Issuu on Google+


A report to the community At Danville Regional Medical Center, our goal is to

Eric Deaton, CEO Danville Regional Medical Center

deliver the best healthcare available to the residents of the greater Dan River Region as we seek to make our community healthier. With the help of dedicated physicians, employees, volunteers and board members, along with your continued support and encouragement, we continue our passionate pursuit of excellence.

Delivering quality healthcare close to home is one of the most important contributions we make. In 2011, we announced our expanded relationship with Duke University Health System, formalizing a comprehensive hospital patient safety and UYEPMX]EJ½PMEXMSR-REHHMXMSRXSSYVGSQQMXQIRXXSUYEPMX]XLIVIEVI many other ways we make a positive impact on the communities we serve. Here are a few of the ways we are making a difference. Nearly $3.4 million in capital improvements In 2011, we opened four new physician clinics: Family Healthcare Center – Brosville, Southside Internal Medicine, Family Urgent Care Center and DRMC Family Medicine Residency Continuity Clinic. At the beginning of 2012, we opened Piedmont Psychiatric Associates and later in the year we will open another Family Healthcare Center in the Mount Hermon area to provide the community with even more access to primary care. We have also added new equipment and made a number of quality improvements to our facility including patient beside monitors in our critical care unit, remote telemetry monitors, dash monitors in the emergency department and new fetal monitors for our women and children’s ¾SSV%PWSSYV7XIT(S[R9RMXLEWERI[ patient call system.

In fact, we invested nearly $3.4 million in our facilities last year which, in addition to the above, included technology replacement, information technology additions/updates, and important facility upkeep and maintenance. Contributing to our local tax base Last year, Danville Regional paid $1,673,341 in taxes which helped support our city, county and state. This included sales taxes as well as property taxes. These dollars help maintain local schools, fund the development of roads, recruit business and industry, and provide other similar services vital to support and sustain a thriving economy. Helping those in need Danville Regional is committed to ensuring the delivery of needed healthcare to all members of the community, regardless of ability to pay. Last year the cost to Danville Regional was nearly $16 million to provide services for those without the ability to pay for their care. Adding new physicians During the past year, Danville Regional Medical Center added 24 new physicians to provide care in family medicine, internal medicine, orthopedics, cardiology, cardiovascular & thoracic surgery, urology, ophthalmology, anesthesiology, emergency medicine and hospital medicine. One of our community’s major employers With an annual payroll of $71,542,020 and 1,310 employees, Danville Regional is one of the largest employers in the region. This means that our staff and family members attend many of the same schools, shop at the same stores and volunteer their time and resources for the same organizations as you do. We thank you for choosing us for your healthcare needs. With your support, we can continue helping our community become healthier.

142 South Main Street ˆ Danville, Virginia 24541 ˆ (434) 799-2100 ˆ www.DanvilleRegional.com


A report to the community COMMUNITY BENEFIT REPORT Charity and other uncompensated care ............................................................................................................................$ 15,970,988 Includes unpaid cost of Medicaid as well as charity care and other uncompensated care

Board of Trustees 2011 – 2012 OFFICERS

Frank R. Campbell, Ph.D., Chairman Stratford House, Inc. Eric Deaton, Secretary Danville Regional Medical Center MEMBERS Larry G. Campbell, Jr. Bibleway Cathedral Michael A. Caplan, M.D. Piedmont Internal Medicine

'SQQYRMX]FIRI½XTVSKVEQW .......................................................................................................................................................$ 1,742,325 Financial contributions............................................................................................................. $ 281,151 Health professionals education.......................................................................................... $ 208,262 Tuition reimbursement ........................................................................................................... $ 74,170 Physician recruitment............................................................................................................... $ 1,153,742 LifePoint Community Foundation Grant...................................................................... $ $25,000 Danville Family YMCA Taxes paid..............................................................................................................................................................................................................$ 1,905,841 Property and other taxes...................................................................................................... $ 780,841 Local sales tax.............................................................................................................................. $ 225,000 State Sales tax.............................................................................................................................. $ 900,000

2011 TOTAL.......................................................................................................................... $ 19,619,154 In addition, the hospital’s payroll of nearly $71.5 million and capital investments of nearly $3.4 million last year GSRXVMFYXIHWMKRM½GERXP]XSXLIGSQQYRMX]´WIGSRSQMGWYGGIWW

George B. Daniel, P.A. Attorney Shannon Hair Danville Community College Janet Laughlin, Ph.D. Averett University Gary P. Miller, M.D. Cardiology Consultants of Danville, Inc. Laurie Moran Danville/Pittsylvania Chamber of Commerce Bhushan H. Pandya, M.D. Danville Gastroenterology Center, PC Mukesh B. Patel, M.D. Danville Gastroenterology Center, PC Harry Phillips, M.D. Duke University Medical Center Richard A. Smith, M.D. Emergency Department at Danville Regional Medical Center V. Kiran Vasireddy, M.D. Danville Patient Care, Inc.

SPONSORSHIPS AND DONATIONS

Danville Regional Medical Center and our employees are pleased to have been able to support the following activities and organizations during the past year. ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ

%P^LIMQIV´W%WWSGMEXMSR %QIVMGER'ERGIV7SGMIX]¯(ERZMPPI%VIE &MK&VSXLIVW&MK7MWXIVW¯(ERZMPPI%VIE &S]WERH+MVPW'PYFW¯(ERZMPPI%VIE 'EVPMWPIWGLSSP 'EW[IPP'SYRX]'LEQFIVSJ'SQQIVGI 'LEXLEQ=SYXL0IEKYI 'LEXLEQ6SXEV]'PYF (ER6MZIV,MKL7GLSSP.638' (ERZMPPI%VIE%VXW ,YQERMXMIW%WWSGMEXMSR (ERZMPPI'ERGIV%WWSGMEXMSR (ERZMPPI'SRGIVX%WWSGMEXMSR (ERZMPPI)HYGEXMSR%VXW 'YPXYVEP'IRXIV (ERZMPPI*EQMP]=1'% (ERZMPPI0MJI7EZMRK (ERZMPPI0MXIVEG]4VSNIGX (ERZMPPI1YWIYQSJ*MRI%VXW ,MWXSV] (ERZMPPI4EVOW6IGVIEXMSR 8SYVMWQ (ERZMPPI4MXXW]PZERME'SYRX]'LEQFIVSJ'SQQIVGI (ERZMPPI4MXXW]PZERME'SYRX]'SQQYRMX],IEPXL Coalition ˆ (ERZMPPI7GMIRGI'IRXIV

Danville Regional Medical Center is part of LifePoint Hospitals ®, a leading hospital company focused on providing quality healthcare services close to home. Through its subsidiaries, LifePoint operates more than 50 hospital campuses in 18 states. With a mission of “Making Communities Healthier,” LifePoint is the sole community hospital provider in a majority of the communities it serves. More information about the Company, which is headquartered in Brentwood, Tennessee, can be found on its website LifePointHospitals.com.

ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ ˆ

(ERZMPPI7LEK'PYF (ERZMPPI7SGGIV'PYF (S[RXS[R(ERZMPPI%WWSGMEXMSR *VMIRHWSJXLI'EW[IPP'SYRX]0MFVEV] )H7XIJJI]+SPJ8SYVREQIRX .EGO;,EPP1IQSVMEP*YRH /IRXYGO]:SPYRXIIV*MVI(ITEVXQIRX /IRXYGO]=SYXL&EWIFEPP /MHWERH4VSW7TSVXW'EQT 0E[VIRGI1'PEVO'IRXIVJSV%JVMGER%QIVMGER Culture 1EVGLSJ(MQIW 4MXXW]PZERME'SYRX]'SQQYRMX]%GXMSR 4VSZMHIRGI*MVIERH6IWGYI 6MZIVZMI[6SXEV] 7EGVIH,IEVX7GLSSP 7SYXLIVR'LVMWXMER0IEHIVWLMT'SYRGMP 7SYXLIVR4MIHQSRX8IGLRSPSK]'SYRGMP 7TIGMEP3P]QTMGW¯:MVKMRME 8LI']WXMG*MFVSWMW*SYRHEXMSR ;IWXSZIV'LVMWXMER%GEHIQ]

“Charity and other uncompensated care” includes the amounts not covered by Medicaid as well as charity care and bad debt. “Physician recruitment costs” include recruitment costs and support of new physicians’ initial practice establishment in the community. 4E]VSPPMRGPYHIWGSRWSPMHEXIHWEPEVMIW[EKIWFIRI½XWERHGSRXVEGXPEFSVGSWXW±'ETMXEP investments” include facility expansions/renovations, equipment purchases, technology replacement, information technology additions/updates, and routine facility upkeep and maintenance. All references to “LifePoint,” “LifePoint Hospitals,” or the “Company” used in this release VIJIVXS0MJI4SMRX,SWTMXEPW-RGERHMXWEJ½PMEXIW


salvation army

page 12

giving back to our community

Contents

page 24

{ A U G U S T 2 0 1 2 } S h o w c a s e M ag a z i n e

Special fe a t u r e s

22 24 28

he said she said gets fit: month two giving back to the community by Moriah Davis

star: flash, smoke, belly buttons and great rock & roll by Jack Garrett like us Showcase Magazine

 Showcase Magazine

| AUGUST 2012 | www.showcasemagazine.com

sections

9

HE SAID HE SAID

Great Service - Same Whining By Larry Oldham & Dena Hill

11

The teaching tree

14

The money club

18

GREEN THUMBS UP

Baby Stages

By Caroline Jennings-Arthur

Segementing Your Email By Todd Boaze

Carrots, Spinach & Onions, Oh My! By Darcy Cropp

32

A Better you

Avoid These Bad Food & Products! By Dave Gluhareff

42

MYSTIFIED

A Life Changed Forever by Misty Brooks

Also Inside the 6 From EDITOR 34 Fun and Games

Crossword, Word Seach & Sudoku

37 41

Area Events Guide Paws for a Cause By Paulette Dean

On the Cover: Defending Dodgeball Champions,The Boys and Girls Club of Danville. (l to r) Carlton Jeter, Ryan Cobbs, Keisha Howerton, Dave Thomas (Unit Director), Brian Henderson (Teen Director). Take your shot at dethroning them on August 18 at the Showcase Magazine Dodgeball Tournament. Photo by Michelle Dalton Photography


FRO M THE EDI TOR

SHOWCASE

The definition of teamwork is a coordinated effort

generated will help fund new air conditioners for

– M A G A Z I N E –

of a group of individuals acting together as a team

the Boys and Girls Club of Danville, supplies for club

AUGUST 2012

to accomplish a specific goal. Through the years, in

members, and makes college tours for teens a

sports, we’ve seen both sides of the coin. Like them or

possibility. Sponsorships are available, but are going

not, a good example of teamwork is the New England

fast. Contact me at paul@showcasemagazine.com

Patriots. They’ve achieved success by bonding as

or Scott at scott@showcasemagazine.com if you

team. There are a handful of AFC teams with more

are interested in becoming a sponsor or if you’re

skilled players, but as the years have proven teamwork

interested in entering a team in the wonderful event.

overcomes individual talent. The flipside of that is the

The deadline to enter is August 10 and the Dodgeball

Miami Heat; sure they won the NBA Championship this

tournament will be held on August 18 at the Boys and

year, but what about last year? Dwyane Wade and

Girls of Danville.

