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A PublicAtion of the times

Survivor Spotlight

Lifeguards at the PooL AlAn nelson of Franciscan omni Health—Chesterton survived cardiac arrest thanks to his fellow employees’ fast action and special training.

Longevity guide to

Also

scarred for life? not so much anymore Ask the expert: spine therapy before invasion Acupuncture: new advances for chronic mental illness MAy/June 2013

nwi.CoM/getHeAltHy

1 | Product


SURVIVE.

thE bESt way to SURVIVE a hEaRt attack IS to nEVER haVE onE. The first step toward preventing a heart attack is to know you’re at risk for one. And a great way to find out is with Porter Regional Hospital’s free online heart risk assessment. It only takes around seven minutes, but it can provide you and your doctor with information that may improve your heart health and potentially prevent a heart attack. Don’t take a chance. Take our free assessment today.

take our free heart risk assessment at PorterheaLth.com/heartaWare or caLL 800-453-2330 to scheduLe your free assessment in Person With our screener. Porter Regional Hospital is directly or indirectly owned by a partnership that proudly includes physician owners, including certain members of the hospital’s medical staff.


Associates in Surgery 85 East U.S. Highway 6, Valparaiso 2000 Roosevelt Road, Valparaiso Jac Cooper, MD Adam Conn, MD Nancy Han, MD Michael Nemeth, MD Roland Thomas, MD 219-983-6240 Associated ENT Specialists 2802 Leonard Drive, Valparaiso 85 East U.S. Highway 6, Valparaiso James Turk, DO Michael Keenan, MD Geoffrey Schwartz, MD 219-531-0355 Cumberland Internal Medicine 1231 Cumberland Crossing, Valparaiso Kimberly Perry, MD Sangeeta Sehgal, MD Daniela Sikoski, MD Crystal Tuncay, DO 219-548-3843

Glendale Primary Care 1101 East Glendale Boulevard, Valparaiso Derek Gasper, DO James Taylor, MD 219-464-9521 Lake Porter Primary Care 336 East U.S. Hwy. 30, Valparaiso Michael Mirochna, MD Maria Stamp, MD 219-464-7430 Lakeshore Urology 85 East U.S. Highway 6, Ste. 230, Valparaiso 809 LaPorte Avenue, Valparaiso 3630 Willowcreek Road, Portage 104 E. Culver Road, Ste. 104, Knox 1919 Lake Avenue, Ste. 107, Plymouth 900 I Street, LaPorte John Lynam, DO Adam Perlmutter, DO 219-983-6230

HEALTH.

Portage Medical Group 3630 Willowcreek Road, Portage Zeba Ali, MD Kenneth Black, MD Don Dunevant, MD Natalie Opanasets, MD Candice Yu-Fleming, MD 219-364-3700

Mohammad Tabib, MD, Urology 3630 Willowcreek Road, Portage 219-465-0940

Porter Hematology-Oncology 85 East U.S. Hwy. 6, Valparaiso Masood Ghouse, DO Mary Y. Klein, MD Lyle R. Munn, MD 219-983-6260

Vale Park Primary Care 401 Wall Street, Valparaiso Sudhakar Garlapati, MD Michael Mirochna, MD 219-462-2106

Porter Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine 1231 Cumberland Crossing, Valparaiso James Anthony, MD Douglas Mazurek, MD 219-464-9054 Primary Care 3125 Willowcreek Road, Portage Donald Maddack, DO Leonard Ostrowski, MD 219-762-3175

Richard Turk, DO, Family Medicine 442 Sand Creek Drive, Ste. 103, Chesterton 219-926-8211

Valparaiso Family Health Center 808 Lincolnway, Valparaiso Faleh Atassi, MD 219-462-4446 Wanatah Primary Care 306 South Ohio Street, Wanatah Geraldine Feria, MD 219-733-2755 Westchester Medical Group 650 Dickinson Road (150 E), Chesterton Omer Ansari, MD Patrick Fleming, MD Heather Hazel, MD 219-926-2133

38 DEDICATED PHySICIANS. ONE FOCUS: yOUR HEALTH.

PorterPhysicianGroup.com

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may/june 2013

18 SOFT AND SMOOTH Skin care is more important than ever as we move into

warmer weather and the summer months. Learn how to protect against scars and skin illnesses to give your skin the best treatment possible.

25 YOUR BODY’S FRAMEWORK Your orthopedic system is what keeps your body moving survivor spotlight

Alan Nelson takes a lap in the pool at Franciscan Omni Health-Chesterton.

Compiled by Times Staff

HEALTHY PRODUCTS LIMITED EDITION T-SHIRTS BENEFIT SAVE THE CHILDREN Babies ’R’ Us will carry specially designed T-shirts from the Truly Scrumptious collection by Heidi Klum to help inspire creativity among kids, while raising awareness for its longtime charitable partner Save the Children, an organization that creates lasting change in the lives of children in need. The fun, monster-themed T-shirts for kids, sizes newborn to 5T, were designed by Johan, 6-year-old son of world-renowned fashion icon and mom of four Heidi Klum. In conjunction with this initiative, Babies ’R’ Us has donated $50,000 to help Save the Children provide support to COURTESY OF BABIES ‘R’ US young children in impoverished regions around the country.

Franciscan St. Margaret Health Volunteer Services is seeking helpers to assist with various duties at the Dyer and Hammond hospital campuses. Volunteers are needed for the gift shop or gift cart—past retail or cashier experience preferred—as hospitality hosts, for the information desk and as nursing unit ambassadors. Volunteers must be dependable, cheerful and willing to show an interest in patients, families and other visitors. They also must display communication and cooperation skills and be trustworthy with confidential patient information. Shifts are 8am to 1pm, noon to 4pm, and 4 to 8pm. For more information, call Marian Gralski in Dyer at 219.864.2037 and Sharon Malecha in Hammond at 219.933.2037.

‘PARTY FOR A CURE’ TO BENEFIT JDRF

The Northern Indiana Branch of JDRF will its second annual Party for a Cure Spring Gala at the at the Gillespie Conference Center and Hilton Garden Inn near Indiana toll road exit 77 in South Bend. Doors will open at 5:30pm EST. Individual tickets are $75 and tables of 8 cost $600. The 2013 Gala will raise funds for much needed research to find a cure, better treatments and methods of prevention for type-1 diabetes (T1D). For more information on event details visit northindiana.jdrf.org/ event/partyforacure2013 or contact Kurt Mikel, JDRF Branch Manager, at 574.273.1810 or kmikel@jdrf.org.

ADMISSION INFORMATION SESSIONS

The University of Saint Francis Crown Point Admission Department will host a question-and-answer session on Tuesday, April 23 at 5:30pm for candidates seeking information about the admission process and program requirements. Admission information sessions will also be offered on May 21, June 25 and July 9 at 5:30pm. An admission counselor will explain entry requirements for University of Saint Francis; USF School of Health Sciences; and the Associate of Science— Medical Lab Technician Program. Candidates for admission may bring high school and college transcripts for a free evaluation. USF Crown Point is located at Franciscan Point, 12800 Mississippi Parkway, Pavilion U, Crown Point, Indiana. An RSVP to the session is strongly suggested but not required. For more information, contact Crown Point Admissions at 219.488.8888 or email cmioduski@sf.edu.

COMMUNITY HEALTH FAIR IN KNOX

Starke County residents are invited to attend the Community Health Fair Friday, April 26 from 2pm to 7pm at the Knox Community Center, 55 E Lake St. Indiana University Health Starke Hospital and Community Services of Starke County partnered for the annual event. Participants will receive a free gift for attending. Refreshments will also be available. For more information, call 800.235.6204, ext. 2415.

DREAM WATER ALL-NATURAL SLEEP AID Dream Water is the first natural sleep enhancer with zero calories, natural active ingredients and no preservatives that help users relax and fall asleep. Why not make better use of the nighttime by rejuvenating and getting the proper amount of sleep? Dream Water helps provide a full nights sleep so users wake up feeling refreshed. Dream Water is sold in over 40,000 locations nationwide including: Walmart, CVS, Walgreens, Kroger, Safeway and Target and over 1,000 airport retailers. It comes in three flavors, Snoozeberry, nightTea night, and Paradise PM sold at COURTESY OF DREAM WATER $2.99 a shot. GNC OFFERS “ME ON GNC” SWEEPSTAKES GNC, the nation’s largest specialty retailer of health, wellness and sports nutrition products, is launching a nationwide campaign for customers to enter their own personal health and wellness success stories in the Me on GNC photo and video contest. The competition offers $100,000 in prizes for the best photo and video submissions. During the voting phase (7/15-8/15), $100 gift cards will be given out randomly to one hundred participants, just for voting for their favorite photo or video entry. To enter the Me on GNC contest, go to gnc.com/MeonGNC.

8 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

the body shop

on your mind

food & fitness

TONY V. MARTIN, THE TIMES

A LIFE SAVED

EXERCISES

you’re dead.” As he fell, students and co-workers rushed to his aid. They began CPR, and used the Automatic External Defibrillator to help resuscitate him. “We grabbed the AED and ran to the pool deck,” said Stephanie Lambert, Customer Care Supervisor at the facility. They dried him off, applied the pads to his chest, and the machine shocked him a few times. They also performed CPR. “While we were doing CPR, I noticed he was turning bluish purple,” she says. By the time paramedics arrived a few minutes later, he was in and out of consciousness and he was taken to the hospital. “He is so fit. He preaches wellness and he personal trains. We’re used to Alan being the person who swims a few miles on his lunch break,” says Sarah Hott, who is a group exercise supervisor at the facility. “When I found out it was him, I couldn’t believe it.” The facility has had an AED since it opened, but there has never been need for it to be used

BENEFICIAL FOR MENTAL HEALTH

The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention recommend adults to engage in 150 minutes of aerobic activity a week. But with those suffering joint pain, that may sound impossible.

Dr.

Dave Musgrave, an orthopedic surgeon at Lakeshore Bone and Joint Institute, said there are a variety of exercises people who experience joint pain can still partake in. “Anything that eliminates gravity is ideal exercise: swimming, water aerobics, etc.” says Musgrave. If you cannot get access to a pool, Musgrave said any kind of stationary bicycle or elliptical machine are great low-impact exercise options. “These machines do not cause excessive wear on joints; your feet are moving but they are fixed. There is some repetitive motion around the soft tissues surrounding the joint, but when you look at a person’s overall health the benefits outweigh the risks.” Dr. Pete Adam, a registered dietitian and chiropractor at Adam Chiropractic Center agrees. “You need to be active to move the muscle in order to support the joint and keep the joint flexible,” says Adam. “But everyone has joint pain for different reasons: a car accident, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid; it’s a very case-by-case basis. It’s important to know your limitations.” Adam, a former certified personal trainer, says if you have joint pain simply limit the stress on that joint. “You don’t want to aggrevate the joint. Take running on the treadmill. Yes that motion on the treadmill is a continual motion but it’s repetitive so it isn’t ideal for hip, knee or ankle pain.”

Ch t t employees Chesterton l come tto the rescue of one of their own hen Alan Nelson began teaching a class in the pool at Franciscan Omni Health-Chesterton on the evening of December 4, he thought he was in perfect health. He had run more than 500 races, done a four-hour, 7.5 mile swim in Lake Michigan, and was a power lifter. “You name it, I do it,” said Nelson, who is a part-time instructor at the facility. “They call me ‘Mr. Fitness’ around there.” But 20 minutes into teaching the class, the 66-year-old started feeling light-headed. He remembers falling backward, and remembers losing consciousness right before his body hit the pool deck. “I was in cardiac arrest,” he says. “I didn’t know it, but I had a defective heart valve since birth. When you have a cardiac arrest, your heart stops. Only five percent of people are survivors. If you don’t get help immediately,

Acupuncture

Joint-Friendly

before, Lambert explains. However, the staff had gone through its quarterly training on resuscitation and using the device within the previous week. “You prepare for it and you talk about it, but to have it actually happening is a different thing,” Lambert says. Hott said she was proud of the way her colleagues worked together to save the life of their friend. “The fact that everyone was so helpful and so capable, it was amazing,” she said. “It reminded us that all the training we do is completely relevant and necessary at all times. It was a wake-up call.” Six days after his life was saved, he underwent open heart surgery, and his faulty valve was replaced. By February 1, he was back at work. “If it would’ve happened in my car, at home, or anywhere else, there wouldn’t have been the people or facilities available to save me,” says Nelson, who recently celebrated his 67th birthday. “That’s how fortunate I was.” —Carrie Rodovich

10 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

If days are dull and nights are too long, if not much seems to matter, the problem may be the lack of an essential process in the body—and the answer may be acupuncture.

