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HEY, MY FLAVOR IS DOWN HERE. SHORT RIBS WITH CHEF ISAAC

FEB. 2019

FROM KOREA TO KINGS HIGHWAY

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KOSHER IN TUSCANY

THE

RESTAURANT ISSUE

22

DISHES THAT TAKE US TO OUR HAPPY PLACE pg

27

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CONTENTS

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BUTCHER’S CUT: SHORT RIBS

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Chef Isaac Bernstein shares life changing, simple techniques to up your short rib cooking skills.

BUTCHER’S CUT: SHORT RIBS

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TOP 22: MOST MEMORABLE RESTAURANT DISHES

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TOP 22: MOST MEMORABLE RESTAURANT DISHES

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KOSHER GURU'S RESTAURANT GUIDE

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KOSHER IN TUSCANY +truffle hunting +pasta making +authentic Italian recipes

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WHY DO WE NEED A RESTAURANT MASHGIACH?

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TRAVEL: KOSHER IN TUSCANY

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COOKBOOK REVIEW: Everyday Secret Restaurant Recipes

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INTERVIEW: ELAN KORNBLUM

104 Each month, a guest editor will provide signature tips, tricks and recipes throughout the issue. For our restaurant issue, we invited Gabriel Boxer a.k.a. Kosher Guru to share his secrets.

GUEST EDITOR

Fleishigs

DINING OUT: Most Bang For Your Buck Tipping Etiquette From the Source: Restaurant Challenges 5. Value 1. 2. 3. 4.

RESTAURANT CHRONICLES: TIERRA SUR RESTAURANT A Kosher Destination

KOSHER GURU'S RESTAURANT GUIDE

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CULINARY SCHOOL Lessons Learned from a Restaurant Kitchen

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EDITOR’S LETTER

FEBRUARY 2019

RECIPE INDEX + A WEEK OF DINNERS

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DAY IN A LIFE: A RESTAURANT MASGIACH

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editor's letter B

ack in the nineties, Dougies, was the hottest kosher restaurant in Manhattan. Lines formed out the door every Sunday night and diners waited hours to feast on hot, sticky buffalo wings, spicy potato wedges and their famous rack of ribs. Their signature wings were a serious revolution. Dougies, was our family hot spot and where my friends and I would grab a batch of wings in between our official Sunday Upper West Side shopping trips. I was so gung-ho about the place that my parents sent a frozen package of Dougies for my birthday while I was learning in Israel after high school. (Yes, I was into food and fleishigs in my teens too.) Decades later, the kosher restaurant scene has expanded pretty impressively. Yes, there is room for more growth, and more specifically service (and value) needs improvement (in my humble opinion), but the options available today and the sheer growth of international cuisine is extraordinary. Japanese food has expanded beyond sushi to the incredible world of ramen. Lesser celebrated world cuisine like Georgian food is being served up in a fresh and modern atmosphere at Marani in Queens. Classic steakhouses, like Shiloh’s in LA, Glatt a la Carte in Borough Park, and Wolf & Lamb in NYC are keeping things fresh. Real deal barbecue has really made an impression thanks to the early influence of Ari White (Wandering Que), 306 Barbecue in Monsey, NY, South Side Sandwich Shop in Lakewood, N.J. and Izzy’s Smokehouse in Crown Heights. The options are endless and I can fill pages writing about the inspiring chefs, food and options available today. Instead, we chose 22 most memorable restaurant dishes and share some incredible secret recipes to go along with it. My personal favorite is the ajitsuke tamago, the unique marinated eggs that no ramen bowl should be served without. Beyond our unique list of restaurant favorites, we share some dining tips from legendary

EDITOR IN CHIEF Shifra Klein

cookbook author and restaurateur Lévana Kirschenbaum, lessons from a restaurant chef, the tipping issue, and destinations worth traveling to. One such destination, Tierra Sur, was the site of our signature "live articles", where we invite guests to join us during the creation of a feature. Chef Gabe Garcia was gracious enough to share some truly epic recipes.His savory profiteroles and veal carnitas are mind-blowingly good and I urge you to try them at least once. (They are both wonderful options for Shabbat lunch, by the way.) On the topic of legends and recipes, Chef Isaac Bernstein is the contributing chef for our Butcher’s Cut section. This month, we delve into short ribs, and Chef Isaac truly does it justice. The recipes he contributes are valuable and delicious, and the techniques shared are truly astounding. One of the most admirable qualities of Chef Isaac and the sign of a confident chef is a willingness to share full recipes and techniques that take months (sometimes years) to develop, like his simple but genius flanken roast. Our travel section, written by talented cookbook author Rochie Pinson, gives a glimpse into kosher options in Tuscany and allows us to vicariously enjoy Italy while it remains on our wish list of places to visit. Bitayavon,

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@Fleishigsmag

P.S. All restaurants featured in our Top 22 were restaurants visited anonymously with the bill paid for personally. We do so to maintain a level of integrity and make an effort to disclose when restaurant visits are comped. In all honesty, a free meal always tastes better. It allows you to be MUCH more forgiving and generous in opinion. The restaurant guide section serves as our collaborative space and advertorial section that we hope to produce one to two times each year.

@Fleishigsmag

EDITORS Chana Z. Weiss Elisheva Taitz PROOFREADER Chava Leiba Sneiderman DESIGN estudio-5.com PRODUCTION estudio-5.com PHOTOGRAPHER Schneur Menaker FOOD STYLIST Chaya Rappaport KITCHEN ASSISTANT Devorah Kahan MARKETING & BRANDING Mann Sales Co. TEST KITCHEN SPONSOR Gourmet Glatt RABBINICAL AUTHORITY www.ok.org

www.fleishigs.com

Comments & Questions: Hello@fleishigs.com Advertising & Partnerships: Shlomo@fleishigs.com

Shifra

Tried one of our recipes? Let us know! Hello@fleishigs.com

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Shlomo Klein

All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part in any form without prior written permission from the publisher is prohibited. Fleishigs magazine assumes no responsibility for content or kashrut of articles and advertisements in the magazine, or for the content of books. Fleishigs magazine is not responsible for typographical errors. Thank you to Fishseddy.com for providing many of the beautiful dishes used to photograph recipes for this issue. Visit www.fishseddy.com or Fishseddy the store at 889 Broadway at 19th Street in NYC for flatware, dining ware, kitchenware, silverware, linens and more.

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BUTCHER'S CUT

B

PHOTOGRAPHY BY SCHNEUR MENAKER

eef short ribs are popular for a reason.

They are delicious, hard to overcook, hold well, freeze well, stay juicy under most circumstances, and give you that all around stick-to-yourribs comfort you look for in a dish. Growing up, they were cheap, called flanken, and used exclusively in cholent or a hearty Friday night dish, served in strips.

Flanken wasn't as in demand as broiled minute steak and was pretty widely available. Today, like beef cheek and skirt steak, it is a luxury cut reserved for only special occasions. Short ribs are loaded with fat and collagen. That collagen melts slowly, the fat bastes the meat, and you’re left with the ultimate beef-eating experience. You get all the steak flavor without having to exert energy chewing your food.

Chef Isaac Bernstein has established a cool factor for Jewish food by cooking up modern heimishe food that has changed the way we think about classics. He founded the kosher catering company Epic Bites, (Northern California) which became known for epic, modern, multi-course pop-up dinners. From Epic Bites, he moved to direct the culinary department at Pomegranate Supermarket in Brooklyn. He has spearheaded the level of kosher food with his Pom Prime Shabbos concept offered up at the famous Pomegranate Supermarket in Brooklyn, NY. Today, Chef Isaac is a restaurant and food consultant and produces exclusive culinary events. You can follow Chef Isaac's food adventures @chefisaacb on Instagram. FEBRUARY 2019

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BUTCHER'S CUT

TYPES OF SHORT RIBS Short ribs come from the chuck section or lower rib cage of the cow, also known as the short plate. It is located underneath the rib section and alongside the brisket.

Flanken Roast The entire short plate, uncut. This is a rich and delicious, centerpiece type roast.

ALTERNATE OPTIONS TO SHORT RIBS: 10

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FLANKEN ROAST:

ENGLISH-CUT SHORT RIBS:

MIAMI RIBS:

French Roast, English Cut Short Ribs, Flanken

2nd Cut Brisket, Flanken

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BUTCHER'S CUT

English-Cut Short Ribs These are big chunks of meat, cut parallel to the bone and are best cooked using the braising method.

Flanken Cross cut, 2-3� thick slices, flanken is amazing in cholent or in braised dishes like the French Onion Flanken recipe shared on page 17. The flanken strip is usually sold with bones, but can be found without too.

Miami or Korean Short Ribs These are uber-thin slices of the short plate/ribs and look similar to flanken, but are sliced much thinner, about ½-inch thick slices. They are INCREDIBLE marinated and grilled on high heat for a short period of time and are popular in Korean cuisine, hence their name. FEBRUARY 2019

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BUTCHER'S CUT

-Bone Short Rib Roast I like to keep bone-in meat simple, and let the flavor that develops from that slow roast on the bone speak for itself. 1 (4-pound) 3-bone short rib or flanken roast 2 teaspoons kosher salt 1 teaspoon black pepper

Preparing the Flanken Roast I season my roast with just salt and pepper, the same way I'd season anything. Liberally. Then I place it on a rack in the fridge uncovered, overnight to let the salt start breaking the meat down, pull out some of the moisture, and let the fridge fan do all the work of drying it out so I get a nice crispy crust. I take out the roast a few hours before before cooking so it can come to room temperature and cook a little more evenly. I want a thin crust, with all that decadent melt in your mouth beefiness that will hopefully follow, if I do it right.

Cooking the Flanken Roast I place the meat in an oven preheated to 275°F, on the middle shelf. I wait an hour until I check on it. It should be beginning to color, the salt and pepper forming specks of crust, the meat beginning to shrink, the color beginning to darken, the crust slowly taking shape. I close the oven and let it hang out for another hour.

MAKE A SIDE: During this time, I make whatever sauce I'm going to serve with the meat. I like to keep it simple, maybe a parsnip puree or some mashed potatoes, and if I'm feeling fancy, I'll also make a jus of sorts to drizzle on top when I serve it.

When Roast is Done At the 3-hour mark, there should be a nice crust, and the meat should be almost falling away from the bone. That’s when you take it out and let it rest. Every piece is different, every oven is different. The bone should give, but shouldn’t pull from a slight touch; it should need some pressure. I like when the meat falls apart on my fork, not on my plate.

Serving the Roast After the meat has rested, I take the bones out. I’d rather clean it in the kitchen then clean it off the table. If you did it right, there should be no meat on the bone when you pull it out. At this point, I carve or portion and serve it. Well, the truth is, I would put the whole thing on a wooden board with some roasted heads of garlic, red onion marmalade, pickled mustard seed because it's simply delicious, with lots of chopped herbs. I invite my guests to take photos for Instagram then dig in. It’s a big piece of meat, it’ll stay hot through your 5 minutes of fame. Don’t like simple? That’s ok. Life doesn’t always have to be simple. You can use your favorite spice mix on it when you put it in the fridge overnight. Curry or Chinese Five Spice? Glaze it if that's your jam by brushing your favorite sauce on the roast and cooking it for 5 minutes in a 400°F oven. You can make a sauce or relish from scratch (like the pineapple salsa or charred scallion relish, see page 17). What's important is to cook the meat until it's tender but not shredding. Don’t shred short ribs, shred brisket. Unless you're really just trying to make a point about how disposable your income is. In that case, I salute you, and I'd love to cook you an extravagant tasting menu in order to cover a new guitar I've had my eye on.

Why It's Worth It We aren’t spending $100 to make pulled beef for 3. This is a centerpiece. It’s the main attraction. It how you’re winning over the in-laws. It’s how you’re showing your wine buddies that you’re a real gourmand. It’s how your wife is telling you that you chose right. It’s important. It’s a simple recipe, but it’s a project.

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Korean-Style Miami Ribs Cutting boneless or bone-in short ribs thinly doesn’t make it more tender, it just makes it easier to chew because it’s thin. The apple juice in the marinade helps tenderize it, but you don’t want to over-tenderize it or it’ll be mushy. So 12 hours is max. Part of the enjoyment of this cut is the subtle chew as you bite into it. It’s not about excessive sauce, it’s about letting the residual marinade glaze the meat, as the flames below char the sugar in that marinade. The garnish is just element of flavor, and makes for a stunning presentation. My side dish of choice is some sticky brown rice and some scallions or quick pickled cucumbers.

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SOO U S O O T U LL T

D O D O

FF O O

Heimish Flanken Cooking onions with meat is as heimish as it gets. This recipe celebrates tradition with a few added steps and ingredients that simultaneously enhances the nostalgic factor and creates the most luscious, tender and savory meat you are likely to try.

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BUTCHER'S CUT

STATURE DOES NOT GOOD TASTE MAKE.

Fancy Boneless Short Ribs (or English-Cut)

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Don't get caught up in making everything homemade! Using store bought ingredients in strategic ways will exponentially enhance your food. Good quality preserves added to balsamic vinegar or your favorite barbecue sauce (it's gotta taste good in its original state), make for elegant, gourmet sauces that take minutes to whip up.

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BUTCHER'S CUT FANCY BONELESS SHORT RIBS (OR ENGLISH-CUT) I’ve cooked thousands and thousands of pounds of fancy boneless short ribs. People love it. I love it. It's easy and will impress your guests. 4 tablespoons kosher salt 2 tablespoons sugar 4 pounds boneless short ribs or English cut short ribs Mix salt and sugar and sprinkle liberally on meat, like you’re seasoning a roast. Refrigerate uncovered for 12 hours. Preheat oven to 275°F. Rinse off cure, then wrap short ribs in 5 layers of aluminum foil. Place on a sheet pan and cook for 3 ½ hours. Chill. Slice into individual portions, and sear on all sides. Glaze ribs with balsamic fig jam, smoked cherry barbecue sauce (recipe to follow), or your favorite sauce. Place under a broiler and cook for 3-5 minutes to achieve the ultimate glaze. Alternatively, sous vide for 24 hours at 156ºF. Chill, slice, and sear.