Graphic Designer Kim Demont, kim@evincemagazine.com

in the NBA. And they lost to the Dallas Mavericks, the

As you’re formulating your team remember something

better “team.” This year the Heat took the Mavericks’

the great Babe Ruth said. He said, “The way the team

Finance Manager Cindy Astin, cindy@showcasemagazine.com

formula, played together as a team, not just two

plays as a whole determines its success. You may have

individuals, and became champions.

the greatest bunch of individual stars in the world, but

LeBron James are arguably two of the best players

if they don’t play together, the club won’t be worth Teamwork isn’t only valuable in sports. It’s important in

a dime.”

every aspect of life. It’s extremely vital in the business world. Here at Showcase there is no way we could put

That sums up teamwork, so let’s all play together and

out our quality publications if we worked individually.

help make this a success for the Boys and Girls Club

Knowing the importance of teamwork, Showcase

of Danville.

Magazine is putting together a Dodgeball tournament with the proceeds to benefit The Boys and Girls Club of Danville. Dodgeball is a fun bonding experience and this tournament is for a great cause. The revenue

STAFF

Publisher Andrew Scott Brooks, scott@showcasemagazine.com Editor Paul Seiple, paul@showcasemagazine.com Creative Designer Katherine Miraldi, katherine@showcasemagazine.com

Circulation Manager Joann Brooks, joann@showcasemagazine.com Advertising 1.877.638.8685 Larry Oldham, Vice President of Sales and Marketing larry@showcasemagazine.com, 434.728.3713 Moriah Davis, Account Executive moriah@showcasemagazine.com Selena Lipscomb, Account Executive selena@showcasemagazine.com, 434.429.9795

Enjoy the issue,

Paul Seiple EDITOR

Customer Service

Subscribe to Home Delivery for $24 per year 753 Main Street #3 | Danville, VA 24541 Phone 1.877.638.8685 | Fax 925.380.5404 info@showcasemagazine.com www.showcasemagazine.com AUGUST 2012 contriButinG Writers Larry Oldham | Dena Hill | Todd Boaze | Misty Brooks Paulette Dean | Dave Gluhareff |Caroline JenningsArthur | Darcy Cropp | Moriah Davis | Jack Garrett contriButinG PhotoGraPhers | Jack Garrett | Michelle Dalton Photography | Kelly Davis

Don’t miss the August 2012 issue of eVince  Showcase Magazine

| AUGUST 2012 | www.showcasemagazine.com


• Adequate Space for 350 people

• Business Meetings, Private Parties, Weddings and Wedding Rehearsal Parties

EVENT CENTER

• HD Projection System 150 inch Screens • Two 70 inch HD Flat Screen TV’s

• Handicapped Accessible Bathroom • Fully Equipped Kitchen • Bride’s Dressing Room • Separate Boardroom

WWWCLOVERDALEQUARTERSCOMs  s,ARRY-ILLER *RsLWMILLER

LIVECOM


Mary Baldwin College Adult Degree Program BACHELOR’S DEGREES • CERTIFICATES • FULL TEACHER LICENSURE

Earn your degree.

TRANSFORM YOUR LIFE. Come see us at the Southern Virginia Higher Education Center to find out more about our co-ed programs in teaching, business, health care administration, and more. Online and in-person options at locations throughout Virginia.

APPLY BY AUGUST 15 FOR FALL 2012 www.mbc.edu/connect/south-boston/ 800-468-2262

Your therapy shouldn’t take the weekend off. Call us for a tour and to GLVFXVVDSODQRIFDUHWRÀW your individual needs. www.lifeworksrehab.com

ÂŽ

We Offer 7 Days a Week of Rehab! Piney Forest Health & Rehabilitation Center

3LQH\)RUHVW5RDG‡'DQYLOOH9$‡  Showcase Magazine | AUGUST 2012 | www.showcasemagazine.com Piney Forest HRC Seven Day Rehab_3_12_12.indd 1

3/21/2012 11:27:03 AM


Your tunnel vision is becoming somewhat annoying. I was with you in that restaurant and yet our recollections are diametrically opposed. I remember and heard every little thing that went wrong that night, and you have put it completely out of your head.

Last month we had the pleasure of attending a friend’s wedding in Atlanta. I really enjoyed the time off because it gave me a chance to shop and be with my best friend in the whole world...you. Everything was beautiful, the wedding was exquisite, being with our friends and sharing good times is what life is all about. You, of course, know all of this so I don’t have to explain it to you.

She Said...

pHOTO BY mICHELLE

There is one little thing that happened that you have not commented about....yet.

I know it was pricey, but it was a fabulous meal with great customer service and that is just what I have missed.

Then, when boredom sets in, I start hearing your take on everyone in the restaurant. “I bet that couple beside us is having an affair.” Right after you said that Friday night I heard our waiter congratulate them on their 20th anniversary. I started to say something to you about it, but I figured it would break up your fantasy, so why bother? The most astonishing request you made was having Frank go through all of the garbage to find empty Coca Cola bottles that you collect and sneak them over to our table in a brown paper bag. REALLY!? I will say that being with you and going out to eat, most always presents a challenge, but I can also say you are never without a word, be it right or wrong. It just sometimes gives me indigestion, which up until now I have hesitated to tell you. But I thought it best to get it off my chest while you are thinking everything was top notch in Atlanta. To me, it was better food, but the same old whining I get in every restaurant.

www.showcasemagazine.com

Be sure to read She Said He Said in Evince.

The reason you didn’t hear any complaints was because these people know how to treat their patrons. Since I traveled many years on a company expense account I had grown accustom to receiving good service while enjoying great meals. When we go to a regularly priced restaurant or even a higher priced restaurant in some cities, they just don’t seem to know the customer service that I have grown to enjoy. I like it when the waiter brushes up the crumbs from the table after the main course with his little comb so that dessert will be served on a clean table. I especially like to have the waiter keep my water or tea glass filled throughout the meal instead of having to call him and ask for a refill.

Send comments to: Larry@showcasemagazin.com

Did you notice that Friday night when we went out for dinner, I did not register one single complaint in the restaurant? Most of the time after we leave a restaurant I’m lectured on what I said or did that was wrong. But Friday night was an exception. Not one complaint from me.You are dying to know why, aren’t you? I thought so.

First of all just let me say it was one of the most delectable meals that we have had in a long dALTON pHOTOGRAPHY time. I’ll give you that. I know it was expensive and the waiter (Frank) did give us great service like initially coming to the table and calling you Mr. Oldham. I guess the maître d’ informed him. That was indeed thoughtful. Keeping the glasses filled also was very nice. Offering to explain the meals is typical of most restaurants, so that was okay. But as soon as he left the table and while other people around us were being served, you started in.You do it at every restaurant. “We were here way before they came in, why do they get their food before we do? What is taking so long with our food, I could have gone out in the woods, killed it myself, skinned it, and cooked it by now!”

he said...she said...

GREAT SERVICE - SAME WHINING

by Larry Oldham & Dena Hill

he Said...

| AUGUST 2012 | Showcase Magazine 


Baby Stages

the teaching tree

Tree Your baby is quickly approaching his/her first birthday. The time has flown by.You’ve been interacting with your little one constantly and eagerly watching for milestones. Smiling is a baby’s first social skill -- he’s picking up on how relationships work -- as well as a signal of emotional growth.Your baby is showing you he can distinguish between different emotional states; he’s aware that the happy feeling he gets when he sees you isn’t the same as the sad feeling he has when you’re not around. Look at what your little one has learned this first year:

Rolling over (2 or 3 months) During tummy time (which you should supervise), your baby may lift herself into a push-up position and then start to rock back and forth or kick her feet. Then, if she’s strong enough, those movements will send her rolling over. (She may get startled and cry the first time!) Flipping from back to front often takes until around 5 months because it requires more coordination and strength.You don’t need to coach your baby.

Grabbing (3 or 4 months) by Caroline Jennings-Arthur caroline@ showcasemagazine.com

After the first few months, babies begin to gauge where things are in space, and they can plan an action, such as grabbing a pacifier. By simply dropping something and picking it up, your baby’s learning that he can manipulate things with his hands, and he’s learning more details about how his toys work. He can make the rattle produce a sound, for instance, which teaches him cause and effect. Being able to grab things means he can engage more in play -- whether by himself or with you.

cuddle. So try not to take it personally if your baby isn’t wrapping her arms around you. She might be more receptive to physical affection before naps, at bedtime, or while you’re looking at a book together.

Playing peekaboo (6 months) What is it about this game that makes your baby crack up no matter how many times you play? When a baby understands the concept of object permanence -- that even though he can’t see your face, it’s still there behind your hands or his blankie -- he gets a thrill from knowing that at any minute your smiling face will pop back into view. A few months later, he’ll be able to play along by hiding himself. How to increase the fun: 1. Sit close enough that your baby can see your eyes. It’ll keep him focused on what you’re doing. 2. Ask, “Where’s Mommy?” Your voice will reassure him that you’re still there. 3.Vary the length of time you’re hiding and play with the tone of your voice to make the game more stimulating for him (and less monotonous for you!).

Hugging (5 months) Your baby will quickly learn to hug Mom, Dad, and other people she’s comfortable around -- as well as her stuffed gorilla, the cat, and anything else she adores -- by watching others hug and getting hugged herself. Not all babies are wild about hugging, though. Some are naturally more affectionate, while others are just too busy exploring their environment to stop for a

10 Showcase Magazine

| AUGUST 2012 | www.showcasemagazine.com

Sitting up (8 months) Once your baby has enough balance, arm strength, and head, neck, and lower-body control, she’ll be able to sit up and take in a whole new world. At this point, her improving eyesight will


allow her to see objects outside her direct line of vision -and she’ll try to pull herself up to get a better look. At first, she won’t be able to sit up for long on her own and may need to put out her hand for balance. To motivate your baby to sit well, dangle or set her favorite toy in front of her, then slowly move it from side to side to encourage her to reach for the toy and rely solely on her torso and legs for balance. She’ll be sitting without help in no time!

Crawling (6 to 10 months) Now that your baby’s sitting up by himself, it won’t be long before he’s looking to broaden his horizons. He’ll probably start by repositioning himself, from sitting to being on all fours. Then he’ll test his arms: When he figures out that they can support him, off he’ll go. Some babies start to move without doing the typical hands-and-knees crawl.Yours might shuffle across the floor on his bottom, slither on his belly, or even roll. To encourage him, clear some space. Then place things he likes (including yourself) just out of reach. And be sure to keep him safe by childproofing the house. Take a tour on your hands and knees, and remove anything your baby shouldn’t get into.

HOMEBUYER & CREDIT WORKSHOP WHEN: August 21st, 6pm WHERE: Piedmont CU :KHWKHU\RXDUHDÀUVWWLPHKRPHEX\HURU DUHUHDG\WRPDNHDPRYH\RXZRQ¡W ZDQWWRPLVVWKLVLPSRUWDQWDQGYHU\ LQIRUPDWLYHVHPLQDU 3OHDVHSUHUHJLVWHUE\$XJXVWWK

REGISTER NOW!

Pulling up (8 months) Until now, your baby has depended on you to help her get up on her feet. But at around 8 months, her torso and leg muscles will be strong enough for her to stand up on her own. It’s also when she’ll realize that she can: Her confidence has been boosted by her ability to roll over, sit up on her own, and crawl.

NMLS# 402961

www.piedmontcu.org | 434-797-1954

At first, she’ll look for things to pull up on -- the side of the crib, the arm of the sofa, your leg -- so be sure to remove objects that aren’t safe or sturdy enough for support, or that have sharp edges she can fall on. And while she may not need to grab your fingers to get up anymore, she won’t know how to bend her knees to sit until she’s about 10 or 12 months.