Depending on where a person’s joint pain is some high impact exercises or bone-jarring activities to avoid are running, heavy weight-lifting, jumping, aerobic dancing or walking on the stair stepper. Musgrave says people with lower extremity issues should avoid the stair stepper. “It puts an awful lot of stress on the patellofemoral joint in the knee, “ he says. “Your condition can be made worse if you run or engage in load-bearing exercise. Try to look for no to low-impact exercises to maintain the benefits of aerobic activity.” The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention also recommend muscle-strengthening activities on two or more days a week that work all major muscle groups. Musgrave says resistance bands are ideal for this because the person can adjust the resistance as the muscle strengthens. Joint-pain sufferers may also consider an antiinflammatory diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids to ease pain and/or take daily supplements. Janet Sirota, general manager for Baums Natural Foods, says the two most purchased supplements to ease joint pain are Glucosamine Chondroitin and Hyaluronic Acid. “The hyalurionic acid lubricates the joint and its something that exists in our body anyway,” says Sirota. “Ginger and tumeric have always been known to help pain and inflammation.” Adam says it’s important to remember supplements for joint health only maintain existing cartilage. “If you have no cartilage in your knee you will not grow new cartilage if you take supplements,” says Adam, adjunct faculty at Purdue Calumet for Food and Nutrition. —Trish Maley

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Acupuncture involves tiny, disposable, sterile needles placed gently into specific points on the body to relieve pain or dysfunction and restore mental health. Flora Arzanipour, acupuncturist at Community Acupuncture in Munster, says the treatment can be effective for such mental disorders as stress, anxiety, depression—even such severe emotional and psychological disorders as hysteria, neurosis, schizophrenia, and others. To understand why this simple procedure can be so effective for such a broad range of disorders, Arzanipour says one must understand Qi (pronounced chee). Qi is the vital energy in all living things, an energy derived from food, air and inherited constitution. Qi flows through the body as an invisible current, energizing, nourishing and supporting every cell, tissue, muscle, organ and gland. So Qi is necessary for growth, mental health, protection against illness and disease, and overall regulation of the body. Traditional Chinese medicine holds that the body tends to be self-healing. That property is vigorous when Qi is flowing freely. When that’s not happening, the body, or parts of it, are said to be stagnant. “There are vital pathways in the body, and the Qi runs through these pathways. If those pathways become stagnant, mental or physical

disease can result,” says Arzanipour. “Depression, according to Chinese medicine, is a disease called long stagnation of the Qi, or fluid, in the body. Any stagnation in the body and internal organs can cause depression.” Acupuncture is believed to break up that stagnation. Arzanipour says she uses it in conjunction with other healthful elements for the mind and body, such as talking with the patient about the problem; encouraging exercise, healthful eating, and spending some time in the sun; and ingesting an herbal formula of 15 or 16 ingredients based on Chinese medicine. The liver is the most sensitive of all organs to emotional distress, says Arzanipour. “Especially for mental health, it’s very important that digestion works properly so you get nourishment from the food you eat.” Acupuncture clears away stagnation, allowing free flow of Qi. Flora Arzanipour, Arzanipour says the production of such acupuncturist at “feel-good” hormones like serotonin and Community Hospital peptides like endorphins can be blocked in Munster performs a procedure on a patient. by stagnation. Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary adds that acupuncture seems to activate endorphins. Traditional Chinese medicine says that’s because it clears the way for Qi to flow. Inventor Thomas Edison declared that “The doctor of the future will give no medicine, but will interest patients in the care of the human frame, in diet, and in the cause and prevention of disease.” It appears that health-care professionals of the present day, like Arzanipour, are taking the point seriously, in the practice of acupuncture. —Julie Dean Kessler

14 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

DIET OFFERS SECRET TO

LONGEVITY A well-known doctor believes the secrets of longevity can be found by looking at the diets of people who have lived for more than 100 years. • Dr. Mao Shing Ni explores this philosophy in his new cookbook, Secrets of Longevity. • Dr. Mao believes in eating five smaller meals a day, consuming more plants, letting food be your medicine.

“T

he philosophy “I don’t think many other nutrition behind this experts would disagree with the core cookbook is that principles of his diet: a balanced diet, less by following the stress, exercise, meditation, five smaller dietary wisdom of meals with more antioxidant rich foods,” the centenarians Rojas says. “I think the drawback is getting from around the world, we can initiate the average American to comply with self-healing within ourselves, enjoy life those guidelines. In this day and age, or more in the present, and achieve longevity economy, just getting family to ccook at home and eat together in the future,” he says. “These longevity recipes is a challenge.” come from a world of the Almost all of the recipes in past—a simpler world in the cookbook are low-sodium, which food was usually sugar-free, gluten-free sourced locally, fresh, and dairy free. He also in season, and free from recommends eating smaller pesticides.” portions five times a day. He stressed the “Perhaps what most sets importance of taking time this plan apart from others is to cook a healthy meal and that it is not only about what to eat together. Too often, food to eat for longevity, but he said, people eat in a also how best to prepare Dr. Mao Shing Ni thoughtless, disconnected them, when to eat, how way in which the priority is much to eat, and where to convenience and speed. eat,” he says. “Part of (centenarians’) health success is due to making the dining table Monica Rojas, a registered dietician and certified diabetes educator for Franciscan the focus of vitality and aliveness, a time for gathering with loved ones and enjoying Medical Specialists in Munster, says Dr. Mao’s diet is based on sound principles. a meal together.”

If your diet needs a radical overhaul, Dr. Mao suggests starting by making small changes. “Start the first week by choosing just two recipes to make. By week two, they could work their way to making four recipes from the week, and gradually work their way to following one of the menus for healing as best as they are able,” he says. He recommends keeping an eating journal, eating one less fast food meal every week, and slowly reducing your intake of salt and replacing salt with herbs and spices. “The real takeaway is to make all changes gradually, because then you will be more likely to create new healthy habits without feelings of deprivation,” he says. If some of the ingredients seem hard to find, Dr. Mao suggests replacing them with less expensive, or easier to find varieties. “For ingredients that are more expensive, you can leave them out. You will be leaving out some of the healing properties, but any move toward cooking healthy food is positive, even if you cannot match the recipes perfectly.” Most importantly, Dr. Mao says if you commit to a gradual, lasting change, you can heal your body, eat well and enjoy life more. “It’s never too late to change your habits,” he said. “Never lose hope that it is too late to get healthy, and also, never lose hope that it can be fun to adopt healthier habits.” —Carrie Rodovich

COOL THE FIRE TROPICAL SMOOTHIE Serves 4 This recipe came from a region in Southern China called Hainan Island, a resort island that is also famous for its population of centenarians. The Hainan people drink this all year round to help with digestion. Tropical fruits are filled with enzymes: the pineapple is rich in bromelain and the papaya contains papain, both natural anti-inflammatory substances, good for arthritis relief, diabetes prevention, and heart disease protection. 1/2 fresh pineapple, peeled, cored, and coarsely chopped 2 kiwis, peeled and coarsely chopped 1 small papaya, peeled, seeded, and coarsely chopped 1 cup seedless grapes 1 cup unsweetened cherry juice 2 heaping tablespoons hemp powder 1 tablespoon flaxseed oil 2 cups almond milk, chilled Put all of the ingredients into a blender and blend until smooth. Divide between four glasses and serve immediately.

senior scope

DR. HOWARD ROBINSON

SCREENING S COLONOSCOPY CRUCIAL COMPONENT OF PREVENTIVE PLAN creening colonoscopies are a vital tool for colon health as symptoms can be a sign it’s too late. “Colon cancer is the second leading cancer killer, and it doesn’t have to be,” says Diane Scott, assistant manager and marketing director at Digestive Disease Center. “It is treatable, beatable and preventable by being screened.” Seniors should add the screening to their preventive health plan beginning at the age of 50 unless they have a family or personal history of colon cancer or polyps, which are small growths. “If there are symptoms such as a change in bowel habits, bleeding or weight loss prior to the age of 50, then you should see a gastroenterologist as soon as possible,” Scott says. A colonoscopy allows a view of both sides of the colon through the use of

Find more recipes online at nwi.com/gethealthy

28 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

ask the expert

Essential

a camera at the end of a flexible tube. Preparation is key to making the most of the procedure and includes a clear liquid diet and laxative prep the day before. “According to our doctors (Drs. Harsh Dalal and Navin Kumar), the most important thing is that preparation is done correctly. You need to clean out your system so they can see the polyps. If they can’t see them, there is no sense in having it,” says Marta Onofrey, surgery scheduler at Digestive Disease Center. She says drug manufacturers are striving to make the preparation drink more palatable and she has seen changes in the last eight years. “We can give you advice on

PROVIDED

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IMAGES PROVIDED

and ready to go. Find out how to recognize the signs of orthopedic issues, and how to give your most important support system the attention it needs to stay pain-free.

what to mix it with to make it easier to drink. We are working to reduce the stress and anxiety involved,” she says. “The doctor wants you to feel as comfortable and secure as possible as it can be a delicate procedure for people.” “Presently, less than 50 percent of appropriate patients (average age starts at 50) have been screened. The major factors leading to this are misinformation, or lack thereof, fear and the belief that it’s painful,” adds Dr. Kumar. Patients are under sedation during a colonoscopy but are also able to take commands. Polyps will be removed or biopsied and larger ones can be marked so a surgeon can remove them at a later date. “If polyps are not removed, they could grow and fester and in time, could become cancer,” Scott says. “If you go in and get screened and it’s clear, then you are good for 10 years (without symptoms). If the doctor finds a polyp, then screenings can be every two, three or five years, depending on the discretion of the doctor.” Outside of the screenings, seniors can focus on diet and exercise to keep their colons healthy. “Increase fiber and hydrate— drink lots of water,” Scott says.

“Avoid contributing to the problem by limiting processed foods, sugar and caffeine.” As the spotlight is often on other cancers, Scott says her team is focusing on screening awareness. “Getting screened saves lives. If you are over 50 years of age, spread the word, tell your neighbors, friends and family that colon screening needs to become a factor in everyone’s life,” says Dr. Dalal. “We’re trying to get the word out that colon cancer is one of the most preventable forms of cancer,” Onofrey adds. “With recent questions about medical procedures, they say the colonoscopy is one of the most important tests that you should still have done.” Susanne Baker, insurance billing and coding manager at Digestive Disease Center, says most major insurance plans include a colon screening after the age of 50 as part of the wellness benefit plan and the staff will check with the insurance carrier directly. Digestive Disease Center is located at 5825 Broadway, Suite B, in Merrillville and 110 Ridge Road in Munster and has satellite offices in Valparaiso and Winfield. For more information, contact 219.981.9000. —Lesly Bailey

30 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

The backbone of spine care

The spine is one of the hardest-working components of your body, yet not many people pay attention to their spine’s health. Dr. Howard Robinson at Ingalls Health System in Harvey, Illinois offers some insight into how patients can keep their spines at the forefront of their health care. Dr. Robinson is a physiatrist who is board certified in physical medicine, rehabilitation and pain management.

Q: What is the most common spine ailment and what is its usual cause? In younger patients it tends to be more muscular mediated, and a little less commonly, disc related. Muscular problems in the low back can be exceedingly painful. Herniated discs can be a problem when they push on or cause inflammation on the nearby nerve. Older patients can have disc or muscular problems, but it’s more likely to be related to the osteoarthritic changes in aging. The pain tends to be in the low back radiating into the lower extremities that is worse with walking and much better with sitting.

help significantly with low back pain: The lighter the load on the spine, the better it will feel. Smoking cessation can also be very helpful. Q: What about chiropractic? Unlike a lot of physicians, I feel that chiropractic treatments can be helpful. From my experience it seems that chiropractors can be very helpful for joint and muscle problems and less helpful for nerve-related problems.