BALSAMIC FIG JAM Makes: 1+cup 1 cup fig jam ¼ cup balsamic vinegar Combine with a spatula or a whisk.

SMOKED CHERRY BBQ SAUCE Makes: 1+ cup ¼ cup high quality cherry marmalade (I use Bonne Maman) 1 cup favorite barbecue sauce 1 teaspoon liquid smoke Mix all ingredients until fully combined. You can also replace the cherry marmalade with peach marmalade for a summer night!

KOREAN SHORT RIBS 1 lb. dark brown sugar 2 cups soy sauce ½ cup pear or apple juice ¼ cup rice wine vinegar (optional) 1 teaspoon sesame oil 2 tablespoons gochujang (optional) 4 pounds Miami or Korean short ribs To make the marinade, combine all the ingredients and throw into a container. Well don’t throw, pour slowly so you don’t make a huge mess. Next, put the meat in and stir it so everything gets some love. Then cover and refrigerate until you cook it. When you’re ready to cook, heat your grill or cast iron over medium-high heat. Shake the excess marinade off the meat, but don’t dry it, you need a little of the marinade. Sear or grill until colored well on both sides. There’s no time here, just common sense. I don’t know how thick your pan is or how fancy your grill is. It should take about 2 minutes a side. If they’re cut too thick, you may need to cook it in the oven for a few minutes. Take them off fire, stack them, and cover them so they can cook a little more. Serve with the Charred Scallion Garnish and Grilled Pineapple Salsa (recipes to follow), both perfect accompaniments to grilled meat.

CHARRED SCALLION GARNISH Serves: 8 You can use store bought pickled chilis instead of making your own as a shortcut to this amazing garnish. 1 bunch scallions 2 tablespoons vegetable oil

¼ cup sesame seeds ¼ cup pickled chilis (recipe follows) 1 tablespoon soy sauce 1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar Brush oil over whole scallions. Place under broiler for five minutes, or until charred. Chop scallions and combine with sesame seeds, pickled chilis, soy sauce, and rice vinegar. Can be stored, covered, in fridge for two days.

PICKLED CHILIS 1 cup seasoned rice wine vinegar ¼ cup white sugar 8 red chilis (cayenne or Carolina) Thinly slice chilis into rounds and place in nonreactive glass bowl. Combine vinegar and sugar in a small saucepan and bring to boil. Pour over shaved red hots and let cool. Store, covered, in fridge for 24 hours before serving. Will last a few months in the fridge.

GRILLED PINEAPPLE SALSA Makes: 3 cups ½ pineapple, peeled and cut into 2-inch rounds ¼ cup vegetable oil 4 sprigs cilantro, chopped 2 scallions, sliced 1 ½ tablespoons soy sauce ¼ cup pickled chilis Brush pineapple with oil. Grill using a grill pan or outdoor grill on both sides until charred nicely, about four minutes. If you do not have a grill, broil for a few minutes per side so pineapple gets charred. Cool, then dice. Combine with cilantro, scallions, soy sauce, and pickled chilis.

HEIMISH FLANKEN Serves: 6 3 tablespoons vegetable oil or chicken fat 4 pounds flanken 4 Spanish onions, sliced 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1 tablespoon soy sauce ¼ cup garlic confit (recipe follows) 1 cup red wine 2-3 cups chicken or beef stock 3 tablespoons onion soup mix 2 bay leaves 3 sprigs thyme Macadamia nuts, horseradish, and grainy mustard, for serving Heat a Dutch oven or heavy bottomed, oven-proof pan over medium-high heat. Once hot, add oil and sear flanken for 3-4 minutes per side, until browned. Set aside. Add onions and salt to pan and cook over mediumlow heat for forty minutes, until caramelized. Add soy sauce and cook until soy sauce has reduced. Add garlic and red wine, and cook an additional five minutes. Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Return flanken to pot and cover ¾ way with chicken stock. Add soup mix, bay leaves, and thyme. Cook in the oven until tender, 3-4 hours. You can serve as is, or strain sauce and simmer until reduced by half for a thick, rich gravy. Grate macadamia nuts or horseradish on top of flanken. Serve with grainy mustard.

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DINING 1A

Most Bang For Your Buck

BY LÉVANA KIRSCHENBAUM And I mean “your buck” on every imaginable level: We want to go out and have fun, but without breaking the budget or the caloric bank. If we are looking to replay the experience, some practical guidelines must inform our choices of venue, selected dishes, and yes, even selected dining companions.

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MY ORDERING POLICIES. As a longtime - now former - restaurant owner, I can tell you with great authority that being a frequent restaurant-goer is no excuse whatsoever for poor eating habits. At the end of the day, it’s all about doing the math! Don’t arrive famished. If a wonderful meal is in the cards tonight, make room for it by eating extra light that day: soup, salad, fruit. Hardly a starvation regimen, and it doesn’t set you back the next day. Heavy dining holiday weeks are really hard to balance with subsequent spartan weeks and make us feel like two cents. And between us, we know it just doesn’t work. Excess prepares us poorly, if at all, if ever, for austerity. So, Yom Yom (one day at a time) is the way to go.

MAKE ROOM FOR THE ELEMENT OF SURPRISE. French fries, onion rings, buttered bread, coke? Hmmm…familiar… please…you will blow most of your caloric allowance right there, even before you get to the exciting stuff. You could be enjoying the restaurant’s dream signature dishes instead, the ones that best showcase their showmanship, the ones you came for in the first place! Order that with sauce and dressing on the side, no rice or potatoes, double the veggies. Damage control right on the spot. w w w.f leishigs.com


OUT

1. 2. 3. 4.

MOST BANG FOR YOUR BUCK TIPPING ETIQUETTE FROM THE SOURCE: RESTAURANT CHALLENGES 5. VALUE & SERVICE

AVOID REFILLS OF ITEMS THAT COMMAND A VERY HIGH MARKUP (ALL DRINKS, USUALLY). Take it for granted that calories in restaurant dishes are far more intractable than those of homemade dishes. Especially desserts and cocktail drinks. It’s all about that math again. Likewise, were you told the restaurant’s bread is outrageous? Very well, it is yours: Wrap it up, and anything else you couldn’t finish but could not bear to see go to waste (that’s what doggie bags are for!) and enjoy it tomorrow, warmed up. You will be making two “affordable” meals out of the original single calorically decadent dinner you almost fell for.

CHOOSE YOUR DINING COMPANIONS JUDICIOUSLY.

On outings with the Joneses, let’s hope and pray the Joneses are treating. Just kidding. Whether you are on the giving end or on the receiving end, don’t fall victim to your companions’ propensity for extravagance; order what you want and what you can afford. Likewise, if you are hosting timid guests that gravitate toward tap water and hamburgers, set a hospitable and encouraging tone by recommending more festive dishes. Lastly, beware the guest who, when the bill arrives, omits in his computations all the nearby food and wine he enjoyed with abandon, and recalls only what he ordered, urging the rest of the table to split the bill in rigorously equal parts. Separate checks, please, waiter, thank you! Make a mental note to save him for a Shabbos meal at your house, where all the good wine and food are on tap.

THE CHOICE OF A VENUE: Yes, there are times and occasions that call for the all-out dinner in a luxurious venue, with all its bells and whistles. Let this be our splurge. Only, let’s not splurge too often when we like to go out frequently. You will be amazed to see that at a more conservative budget the luxurious venues you are pining to offer some simpler dishes at a good budget, and do not oblige you to order expensive drinks (often more expensive than the whole meal put together), or extra apps and desserts, for that matter. Don’t be afraid of the waiting staff getting annoyed, or worse, slighting you: you will be back more often, and a frequent customer is a desirable customer.

MY THOUGHTS ON THE TIP:

There’s a perennial battle raging about To-Tip-Or-Not-To-Tip policies – and how much, and how, and who - with no truce in sight. While I doubt that this supremely contentious topic will be settled in our lifetime or beyond, I and all – yes, all - my fellow restaurant goers have a categorical demand for all restaurants who have decided to include the gratuities at a set percentage at the bottom of the itemized bill. You have set your price. Fair enough. Now please do not add the tipping line at the bottom of the bottom line located at the bottom of the bill. It’s confusing, it’s misleading, and it’s not fair. I paid my bill, with the tip you have set for me. What do you want from me now? I am done, OK? Glad we had this little talk!

Lévana Kirschenbaum was co-owner of the acclaimed eponymous Levana Restaurant on Manhattan’s Upper West Side (alas, recently closed after thirty two years), and the pioneer in Kosher Upscale Dining. She is a cooking teacher and cookbook author, known for her fearless approach to cooking, the diva of modern simple natural meals, and is entirely devoted to the busy health-oriented modern mom. Lévana gives cooking demo engagements around the country and beyond: Dinner and a Show! Not for nothing has Lévana been affectionately nicknamed the Jewish Julia Child. Her best-selling cookbooks are Levana’s Table: Kosher Cooking for Everyone, Levana Cooks Dairy-Free, In Short Order, and her Magnum Opus, aptly titled The Whole Foods Kosher Kitchen: Glorious Meals Pure and Simple. Lévana blogs on her popular site, LevanaCooks. Book Lévana for your next cooking demonstration event in your community, and order her cookbooks at www.levanacooks.com. FEBRUARY 2019

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2. TIPPIN IS REQUIRED TIPPING JUSTIFIED?

T

There is a growing trend among restaurant establishments to tack on a required gratuity (sometimes as high as 18%) to restaurant bills. Many restaurants who add an automatic service return the bill with the tipping line empty, resulting in diners unintentionally double tipping. This trend is quietly being implemented with surprisingly little backlash. Do restaurants have a right to tell their customers how gratuitous to be? Is it even valid to have an expectation of a tip? Shouldn’t it be standard to have good service with or without tipping? There are hundreds of books and websites dedicated to breaking down the rules of tipping. In fact, the concept of tipping has become such a strong part of our culture that many diners are starting to tip 25-30%! In May 2012, a family from Houston, Texas was locked inside a restaurant and police

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were called after they refused to pay the 17% tip added to their bill. The family was unhappy with the service and didn’t feel that 17% tip was justified. What we found fascinating is how tipping in restaurants is such a social norm, yet standard tipping in any other industry is unheard of. It is also interesting to note the double standard in tipping. A waiter in a pizza store gets little to no tip, while a waiter at a high-end establishment gets ten dollars if he serves you one rib steak! Essentially, a tip helps the restaurant owner pay his staff. In fact, many restaurants even have the gall to take a cut off the tips and use this as revenue to help pay their bills. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, food and beverage service workers made a median hourly wage of $8.72 per hour in 2010. About half of all states allow restaurants to pay servers $2.13 per hour, as

BY SHIFRA KLEIN

long as the employer makes up the difference if the server doesn’t reach the standard minimum wage after tips. (The current federal minimum wage is $7.25.) Another point to consider: restaurants do not have to pay taxes on money received from tips. Maimon Kirschenbaum, a lawyer based in NYC (the son of well-known Lévana Kirschenbaum) has won millions of dollars in lawsuits filed on behalf of restaurant servers for wage and tip issues. Big name chefs such as Mario Batali and Joe Bastianich weren’t spared. Kirschenbaum issued a class-action complaint alleging wage and tip violations against Batali and Bastiniach in 2010 that eventually led to a $5.25 million settlement that was distributed among 117 plaintiffs and others who worked for the eight restaurants in question between 2004 and 2012.

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NG 80%

of readers surveyed pay 15-20% tip; sometimes more.

58%

are against required tipping.

42% support required tipping.

95%

support the idea of voluntary tipping.

Bottom line: Tips are how restaurant owners cut costs and pay their waitstaff. Tips are crucial to waiters, bottom line, but the payment process is not always an easy one. In fact, as tips are automatically tacked on to the bill, the money meant for waitstaff can at times end up in the hands of restaurant owners.

THE DEBATE: YOUR WORDS. Surveyed on Instagram

YES!!!

NO!!!

 Some people wouldn’t leave a tip if it wasn’t rolled into the bill. Whether they are not tipping on purpose because of bad service (which isn’t always the servers, fault) or they aren’t tipping because of legitimate ignorance and thinking it’s optional- either way I totally understand why a restaurant would make it required

 Why can’t waiters simply be paid better! We are already paying for the restaurant...let them put it in the price.

 When it’s not required people generally don’t tip them the amount that should be tipped. I work in a restaurant part time as a manager so I know a little bit about how it works. The waiters salaries is the tip. So if they're not getting the 18% they're not making any money.

 A tip should be an extra extended for good service, motivation for employees to want to work harder to give good service. By making it mandatory you’re basically just raising the price of the food, not rewarding good service from good employees. On the other hand, as a consumer make sure to tip for good service even when not required.

 Totally agree. The servers depend on it. And that makes them be super nice to us clients.

 It’s never clear if it’s already added or not, and then when it is, do you still add on top? And then what if the food isn’t great or the kitchen is backed up and really they don’t deserve a tip but the waiter relies on tips so you got mediocre service but you still tip because of guilt. Tips are supposed to be for what people do that is above and beyond. Restaurants should pay wait staff an appropriate wage, and tipping should be a bonus left to the customers discretion.