Walking (10 to 18 months) First steps represent a huge developmental leap. Walking requires muscle strength, coordination, balance -- and a certain level of emotional maturity, too. After all, when you’re crawling, your center of gravity is just a few inches off the ground. To walk you need to have a bit more confidence. That’s why some beginning walkers are content to cruise along the furniture for weeks. The more eager hike away and never look back. On the most basic level, walking frees up your child’s hands to carry items while he moves about independently. By incorporating everything he’s learned from all the other milestones -- about space, objects, and people -- he can now bring you things. This turns a purely physical skill into a game, as well as a rich social interaction. For instance: He comes over to you with his little toy duck and you say, “Thank you.� You quack a few times (to his delight), and then he takes his duck away and you say, “Bye-bye, duck.� SM Note: Parents Magazine was used as a source of reference for this month’s column.

www.showcasemagazine.com

| AUGUST 2012 | Showcase Magazine 11


with Chef Paul

cooking

PAUL's

CORN SALAD ingredients 2 ears white sweet corn 2 ears yellow sweet corn 2 Tbsp. rice vinegar 2 Tbsp. light olive oil 1 packet SplendaŠ 1/3 cup basil, thinly sliced 1 red pepper, chopped 3 scallions, chopped salt & pepper

directions For a fun, informative talk on hospitality, at your next meeting or function, contact Chef Paul at 276.732.2089 (C) or 276.957.3210 (H)

Blanch corn for 3 minutes in boiling water, then plunge in cold water to stop cooking. Cut from cob with a sharp serrated knife, but do not scrape cobs. Mix together 2 Tbsp. seasoned rice vinegar, 2 Tbsp. light olive oil, dash of salt & pepper, 1 packet SplendaŠ, and 1/3 cup thinly sliced basil. Chop 1 red pepper and 3 scallions including green part. Add to corn. Add vinegar mixture and mix thoroughly. Chill 2 hours or overnight before serving. Gets better as it sits!

marketing is not To Advertise in Showcase Magazine Contact Larry Oldham at alien 434.728.3713 or to us Larry@ShowcaseMagazine.com Advertising - Graphic Design - Promotional Products - Marketing Consulting - Social Media

12 Showcase Magazine

| AUGUST 2012 | www.showcasemagazine.com


Home Infusion Therapies Provided: /* ÊUʘ̈LˆœÌˆVÃÊUʘ̈v՘}>Ã ˜ÌˆÛˆÀ>ÃÊUÊ-ÌiÀœˆ`ÃÊUÊÞ`À>̈œ˜ *>ˆ˜Ê>˜>}i“i˜ÌÊUÊ …i“œÌ…iÀ>«Þ 6ÊUÊ ˜ÌiÀ>Ê ÕÌÀˆÌˆœ˜ ——————————————————————)——————————————————————  "   9 Ê " 7

Ê

Ê " * , / Ê U Ê  " 

/Ê "--"

Ê

, /

ˆ˜ˆV>Ê*…>À“>VˆÃÌÊ>Û>ˆ>LiÊÓ{ÊÉÊÇÊÉÊÎÈxÊUÊ œ“«iÌiʏˆ˜iʜvʈ˜vÕȜ˜Ê`iˆÛiÀÞÊÃÞÃÌi“à 6Ê>˜`Ê ˜ÌiÀ>Ê*Փ«Ê,i˜Ì>Ê-iÀۈViÃÊUÊ*>̈i˜ÌÊÉÊ >Ài}ˆÛiÀÊÉÊ>“ˆÞʘ‡…œ“iÊi`ÕV>̈œ˜Ê>˜`ÊÌÀ>ˆ˜ˆ˜}

ˆ˜ˆV>Ê*…>À“>VˆÃÌÊ œ˜ÃՏ̈˜}Ê-iÀۈViÃÊUÊ6Ê >̅iÌiÀÊi`ˆV>̈œ˜Ã]Ê-Õ««ˆiÃÊ>˜`Ê>ˆ˜Ìi˜>˜Vi -ÌiÀˆiÊ œ“«œÕ˜`ˆ˜}ÊUÊi`ˆV>Ài]Êi`ˆV>ˆ`]Ê>˜`ʓœÃÌÊ>œÀʘÃÕÀ>˜ViÃÊ>VVi«Ìi` ——————————————————————)—————————————————————— MASTERCARD, DISCOVER AND VISA CARDS ACCEPTED

Jake Patterson, RPh

£££Ê>Ê ÀˆÛiÊUÊ >˜Ûˆi]Ê6ÊÓ{x{ä {Î{°Ç™Ó°ÈÎnÇÊUÊ>Ý\Ê{Î{°Ç™Ó°ÈÎn™ >ŽiJ«ˆi`“œ˜Ìˆ˜vÕȜ˜°Vœ“ÊÊUÊÊÜÜÜ°«ˆi`“œ˜Ìˆ˜vÕȜ˜°Vœ“

www.showcasemagazine.com

| AUGUST 2012 | Showcase Magazine 13


Get Better Results by Segmenting Your Email

financial

One of the most priceless assets in your online marketing arsenal is a targeted email list. Understanding its power and potential can make a huge difference to your marketing program. It is a common variable to give you a competitive advantage, however, uncertainty about what lead types and audience can dramatically prevent your promotions to effectively reach the right customer. In order to thoroughly grasp the idea of segmenting leads from current customers, it is important to know that every type of lead is different. People are different and their behavior, purchase power, and demographics are not the same. A person who participates in your online program is not capable of meeting with you face-to-face. You will not know your complete audience; therefore, not everyone will be in the same profile. Contrary to belief, you will not be aware if a lead is ready to purchase from you. To leverage off of all kinds of leads, it is wise to segment your list types into categories that will help you better understand how to communicate with your audience.

Might Be Customers Realistically, the vast majority of your audience does not even know you exist. In fact, they are not motivated to purchase from you. They are not ready to receive your promotions, although, these make up your largest target audience. They will need a substantial amount of education about your products and services, and it will require a longer time period to do so. The most important thing to remember is your marketing message and strategy must be different from all other material. Amazingly, somehow they already know about you, and perhaps they have been responsive to your message.You have collected their data, but cannot seem to overcome the hurdle to close the sales process.

Best Customers by Todd Boaze todd@showcasemagazine.com

Money management tips, small business strategies and a variety of other financial concepts. Facts and information contained is not intended to provide specific legal, financial or tax advice, or any other advice for any individual or company and should not be relied upon in that regard.

14 Showcase Magazine

These are the best-of-the-best. In fact, they could be classified similarly as your best friends. This type of lead is most certainly ready to purchase from you, but you do not even know them. They have heard about your company and they are left with a good impression about your brand and offerings. This type of lead manages to find you, because you have taken the time to reach out to them. You have mastered the chance to convert them with your proposition and quickly close for profitability. Typically, this lead requires a totally unique marketing message and approach before you can consider them the best prospect.

| AUGUST 2012 | www.showcasemagazine.com

Current Customers These are your current customers. They chat with you regularly and are loyal to your brand.You have setup their customer profiles, know specific behavior patterns, and know which products or services they are interested in the most. Some are on speed dial, others in your favorite’s list, and a few might be locals with a daily routine of stopping by. This type most certainly requires your marketing approach to remain competitive. This group will always favor and agree upon your decision making processes, as long as, they receive the same quality product and service.

Non-Frequent Customers There are literally millions of these types of leads. Why? Because humans are lazy by nature and most of the time they purchase on impulse. Most who have done business with you in the past will not automatically return. They might not know the full extent of your product or service, yet they are somewhat familiar with your brand. The way you understand them, communicate, and nurture their relationship with you will be the driving force behind accelerated entrepreneurial opportunities. As a result, your message must be entirely focused, and complimentary to your business approach. A unique type of lead may appear and be in a different frame of mind than your typical prospect, but do not overlook the opportunity to contact them based on non-typical origins. Caring for leads may be a marketing responsibility; however, building and maintaining relationships must be in the mix in order to sustain a quality segmented list of leads. Each email you send is extremely important. Tracking these initiatives will clearly indentify lead types and enable your lead generation and management practices to become the highest achievement in segmenting targeted email lists. SM


www.showcasemagazine.com

| AUGUST 2012 | Showcase Magazine 15


?

Why isn’t

your company advertising in

Emerge!

TENS OF THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE ARE ASKING THE SAME QUESTION. W W W . EMERGEVA.COM


www.showcasemagazine.com

| AUGUST 2012 | Showcase Magazine 17


Carrots, Spinach, and Onions, Oh My!

green thumbs up

by Darcy Cropp

Ask the Gardeners! Email your gardening questions to g4generations@ gmail.com

www.hortmag.com/ category/horticultureradio

18 Showcase Magazine

Even though this area is still in the heat of summer, fall is approaching and it’s time to consider what to plant in our cool season vegetable gardens. There are a lot of options, so grab your seed boxes and start digging to see what is left over from last season. If the box needs some attention, it is always helpful to picture what you would like to eat in a delicious salad. It is hard to resist a medley of carrots, onions, lettuce, and radishes!

en Gruembs Th

UP

With possible plantings in mind, check out what space will be needed for the new crops. Evaluating the space allows us to leave and maintain any crops that are still producing well from the spring and summer growing seasons as well as clean up any areas in the garden that are overgrown. We can also consider any beds that were weaker in production and would benefit from a cover crop of clover, rye, or soy. After deciding what cool season vegetables to plant where, we are now one step closer to planting. Once there is a plan, it’s time for bed preparation, which means cleaning up the beds before tilling or digging in any compost or organic matter. North Carolina State University’s website recommends “seeds should be planted deeper in the fall, because, the moisture level is lower in the soil and the surface temperature is higher.” This could mean planting 1 1/2 to 2 inches deeper than we are used to, but this should ensure a happier, healthier plant. It is also helpful to keep in mind how much space the full grown plant will need to allow for adequate growth and air circulation. In addition, water needs should be taken into consideration. Not everyone may have been affected by the drought, but those of us who were need to figure out how to keep our seeds and seedlings moist until cooler temperatures set in. For seeds to germinate they need at least an inch of water per week. If watering by hand or with a sprinkler, make sure that the water penetrates the soil to the seeds. Now that some major factors are in place for planting preparation, we can talk about what options may be hiding in the seed box. There are a variety of greens available: Swiss chard, kale, collards, arugula, lettuce, mustard, and spinach – and these are just to name a few! If there are any leftover nasturtiums or marigolds from the summer, add them to the mix for a beautiful color contrast and peppery taste. Don’t forget that we can still plant cucumbers, so definitely consider adding a couple to the garden. | AUGUST 2012 | www.showcasemagazine.com

Onto the Brassica family, which includes cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts. Nothing beats some cheesy mashed cauliflower, steamed broccoli with vinegar, or roasted Brussels sprouts. I don’t know about you, but I think we are going to have to plant several of each. We have found that we have better luck with these vegetables in the fall, because, if planted too late in the spring, cabbage moths will destroy any hope of eating any coleslaw from the cabbages! There are several options for root vegetables as well. Turnips, carrots, beets, radishes, and rutabagas are among some of my favorites. The greens from turnips and beets can also be eaten. We have found that the shorter variety of carrots produce faster so we can eat them sooner, otherwise we could be waiting until spring to eat our first carrots. This is also a good time to plant onion seed and sets. Don’t forget them when thinking of another option. Also recommended for fall planting are garlic and asparagus crowns. Garlic won’t be ready until spring, so it is good to get a jumpstart on them. Asparagus can take a couple of years until it will be ready to harvest to eat, but it is worth the wait! Hopefully your mouth is watering and you are heading to your seed boxes and filing through them to see what you can plant. There are so many options, the best thing to do is to figure out what you like to eat and how much work you want to put into a cool weather garden after a long hot summer season. No matter what you decide, it will be worth it! Here’s to gardening,