Q: What is the most common treatment(s) for spine injuries? Most back pain resolves on its own, but if it doesn’t, we typically start with the least invasive options. We usually have patients try physical therapy first. Most of the time a very good physical therapist will be able to help the patient rather quickly and painlessly. In addition, we will often use medications to help with the pain. Injection treatments have been very helpful for many of my patients. Surgery continues to be a good option for pain, especially for patients with coexisting weakness. Acupuncture, massage, and nutrition consultations can be very helpful. Weight loss can

Q: What can people do who are in jobs that stress the spine, such as heavy lifting or sitting for long periods of time? Short of getting a new job, use good biomechanics with the lifting – lifting with the legs rather than with the back. In jobs that require lengthy periods of sitting, change positions as often as possible, getting up and walking around the office or going for a walk at lunchtime. Q: If a person thinks he or she may have injured the spine, how long should someone wait before seeing a doctor if the pain doesn’t subside? Most of the time, low back pain occurs gradually over time. I would suggest seeing a physician sooner rather than later if the pain does not resolve after about a week or two. If there’s

weakness associated with the low back pain, their physician should be seen as soon as possible. Q: Should heat, or cold, be used on an injury/ surgical site? I suggest using cold for an acute injury. If the low back pain started within two to three weeks I would suggest using only cold, alternating with 20 minutes of cold on the painful site, then 20 minutes off, and so on, for hours if necessary. You don’t want to risk frostbite by leaving the ice on too long. Packaged frozen vegetables work well; they can be molded to fit and can be refrozen. Heat tends to work better on chronic conditions; it helps loosen up muscles. We do caution patients not to leave heat on to long as it can actually burn the skin. Q: Can exercise strengthen the spine? Absolutely; it can strengthen the muscles that support the spine. Often my patients are instructed to avoid doing weight lifting exercises above their shoulders because it produces a significantly compressive force on the spine. —Julie Dean Kessler FOR YOUR INFORMATION

Ingalls Health System Spine Center One Ingalls Drive . Harvey, Ill . IngallsHealthSystem.org

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what’s new

survivor spotlight

body shop

on your mind

food & fitness

senior scope

ask the expert

Shirts for a cause, natural sleep aid and a GNC contest

When a heart attack struck one of their own, Franciscan Omni Health staff was prepared

Exercises easy on the joints and bones can alleviate pain

Acupuncture may be able to help with memory retention and other mental health issues

Dr. Mao offers suggestions on foods for a long life

It’s more important than ever to get screened for colon health

Dr. Howard Robinson on how to keep your spine in tip-top shape

4 letter from the editor 2 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

|

6 health care advisory council


Moving forward. Making a difference. Orthopedic and Spine Specialists Close to Home

Methodist Physician Group has assembled a remarkable team of orthopedic and spine specialists, right here in Northwest Indiana. Together, these experienced, accomplished and compassionate physicians offer a wide range of The Region’s most advanced care in all areas of treatment, including spine care, total joint replacement, sports medicine and podiatric care. They offer the latest techniques, including non-surgical and minimally invasive treatment methods to help minimize your pain and maximize your quality of life.

9105 A Indianapolis Blvd, Suite 102, Highland

219-923-9090 200 E. 89th Ave., Suite 3-C, Merrillville

219-757-7566 9235 Broadway Merrillville

219-738-2255

Mark Jones, DPM Foot and Ankle Surgery Judson Wood, MD Orthopedic Surgery Hiren Italia, MD Sports Medicine Elian Shepherd, MD Spine Surgery Vineet Shah, DO, MPH Orthopedic Surgery

Simply put, we can fix virtually every bone and joint in your body.

The right doctors make all the difference. may/june 2013 | GET HEALTHY | 3


letter from the editor volume 8 | issue 3

A

INHERITED INSIDES AND OUTSIDES

s I often say, my outsides may be all Dorsey, but my insides are all Valandingham. (Valandingham being my grandmother’s maiden name.) I say this because although I look very much like my dad’s side of the family, all the little inexplicable twinges, aches and pains that I experience are familiar to me not from personal experience, but because I’ve listened to the women on my mother’s side of the family and their various health complaints for my entire life. Every one of us gets these terrible weatherrelated migraine headaches. As soon as spring weather rolls in, we’d like nothing better than to curl up in a ball with a blindfold and some earmuffs to block out external stimuli. And sure enough, it just kicked in for me this week. Even a strange little thing that happens when I drink wine I can trace back through my family. Somehow, drinking certain things makes the glands at my jaw joint ache. If this is a diagnosable ailment, I don’t know about it; the only people who suffer from it, to my knowledge, are related to me on the matrilineal side. My grandma and I had the same type of feet. Long, narrow and possibly functional as water skis should the strap-on kind fail. These, of course, come with abysmally weak ankles—not great for someone who wants to spend three nights a week skating, but I do my best. Another development that seems to manifest

as the Valandingham women get older is the inevitability of tailbone problems. I don’t have it yet, but going by the track record, I’m certain I will. Despite all these inherited issues, or non-issues, in putting this issue together, I have learned that there are things I can do to possibly change my destiny. Like paying attention to my spinal health before it’s too late. I also didn’t know that there were so many gender-specific issues with orthopedic ailments. Medicine is not a one-size-fits-all affair, and it is reassuring to know that these specialists are looking out for the individual needs of their patients. Another inspiring story involved Alan Nelson, an employee at Franciscan Omni Health in Chesterton, who was given first aid by his coworkers when he experienced a heart attack at the club. You can never underestimate the benefit of knowing CPR and having the right equipment nearby. And finally, it seems that the more you take care of your skin, the more it will take care of you. This is particularly important as we move into the summer season and head out to the beaches. Sunscreen and protective moisture creams can do you a world of good in the long run. In conclusion, while some things that happen to our bodies may be inevitable, others can be easily prevented. Let’s do our best to take care of the health we have today. KATHLEEN DORSEY MANAGING EDITOR

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Publisher — BILL MASTERSON, JR. Associate Publisher/Editor — PAT COLANDER Managing Editor — KATHLEEN DORSEY Design Director — BEN CUNNINGHAM Designer — APRIL BURFORD Contributing Editors JANE AMMESON, LESLY BAILEY, ASHLEY BOYER, CHRISTINE BRYANT, TRISH MALEY, JENNIFER PALLAY, PHILIP POTEMPA, CARRIE RODOVICH, ELOISE VALADEZ, SHARON BIGGS WALLER NICHE PUBLICATION SALES Account Executives MIKE CANE, ANDREA WALCZAK Operations Manager ERIC HORON Advertising Managers DEB ANSELM, LISA DAUGHERTY, CRAIG CHISM, DEEDEE WHITE, CHUCK SMITH Production Manager TOM KACIUS Creative Services Manager AMI REESE

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?

TRUE or FALSE Colorectal cancer is the 2nd leading cancer killer. TRUE

FALSE

Both men and women get colorectal cancer. TRUE

Harsh, Dalal, MD, FACG

Navin Kumar, MD

FALSE The specialist at Digestive Disease Centers bring their expertise and experience to patients throughout Northwest Indiana.

Colorectal cancer often starts with no symptoms. TRUE

FALSE

You can stop this cancer before it starts. TRUE

FALSE

With offices in Merrillville, Munster, Winfield, and Valparaiso, we are able to schedule patient appointments very quickly to assess your symptoms, recommended a testing/treatment plan, or to simply provide digestive wellness screenings and check-ups. Dr. Harsh Dalal and Dr. Navin Kumar are dedicated to providing the highest quality of compassionate care, placing emphasis on their patients’ comfort, privacy and health concerns at all times.

Comprehensive Health Care Digestive Disease Centers specialize in comprehensive care of all gastrointestinal and liver diseases with an array of testing and treatment services, including:

Testing for colorectal cancer can save your life. Screening tests can find precancerous polyps so they can be removed before they turn into cancer. Screening can also find colorectal cancer early, when treatment is most effective. Talk to your doctor and Screen for Life.

• Colon Cancer Screening • Colon Polypectomy • Upper Endoscopy • Esophageal Dilation • ERCP • Small Capsule Endoscopy

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Schedule an Appointment at One of Our Convenient Locations! MERRILLVILLE 5825 Broadway Suite B 219-981-9000

MUNSTER WINFIELD VALPARAISO 110 Ridge Rd. 9150 109th Ave. 1551 E. Sturdy Rd. 219-922-4900 Suite 2C 219-464-7200 219-981-9000 may/june 2013 | GET HEALTHY | 5


WHAT WE TALK ABOUT WHEN WE TALK ABOUT HEALTHCARE

John Gorski Community Healthcare System Donald Fesko Community Hospital

T

he new tools are death-defying in their scope and capabilities: Do-it-Yourself health and fitness calculators. Detailed news about prescription drugs that are coming on the market. A less-invasive procedure for bariatric surgery. Minimally disruptive techniques to eliminate chronic pain. Heart health risk assessment. Symptom identifier and wellness management. Effective self-treatments for chronic diseases. Calorie counters and diet trackers. Mobile nutrition analysis with personal online database and photo option. Dental health indicators of conditional diagnoses. Measurement of digestive disorders and gastrointestinal disease. Search any of these phrases and you will find millions of entries for each one—forms to fill out, evaluations to study, social networks with a common interest to join. Try entering self-diagnosis and cyberchondria and you will find out that you are on a delusional path that is doomed to fail. Though the web is a rich source of information that has produced a bottomless file cabinet of what we know about potential treatments for the vast array of ailments it is possible to encounter, it is also a vault of true-life experiments and experiences that serve confusion, build fear, circulate rumors about the spread of disease and generate the additional burden of stress. The very human tendency to identify with symptoms you are studying is well-known: Wikipedia has an entry from Three Men in a Boat, by Jerome K. Jerome in 1889, that describes the author going to the British Museum to read up on hay fever and “I came to typhoid fever—read the symptoms— discovered that I had typhoid fever, must have had it for months without knowing it—wondered what else I had got, turned up St. Vitus’s Dance—found, as I expected that I had that too . . . and that the acute stage would commence in about another fortnight . . . ” Yet, the healthcare industry wants us to be more self-reliant, personally responsible and aware of options for whatever symptoms we find troubling. Every physician will urge a patient to get a second opinion, but people usually get second opinions only when they don’t like the first opinion, which more often than not is confirmed. Which is not to say that you should not get second opinions, just be honest with yourself about it. (When my doctor recommended I have a colonoscopy, I immediately sought a second opinion. Of course, the second doctor’s opinion was that I should have a colonoscopy right away.) Most workplaces by now have competitive teams engaged in weight loss initiatives because they work. Most primary care physicians want to see their patients at regular intervals, especially if they are hoping to control a chronic illness or correct an imbalance that could be dangerous. This is the kind of relationship building that helps to save lives. Health clubs give gifts to members who bring in new members; it’s a win-win for everybody. In our office, one of my colleagues, lost 20 pounds over several months, one carrot stick at a time. Everyone applauded her announcement. A friend of mine recently walked the Manitou Incline, a mile straight up and three miles down and he put it on Facebook. Lots of likes and comments followed. When you ask yourself if you should share your treadmill mileage, say yes.

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John Doherty Doherty Therapeutic and Sports Medicine Dr. Alex Stemer Franciscan Medical Specialists Paul Chase AARP

Mary Ann Shachlett Community Foundation of Northwest Indiana

Dr. Pat Bankston Indiana University Northwest School of Medicine College of Health and Human Services

JoAnn Birdzell St. Catherine Hospital

Phillip A. Newbolt Memorial Health System

Janice Ryba St. Mary Medical Center

Nitin Khanna, MD Orthopaedic Specialists of Northwest Indiana

Gene Diamond Franciscan Alliance David F. Ruskowski Franciscan St. Anthony Health Crown Point Daniel Netluch, MD Franciscan St. Anthony Health Crown Point Carol Schuster, RN, MBA Franciscan Alliance Thomas J. Gryzbek Franciscan St. Margaret Health

Thor Thordarson Indiana University LaPorte Hospital ______________

MARKETING AND COMMUNITY RELATIONS

Jim Lipinski Franciscan Alliance

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Trish Weber, RN, MBA Franciscan St. Anthony Health Michigan City Jonathan Nalli Porter Hospital Ian McFadden Methodist Hospitals Denise Dillard Methodist Hospitals Haroon Naz Pinnacle Hospital Barbara H. Greene Franciscan Physicians Hospital Beverly DeLao Franciscan Hammond Clinic Rob Jensen Franciscan Hammond Clinic C.D. Egnatz Lake County Medical Society John T. King, MD Franciscan St. Anthony Crown Point

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Kelly Credit Porter Hospital Karen Keltner Porter Hospital Mary Fetsch St. Mary Medical Center Marie Forszt Community Hospital Joe Dejanovic Franciscan Alliance Ellen Sharpe Franciscan Alliance Sister M. Aline Shultz, OSF Franciscan Alliance Maria E. Ramos Franciscan Alliance Neil Mangus, MHA IU Health LaPorte Hospital Colleen Zubeck Franciscan Medical Specialists Centers of Indiana

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may/june 2013 | GET HEALTHY | 7


what’s new Compiled by Times Staff

Local Health News

HEALTHY PRODUCTS

HOSPITAL SEEKS VOLUNTEERS

LIMITED EDITION T-SHIRTS BENEFIT SAVE THE CHILDREN

Franciscan St. Margaret Health Volunteer Services is seeking helpers to assist with various duties at the Dyer and Hammond hospital campuses. Volunteers are needed for the gift shop or gift cart—past retail or cashier experience preferred—as hospitality hosts, for the information desk and as nursing unit ambassadors. Volunteers must be dependable, cheerful and willing to show an interest in patients, families and other visitors. They also must display communication and cooperation skills and be trustworthy with confidential patient information. Shifts are 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., noon to 4 p.m., and 4 to 8 p.m. For more information, call Marian Gralski in Dyer at 219.864.2037 and Sharon Malecha in Hammond at 219.933.2037.