 I find it easier to have it already on the bill so I don’t mind. I am however bothered when they set it at 20%.  Restaurants don’t provide waiters with a livable wage. While I think that waiters should be paid properly and tipping should be abolished altogether, for now you must tip because it is the right thing to do. The staff work hard and don’t make so much $$. It’s nice to show appreciation. It’s just like a salon or spa.  I got so used to it! If you can spend on food, just accept it as part of the cost.  A lot of times waiters don’t get paid and that has to change. They served us so they ought to get paid!!!  I tip 20% (sometimes more) no matter how good or bad I think the server has been. My mother worked as a waitress and bartender to support herself, her four children and her mother. Restaurants don’t pay people a living wage; I know because I have worked at those same jobs, and without tips I would not have been able to survive.

GE GUEST EDITOR

 Waiters are working for you! I do however disagree when tipping is included and the waiters are not attentive because they know they’ll get tip anyway.

 If it is required tipping, I find that the workers slack off because they get a tip anyway, if they need to work for their tips, they actually take care of their customers. We went to one place , that was really nice and sit down but you had to go to the counter, see your food, pick it up and clean up the table and they still added in 18% on the check... why?!?!  It gives the waiters an excuse to slack off because they know they’ll be getting a tip regardless of their service and behavior. Tips are an extra bonus for a job well done. Not a way for the restaurant to get away cheap with their salaries.  I’m a graphic designer working at an agency and don’t expect a tip from a client to further compensate besides for my annual salary. If a waiter expects to be tipped, it’s because the restaurant owner is not paying him enough and he requires further compensation. Charge more for food if necessary... hidden fees that catch you at the end are a no. BTW in England tipping doesn’t exist.

KOSHER GURU SAYS YES! Whether right or wrong, tipping is the industry standard and waiters go above and beyond expecting a tip at the end of service. I truly believe in saying thank you to those who service you, in all industries. Giving proper gratuity is the right thing to do. This motivates the server to keep up the good service.

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3. ETIQUETTE

Rules to Live By: 1. NOT SHOWING UP? CALL. RUNNING LATE? CALL. Restaurants lose valuable dollars holding tables for expected customers if they don’t show up. Tables are held on average for 15 minutes. Potential customers may be turned away, so to combat lost revenue due to inconsiderate customers, restaurants like Abaita (NYC) and Alenbi (Crown Heights) charge a reservation fee.

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FROM THE SOURCE:

Challenges in Owning a Restaurant

“Keeping your eye on the day-to-day, nitty gritty details of the restaurant while simultaneously remaining focused on the big picture of the restaurant experience and your long term goals. In other words, not letting the day-to-day challenges throw you off your focus of the big picture, long-term vision for the restaurant.” –Zalman Wuensch, Wolf & Lamb Restaurant, NYC & Brooklyn

2. GIVE RESTAURANTS THE BENEFIT OF DOUBT. The restaurant business is tough. This doesn’t excuse bad service or messed up orders, but each restaurant is run by human beings who do make mistakes from time to time. Understanding that people are just trying to make a living and mistakes happen can help diffuse stressful incidents that may occasionally take place.

3. READ THE ROOM. Going to a quiet, fine dining restaurant? Dress and act the part. Heading to a loud, happening, casual spot? Expect high volume and a party vibe. Come ready for the action.

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Yidel Goldberg & Binem Neiman (L,R)

“We have been open for twenty years so we have to balance serving exquisite culinary creations with staying current and trendy at the same time. It is a tough challenge, but we are doing it everyday.” –Glatt a la Carte, Brooklyn, NY w w w.f leishigs.com


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DINING OUT

Value & Service

One of the biggest challenges for restaurants is balancing the value they offer and combining that with the right level of service. When entering a pizza shop or cheap, casual, Chinese takeout spot, it is understood that service will be casual and waiters won’t be bringing slices of pizza and extra packets of ketchup to our tables. However, the price is cheap, the food is quick; you get what you pay for. On the opposite spectrum, pricier restaurants with sit down service come with higher levels of culinary and hospitality expectations that needs to justify the price point. This is an area in the kosher restaurant scene that will hopefully continue to improve. The following restaurants provide a valuable dining experience, by providing real-deal value for the price point.

Shaya Lazarus at a recent Fleishigs Magazine dry-aged steak tasting.

“Pricing a menu that is within the budget of our clientele while keeping the business profitable. There are many costs that go into certain dishes and high quality ingredients that may be hard for someone who is not in the restaurant industry to understand.” –Shaya Lazarus, The Ridge, Monsey, NY

GE GUEST EDITOR

KOSHER GURU TALKS ETIQUETTE If we expect a certain level of hospitality from a fine dining restaurant, it is only appropriate for us to walk in the right way as well. I think of it as walking into a king's palace. Make sure you're on time, going in with an open mind of enjoyment, and that you call restaurant beforehand for any advance questions and allergy issues. Put your phones down, enjoy your company, savor every minute, and always say thank you.

1. LE MARAIS, NYC Here you can get steak, fries, and salad for $30 in Midtown Manhattan, and a righteous burger and fries (although it’s not officially on the menu) for a bit over $20, served up in a classic NYC bistro-style restaurant. Steps away from Times Square, Le Marais is a kosher treasure.

2. SHILOH’S, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA It is a steakhouse, so expect prices to match. However, the service and generous portions truly make you feel like it is money well spent.

3. EXPRESS 15, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA Good quality Chinese food, served up buffetstyle. All day. Every day. We went with three adults and four kids, spent $65, and walked out with leftovers to boot.

4. CHIMICHURRI CHARCOAL KITCHEN, CEDARHURST, NY You can order half a chicken, grilled or fried, and two amazing sides for under $15. Their food is consistent and fresh and always a good bet. FEBRUARY 2019

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1

Mama’s Kitchen Hummus

 It’s easy to forget why hummus is so incredible when consuming the mass produced variety. Eating a plate of the creamiest, smoothest, sensational hummus at Mama’s Kitchen on the outskirts of Crown Heights re-establishes hummus as the transcendent dish it really is.

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LEVY’S TRUMP BURGER

 Levy’s is a south Florida Israeli restaurant powerhouse. Classic shawarma, rice and beans, and kebabs are all on point. Levy’s is a family-run joint that has a sense of humor that is reflected in their original burger creations, like the pastrami-stuffed, dough-wrapped Trump Burger that eats like a burger stuffed bun and is juicy deliciousness.

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Fish Grill’s Fish Tacos

 Fish Grill (Malibu & Los Angeles) is the OG of tacos in the world of kosher. They established fish plus tacos as a valid eating experience to the kosher consumer decades ago. While tacos are now available at most modern kosher hot spots, nothing compares to Fish Grill, where the fish is grilled over a charcoal grill which gives the fish a wonderful flavor.

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Wolf & Lamb Chicken Salad

Izzy’s Barbecue Brisket

Charcuterie at Harbour Grill

 Wolf & Lamb (with two locations (Brooklyn & Midtown Manhattan), has been serving up steakhouse fare with consistent service for years. The chicken salad (which isn't currently on the menu) is phenomenal and combines grilled chicken thighs with crispy chickpeas and is a meal onto itself.

 Izzy’s in Crown Heights serves real-deal Texan inspired barbecue. This style of barbecue refers to cooking over wood on low heat for a long time. Izzy’s has gained national fame for his on-point brisket, but we wouldn’t do this section justice without mentioning his smoked fried chicken sandwich. Epicness in its own right.

 Authentic charcuterie is hard to come by. Harbour Grill in Bal Harbour, Florida serves up legit charcuterie with accompaniments such as fig jam and cornichons. Samples include merguez, foie gras, pâté, lamb chorizo, beef bresaola, "bacon" and much more.

(see recipe on page 43)

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ALENBI’S DRUNK LIVER  The creamiest, most elegant liver dish on the menu at Alenbi (Crown Heights), is comprised of chicken liver mousse, pistachio, silan syrup, crispy onion, and Jerusalem bagel bites.

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Salmon Carpaccio at Noi Due Carne  Noi Due is a staple restaurant in Manhattan with great service, delicious food and good vibes. The owners recently expanded their dairy offerings and also opened a meat restaurant next door. We recently enjoyed a salmon carpaccio dish that was fresh, light, and full of flavor. The liver crostini are also worth mentioning.

Jeff’s Gourmet Sausage Sliced Steak Sandwiches  Jeff’s is an LA kosher landmark for good reason, as they serve solid, full-flavored, consistent, fresh fast food. We always have a sliced steak sandwich in our carry-on bag heading home and are met with other kosher consumers doing the same. Their wings, burgers (especially the Western Burger), and onion rings are also incredible.

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Tevere 84’s Napoleon  If you want to experience the taste of Rome without traveling to Italy, stop by Tevere 84 on the Upper East Side of Manhattan for authentic Roman cuisine in an cozy, brick-walled restaurant. Their nondairy napoleon rivals most dairy napoleons we’ve tried. The secret? Making a zabaglione, a white wine custard, in place of traditional pastry cream.

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for recipe

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A5 Grade Koru Wagyu Beef at Reserve Cut

 In his mission to serve the best of the best, Albert Allaham, proprietor of Reserve Cut, has secured an exclusive supply of A5 Grade Koru Wagyu Beef. Wagyu refers to an exclusives to Japanese breed of cattle that is very well marbled and known for its tender, juicy texture. A5 grade is the highest grade wagyu available. The chefs at Reserve Cut, dry age the beef in house for a minimum of 45 days which creates a unique earthy, tender and ultimate steak experience, served table side for even more drama. It doesn't come cheap, but it is definitely memorable.

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Reader Favorite

MIKE’S BISTRO DUCK GNOCCHI  When we asked our readers on Instagram to share the

best dish they ate this year, the gnocchi dish at Mike's Bistro in Midtown Manhattan was by far the most shared suggestion. The gnocchi is light, fluffy and cooked with tender duck confit and mushrooms, tossed together in duck jus and finished with white truffle oil and chives. It is comforting and elegant all at once.

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Beef Board at T-Fusion Steakhouse

 A meat lover's dream, T-Fusion, in Brooklyn, NY, serves up an array of beefy treats, from chopped liver, marrow bones, pulled beef, and dried meats that change seasonally.

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 Boru Boru, located in the Upper West Side of Manhattan, makes Japanese ramen and incredible noodle bowls (always order their noodle bowl special, if available). We recently enjoyed a (virgin!) cocktail for our 14 year old's birthday celebration that was brought out on fire.

for recipe

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Boru Boru’s Tiki Hurricane

Boeuf & Bun Chili Fries

 There are always lines at this popular sit-down burger joint in Crown Heights, for good reason. Beyond the popular wings, tacos, and burgers, we encourage you to try the chili fries, topped with a fried egg and truffle mayo.

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Beverly Hills Thai Drunken Noodles & Chicken Pad Thai

Soho Asian Bar & Grill Mongolian Beef  Soho Asian Bar & Grill in Aventura, Florida has something for everyone. They offer grilled options like 16-ounce rib eyes and full sushi and cocktail menus, but where they shine is their Asian food. A separate kitchen is dedicated to producing fresh Chinese specialties. Their Mongolian Beef tasted great even when we had it delivered.

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for recipe

GE GUEST EDITOR

 Beverly Hills Thai is the ONLY kosher restaurant dedicated to 100% Thai cuisine. Their authentic curries and noodle dishes are the realdeal. The restaurant is located in central Beverly Hills, making a trip to this cozy spot an always memorable experience.

KOSHER GURU'S FAVORITE RESTAURANT DISH

Reserve Cut's beef carpaccio. This elegant dish is made from 3 ounces of their A5 grade Wagyu, served on a hot slate stone to achieve a slight sear. Accompaniments include togarashi (a Japanese spice blend), teriyaki sauce and maldon salt.

(see page 37 for recipe)

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Mike’s Chicken Crunchers’ Hot Chicken Poppers Mike's Chicken Crunchers in Lakewood, NJ is one of those spots that showcases what happens when you specialize in ONE thing. This is THE place to go for fried chicken, and that is pretty much all they do. They offer various fried schnitzel options from Pilsner & Pretzel and Bourbon Hickory to Greek Herb and Hot Poppers. We can never get enough!

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Boru Boru & Nobo Chicken Ramen with Marinated Egg Ramen has been popping up in various restaurants, for good reason. We have had righteous ramen at Pho Men in Crown Heights, Boru Boru, and surprisingly, Nobo Wine & Grill in Teaneck and Harbour Grill in Bal Harbour, Florida. We have recreated the ramen magic and created our favorite version of all four. (See page 39 for recipe)

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Orange Beef at Chosen Island If you like sticky, sweet, crispy chinese food, this dish at the popular longstanding Chinese restaurant in Lawrence, NY is for you.

Boneless Chicken Wings at The Ridge These are addicting. Crunchy boneless chicken wings and onions, cooked to perfection and dusted with a magical blend of spices. These are a must-get before ordering the famous dry-aged steaks at this upscale Monsey, NY eatery.

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MARANI’S KHINKALI

(GEORGIAN BEEF & BROTH DUMPLINGS)

 Marani Restaurant in Queens, NY serves authentic Georgian food at great prices in a fresh, modern spot with attentive service and a full cocktail menu. The kabobs, breads, and Chicken Tabaka (a Georgian take on fried chicken) are all wonderful choices, but these dumplings are the most unique bites of food we’ve tasted yet. FEBRUARY 2019

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Beverly Hills Thai's Chicken Pad Thai

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Fish sauce is a classic Thai ingredient that uses a combination of dried seafood to create a funky salty flavor that adds a unique level of umami to any dish it is added to. Kosher fish sauce is currently available under the Red Boat brand (as a separate run, look for the OK symbol) and is made from anchovies. It is quite delicious in small doses as a flavor booster to sauces and salad dressings, but cannot be paired with meat dishes when eating a kosher diet. You can swap out the chicken for fish, tofu, or more vegetables or you can make your own vegan fish sauce. Recipe below

Serves: 8 Sauce: 4-6 tablespoons fish sauce** (Amount will depend on how salty you’ve made your vegan fish sauce) ½ cup tamarind paste ½ cup palm sugar or brown sugar 2 teaspoons dried chili flakes **Kashrut note: Store bought fish sauce (kosher under the Red Boat brand) contains fish and can't be used in meat recipes.