Gardeners Four Generations Darcy, Kathy, Erick and Emily Visit Kathy’s garden school, Garden How To University at www.hortmag.com/ghtu


20 Showcase Magazine

| AUGUST 2012 | www.showcasemagazine.com


www.showcasemagazine.com

| AUGUST 2012 | Showcase Magazine 21


He Said She Said Month Two of GPT Classes

feature

month twoof GPT Classes

He Said She Said

He Said and She Said have completed their second month of exercise classes called GPT (Group Personal Training) at the DAC 24/7 Fitness Club. As we left them last month they had just gone through a series of fundamental exercises for people just starting out. Showcase Magazine: Well, you are both still here so that’s a good sign and I believe you both do look trimmer and thinner.These classes must be working for both of you. He Said: I will have to say that I do feel much better and that the classes have limbered me up which was one of our goals. She Said: He does not groan as much and seems to be healthier than when we first started. He is drinking much more water and less soda, so that has to be good for him also. SM: What experiences have you gone through as far as the kind of exercises that you performing? He Said: For one thing, I can tell you that we have had three teachers in the two months that we have been going. I think I am just wearing them down one by one. She Said: I can tell from experiences that they are probably trying to find a teacher that will be willing to put up with you every week and your antics. Also, this is the vacation time and they are just rotating. SM: Is that true about the antics? He Said: Well….. we have had some trainers who work

22 Showcase Magazine

| AUGUST 2012 | www.showcasemagazine.com

us more strenuously than others.The classes seem to be getting harder instead of easier. I thought by now they would be asking me to teach one of the classes, but that hasn’t happened yet. She Said: I thought by now that all of the teachers would have quit or refused to train you and that we would be training ourselves. SM: Is that because He really misbehaves in class? She Said: You know him. He brought his own music to class and wanted them to play rock and roll exercise music.The trainer was really tactful with him as she said “no.” He Said: I beg your pardon. She used a couple of my songs on a mix exercise tape that we both thoroughly enjoyed working out to. As a matter of fact, her son heard it and put it on one of his mixes. SM: What other antics has He gotten into in class? He Said: I have been the perfect trainee. I have learned all the exercises and have participated in a majority of them. She Said: That is the key word. He participated in some of them. He is doing better, but still has a problem with flexibility. One trainer said he had never seen anyone so inflexible. He Said:He did say that and I do think he’s right. I can’t touch my toes bending over. I have to lean on the wall to keep my balance. I can’t put my head way back or I get dizzy. I don’t like putting my leg in that stirrup while trying to bend down.


She Said: He already takes more water breaks and wipes sweat more often that everyone else in class! SM: Would you recommend that other people take this class to get into shape? She Said: Definitely.The benefits far outweigh the need to remain lethargic and lazy, and I am sure it will help us to live much longer and be more flexible on a day-to-day basis. I was really impressed with the test they gave us before we started the program to see where we were in order to avoid injuries. I have talked to many other people who don’t get this free service at their gyms or with other trainers. Of course many people may be exercising at home. She Said: Which reminds me, we do have some exercise workouts that we were given for homework, so I guess we should get to working on those.

She Said: Precisely, and that is exactly why we are taking the class. He is getting better and looser as the trainer told him. I am seeing progress every week. SM: It sounds like this GPT class is just what the doctor ordered for both of you. He Said: I agree, although I am thinking about taking a stand on this getting water policy. I would like to see us get water twice more than what we are getting. I don’t want to protest with picket signs or anything….just saying….

He Said: Homework in exercise? No one told me that there was going to be exercise homework? Are you sure about this? How are they going to check on whether we did it or not? SM: Sounds like trouble brewing on the home front. Be sure to check out how He Said She Said tackle GPT next month in the September edition of Showcase Magazine.That is if they don’t flunk out because of not doing their homework exercise assignments. SM


24 Showcase Magazine

| AUGUST 2012 | www.showcasemagazine.com


feature

When you think of the Salvation Army what are some of the first images that flash through your mind? If you are like many of us, thoughts of a person standing by

Giving Back to the Community

Giving Back to the Community

a kettle, bell ringing, or the idea of thrift stores pass through your mind. While those are all very intricate parts of the Salvation Army, you would be selling the organization short to think their work stops there.

As an overall company the Salvation Army’s mission is to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ without discrimination, and help human needs in his name. With that policy in mind the local branch uses all means to accomplish that goal. Using funds generated from the local Family Store and various other fundraisers, the Salvation Army is able to help people’s needs within the community. Using the money given at Christmas through the kettles the Salvation Army is able to purchase toys for children in the area. Outside of that, the money left over goes to other various programs throughout the year which return the community. Many people may not realize that locally with the help of Pittsylvania County Community Action (PCCA) the Salvation Army is able to offer a free lunch program Monday through Friday, at their center on 123 Henry Street, off of North Main Street. Everyday a group prepares on average 80-100 lunches for people in the community to come and eat at no charge. During the summer, while school is out of session, the number of prepared lunches dramatically increases to an average of 1,000 per day, mostly feeding the youth in the area. While that number is astounding, Captain Karl Dehlin, Commanding Officer for the Salvation Army in Danville, reminded us of a very sobering fact about our community. He stated, “Danville has the dubious distinction of having the highest rate of youth poverty in Virginia.” When Captain Dehlin moved here a year ago in the middle of the summer the food program was in full swing. He stated, “I couldn’t believe all that they were doing here. When I came in last year, in just one day we had served around 1,400-1,500 people. In just one day! “ With the availability of free lunch while school is in session, to those whose family meets the requirements, these children don’t have to worry about their lunch, but during the summer that may be a different case. With the help of PCCA and the Salvation Army, these children and adults within the community don’t have to wonder where their next meal is going to come from. Another interesting fact about the Salvation Army is their willingness to help those in times of trouble. When you donate to the Family Store at 2905 Riverside Drive, behind Dairy Queen, you may be helping your neighbor or family

member in a time of need. Many times when a home is overcome by fire or another disastrous event people come to the Salvation Army for help. It is in those circumstances when your donations may become a tool that gives hope to families. Giving clothes or furniture is customary for the Salvation Army, but those items are only available when they have donations. With all of the ways that the Salvation Army gives back to the community, they are only able to do it through your support. Captain Dehlin stated, “One thing that makes us different than another Thrift Store or NonProfit, is that we cannot buy things to put into the store. Everything must be donated.”

by Moriah Davis Photos by Kelly Davis, Oscar Schnell, & fzd.it

If the donations were not given to the Family Store they wouldn’t be able to offer the programs and give back to the community in the form in which they do. So remember, when you donate to the Salvation Army Family Store or make a purchase, you are giving back to your community. SM www.showcasemagazine.com

| AUGUST 2012 | Showcase Magazine 25


26 Showcase Magazine

| AUGUST 2012 | www.showcasemagazine.com


www.showcasemagazine.com

| AUGUST 2012 | Showcase Magazine 27


Star: Flash, Smoke, Belly Buttons & Great Rock and Roll

feature by Jack Garrett Photos Courtesy of Jack Garrett

FLASH, SMOKE, BELLY BUTTONS, & GREAT ROCK AND ROLL

Every now and again a band will make its mark before the members split, only to reform and continue in a completely different direction. Such was the case with Star, whose glitter would eventually evolve into the gritty, Southern rock sounds of Afton.

Star began its musical journey in 1974 as Carney Hill. Bassist Donnie Hughes recalls that Carney Hall was formed from the remnants of Beowulf, a 9-piece band with horns from South Boston. Besides Hughes, the band consisted of Mike King on guitar, Will Dodson on drums, and Steve Watts on guitar. Hughes placed an ad on a bulletin board at Danville Community College and David Bailey answered, joining on keyboards and vocals. Phil Wolfe would replace King on guitar and Bailey says they were able to expand their repertoire. Wolfe was an excellent slide guitarist and the band performed “a lot of Southern rock,” borrowing heavily from the Allman Brothers Band. Bailey, who started as a bass player in the band Blue Odyssey, remembers “confiscating” sheets of plywood and building two bass cabinets for a sound system in an upstairs room at the Hughes’ home. When they finished, Bailey says the columns were “so big that we couldn’t get them out of the house.”

28 Showcase Showcase Magazine Magazine

| AUGUST 2012 || www.showcasemagazine.com www.showcasemagazine.com MARCH 2012

Top photo: Star logo.

Bottom photo: David Bailey on stage with Star.


The band played clubs and frat parties throughout Virginia and North Carolina. Hughes recalls an extended engagement in Charlottesville at the 1776 Club. Members traveled in two vans but were paid only $500 for the week. They didn’t have enough for rooms, “so we pulled the two vans together in the parking lot of the club and that’s where we slept.” Carney Hill also performed two nights in 1974 at a Danville nightclub called The Webb for the grand sum of $250.

the drums; and Brown moved from bass to high-octave vocals and sound for Star. Craig Saunders was added for lighting and visual effects. The youngest member of the band, the 17year-old Williams, joined in early 1974. He was already a veteran of the local bands scene, having played in the group Slow Motion, which would evolve into Multiplex. Williams explains that “after we had played together for a few months with Brown on bass, Bailey mentioned Hughes. He joined the group and we went in a somewhat heavier musical direction as Star.”

After a year on the road, Bailey left the band and an ad was placed in Rolling Stone for a new keyboard player. Steve Kaye (whose band Baxter was touring with Rare Earth) agreed to join Carney Hill, so Hughes and Watts drove to New London, Connecticut to pick up the new recruit. Hughes says Kaye’s work on keys was “incredible.” But they were still without a lead singer, so Bailey was contacted and agreed to return and front the band. The group was signed by United Entertainment and had more work than they could handle.

At this point, the group was managed by Jim Hill, a Danville DJ known to his listeners as “Jungle Jim.” Hill also ran a local disco (J.J.’s) and would go on to own and operate radio stations in Danville and Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.

But more personnel changes followed. Watts was married and had to quit because of all the traveling. Kaye and Bailey also departed, Kaye to a larger city to join Roanoke’s High and Mighty. With Hughes, Dodson and Wolfe remaining, the band regrouped with Robyn Robbins on vocals, Mike Oakes on keys and second guitarist Jon Van Hoy. Robbins migrated from Robyn and the Hoods, a group from nearby South Boston,Virginia.