‘PARTY FOR A CURE’ TO BENEFIT JDRF

The Northern Indiana Branch of JDRF will its second annual Party for a Cure Spring Gala at the at the Gillespie Conference Center and Hilton Garden Inn near Indiana toll road exit 77 in South Bend. Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. EST. Individual tickets are $75 and tables of 8 cost $600. The 2013 Gala will raise funds for much needed research to find a cure, better treatments and methods of prevention for type-1 diabetes (T1D). For more information on event details visit northindiana.jdrf.org/ event/partyforacure2013 or contact Kurt Mikel, JDRF Branch Manager, at 574.273.1810 or kmikel@jdrf.org.

ADMISSION INFORMATION SESSIONS

The University of Saint Francis Crown Point Admission Department will host a question-and-answer session on Tuesday, April 23 at 5:30 p.m. for candidates seeking information about the admission process and program requirements. Admission information sessions will also be offered on May 21, June 25 and July 9 at 5:30 p.m. An admission counselor will explain entry requirements for University of Saint Francis; USF School of Health Sciences; and the Associate of Science— Medical Lab Technician Program. Candidates for admission may bring high school and college transcripts for a free evaluation. USF Crown Point is located at Franciscan Point, 12800 Mississippi Parkway, Pavilion U, Crown Point, Indiana. An RSVP to the session is strongly suggested but not required. For more information, contact Crown Point Admissions at 219.488.8888 or email cmioduski@sf.edu.

COMMUNITY HEALTH FAIR IN KNOX

Starke County residents are invited to attend the Community Health Fair Friday, April 26 from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Knox Community Center, 55 E Lake St. Indiana University Health Starke Hospital and Community Services of Starke County partnered for the annual event. Participants will receive a free gift for attending. Refreshments will also be available. For more information, call 800.235.6204, ext. 2415.

8 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

Babies ’R’ Us will carry specially designed T-shirts from the Truly Scrumptious collection by Heidi Klum to help inspire creativity among kids, while raising awareness for its longtime charitable partner Save the Children, an organization that creates lasting change in the lives of children in need. The fun, monster-themed T-shirts for kids, sizes newborn to 5T, were designed by Johan, 6-year-old son of world-renowned fashion icon and mom of four Heidi Klum. In conjunction with this initiative, Babies ’R’ Us has donated $50,000 to help Save the Children provide support to young children in impoverished regions around the country.

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DREAM WATER ALL-NATURAL SLEEP AID

Dream Water is the first natural sleep enhancer with zero calories, natural active ingredients and no preservatives that help users relax and fall asleep. Why not make better use of the nighttime by rejuvenating and getting the proper amount of sleep? Dream Water helps provide a full nights sleep so users wake up feeling refreshed. Dream Water is sold in over 40,000 locations nationwide including: Walmart, CVS, Walgreens, Kroger, Safeway and Target and over 1,000 airport retailers. It comes in three flavors, Snoozeberry, nightTea night, and Paradise PM sold at $2.99 a shot.

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GNC OFFERS “ME ON GNC” SWEEPSTAKES

GNC, the nation’s largest specialty retailer of health, wellness and sports nutrition products, is launching a nationwide campaign for customers to enter their own personal health and wellness success stories in the Me on GNC photo and video contest. The competition offers $100,000 in prizes for the best photo and video submissions. During the voting phase (7/15-8/15), $100 gift cards will be given out randomly to one hundred participants, just for voting for their favorite photo or video entry. To enter the Me on GNC contest, go to gnc.com/MeonGNC.


NEW.

ThE cENTEr for WomEN’s hEalTh. jusT for you. When it comes to mammography, breast imaging, bone density testing, and other imaging needs, the team at our new Center for Women’s Health is dedicated to making your experience as convenient and comfortable as possible. We offer specialty 3D digital breast imaging technology, as well as early morning, evening and Saturday appointments at several locations. You’ll also have peace of mind knowing you will receive your results within twenty-four hours and that they’ll be interpreted by an experienced women’s imaging radiologist. It’s all to help your future remain as bright as possible. Walk-ins welcome for screening mammograms.

Call 219-983-8335 to schedule your mammogram or bone density scan or, to learn more, visit us at porterhealth.com/women.

Porter Regional Hospital is directly or indirectly owned by a partnership that proudly includes physician owners, including certain members of the hospital’s medical staff.

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4/5/13 2:38 PM

may/june 2013 | GET HEALTHY | 9


survivor spotlight

Alan Nelson takes a lap in the pool at Franciscan Omni Health-Chesterton. TONY V. MARTIN, THE TIMES

A LIFE SAVED

Chesterton employees come to the rescue of one of their own hen Alan Nelson began teaching a class in the pool at Franciscan Omni Health-Chesterton on the evening of December 4, he thought he was in perfect health. He had run more than 500 races, done a four-hour, 7.5 mile swim in Lake Michigan, and was a power lifter. “You name it, I do it,” says Nelson, who is a part-time instructor at the facility. “They call me ‘Mr. Fitness’ around there.” But 20 minutes into teaching the class, the 66-year-old started feeling light-headed. He remembers falling backward, and remembers losing consciousness right before his body hit the pool deck. “I was in cardiac arrest,” he says. “I didn’t know it, but I had a defective heart valve since birth. When you have a cardiac arrest, your heart stops. Only five percent of people are survivors. If you don’t get help immediately,

10 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

you’re dead.” As he fell, students and co-workers rushed to his aid. They began CPR, and used the Automatic External Defibrillator to help resuscitate him. “We grabbed the AED and ran to the pool deck,” says Stephanie Lambert, Customer Care Supervisor at the facility. They dried him off, applied the pads to his chest, and the machine shocked him a few times. They also performed CPR. “While we were doing CPR, I noticed he was turning bluish purple,” she says. By the time paramedics arrived a few minutes later, he was in and out of consciousness and he was taken to the hospital. “He is so fit. He preaches wellness and he personal trains. We’re used to Alan being the person who swims a few miles on his lunch break,” says Sarah Hott, who is a group exercise supervisor at the facility. “When I found out it was him, I couldn’t believe it.” The facility has had an AED since it opened, but there has never been need for it to be used

before, Lambert explains. However, the staff had gone through its quarterly training on resuscitation and using the device within the previous week. “You prepare for it and you talk about it, but to have it actually happening is a different thing,” Lambert says. Hott says she is proud of the way her colleagues worked together to save the life of their friend. “The fact that everyone was so helpful and so capable, it was amazing,” she says. “It reminded us that all the training we do is completely relevant and necessary at all times. It was a wake-up call.” Six days after his life was saved, he underwent open heart surgery, and his faulty valve was replaced. By February 1, he was back at work. “If it would’ve happened in my car, at home, or anywhere else, there wouldn’t have been the people or facilities available to save me,” says Nelson, who recently celebrated his 67th birthday. “That’s how fortunate I was.” —Carrie Rodovich


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with in-center and home dialysis. DaVita速 serves more than 128,000 patients that are diagnosed with chronic kidney failure or chronic kidney disease (CKD) in approximately 1,642 centers nationwide.

Seeking medical care as soon as possible is important to make a full recovery and decrease the chance of developing long-term problems. The Concussion Clinic at Community Hospital, Munster Indiana has a team of medical professionals experienced in evaluating and treating concussions. If you have a head injury, don't wait to seek medical care. Call Community Hospital's Concussion Clinic at 219-836-4461 and get back in the lineup.

Visit one of our convenient locations. Chesterton (219) 926-6049

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www.DaVita.com may/june 2013 | GET HEALTHY | 11


the body shop

Joint-Friendly

EXERCISES The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention recommend that adults engage in 150 minutes of aerobic activity a week. But with those suffering joint pain, that may sound impossible.

Dr.

Dave Musgrave, an orthopedic surgeon at Lakeshore Bone and Joint Institute, says there are a variety of exercises people who experience joint pain can still partake in. “Anything that eliminates gravity is ideal exercise: swimming, water aerobics, etc.” says Musgrave. If you cannot get access to a pool, Musgrave says any kind of stationary bicycle or elliptical machine are great low-impact exercise options. “These machines do not cause excessive wear on joints; your feet are moving but they are fixed. There is some repetitive motion around the soft tissues surrounding the joint, but when you look at a person’s overall health the benefits outweigh the risks.” Dr. Pete Adam, a registered dietitian and chiropractor at Adam Chiropractic Center agrees. “You need to be active to move the muscle in order to support the joint and keep the joint flexible,” says Adam. “But everyone has joint pain for different reasons: a car accident, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid; it’s a very case-by-case basis. It’s important to know your limitations.” Adam, a former certified personal trainer, says if you have joint pain simply limit the stress on that joint. “You don’t want to aggravate the joint. Take running on the treadmill. Yes that motion on the treadmill is a continual motion but it’s repetitive so it isn’t ideal for hip, knee or ankle pain.”

12 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

Depending on where a person’s joint pain is some high impact exercises or bone-jarring activities to avoid are running, heavy weight-lifting, jumping, aerobic dancing or walking on the stair stepper. Musgrave says people with lower extremity issues should avoid the stair stepper. “It puts an awful lot of stress on the patellofemoral joint in the knee, “ he says. “Your condition can be made worse if you run or engage in load-bearing exercise. Try to look for no to low-impact exercises to maintain the benefits of aerobic activity.” The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention also recommend muscle-strengthening activities on two or more days a week that work all major muscle groups. Musgrave says resistance bands are ideal for this because the person can adjust the resistance as the muscle strengthens. Joint-pain sufferers may also consider an antiinflammatory diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids to ease pain and/or take daily supplements. Janet Sirota, general manager for Baums Natural Foods, says the two most purchased supplements to ease joint pain are Glucosamine Chondroitin and Hyaluronic Acid. “The hyalurionic acid lubricates the joint and its something that exists in our body anyway,” says Sirota. “Ginger and tumeric have always been known to help pain and inflammation.” Adam says it’s important to remember supplements for joint health only maintain existing cartilage. “If you have no cartilage in your knee you will not grow new cartilage if you take supplements,” says Adam, adjunct faculty at Purdue Calumet for Food and Nutrition. —Trish Maley


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may/june 2013 | GET HEALTHY | 13


on your mind

Acupuncture BENEFICIAL FOR MENTAL HEALTH If days are dull and nights are too long, if not much seems to matter, the problem may be the lack of an essential process in the body—and the answer may be acupuncture. Acupuncture involves tiny, disposable, sterile needles placed gently into specific points on the body to relieve pain or dysfunction and restore mental health. Flora Arzanipour, acupuncturist at Community Acupuncture in Munster, says the treatment can be effective for such mental disorders as stress, anxiety, depression—even such severe emotional and psychological disorders as hysteria, neurosis, schizophrenia, and others. To understand why this simple procedure can be so effective for such a broad range of disorders, Arzanipour says one must understand Qi (pronounced chee). Qi is the vital energy in all living things, an energy derived from food, air and inherited constitution. Qi flows through the body as an invisible current, energizing, nourishing and supporting every cell, tissue, muscle, organ and gland. So Qi is necessary for growth, mental health, protection against illness and disease, and overall regulation of the body. Traditional Chinese medicine holds that the body tends to be self-healing. That property is vigorous when Qi is flowing freely. When that’s not happening, the body, or parts of it, are said to be stagnant. “There are vital pathways in the body, and the Qi runs through these pathways. If those pathways become stagnant, mental or physical

14 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

disease can result,” says Arzanipour. “Depression, according to Chinese medicine, is a disease called long stagnation of the Qi, or fluid, in the body. Any stagnation in the body and internal organs can cause depression.” Acupuncture is believed to break up that stagnation. Arzanipour says she uses it in conjunction with other healthful elements for the mind and body, such as talking with the patient about the problem; encouraging exercise, healthful eating, and spending some time in the sun; and ingesting an herbal formula of 15 or 16 ingredients based on Chinese medicine. The liver is the most sensitive of all organs to emotional distress, says Arzanipour. “Especially for mental health, it’s very important that digestion works properly so you get nourishment from the food you eat.” Acupuncture clears away stagnation, allowing free flow of Qi. Flora Arzanipour, Arzanipour says the production of such acupuncturist at “feel-good” hormones like serotonin and Community Hospital peptides like endorphins can be blocked in Munster performs a procedure on a patient. by stagnation. Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary adds that acupuncture seems to activate endorphins. Traditional Chinese medicine says that’s because it clears the way for Qi to flow. Inventor Thomas Edison declared that “The doctor of the future will give no medicine, but will interest patients in the care of the human frame, in diet, and in the cause and prevention of disease.” It appears that health-care professionals of the present day, like Arzanipour, are taking the point seriously, in the practice of acupuncture. —Julie Dean Kessler


Joint care. It’s better in the burbs. If you live in the South Suburbs, you’ll find award-winning orthopedic care is just around the corner. Ingalls is distinguished as one of the best orthopedic hospitals in the nation, #2 in Illinois…and we’re proud to provide exceptional care that is exceptionally close. If you’re ready to move beyond your pain and get back to living, schedule an appointment today. To see a specialist within 24-48 hours, call IngallsExpress at 708.915.PAIN (7246) or visit www.Ingalls.org/Express.

