several of the local music legends among its members. That night, the Regents Four were Charles Schwabe, Ernie Willis, Danny Lamb and Bill Kell; the Four Plys were Bo Flanders, Danny Beasley, Tommy Rountree and Donnie McNeely. The Regents Four began when a group of friends (on the heels of the Beatles first trip to the US) began gathering in the summer of ’64, to play music at Bobby Smith’s house in the Lake Luck community. The band developed quickly, moving away from the folk scene fostered by national television shows like Hootenanny and Hullabaloo, from the music of The Kingston Trio and The Seekers, and toward the Rock-n-Roll of the British Invasion. Boasting a repertoire that included songs by The Beatles, Paul Revere and the Raiders, along with some original instrumentals, the Regents Four began by summer’s end playing at Vann’s Park Swimming Pool. By the fall, they would be performing for post-football game dances in the Vann Community House.

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STORY BY ALAN BRASHER

Within the year, equipped with Silvertone amplifiers, a single Bogen PA speaker, and at least one Hagstrom guitar, purchased largely from Stewart’s Jewelers, The Regents Four began playing Teen Town dances in small towns around Augusta. Mayor Charles Schwabe, lead guitarist and vocalist, remembered the teenaged girls in their audiences, conditioned by film clips of the Beatles’ US tour, screaming while the band played. And with a wry smile he describes the band’s showmanship. “To ‘wow’ the crowd, we would crouch down behind our equipment and rise up during a song like we were on a riser—that was our choreography,” he said. Casting themselves in the sharp-dressed style of the early British rockers, The Regents Four played at a Junior-Senior Prom at a skating rink in Gibson, wearing pink shirts, accented with custom paisley ascots created by the alterations shop at Dolores and Woody’s department store. Schwabe said his “mother’s worst day was when she came home to find [he] had cut the lapels off his Sunday suit in order to look like the Beatles.” Likewise, he thought his “daddy was going to kick [him] out of the house when he came home with a pair of high-heeled Beatles boots” from Dolores and Woody’s Bargain Basement. The Dec. 15, 1965, issue of the Forest-Blade features a writeup on the emerging Four Plys, who had debuted at a Junior dance at Emanuel County Institute. The accompanying picture shows a self-assured, four-piece band in matching suits and ties. (The photo includes original guitarist Chuck Clarkson who joined the Air Force after graduation.) Bassist Bo Flanders remembered the group as having “football backgrounds instead


The Four Plys ­continued under that name into the ‘70s, a name derived from the Flanders Tire Recapping Company where they practiced.

The Four Plys playing December 15, 1965. PHOTO COURTESY OF SWAINSBORO FOREST-BLADE.

of music training.” They performed in a wide variety of venues, from wedding receptions and bar mitzvahs to Teen Towns and a gogos. The largest crowd Flanders recalled playing for was around 1,000 people at WJAT’s Nancy Auditorium. He recalled their having had high-quality sound equipment and a professional approach that included pre-tuning all instruments so the band could walk on stage and start without the normal checking of sound and tuning of stringed instruments. Promoting the band was a matter of making and hanging posters, sitting for radio interviews, and announcing events through a loudspeaker atop a car. McNeely recalls auditioning for Teen Town dances in Martinez and Fleming. He recalled at one audition, “we just played ‘Misirlou’ and that was it—they wanted us.” The Four Plys continued under that name into the ‘70s, a name derived from the Flanders Tire Recapping Company where they practiced. As they moved forward they lost members to the armed services, the ministry, and various life changes, but they “held together for years with members leaving and members coming in.” Flanders said. “The departing member would share with the new member. Sometimes they would play together for a while.” In addition to the members listed above, the Four Plys would eventually include Lige Moore, Glenn Fennel, Ronnie Watson, Jerry Hargraves, Bobby Smith, and, on occasion, Phil Wilson. Though he did not play at the August ‘66 battle, drummer Bobby Smith was there for the founding of the Regents Four and the closing of the Four Plys.

Flyer from “Battle of the Bands” 1966.

The battle itself consisted of only about seven or eight songs by each band. Unlike contemporary Battle of the Bands, the two bands set up side-by-side on the stage and alternated songs. Because both bands were out playing regularly, neither had seen the other perform before that night. Though local lore has the Four Plys benefitting from superior sound equipment, Danny Lamb does not recall a winner being declared, but rather theater owner and emcee Tom Kell stating that both bands were winners. In keeping with that spirit, Flanders recalls the battles as “a fun way to have more than one band appear without declaring a headliner! Sometimes people would ask the next day if anyone knew who won.” The Regents Four disbanded in early ’67. Danny Lamb said he always felt “proud to see other local bands form and succeed” and later “loved to come home from college and see the local bands.” Flanders said, “The Four Plys stood for more than the members. It is hard to explain. I guess it represents an era.”

Author’s note - This story is based on dusty memories of the distant past. Inaccuracies and omissions are unintentional, though probably inevitable. EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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SHOWCASING YOUR COMMUNITY’S PERSONALITY


Crider Foods MARKET LEADER, HUMBLE BEGINNINGS

PRODUCTS FROM FAMILY-OWNED BUSINESS HERE TAKES FLIGHT ACROSS THE GLOBE A big metal chicken adorns the front yard of Crider Lodge on Stillmore Highway across from Crider Foods plant. It is a symbol of pride for Crider Foods and their more than 500 employees.

S T O R Y B Y D E R B Y WAT E R S

PHOTO BY JOHN RIDDLE

S

omeone in almost every corner of the world will be eating something today that was prepared right here in Emanuel County. Though most average customers may not realize it, Crider Foods in Stillmore cooks and cans food under many labels which are shipped across the United States and to many foreign nations.

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ABOVE: Privately owned and operated, Crider represents six decades of family commitment to quality and service. Bill Crider, Ahtee Crider, and Billy Crider (Bill’s father and Ahtee’s son). TOP RIGHT: Billy, Ann, and Bill Crider in the lobby of Crider’s headquarters. Crider Foods is still wholly owned by the Crider family as it has been for 70 years. BELOW: Crider Foods continues to diversify their canned product line to meet the global demand of their retail and food service customers. Driven by their longstanding commitment to innovation, we maintain ultramodern facilities equipped with the latest technology. The canning factory consistently exceeds all food safety and quality standards that has been authenticated year after year by their “excellent” rating SQF3 standing. Crider Foods is a trusted name in markets around the world.

Chicken Little

Not bad for a business which had its beginnings in 1944 as a small fish market in Douglas, GA. That’s where Ahtee Crider and his wife, Emma Lou, prepared chickens at their home and took them to the fish market to sell. Before long, Ahtee was adding on to the fish market, buying equipment and working with local farmers to grow chickens for the expanding line of chicken products. After that Ahtee built a larger facility on the outskirts of Douglas so he could keep up with the growing demand. That was when the business hit a harsh economy and Ahtee was forced to sell the business. That could have been the end of the line for all the hard work, but it was also the last quarter of school in his senior year at the University of Georgia for son Billy. He dropped out of school and returned to Douglas. Billy and his father built a small block building and started

Crider Foods

processing spent laying hens that were used in the canned chicken business. This enabled the Crider’s to pay off the old debts and the business grew.

Second Hatching

By 1970 the business was acquired by Flowers Industries of Thomasville, Georgia. Ahtee died, and in 1977 Billy resigned from Flowers to open Billy Crider’s Poultry, Inc. in a closed facility in Stillmore. Then in 1985 Billy opened Crider, Inc.—a cooking and canning business in Lincolnton, which Billy operated until it was destroyed by fire in 1999. A year later the canning facility was moved to Stillmore, and Crider Poultry and Crider, Inc. were merged. Billy then added a cooking plant to the Stillmore operation, which has continued to grow through today.

IS A FAMILY BUSINESS TODAY, JUST AS IT WAS BACK MORE THAN 70 YEARS AGO. THE MODERN VERSION IS A FULL-SERVICE COOKING AND CANNING BUSINESS WITH CUSTOMERS AROUND THE GLOBE.

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Today, the Crider Foods administrative and manufacturing headquarters in Stillmore, Georgia, is a far-cry from its humble beginnings in 1977. The site includes a 110,000 sq. ft. warehouse which was added to meet the growing demands for their products and a lab for nutritional testing and safety. PHOTO BY JOHN RIDDLE

One wall in the lobby of the Crider Foods headquarters is dedicated to the history of the business. It includes the old black wash pot (far right) which is the very one Billy’s mother would use to clean chickens back when she and Billy’s father, Ahtee, first started the chicken business. Billly and Ann are standing by the chicken processor he used while working for his father, whose photo (top) is a constant reminder of all that he started.

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A plat showing the original parcel Billy bought when he began his operation in Stillmore. He rented a much smaller parcel of land than they have now with an old building that “had a tree growing out of the roof.” Billy laughed as he remembered the first time his Mother saw it. “My Mother came to see it and cried. She said, ‘If I had known you needed money I would have given you some.’” (Photo by John Riddle)

500 employees TO THE MORE THAN

OF THE COMPANY, THE BIG BIRD MEANS GOOD JOBS HERE AT HOME AND PRIDE IN BEING A PART OF A GREAT COMPANY.

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Crider Foods is a family business today, just as it was back more than 70 years ago. The modern version is a full-service cooking and canning business with customers around the globe. Crider Foods is wholly owned by the Crider family. The family consists of William (Billy) A. Crider, Jr and his wife, Ann Crider, a former school teacher.  Then there is their son, Bill, and his wife, Ruthie, and their children, Billy and Bo. Also a part of the family are two daughters, Ginger Crider Mock and her husband Jay and their children, Jenkins and Emma Catherine; Cindy Crider Jarrel and her husband Stewart and their children Stewart Lane, Grace Ann and Bishop.