Hill recalls one memorable performance at Castaways, a popular club in Greensboro, North Carolina. They were auditioning for Bill Griffin, the famed beach club owner and The new line-up performed just promoter. Hill says this Top picture: Star performs in the gym at Halifax County High School. L-R: once as Carney Hill, for a private was “Star’s big break, so Donnie Hughes, David Bailey, Bob Campbell. academy in South Boston. the band was stoked.” Star was playing Paul Bottom picture: Jeff Baldwin with Star in Ballou Park While the line-up was “as strong as McCartney’s “1985” and ever,” the band splintered after a few months. Griffin was commenting on the energy of the band. At the end of the song, Campbell “promptly threw up all over his drums.” Not Hughes left on January 1, 1975, saying the band “had run its course.” missing a beat, Griffin turned to Hill and said, “Can he do that every time?” In May of that year, the band Leevi Whizz (put together by Bailey and Jeff Baldwin) was performing at the Halifax County Country Club. Hughes was A born promoter, Hill designed and published a press book for in attendance and sat in on a couple of numbers. The chemistry clicked and Star, complete with band bios, pictures, a song list, and testimoniHughes joined the band. Besides Bailey and Baldwin, the original Leevi Whizz als from satisfied customers. This at a time when most local bands line-up included Dane Williams on guitar, Bob Campbell on drums, and bassist were lucky to have a group shot from their booking agent, usually Bill Brown. East Coast or Hit Attractions. Hughes and Bailey regrouped again and changed the name to Star. Bailey was lead vocalist; Hughes was back on bass and vocals; Williams played lead guitar; Baldwin was featured on piano, organ and vocals; Campbell played

Star was certainly the best dressed group in Southside and patterned their look after Aerosmith, right down to the scarves on their microphone stands. Bailey recalls that rival bands would attend their shows just to see what they were wearing.

www.showcasemagazine.com

| AUGUST 2012 | Showcase Magazine 29


Photos from left: Donnie Hughes with Star before the Festival in the Park show in Ballou Park, Bob Campbell on stage with Star, Dane Williams with Star in Ballou Park, Poster for Star show. Band members made their own flash pods using powder purchased from a theatrical supply house. Hill explains that they would craft a single strand of electrical wire placed between alligator clips that were connected to a circuit placed in the middle of a block of wood with a hole dug out in the center. When the flash was required, a roadie simply plugged it in to a high voltage receptacle. The house lights went dim, followed by a flash and a huge puff of smoke. Hill says the crowd loved it but marvels that “we weren’t in the news with some kind of tragedy.” Bill Brown (who would go on to play bass in Afton) worked sound for Star and also provided some vocal harmonies. He came up with the idea for the flash pods and admits there were some close calls. Star was playing at Ray El’s Pizza in King’s Fairground Shopping Center when the owner stepped on one of the pods. A charge of static electricity from his shoe lit up the powder and he was “surrounded by flash and smoke.” On another gig at the American Legion Hall in South Boston, the group left the pods at home. Brown improvised his own using ash trays, wire, and some duct tape. While the band was on a break, an unsuspecting patron put out his smoke in one of the “loaded” ash trays. The room “flashed” and the band turned to see the hapless soul bent over the pod, still holding his cigarette but minus his eyebrows. Miraculously, he wasn’t injured. Brown and his compatriots managed to contain themselves long enough to duck into a side room, where they bowled over with laughter. Bailey says Star used “a lot of pyrotechnics,” including a cannon-like tube designed by Al Shotwell, who worked sound and would later manage the band. The cannon was introduced at a Hell’s Angels Club in Durham. The road crew packed the 10” well casing with a large amount of compressed flash powder. When the set started, the cannon erupted, knocking Bailey into the drums, and stopping the entire band in their tracks. Thinking they were under siege, members of the motorcycle club came running out “with

30 Showcase Magazine

pistols drawn,” ready for a gunfight. While he laughs now, Bailey says it wasn’t humorous at the time. Hughes insists there were no guns. The band pursued a busy concert schedule in Virginia and North Carolina that included a headlining performance at the Rock Reynolds Music Festival, The Pier in Virginia Beach, and a gig at Danville’s Festival in the Park that attracted several thousand fans. At the Good Times Express in Eden, Saunders set off ten flash pods in succession. All was fine until Hughes happened to look around and noticed the stage, which was “covered in shag carpet was fully emblazed in fire; We burnt up about a 5-foot square section of stage.” While performing at Halifax County High School, the band kept the curtains closed during the opening number and lit orange military signal flares. The curtains parted and the stage was filled with smoke. The crowd went wild, but the band had orange nostrils for the rest of the night. A week-long engagement at Charlottesville’s Odyssey 2000 almost ended on opening night. Saunders was working the lights when the spot used to follow the action landed on top of him, burning his face. He survived, but the club owner was more concerned about his equipment than Saunders’ injury. Later that night, the band blew the main power amp and had to finish with an acoustic set while Baldwin and Brown drove back to South Boston to get the old PA so Star could finish the week. Star had an old school bus for transportation and the group rehearsed and stored equipment at the former Robert E. Lee Jr. High School building on Holbrook Street. While pulling up to load one afternoon, the engine of the dilapidated bus caught fire. Hughes says the bus was “left out of gear and started to roll. Nobody could get in it in time before it slammed right into a big oak.” Campbell says his most memorable performance

| AUGUST 2012 | www.showcasemagazine.com

was the Good Time in the Pines show in Charlottesville. The outdoor show attracted a crowd of 6,000. But it was freezing by the time Star hit the stage around eleven that night. Hughes and Williams had trouble keeping their guitars in tune and Campbell says his hands felt like he was slamming “a foul ball with a baseball bat every time (he) hit the drums” Always the trouper, Williams played despite German measles and a temperature of 102. Bailey remembers Star was the headline act on the bill. After playing a club in Charlottesville, Baldwin and Hughes drove to Virginia Beach to pick up a “monster” PA the band had purchased (thanks to a note signed by Campbell’s dad) specifically for the outdoor arena. They set up just in time to play their set, only to have the sound system shut down “after the first three notes” because the power supply to the stage wasn’t adequate to run the huge amplifiers. People were climbing trees, falling down, and staggering to the stage in a scene reminiscent of Woodstock, only at 3:00 in the morning. When they loaded to leave, the place was covered with trash and the band trailer just missed a fan who had passed out in front of the stage. Campbell describes the scene as “a typical seventies rock show.” According to Campbell, the monster PA died during a performance at a large disco bar in Charlottesville. All of the speakers blew out due to the low amperage of the house power system and members had to return to Virginia Beach for replacement parts. Star split in March of 1977. The reasons remain foggy, but around this time Williams called Hughes, informing him that the band’s rhythm section planned to record an album with vocalist and songwriter Mike Ketchum. Hughes joined Williams, Ketchum, and Campbell in the exodus and the group Afton was formed from the ashes of Star. Afton went on to record an album of original songs penned by Ketchum; however, that’s a story for another day. SM


02%6)/53,9WEREVIEWEDSOME ADD ONFEESANDCHARGES COMMONLYEMPLOYEDBYAUTO DEALERS7ETHENEXAMINEDIN DETAILONEOFTHEMOSTEXPENSIVEOF THESEADD ONS!$*534%$-!2+%4 6!,5%!-6 ORWHATAUTODEALERS CALLTHEhBUMPSTICKERv 4HE!-6hBUMPSTICKERvISASMALLER WINDOWSTICKER USUALLYFOUNDNEXT TOTHEFACTORYSTICKER WHICHSERVES TOhBUMPvTHENEWVEHICLERETAIL PRICEOREVEN ABOVE THEMANUFACTURERSUGGESTED RETAILPRICE-320 )FYOUARE UNFORTUNATEENOUGHTOENCOUNTER THEDREADEDhBUMPSTICKERv IMMEDIATELYINSISTONAPRICE REDUCTIONBACKDOWNTO-320 BEFOREBEGINNINGNEGOTIATIONS "YFARTHEMOSTCOMMONADD ON FEEISTHEDEALERhPROCESSINGv hDOCUMENTARYvORhDOCvFEE4HIS FEETYPICALLYSETSTHECONSUMER BACKANADDITIONALTO

WHENTHElNALPAPERWORKIS PREPAREDFORSIGNATURES)FADEALER CHARGESTHISTYPEOFFEE ANDMOST DO HEORSHEMAYNOTLEGALLY REMOVEITFROMTHEPAPERWORK #ONSEQUENTLY YOUTHECONSUMER ENDUPPAYINGTHEhPROCESSING FEEvINADDITIONTOTHENEGOTIATED PURCHASEPRICE3UGGESTION&IND OUTTHEhPROCESSINGFEEvUPFRONT THEN NEGOTIATEALOWERPURCHASEPRICE ACCORDINGLY )PERSONALLYDONOTBELIEVEINhBUMP STICKERSvORhPROCESSINGFEESvAND PREFERASTRAIGHT FORWARDAPPROACH TOBUSINESSWITHOUTALLTHESMOKE ANDMIRRORSTHEREFORE OURDEALERSHIP CHARGES./PROCESSINGFEE DEALER PREPFEE OR!-6!NDOURCUSTOMERS REALLYSEEMTOAPPRECIATEOUR APPROACH 3AFEDRIVING

*AMES"ARKHOUSER "ARKHOUSER&ORD,INCOLN 0RECISION#OLLISION#ENTER

www.showcasemagazine.com

| AUGUST 2012 | Showcase Magazine 31


Avoid These Bad Foods & Products

health

Avoid These Bad Foods & Products Being a full-time personal trainer with 16 years of experience, I’ve focused on helping clients in person and online. Whether it is through One-on-One sessions,

Small Group workouts, or Virginia Bootcamp fitness, I’ve witnessed many success stories. Also, I am a speaker and writer on subject matter including weight loss, obesity, motivation techniques, strength and conditioning for all ages, nutritional planning, and many other fitness-related topics. I contribute to some of the largest health and fitness magazines, websites, and supplement companies. I have written two books, How I Lost 100 Pounds! and The Healthiest Weight Loss Solution Personal Training Manual. My latest endeavor is producing exercise and nutritional aids to help my clients and others. I am giving you a quick resume only to say that in all these years and with the thousands of people I have trained and advised and the millions who have read my articles, I have never tried to mislead or lie to anyone. Never have I written about a product, food, or exercise I have not personally tried or experienced myself or with a client. I do not get paid to lie to my clients and customers. If I did I would not be in business for as long as I have.

by Dave Gluhareff In the late 1990s David Gluhareff lost over 100 pounds. Dave then became a certified personal trainer with the International Sports Sciences Association (ISSA) and began his career as a personal trainer. In March of 2009 David earned the elite status of Master of Fitness Sciences (MFS) by the ISSA, their highest level of personal training qualifications. As a personal trainer, Dave has been helping people take charge of their physiques to help them feel, look, and move better through life. Visit www.VirginiaBootcamp.com for more information.