Dry Ingredients: 1 (8-ounce) package rice noodles (the wide variety) ¼ cup vegetable oil, divided, or more as needed 2 pounds skinless, boneless chicken breasts, thinly sliced 4 eggs, beaten 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 onion, finely chopped ½ cup shredded carrots 1 package extra firm tofu, drained, dried, and cubed 1 pound bean sprouts 1 bundle scallions, chopped ½ cup peanuts, finely chopped 2 limes, cut into wedges Place rice noodles in a large bowl and cover with boiling water. Soak for 30-40 minutes. Drain noodles and toss with a small amount of vegetable or sesame oil to prevent sticking. Set aside. While noodles are soaking, make the

sauce by combining fish sauce, tamarind paste, brown sugar, and chili flakes in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Stir mixture until it comes to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 10 minutes. Due to natural variations in the tamarind and homemade fish sauce, taste frequently to make sure you have a good balance of sweet, salty, and sour. Adjust as needed to suit your taste. Set aside. Heat one tablespoon of oil in a wok over medium-high heat and scramble eggs. Set aside. Heat another tablespoon of oil in the wok and add chicken and 2 tablespoons of sauce. Stir fry until chicken is just cooked through. Set aside. Heat one tablespoon of oil in the wok and sauté garlic until it begins to turn slightly golden brown. Immediately add onions with another 2 tablespoons of sauce. Fold in the carrot shreds. For a meatless version, add a cup of parboiled, chopped broccoli, and any other vegetables you like. Add noodles to vegetables, adding more sauce as needed to keep noodles moist and turn them slightly brown. You likely will not use all of the sauce. If noodles are well seasoned but a little dry, sprinkle with a little bit of water. Be careful not to overcook! Set aside. Heat remaining tablespoon of oil in wok and sauté tofu with 1-2 tablespoons of sauce. Add noodles, eggs, chicken, bean sprouts, and scallions back into the

wok and toss to combine. Remove from heat once ingredients are well combined and heated through. Serve immediately topped with chopped peanuts and lime wedges. Sprinkle with chili flakes, if desired. Vegan Thai Fish Sauce: 2 Kombu* (kelp) leaves or 2 cups nori, shredded 3 cloves garlic 1½ tablespoons whole black peppercorns 3 tablespoons light soy sauce 1 tablespoon salt 1 tablespoon white vinegar 3 teaspoons sugar 1 teaspoon ground ginger Place seaweed in a small pot with 3 cups of water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes. Add remaining ingredients and bring back to a boil. Reduce heat to medium and continue to simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes. Let cool and strain well to avoid particles in your fish sauce. Store in refrigerator. *Kombu is a Japanese sea kelp that gives the broth its unique umami flavor and is available kosher certified from Eden brand.

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Boru Boru’s Tiki Hurricane Serves: 1 Double, triple or quadruple the recipe as needed.

1 ounce white rum (such as Bacardi) 1 ounce spiced rum (such as Cruzan) 1 ounce simple syrup (recipe follows) 1 ounce freshly squeezed lime juice ¾ ounce pineapple juice ¼ ounce passion fruit puree ¼ ounce grenadine 1 flaming crouton (recipe follows)

Fancy garnishes such as half a lime, pineapple leaf, fruit wedges, or cinnamon stick Combine white rum, spiced rum, simple syrup, lime juice, pineapple juice, passion fruit puree, and grenadine in a cocktail shaker. Add ice and shake vigorously. Strain into glass filled with crushed ice. Garnish abundantly with desired garnishes. Top with crouton, and light with a match immediately before serving. Simple Syrup: 1 cup sugar ½ cup boiling water Mix together until sugar is completely dissolved and liquid is clear, not cloudy. Flaming Crouton: 1 slice stale bread 1 tablespoon lemon extract Slice bread into one-inch cubes. Toast until golden brown. Pour lemon extract onto toasted bread.

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SOHO ASIAN BAR & GRILL'S MONGOLIAN BEEF Serves: 6 Thin slices of beef are crucial for this dish – beef can be frozen for 30 minutes in advance to facilitate easier slicing. We recommend using "fillet split" - a minute roast that has been split into two pieces with the main sinew removed. Always slice again the grain.

1 fillet split (approximately 1.5-1.75 lb.), sliced crosswise thinly, 1/8-1/4” thick ⅓ cup + 2 teaspoons cornstarch, divided 5 tablespoons canola or peanut oil, divided 1½ tablespoons toasted sesame oil

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1 tablespoon minced garlic 1 tablespoon minced ginger 3 dried red hot chili peppers ½ cup soy sauce (preferably low-sodium) ½ cup dark brown sugar 4 scallions, green parts only, sliced thinly

Place steak in a large resealable plastic bag with ⅓ cup cornstarch. Shake to coat evenly (or coat in a large shallow dish). Heat 2 tablespoons oil in a large wok or skillet over high heat. Working in batches, add meat in a single layer. Avoid overcrowding pan to prevent meat from steaming instead of searing. Cook for 1-2 minutes per side or until browned. Transfer to a separate plate; repeat with remaining batches, adding another 2 tablespoons oil to pan as needed. Reduce to medium heat. Add remaining 1 tablespoon oil and sesame oil to the pan. When hot, add garlic, ginger, and chili peppers to the pan and cook for about 1 minute, until garlic is golden. Add soy sauce, brown sugar and ⅓ cup water to the pan and bring to a simmer, stirring to dissolve sugar. In a separate bowl, mix remaining 2 teaspoons cornstarch with 1-2 tablespoons of cold water until dissolved. Add mixture to the sauce and bring to a boil, whisking constantly until sauce is thickened, about 30-60 seconds. Return meat to the pan and toss to heat and coat with sauce. Add scallions. Remove from heat and serve over rice. FEBRUARY 2019

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Ajitsuke Tamago We are obsessed with these indescribably delicious marinated eggs, which take ramen to next level heights. Trust us on this: making ajitsuke tamago is definitely worth it!

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Shoyu Chicken Ramen Soup

A labor of love, it's best to start this soup a day in advance- it's well worth the effort! A delicious flavorful broth, Ajitsuke Tamago (soy-marinated soft boiled egg), shoyu roasted chicken, and ramen all come together for a meal-in-one to remember!

Serves: 6 Broth: 3.5-4 lb. chicken bones (backs, wings, etc.) 1 lb. beef marrow bones 3 leeks, roughly chopped ¼ cup sliced fresh ginger 6 cloves garlic 1 bunch scallions, trimmed and coarsely chopped 2 carrots, peeled and cut into chunks ¼ cup dried shiitake mushrooms 2 (6” inch) pieces kombu* Tare (pronounced “Ta-rey”): A soy-based mixture that lends flavor to ramen soup. ¾ cup shoyu or tamari soy sauce ½ cup mirin ⅓ cup sake Ramen & Garnishes: 6 eggs 4 bone-in chicken breasts 1 teaspoon black pepper 3 tablespoons shoyu or tamari soy sauce 5 (3 oz.) packages ramen noodles (discard accompanying seasoning packets) 4 scallions, green parts only, thinly sliced (on the bias) 2 sheets nori, cut into strips

Shaved radishes Shredded carrot Optional: 3-4 oz. sautéed or braised sliced shiitake mushrooms Serve with: chili oil, sesame oil, and/or shichimi togarashi (Japanese 7-spice blend) A DAY IN ADVANCE: Broth: Preheat oven to 400°F. Spread chicken and marrow bones, leeks, ginger, and garlic on a baking sheet. Roast for thirty minutes. Place roasted chicken and marrow bones, leeks, ginger, and garlic in a large pot with 4 quarts water, and bring to a boil over medium heat. Skim off any scum that rises to the top. Add scallions, carrots, and dried mushrooms. Reduce heat and simmer uncovered for about 2 hours, skimming surface occasionally, as needed. Add kombu and continue simmering, partially covered, for another hour. Stock will have reduced to about 2 quarts. Remove from heat. Strain and let cool, then refrigerate. Remove congealed fat from surface before use. Tare: Combine soy sauce, mirin, and sake in a small bowl; cover and chill.

Soy-marinated eggs: Bring a medium pot of water to a boil. Carefully add eggs one at a time and boil gently for exactly 6 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, immediately transfer eggs to a bowl of ice water to stop cooking. When cool, drain eggs and peel. Add half of the prepared tare to eggs to marinate; place paper towel over eggs to keep submerged in marinade. Marinate for a minimum of 4 hours or up to 12 hours for best textural results. Remove eggs, discard marinade. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve. THE DAY OF: Shoyu chicken breasts: Preheat oven to 400°F. Place chicken breasts in a baking pan, season with black pepper, and drizzle with shoyu. Roast uncovered for 45 minutes, basting with additional shoyu halfway through cooking. Remove from oven to cool. When cool, cut each breast off the bone and slice crosswise. Set aside. Heat broth and cook noodles: When ready to serve, bring broth to a simmer; it should be very hot. At the same time, cook noodles in a large pot of boiling water according to package directions until al dente; drain (no need to salt the water, as ramen noodles contain more salt than regular pasta).

To Assemble: Divide noodles between 6 deep bowls. Ladle hot broth over noodles. Pour a little of the remaining tare into each bowl. Stock should come up just to the level of the noodles. Arrange a few slices of the chicken on one side of the bowl. Halve eggs and place next to chicken. Arrange scallions, shredded carrots, and radishes on top, as well as shiitake mushrooms, if using. Tuck strips of nori on the side so they poke out. Serve ramen with chili oil, sesame oil, and shichimi togarashi, a Japanese spice mix that is a traditional accompaniment to ramen.

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(Giant Georgian Beef & Broth Dumplings) Yield: About 25-30 dumplings These unusual dumplings have a surprise waiting for you inside! Pick up one of these large dumplings by the kudi (the little bulbous topknot) and take a little nibble on the side, then suck out the delicious soup broth first before eating the rest of the delicious meat filling. The kudi are traditionally left lined up on the plate to show how many you’ve enjoyed! For the dough: 4 cups flour 2½  teaspoons salt 1 egg, beaten  1¼ cups warm water For the filling: ¾ lb. ground beef (not lean) ½ lb. ground veal ½ cup finely minced onion (1/2 medium onion) 2 tablespoons rendered chicken fat 1 teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon cumin 1½ teaspoons Blue Fenugreek (utskho suneli)* or 2 tsp. dried fenugreek leaves

½ teaspoon red chili flakes ¼ cup chopped cilantro (packed) Freshly ground black pepper, for garnish *Available in Georgian markets To make dough: Place flour and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook. Mix to combine, leaving a well in the center of the flour. Add egg and water to the well. Mix with dough hook on low setting until a dough forms and comes away from the sides of the bowl. Increase to medium speed and continue to knead with dough hook for 2-3 minutes until dough becomes pliable, smooth and elastic. Dust with flour and cover with a clean towel or plastic wrap. Allow dough to rest for 20-30 minutes. Meanwhile, make the filling: Combine all filling ingredients and mix by hand. Adding 1 cup water to create a loose meat mixture and help create the broth inside the dumpling. Set aside. Rolling & Assembly: If rolling by hand: Cut the rested dough into 4 sections. Take one section (make sure the others are covered to prevent dough from drying out) and roll it out on a well-floured work surface into a large circle, about ¼ -inch thick (if not a little thicker). Using a cookie/biscuit cutter (or glass) about 2½-3 inches in diameter, punch out rounds from the dough. Roll each round out to about 4½-5 inches in diameter and no less than ⅛ inch thick. The meat filling is heavy and wet, and the last thing you would want is for the dough to break. Repeat with remaining sections of dough. o roll with pasta maker: T Set pasta roller for widest setting. Cut the rested dough into 4 sections. Take one section (make sure the others are covered to prevent dough from

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Marani’s Khinkali

drying out) and slowly pass it through the pasta roller once to form a wide swath of dough, approximately 1/8-1/4” thick. Carefully transfer and lay flat on a well-floured surface. Cover with towel. Repeat with remaining sections of dough. Using a cutter or tip of a paring knife, cut dough into 4½-5 inch squares. To fill & shape: Place each round or square on a small plate and place one full tablespoon of filling in the center. Using your fingers, take one edge and bring it in towards the center. Moving in a clockwise direction, begin folding the edges, allowing each fold of dough to overlap the previous one. Continue to pleat and pinch as you go, until the filling is completely encased. It is important to ensure a tight seal to prevent juices from leaking out. Firmly pinch the “neck” and twist the pleats together while turning the dumpling the other way. Give slight tug at the formed knot upward to create a bit of space between the dough and filling. Pinch off any excess dough above the “neck.” Transfer formed khinkali to a well-floured surface and keep covered with a damp cloth while you form the rest so they don’t dry out in the interim. Repeat with remaining dough. At this point, you can cook them all, or cook some and freeze the rest - don't let them sit! Bring a large pot of well-salted water to a boil and, working in batches of 8-10 at a time, lower each khinkali with its topknot facing down. Give the pot a shake to keep the dumplings from sticking. Return to a boil and then adjust heat to maintain simmer (not hard rolling boil). Continue to cook for 10 to 12 minutes—they will float up to the top when ready. Remove with a slotted spoon, place on a serving platter, and garnish with freshly ground black pepper. Repeat with remaining batches. Serve immediately. FEBRUARY 2019

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Serves: 6

TEVERE 84’S NAPOLEON

Cooking the puff pastry between two cookie sheets creates crispy puff pastry layers that balances perfectly with the light, airy zabaglione based cream. 1 (17.5-ounce) package puff pastry dough ¼ cup sugar 6 egg yolks ½ cup sugar ½ cup white marsala wine 1 (8-ounce) container non-dairy whipped topping Powdered sugar, for dusting Preheat oven to 400°F. Lay puff pastry sheets on a cookie sheet. Prick dough with a fork and sprinkle with sugar. Top puff pastry with parchment paper and top parchment paper with another cookie sheet. Bake for 15 minutes. Set aside and let cool. While puff pastry is baking, whip non-dairy whipped topping until stiff peaks form. Set aside. Beat egg yolks, sugar, and wine until smooth in a heatproof bowl. Place bowl over pot of simmering water and continue to whisk until thick and foamy, about 15 minutes. Set aside to cool and fold into whipped cream. Use a serrated knife to cut equal rectangular shapes of puff pastry to form napoleons. You should have 18 rectangles, to make 6 napoleons. Layer cream in between layers of puff pastry. Top with powdered sugar.