Let the Big Rooster Crow

When Crider, Inc. was first formed it had one major customer, Hormel. Nowadays, the list of brands prepared in Stillmore includes Costco, Wal-Mart, Publix, Kroger, Swanson and Bumble Bee. Add to that a growing list of customers in places such as Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Peru, Chili, Columbia and Mexico.

SHOWCASING YOUR COMMUNITY’S PERSONALITY

But the answer to the company’s continuing success in never-ending innovation. The business depends on product research and development for canned chicken and other meats, not only for the domestic market but for niche markets abroad. Foods prepared here provide customers with convenience, great taste and extended shelf life, plus the business has been awarded top food-safety certification of SQF Level III, the highest certification awarded. In addition, Crider Foods is a good neighbor, providing monetarily to needy causes and providing donations to food banks. Billy is known for his community involvement and his charitable giving. Out on the Stillmore Highway stands a large metal chicken, a symbol of Crider Foods. Passersby sort of get the idea that chicken plays a large role in whatever is going on. But to the more than 500 employees of the company, the big bird means good jobs here at home and pride in being a part of a great company. And that just (pun intended) “scratches” the surface of the importance of Crider Foods here in Emanuel County and around the globe.


Local, Convenient & Affordable, With 4 Locations: Swainsboro 455 E Main St (478) 237-4061

Vidalia 311 McNatt St (912) 538-1200

Statesboro 128 N Main St (912) 764-4444

Sandersville 638 S Harris St (478) 552-3005

centralfenceco.com | Call for a free Estimate EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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Danny Wayne Faircloth was born and raised in Swainsboro graduating from high school in 1969 and came back home in 1972 after his service in Vietnam. His first job was in a sawmill. A job he didn’t know would provide training for his wood-related businesses later in life.

HARD WORK

Pays Off

Danny Wayne Faircloth knows no other way to success but through hard work and determination. S T O R Y B Y J O H N R I D D L E | P H O T O S C O U R T E S Y O F T H E FA M I LY

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“You can’t have a ‘million-dollar dream with a minimum-wage work ethic.’ That’s the way he taught the boys. They worked on Saturday and after football practice. Ben was driving big trucks at 13 years old. They could hop on any piece of equipment and run it.” - Karen Faircloth

Jaycee Faircloth in the Georgia Sports Arena, built in 2013, that was initially conceived as a small arena for their granddaughters to ride in. Managed by Karen, the arena has hosted over 500 riders in one weekend. The venue is also a draw for the community hosting concerts, circuses, rodeos, and other events.

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anny Wayne Faircloth and his family have been blessed – they’ll be the first to say it. But, they’ve also worked hard and stuck together in good times and bad, putting family first and work second, to ensure that they have jobs for themselves and others. Family is important to Danny Wayne, but the community is too. “Part of the reason I’ve built these businesses is to promote the community,” he explained. “Too many of our young people must leave for jobs. They don’t have the opportunity to stay here.” Their six businesses include a pellet mill, a carbon plant, a sports arena, a farming operation, and a new a sawmill. After the sawmill is finished the total number of their employees will be over 100 - something he is proud of because of what it means to the community. His passion for creating jobs stems from his desire as a young boy to return home and work with his Dad. “I always worked with my Daddy as a kid, helping him farm,” Danny Wayne said. “He and I often talked about when I got older we would be business partners. He died shortly after I got back from Vietnam. So, that

drove me to continue that dream – now I work with my sons.” Danny Wayne’s road to being able to work with his sons was not an easy one. It took determination and, well, a lot of hard work. Danny Wayne was born and raised in Swainsboro, graduated from high school in 1969 and came back home in 1972 after his service in Vietnam. His first job was in a sawmill. A job he didn’t know would provide training for his wood-related businesses later in life. He married Karen Wilson, also a Swainsboro native, in 1974. By 1975 they had a son, Jeremy, and Danny Wayne knew he needed a better paying job to support his growing family. Those early years of family life were tough he admitted. “When we were first married our lights were cut-off at one point. We had to learn how to manage money,” he explained. They learned a lot that would help them later as most young newlyweds do. He found a better job on the road with a construction crew building power plants. By 1977, they welcomed their second son Ben. Work on the road grew tiresome and it took him away from his young family. So, he started his own construction business focused mainly on building lumber mills and other wood-related EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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The Faircloth family: Jeremy, Rayleigh, Jessica, Karen, Jaycee, Danny, Logan, Shana, Ben, and Racyn.

Ben and Jeremy Faircloth both joined the family business at an early age. Though they haven’t always had it easy they are grateful for the opportunity to work with their family and to have been trained to work hard and persevere.

businesses. That led to his future entrepreneurial ventures. In 1999, he decided to build his own sawmill – he certainly knew how to build one by then. It was a smaller version of the one he currently has under construction. Jeremy had joined him in the construction business in 1994. Ben came to work with them after his first year of college. Finally, Danny Wayne was fulfilling a dream he had with his father – though they were unable to fulfill it themselves - he was working with his sons in his own business. Eventually, they closed that sawmill but continued in wood-related businesses with a remanufacturing plant and a fence post company. They partnered with others on the construction and operation of a pellet mill. In 2012, they built their own pellet mill, LJR Forest Products, capable of producing 3000 tons of pellets weekly, which brings international clientele to Swainsboro to purchase pellets used predominantly in Europe. In 2013, they built the Georgia Sports Arena. It was originally designed as a small place for their grandchildren to ride. As construction started, Danny Wayne’s vision grew, and it ended up being larger than expected. The venue, managed by Karen, has hosted over 500 riders in one weekend with 350 stalls rented. It doubles as a space for concerts, circuses, rodeos, and other events. Through their careers, and as they continue to expand their business interests, Danny Wayne and Karen have always been committed to working hard and keeping their family close and involved during good times and bad. “I think both Jeremy and Ben will tell you it’s not always been ‘peaches and cream.’ There have been trying times where everybody pitches in to hold our own. We did without things when times were bad including some weeks without pay checks. But, we’ve been fortunate to reap the rewards in the good times,” Danny Wayne explained. Karen agrees, “You can’t have a ‘million-dollar dream with a minimum-wage work ethic.’ That’s the way he taught the boys. They worked on Saturdays and after

“I think both Jeremy and Ben will tell you it’s not always been ‘peaches and cream.’ There have been trying times where everybody pitches in to hold our own.” – Danny Wayne Faircloth

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Jeremy, Karen, Danny Wayne, and Ben Faircloth work together daily managing their six businesses. Karen explains that it’s not as easy as people might think working with family. “But, it’s great to get to be together and see our boys excel at what they’re doing.”

“A young person has to have passion – has to want something – to make their dreams a reality. Do more than what others do. Strive to be the best.” – Danny Wayne Faircloth

football practice. Ben was driving big trucks at 13 years old. They could hop on any piece of equipment and run it.” Though Jeremy and Ben haven’t always had it easy they seem grateful for the opportunity to work with their family and to have been trained to work hard and persevere. “It hasn’t always been fun. He fired me once. I was without a job for five days,” said Jeremy who has worked full-time in the family business since 1994 (well, except for those few days). “He taught us that you can either be raised to work for somebody or you can be raised to learn to get out and make it yourself. I’ve learned everything from Dad.” Ben agrees, “I’ve been fired many more times than Jeremy. People might think it’s easy, but we work a lot more than normal employees and a lot more is expected. Knowing how to work is an important lesson – one they don’t teach in college. I feel like we can go anywhere and survive due to our strong work ethic.” Karen explains that it’s not as easy as people might think working with family. “But, it’s great to get to be together and see our boys excel at what they’re doing.”

For Danny Wayne, it’s also fulfilling a dream he had with his father. “It’s a pleasure to get to work with my sons. We work together - they don’t just work for me.” he said. Danny Wayne’s formula for success is simple. “You’ve got to really work at something to make it your own. When I was young, if a man hired me I wanted to be his best employee. I would take better care of his things than he would himself.” He applied that same practice to every avenue of his life. “Even in Vietnam, I was the first one up to do anything. My first sergeant would say, ‘Look, I need you to be the one to do this.’” And his advice for young people wanting to succeed? “A young person has to have passion – has to want something – to make their dreams a reality. Do more than what others do. Strive to be the best,” he emphasizes. Danny Wayne’s father had a dream to work with his son that never materialized. Danny Wayne has fulfilled a dream to work with his own sons. He and Karen wish the same for their boys. “We‘re hoping our grandchildren will move back home after college and work with us too.” EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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Our full-time staff of trained professional are here to assist with your traditional real estate needs and the auction process.

478-455-1861 338 East Main Street Swainsboro, GA 30401 southauctiongroup.com Memory Lane Photograpy

Visit Swainsboro Supply for all your hardware and construction needs. 50

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(478) 237-8876

360 E Main Street, Swainsboro, GA 30401


A True

SHOT STRANGE

Southern Gentleman • S T O R Y B Y LY N N B R I N S O N

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK WILLIAMS STUDIO •

It was the early 1930s

and economic conditions in the south were dire. The Boll Weevil had wreaked havoc on the cotton industry and the stock market crash of 1929 had sent the country into the worst economic crisis in modern history. Larson C. “Shot” Strange was a young boy growing up in the southern Emanuel County community of Oak Park at the time. Alongside a dusty, unpaved stretch of U.S. Highway 1, Strange began his working life in the tobacco fields before his 10th birthday, earning just 30 cents per day. “When I was about 12 years old, I worked for the local farmers earning 50 cents per day, plowing a mule from sun up to sundown,” Strange remembers, “It was tough, and I knew then that 50 cents per day was not going to cut it.”