32 Showcase Magazine

Please listen to me when I say to avoid the following foods if you are trying to eat healthy! AVOID: > Most doughnuts, muffins, non-whole wheat crackers, potato chips, white flour tortillas, cheese crackers, fat-free crackers, fat-free chips, white pastas, white potatoes, white pita bread, white sandwich bread, white rice cakes, white rice, prepackaged meals/snacks made with white flours and processed junk or preservatives, sugary sweet cereals, popcorn, fried foods, greasy burgers, high-fat red meat, heavily buttered vegetables, and canned or dried fruit

> Diet soda, soda, sugar-free juices, juices, expensive sweet coffee, sugar-free, syrup-filled coffee or tea, sweet tea, sugary sports drinks, sugar-free sports drinks, high-fat milk, high-fat cheeses, high-fat cottage cheese, high-fat/high-sugar yogurts, and margarine

> High calorie creamy dressings and creamy sauces

| AUGUST 2012 | www.showcasemagazine.com

You can, however, eat the following foods in moderation! > Healthy Complex Carbs & Lean Proteins: oatmeal, whole grain cereals, rolled oats, whole grain breads, whole wheat pastas, veggie pastas, whole wheat crackers, sweet potatoes, yams, brown rice, wild rice, almonds (unsalted or raw), walnuts (unsalted or raw), peanuts (unsalted or raw), pecans (unsalted or raw), low-fat cheese, low-fat cottage cheese, low- sugar and low-fat yogurt, eggs (preferably the whites), chicken breast, turkey breast, turkey burger, chicken burger, salmon, halibut, flounder, tuna, shrimp, tofu, soy milk, quinoa, peanut butter, and almond butter

> Fruits: apples, pears, blueberries, strawberries, cherries, blackberries, apricots, papaya, mango, oranges, grapefruit (Not with Lipitor), tangerines, plums, bananas, and kiwi

> Vegetables: broccoli, asparagus, kale, turnip greens, spinach cold or cooked, romaine lettuce, lettuce, celery, black beans, green beans, kidney beans, soy beans, navy beans, black eye peas, lima beans, corn, lentils, radishes, tomatoes, olives > Water, coffee or black or green tea (preferably unsweetened), real fresh squeezed homemade orange or apple juice, other veggie or fruits juiced with a home juicer, skim or low fat milk

> Dressings such as olive oil or canola oil and balsamic or apple cider vinegar and broth based no-cream sauces The above is a quick punch list of foods to avoid and foods you can eat. Please remember I am not perfect with my food all the time, but I try to be good during the week, then cheat a little on the weekends to help keep sanity and to sort of reward myself for being good during the


week. You will not be perfect, but if you try really hard to eat the healthy stuff and avoid the junk, you will lose weight, feel better about yourself, sleep better, have fewer illnesses, and function more appropriately. Always check with your doctor before eating any of these foods if you are on any medications or are diabetic or allergic to any of the foods mentioned. Also eat in moderation and do not stuff yourself! If you are really serious about getting into great shape and saving your life, then stay away from the above bad foods first mentioned! Even if they are fat-free or sugar-free they may still be full of sodium, sugars, or fake trans fats! Your health is too important to eat this crap! Would you rather eat some junk to satisfy an impulsive craving, only to get sick and die early in life? Or can you resist the junk food urges to save your life and extend your years here on this earth to spend more time with your family and friends? Junky muffins and white flour carbs are not nutritious! They are sometimes better than a greasy cheeseburger, but they are still not helping you eat for better daily functioning and living. You want to eat for a better quality of life, not just to eat low calorie and NON-Nutritious foods only to help you survive day-today! SM

Dave www.TrainWithDave.com

www.showcasemagazine.com

| JULY 2012 | Showcase Magazine 33


games Fun &

ACROSS 1 Adder 6 Voiced 10 Stair 14 Religious holiday 15 African nation 16 Brand of laundry detergent 17 Bye 18 Iran’s neighbor 19 Fury 20 True 21 Snacked 22 Loan shark 24 Roads 26 Thirst quencher 27 Perfumed hair ointment 30 Fill a glass 31 Not these 32 Sword 33 Eye infection 36 Strong rope fiber 37 Sign language 38 Alight 40 Period 41 Critical 43 Organized crime

Name the

ARCH WORD SE E THEM

44 Small particle 45 Intimidate 46 Like hippie’s clothing 49 “as you ___” 50 Flyers 51 Wheeled vehicle 52 Type of hair do 56 Radar echo 57 Malicious 59 Imprecise 60 Choice 61 Window ledge 62 Clothes pressers 63 Colorless DOWN 1 Box 2 Naked 3 Opera solo 4 Polish sausage type 5 Flightless bird 6 Misses 7 Unusual 8 Wing 9 Syrupy alcoholic drink 10 Prance 11 Jeweled headdress 12 Lawn tool

13 Look at 21 To be 23 Shrieking person 25 Capital of South Australia 26 Dignified 27 Posttraumatic stress disorder 28 American state 29 Max 30 Noodle 32 Fry 33 Winnow 34 Three 1

2

3

4

$25 M tificate gift cer

20

21 24

27

28

32

36

37 41

47

60

61

62

63

64

65

N

I

D

O

I

Z

I

H

T

B

T

T

N

Z

N

Q

N

N

L

C

N

www.CrosswordWeaver.com

V

P

G

E

W

Q

S

C

O

M

E

ACROSS

B

D

S

G

G

O

T

M

R

U

G

W

R

O

C

D

Y

U

Q

I

N

O

A

L

P

I

A

I

X

K

N

I

R

D

V

U

G

H

R

N

O

E

M

T

M

M

D

T

T

G

B

K

M

U

I

Q

S

I

L

V

E

R

O

M

L

N

G

L

X

E

N

O

N

V

N

A

N

1 6 10 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 24 26 27 30 31 32 33 36

ZINC

LITHIUM

SODIUM

CARBON

Arsenic

34 Showcase Magazine Barium| AUGUST 2012 |

Lithium SILVER Nitrogen Oxygen

www.showcasemagazine.com

53

54

55

39

52

57

E

35

49

56

N

34

45

51

H

33

43

50

C

OXYGEN

42

48

Z

GOLD

13

23

38

44 46

12

26

31

C

BARIUMAluminumIODINE

25

11

30

M

ARSENIC

22

29

U

XENON

10

19

I

NITROGEN

9

18

R

CHLORINE

8

17

A

ALUMINUM

7

16

B

www.WordSearchMaker.com

6 15

40

Email paul@showcasemagazine.com with the theme of this Word Search (AUGUST 2012) for a chance to win a $25 Medo’s II gift certificate. Winner will be announced on Facebook (Showcase Magazine) on August 20, 2012.

5

14

HOW TO ENTER

! & WeIdN o’s II

35 365 days 58 Rival 39 Head feature (2 59 By way of wds.) 42 Bashfulness 45 Chicken 46 Floor coverings 47 Scots’ neighbors 48 Vacant 49 Ceiling supports 50 Father 51 Capital of Vanuatu 53 Id’s counterparts 54 Ancient German character

58

RATING: MEDIUM

Adder Voiced Stair Religious holiday African nation Brand of laundry detergent Bye Iran's neighbor Fury True Snacked Loan shark Rods Thirst quencher Perfumed hair ointment Fill a glass Not these Sword Eye infection Strong rope fiber

59

37 38 40 41 43 44 45 46 49 50 51 52 56 57 59 60 61 62 63 64 65

Sign language Alight Period Critical Organized crime Small particle Intimidate Like hippie's clothing "as you __" Flyers Wheeled vehicle Type of hair do Radar echo Malicious Imprecise Choice Window ledge Clothes pressers Colorless Oceans Afloat (2 wds.)

A ns wers on Page 40

DO 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 21 23 25 26 27 28 29 30 32 33 34 35 39 42 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 53 54 55 58 59


Covering

Discovering your roots

Come visit Zinc’s new

Nail Bar

434-792-ZINC (9462) 36 Showcase Magazine

| AUGUST 2012 | www.showcasemagazine.com


DON’T

MISS!

DANVILLE 1 – Senior Bowling Tournament: Riverside Lanes: 10am-12pm: 434.791.2695: www.playdanvilleva.com.

Martinsville 18 – Dodgeball Tournament: Boys & Girls Club of Danville: 10am: 434.792.6617 or 434.709.6311.

5

1 2 3 4

6 7 8 9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

AUG ’12 a rts

7 – National Night Out: Halifax County Fair Grounds: 6pm: www.gohalifaxva.com.

AREAEventsGuide

South Boston

S M T W T F S

|

Arts/Exhibits

| K i ds | L i f e styl e / L e c tur e

www.showcasemagazine.com

H o bb i e s / S p o rts

Thru Aug. 4 – LEGO Build-off: Piedmont Mall: 7:13am: 434.334.8324: www.mdabuildoff.com. 1 – Signs of Alzheimer’s: Ballou Rec. Center: 12:30pm: 434.799.5216: www. playdanvilleva.com. 1-29 – Blood Pressure Checks: Times/Locations Vary: 434.799.5216: www.playdanvilleva.com. 1-31 – Tax Relief & Reduced Refuse: Ballou Rec. Center: 9am-2pm: 434.799.5216: www.playdanvilleva.com. 4 – Yack & Snack Book Club: Main Public Library: 12-1pm: 434.799.5216 or 434.799.5195: www.playdanvilleva. com. 4,11,18,25 – Virginia Grown

|

Lifestyle/Lectures

H e lp i n g H a n ds

Thru Aug. 31 – Summer Reading Program: Danville Public Llibrary: 2-4pm: 434.799.5195: www. playdanvilleva.com. 1 – Harry Potter Movie Marathon: Danville Public Llibrary: Times Vary: 434.799.5195: www.playdanvilleva.com.

1-5 – Songs for a New World: Union Street Theatre: 7:30pm: 434.791.4747: UnionStreetTheatre. com. 2,16 – 57 Express Bluegrass Concert: Community Center, Chatham: TH, 7pm: 434.432.3115: www.chathamcares.org. 3 – Fridays at the Crossing: Carrington Pavilion: 6pm: 434.793.4636: www.danvillevaevents. com. 3,4,5 – Bye, Bye Birdie: Gretna Movie Theatre: 7:30pm/2:30pm: 434.228.1779. 10 – Centra Summer Outdoor Movies: Ballou Park: 9-11pm: 434.799.5215: www.playdanvilleva.com. 10 – Magic of the Masters CloseUp Magic Show: Balcony Mini Theatre, North Theatre: 434.793.7469: www.thenorththeatre.com.

|

Kids/Family

Entertainment

11 – Museum Meets Margaritaville: Community Market: 6-9pm: 434.793.5644: www. danvillemuseum.org. 16 – Enchanted Evening in the Park: Ballou Park: 6:30-8:30pm: 434.799.5216: www.danvillevaevents. com. 17,18: Little Red Riding Hood: Union Street Theatre: 7pm/11am: 434.791.4747: www. UnionStreetTheatre.com. 24 – Harvest Jubilee Concert Series: Kellie Pickler: Carrington Pavilion: 6-11pm: 434.793.4636: www. danvillevaevents.com. 24 – It Was a Very Good Year: North Theatre: 8pm: 434.793.7469: www.thenorththeatre.com. 25 – Night of Swing: Ballou Rec. Center: 434.799.5216: www. danvillevaevents.com. 25 – 35th Anniversary Celebration Concert: White Oak Worship Center: 6pm: 434.822.0800. 25 – Gala Grand Reopening: North Theatre: 8pm: 434.793.7469: www. thenorththeatre.com. 28 – Fresh Water Fish Festival: Olde Dominion Agriculture Complex: Tickets $30/Corp Table $300 (8 seats + parking passes): 5-10pm: 434.432.8026.

AUGUST 2012

Thru August 20 – 7 Visions Art Exhibit: The Art Space @ The Gourmet Frog: TU-SAT 10am-5pm: 434.710.7479. Thru August 23 – American Masterpieces of Southern Craft & Traditional Art Exhibit: Danville Museum of Fine Arts & History: 434.793.5644: www.danvillemuseum. org. Thru Sept. 3 – Wild Music Exhibit: Danville Science Center: Free/$6/$5: M-S 9:30am–5pm: Sun 1–5pm: 434.791.5160: www.dsc.smv.org. Thru Oct. 1 – Hubble Space Telescope Exhibit: Danville Science Center: Free/$6/$5: M-S 9:30am–5pm: Sun 1–5pm: 434.791.5160: www.dsc. smv.org. Thru Oct. 1 – Damsels, Dragons and Ladies Exhibit: Danville Science Center: Free/$6/$5: M-S 9:30am–5pm: Sun 1–5pm: 434.791.5160: www.dsc. smv.org. Thru Oct. 13 – Butterfly Station and Garden: Danville Science Center: 434.791.5160: www.dsc.smv.org. 1,8,15,22 – Art with Flo: Times/ Locations Vary: 434.797.8848: www. playdanvilleva.com. 4 – Bob Ross Painting Class: Ballou Park Annex Building: 10:30am-3:30pm: 434.797.8848: www.playdanvilleva.com. 6-28 – Art with Judie: Ballou Park Annex: M/TU, Times Vary: 434.797.8848: www.playdanvilleva.com. 31-Sept.30 – Father/Sons Art Exhibit - Featuring Phil, Curt and Wyatt Ramsey: Danvillian Gallery: 8/31-Opening Reception, 6-9pm: 434792-1860: www.danvilliangallery.com.