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TOP 22

Wolf & Lamb’s Chicken Salad A good salad can be a meal in itself. This wonderfully layered salad is the perfect example. We also love how the marinade works as the salad dressing.

1 cup extra virgin olive oil 3 cloves minced garlic ½ cup chopped parsley ½ cup chopped dill ½ cup chopped tarragon 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice ¼ cup white wine vinegar 1 tablespoon honey 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon kosher salt ½ teaspoon ground black pepper 1 ½ pounds boneless skinless chicken, cut into 3-inch chunks 4 cups mixed greens 2 cups green beans, blanched 2 cups crunchy roasted chickpeas (can use store bought crunchy chickpeas or corn nuts) 2 tomatoes, sliced Combine oil, garlic, parsley, dill, tarragon, lemon juice, vinegar, honey, mustard, salt and pepper. Reserve half to dress salad, pour the other half over the chicken to marinate. Marinate chicken in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours, or up to one day. Cover dressing and refrigerate until ready to serve. Heat a grill, grill pan, or cast iron skillet over medium heat. Remove chicken from marinade and cook for six minutes per side. Combine salad greens, green beans, chickpeas, and tomatoes with reserved dressing. Top with chicken. Serve immediately.

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Noi Due Carne’s Salmon Carpaccio

1 pound salmon, as fresh as possible (ask your fishmonger for sushi-grade or sashimi style salmon) 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil Salt, to taste Black pepper, to taste 1 tablespoon silan (date syrup) ⅓ cup chopped pistachios ⅓ cup pomegranate seeds Radish sprouts, optional

Noi Due, a well-known dairy restaurant on the Upper West Side in NYC, has recently opened a meat restaurant right next door. Like Noi Due, it has great service, a great vibe and solid food. This simple salmon carpaccio special is just delicious. Use smoked salmon slices if you do not want to eat raw fish.

Place salmon in freezer for 30 minutes to firm up. Slice salmon into thin long slices, to resemble lox. Spread on a platter. Mix lemon juice and oil and drizzle over salmon. Top with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Drizzle with silan and top with pistachios and pomegranate seeds. Finish with radish sprouts, if desired. Serve immediately.

Serves: 4

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TOP 22

JEFF’S GOURMET SAUSAGE’S SLICED STEAK SANDWICHES

Levy’s of Hollywood's Trump Burger Serves: 4 Levy’s produces some of the most consistent Israeli food in the United States. They are also famous for their babka and creative burgers. The Trump Burger was created way before Donald Trump ran for president and represents true decadence. We love that the burger is baked in the bun with juicy pastrami and a dollop of sauce. 1 pound challah dough, divided into four portions ¼ cup all-purpose flour, for rolling out dough 1 pound ground beef ¼ cup barbecue sauce 6 ounces sliced pastrami 1 egg, beaten ⅓ cup sesame seeds

Serves: 4 This sandwich is a winner. The silvertip roast is great in salads as well. 1.5 pounds silvertip roast ⅓ cup olive oil 2 teaspoons kosher salt 1 teaspoon ground black pepper 4 baguettes, halved 2 cups favorite barbecue sauce Ranch dressing*, to serve Preheat oven to 375°F. Pour oil over roast, and season with salt and pepper.

Roast, uncovered, for an hour and half. Cool. Slice as thinly as possible. Toast baguettes. Heat frying pan or grill to high heat. Coat sliced meat in barbecue sauce and sear in pan or on grill (or even under a broiler) for ten minutes, so sauce caramelizes around meat. Serve stuffed into a baguette or roll with ranch dressing on the side.

Preheat oven to 375°F. Line a baking tray with parchment paper. Set aside. Roll out each portion of challah dough and place 4 ounces ground beef in center. Top with a tablespoon of barbecue sauce and three pastrami slices. Seal dough. Place dough, seal side down, onto prepared baking tray. Brush with egg and top with sesame seeds. Bake for twenty minutes, until golden brown. Let cool for five minutes. Slice and serve immediately.

*Ranch dressing: Mix 1 packet Lipton kosher ranch dressing mix and 16 ounces non-dairy sour cream.

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TOP 22

Fish Grill’s Fish Tacos What makes Fish Grill’s fish so memorable is the fresh quality and wood burning grills used to cook the fish. This recipe works with a variety of fish, from salmon to sea bass fillets to tilapia. In recent years, many varieties of tortillas have become available in the kosher market. Del Compo Tortilla Co. produces a variety of corn tortillas, and really adorable mini tortialla shells (great for a party). Quick tip to remember: toasting them in an oven or on a grill makes a huge difference in taste.

Serves: 4

2 tablespoons cajun seasoning 1 teaspoon kosher salt ¼ cup olive oil 4 (4-ounce) halibut fillets 8 corn tortillas Tartar Sauce (recipe follows) Coleslaw (recipe follows) Pico de Gallo (recipe follows)

Combine cajun seasoning, salt, and oil together and rub over fish. Heat a grill on medium-high heat or a broiler to high. Grill or broil fish for eight minutes. Set aside. Heat tortillas until warmed through. Spread tartar sauce over tortillas, then top with fish, coleslaw and pico de gallo. Serve immediately. Tartar Sauce

Makes: 1+ cup 1 cup mayonnaise ⅓ cup sweet pickle relish 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard ¼ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon black pepper Combine all ingredients.

Coleslaw

Serves: 8 2 cups sliced green cabbage 1 cup sliced purple cabbage 1 cup sliced carrots ½ cup mayonnaise 2 tablespoons sugar 1½ tablespoons lemon juice 1 tablespoon white vinegar ¼ teaspoon kosher salt ½ teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper Combine cabbage and carrots in a large bowl. Mix mayonnaise, sugar, lemon juice, vinegar, salt, and pepper until smooth. Pour over salad and mix well. Pico de Gallo

Makes: 1 cup 2 tomatoes, diced 1 small red onion, diced (¼ cup) ½ cup chopped parsley (plus a few extra leaves, for garnish) 1 tablespoon lemon juice Add all ingredients to a small bowl. Mix to combine. Top with reserved parsley.

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MIKE'S CHICKEN CRUNCHERS' HOT CHICKEN POPPERS Serves: 6

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Chicken Poppers: 1 ½ pounds chicken, cut into 1” cubes 1 cup hot sauce, divided 1 ½ cups all purpose flour 2 eggs, beaten 2 cups plain breadcrumbs Oil, for frying ¼ cup honey Creamy ranch dip, for serving (recipe follows) Celery spears, for serving

chicken for five minutes, until cooked through and crispy. Drain on paper towels. Mix remaining ⅔ cup hot sauce and honey, and pour over chicken. Toss to coat. Serve with creamy ranch dip and celery spears.

Mix chicken with ⅓ cup hot sauce and marinate for at least 2 hours, or up to one day. Drain chicken and discard marinade. Dust chicken in flour. Dip floured chicken in eggs and then breadcrumbs. Heat oil in a large pot or skillet. Fry

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Creamy Ranch & Chive Dip:

Makes: 1 ½ cups 1 ½ cups mayonnaise 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 3 tablespoons sugar 3 cloves garlic

1 head roasted garlic* ½ cup chives ½ teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper Blend all ingredients together. Cover and store in the fridge for up to a week. *Roasted Garlic: Slice top third of garlic open crosswise. Place on a square of aluminum foil. Drizzle with 1 teaspoon of olive oil and pinch of salt. Seal foil around garlic. Cook in preheated 375˚ F oven, covered, for 40 minutes.

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Lessons Learned from Restaurant Kitchens

CULINARY SCHOOL

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How a Home Cook Can Raise the Bar Without a Kitchen Staff BY NAOMI ROSS

Trailing at restaurants is like interning but can be for short (or long) stints of time and is how many cooks get experience and learn. I got my feet wet in the professional kitchen by trailing at some well-known restaurants such as Bobby Flay's Mesa Grill and Bar Americain as well at the Prime Grill in NYC. Hanging out in restaurant kitchens, one enters a different world from the home kitchens we are used to, especially since at home we lack the kitchen staff to execute tasks for us. That said, there are still game-changing lessons I have learned that changed the way I run my home kitchen, making my cooking time more efficient, organized and even more innovative.

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Mise en place

Think in Components

Home cooks think in recipes – the start to finish steps for one dish. Restaurants think in terms of “building block” recipes – subrecipes or components which come together to create the special multi-layered dish you are willing to pay money for multiple people to prepare for you. Most of the time, those same components are often used in other ways within the restaurant. In other words, the work of making a homemade pesto is not just for one sandwich, but may be in multiple other dishes on the menu. Once I shifted my cooking in this way, it opened up endless creative possibilities for what I could quickly put together because I happened to have a batch of cooked white beans or roasted red peppers in the fridge. I may not do it on the same scale as a restaurant, but it definitely freed me from only cooking within the limitations of specific recipe.

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Sheet Pans

Sheet pan cooking has been a thing for few years now. But it was really always the best kept secret of how things got done en masse in restaurant kitchens. Roasting large quantities of vegetables (or pretty much anything else!) in a single layer on super high heat gets it done easily, evenly and quickly. A quick toss with olive oil and salt and pepper (or your choice of seasonings) is all you need. Sheet pans are especially handy when preparing multiple components for a dish. Line your sheet pans with heavy duty foil for a no-mess clean-up.

Literally translated “everything in its place,” mise en place (meeson-plahs) is the defining practice of a chef or restaurant cook. It is the process of prepping each and every ingredient before beginning to cook - pre-measuring, chopping, grating, etc. Mise en place is the thoughtful process of getting everything prepared that is needed to execute a dish, of having it all organized in an efficient manner and at the ready. Without the pressure of a customer awaiting his meal, home cooks often don’t feel that it is a necessary part of their cooking, worried that it will take extra time or isn’t worth the extra bowls to wash. The truth: all cooking gets done faster, more efficiently and with more care when everything is ready and prepared. Rushing around your kitchen to get garlic chopped in time to throw it into the pan is often how dishes get burnt or ruined. Even if you don’t mise en place to the same degree as a restaurant cook, implementing this system will make you a better cook at home.

4.

The Balance of Flavor & Texture Great cooking is all about contrast. The contrast of flavors, textures, spices and colors. A good cook looks to achieve these elements in a given dish and to strike a balance between them in delicate harmony — without one element overpowering another. Sweet tempering spicy, creamy contrasting crunchy, acid brightening base flavors, and a mix of colors that compliment and attract the eye. While a restaurant might achieve this balance with a multi-layering of components, a home cook can take a lesson from this approach to cooking, paying attention to the details of flavors and ingredients.

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Clean Your Space

You would only need to work in a professional kitchen for one day (if not less!) to learn that it is your responsibility to work clean and keep your work space clean. “Sink or swim,” is part of the working etiquette of the kitchen. One must learn quickly to keep things tidy and not be inconsiderate to those sharing the kitchen space. No one else will do it for you and the necessity is great in order to keep things sanitary (enough that you’d want to eat there!). Apply this to your home kitchen and you will find that clean up is much easier if you clean as you go. Just as a cook has a defined “work space” in a restaurant kitchen and wouldn’t dream of taking over the whole kitchen, a home cook can choose to define and contain his/her work space, streamlining the chaos and making it a neater experience. Cleanliness is next to G-dliness.

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TIERRA

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SUR

RESTAURANT

A Kosher Destination with Distinction WRITTEN BY NAOMI ROSS

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A

About sixty miles west of Los Angeles on the Southern California coastline lies a small town named Oxnard. Home to about twenty miles of super soft sandy beaches and a strong riptide surf, it is also the center of the largest kosher wine production in the United States: the Herzog Winery. On the western edge of the fertile Oxnard Plain, the main producer of strawberries and lima beans, lies a hidden epicurean gem where the best in locally grown agriculture is served in perfect counterpoint to the wines produced on site: Tierra Sur Restaurant. While most kosher restaurants are supported by the observant Jewish community in which they reside, Tierra Sur is different. With glimpses of the wine cellars peeking out at you, being the exclusive dining venue of a famous winery means that the winery is the destination and you must travel for the visit. But travel you will, knowing that the food is meant to heighten and compliment each glass poured and savored. When Executive Chef Gabe Garcia crafts a menu, rest assured that it will be paired with a show-stopping wine to elevate the meal. A Southern Californian native, his cooking is highly influenced by the fresh local produce available – indeed, the restaurant sources their produce from neighboring farms and changes its menu seasonally. Garcia also incorporates the fresh taste of a wood-burning outdoor grill, adding unique nuances of smoke to many modern grilled dishes.

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With glimpses of the wine cellars peeking out at you, being the exclusive dining venue of a famous winery means that the winery is the destination and you must travel for the visit.