Advanced Orthopedic Institute Move Again. Live Again. SM

may/june 2013 | GET HEALTHY | 15


St. Catherine Hospital Orthopedic Surgeon ‘Godsend’ for Hammond Woman W

hen Lydia Banda of Hammond stumbled into Orthopedic Surgeon Surender Dhiman’s office, she was in complete despair, living with unbearable pain. After a fall off a rocking chair at home in 2004, her knee was never the same. She tore her ACL ligament. She endured three surgeries, visited several different physicians and suffered lots of frustration, but her knee never recovered properly. “Before coming to Dr. Dhiman, I had been in a lot of pain and was seriously ready for amputation just to make it stop,” Banda said. “To imagine that I came in determined to have my leg cut off…I was ready to give up, but Dr. Dhiman delivered hope to me. I am so grateful,” she said. Although ACL repair usually includes a long road to recovery, staff at St. Catherine Hospital in East Chicago make it a pleasant patient experience. It’s total care that patients, including Lydia Banda, feel more confident and comfortable about and allows

them to do everyday activities again, such as walking, without pain. At the Joint Academy and Hand Center of St. Catherine Hospital, Surender Dhiman, M.D. had a much different, more conservative plan of care for Banda that would alleviate the pain and restore her quality of life. “Since she endured so much with her prior surgeries, I suggested other options before yet another open procedure, including an intense therapy program,” Dhiman said. “I called in her family support system to

“Dr. Dhiman has been one of my angels- an answer to my prayers. Since 2004, I had suffered in pain often going to bed crying myself to sleep. After three unsuccessful surgeries, I finally met with Dr. Dhiman. With his support, guidance and skills, I am now walking comfortably! He truly is a godsend.” -Lydia Banda, Hammond make sure everyone else was onboard,” he said. ‘Open communication and having a complete treatment plan is an important part of my care philosophy, he added. While Banda had ACL repair surgery and not a joint replacement, many of the same staff work with patients of The Joint Academy and Hand Center program. Each patient is fully educated about his or her procedure prior to surgery, and continues with inpatient group therapy, followed by education and readiness for recovery at home. Each patient is assigned their own specialized, dedicated team of orthopedic professionals.

“Together, we go through the entire plan and discuss every aspect from pre-op therapy to post-op rehabilitation,” Dhiman said. “I tell patients ‘I’m going do my part,’ and ask, ‘are you committed enough to do your part’?” After therapy, Banda had a complete ACL reconstruction, but this time she was ready. She is currently undergoing post surgery therapy. “It is so rewarding to see that she is a new person from the one who came in initially in such misery and pain,” said Dhiman. When it comes to orthopedic care, St. Catherine Hospital staff recognizes that education, including pre- and postoperative teaching, is a very important part of the healing process for such care and has taken its joint care to a higher level. St. Catherine Hospital’s knee and hip repair and replacement patients are supported by board certified and fellowship-trained orthopedic physicians, specially trained orthopedic nursing staff and surgical technicians through the surgery phase of their procedure. After a short hospital stay, patients continue therapy after discharge at the Outpatient Rehabilitation Center based at the hospital where they receive education and follow up from certified physical therapists, occupational therapists and social workers. Through a combination of inventive techniques in pain management; rapid rehabilitation and education, staff at St. Catherine Hospital is able to complete successful knee repairs and replacements that help patients increase their quality of life.

Cert. MDT, Director of Therapy Services Sylvia Gould, DPT, MHS, OCS at St. Catherine Hospital, works with patient Lydia Banda as part of Lydia’s rehabilitation program. Lydia gives credit to the well rounded team approach starting from Dr. Surender Dhiman, surgery staff and therapy services she encountered at St. Catherine Hospital for her recovery.

Dr. Dhiman’s experienced quality care and attentiveness to his patient’s needs brings a renewed quality of life. His care includes a specialized treatment plan for all patients and works collaboratively with various departments to ensure a complete recovery. Dr. Dhiman is accepting new patients at St. Catherine Hospital’s Professional Office Building location in East Chicago. St. Catherine Hospital Comprehensive Orthopedic Care • Hip Replacement Professional Office Building • Knee Replacement • Arthritis 4320 Fir Street, Suite 201 • Arthroscopic Surgery • Minimal Incision Surgery East Chicago, IN • Fractures • Reconstructive Surgery To make an appointment, call 392-7664. 16 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy


Stomping Out Amputation One Foot at a Time Diabetes can be a tricky and sneaky disease. Just ask Rene Garcia of Hobart. At 45 years of age, Garcia had unexplained discomfort and swelling of his right foot. He often associated the swelling from being on his feet all day at work at a sporting goods store. The truth was, for years, he had undiagnosed diabetes. “Being on my feet so much, having an arch that collapsed, and having extended periods of elevated blood sugar levels, my bones started to soften and began to break,” Garcia explained. “I was diagnosed with Charcot joint disease by Dr. Ahmad El-Samad, DMP and advised to monitor my blood sugar levels.” Charcot joint disease is a complication of diabetes and refers to the progressive degeneration of a weight-bearing joint. If the disease remains unchecked, it can result in joint deformity, ulceration, loss of function, and in the worst case scenario, amputation or death. “Dr. El-Samad said there was a 50/50 chance of keeping my entire leg,” he said. “I was not prepared to hear that. He said I had to comply or else…I decided to do whatever he advised.” Medical Director of the Limb Recovery Center at St. Catherine Hospital, Dr. El-Samad, specializes in complex reconstruction of the foot and ankle, including flat foot reconstruction, joint replacements, joint fusions and arthroscopic surgery. “When I met him, Rene was almost at the point of amputation, but I wanted to work with him and get his health back on track. The outcome has proven very successful,” Dr. El-Samad explains. In 2011, Dr. El-Samad completed an innovative Charcot reconstruction on Garcia’s right foot, replacing bones and reconstructing arches while fusing joints with screws and later performing a skin graph surgery. ALL IN THE FAMILY “He is definitely a physician I would recommend to friends and family – both my father and brother are patients as well,” Garcia says.

Medical Director of the Limb Recovery Center at St. Catherine Hospital Ahmad El-Samad, DPM (third from left) works with patients, many with diabetes, to avoid amputation of a limb. Hobart resident Rene Garcia (right) had such success getting his health back on track that other family members (from left brother Richard and father Richardo) are now seeing Dr. El-Samad, too.

hairline fracture that wouldn’t heal. Suffering from arthritis and a chip fracture in his talus, Dr. El-Samad preformed a one-of-a kind procedure using a frame to distract his ankle and correct his ankle joint while removing the chip fracture. “My brother went to see several doctors and wasn’t happy with the results. Dr. El-Samad was able to get him up, active and back to work,” Garcia explained. Renee’s father, Richardo, 63, a crane operator had reoccurring problems with his Achilles’ tendon. Due to a traumatic injury, he had no Achilles tendon so Dr. El-Samad performed a state-of-the-art Achilles transplant. For the first time in years, Richardo was able to feel muscles he hadn’t felt. “Dr. El-Samad performed a life altering Achilles tendonitis transplant that helped my dad get his quality of life back and return to work,” Garcia said. “All three patients are doing great and we are proud to have them as a part of the family,” said Dr. El-Samad. For more information about the Limb Recovery Center at St. Catherine Hospital, call 219-392-7786.

One of the best compliments a physician can receive is a patient to patient referral but when it happens twice in one family that is extraordinary. Renee’s brother, Richard, 47, a truck operator by trade, was frustrated with a repeated

Dr. El-Samad is accepting new patients at St. Catherine Hospital in East Chicago.

Medical Director of the Limb Recovery Center at St. Catherine Hospital Ahmad El-Samad, DPM is accepting new patients at St. Catherine Hospital’s Professional Office Building location in East Chicago.

www.comhs.org

Comprehensive Foot Care • Achilles tendonitis • Arch pain • Arthritis • Flat feet

• Fractures • Limb Recovery • Minimal Incision Surgery • Reconstructive Surgery

St. Catherine Hospital Professional Office Building 4320 Fir Street, Suite 201 East Chicago, IN To make an appointment, call 392-7786.

may/june 2013 | GET HEALTHY | 17


SOFT

Revitalizing LIPS

Smooth B AND

Skin care is more important than ever as we move into warmer weather and the summer months. Learn how to protect against scars and skin illnesses to give your skin the best treatment possible.

AFTER A COLD WINTER

rutal winters take a toll not only and State of Mind Salon and Spa in Crown Point. on our souls yearning for sun and Because lip care can also include reducing the warmth but also on our skin. But while fine lines around the mouth, Kobe says the spa remedies for restoring faces abound, offers a mini facial for the lips which creates an filling cosmetic and drugstore shelves, instant change in the firmness and plumpness of lip care often seem relegated to a small the skin. selection of lip balms. But poor lips, Taking it to the next level, she also offers lacking sweat and oil glands, are even microdermabrasion treatments to resurface and more sensitive to damage and thus deserve their refine the skin. own special pampering. “We do these in a series of three,” says Kobe. “Here at SpaPointe we have a Youthful Lip “Some people do the whole face while others Treatment that is approximately 20 to 30 have us focus on one area. It’s a great treatment minutes long available by itself or it can be to treat smoker’s lips which are those fine lines added to any facial,” says Toni Lozano, supervisor around the mouth and to minimize pores.” at SpaPointe & Hair Studio in Munster. “The For maximum results, treatment is very healing, especially for Kobe offers several people who are prone to a lot of dryness glycolic peels which and cracked lips. As an added benefit, produce smoother the treatment can also help reduce the skin texture and appearance of fine lines increase the cellular above the lip area.” rejuvenation rate. “The The treatment not deeper you peel the only removes dead skin skin, the faster your cells and replenishes body works to heal it,” moisture but also she says. ChapStick, which was invented back contains Retinol, a Inspire and Spa in the 1880s, now has an Overnight Vitamin A derivative Concept’s State of Mind Lip Treatment available at drugstores for around $4. It’s important when that studies show make-up options for choosing a lip balm to make sure trigger changes in the treating dry and cracked that it has an SPF of at least 15 and skin to make it look lips include the Beauty ingredients such as beeswax, phenol, petroleum jelly, soft paraffin, aloe and clearer and more for Real line, lip glosses petrolatum. For super dry lips, look for youthful. containing plant-derived camphor and menthol as well. “We are offering antioxidants and marine Drink plenty of water as hydration helps fight dryness. But keep the several different collagens which help water inside, licking your lips, treatments from the in regeneration and though it might make them feel less most instant and most anti-aging and also dry in the short term, but because the water quickly evaporates, it does temporary to those plump up the lips. more harm than good. And because with longer lasting Lozano recommends saliva is loaded with enzymes which effects,” says Patti Kobe, using products such as help break down foods, the digestive action on your lips can cause them owner of Inspire A Jane Iredale Sugar & to crack even more. Lip exfoliating State of Mind and Spa Butter and Lip Drink. products are available online and at Concept in Valparaiso —Jane Ammeson retail stores and simple homemade

Home Care for Lips

exfoliating recipes abound on the Internet, many using a mixture of brown sugar, honey and Vaseline.