2 – PJ Storytime: Danville Public Llibrary: TH 6:30pm: 434.799.5195: www.playdanvilleva.com. 3 – Earlybirds & Sleepyheads Storytime: Danville Public Llibrary: Fri: Earlybirds 10am; Sleepyheads 11am: 434.799.5195: www.playdanvilleva.com. 4 – Super Smash Brothers Brawl Tournament: Danville Public Llibrary: SAT 11am: 434.799.5195: www. playdanvilleva.com. 4,11,18,25 – Hip Hop 101: City Auditorium: Ages 15-21: 11am-1pm: 434.797.8848: www.playdanvilleva.com. 6-10 – Outdoor Adventure Camp IV: 8:30am-5:30pm: 434.799.5215: www.playdanvilleva.com. 7,8,9 – Kiddie Musik Kamp: Coates Rec. Center: 9:30am-11:30am: 434.797.8848: www.playdanvilleva.com. 8 – Polliwogs & Science Stars: Danville Science Center: Polliwogs, Ages 3–5, 1–2pm; Science Stars, Ages 5-7, 3:30–4:30pm: $3/$6: 434.791.5160: www.dsc.smv.org. 19 – Winnie the Pooh, Kids Auditions. Union Street Theatre: 12:30-2:30pm: 434.791.4747: www. UnionStreetTheatre.com.

e n t e rta i n m e n t

DANVILLE

| AUGUST 2012 | Showcase Magazine 37


Continued from Page 37

AREAEventsGuide

Farmer’s Market: Olde Dominion Agricultural Complex: 8am-12pm: www. oldeagfoundation.org. 4,11,18 – Senior Community Market Trip: 7am: 434.797.8994: www.playdanvilleva.com. 7 – Trip to Greenbriar Bunker: Ballou Rec Center: 6am: 434.799.5216: www. playdanvilleva.com. 12 – Open House: Sacred Heart School: 23pm: 434.793.2656. 14 – Welcome to Medicare Seminar: Ballou Rec. Center: 1-2pm: 800.967.9386. 16 – Keeping Well in Mind, Body, and Spirit: Surviving Cancer: First Presbyterian Church: 11:30am-1pm: 434.766.6650. 17 – Just Everyday Women Walking by Faith: Mary’s Diner: 11am-1pm. 21 – Averett University Open House: Riverview Campus: 4-5:30pm: www.averett.edu. 21 – Alzheimer’s Support Group Meeting: Emeritus at Danville: 6pm: 434.791.3180. 28 – Walk to End Alzheimer’s Meeting: Ballou Park: 12pm: 434.845.8540: www. danvillewalktoendalz.org.

Hobbies/Sports

1 – Senior Bowling Tournament: Riverside Lanes: 10am-12pm: 434.791.2695: www.playdanvilleva.com. 1,2,3 – Braves vs Bristol: Legion Field, DDMP: 7pm: 434.797.3792: www.dbraves.com. 1,6,15,20,21– Bingo: Times/Locations Vary: 434.799.5216: www.playdanvilleva.com. 2 – Play Day: Ballou Park: 5-8pm: 434.799.5215: www.playdanvilleva.com. 2 – Kayak: Dan Daniels to Anglers: 6-8pm: 434.799.5215: www.playdanvilleva.com. 2-30 – Prime Time Fitness: Ballou Center: M/TH 9:30-11am: 434.799.5216: www. playdanvilleva.com. 2-30 – Kuumba-West African Dance: City Armory: TH 6:30-8pm: 434.797.8848: www. playdanvilleva.com. 4,11,18 – Doggie Days of Summer: Coates Bark Park: 10am-12pm: 434.799.6564. 6,13,20,27 – Boogie Mondays: Ballou Rec. Center: 7–8:30pm: 434.799.5216: www. playdanvilleva.com. 7,8,9 – Braves vs Burlington: Legion Field, DDMP: 7pm: 434.797.3792: www.dbraves.com. 7,14,21,28 – Karate Class: Community Center, Chatham: TU 5:30-7:30pm: 434.432.3115: www.chathamcares.org. 7,14,21,28 – Urban Line Dance Class: Ballou Rec. Center: 6-7pm: 434.799.5216: www.playdanvilleva.com. 7,14,21,28 – African Dance Ensemble: Coates Rec. Center: TU 6pm: 434.797.8848: www.playdanvilleva.com. 7-30 – Cardio Step Class: City Auditorium: TU/TH: 8:45-9:45am or 12-1pm: 434.797.8848: www.playdanvilleva.com. 11 – Inside Community Yard Sale: Community Center, Chatham: 9am-1pm: 434.432.3115: www.chathamcares.org. 14 – Easy Soap Making Class: Ballou Rec. Center: 5:30-7:30pm: 434.799.5216: www.

38 Showcase Magazine

| AUGUST 2012 | www.showcasemagazine.com

playdanvilleva.com. 15 – Communicating with Captel: Ballou Rec. Center: 12:30pm: 434.799.5216: www. playdanvilleva.com. 16 – Canoe-Bird Watching: Abreu-Grogan Park: 6-8pm: 434.799.5215: www.playdanvilleva. com. 17 – Summer Bingo: Ballou Rec. Center: 12pm: 434.799.5216: www.playdanvilleva.com. 17,18,19 – Braves vs Bluefield: Legion Field, DDMP: 7pm: 434.797.3792: www.dbraves.com. 18 – Dodgeball Tournament: Boys & Girls Club of Danville: 10am: 434.792.6617 or 434.709.6311. 18 – Blistering Heat Bowl Disc Golf: Ballou Park: 10am: 434.799.5215: www. playdanvilleva.com. 21 – Fun with Beads: Ballou Rec. Center: 5:30-7:30pm: 434.799.5216: www. playdanvilleva.com. 23,24,25 – Braves vs Greeneville: Legion Field, DDMP: 7pm: 434.797.3792: www.dbraves.com.

Martinsville Arts/Exhibits

Thru Nov. 3 – Rocks to Racing Exhibit: Virginia Museum of Natural History: 276.634.4185: www.vmnh.net. 2 – Bob Ross Technique Workshop: Piedmont Arts: 9am: 276.632.3221: www.piedmontarts.org. 3 – First Friday Art Walk: Studio 107: 57pm: 276.638.2107: www.piedmontarts.org.

Kids/Family

6-10 – Engineering Challenge Summer Camp:Virginia Museum of Natural History: Ages 9-11: 9am-4pm: 276.634.4185: www. vmnh.net. 7-9 – Doodle Bugs - From Farm to Table: Virginia Museum of Natural History: Ages 3-5: 9:30-11:30am: 276.634.4185: www.vmnh.net.

Entertainment

24 – TGIF Concert Series: Uptown: 710:30pm: www.martinsvilleuptown.com.

Hobbies/Sports

1-30 – Classes at the Centre: Chair/ Step Aerobics, Aerobics with Anita, Boot Camp/Power Sculpt, Zumba: Spencer-Penn Centre: Days/Times Vary: 276.957.5757: www. thecentreatspencerpenn.com. 2 – Photography Club: Spencer-Penn Centre: 6:30pm: 276.957.5757: www.thecentreatspencerpenn.com. 2-30 – Seniors in the Know: Spencer-Penn Centre: TH 10am: 276.957.5757: www.thecentreatspencerpenn.com. 7 – Tour de Scholar Charity Bike Ride: Smith River Sports Complex: 7am: 276.632.6401: www.martinsville.com. 4 – DRBA First Saturday Outing: Kibler Valley: 10am: 336.547.1903: www.danriver.org. 9 – Book Discussion: Spencer-Penn Centre: 7pm: 276.957.5757: www.thecentreatspencerpenn.com. 18 – Cruise In: Uptown: 4pm: 276.632.5688:

www.martinsvilleuptown.com. 21,28 – Craigslist Workshop: SpencerPenn Centre: 6-8pm 276.957.5757: www. thecentreatspencerpenn.com.

SmL/Bedford Entertainment

Thru Sept. 15 - Escapes Art Exhibit: Bower Center for the Arts: 540.586.4235: www.bowercenter.org. Thru Oct. 30 - Farmers Market: Bedford Farmers Market: T-F 7am-2pm: 540.586.2148: www.centertownbedford.com. Thru Oct. 31 - Wildlife Wednesday Cruises:Virginia Dare: 12-2pm: 540.297.7100: www.vadarecruises.com. 3 – Bike Show for Man’s Best Friend: Downtown Moneta: 4-8pm: www. downtownmoneta.com. 3 - Runa Concert: Bedord Public Library: 7:30pm: 540.586.8911: www. friendsofbedfordlibrary.org. 3,10 – Jr. Rangers: SML State Park: F 10am12pm: 540.297.5998: www.dcr.virginia.gov. 3,10 – Fridays at the Museum: Bedford Museum: 2pm: 540.586.4520: www. bedfordvamuseum.org. 3-19 - Peachy Open House: Peaks of Otter Winery: FSSun 12-5pm: 540.586.3707: www. peaksofotterwinery.com. 4 - Summer Jam Fest: Sedalia Center: 511pm: 434.299.5080: www.sedaliacenter.org. 4,11,18,24,25 – BYOC Event: Gallery 2000: 10am: 434.755.1272: www.visitbedford.com. 8 – Little Rangers: SML State Park: 10:3011:30am: 540.297.5998: www.dcr.virginia.gov. 10 - 2nd Fridays: Centertown Bedford: 540.586.2148: www.centertownbedford.com. 11 - Greg Osterhaus Show: The Little Gallery: 540.721.1596: www.thelittlegallerysml. com. 11 - Master Gardeners: Poplar Forest: 2pm: 434.525.1806: www.poplarforest.org. 11 - Keep the Spirit of ’45 Alive Concert & Ceremony: D-Day Memorial: 7pm: 540.587.3619: www.dday.org. 11 – Music Jam: Camp Karma Primitive Camping: 7-10pm: 540.297.5762: www. visitbedford.com. 11 - Sunset Saturdays Music Series: Hickory Hill Vineyards & Winery: 540.296.1393: www.smlwine.comg. 12 - Sunnyside Band Concert: Peaks of Otter Amphitheater: 2-4pm: 540.586.4496: www.visitbedford.com. 16 - Child Safety Awareness Day: State Farm Insurance: 1-3pm: 540.586.0811: www. visitbedford.com. 18 - Bedford Co. Farm Tour: Mountain Run Farm: 10am-3pm: 540.586.7675: www. bedfordfarmtour.org. 18 - Another Roadside Attraction Concert: Bower Center for the Arts: 7:30pm: 540.586.4235: www.bowercenter.org. 24-Sept. 2 - Apple a Day Open House: Peaks of Otter Winery: FSSun 12-5pm: 540.586.3707: www.peaksofotterwinery.com. 25 - Beach Bash: Parkway Marina: 4-9pm: 540.586.9401: www.bedfordareachamber.com. 25 - Jazz & Wine Festival: Sedalia Center:


434.299.5080: www.sedaliacenter.org. 25 – Music in the Park: SML State Park: 810pm: 540.297.6066: www.dcr.virginia.gov.