A warm, balmy evening this past December was a special night for Tierra Sur. An intimate VIP tasting event: eight courses, ten food influencers, twenty guests and a whole lot of wine glasses ready to be filled. International flavors dominated the evening but with a California feel. The event opened al fresco in a relaxed setting over Drappier Champagne Bruts and Apple Cider Frosé (vodka, apple cider and cinnamon slush), where guests mingled over the first four appetizer courses with Chef Gabe and his professional staff. The chef shared experiences and anecdotes as he finished and plated his 5-day cured Peking duck with orange glaze on scallion pancakes and baby chive salad before the eyes of the small crowd. The staff was happy to answer questions as they assembled

the other courses: Profiteroles with pastrami, steamed buns with korean short ribs and kimchi, and veal carnitas in tacos topped with pickled onions and chimichurri…all executed in seamless and efficient harmony. A move indoors signaled the second part of the tasting evening: a formal dinner with elegant ambiance and delicate presentation. There was regalia reminiscent of a Pesach Seder, replete with four glasses of wine - but no heavy matzoh to wash down. No stories of Exodus were told, but rather an explanation before each course by Chef Gabe and its wine pairing by owner Joseph Herzog. There may not have been four sons, but there were four expressions of cooking on the menu: Charcuterie, Braise, Grilled, and Smoke.

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Chef Gabe joked “Are you asleep yet? …Well, if not, you’ll be asleep after this!” The main event inside the party room.

While most people today think of cured sliced meats when they think of charcuterie, Chef Gabe presented a soft yet sophisticated side of curing: the world of terrines. Garcia’s terrine of pâté en croûte (in flaky pastry) was a study in balanced contrasts, rich and flavorful, served with a smooth fois gras mousse, pickled fig and pickled mustard seeds. A fennel jam on top was a perfect

finish: sweet, with slight acidity yet without an overpowering fennel flavor. The Herzog Special Reserve Syrah (Paso Robles 2016) contrasted the creamy mousse with a kick of subtle spice. The flavors of fennel and orange were the understated heroes of evening, permeating throughout multiple courses in creative uses.

WHAT ARE TAMALES? A Mexican dish of seasoned meat wrapped in cornmeal dough and steamed or baked in corn husks. They are served up in endless flavor options and are a traditional street food in Mexico, that got an update at the Tierra Sur-Fleishigs dinner.

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RESTAURANT CHRONICLES

Chef Gabe Garcia and guests.

The airy patio where appetizers were served by the chef.

“Fennel is at the peak of the season. We get them from Ojai with some beautiful oranges that are also at the peak of the season,” Garcia explained as he introduced his fennel & orange stuffed tortellini, an accompaniment to the second course: confit bison short ribs. The melt-in-your mouth bison had a mild, beefy flavor after a sous vide in duck fat. Savory jus and chanterelle mushrooms were balanced by the brightness of the tortellini filling. Herzog paired Special Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon (Valhall Vineyard, Sonoma County 2014) a winery exclusive, because of its earthy tones to compliment the earthiness of the bison.

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By the time the eighth course (SMOKE) came, feelings of elated satiety swept over the posse of willing enthusiasts.

A dinner event is an opportunity for a restaurant to pull out all the stops with high-end quality and that is what course number seven was all about. Kosher Wagyu steak is hard to come by so when a chef gets it, it better be cooked right. The steaks were first cooked rare in sous vide, then seared with a simple seasoning of sea salt. The steaks cut like butter, accentuated with a decadent shaving of black truffle and a base of pomme purée, topped with the slight bitter crunch of kale chip on top and a touch of sweetness from house-made onion jam. With empty plates and full bellies, the group polished off a Herzog Special Edition Cabernet Sauvignon (Warnecke Vineyard, Chalk Hill, Sonoma County 2015). By the time the eighth course came, feelings of elated satiety swept over the posse of willing enthusiasts. Chef Gabe joked “Are you asleep yet? Well, if not, you’ll be asleep after this!” The Pascal Sacrifice had arrived and was to be packed up in to-go boxes for the overly full. Indeed,

this lamb dish was not to be overlooked or wasted, as it was a beautiful homage to Chef Gabe’s family roots: achiote marinated lamb chops served with grilled tamales stuffed with braised lamb shoulder. Chef Gabe learned to make traditional Mexican mole from his grandmother. The painstaking process involves much time and many ingredients: it was this Mexican sauce that completed the dish, topped with a slightly acidic escabeche for a punch of brightness. Wine Pairing: Herzog Special Edition Cabernet Sauvignon, (Rutherford District, Napa Valley 2015). This was elegant Mexican inspired food at its finest. Small sweet bites welcomed the crowd back outside, including freshly torched smores over delicate house-made cookies. Mini passion fruit pavlovas were a bite-size dream to end the evening before returning to LA. The palm trees waved us on back into the night for a long ride home. To digest and to reflect are part of the experience of Tierra Sur. And after that…time to dig in to that to-go box!

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Buon appetito!

MADE IN

AGENZIA PIÙ DELIZIOSA

ITALY ITALY

. n a i l a t I y l c i t n Authe


THE MEAL IN A NUTSHELL

RESTAURANT CHRONICLES

The wines served during the sit down meal.

Savory Profiteroles Peking Duck on Scallion Pancake Korean Steam Buns Veal Carnitas Tacos

F L E I S H I G S

M A G A Z I N E

Mix

C H E F ’ S

Rest

T A B L E

D I N N E R

Bask

CHARCUTERIE PATE EN CROUTE | FOIE GRAS MOUSSE

VEAL CARNITAS PEKING DUCK KOREAN BARBEQUE SHORT RIB WAGYU BRISKET PASTRAMI

BRAISE BISON RIBS | MUSHROOMS | TORTELLINI

GRILLED WAGYU RIBEYE | ONION JAM POMME PUREE

SWEET WARM COLD SAVORY

SMOKED LAMB RACK | MOLE | TAMALE

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WINES BY HERZO G WINE CELLARS

H OSTED BY TIERRA SUR

COHOSTED BY FLEISHIGS M AGAZINE

JOE H URLIMAN

CHEF GA BE GA RCIA

SHLOMO & SHIFRA KLEIN

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CIPOLLINI ONION JAM I love onion jam, it’s a perfect condiment for sandwiches, steaks, or charcuterie. ¼ cup vegetable oil 1 quart Cipollini onions, sliced in rings 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1 bay leaf 1 sprig thyme 1 sprig marjoram 2 cups high quality red wine ¼ cup red wine vinegar ½ cup honey Salt, to taste Black pepper, to taste In a medium sauté pan, heat the oil until it begins to smoke lightly. Add onions and salt and cook until they begin to turn translucent about 3 to 5 minutes. Add wine, bay leaf, thyme, marjoram, red wine vinegar, and honey. Lower the heat and cook the onions until the sauce is syrupy. Remove from the heat, season and serve.

SAVORY PROFITEROLES Sometimes bread can be a little heavy, so here is a great recipe for a savory profiterole that can be used as a replacement for bread in a sandwich.

1 cup water ½ cup margarine ¼ teaspoon salt 1 cup all-purpose flour 4 eggs 2 tablespoons rehydrated minced onion 2 tablespoons rehydrated minced garlic 1 teaspoon poppy seeds 1 teaspoon black sesame seeds 1 teaspoon white sesame seeds 1 teaspoon caraway seeds 1 teaspoon Maldon salt 60

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Preheat an oven to 425` F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Bring the water to a boil in a saucepan. Add the margarine and salt. Once the margarine has melted, remove the pot from the stove and add the flour. Stir until no lumps of flour remain. Return the pot to medium heat and continue stirring the dough for another 3 minutes. The dough will leave tracks on the bottom of the pot. Transfer the dough to a stand mixer and beat the mixture until it has mostly

cooled. Add one egg at a time, waiting until each egg is fully incorporated before adding the next egg. This step can also be done by hand. Fold in the rehydrated onion and garlic. In a separate bowl mix the remaining ingredients. Scoop 4 ounce portions onto the prepared baking sheets and sprinkle the top with the salt mixture. Bake for 20 minutes. Do not open the oven during this first baking period. Lower the oven to 300*F and continue baking for another 10 to 15 minutes or until they are lightly golden. Remove and cool. Fill with your favorite cold cuts or deli. w w w.f leishigs.com


GLOBAL FOODSERVICE STANDARDS

THE ~ KOSHER CERTIFICATE ON A FOODSERVICE ESTABLISHMENT MEANS:

Chassidishe Shechita 

Keys to meat areas

Kashered only when

are held by mashgichim only

Eino Ben Yoma

Pareve and dairy establishments always have a Shomer Shabbos Jew on premesis

Our vegetable checking methods were developed under the guidance of HaRav Asher Eckstein, shlita, who is world-renowned for his expertise in vegetable checking

Pas Yisroel

Cholov Yisroel

Mevushal

OK.ORG


RESTAURANT CHRONICLES

Confit veal breast, Chef Gabe's kosher version of carnitas, is slow cooked in duck fat and results in luscious, unctuous meat.

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VEAL CARNITAS My dad was born in Michoacan, Mexico, where the signature dish is pork carnitas, literally meaning little meats. Here is a kosher version I’m sure you will enjoy.

2.5 pounds veal breast 1-2 quarts melted duck fat 1 onion, chopped 6 clove garlic, chopped 5 sprigs oregano 2 bay leafs Zest of 1 lime Vegetable oil, for frying Sliced avocado, corn tortillas, sliced radishes, jalapeños and diced onions, for serving Preheat your oven to 425°F. Season the veal with salt and pepper. Place on a roasting pan and brown the meat in the preheated oven, about 15 minutes, then remove. Turn down the oven to 350°F. Place the browned veal in a pot or braising pan. Add duck fat, onion, garlic, oregano, bay leaf, and lime zest. Cover and cook in the oven for one hour and 20 minutes or until the meat is fork tender. Remove the meat from the fat and cool to room temperature. Heat a pot of oil until temperature reaches 350°F. Deep fry the cooled meat in large chunks until golden brown and crispy on the outside, no more than five minutes. Shred and season the veal. Serve with corn tortillas and fresh salsa or sliced avocado and radishes.

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Restaurant Guide Guide to Dining Out

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am honored to introduce the premiere restaurant guide for Fleishigs magazine. I have worked in the food industry for half my life, from catering halls to supermarkets, commercial food production to consulting and marketing. In between all of these food gigs, I have eaten out at more places then I can count and learned a few things along the the way.

Editor's Note: The restaurant guide section serves as our collaborative space and advertorial section.

Whether it’s a night out on the town with friends or loved ones, whether you’ve gone to the same spot dozens of times or it’s a first in a new city, dining out should be and always is an experience. I’ll walk you through each “course” in my guide to dining out, and let you in on my secrets to having an ultimate experience each time.

For starters, call in advance to see if reservations need to be made. Having reservations will help reduce wait time. Try to plan your day accordingly. The tension from being in a rush is never a good feeling. If you’re running a few minutes late, a courtesy call to the restaurant with a heads up is always appreciated. To start your meal off with a nice vibe, thank your host after they show you to your table, and thank your servers throughout the meal. I always ask my server what their name is after they take my initial drink order to show that I view them as an actual person, not just by the title “Excuse me!”

As a rule of thumb, order slowly. See what catches your eye or ask what’s popular on the menu. I don’t recommend jumping ahead and ordering each course within the first 5 minutes of sitting down. Often times diners order more than they can eat. If you’re still feeling hungry at the end of your meal, then order a main dish accordingly, or stick with ordering various appetizers to create a custom tapas-style meal. Order the specialty of the house. A steakhouse should have their steak and meats down pat, and dairy restaurants generally specialize in fish and pasta. Focus on the restaurant’s specialties. I often leave room for dessert.

If the desserts are homemade, order desserts! It may just end up being the best part of the night out. If they are not homemade, it is probably best to skip it and save the calories for another occasion. To tip or not to tip? Honestly, there really is no question. Some eateries include tip in the final bill. By all means, help me out with the math! I always make sure to include a tip no matter what. There was time and effort put in by someone else to make my experience happen. Showing appreciation never hurts. Lastly and most importantly, take in the ambiance and enjoy the company you’re with.

Gabriel Boxer, known as “Kosher Guru” is a leading kosher industry food & restaurant consultant with a thriving social media following. His @KosherGuru Instagram page has 40,500 followers who enjoy being part of his fun and fresh approach to anything and everything kosher. He runs one of the largest and fastest organically growing Kosher Foodie Facebook Groups, “Kosher Guru’s Kosher Nation”. He also hosts “The Nosh”, a radio show which airs every Thursday at 9:30 pm on 620 AM in the NYC area and broadcasts the show on his iTunes and Google Play podcast channel and YouTube channel. He can be found on Twitter @thekosherguru. In his spare time, he writes for Whisk (by Ami Magazine) and shares his top 5 kosher destinations each month in Fleishigs magazine.

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774 Amsterdam Ave New York, NY 10025 917-261-2472 BoruBoruNYC.com resy.com/cities/ny/boru-boru 917-261-2472 I: @BoruBoruNYC F: BoruBoruNYC Mehadrin Kosher under the supervision of Rabbi Avrohom Marmorstein

HIGHLIGHTS BRISKET RAMEN

ME NU

A hearty and flavorful bowl of comfort, with a black garlic and new potato broth, Romanian sausage stuffed dumplings, Koji aged brisket, and caramelized celery root, all on top of our fresh made ramen noodles

SELECTION OF AUTHENTIC, HANDMADE DUMPLINGS Featuring the freshest of local ingredients, and bursting with flavor JAPANESE STYLE BAO BUNS

A soft, steamed, yeast bun, stuffed with a variety of fillings and toppings. The Bao Buns are handmade each day, and are one of Boru Boru's most popular items.

CRAFT COCKTAILS AND IMPORTED SAKE One of our most famous drinks is our Tiki Hurricane, a beautiful and balanced drink, made with a variety of blended rums, tropical juices, and housemade liquors.