Strange saved his earnings to buy a bicycle, which he used to deliver newspapers for the Augusta Herald and Atlanta Journal while continuing his studies at the Oak Park School. He recalls the hardships of obtaining an education during the Depression due to the lack of tax funds available to support the public school system. “There was no electricity, no indoor toilet, and no cafeteria. We had to buy our own books and the school was heated with a potbellied stove that burned wood that was cut and hauled to the school by the students’ dads.” Strange points out that there was even one year in which students had to pay an annual tuition and the teachers collected no salary for the final three months of the school year.

ABOVE: At 97 years of age, Strange continues to operate his farm with help from others. It borders the same stretch of U.S. 1 that he worked as a child, though the scenery has changed over the years. That dusty, one-lane road is now a paved, four-lane highway that bears his name. EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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{ SHOT STRANGE }

“A lot of the boys I was with in Atlanta and at Ft. Lewis never did make it back… only in a coffin,” Strange quietly added. In early 1944, Strange’s battalion at Ft. Lewis received orders for deployment. Though their exact assignment was unknown, the troops knew that within 72 hours they would be in the midst of battle. Strange recalls a friend’s speculation that they would land in Belgium. With his duffle bag in-hand on the morning of deployment, Strange learned that he would be held back at Ft. Lewis to train additional battalions stationed at the post. “About three weeks later, I received a letter from my friend that said, ‘I’m where I said we were going, and the snow is deep,’” he said. That letter would become the last communication he had with his friend. “A lot of the boys I was with in Atlanta and at Ft. Lewis never did make it back…only in a coffin,” Strange quietly added. In 1940, Shot attended the Citizens Military Training Camp in Ft. Moultrie, South Carolina

Upon graduating from the Oak Park School in 1940, Strange attended Citizens Military Training Camp in Ft. Moultrie, South Carolina where he underwent a three-month basic training program. Afterward, he used his savings from his paper route and working in the fields to enroll in Young Harris College. “During my second year in college, on December 7, 1941, I heard a radio news story about Pearl Harbor,” Strange recalls. “Soon after, when the draft age was moved to 18, I knew I was destined to go.” As a draftee, Strange’s military career began at Ft. McPherson where his experience working in his father’s general store combined with his previous military training led to positions in the supply depot and leading training courses for incoming personnel at the reception center. After media scrutiny that the sons of politicians were receiving preferential treatment by being stationed at the base rather than being deployed for combat, many of the soldiers, including Strange, were transferred to Ft. Lewis near Tacoma, Washington, where they were prepared for war.

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Strange was eventually deployed overseas as the war drew to an end, but did not see combat during his time there. Upon his discharge he returned to Oak Park to work at his father’s store and become a farmer and landowner. “I bought as much land as I could, because I knew I wasn’t going to work for 50 cents a day anymore,” Strange chuckled. After his return to Oak Park, Strange accepted the position of Chief Deputy to the Emanuel County Sheriff, and then in 1968 he took a position with the Georgia Department of Corrections. After appointment as the Chief Probation Officer for the Middle Judicial Circuit, Strange became Regional Director where he oversaw correction facilities and probation programs for 26 counties until his retirement in 1992. Strange maintained his farming interests throughout his law enforcement and corrections career, employing farm managers to oversee the day-to-day operations. “There were times that I would come home from meetings in Atlanta and the ground would be frozen, but I would stay out feeding my cattle until 2:00 a.m.,” Strange said. “I’ve always enjoyed my time on the farm.”


Strange has been honored by three governors and the Georgia House of Representatives and Senate for his contributions to the state.

At 97 years of age, Strange continues to operate his farm with help from others. It borders the same stretch of U.S. 1 that he worked as a child, though the scenery has changed over the years. That dusty, one-lane road is now a paved, four-lane highway that bears his name. A devoted member of the Swainsboro Exchange Club, Strange offered the suggestion to four-lane the highway across the state during a 1986 club meeting. With the support of the club and assistance from colleagues, he led the effort to create the transportation corridor, meeting with state and local officials from every community along the highway. The project is still in-process but has resulted in the four-laning of hundreds of miles of U.S. 1. “I knew this was something we needed to do for the future,” said Strange, whose leadership was also a driving force in the completion of the Twin City Detention Center, a project that was initiated by Rep. Butch Parrish and Sen. Bill English. Not only did he assist the advancement of the project through its design and implementation phases, he was also instrumental in staffing the center.

A more personal mission that Strange took on during that time was the construction of his clubhouse, which has become a landmark in the Oak Park community. The unique structure, which sits on his farm, was engineered and built by Strange, himself. Constructed of materials gathered from around the farm, the focal point of the expansive clubhouse is the fully restored old farm house that sits in the center of the room. The house was originally located across from Strange’s home on U.S. 1, but he moved it to his pond in 1979 as the first step in building the clubhouse. The facility has hosted thousands of guests since 1980, ranging from close friends and family to governors and state officials. It has been the site of Southeastern Technical College’s Annual Appreciation BBQ for 37 years. Strange recalls a particular meeting in which he invited officials from the Georgia Department of Transportation, along with representatives from each community bordering U.S. 1, to the clubhouse. “On that floor is where I stated my case for four-laning [U.S. Highway] Number 1,” Strange stated, adding that his late wife, Jean, also played a vital role in all of the activities hosted at the clubhouse. EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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G

{ SHOT STRANGE }

John Terwilliger, who worked with Strange for 19 years and had a front row seat for many of his endeavors noted, “He is the most civic-minded person that I’ve known. He is devoted and committed and has never let anything deter him.” Strange has supported and held leadership roles in a number of community organizations, including the Swainsboro Exchange Club, Swainsboro Masonic Lodge, American Legion, Georgia Cattlemen’s Association, Georgia Sheriffs’ Association, Emanuel County Farm Bureau, Emanuel County Agribusiness Council, East Georgia State College Foundation, and the Southeastern Technical College Foundation, among many others.

Department of Corrections Manager of the Year, Georgia Probation Association Lee Broome Award for Excellence, Swainsboro Exchange Club Book of Golden Deeds, Exchangite of the Year, Technical Colleges of the State of Georgia Volunteer of the Year, Farm Family of the Year, Commissioner’s Award for Outstanding Service to the Georgia Department of Corrections and the State of Georgia, Faithful Service Award to the State of Georgia, Governor David Emanuel-Adam Brinson Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) Community Service Award, and the Pine Tree Festival & Southeast Timber Expo Green Jacket.

Though the humble gentleman can be shy in sharing some of his personal contributions to the community, those close He has been honored by three to Strange are happy to point governors, including recognition out his generosity, citing his by Gov. George Busby for his delivery of fruit and turkeys contributions to the state, and to neighborhood families appointment for excellence in his during the holidays, the field as Lt. Colonel Aide-de-Camp donation of land to a church for the Governor’s Staff, twice, by in Oak Park for its expansion, Shot’s wife, Jean, was a partner in all of his endeavors. Georgia Governors Lester Maddox and his personally financing and Zell Miller. In addition, he and improvements to the Emanuel Jean, who have been widely regarded County Veterans Center and for their selfless service to their community over the years, a church in which he had no prior association. He has also received honors from the Georgia House of Representatives and endowed scholarships at Southeastern Technical College and Senate. East Georgia State College in memory of his late wife, and was the benefactor of the Shot & Jean Strange Clubhouse on the “I was always fortunate to have quality people to support me,” campus of East Georgia State College. said Strange, “especially my wife, Jean, who was a partner in all of my endeavors. She supported me 100%.” “He has helped lot of people,” said Mack Griffin, who considers Strange a mentor, both personally and as a Shriner. Strange The framed proverb that sits in Strange’s office, a gift from his served as Potentate of the Alee Shrine in 1988, a seat that Griffin children and grandchildren, is a fitting tribute to his legacy in later held in 2008. Emanuel County: a society grows great when men plant trees under whose shade they know they shall never sit. Strange has accumulated dozens of awards and accolades over the years including, among others, Emanuel County Citizen Griffin affirms, “L.C. Strange is the epitome of a true southern of the Year, Swainsboro Jaycees Lawman of the Year, Emanuel gentleman.” County Soil and Water Conservation Man of the Year, Georgia

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Swainsbbo GEORGIA

101 West Main Street Swainsboro, GA 30401 (478) 237-7025 cityofswainsboro.org

Rich in History, Natural Beauty, Culture and Education, Recreation and Leisure, Progressive Development, and much more. These are a few traits that make Emanuel County

“The Place to Grr.” “T

101 North Main Street • Swainsboro, GA 30401 478-237-3881 • For More Information on Emanuel County visit: emanuelco-ga.gov

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Sponsored Content Seafood including shrimp and grits, crab cakes, prime-rib kabobs, and hand-cut steaksare but a few of Berni's customers' favorite dishes.

Berni’s On West Main Offers Exceptional Fare & Atmosphere

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here are lot of things about Berni's on West Main that are deceiving. The restaurant looks as if it has been there for decades, but it was only opened three years ago. The owners, David “Berni” Bernard and his son Cutler Bernard, seem more like the “help” than the owners. Then there’s the food - which is exceptionally different than most would expect from a “small town diner” in South Georgia. And, that’s how Berni and Cutler like it.

“The best thing about our restaurant is that it’s a pleasure and a joy to provide people with good food.”