Roanoke Entertainment

1-5 – Mountain Valley Cluster Dog Show: Salem Civic Center: 800.745.3000: www. salemciviccenter.com. 12 – Back 2 School Blast: Roanoke Civic Center: 2-6pm: 540.853.5483: www.roanokeciviccenter.com. 17 – Old Crow Medicine Show: Salem Civic Center: 8pm: 800.745.3000: www. salemciviccenter.com. 18,19 – Roanoke Valley Gun Show: Roanoke Civic Center: 9am: 540.853.5483: www.roanokeciviccenter.com. 25 – Mopar Club Car Show: Roanoke Civic Center: 8am: 540.853.5483: www. roanokeciviccenter.com.

North Carolina Entertainment

3-31 – Paper Works Exhibit: Kirby Gallery, Roxboro: Reception 8/3, 6-8pm: 336.597.1709: www.kirbytheater.com. 4 – Flem Whitt Beach Music Festival: Hyco Lake: 12-5pm: www.flemwhitt.com.

south Boston

7 – Fridays at the Crossing: Carrington Pavilion: 6pm: 434.793.4636: www. danvillevaevents.com. 12 – Medicare Decisions Made Easy: Ballou Rec. Center: 1-2pm: 800.967.9386.

Entertainment

4,18 – Auto Racing: South Boston Speedway: 877.440.1540: www. southbostonspeedway.com. 7 – National Night Out: Halifax County Fair Grounds: 6pm: www.gohalifaxva.com. 10 – Blues & Brews: Town of Halifax Farmers Market: 6-10pm: www.gohalifaxva. com. 17 – Pause for the Cause: Constitution Square Downtown South Boston: 7:30pm: 434.575.4209: www.downtownsobo.com. com.

South Boston

UPCOMINGEVENTS

SEPTEMBER 2012

DANVILLE

1-29 – Virginia Grown Farmer’s Market: Olde Dominion Agricultural Complex: 8am12pm: www.oldeagfoundation.org. 6 – Yack & Snack Book Club: Main Public Library: 12-1pm: 434.799.5216 or 434.799.5195: www.playdanvilleva.com.

1,15 – Auto Racing: South Boston Speedway: 877.440.1540: www.southbostonspeedway.com. 7 – Friday Night Jams: South Main Street, Halifax: 6pm: 434.470.1602: www.gohalifaxva.com. 8 – Think Big Youth Explosion: Halifax County High School: 5pm. 15 – Goats Galore! A Family Fun Day: Halifax County Agricultural Center: 9:30am-3pm: www.svmga.org.

Martinsville

7 – First Friday Art Walk: Studio 107: 5-7pm: 276.638.2107: www.piedmontarts.org. 14 – TGIF Concert Series: Uptown: 710:30pm: www.martinsvilleuptown.com. 15 – Craft & Collectible Fair: SpencerPenn Centre: 9am: 276.957.5757: www. thecentreatspencerpenn.com. 15 – Cruise In: Uptown: 4pm: 276.632.5688: www.martinsvilleuptown.com.

Keeping Well in Mind, Body & Spirit Programs for those concerned with cancer prevention and survivorship This popular FREE series brought to the community by the Cancer Resource Center of Southern Virginia and with the support of Danville’s Cancer Task Force continues in August with Surviving Cancer: Quality of Life & Your Relationship with Your Doctor. What is your New Normal and how can your medical provider help? Come and find out. Saria Saccocio, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Danville Regional Medical Center will present the program and answer your questions on Thursday, August 16, from 11:30 am-1:30 pm, at First Presbyterian Church, 937 Main Street, Danville. Saria was a key speaker at the Connected By Cancer & Beyond Conference in May. Please bring your lunch and a friend! Drinks and dessert will be provided.

Call to make a reservation, 434-766-6650, Charlotte or Melanie or email cllitzenberg@vcu.edu.

www.showcasemagazine.com

| AUGUST 2012 | Showcase Magazine 39


fun & games solutions Solution:

S P A R

K I E L B P O M A T H O S S I S A D O T

A B B A

N U D E

T I L E S

A R I A

I R I S H

E M P T Y

E M U

O M I A T A R S D E E S L A A C U I O T D Y E E N E V S I S E

40 Showcase Magazine

R A L A L I R A Q E U S N E C P O U R A B R E S L A T E M A H E W E R V A N I L V L L I A S A

S T R U T

F A C E P A R T

T I A R A

E D G E R

P E E R

S I F T

T R I O

Y E A R

E G O S

R U N E

M E S A

Continued from Page 34

B

A

R

I

U

M

C

Z

C

H

N

E

N

I

D

O

I

Z

I

H

T

B

T

T

N

Z

N

Q

N

N

L

C

N

V

P

G

E

W

Q

S

C

O

M

E

B

D

S

G G

O

T

M

R

U

G

W

R

O

C

D

Y

U

Q

I

N

O

A

L

P

I

A

I

X

K

N

I

R

D

V

U

G

H

R

N

O E

M

T

M

M

D

T

T

G

B

K

M

U

I

Q

S

I

L

V

E

R

O

M

L

N

G

L

X

E

N

O

N

V

N

A

N

| AUGUST 2012 | www.showcasemagazine.com


Not long after I started working for the humane society (about twenty years ago), I was driving on a busy street in Danville. I spotted an Eastern box turtle on

the shoulder of the road, and started to pull over so I could get it out of danger. I was horrified by what I saw happen next. A pickup truck swerved and hit the turtle, and the young man driving the truck started laughing. I was very upset; the actions of the driver were deliberate and they were cruel. I have often wondered who he was, and where he is now. There is a cycle of violence that affects humans as well as animals. If the young man would intentionally kill a turtle, it’s not a stretch of the imagination to think that he would hurt a child, or an elderly person, or a handicapped person. As one man put it during a cruelty investigation – “I don’t hit my puppies any more than I hit my children.” Margaret Meade, a well-known anthropologist, warned that the worst thing that could happen would be for a child to hurt an animal and get away with it. All serial killers on death row started out by abusing, torturing, and killing animals. We urge parents to carefully watch children and immediately take action if animals are treated with anything but kindness. We also strongly suggest to young people that you choose your friends wisely; if you see a friend mistreat an animal, tell a grown-up. That poor turtle twenty years ago helped my eyes to be open to the existence of sheer meanness. I still wish the lesson was not a necessary one. SM

Bruiser

adopt me

It is definitely time to have all cats spayed and neutered, too! We are receiving lots and lots of kittens and cats.

The puppy’s name is Bruiser. He is a Boston terrier mix; he was born at the shelter in July.

Thank You to the ADVERTISERS who make this publication possible. Please be generous in supporting our local businesses. 27 Averett Alumni

17 Medo’s II Pizzeria

31 Barkhouser Ford

20 Medtronic

5

Cardiology Consultants

15 Michelle Dalton Photography

7

Cloverdale Quarters

41 Oak Tree Tavern

11 Curves

11 Piedmont Credit Union

23 Danville Athletic Club

13 Piedmont Infusion Services

19 Danville Dental Associates

8

31 Danville ENT Hearing Center

15 RPJ Cleaning & Pressure Washing

Piney Forest Health & Rehab Center

8

Danville Harvest Jubilee 35 Sacred Heart School 12 Danville Orthopedic & Athletic Rehab 27 Sallie S. Abreu, Realtor 19 Danville Regional Foundation 15 Salon One 11 26 Danville Regional Foundation 13 Shop.Danville.Local.First 2

Danville Regional Medical Center

21 Southside Urology & Nephrology

44 Danville Toyota

31 The Gentry Barn

17 Epiphany Episcopal School

20 URW Community Federal Credit Union

40 Freshwater Fish Festival

27 Wilson’s Auto Body

15 Gateway Health

21 Yates Home Sales

17 Gamewood Technology Group, Inc.

36 Zinc Total Salon

20 Goodwill Industries

Danville Area Humane Society 434.799.0843

21 Hallmark Home Health Care 33 Interstate Battery 9

M&M Furniture

8

Mary Baldwin College www.showcasemagazine.com

| AUGUST 2012 | Showcase Magazine 41


A Life Changed Forever

mystified

Month to month you will find Misty stating the outrageous

by Misty Brooks

or ridiculous truths in her day-to-day life, and you will realize that you are not alone in this maniacal concept known as parenting. Yes, welcome to 5150 Lunatic LaneWhere skills and tactics are tried, tested, and often fail. But she keeps doing it anyway! Misty’s children Jason-20, Corey-12, Spencer-10, Tucker-9, and Kendall8 know all too well the joy and sorrow of being a big family. And new husband Scott is still waiting for the punch line.

Twenty years ago this month my life changed forever. On August 15, 1992, I had a baby. I named him Jason. I was 17-years old-and had no idea what I was doing. This poor little baby was born to a mother with no experience, and barely any common sense for child-rearing. I was never so sleep deprived in my entire life. When would it end? I was exhausted, weak, and feeling hopeless some days. I couldn’t think past a couple of days. Getting through the next feeding, bath, and ride to the store were huge stressors at times. I learned to take one day at time. I also learned a tremendous amount of patience. Soon it was time to grow up and get a job again. Jason was a bit older and I liked the idea of him spending time with other kids at the sitters. Plus, I got a little bit of my life back while I was at work. I almost felt like a person again!! Preschool, then kindergarten...ahh it was nice to have the baby years behind us. Time was speeding by. By the time Jason was eight he had a sibling....then another, and another, and another. In elementary school Jason played soccer and baseball. And he was really good at both sports. He bowled in a junior league. He made good grades. He rode a mean skateboard and had lots of friends. I’ll never forget the time he smoked cigarettes at the neighbor’s house where an older boy lived. His eyelashes were nearly singed off and he couldn’t figure out how I knew. Or the time he had a bunch of boys sleep over for his 13th birthday and they put water on one boy’s sleeping bag and pants and convinced him he had an accident! Then they all sat around telling made up stories of how they too wet the bed at night.

Jason was soft-spoken and patient. He loved his grannies, and he loved his mama. He got into a fair share of trouble as a teenager. He wrecked his first car. He got three traffic tickets in the first four months of driving. He’s blown up motors, learned to buff and paint his own cars, and bought plenty of car parts real cheap and sold them for a profit. He still has time to school his brothers at basketball from time to time, and still likes peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. Jason’s done well in his 20 years of life. I know it hasn’t been an easy road, because I too have traveled it. But he’s motivated and determined to make his mark in this world and I get the joy of watching him do it. Happy 20th Birthday to my very first baby.You paved the way for four other children who are happy to have you as their brother. I’m proud of you! SM Another 20 year milestone for me is graduating high school. The Tunstall High School Class of 1992 was about to wreak havoc on the world. We were to set out and do great things, continue our education, settle down, start a family... I think each of us did that, just not necessarily in that order. How boring a class would we have been to meet up 20 years later and all have the same story? If you are a 1992 Tunstall High School graduate please find me on Facebook and get the details. Or LIKE the Tunstall High School Class of 1992 page. I’d prefer you did both!! If you live under a rock and don’t have Facebook, but manage to crawl out from time to time to use your email, please email me at misty@showcasemagazine.com and I’ll give you the scoop!!

42 Showcase Magazine

| AUGUST 2012 | www.showcasemagazine.com


www.showcasemagazine.com

| AUGUST 2012 | Showcase Magazine 43



Showcase Magazine August 2012