18 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy


Chicken Pox

ANDShingles

STILL AN ISSUE AFTER ALL THESE YEARS

B

efore a vaccine became available, about 4 million people would get the chickenpox each year in the United States. Since licensed in 1995, the vaccine has been largely responsible for a reduced number of reported chickenpox cases— by as much as 93 percent, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Physicians say, however, it is still possible for chickenpox outbreaks to occur, as evidenced by a large outbreak at the end of last year in Vigo County, Ind., in which more than 100 people contracted the virus. Several of those infected had received the vaccination, which isn’t 100 percent effective.

Still, doctors say the best line of defense is to get vaccinated. The CDC recommends two doses of chickenpox vaccine for children and adults who haven’t had the chickenpox. When given two doses, the vaccine is more than 95 percent effective in preventing a severe chickenpox case. But what about those who already have had the chickenpox—likely now adults who contracted the disease long before the vaccination was made available? Dr. Alex Stemer, president of Franciscan Medical Specialists in Munster, says even if you’ve had the chickenpox, you’re not in the clear. “When you get over the chicken pox, you are immune and the virus is under control, but it doesn’t

really die,” he says. “The virus sort of reconstructs itself and goes into a hibernating phase. It’s living as long as you’re living.” Almost one out of every three people in the United States will develop shingles—which is caused by the same virus that produces chickenpox. For reasons not known yet, the chickenpox virus reactivates years later, causing shingles. “If you’re old enough to have not gotten the chickenpox vaccine, you’re 90 percent likely to have had the chickenpox,” he says. Which makes anyone who has had the chickenpox at risk for developing shingles, Stemer says. However, the risk of the disease increases as a person gets older. About half of all cases occur among men and women 60 and older. That’s why medical professionals recommend adults 60 and older get the shingles vaccination. At 64, Stemer has had the vaccination himself. “It’s not uncommon to experience an illness and have shingles follow it,” he says. “Stress also may play a part.” While vaccinations are available, Stemer says it’s important to know what to expect if you contract the chickenpox or shingles. Because both are caused by a virus, antibiotics are not effective, he says. There currently are no antiviral medications used regularly to treat chickenpox. Like many viruses, treatment tends to focus on relieving the symptoms, which usually involve skin discomfort. In the case of chickenpox, a skin rash turns into itchy, fluid-filled blisters, when then turn into scabs. “After a week or so of forming new blisters, you begin to crust,” Stemer says. “It’s actually a fairly nasty disease because all those blisters can get infected.” Over-the-counter medications or lotions may be used for itching, as well as colloidal oatmeal baths. Keep fingernails trimmed short to help prevent skin infections caused by scratching the blisters. Shingles tend to be far more painful — first beginning as a painful rash on one side of the body or face and then forming blisters that typically scab over and clear up with two to four weeks, according to the Indiana State Department of Health. Unlike the chickenpox, there are several antiviral medicines that are available to treat shingles. If treated with soon after a rash appears, these medications may help shorten the severity of the illness. The Department of Health also recommends wet compresses, calamine lotion and colloidal oatmeal baths to help relieve itching of the skin. —Christine Bryant

may/june 2013 | GET HEALTHY | 19


Dental IMPlantS

Dr. Jay Platt has served Northwest Indiana for over 20 years with quality oral surgery care. Choosing an oral surgeon is an important decision. Our team is composed of experienced professionals who are dedicated to your care. Dr. Platt attends 80 or more hours of Continuing Education per year and provides many Continuing Education seminars to the surrounding dental community. Dr. Platt has extensive training and expertise in placing dental implants, preserving and rebuilding the jaw, and treating conditions that affect a person’s face, teeth and mouth structures. Dr.Platt has placed thousands of dental implants over the past 24 years - placing his first one in 1989. We have a state-of-the-art Cone Beam CT Scanner in our office which provides full-cranial anatomically correct 3D images enabling us to better plan for patient care and treatment. We offer a no-cost consultation and a complimentary CT scan if necessary for patients who are treated by Dr. Platt.

Do You Need to Go to an Implant Center?

You have undoubtedly seen and heard t.v. and radio ads promoting implant centers which are springing up all over the country. Many of them are advertising the convenience of having everything under one roof: the surgeon, the prosthodontist, the dental lab and a CT scan. It is certainly convenient for the patients and the doctors providing treatment to have everything in one location; however, convenience should not be the primary consideration with implant treatment. The most important factors should be the experience of the treating

20 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

clinicians, especially since surgical procedures are involved, so that each patient receives the optimal outcome. Some implant centers claim to be the leaders in implant dentistry and to have more experience than other clinicians. It is implied that because of the volume of implants placed and restored they are more experienced. However, the volume of implants placed in some cases is for all of their centers. The truth is that some of the doctors in these centers are very experienced and some are not any more experienced than their colleagues in the area. Some implant centers have general dentists placing and restoring


implants who do not have near the training or experience as specialists. It is important to remember that this “advertising” is intended to “sell” the benefits of those particular implant centers, and you should take this into consideration when evaluating your various options.

Immediate Full Arch Provisional Restoration

Immediate Full Arch Provisional Restoration is a specific treatment option that is not appropriate for all patients. It is a suitable treatment option for those patients who are missing all of their upper and/or lower teeth, and who have adequate bone conditions to support an arch of teeth with only 4 implants. For these select patients fewer implants would be required, no bone grafting would be necessary, and so it is typically less costly than other implant procedures.

No Need to Change Dentists!

Unlike some “one stop shop” dental implant centers that make you use their dentists; we work with you and your current dentist. We are very fortunate in that in Northwest Indiana and Northeastern Illinois, there are many outstanding restorative clinicians. Dr. Platt works with most of them on a regular basis. We would encourage you to seek treatment from your current dentist whom you have a long standing relationship with. If you do not currently have a dentist, we can refer you to one that we work with frequently.

Please feel free to contact our implant coordinator, Monette, if you have any questions about treatment or to schedule a no-cost consultation. 322 Indianapolis Blvd.,• Suite 100 (Behind Steak N’ Shake) • Schererville, IN Interest Free Patient Financing Available

We Welcome neW patients

Mon.-Thurs. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. • Fri. 7 a.m.-2 p.m.

219•864•1133

www.jplattdds.com

may/june 2013 | GET HEALTHY | 21


Scarred

LIFE?

FOR

Treatments to improve scarring and skin blemishes

S

cars, can be an unsettling and unsightly reminder of previous traumas—accidents, prior surgeries or severe acne. Even when they can’t be completely be removed, they can be revised into a new, more aesthetically pleasing and less noticeable scar. “Scar revision is taking an existing scar and remodeling or camouflaging it,” says Dr. David Robinson of Indiana Plastic Surgery with offices in Munster and Valparaiso, noting that scar revision also can help improve the skin’s function and can provide positive emotional and cosmetic results. Depending upon the scar, plastic surgeons like Robinson can offer several surgical approaches to scar revision based upon the size, shape and depth of the scarred tissue. The best candidates for such surgeries, he says, include non-smokers because they usually heal more quickly. In some cases, non-surgical treatments can be

22 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

beneficial such as microdermabrasion, injection treatments or laser scar removal. “There are also creams and lotions for addressing scars,” says Robinson. “Some are available over the counter but the best usually are prescription or medical care skin creams.” Robinson also offers corrective procedures for stretch marks which can be caused by pregnancy, excess weight gain and genetics—in other words if your mother had stretch marks, you’re likely to have them too. Indiana Plastic Surgery also offers microdermabrasion, medical grade skin products and laser treatments. For more severe stretch marks, even surgery is an option. “One of the most reliable ways to surgically excise skin with stretch marks is like the way we do tummy tucks,” says Robinson about the procedure that tightens the skin, making it smoother. As for preventing stretch

marks, Robinson says there’s some evidence that people, particularly pregnant women should keep their skin moisturized with coconut oil. At Healing Arts Center in Valparaiso, Renee Kimberling, ND, RN, uses Nambudripad’s Allergy Elimination Technique (NAET) to treat scars. “Scar tissue can affect people both internally and externally,” she says. “NAET uses different therapies and includes principles of Chinese medicines that work with the energy in the body as well as acupuncture to impact the nerves coming out of the spinal column. It reboots the computer in the brain to read their sensitivity as a friend rather than a foe. It’s a very subtle technique that’s applicable for all groups.”

Kimberling says that both scars and stretch marks can benefit with such topical treatments as coconut oil which contains Vitamin E as well as anti-fungal and anti-viral properties. Besides providing a defense against yeast and fungus, coconut oil can help in reducing the appearance of scars and stretch marks and also make the skin suppler. Jojoba oil is also a good treatment because of its natural healing properties as well as its ability to sooth, moisturize and restore the skin’s texture. “Both jojoba and coconut oil, which can be found at any reputable health food store, are helpful,” says Kimberling, “because they’re emollients with a lot of healing power.” —Jane Ammeson


ARE Anti Aging Creams

EFFECTIVE?

Y

ou lean into towards the mirror, and there they are—ine lines, a few wrinkles, some dry skin. You figure it’s time to buy anti-aging cream. But are those creams and supplements really effective? The answer is complicated, says Dr. Karin Patterson, a doctor in integrative and family medicine at Valparaiso Health Center of St. Mary’s. “Certain over-the-counter creams and anti-aging substances do work, but it’s not one size fits all. People have different levels of hormones, vitamins, exercise, stress, time spent in the sun – all play a role in healthy skin. So it’s usually a combination of things.” That’s why one anti-aging cream or supplement is unlikely to be effective for everybody, Patterson says, adding that some over-thecounter anti-aging products don’t indicate how much of a vitamin or hormone is contained in them. But vitamin supplements can be helpful, says Patterson, because “When nutrition is out of balance, it can affect the appearance of your skin.” TONY V. MARTIN Amy Boswinkle at Baum’s Dr. Karin Patterson Natural Foods in Munster says the store offers retinoic acid—a form of Vitamin A—in cream form. “Vitamin A helps in renewal of cells and improving circulation to the skin.” Baum’s also sells beta carotene, another form of Vitamin A. Beta carotene is an anti-aging substance that can treat dry skin, eczema, and psoriasis. And Vitamin E supplements help protect against ultraviolet rays. Patterson stresses the importance of getting at the root cause of skin conditions. “That’s why testing is important. Patients are surprised when I order a stool test, but the gut is a good window to health. We look at the person’s nutrition; we may discover certain food

intolerances, or that food is being absorbed differently.” Processed and sugary foods are a big burden on the gut, says Patterson, and eventually the skin is likely to show it. “Cleaning up the gut and prescribing hormones can help with aging and its effects.” Are there products in the anti-aging skin market that are basically worthless? “Probably,” says Patterson, “because there’s such a big range between what one individual may need compared to another individual needs, in the way of hormones and nutrition. And some creams may have something a person doesn’t need.” What everyone needs for soft, fresh skin is hydration – water. “Hydration is really important,” says Patterson, “Eight glasses of water a day is a good rule of thumb, but there are other factors, too, like the amount of water in the vegetables and fruits someone eats.” Collagen is important, too, says Boswinkle. As we age we lose some of that collagen that makes children’s skin soft and elastic. Baum’s sells collagen in tablet or powder form, and “taking Vitamin C with it helps in the uptake of the collagen,” says Boswinkle. She and Patterson agree that Omega 3 fatty acids help protect against dry skin and help smooth rough skin. Still, “There’s not a whole lot of miracles in this kind of medicine,” says Patterson. So do like Mom says: Eat your vegetables. Toss the cigarettes. Drink water. Reduce stress. Pop on a sun hat as you go out the door, and it’ll be a step towards younger-looking skin. —Julie Dean Kessler

may/june 2013 | GET HEALTHY | 23


North Point Orthopedics North Point Orthopaedics focuses on General Orthopaedics, Spine Care, Acute Trauma, Fractures and Sports Medicine with two locations to provide the best possible care.

Munster - 801 MacArthur Blvd. Suite 304 Munster, IN 46321 • 219-836-1060 Dyer - 15900 West 101st Avenue Dyer, IN 46311 • 219-836-1060 Gregory P. McComis, M.D.

Visit us on the web at www.NPORTHO.net

SKILLED.

uroLogIc carE at FIVE conVEnIEnt LocatIonS. Adam Perlmutter, D.O., and John Lynam, D.O., of Lakeshore Urology give you the peace of mind in knowing you will have access to the most minimally invasive and advanced urological treatments available. Dr. Perlmutter is the only fellowshiptrained urologic oncologist in Northwest and North Central Indiana. Lakeshore Urology offers five convenient treatment locations throughout Northern Indiana in Valparaiso, Portage, Plymouth, LaPorte and Knox.