They are certainly not new to the restaurant business. Berni was the main cook for 25 years at the landmark Coleman Lake Restaurant where everyone would go see him in the kitchen – something they can still do with their open-kitchen concept. Cutler brought his restaurant management acumen that includes stints at leading restaurants in Charleston, Savannah, Augusta, and helping launch Sweetgrass in New Jersey that won critical acclaim in the New York Times. The idea for Berni’s came when Coleman Lake closed, and Cutler decided to move back home to start Berni’s on West Main with his Dad. As exceptional as this duo is – which includes speaking to guests at every table - their food is what draws people back time after time. All the seasonings are made in-house from Berni’s long-time recipes. The seafood is always fresh from the East Coast. Steaks are cut in-house. But, it’s not pretentious. You can feel the “soul” in every plate that matches their joy in providing their customers with good food. That’s part of what makes it exceptional. Open for lunch from 11:00 – 2:30 | Dinner from 5:00 until – Tuesday - Saturday | Breakfast at 10:30 on Friday & Saturday | Full Bar An Open-Air Venue Offers Live Music Thursday & Saturday Nights It also is available for weddings and special events

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Photography by Lily Hannah Photography


Photo by Cal Avery

Experience Emanuel

Crossroads of the Great South

I N F O R M AT I O N A N D P H O T O G R A P H Y P R O V I D E D B Y T H E C H A M B E R O F C O M M E R C E

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manuel County, on the Georgia Grown Trail 1 route and just off the well-worn path of Interstate 16, is a community rich in history and “roads less traveled.” A trip through Emanuel County offers what no interstate or bypass can—the scenic route—and the opportunity to see all the hidden gems our community has to offer.

Natural treasures like the Ohoopee Dunes and George L. Smith State Park welcome visitors from across the Southeast and beyond. And while they’re here they enjoy plenty of charming places to visit and shop, enjoy fantastic cuisine, and often stay a while in some of the area’s most unique lodging. EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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Experience Emanuel

Georgia Grown Trail:1 Emanuel County Emanuel County is proud to be a part of the newly formed Georgia Grown Trail:1. The portions of highways to be included in Georgia Grown Trail:1 wind through eight counties with miles of family-owned farms, unique lodging, u-pick farms, farm stands, farm-to-table restaurants, and hands on educational farm experiences. Emanuel County is proud to have ten stops along this trail to help boast our agritourism industry.

Main Street Market Swainsboro

The Main Street Market in Downtown Swainsboro is one of our hidden treasures! This 12,000-square foot building is home to over 75 booths featuring antiques, collectibles, unique gifts, arts from local residents, and the Swainsboro Museum of Coca-Cola, home of rare, one-of-a-kind items. The Swainsboro Museum of Coca-Cola is the private collection of resident Michael Bright. Michael has been collecting vintage CocaCola advertisements for more than 30 years. Main Street Market and the museum of Coca-Cola offer a climate controlled environment for easy shopping. The shops are open Monday through Saturday from 10 am - 5pm, and located at 215 West Main St., in Swainsboro.

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Experience Emanuel

The Ohoopee Dunes Wildlife Management Area is unique to Georgia. The dunes are large oval structures believed to have been formed by wind deposits of sand on the eastern and northern banks of the Ohoopee River in South Georgia during the late Pleistocene Age (20,000 years ago). The Ohoopee Dunes protect some of Georgia’s most significant natural communities and many rare species. To protect these resources vehicular access is limited, and no ATVs or horses are allowed on the property. The Ohoopee Dunes offer opportunities for hunting deer, turkey, squirrel, and waterfowl. There is a hiking trail on the most northern tract of this four-tract wildlife area. Accommodations include a boat ramp, canoe access and nature trails. Additional activities include geocaching, river fishing and wildlife viewing. From Downtown Swainsboro, take US 80 West for approximately six miles. Look for a kiosk on the north side of the highway.

Ohoopee Dunes Wildlife Management Area Swainsboro

George L. Smith State Park Twin City With natural beauty, lakeside camping and cozy cottages, this secluded park is the perfect South Georgia retreat. It is best known for the refurbished Parrish Mill and Pond, a combination gristmill, saw mill, covered bridge and dam built in 1880. A group shelter near the bridge is popular for family reunions and parties. Some campsites sit right on the water’s edge, while cottages with gas fireplaces and screened-in porches are nestled into the woods. Boasting 412 acres of cypress lake fishing, George L. Smith State Park is an angler's paradise.

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Experience Emanuel

Twin City Welcome Center Twin City Renovated in 2015, the Twin City Welcome Center is the place to visit while in Twin City. The Welcome Center sits directly across from City Hall on the old railroad bed. The Welcome Center has a meeting space, a front porch and lawn for concerts and performances, a small museum and display of the City’s rich history, and houses the office of the City’s Main Street Director. Twin City was formed in 1921 from the consolidation of the towns of Summit and Graymont, so please stop by and visit Twin City and explore our great history. You will find the people of Twin City to be “Twice as Friendly, Twice as Nice”.

Georgia Sports Arena Swainsboro The Georgia Sports Arena is a multi-use arena with seating for up to 5,000 people. The arena is used for horse shows, rodeos, and other entertainment shows. Located at 1093 Highway 56 South, the arena is a family-friendly atmosphere for all ages.

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Experience Emanuel

The Coleman House Inn Swainsboro The Coleman House Inn is a beautifully restored three-story Victorian home with a wraparound porch that is famous for their buffet lunch, which is served daily and on Sundays. The inn also has rooms to rent if you would like a more bed-andbreakfast style stay.

The Edenfield House Swainsboro The Edenfield House is a historic bed and breakfast in beautiful Swainsboro, Georgia. This gorgeous historic mansion was built in 1895 and exhaustively restored in 1985. The Edenfield House boasts nine spacious guestrooms, all with private bathrooms and individually-controlled heat and air conditioning. The mansion is also an event venue and has an on-site commercial kitchen for catering.

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PROFILES

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wainsboro’s Dixie Youth Baseball league is primed to bat a thousand. The AAA All-star team advanced to the Dixie Youth World Series this season for the second consecutive year, and the AA All-star team advanced to the World Series as well. All the success the teams have had wouldn’t have been possible without the dedication of their players, coaches, parents and the many volunteers that make up the league.

Coaches on the AAA All-star team included Head Coach Eric Boddiford, Coach Brent Flemming and Coach Mason, and players Tuff Boddiford, Nox Williams, Brody Fleming, Maddox Robertson, Kason Edenfield, Peyton Mason, Jake Adams, Jay Johnson, Brent Cox, Luke Colston, North Williams, and Thomas Purvis.

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AAA All-star Coach Robert Mason, Peyton Mason and State Director Jerry Holmes during the DYB World Series

Swainsboro’s AA All-star team includes players Karson Kettles, Jace Farmer, Brody Newsome, Levi Hall, Jacob Hughes, Nate Loyd, Landon Lumpkin, Gannon Smith, Landon Claxton, Knox Lumley, Paxton Dixon and Ayden Bishop; Manager Lincoln Kettles; and assistants Jason Farmer, Chesley Dixon and Ronnie Newsome.

SWAINSBORO

DIXIE YOUTH BASEBALL KNOCKING IT OUT OF THE PARK S T O R Y B Y C A N D I C E M C K I N L E Y | P H O T O S P R O V I D E D B Y DY B T E A M S

Dixie Youth Baseball (DYB) is a volunteer organization, operated and funded entirely by parents and volunteers. “We receive no state funding whatsoever,” said AAA Coach Robert Mason. “Our board of directors, which consists of 8 members (all of which have kids involved in the league), meet several times throughout the year. In those meetings, we assign coaches based on those who volunteer to help. We have a two-week period just before Spring where we have sign ups and then right into tryouts for each of our three leagues.” The leagues include 6 to 8-year-old AA coach pitch, 9 to 10-yearold AAA live pitch, and 11 to 12-year-old Majors live pitch. “All of our umpires, concession workers and coaches are complete volunteers,” Robert said. Robert has been involved with DYB since 2014, when his then 6-year-old son joined the league. “At first I was just a parent watching his kid play,” he said. “After that I became a coach.” Coach Mason eventually joined the Board as vice president of the AA

league and currently serves as vice president of the AAA league, and hopes to serve as vice president of the majors next year. He has continued to coach throughout his involvement with DYB, not only during regular season but also during All-stars and at the State and National levels. The AAA All-star team advanced to the World Series by winning the Dixie Youth State Championship two years in a row. “A feat that has not been accomplished for a very long time in the state of Georgia,” Robert said. Coaches on the AAA All-star team included Head Coach Eric Boddiford, Coach Brent Flemming and Coach Mason, and players Tuff Boddiford, Nox Williams, Brody Fleming, Maddox Robertson, Kason Edenfield, Peyton Mason, Jake Adams, Jay Johnson, Brent Cox, Luke Colston, North Williams, and Thomas Purvis. The AA All-star team players, led by Coach Lincoln Kettles, included Karson Kettles, Jace Farmer, Brody Newsome, Levi Hall,

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Swainsboro’s AAA All-star pitcher Tuff Boddiford

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Jacob Hughes, Nate Loyd, Landon Lumpkin, Gannon Smith, Landon Claxton, Knox Lumley, Paxton Dixon and Ayden Bishop. “As for the 8u group,” said 8u (aged 8 and under) AA assistant coach Jason Farmer. “Lincoln Kettles was the manager and did a fantastic job. Myself, Chesley Dixon and Ronnie Newsome were assistants. We made the World Series, which was a great experience for the players and coaches. Most of the kids will be moving up to the 10u division next year. This will be a learning curve as they will go from coach pitch to kid pitch and it usually takes some adjusting to comfort levels. I know these boys and they are looking forward to the challenge.” “We spent a lot of summer afternoons practicing on the field next to the 10u [aged ten and under] boys and it was great for our team to be able to watch them,” Jason said. “The group of 10u are a very experienced, well coached, and talented group of kids. Most of the kids have been playing together for a while now and they seem to really play for each other. It was fun to watch them in the [Dixie Youth Baseball] World Series and I’m sure they will continue to improve. I wouldn’t be surprised to see the same group winning the state tournament as they reach the 12u division.” During the World Series, the AAA team competed against 11 states, all from the Southeastern US. They defeated teams from North Carolina and Alabama before losing the second game of double elimination to the team from North Carolina. “Swainsboro Dixie Youth has been the most competitive league in the entire state of Georgia over the last 5 years,” said Robert. “We have won or been runner up at nearly every state tournament in those years in all leagues. Fielding 5 consecutive Dixie Youth World Series appearances in two different leagues. Something unheard of from any state and something this community should be extremely proud of. “Our team this year consisted of a mixture of kids with lots of experience at high level baseball including several World Series appearances from kids such as Peyton Mason, Brody Fleming, Jake Adams, Tuff Boddiford, Jay Johnson and Maddox Robertson,” Robert said. “We also had some kids who were able to enjoy this for the first time, which was really special for us coaches and parents who have been there before. Thomas Purvis, Brent Cox, and North and Nox Williams all enjoyed their first experience at the World Series. We suffered some injuries throughout the season including elbow injuries to two of our best pitchers Nox and Brody. Other Kids such as Luke Colston and Jay Johnson really stepped up and pitched some amazing games to help propel us to success.” There is no mistaking--the DYB program in Swainsboro is top-notch, and everyone from the players and coaches to the volunteer parents to the community at large is looking forward to what the next season will bring. For more information about Swainsboro’s Dixie Youth Baseball program, or to follow the teams’ progress, find them on Facebook at: facebook.com/SwainsboroDYL.