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oru Boru is the place to go if you would like to explore Asian comfort food and ingredients likely not found on any other kosher restaurant menu. Ingredients that are impossible or difficult to find kosher are made in house for a flavorful, one-of-a-kind dining experience. The food at Boru Boru (located on the Upper West Side of NYC) is inspired by the flavors of the Lower East Side of NYC (a fusion of Chinatown & Jewish Deli). You can experience standouts like their noodle special, classic ramen bowl, brisket ramen bowl, oxtail fried rice and whatever dish they have with duck...order! The restaurant is cozy and modern and has bar seating available too. Their cocktail menu is a great addition and the tiki hurricane, a must try. FEBRUARY 2019

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550 Central Avenue Cedarhurst, NY 11516 www.fivefiftyny.com F: @fivefiftyny I: @fivefiftyny T: @fivefiftyny Under the supervision of the Vaad of 5 Towns

HIGHLIGHTS ROASTED LAMB BELLY

ME NU

Assorted Micro Greens, Baby Arugula , Onions, Pickles, Moroccan Spice Lamb Reduction Dressing SHORT RIB PASTILLA

Short Rib Spring Roll, Almond - Saffron, Cilantro, Sweet And Sour Apricot Dip SEARED YELLOWFIN TUNA

Avocado Mousse, Eggplant Crema, Harissa, Cilantro Oil FALLEN EGGPLANT NAPOLEON

Ribeye Bolognese, Smoked Almond Ricotta RIB EYE STEAK

24 Oz Special Cut "Cote De Boeuf" 550 BURGER

(Add Pastrami Bacon & Fried Egg) Stuffed with Braised Short Rib Tomato, Lettuce, Onion French Fries, Spicy Mayonnaise

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French-influenced steakhouse serves up fine dining flair in the heart of The Five Towns, minutes away from J.F.K. They also offer an impressive lineup of charcuterie, awesome daily specials and a full bar menu. Our favorites include the specialty burger stuffed with braised short rib, tuna tartare, and an oxtail soup served with a perfect poached egg. Five Fifty is a wonderful spot for an evening out, but is also known for throwing elegant parties, sheva brachot and an openbuffet Shabbat takeout every Friday.

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GRAND

CAFE

Š

Sandwich & Espresso Bar

2905 Stirling Rd. Hollywood, FL 33312 954-986-6860 www.GrandCafe.us F: www.facebook.com/GrandCafeHollywood I: www.instagram.com/grandcafe.us Under the Hashgacha of the O.R.B

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e love the outdoor seating and Israeli restaurant vibe at Grand Cafe. Here you can find breakfast specialties, great pastries and coffee, rich pasta dishes, and fresh salads, centrally located in Fort Lauderdale. One of our favorites was the shawarma fish. They open early (7 AM) and close late (midnight), so you can rely on stopping by any time of day. The homemade desserts, dairy whipped cream and full coffee menu are amazing. FEBRUARY 2019

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Brick-oven pizza, Vegetarian Italian & coastal Mediterranean

143 West 69th St New York, NY 10023 212-712-2222 www.noiduecafe.com F: @noiduenyc I: noiduecafe Under the supervision of the OK

HIGHLIGHTS BALCANICO PIZZA Roasted & Charred Eggplant, Feta, Pesto, Za'atar

ME NU

GREEN HEALTH SALAD Chopped Romaine, Parsley, Celery, Mint, Cranberries, Toasted Almond, Labane, Red Wine Vinaigrette

STUFFED MUSHROOMS Mozzarella, Ricotta, Feta, Za'atar, Marinara

SALMON SPECIAL Cherry Tomato Marmalade, Avocado Mousse, Baby Carrots

SPAGHETTI MARINARA San Marzano Tomatoes, Garlic, Basil, Oregano

MACARONI & CHEESE BALLS House blend cheese, rosa rosa sauce, parmigiano

BAKED STUFFED BRANZINO Olive tapanade, charred roasted pepper, parsley, lemon zest, tabbouleh, Mediterranean spices

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his classic dairy restaurant offers consistent service and food year after year. Offering up Italian classics like homemade pizza, pastas, and antipasti, NoiDue is popular for good reason. There is a warm and happening atmosphere and a feeling that the owners care. The roasted sweet potato salad, fresh lasagna, onion soup in a bowl, and array of drinks are a must try! The fried macaroni and cheese, fish dishes and extensive dessert and drink options make this a place where everyone leaves happy.

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Novel/contemporary Italian & coastal Mediterranean 141 West 69th St, New York, NY 10023 212-712-2223 www.noiduecarne.com F: @noiduecarne I: noiduecarne Under the supervision of the OK

HIGHLIGHTS HALF CHICKEN AL MATTONE Potato puree, rosemary jus, gremolata

14 OZ. PRIME USDA RIBEYE Sea salt, olive oil & roasted plum tomato

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BURGER 10 oz. burger short-rib brisket blend, sesame-challah bun, fries, zucchini pickles, aioli

FATTOUSH SALAD Romaine, cucumber, heirloom tomato, radish, red onion, mint, Kalamata, za'atar pita chips, sumac red wine vinaigrette

RIGATONI BOLOGNESE Veal ragu, Pinot Grigio, marinara, rosemary

BEEF CARPACCIO Mustard vinaigrette, balsamic reduction, crispy sweet potato

WARM CHOCOLATE GANACHE CAKE Vanilla gelato, crispy rice

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he sister (and neighboring) restaurant to NoiDue, NoiDue Carne brings the same service and food quality of NoiDue with a meat-inspired menu. Their spaghetti stuffed meatball gained national fame, but we love the chicken liver pate crostini and Roman-style baby artichokes. Their steaks, burgers, and rigatoni bolognese are always good options, and their homemade desserts end the meal on a perfect note. FEBRUARY 2019

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Executive Chef: Gustavo Gutierrez 310 Saddle River Rd, Monsey, NY, 10952 845-517-0022 Ridgesteakhouse.com F: @ridgesteakhouse I: @theridgesteakhouse Rabbi Benyamin Taub - North American Kosher

HIGHLIGHTS 20-180 DAY DRY AGED TOMAHAWK.

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Aged Tomahawk steaks aged in house in our private dry aging box set at the perfect temperature, humidity and air flow to create a unique flavor and super soft texture for an incredible experience and taste.

STEAK TARTARE Freshly diced beef, egg yolk, pickled mustard seeds

36 HOUR SMOKED OXTAIL Israeli Pita, spicy tomato sauce, Chili pickled red onion

BEEF CHEEK Gooseberry Glaze, baby carrots, fingerling potatoes

BRISKET PLANTAIN FRITTERS Chef Gus's Cuban heritage mixed with classic brisket, a deep fried plantain fritter topped with guacamole, in-house smoked brisket and a pesto drizzle

KALE GNOCCHI Pan seared homemade gnocchi, served with sautĂŠed mushrooms & pulled short rib, truffle honey drizzle and kale chips

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amous for their dry aged steaks, The Ridge has much to offer and is our consistent stopover on family trips to and from the Catskill Mountains. Their fried boneless chicken wings are addictive (order at least two!) and the roasted beet quinoa salad is a personal favorite as well. You can’t go wrong when ordering any steak (aged or not), the charcuterie board, or rack of lamb. If heading over for dry aged steaks (definitely worth a drive) call in advance to make sure they are in stock. The restaurant is bright, airy, and modern and offers a full sushi, cocktail and wine menu.

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933 Amsterdam Avenue New York, NY 10025 (Corner of 106th/Amsterdam) http://nybratfactory.com I: @nybratfactory F: @nybratfactory Under the Supervision of Rabbi Avrohom Mamorstein

HIGHLIGHTS PULLED BBQ BRISKET SANDWICH Slowly Cooked Brisket, pulled and served with Red Cabbage Slaw

ME NU

BRATWURST House Made Bratwurst topped with Sautéed Onions and Horseradish Mustard

SLICED RIB EYE SANDWICH Grilled Rib Eye piled high on a Hoagie Roll topped with Crispy Onions and Jalapeño Mayo

THE REUBEN Our Famous Corned Beef served on Rye topped with Sauerkraut and Thousand Island Dressing

LOADED FRIES Our Hand Cut French Fries topped with a Chili and Pulled Brisket

SWEET AND SPICY CAULIFLOWER Tossed in a Sweet Chili Sauce, Cashew Cream and Crushed Cashews

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lready garnering raves among foodies for its housemade hot dogs and sausages, the NYBF menu also features elevated deli standards like brisket, pastrami, and burgers, along with many other choices (deep-fried pickles, pulled brisket spring rolls, or sweet and spicy cauliflower, anyone?). There are even some interesting options for vegetarians. Don’t forget to leave room for dessert! It’s hard to resist the fresh, hot churros and deep-fried Oreos (yes, it’s a thing!). This family friendly spot, on the Upper West Side in NYC is a great spot for filling, fun food that won't break the bank. FEBRUARY 2019

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1635 Coney Island Ave Brooklyn, NY 11230 718-627-4676

16 East 48th Street New York, NY 212.317.1950

http://www.wolfandlambsteakhouse.com I. @wolfandlambnyc Visit our Brooklyn location at 1635 Coney Island Ave . | 718 - 627- 4676 F. @wolfandlambsteakhouse WOLFANDLAMBSTEAKHOUSE.COM Wolf & Lamb BROOKLYN & MANHATTAN is under the strict Kosher supervision of the OK

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ervice, consistency, and quality reign supreme at Wolf & Lamb restaurant in both the Brooklyn and Manhattan locations. They have been in service for over twenty years, and are true revolutionaries in increasing the standard in kosher fine dining in regards to food and hospitality. Wolf & Lamb’s Manhattan location is our go-to spot for business meetings (lunch and dinner) and family celebrations. We love their rib steak, sweet potato fries, onion rings, and signature steak sauces (ask to taste them all). They grind their own meat for the juiciest burgers. The vegetarian gnocchi at the Manhattan location and all the meat pizzas at the Brooklyn location are always on our order list. Both locations are visually stunning with wonderful light and design. They make awesome homemade desserts - the chocolate peanut butter pudding is a must try!

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T FUSION ATERING. SE AND C G STEAKHOU OUTSIDE CATERIN OM & O E R S G IN HOU PRIVATE DININ & . AVAILABLE ULL OUTDOOR DECK F H IT W OR 80 SEATING FTABLY. COMFOR

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK & INSTAGRAM AND STAY IN THE LOOP: * NEW HEAD CHEF ZACK HESS * NEW PARTY MENUS AVAILABLE * STAY TUNED FOR BIG NEWS COMING SOON!!

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-Fusion is an elegant upscale option - a Manhattan steakhouse experience in the heart of Brooklyn. Their churros are famous and definitely worth ordering. They also do justice to the charcuterie board with added goodies like roasted marrow bones, savory chopped liver, and pulled beef. From the full steakhouse menu, we recommend the delmonico steak, seared to perfection and served with a side of choice. Another great way to end the meal is with the chocolate fondue, a great dessert option for sharing.

3223 Quentin Rd Brooklyn, NY 11234 USA 718-627-8325 www.tfusionsteakhouse.com Under the hashgacha of Rav Yisroel Gornish

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509 Ave P Brooklyn, NY 347-702-5711 www.pescadasteakhouse.com F. @pescadasteakhouse I. @pescadasteakhouse Under the supervision of Rabbi Yechiel Babad (Tartikov)

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he restaurant that inspired the hawaij roasted cauliflower, currently the most popular Fleishigs Magazine side dish recipe yet; Pescada Steakhouse serves steakhouse classics with a twist in a modern, airy space in the heart of Flatbush, NY. The fried cauliflower appetizer is a must, as well as the gnocchi and chicken paupiette. For mains try the baby chicken and 22oz ribeye steak. For a party they’ll bring out the most festive dessert platter accompanied by happy birthday tunes.

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5123 18th Avenue Brooklyn, NY 718-438-6675 www.glattalacarte.com I: @glattalacarte F: @GlattALaCarte T: @Glattalacarte Under the Supervision of Rabbi Yechiel Babad Tartikover Rav

HIGHLIGHTS TEXAS BEEF SPRING ROLLS BRAISED BRISKET BBQ potato salad, honey hickory sauce

ME NU

COFFEE RUBBED RACK OF BEEF RIBS Bourbon BBQ Sauce

24 OZ. TOMAHAWK STEAK Bone-in steak

BEEF WELLINGTON Potted mushrooms, port wine sauce, mashed potatoes

STICKY CINNAMON BUN Chantilly cream, maple glaze

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n business for twenty years, this legendary restaurant has managed to maintain a great reputation, solid service, and delicious food. There is a friendly, welcoming feeling when dining out at Glatt a la Carte, an amazing space for sheva brachot and family gatherings. The pulled beef tacos, chicken lollipops, and sliders are a great way to start the meal. The grilled portobello and sweet potato salad is also wonderful. The chimichurri skirt steak is always on point and is great with sweet potato fries. We love that the desserts can be ordered family style.

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8939 W. Pico Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90035 (310) 278-1500 contact@shilohs-la.com I: @Shilohs_la F: @Shiloh’s Restaurant & Catering Under the Supervision of the OK

HIGHLIGHTS SWEET BREADS IN MINI VOL AU VENT Bouchee a la reine trio, carrot curcuma, truffle, traditional French sauce

ME NU

SALMON CARPACCIO Thinly sliced raw salmon with mango, cilantro, ginger & citrus vinaigrette

TARTE FLAMBÉ Beef bacon, grilled onions, and parve creme fraiche

CHEF'S CUT CALOTTE 12OZ The most tender cut. High marbling.