For an appointment, call 219-983-6230.

John Lynam, D.o. Urologist

24 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy 67553_PORT_newLSU_9_89x4_95c.indd 1

adam Perlmutter, D.o. Board-Certified Urologist

PorterPhysicianGroup.com

3/28/13 1:28 PM


SPECIAL FEATURE

Orthopedic Health in Men and Women Although no one is immune to orthopedic injuries, men and women differ when it comes to orthopedic health.

YOUR

BODY’S

FRAME WORK Your orthopedic system is what keeps your body moving and ready to go. Find out how to recognize the signs of orthopedic issues, and how to give your most important support system the attention it needs to stay pain-free.

A DIFFERENCE IN ANATOMY Women tend to have more instability with the shoulders and kneecaps. “They are more loose jointed than men,” says Anthony Levenda, MD, orthopedic surgeon from the Lakeshore Bone & Joint Institute. “The anatomy of a woman’s pelvis has a different angle from hip to ankle, which causes the knee caps to shift outward a little. Women can have pain while kneeling, squatting, climbing stairs, and getting in and out of a low chair.” INJURIES AND HEALTH ISSUES Injury rate in men and women is also different. Martin Hall, MD, orthopedic surgeon at Keystone Orthopedic Specialist in Munster, Ind., says the thinking used to be that men had more knee injuries than women, but women are more active than they were twenty years ago. Females have an increased risk of tearing their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), one of the four major ligaments in the knee. While it’s a common injury in sports, female soccer players injure their ACL four times more than males do. “Once of the reasons for the tear is due to bone structure,” says Dr. Levenda. “Women have a narrower notch where the ACL resides. So the ACL has less room, which increases the risk of tear. You can’t fix structural anatomy, but keeping the legs strong and working the core muscles can help prevent injury.” Osteoporosis is more prevalent in women, in particular thin, light-skinned women, which puts them at risk for hip and wrist fractures. Bones are stronger in heavier individuals. Men are bigger, so that’s one of the reasons why they aren’t as at risk for osteoporosis as women. But Dr. Hall says that men can have bone loss, too.

“Women have bone loss during menopause, but two things can cause thinning of the bones in both sexes: cigarettes and alcohol,” he says. “Bone is a living tissue, and we’re always resorbing bone. But if we don’t produce enough to replace the bone that’s resorbed, that’s when fractures occur.” GOOD HEALTH FOR ALL GENDERS Exercise is very important for orthopedic health, no matter your gender. Strengthening the muscles around the joint prevents injuries because muscles work by providing stability to the joint and protecting it from force. “In the lower extremities, every step you take you put about three times your body weight into that joint,” says Dr. Hall. “When jogging, that number increases five to seven times. And if you’re overweight the joint is taxed even further.” Dr. Hall says it’s important for both genders to strengthen all the muscles around the joint, not just one. “It depends on the sport, but most important thing is to stretch first and then work muscles on the front and back of the joints.” Dr. Levenda recommends cross training because he says that focusing on one specific activity can develop problems. “For instance, if you’re a runner, you can have knee problems,” he says. “So mix it up; run, lift weights, bike. In this way you hit all elements of the body without stressing it. Weight training can include push-ups, pulls-up, bands, free weights. Yoga is great because it creates good balance, and it’s a good core exercise. Most importantly, never stop exercising; you’re never too old to work out. Physically you can always do something, and that will go a long way toward orthopedic health.” —Sharon Biggs Waller

may/june 2013 | GET HEALTHY | 25


Proper foot care can prevent disease MOST PEOPLE BELIEVE “OUT OF SIGHT, OUT OF MIND” WHEN IT COMES TO THEIR FEET. • BUT A LOCAL DOCTOR SAYS IT’S IMPORTANT TO PAY ATTENTION TO AN IMPORTANT PART OF OUR BODY THAT KEEPS US MOBILE. “Because our feet are tucked away in boots and shoes, we actually need to be more thorough about taking care of them,” says Michael Nirenberg, a doctor of podiatric medicine at Friendly Foot Care in Crown Point. No matter the time of year, common skin problems located on the foot such as athlete’s foot, calluses and corns can not only be irritating, but burdensome. Below are some frequent foot ailments and how they can be prevented and treated. ATHLETE’S FOOT Athlete’s foot is a fungal infection that makes the skin on feet raw, itchy, red and inflamed, Nirenberg says. It can lead to more serious infections as well. “Athlete’s foot and fungal toenails can become serious and tough to alleviate,” he says. “It is important to catch these problems early.”

26 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

Fungi grow best in warm, wet places—and one of the best spots on the human body is between the toes. It also spreads easily—people can get it by walking barefoot on contaminated surfaces near swimming pools or in locker rooms. That fungus then grows in someone’s shoes, especially ones that are so tight that air cannot move around the foot. Nirenberg says taking simple precautions can help eliminate getting infected. “Keep your shoes clean,” he says. “Most people wash their clothing, but never think about their shoes. A simple trick to limit bacteria and fungus in your shoes is to spray them with Lysol.” Air shoes out daily and when possible, let them sit in direct sunlight, he says. Nirenberg also recommends keeping

feet well-hydrated by using a good moisturizer because once feet crack or split open, the risk for infection increases. “Examine your feet daily. If you cannot see the bottom of your feet, use a mirror or have your spouse check them,” he says. “Checking your feet daily is especially important for those people who are diabetic, have poor circulation or are elderly, as these people are at higher risk for foot infections.” Nirenberg recommends seeing a podiatrist if you may have athlete’s foot. There are also several nonprescription antifungals on the market that can be applied to the skin. If they do not work, a doctor may prescribe a stronger antifungal medication. CALLUSES AND CORNS Anyone who has ever worn shoes that don’t fit quite right has probably experienced a callus or corn. Calluses and corns are thickened areas of skin caused by pressure or friction on the skin. Corns usually appear on the tops or the sides of toes, while calluses can appear any place that experiences friction including the bottom of feet. Wearing well-fitting, comfortable shoes is the easiest way to avoid these unsightly nuisances—yet many still choose style over comfort. “Wearing ill-fitting shoes too often can cause the toes to crunch up, possibly causing permanent

deformities, pinched nerves, corns, calluses and other problems,” Nirenberg says. When shoe shopping, Nirenberg recommends making sure the shoes fit properly by shopping for them late in the day when feet tend to be the most swollen. “When you walk in the shoes you try on, try to avoid the soft, plush carpet found in most shoe stores,” he says. “If shoes hurt in the store, they will hurt when you get them home. A shoe should never need to be broken in.” Many corns and calluses will gradually disappear once the friction disappears, but if they appear infected or do not disappear on their own, see a podiatrist or orthopedist. PLANTAR WARTS Plantar warts are tough growths that develop on the foot’s sole or on other pressure points. They are caused by a virus that enters through broken skin, and if left untreated, can be very painful. The pressure put on a foot when walking also can cause a plantar wart to grow inward beneath a thick layer of skin called a callus. The best way to avoid plantar warts is to avoid direct contact with other warts and keep feet clean and dry. As with preventing other skin infections, avoid going barefoot in public areas as well, Nirenberg says. Plantar warts don’t always require treatment, but if they are bothersome, see a doctor who may advise removing them. —Christine Bryant


IMAGES COURTESY OF DR. COMFORT SHOES

JOHN LUKE, THE TIMES

Drs. Michael Nirenberg, left and Michael Lacey

For your information It’s often what you can’t see that hurts you. That’s why Dr. Michael Nirenberg, a doctor of podiatric medicine at Friendly Foot Care in Crown Point, says taking care of your feet is important. Below are some simple steps you can take to prevent foot infections. • WASH YOUR HANDS. Wash your hands frequently, especially before you touch your feet and other parts of your body. • CHECK YOUR FEET DAILY. Use a mirror if you cannot see the bottom of your feet, and look for small red bumps, bug bits, swelling, blisters, cuts and open sores. • KEEP YOUR FEET DRY. After washing them, which should be done daily, dry them well —especially in between the toes. Moisture is the perfect breeding ground for bacteria. • WEAR COTTON-BLEND SOCKS. These socks help keep moisture from building up. Make sure they fit correctly as well so they don’t bunch up under the toes and create friction. • BE CHOOSY ABOUT GOING BAREFOOT. Avoid going barefoot in damp areas, such as showers, bathrooms and locker rooms, but go barefoot in safe places, like at night in bed. • TAKE CARE OF YOUR FEET. Let your shoes air out, and cut your nails regularly straight across and not too short. Moisturize feet as well to prevent dry, calloused skin that can crack, allowing infections to enter.

Shoes relieve burdens on your soles Your feet bear the full weight of your body, so it should be of no surprise when many foot disorders are directly tied to poorly fitted shoes and the abuse of feet.

W

hen just one small bone or muscle in your foot is injured, it can affect your body’s ability to carry out daily activities. “Improperly fitting shoes contribute to a wide range of long-lasting foot problems,” says Deborah Parra, president of ABC Medical Services in Lansing, Ill. “Too often, consumers will fit their foot to the shoe instead of fit the shoe to the foot — and without regard for foot shape, arch support, adequate room for toes or material construction of the shoe.” Orthopedic shoes and products, however, provide solutions to a growing consumer base of those experiencing foot problems — and more and more of these shoes aren’t coming at the expense of fashion. Several companies now manufacture orthopedic shoes, slippers and socks — and depending on a person’s condition, these items may be covered under Medicare or other insurance. While some brands help diabetics seek shoes with special features, other companies reach out to athletes looking for shoes with arch support and heel stabilization. There are even children’s shoes available that provide proper support to growing feet. Parra, a registered nurse and licensed pedorthist, says pedorthic services is a

specialty requiring licensure in Illinois, and ABC Medical Services has two pedorthists and one certified shoe fitter on staff. The company recently became an exclusive retailer for a new therapeutic shoe line produced by Dr. Comfort that aims to reduce knee pain. According to a news release from Dr. Comfort, studies conducted at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago indicate people who wear the shoes experience an average knee load reduction of 20 percent. “Orthopedic shoes can over time help to slow the progression of certain chronic problems such as osteoarthritis of the knee,” Parra says. When searching for a pair of orthopedic shoes, Parra says to consider your goal. “The word ‘orthopedic’ means to prevent or correct skeletal deformities,” she says. One person’s goal may be to relieve pain, while another person may have special needs such as the diabetic foot that has decreased nerve sensation. Others may simply want more comfort and support in their shoes. Features to consider include good arch support, a wide toe box, extra depth, modest heels, breathable fabric and lining that helps reduce moisture. The most important feature to consider, Parra says, is finding the right size and shape for your feet. —Christine Bryant

may/june 2013 | GET HEALTHY | 27


IMAGES PR OVIDED

food & fitness DIET OFFERS SECRET TO

LONGEVITY A well-known doctor believes the secrets of longevity can be found by looking at the diets of people who have lived for more than 100 years. • Dr. Mao Shing Ni explores this philosophy in his new cookbook, Secrets of Longevity. • Dr. Mao believes in eating five smaller meals a day, consuming more plants, letting food be your medicine.

“T

“I don’t think many other nutrition he philosophy experts would disagree with the core behind this principles of his diet: a balanced diet, less cookbook is that stress, exercise, meditation, five smaller by following the meals with more antioxidant rich foods,” dietary wisdom of Rojas says. “I think the drawback is getting the centenarians the average American to comply with from around the world, we can initiate those guidelines. In this day and age, or self-healing within ourselves, enjoy life economy, just getting family to more in the present, and achieve longevity cook at home and eat together in the future,” he says. is a challenge.” “These longevity recipes come from a world of the Almost all of the recipes in the cookbook are low-sodium, past—a simpler world in sugar-free, gluten-free which food was usually sourced locally, fresh, and dairy free. He also in season, and free from recommends eating smaller pesticides.” portions five times a day. He stressed the “Perhaps what most sets importance of taking time this plan apart from others is that it is not only about what to cook a healthy meal and food to eat for longevity, but to eat together. Too often, also how best to prepare he says, people eat in a Dr. Mao Shing Ni them, when to eat, how thoughtless, disconnected much to eat, and where to way in which the priority is eat,” he says. “Part of (centenarians’) health convenience and speed. success is due to making the dining table Monica Rojas, a registered dietician and the focus of vitality and aliveness, a time certified diabetes educator for Franciscan for gathering with loved ones and enjoying Medical Specialists in Munster, says Dr. Mao’s diet is based on sound principles. a meal together.”