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S T O R Y B Y D E A N N A R YA N PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK WILLIAMS STUDIO

Smile president. They worked long hours on two newly built wards, often putting in a full day’s work assisting patients by escorting them around the hospital, filling water pitchers, delivering flowers and writing letters. This group also organized Candy Stripers, young girls who volunteered after school and during the summer. After about ten years of service, Pink Lady membership decreased and the group disbanded. “Frances and I saw a lot of ladies come and go,” Dot recalled.

ince the late 1950s, Emanuel Medical Center (EMC) has benefitted from volunteers who’ve come and gone in a changing of colors starting with the grey ladies established by the American Red Cross in 1957 to the Pink Ladies in 1965 to a yellow group of both male and females known as the Sunshine Volunteers in 1978 to today’s EMC volunteers who wear aqua smocks. For over 50 years, Dot Fagler has led the Pink Ladies and Sunshine Volunteers and EMC volunteers on and off as their president, but she wasn’t alone in getting things started. She had her best buddy and right-hand lady Frances Sconyers there with her.

In 1978, male and female volunteers gathered to support the hospital, this time wearing yellow and calling themselves the Sunshine Volunteers. This group, also led frequently by Dot Fagler, helped man the Sunshine Corner Gift Shop and create scholarships for EMC employees to receive higher education and the scholarship still exists today. As of 2010, EMC volunteers continue to help as they once did when they donned grey, pink and yellow, but now they wear an aqua smock, thanks to a Mill Creek Grant. They have extended their service into buying items for the hospital such as equipment, automatic doors, an aviary for the nursing home, big kitchen appliances and furnishings for the ICU courtyard. Even though Dot is aware of the many things the volunteers do, she is quick to say, “We do things for the patients, not to them.... but I’d like to think we’ve helped because ‘when you’re feeling good you give and get a smile and I think that helps make their day.’” Even after the passing of her best friend Frances, and even as she’s held down full time jobs of her own, Dot never stopped volunteering. According to Carmen Tanner, EMC Manager for Volunteers and Public Relations, Dot worked at Shop Rite Pharmacy for 28 years and then Wilson’s Pharmacy in the gift department until last year when she turned 90. When she was working full-time she would still volunteer one day a week at the hospital. After she left her job at Wilson’s, Dot was approached by a customer who wanted her to return because he said that missed her smile.

Dot and Frances decided to volunteer at the Emanuel Medical Center. “We’d already been out volunteering on our own when Mr. George Mason, the head hospital administrator, asked if we’d be interested in starting a group, and we thought that was wonderful since we were already doing it, Dot said. “So, we took it from there. Word spread that we needed volunteers, and ladies willing to donate their time, love and care joined us from all over town.” The Pink Ladies at one point consisted of over 16 charter members and 35 members with Dot elected as president and Frances as vice-

If someone sees Dot out today, she might be visiting family, attending a First Baptist Church activity, or the BB&T coffee club. Most of her time goes to First Baptist Church, “I practically live down there,” she said. “I’ve threatened to take my pajamas!” But they don’t have all her time, because once a week she can be found at the front door of Emanuel Medical Center ready to assist. No matter how her pace may have changed, there’s always room for volunteering because she loves giving her “time and love,” she said, “because I care about others.’

One of Dot’s favorite volunteer jobs is welcoming people when they enter the hospital.

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Dot Fagler has volunteered with Emanuel Medical Center for over 50 years and shows no signs of slowing down.

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VISION 2020 HOPE FOR A FUTURE GENERATION S T O R Y B Y K E N WA R N O C K | P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y C H E R I E H O O K S

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hat began as routine industry visits in the fall of 2014 quickly became much more. Ken Warnock, CEO of the Swainsboro-Emanuel County Chamber of Commerce and Development Authority, noticed a common theme among all the industries visited that fall. Industries in Emanuel County were having problems finding qualified, responsible, and motivated employees. Over the next several months, meetings were held between the Swainsboro-Emanuel County Chamber of Commerce, Emanuel County Schools, industry representatives, and the Emanuel County Development Authority. It was decided that this group would address the workforce issue, and out of that resulted VISION 2020, a workforce initiative that would address attendance, workplace attire, workplace etiquette, entry-level skill sets, and soft skills

lacked by entry-level employees as identified by industry partners. Counselors at Swainsboro High School and Emanuel County Institute were contacted to identify students that could potentially fit a rubric created by the Great Promise Partnership, a state initiative to address students at risk of not graduating on time or even dropping out. “The issue we were having in Emanuel County was happening in virtually every community within our state,” Warnock stated. “The kids we were trying to identify were not the top five percent of their graduating class, but those of the remaining 90 percent of the student body that is sometimes overlooked because of challenges they face not only at school but also at home.” The program started with 68 applicants, who were interviewed, scored, and ranked by the original six industry partners. EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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Crider Foods, Nordson, Advanced Metal Components, American Steel Product, HotSet, and Interfor sent company representatives to meet the applicants, and they participated in a one-day career interview blitz. Southeastern Technical College and East Georgia State College also participated, then became the seventh and eighth partners after the interview process. A two-week “boot camp” for the students was created by Cherie Hooks, the Work-Based Learning coordinator for the Emanuel County School System. The camp consisted of units on personal financial planning, workplace etiquette, resume building, workplace communication, and personal appearance in the workplace. In addition to the skillbuilding units, the students also visited six of the industry partner locations representative of the jobs available for the

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participants. The fall of 2015 saw 18 students that started at six partner locations, and the program was off and running. Each location has a site coordinator and a mentor for each student. Periodic roundtable discussions are held to address issues and concerns that would arise with students, as well as challenges the industry partners may be having. Also, new opportunities are discussed at these meetings to bring new ideas to the program to make it even more valuable and enhance the student's experience. The program has been a huge success. In fact, the model here in Swainsboro is being copied by several communities in the state, as well as Tennessee, Kentucky, Texas, and Florida. We are very pleased with the outcome of all the partners' efforts and will continue to strive to make the program stronger, touching even more young lives in our community. The


program strives to give our young people meaning and purpose which has proven to increase a person’s selfworth and will allow them the opportunity to give back to a community that gave them a chance. Attendance is up dramatically, and unexcused absences are virtually a thing of the past with this group of students. The first year saw 27 of 27 seniors graduating with their high school diplomas. The two juniors from the first year have returned to the program and are on track to graduate this spring. Fourteen of last year’s participants were offered permanent positions with the companies they were with, and eight are continuing their education at STC or EGSC. This program is a win-win-win for the entire community. Young people are graduating that may not have otherwise, companies getting a better-trained workforce, and young citizens are paying into the system, giving them a sense of value and self-worth, rather than being forced to live off a system that is already strained. The program, since its inception in 2015, has seen over 100 young people participate with a 100 percent graduation rate among those finishing the program. The 2018 fall semester has 24 participants at eight of the industry partner locations. Positions range from welders and forklift operations to production technicians and logistics personnel. These and other positions at the partner industries give the students invaluable experience that can help them in their career choices for the rest of their lives. Emanuel County was designated a Marquise Community by Great Promise Partnership during the spring 2016 semester. A Marquise Community is one that demonstrates a strong public, industry partnership; private, the Swainsboro-Emanuel County Chamber of Commerce and Development Authority; and local government, the Emanuel County School System, working together to create a stronger workforce through education, determination, soft skill building and life skill training, creating a better trained and motivated entry-level worker for tomorrow’s industry needs. “We'd like to extend a special thank you to the Mill Creek Foundation for financially supporting the VISION 2020 program, for without them, the program would not be as special or successful as it has grown to the lives of over 100 young people in our county. Also, thank you to Dr. Kevin Judy and the board of the Emanuel County School System for their support and commitment to the program. But most of all, thank you to the industry partners; Advance Metal Components, American Steel Products, Crider Foods, East Georgia State College, HotSet, Interfor, Nordson, R&F Marketing, and Southeastern Technical College for their trust and commitment to our community’s VISION 2020,” said Warnock. If you are interested in supporting or learning more about VISION 2020 for your company, contact Warnock at the Swainsboro-Emanuel County Chamber of Commerce and Development Authority for more information. EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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EGSC's culture of individualized attention creates a welcoming community of discovery and learning so that ALL INDIVIDUALS HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO PURSUE A COLLEGE DEGREE.

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TUDENT-FOCUSED, East Georgia State College (EGSC) provides affordable access to higher education, enabling all students to achieve their academic goals with minimum delay and expense. As an access institution within the University System of Georgia, EGSC’s specialized attentiveness effectively supports a wide range of academic abilities and preparation levels. Students can pursue associate’s degrees, targeted bachelor’s degrees and transfer paths to other institutions. EGSC has the distinction of being among the few USG institutions approved to award associate’s degrees with disciplinary distinction.

WWW.EGA.EDU

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EGSC also contributes to the region’s economic vitality by producing an educated work force and continuously engaging the communities it serves through service, educational outreach, cultural enrichment, and economic development opportunities.


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PRIDE:

• ONE OF THE LOWEST TUITION AND FEE RATES IN THE U.S.: Coupled with student employment, The Correll Scholars Program, merit and need-based scholarships, EGSC students generally have a lower college expense which means less student debt.

• THREE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS: EGSC

Swainsboro (main campus) and EGSC Statesboro are located near I-16 East. EGSC Augusta, located on the Summerville campus of Augusta University, is near I-20 East. Collaborative agreements with Georgia Southern University and Augusta University provide a seamless transfer option for EGSC Statesboro and EGSC Augusta students to these senior institutions.

• A COMFORTABLE TRANSITION TO COLLEGE:

Safe, nurturing environment with small classes, abundant academic resources, diverse student life activities, and a residential option, Bobcat Villas South and West on the Swainsboro campus.

• FACE-TO-FACE AND ONLINE DEGREE

PROGRAMS: Certificate in: Digital Photography; Associate of Arts in: Art, Business Administration and Economics, Criminal Justice, English, History, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology; Associate of Science in: Chemistry, Mathematics and Biology; Bachelor of Science in: Biology and Nursing; and a Bachelor of Arts in: Fire and Emergency Services Administration.

• APPROACHABLE, HIGHLY QUALIFIED FACULTY: Focus is on teaching and fostering student academic growth to ensure successful college completion.

• INCLUSIVE LEARNING: In January 2015, East

Georgia State College became the second college in Georgia to offer academic access for students with intellectual disabilities with the creation of its CHOICE Program (Creating Higher Educational Opportunities to Increase College Experiences), which focuses on helping students achieve gainful employment. As a designated Comprehensive Transition Program (CTP), students can receive a Certificate of Accomplishment in Work Readiness Skills after successful completion of forty-four credit hours, two supervised work-based internships, and presentation of a career-focused portfolio.

• LEARNING GOES BEYOND THE CLASSROOM:

Situated among a 385.61 acre pine forest, the main campus in Swainsboro is an outdoor oasis and home to several protected plant and animal species, two outdoor ponds, tennis and basketball courts, an 18-hole disc

golf course, a ropes course, nature trail, and a 3.1 cross country track.

• INTERCOLLEGIATE SPORTS: A member of the

Georgia Collegiate Athletic Association, Bobcat athletics includes men’s and women’s basketball, baseball, and softball.

• A CATALYST FOR REGIONAL GROWTH: EGSC had an economic impact of more than $80 million according to the most recent study completed by the University of Georgia’s Selig Center for Economic Growth.

• CONNECTED TO THE COMMUNITY: Through the

many educational events and summer camps held at the Sudie A. Fulford Community Learning Center and the First Friday gatherings at the Morgan House, East Georgia State College continuously provides valuable outreach opportunities to interact with the communities it serves.

In a world as interconnected as ours, the challenges and opportunities facing societies are increasingly shared. The role of the state college is to provide access to higher education and empower students to make a difference in our increasingly complex world. East Georgia State College is uniquely prepared to fulfill this role. The college combines intensive and personalized teaching with an expansive global perspective and a comprehensive network of educational resources to ensure every student is successful in obtaining a college degree. Taken together, our programs and our alumni enable the college to have an important and lasting impact on the communities served. For more information, visit East Georgia State College’s website at www.ega.edu. EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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Goat Soap A FUNNY NAME FOR A SPECIAL PRODUCT

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S T O R Y B Y D E R B Y WAT E R S | P H O T O S C O U R T E S Y O F T H E FA M I LY

ABOVE: One of the many bars of soap at Candace & Kids Soap Co.

T FIRST, LIKE MOST FOLKS, YOU MIGHT BE A BIT BUTT-HEADED. But when you listen to users and give the product a try you just might become another convert to the many uses of goat’s milk soap. This is a down-home cottage-business product of Candace & Kids Soap Co. in Swainsboro. And satisfied customers from Tennessee to California will testify to its many benefits. Users cite amazing results in clearing up psoriasis, eczema, dry skin and even itchy, smelly dogs. And one user even claimed it helped him bag a big buck because of the soap formula he selected. So, what’s the story here? Well, it all goes back to Cleopatra who is said to have bathed in milk to protect her beautiful skin. But unlike cow’s milk or camel’s milk or whatever blend the Queen of the Nile might have used, goat’s milk is known to have the same ph as human skin. In other words, it is acidic-neutral and agrees with your skin.

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CANDI DANIELS

Goats milk soap is also full of vitamins and alpha hydroxy acid (also found in sugar cane and used in skin-care products to promote collagen production, which helps reduce lines and wrinkles). Each batch of soap also contains unrefined shea butter, olive, palm, coconut and soy oils. Depending on the blend of soap chosen, it may contain other essential oils, natural colorants and high-quality fragrance oils. Even the packaging is made from recycled paper and cardboard.

Love begins with worm poop

Candace Daniel got interested in goat’s soap after trying it and finding that it helped her then 5-year-old daughter who had sweating issues. A dry-skin sufferer, Candace herself found that the soap relieved a lot of her symptoms. A graduate of David Emanuel Academy and a fourth generation of the Sumner family in Emanuel County, Candi, as she is known by family and friends, didn’t start off to be a soap maker. After graduating in a class of 21, it was off to the University of Georgia to continue her education. “I was determined to go to Athens, Georgia,” she said. At UGA she played sports for her sorority and earned a degree in early childhood education. After that she moved back closer to home and received a masters degree from Georgia Southern. She taught school in Bulloch County for five years and met her future husband, Matt. “My mother found him,” Candi likes to say. In fact, in a way, she did. You think goat’s soap sounds strange? Try finding a husband while assisting your mother in acquiring worm poop.

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Actually, she went to Thomaston with her mother who was looking for vermicompost to use in growing her plants. Just so happened that Matt’s worm business had plenty. And that unlikely meeting began their love story. After living away for several years, Candi, Matt and their two daughters returned to the family farm four years ago. “It’s great,” she says of being back home. And Matt says being here is “like a breath of fresh air.” Her mother, Ann Mason Sumner, has since passed away. Oldest daughter, Savannah, graduated from David Emanuel in 2016, and youngest daughter, Ann Carol, is now an eighth grader at the school, where Matt is a member of the Board of Trustees. Candi volunteers as a coach for the junior varsity Lady Eagles basketball team. “I love it,” she says of her time with the young athletes. “I sometimes get out there and scrimmage with them. But it tells on me the next day,” she laughs.


“My entire world revolves around my children,” she says. And that is evident again when the family loads up every week or two to carry Ann Carol to barrel-racing competition. And then there is the family involvement at Nunez Baptist Church. “I fly by the seat of my pants,” Candi offers as an explanation of how she gets so much done. When she takes on something, she commits. And so it is with the soap business. Candi began an extensive research into goat’s soap and natural ingredients that could be blended to produce a superior bar of goat soap.

Great soap begins with special care

“All Candace and Kids Soap Company soaps are handmade on our family farm in Swainsboro, Ga. We use 100% farm fresh goat’s milk for the liquid in our soaps,” says the company’s website. The bars are “hand friendly”, cure for 6 weeks or longer and are at least 5.5oz. The bars are approximately 35% goat’s milk, retain 10% natural glycerine and may be used as shampoo bars too. Many customers with dry skin, oily skin, acne, rosacea, sensitive skin, eczema or psoriasis report that our soaps have given them relief of their skin and scalp problems,” relates her company website.

“I have a lot of family that helps me,” Candi says, including her 84-year-old dad, Pete Sumner, who often helps stamp bags and organize and transport shipments. And she also says she finds herself in her soap shop a lot of times after a full day. Sometimes that means working late into the night. Each week the group produces some 1,250 bars, which are then allowed to cure for at least six weeks so that the soap hardens and thus lasts longer. Careful attention is given to the temperature of each batch because this is critical to retain the skin benefits. Only a cold process is used instead of a hot process, which is normally used for regular soap production. The result is that each bar can be used “head to toe” as shampoo and body wash. Natural Vitamin E is added to each batch as a preservative and to keep the aroma fresh in each bar. In fact, if a bar of this soap is not used for six months, it will retain all its benefits just as if it had just been produced. “I listen to my customers,” Candi says.

“THE PUP SCRUB SOAP FOR DOGS IS A WONDERFUL LIFE SAVER. I HAVE FOUR DOGS AND TWO HAVE VERY SENSITIVE SKIN AND LOTS OF ALLERGIES.  BATH DAYS WERE TERRIBLE WITH ALL THE SCRATCHING AND CHEWING AFTER THE BATHS.  NOW THERE IS NO MORE UP ALL NIGHT AFTER A PUP SCRUB BATH, THEY SMELL WONDERFUL, AND THERE HAS BEEN NO DRY FLAKY SKIN.  THEY ARE NICE CLEAN HAPPY DOGS AND I NO LONGER DREAD BATH DAYS.  THANKS FOR A WONDERFUL PRODUCT.  WILL BE ORDERING MORE.”  

“BEING A MAILMAN, I WOULD ALWAYS GET BITES (MOSQUITOS, FLEAS AND FLYING ANTS) ON MY LEGS WHILE CARRYING THE MAIL.  ONCE I STARTED USING BUZZ AWAY, I NO LONGER GET ANY BITES. IT IS AMAZING.»   