28 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

If your diet needs a radical overhaul, Dr. Mao suggests starting by making small changes. “Start the first week by choosing just two recipes to make. By week two, they could work their way to making four recipes from the week, and gradually work their way to following one of the menus for healing as best as they are able,” he says. He recommends keeping an eating journal, eating one less fast food meal every week, and slowly reducing your intake of salt and replacing salt with herbs and spices. “The real takeaway is to make all changes gradually, because then you will be more likely to create new healthy habits without feelings of deprivation,” he says. If some of the ingredients seem hard to find, Dr. Mao suggests replacing them with less expensive, or easier to find varieties. “For ingredients that are more expensive, you can leave them out. You will be leaving out some of the healing properties, but any move toward cooking healthy food is positive, even if you cannot match the recipes perfectly.” Most importantly, Dr. Mao says if you commit to a gradual, lasting change, you can heal your body, eat well and enjoy life more. “It’s never too late to change your habits,” he says. “Never lose hope that it is too late to get healthy, and also, never lose hope that it can be fun to adopt healthier habits.” —Carrie Rodovich

Find more recipes online at nwi.com/gethealthy

COOL THE FIRE TROPICAL SMOOTHIE Serves 4 This recipe came from a region in Southern China called Hainan Island, a resort island that is also famous for its population of centenarians. The Hainan people drink this all year round to help with digestion. Tropical fruits are filled with enzymes: the pineapple is rich in bromelain and the papaya contains papain, both natural anti-inflammatory substances, good for arthritis relief, diabetes prevention, and heart disease protection. 1/2 fresh pineapple, peeled, cored, and coarsely chopped 2 kiwis, peeled and coarsely chopped 1 small papaya, peeled, seeded, and coarsely chopped 1 cup seedless grapes 1 cup unsweetened cherry juice 2 heaping tablespoons hemp powder 1 tablespoon flaxseed oil 2 cups almond milk, chilled Put all of the ingredients into a blender and blend until smooth. Divide between four glasses and serve immediately.


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senior scope

Essential

SCREENING S COLONOSCOPY CRUCIAL COMPONENT OF PREVENTIVE PLAN

creening colonoscopies are a vital tool for colon health as symptoms can be a sign it’s too late. “Colon cancer is the second leading cancer killer, and it doesn’t have to be,” says Diane Scott, assistant manager and marketing director at Digestive Disease Center. “It is treatable, beatable and preventable by being screened.” Seniors should add the screening to their preventive health plan beginning at the age of 50 unless they have a family or personal history of colon cancer or polyps, which are small growths. “If there are symptoms such as a change in bowel habits, bleeding or weight loss prior to the age of 50, then you should see a gastroenterologist as soon as possible,” Scott says. A colonoscopy allows a view of both sides of the colon through the use of

30 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

a camera at the end of a flexible tube. Preparation is key to making the most of the procedure and includes a clear liquid diet and laxative prep the day before. “According to our doctors (Drs. Harsh Dalal and Navin Kumar), the most important thing is that preparation is done correctly. You need to clean out your system so they can see the polyps. If they can’t see them, there is no sense in having it,” says Marta Onofrey, surgery scheduler at Digestive Disease Center. She says drug manufacturers are striving to make the preparation drink more palatable and she has seen changes in the last eight years. “We can give you advice on

what to mix it with to make it easier to drink. We are working to reduce the stress and anxiety involved,” she says. “The doctor wants you to feel as comfortable and secure as possible as it can be a delicate procedure for people.” “Presently, less than 50 percent of appropriate patients (average age starts at 50) have been screened. The major factors leading to this are misinformation, or lack thereof, fear and the belief that it’s painful,” adds Dr. Kumar. Patients are under sedation during a colonoscopy but are also able to take commands. Polyps will be removed or biopsied and larger ones can be marked so a surgeon can remove them at a later date. “If polyps are not removed, they could grow and fester and in time, could become cancer,” Scott says. “If you go in and get screened and it’s clear, then you are good for 10 years (without symptoms). If the doctor finds a polyp, then screenings can be every two, three or five years, depending on the discretion of the doctor.” Outside of the screenings, seniors can focus on diet and exercise to keep their colons healthy. “Increase fiber and hydrate— drink lots of water,” Scott says.

“Avoid contributing to the problem by limiting processed foods, sugar and caffeine.” As the spotlight is often on other cancers, Scott says her team is focusing on screening awareness. “Getting screened saves lives. If you are over 50 years of age, spread the word, tell your neighbors, friends and family that colon screening needs to become a factor in everyone’s life,” says Dr. Dalal. “We’re trying to get the word out that colon cancer is one of the most preventable forms of cancer,” Onofrey adds. “With recent questions about medical procedures, they say the colonoscopy is one of the most important tests that you should still have done.” Susanne Baker, insurance billing and coding manager at Digestive Disease Center, says most major insurance plans include a colon screening after the age of 50 as part of the wellness benefit plan and the staff will check with the insurance carrier directly. Digestive Disease Center is located at 5825 Broadway, Suite B, in Merrillville and 110 Ridge Road in Munster and has satellite offices in Valparaiso and Winfield. For more information, contact 219.981.9000. —Lesly Bailey


Don’t let chronic back and leg pain prevent you from being active. Surgery Date

October 30, 2012

Indication for Surgery

Stenosis, spondylolisthesis, and pars defect

Surgery Performed

Minimally disruptive posterior lumbar interbody fusion and decompression L4-L5

The NuVasive® MAS® PLIF procedure is a minimally disruptive approach to traditional back surgery. MAS PLIF can result in a faster recovery and a reduced hospital stay compared to traditional spine procedures. Learn more about MAS PLIF. Visit www.nuvasive.com.

“Dr. Tyndall, in my opinion, is an excellent doctor. He has a great bedside manner and he also explained in detail what to expect before, during, and after the surgery. He always had a postitive attitude and his expertise in spine was encouraging. I had chronic back problems my whole adult life and by 2012 could barely walk or stand for any length of time. I even tried pain management for a year, but got no relief. So, I revisited Dr. Tyndall who assured me that I could be fixed. It’s been 4 months since my surgery and I have NO PAIN. I am able to enjoy my retirement fully, and am fishing and woodworking again. My recovery is just short of a miracle. His staff was the best, especially his nurse Carrie. She was pleasant and answered all my questions, set up appointments and fitted me for my back brace. They had a great team attitude that helped me to eliminate my lifelong battle of chronic back pain. Thank you Dr. Tyndall & Carrie.

Dr. Khanna and Dr. Tyndall of Spine Care Specialists perform the MAS PLIF procedure, in addition to other minimally disruptive techniques.

Nitin Khanna, M.D., FAAOS Orthopaedic Spine Surgeon

Spine Care Specialists, in Munster, IN, offers the full spectrum of Spine Care solutions for patients suffering from painful conditions of the spine including comprehensive diagnostic services, conservative treatment approaches and the latest surgical options in the event that surgery is required. All surgeons are Board certified and Fellowship trained, and dedicated solely to the care of the spine.

To schedule a consultation, please call 219.924.3300 or visit www.spinecarespecialists.com. Dwight Tyndall, M.D., FAAOS Orthopaedic Spine Surgeon

As with any major surgical procedure, there are potential benefits and possible risks involved in orthopedic surgery. Please consult your physician for a full list of potential complications and to determine if you are a candidate for the MAS PLIF procedure. © 2013. NuVasive, Inc. All rights reserved.

, NuVasive, Speed of Innovation, and MAS are registered trademarks of NuVasive, Inc.

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may/june 2013 | GET HEALTHY | 31


PROVIDED

ask the expert DR. HOWARD ROBINSON

The backbone of spine care

The spine is one of the hardest-working components of your body, yet not many people pay attention to their spine’s health. Dr. Howard Robinson at Ingalls Health System in Harvey, Illinois offers some insight into how patients can keep their spines at the forefront of their health care. Dr. Robinson is a physiatrist who is board-certified in physical medicine, rehabilitation and pain management.

Q: What is the most common spine ailment and what is its usual cause? In younger patients it tends to be more muscular mediated, and a little less commonly, disc related. Muscular problems in the low back can be exceedingly painful. Herniated discs can be a problem when they push on or cause inflammation on the nearby nerve. Older patients can have disc or muscular problems, but it’s more likely to be related to the osteoarthritic changes in aging. The pain tends to be in the low back radiating into the lower extremities that is worse with walking and much better with sitting. Q: What is the most common treatment(s) for spine injuries? Most back pain resolves on its own, but if it doesn’t, we typically start with the least invasive options. We usually have patients try physical therapy first. Most of the time a very good physical therapist will be able to help the patient rather quickly and painlessly. In addition, we will often use medications to help with the pain. Injection treatments have been very helpful for many of my patients. Surgery continues to be a good option for pain, especially for patients with coexisting weakness. Acupuncture, massage, and nutrition consultations can be very helpful. Weight loss can

32 | GET HEALTHY | nwi.com/gethealthy

help significantly with low back pain: The lighter the load on the spine, the better it will feel. Smoking cessation can also be very helpful. Q: What about chiropractic? Unlike a lot of physicians, I feel that chiropractic treatments can be helpful. From my experience it seems that chiropractors can be very helpful for joint and muscle problems and less helpful for nerve-related problems. Q: What can people do who are in jobs that stress the spine, such as heavy lifting or sitting for long periods of time? Short of getting a new job, use good biomechanics with the lifting—lifting with the legs rather than with the back. In jobs that require lengthy periods of sitting, change positions as often as possible, getting up and walking around the office or going for a walk at lunchtime. Q: If a person thinks he or she may have injured the spine, how long should someone wait before seeing a doctor if the pain doesn’t subside? Most of the time, low back pain occurs gradually over time. I would suggest seeing a physician sooner rather than later if the pain does not resolve after about a week or two. If there’s

weakness associated with the low back pain, their physician should be seen as soon as possible. Q: Should heat, or cold, be used on an injury/ surgical site? I suggest using cold for an acute injury. If the low back pain started within two to three weeks I would suggest using only cold, alternating with 20 minutes of cold on the painful site, then 20 minutes off, and so on, for hours if necessary. You don’t want to risk frostbite by leaving the ice on too long. Packaged frozen vegetables work well; they can be molded to fit and can be refrozen. Heat tends to work better on chronic conditions; it helps loosen up muscles. We do caution patients not to leave heat on to long as it can actually burn the skin. Q: Can exercise strengthen the spine? Absolutely; it can strengthen the muscles that support the spine. Often my patients are instructed to avoid doing weight lifting exercises above their shoulders because it produces a significantly compressive force on the spine. —Julie Dean Kessler FOR YOUR INFORMATION

Ingalls Health System Spine Center One Ingalls Drive . Harvey, Ill . IngallsHealthSystem.org


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World-class cancer treatment— right here at home.

When facing cancer, you want the best possible care. The hospitals of Franciscan Alliance are committed to providing state-of-the-art treatment using the most advanced cancer-fighting technology available—all right here in your community. In fact, Franciscan Alliance hospitals are nationally recognized for providing outstanding cancer care. You would go anywhere for When facing cancer, you want thethe best possible care. TheThe hospitals of of Franciscan Alliance areare When facing cancer, you want best possible care. hospitals Franciscan Alliance world-class cancer treatment. It’s nice to know you don’t have to go far. committed to to providing state-of-the-art treatment using thethe most advanced cancer-fi ghting committed providing state-of-the-art treatment using most advanced cancer-fi ghting

When facingyou cancer, best possible The hospitals of Franciscan Alliance are World-class cancer treatment— World-class cancer treatment— When facing cancer, wantyou thewant best the possible care. Thecare. hospitals of Franciscan Alliance are technology available—all right here in your community. In In fact, Franciscan Alliance hospitals technology available—all right here in your community. fact, Franciscan Alliance hospitalsghting committed to providing state-of-the-art treatment using the most advanced cancer-fi to providing state-of-the-art treatment using the most advanced cancer-fighting right here atat home. right here home. committed World-class cancer treatment— World-class cancer treatment— areare nationally recognized forfor providing outstanding care. You would gogo anywhere forfor nationally recognized providing outstanding cancer care. would anywhere technology available—all right here in your cancer community. InYou fact, Franciscan Alliance hospitals technology available—all right here in your community. In fact, Franciscan Alliance hospitals world-class cancer treatment. It’s nice to know you don’t have to go far. world-class cancer treatment. It’s nice to know you don’t have to go far. right here at home. right here at home. are nationally recognized for providing outstanding cancer care. You would go anywhere for are nationally recognized for providing outstanding cancer care. You would go anywhere for world-class cancer treatment. It’sknow nice to know you don’t have world-class cancer treatment. It’s nice to you don’t have to go far.to go far.

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