D A N N Y K E L LY, U S P O S TA L C A R R I E R

Goat’s milk contains vitamins A, B6, B12 and E and contains triple the amount of casein protein as may be found in cow’s milk. Casein is absorbed into the skin and provides rapid hydration. People with allergies find that the soaps of Candace & Kids does not contain any of the chemicals found in industryproduced soaps that can aggravate allergies, dry out skin and cause irritation. Some customers report that using goat’s milk can reduce wrinkles and abrasions on different parts of the skin where it is applied. It can help create that youthful glowing skin that so many skincare products claim to provide. At the heart of every bar of soap that the family produces is what Candi calls PURE. It’s her own researched and developed formula of goat’s milk, coconut and olive oils. To that base other all-natural ingredients may be added to produce one of 55 different bars the company now offers. Each year since her first batch at Christmas of 2010 the company has grown and now the products are sold in more than 65 retail outlets and more than 3,000 customers who regularly buy over the internet. Matt, Savannah Ann and Ann Carol have been an integral part of the business. Nowadays the family is joined by extended family members, including 89-year-old Aunt Emily, who is also known as the Chief Polishing Officer of production.

JUDIE, JACKSONVILLE, FL

She feels this is one reason for the company’s success. That and the extra costs she pays for only all-natural ingredients that are more expensive that chemical alternatives but provide all the extra benefits she feels are essential for a superior product and satisfied customers. But what else would one expect from this family enterprise? From soap making to school to the family farm, there is a sense of place and tradition. Looking out over the sports arena where Ann Carol now competes in barrel-racing, Candi remembers that the land here once belonged to her grandfather Leonard Mason. “I plowed a mule there,” her Uncle Charles Mason used to say. Today her father, Pete Sumner, who is now 84, still participates in the family farming operation and in the soap making. “It’s a family business,” Candi proudly claims. It begins with a strange-sounding base of goat’s milk, which is then blended with all natural specially selected ingredients that go into the soap. But perhaps more than anything, it is that family love that is the most special ingredient in each bar. To learn more about this company and its many goat-soap products, visit candaceandkidssoapcompany.com or call (706) 975-0004. EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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GIVING BACK

Desse serves as an Emanuel County Commissioner and has for the past 23 years.

Desse Davis

A Role Model for Giving Back and Inspiring Others S T O R Y B Y N ATA L I E D AV I S

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orn and reared in Swainsboro, Desse Ervin Davis Sr. has touched the lives of families all over Emanuel County and beyond through his many years in education and public service. At 80 years old, time may have slowed him but his desire to help others better themselves hasn’t dissipated in the least. He was born in April 1938 in Swainsboro, the son of the late Bessie Lucille and Carlos Davis. His father was killed when he was a toddler, so Davis and his siblings were raised primarily by a single mother who worked multiple jobs to make ends meet for her family of four children. As the oldest male in the home, he learned the value of hard work at an early age. Those traits honed through hours working on farms and in the fields made a lasting impact on his life and helped

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shaped values for his future. He graduated from public school in Emanuel County and played college football and basketball while on his way to earning his bachelor’s degree from Fort Valley State University. He began his teaching career at Emanuel County Elementary & High School, but most people may not know that his first job in education was working as a school janitor on his way to eventually becoming a teacher and coach. He later met another young teacher, Nellie Zackery, and they wed in March 1968. They celebrated their golden wedding anniversary in 2018 in a union that produced three children — the late Desse Jr., John and Natalie — as well as two grandchildren, Brayden and Bella. John, their second son, an accountant,


lives and works in Atlanta and Natalie a newspaper editor with The Union-Recorder in Milledgeville. Nellie, a retired English teacher, affectionately known as Zack to family and close friends, passed away in August after an extended battle with cancer. Davis earned a master’s degree from Valdosta State University and an education specialist’s degree from Georgia Southern University. He worked as a math teacher, cross country, football and track coach in Emanuel County Schools for 22 years. He also worked part-time for the Emanuel County Recreation Department and for 25 years as a referee and high school athletics official. He became the first African American principal of Swainsboro High School and was the first principal to serve in the newly built SHS in 1989. He was principal for 10 years at SHS, working alongside former students turned teachers and helping guide the lives of second and even third generations of students and families. As a track and cross-country coach, he received 13 Coach of the Year awards from the Georgia High School Association. During his tenure as principal of Swainsboro High School, SHS was designated a Public School of Excellence as well as a National Blue-Ribbon School. In 1993 he was honored as a national educator of the year by the Milken Family Foundation. He retired from SHS in 1995 after 32 years as an educator, but his efforts to inspire young people continue to this day. After retiring from the public school-system he became full-time principal at the Emanuel County Youth Development Center. In addition to his work in education and athletics, Davis is deeply involved in his church and community as a deacon of 50 years at Oak Grove Missionary Baptist Church, a member of the local Chamber of Commerce, and as an Emanuel County commissioner for the past 23 years. He was honored as Citizen of the Year by the Chamber of Commerce in 2010. In spite of tough times, he is not above offering financial support to others who are really in need. Whether working in his church, tending to his farm, or speaking to young people in the community, he still works hard at whatever he does in an attempt to give back and inspire others.

In 1993, Desse received the Georgia School of Excellence Award from then Governor Zell Miller and State School Board Superintendent Werner Rogers.

Desse worked as a math teacher, cross country, football and track coach in Emanuel County Schools for 22 years. He also worked part-time for the Emanuel County Recreation Department and for 25 years as a referee and high school athletics official.

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Crider Foods family has been

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for 40 years with commitment to quality and service and is recognized as a global leader in the canned chicken market.

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912-562-4435 1 Plant Avenue Stillmore, GA 30464 criderfoods.com


TALK OF THE TOWN Showcasing emanuel County’s People and Events

Photo by John Riddle

EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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SWAINSBORO’S SUMMER CONCERT SERIES The Downtown Development Authority of Swainsboro launched a new summer concert series at The Boneyard on June 22, 2018. The initial show featured The Dukes with a set list influenced by popular R&B, soul, and classic rock hits. The band Indulgence headlined the second concert on July 27, 2018 with a variety of classic and alternative rock tunes. The free, family-friendly events drew crowds of all ages who enjoyed dancing, singing, and taking in the music under the warm summer sky.

EMANUEL COUNTY INSTITUTE STATE CHAMPIONS Emanuel County Institute’s varsity track team had a state champion last year.  Given that the school has no actual track, nor high jump facility to practice on, speaks volumes as to the determination and hard work of this young man.  Senior Gregory Jordan placed 1st in the 2018 State Championship in the high jump event clearing the bar at 6’6”.  He broke his own record of last year of 6’2” at regionals.  Unfortunately, he never got the chance to compete at last year’s state event due to a torn ACL injury, from basketball, the week before the state rounds.  The school and coaches are extremely proud of his accomplishment.

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2561 Lambs Bridge Rd Twin City, GA 30471 sales@whitďŹ eldpineseedlings.com

(912) 515-4103

Since 1996

EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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TALK OF THE TOWN FFA FORESTRY FIELD DAY The annual Future Farmers of America (FFA) Forestry Field Day was held April 19 at the Swainsboro-Emanuel County Recreation Department. Each year, FFA Chapters from around the state come to Swainsboro to compete in the annual forestry competition sponsored by the Swainsboro-Emanuel County Chamber of Commerce and the Mill Creek Foundation. The Echols County Middle School Team won the Junior Division while The Wheeler County High School Team went home with the prestigious title of Senior Division Champions.

TRADITIONAL, CREMATION AND GENERAL SERVICES PROVIDED “UNDERSTANDING OTHER’S NEEDS” Durden-Hudson Funeral Directors, Peebles-Curry Memorial Chapel are here to help families through the difficult times that accompany the loss of a loved one.

Durden-Hudson Funeral Directors Peebles-Curry Memorial Chapel

4782372131 206 E PINE STREET SWAINSBORO, GA 30401 durden-hudsonfuneraldirectors.com 24 hour obituary line: 478-237-2136

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TALK OF THE TOWN MARDI GRAS CELEBRATION FOR THE ARTS The Swainsboro Country Club was transformed into Bourbon Street earlier this year for the Emanuel Coalition for Cultural & Economic Development’s “Mardi Gras Celebration.” The event was held in support of the renovation of the Historic Dixie Theatre and development of the Barbara and Tobe Karrh Community Arts Center and raised more than $20,000. The event featured music by Blount, Blake & Brasher, hors d’oeuvres, and a 50/50 raffle. Johnny Ware won the $1,240 raffle prize, which he generously donated back to the project.

GOLDEN RADISH WINNERS Every year in October, school representatives from across the state gather in Atlanta for the Golden Radish Awards. Presented by the Georgia Department of Education, Georgia Department of Agriculture, Georgia Department of Public Health, the UGA Cooperative Extension, and Georgia Organics, the Golden Radish recognizes Local Educational Agencies (LEAs) for their outstanding work with farm to school. Radishes are awarded at five different levels to recognize varying levels of participation in farm to school. Platinum, Gold, Silver, and Bronze radishes are awarded to LEA’s with established farm to school programs while Honorary Radishes are awarded to programs that are just getting started. Honorary Radish recipients must satisfy at least one criterion within the Bronze level or higher. Emanuel County was awarded the Honorary Radish Award for the 2018 school year. “This award was the result of countless hours of collaborating, organizing and implementing farm to school activities by our teachers, staff, and administrators,” stated Chandra Hooks, School Nutrition Director for Emanuel County. “Students in Emanuel County are fortunate to have teachers who are passionate about agricultural education, health and wellness, and the hands on learning opportunities that farm to school activities offer. We are overjoyed with the Honorary Radish Award and hope to see our farm to school initiative grow over the next few years.”

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TALK OF THE TOWN Miss Emanuel County & Miss Southeast Georgia Pageant

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n Saturday, August 4, 2018, the 41st Annual Miss Emanuel County and Miss Southeast Georgia Scholarship Pageants were held at the Swainsboro City Auditorium. Twenty-one contestants from around the local area competed for the respective titles. At the end of the evening, Lelyn Stewart was crowned Miss Emanuel County, Sarah DeLoach was crowned Miss Southeast Georgia, Savannah Lariscy was crowned Miss Emanuel County’s Outstanding Teen, and Caroline Mason was crowned Miss Southeast Georgia’s Outstanding Teen. These ladies will now go on to represent Emanuel County at the Miss Georgia Pageant held in Columbus each June.

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3 1: Board Members with the new queens 2: 1st Runner Up Brittany Sherrod, Miss Emanuel County Lelyn Stewart, 2nd Runner Up Madolyn Howard 3: Miss Emanuel County’s Outstanding Teen Savannah Lariscy, Miss Emanuel County Lelyn Stewart, Miss Southeast Georgia Sarah DeLoach, Miss Southeast Georgia’s Outstanding Teen Caroline Mason 4: 1st Runner Up Melanie Purcell, Miss Southeast Georgia’s Outstanding Teen; Caroline Mason, Miss Emanuel County’s Outstanding Teen; Savannah Lariscy, 2nd Runner Up Anna Kate Robinson 5: 1st Runner Up Darlyn Davis, Miss Southeast Georgia Sarah DeLoach, 2nd Runner Up Caroline Burnette

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Haddock & Holsonback

Chiropractic Live a Well-Adjusted Life Monday - Friday: 8:00am - 12:00pm & 2:00pm - 5:30pm

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DUBLIN LOCATION Swainsboro Location Statesboro Location (912)538-3100 (478) 275-3543 (478) 237-7948 (912) 681-7090 (478)289-2200 1101 Hilcrest PARKWAY 206 North Green Street 1601 Fair Road Suite I Swainsboro, GA 30401 Suite 700 Dublin, GA 31021 Statesboro, GA 30458

www.southeasterntech.edu Lose 2-3 Inches In

e HHr

Southeastern Technical College is an Equal Opportunity Institution

VOTED BEST FLORIST!

Haddock & Holsonback

Chiropractic Live a Well-Adjusted Life Monday - Friday: 8:00am - 12:00pm & 2:00pm - 5:30pm

(478) 237-7948 206 N Green St. • Swainsboro, GA 30401 For a full list of services available, visit our website: markhaddockchiropractic.com

ULTRASLIM BODY SCULPTING & FACIAL REJUVENATION DUBLIN LOCATION (478) 275-3543 1101 Hilcrest PARKWAY Suite I Dublin, GA 31021

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Swainsboro Location (478) 237-7948 206 North Green Street Swainsboro, GA 30401

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TALK OF THE TOWN Green Jacket Dinner

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n Thursday, May 3, 2018, the 5th Annual Green Jacket Dinner was held at the Swainsboro Country Club. After a social hour and dinner, the highlight of the evening came when Milton Gray was awarded the coveted green jacket. Milton has served on the Pine Tree Festival Foundation for many years as treasurer and handled the information booth during the festival. Milton’s servant spirit goes far beyond the Pine Tree Festival having served his community for many years in various capacities.

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3 1. Milton & Tammy Gray 2. Kay Rogers, Connie Riddle, Bill Rogers, Jr. 3.Matt Donaldson, Wade Johnson, Lynn Brinson, Twin City Mayor Eileen Dudley 4. Leah & Zac Frye, Tracy Mason 5. Jodi & Guy Singletary, Tanya Lane 6. Eliza Noles and Denise Warnock 7. Daisy Reeves, Judge Bobby Reeves, Ken Warnock

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8. Larry Calhoun, Ruth Ann and Senator Jack Hill 9. Cason DeVane and Reagan Freeman 10. Mitch & Kristin Hall 11. Sabrina Greenhouse and Dottie Durden 12. Ken Gray, 2018 Green Jacket Recipient Milton Gray, Tammy Gray, Ann Gray 13. Miss Pine Tree Festival Sydney Dorsey, Eliza Noles, Teen Miss Pine Tree Festival Courtney Akridge


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PINE TREE FESTIVAL AND SOUTHEAST TIMBER EXPO

F

OR ANOTHER CONSECUTIVE YEAR, the crowds showed up and made this year’s Pine Tree Festival one of the biggest yet! Friday night’s Rhythm & Pines Music Festival was once again a good time for all. Sam’s Drive-In kept the folks at the fountain dreaming of the beach, Rhett Blount & Friends brought everyone back to their country roots, and the Swingin’ Medallions packed the Boneyard for the largest crowd Emanuel County has ever seen on Friday night! The Grand Parade on Saturday morning kept the momentum going with over 100 entries. The crowds were entertained with the Ultimate Air Dogs, the SAWA Lumberjack Challenge, and a zip line through downtown Swainsboro. All-in-all, the 73rd Annual Pine Tree Festival was a huge success and definitely one for the history books!

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millpondkayak@gmail.com P.O. Box 576 | Twin City EMANUEL COUNTY LIVING

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TALK OF THE TOWN SwainsboroEmanuel County Chamber of Commerce Golf Classic

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n Friday, September 21, 2018, the 26th Annual Industry Appreciation Chamber Golf Classic was held at the Swainsboro Golf and Country Club. With 27 teams in the field, the team from Jendyk Enterprises won the Industry Flight while the Queensborough Bank & Trust team won the non-industry flight, as well as the Overall Champion of the tournament. This annual event is hosted each year by the Swainsboro-Emanuel County Chamber of Commerce and the Emanuel County Development Authority.

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1. Nordson 2. Crider Foods 3. Firepit winner, Jendyk Enterprises 4. Emanuel Medical 5. Twin City Precision Metal 6. Interfor 7. Stitch-N-Print

8. Industry Flight winner, Team Jendyk Enterprises 9. Yeoman’s 10. Queensborough Bank & Trust, Overall Winner 11. Jendyk Enterprises

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Sunshine House Children’s Advocacy Center 2018 Dinener and Auction

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n conjunction with the Sporting Clays Tournament each year, The Sunshine House Children’s Advocacy Center hosts a dinner and auction. Proceeds from the event strengthen the program needs at the center and in 2018 the counseling program benefited. The annual event takes place at Beaver Creek Plantation in Twin City and draws participation from Candler, Emanuel, Laurens and Bulloch counties. The wonderful dinner is provided by the Beaver Creek chef and staff. A highlight of the evening is a sumptuous buffet of desserts prepared by Judge Kathy Palmer. Following the meal, Auctioneer Rusty Lane takes the floor and the fun begins. The silent and live auctions contain a variety of hand-made items along with antiques, art, trips, furniture and more. The 2019 Dinner and Auction will be held March 28.

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1: Cheryl Patrick, Jimmy & Tammy Bellamy, District Attorney Hayward Altman 2: Charles Schwabe, Mayor of Swainsboro, Jean Schwabe Board Member 3: Donny Wilson, Sheila & Jerry Cross 4: G.W. Johnson and Lynn & Phil Torrance 5: Bobby & Deidre Clark and Tammie Bellamy 6: Julie Roberts, Board member and her husband Larry Roberts, and Ralph Clinton 7: The Sunshine House Staff-Gail Carter, Brandi Hood, Haley Bullis 8: Mitch & Kristin Hall and Tanya & Rusty Lane 9: Julie Roberts and Lydia Kahout 10: Carter and Jessie Meadows

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Index of Advertisers

91 56 74 45 68 64 14 55 80 19 31 20 84 IFC 5 55 BC 7 83 65 87 74 8 74 91 3 32 91 91 25 80 50 87 87 40 IBC 50 68 87 83 1 65

Altamaha EMC Bernie's on West Main Big Dog Lending Central Fence Company, Inc. Central Georgia Clinic of Chiropractic Chapman Funeral Home Citizens Bank of Swainsboro City of Swainsboro Crider Foods, Inc. Daniels Cheverolet-Buick-GMC Downtown Development Authority Durden Banking Company Durden-Hudson Funeral Directors East Georgia Healthcare Center East Georgia State College Emanuel County Commissioners Emanuel County Development Authority Emanuel Medical Center Gambrell Photography Georgia Dermatology Associates Haddock & Holsonback Chiropractic Handi-House Mfg. Company Interfor JAB-0 Metal Fabricating Co., Inc. Kilpatrick Sconyers Kwik Shop Mark Williams Studio Mill Pond Kayak Northland Communications Parrish Pest Management Servpro South Auction & Realty Southeastern Technical College Southern Traditions Floral & Gifts Spivey State Bank Swainsboro-Emanuel County Chamber of Commerce Swainsboro Supply The Edenfield House Ultra Slim Whitfield Farms & Nursery Wrens Southern Ladies & Gents Yeomans & Associates Agency

altamahaemc bigdoglending.com centralfenceco.com centralgeorgiaclinic.com chapmanfhofswainsboro.com cbs-lc.com cityofswainsboro.org criderfoods.com danielschev.com cityofswainsboro.org durdenbc.com durden-hudsonfuneraldirectors.com eghc.org ega.edu emanuelco-ga.gov emanuelchamber.org emanuelmedical.org gambrellphotography.com gaderm.ocm markhaddockchiropractic.com handihouse.com interfor.com jabometals.com kilpatricksconyers.com kwikshop.com markwilliamsstudio.com millpondkayak.com yournorthland.com servprostatesboro.com southauctiongroup.com southeasterntech.edu southerntraditionfloral.com personsbankingcompany.com emanuelchamber.org edenfieldhouse.com myultraslim.com whitfieldpineseedlings.com

Please thank these advertisers for making this publication possible! Support these businesses and buy local. 96

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Fall 2018

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Fall 2018

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Emanuel County Living 2018  
Emanuel County Living 2018  
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