LAMB LOLLIPOPS Lamb chops with herbes de Provence

MAITRE D CORNISH HEN Flavors of thyme & rosemary with vegetables of the day

BEEF CARPACCIO Thinly sliced seared raw beef medaillons with truffle

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Los Angeles staple, Shiloh’s recently turned over to new management and it is even better than it ever was. Shiloh’s offers a great value, presenting steakhouse flair with wonderful service and generous portions. The beef carpaccio serves enough for two and is seared slightly and topped with shaved truffles. We also enjoyed the assorted dips and malawach, a great option when coming with family. This is also the place to try sweetbreads. You can’t go wrong with any steak or burger option. We were also impressed with the waiter’s knowledge of the menu and recommendations. Shiloh's offers catering for all events from Bar/Bat mitzvah's to weddings, engagement parties & much more.

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61 East 34th Street New York NY 10016 212.576.1515 www.bedfordkitchen.com I:@BedfordOnPark F:@BedfordOnPark Under the strict supervision of the OU

HIGHLIGHTS MAPLE GLAZED BACON Sweetened lamb to a crusted perfection with roasted shisito peppers

ME NU

BBQ BRISKET SLIDERS Our in-house Smoked Brisket is shredded, blended with Chef's private BBQ sauce and topped with citrus aoli, Shallots and Peppadew pepper

LA CAESAR SALAD Tuscan Kale strips, Baked croutons, avocado, sundried tomato, homemade Caesar dressing

TOP CAP The most tender section of the rib eye.

MURRAY HILL CLASSIC Overstuffed pastrami and corned beef on toasted ciabatta club. A NY Deli Delight!

WHOLE BRANZINO Drizzled with fresh chimichurri and fired up on a cast iron skillet. You'll never look at fish the same way again!

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lassic steakhouse meats tapas style tastings at Bedford (Midtown Manhattan) where you can order a substantial steak with classic sides like hand cut fries or share plates of sliders, duck spring rolls, maple glazed lamb bacon with shisito peppers, LA Caesar salad, poutine fries or barbecue spare ribs with cornbread. Sandwiches we love (for lunch or dinner) are the grilled chicken sandwich on a pretzel bun or the filthy burger, which comes with maple barbecue short ribs and vidalia onions. They have a great selection of craft beer and wines at reasonable prices. Bedford on Park's open kitchen, industrial design and high ceilings add to the dining experience. FEBRUARY 2019

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845 United Nations Plaza New York, NY 10017 212-223-1801 www.unplazagrill.com I. @UNPlazaGrill F. @UNPlazaGrill Under the supervision of the OU

HIGHLIGHTS TUNA PIZZA Flour Tortilla, Avocado Crème, Olives, Capers, Red Onions, Serrano, Black Truffle, Micro Greens

ME NU

U.N B.B.Q. SHORT RIB TACOS Pineapple – Plum Tomato Salsa, Micro Cilantro

CHATEAUBRIAND ROSSINI Foie Gras, Bone Marrow, Black Truffle Sauce

CHICKEN SATAY SALAD Napa Cabbage, Mango, Fennel & Endive, Miso Peanut Dressing

SHORT RIB BOURGUIGNON Truffled Wild Mushrooms, Potato Puree, Shishito Peppers

FRENCH CREOLE BEIGNETS Caramel Vanille, Chocolat, and Crème Anglaise

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YC’s latest fine dining establishment offers up high quality steaks, sushi and seafood in an elegant setting. Our favorite sushi dishes include the New York (Spicy Tuna, Mango, Red Onion, Sliced Avocado, Truffle, Ikura) and the Red Dragon (Peppered Tuna, Avocado, Spicy Crunchy Tuna, Tobiko, Tortillas Chips, Sweet soy Glazed). The coolest steak dish on the menu has to be the Chateaubriand Rossini which is served with foie gras, bone marrow and a black truffle sauce. Appetizers like the Sichuan Beef Potstickers, U.N B.B.Q. Short Rib Tacos and the cippolini onion bone marrow side are great options. The desserts are all homemade by their in-house pastry chef and are truly phenomenal and a must try. Most impressive are the beignets with three sauces and the coffee ice cream and anglaise that accompanies the warm chocolate cake.

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560a Central Ave Cedarhurst, NY 11516 (516) 624-7711 www.juddsmemphis.com I: @juddsmemphis F: @juddsmemphis Under the supervision of the Vaad of 5 Towns

HIGHLIGHTS THE GRIZZLY A tantalizing blooming onion "claw" of a grizzly bear. In tribute to our hometown basketball team, the Memphis Grizzlies!

ME NU

THE $100 BURGER Judd's Signature seasoned burger on a layer of thinly sliced roast beef & drizzled with our garlic aioli on a soft pretzel bun

THE JW Judd's Famous Fried Chicken Sandwich topped with pickle slices, maple aioli, served on a soft pretzel bun

THE MEMPHIS HOT "SANDO" Judd's take on a "Nashville Hot" Fried Chicken, served on a warm pretzel bun with "bread & butter" pickle slices, and our maple bacon aioli

THURSDAY NIGHT YAPCHIK A luscious strata of fine shredded potato, cubed smoked beef ends, agressively seasoned, agressively fleishigs.

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udd’s Memphis Kitchen is a fast casual restaurant located minutes from JFK airport, in the heart of Cedarhurst, NY. The restaurant started out as a popular food truck and went brick and mortar due to the passionate following of diners who wanted Judd’s famous fried chicken sandwich and hundred dollar burger weekly. Judd’s makes a great fried chicken sandwich and if you like things hot, try his Memphis version, coated in a rich glaze of hot peppers. His hundred dollar burger (juicy patty with pulled beef on top) is popular for good reason. His wings and Thursday night yapchik are also great and the restaurant has screens that air popular sports games for your viewing pleasure. FEBRUARY 2019

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40 BROAD STREET, 2ND FL. New York, NY 10004 212-747-0300 www.reservecut.com/ I. @reservecutnyc F. @ReserveCutNYC Under the supervision of the OU

HIGHLIGHTS VEAL TONGUE DUO

ME NU

Shaved pickled tongue, tongue schnitzel, smoked egg yolk aioli, crostini, house pickles

BRAISED BEEF CHEEKS Parsnip polenta, hazelnut gremolata, perigord sauce, shaved black truffle

3 OZ SHAVED WAGYU CARPACCIO Seared on a hot stone tableside and garnished with Togarashi, Teriyaki, and Maldon Sea Salt

42 OZ ALLAHAM TOMAHAWK FOR TWO Our Signature Kuro Wagyu Steak carved tableside

TUNA & BLACK TRUFFLE Avocado, tempura crunch, teriyaki, cilantro

SHORT RIB TACOS Hickory smoked prime beef, grilled pineapple salsa

RC CRISPY RICE & SPICY TUNA Teriyaki glaze & spicy mayo

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eserve Cut has to be one of the highest end kosher restaurants in the kosher market. Set in the Financial District in NYC in the Setai Hotel, Reserve Cut is a visually stunning restaurant, with an open kitchen concept and access to a rooftop space for private events. Starter standouts include the smoked short rib tacos with pineapple salsa, LA surprise flatbread (truffle mushroom, caramelized shallots, heirloom tomato, petite herbs, crispy beef bacon), and the pan seared sweetbreads (parsnip puree, cauliflower crumble, plump cherries- golden raisins, pumpkin seeds, curry oil). Beyond the choice of great quality steaks, the wagyu steak porcini burger and rack of lamb are must orders. They also offer top quality sushi bar and a variety of elegant, homemade desserts.

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1306 40th Street Brooklyn NY 11218 718-475-5600 www.theloftsteakhouse.com I. @theloftsteakhouse F. @theloftsteakhouse Under the supervision of Rabbi Yechiel Babad Tarikover Rov

HIGHLIGHTS BBQ BEEF FLATBREAD Pickled red onions, capers, cilantro, cumin lime aioli

ME NU

SIGNATURE CHICKEN LOLLIPOPS Sweet chili sauce

BABY LAMB RIBLETS Chimichurri, lemon truffle crumble , roasted olives

CRISPY BEEF Julienne of carrots, snow peas, toasted sesame

GRILLED BABY LAMB CHOPS Mediterranean couscous, artichoke hearts, tomatoes, roasted vegetables

FILET MIGNON Pan roasted, root vegetables, house cured veal bacon, sautĂŠed mushrooms, truffle cabernet jus

SMORES PIE Loaded with chocolate & homemade cookie, topped with toasted marshmallow, ice cream & caramel

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n elegant, classic, steakhouse restaurant in the heart of Borough Park, The Loft provides solid food and service. The veal gnocchi, crispy beef and beef flatbreads (pulled beef, pickled red onions, capers and cumin aioli) are a great way to start the meal and also great for sharing. Get the baby lamb riblets, if available. The hanger steak (served with seasoned fries, sauteed kale and honey mustard glaze) and fillet mignon (pan roasted, served with root vegetables, veal bacon, sauteed mushroom and truffle Cabernet jus) are our go-to mains. For dessert, we recommend the signature mille-feuille and s'mores pie. The Loft offers elegant sheva brachot and party options in their new "Loft Lounge" and has a full sushi and wine menu. FEBRUARY 2019

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Essen NEW YORK Deli 1359 Coney Island Ave Brooklyn, NY 11230 http://www.essennydeli.com I. @essennydeli F. @Essen-NY-Deli Under the supervision of Kehilla Kasharus.

HIGHLIGHTS THE GRAND CONEY KNISH

ME NU

Coney Island square knish, topped topped with brisket & smothered in gravy

HONEY BEEF AND PASTRAMI Honey glazed beef or housemade pastrami served on club or rye or on its own

THE HERMINATOR Schnitzel topped with derma, sliced brisket & gravy

SESAME CHICKEN Crispy boneless tender white meat in a brown sauce

TONGUE PALONAISE Sliced tongue in a sweet & sour sauce served with rice

FRIED KREPLACH & ONIONS Homemade Hungarian beef dumplings with fried onions

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his is one of the last remaining kosher Jewish delis, serving up overstuffed pastrami and corn beef sandwiches with crunchy coleslaw and authentic New York deli style sour pickles. All the meats are cured and smoked by hand and served up on rye or stuffed in wraps. Beyond classic deli sandwiches there are treasures on the menu we always order, like the hand cut fries, tongue polonaise, the grand Coney knish (knish served open face with brisket and gravy poured over top), and a good old juicy burger. The surprise at Essen is the solid Chinese food, like classic sesame chicken, that never disappoints.

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7122 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles,California,90036 323-954-1250 www.menschbakery.com F: @MenschBakeryandKitchen I: @ Menschbakery Under the supervision of Kehila kosher

HIGHLIGHTS SHAKSHUKA

ME NU

Two eggs poached in a tomato sauce,bell pepper and onion served w/ a side of Israeli salad,tahini and olives

KALE BARLEY SALAD Avocado,red onion,cherry tomatoes,sunflower seeds and feta in lemon honey dressing

CALIFORNIAN VEGGIE SANDWICH Avocado,goat cheese,cucumber,spinach,carrot,radish and pickled onion on multigrain bread

QUINOA BOWL Quinoa,kale,garbanzo beans,tomato,red bell pepper,zucchini,red onion and avocado garnished w/parsley in a lemon and olive oil dressing

BEET-PESTO TOAST Open faced avocado, roasted beet pesto, fresh mozzarella, arugula salad on your choice of house sourdough bread

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ensch bakery is a French style bakery centrally located in the heart of La Brea, Los Angeles. We are obsessed with their chocolate almond croissants. Ask them to toast it...the melting chocolate and almond cream stuffed into layers of buttery croissant is incredible. It is a great spot for breakfast, lunch or brunch serving up breakfast platters, and sandwiches. The beet pesto toast (beet pesto, fresh mozzarella, arugula salad on top of your choice of house sourdough bread) is a generous, hearty meal on its own. The basic breakfast plate and kale caesar salad are also great options. Their french-style cakes make a great hostess gift. FEBRUARY 2019

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Why Do We Need

A Restaurant

Mashgiach? Based on a Shiur by Rabbi Nachman Wilhelm, Rosh Yeshiva of Online Smicha -

‫מכון להוראה‬ Edited by Rabbi Mottel Friedman

Being Strict With Kashrus

The Sefer Hachinuch in Mitzvah 73 writes that just as tongs are the tool of a blacksmith, a person’s body serves as tongs for the soul. Just as the smith can only make good, strong vessels if he has sturdy tongs, so too the body must be a strong and healthy tool for the soul. What makes us strong? Hashem tells us what to eat and what not to eat, what is kosher and what is not, and this is what keeps us strong. Although a doctor may try to tell you what is good for you and what is not, or that the nonkosher food is not unhealthy, the Trusted Physician, Hashem, tells us what is truly good and what is truly bad, and He knows better than any doctor.

When There Was No Mashgiach

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t is true that in years past we relied on the owner to certify the kashrus of what was being served, and back then it really was acceptable, as there is basis for that in halacha. There are several places in Gemara (Chulin 10b, Gittin 2b, etc.) where we learn the general rule, “For matters of isur (things forbidden in the Torah), one witness is sufficient.” There are many matters in halacha where two witnesses are necessary to render a decision, but with regard to isur, one witness is enough.

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or not she is a nidah. Here we see two leniencies: firstly, that we decide whether or not this woman is forbidden based on the testimony of only one witness - the woman herself; secondly, although in most cases of halacha we do not accept the testimony of a woman (and the witness must be a man), in this case of isur we trust a woman. From the above we see that in general matters of isur, the testimony of one person is sufficient to make a halachic decision. The average person is trustworthy, and if they say that what they are presenting or selling is kosher, me’ikar hadin, according to the letter of the law, that is enough.

What Has Changed?

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Rashi, in his commentary on Chulin, writes, “Certainly, in matters of isur (things forbidden in the Torah), one witness is enough, for surely, unless we have reason to suspect that a specific person is lying, we trust him. For if not, people will never eat at their friend’s table, or even trust the members of their own household.”

ith the passage of time, this trustworthiness was lost. As far back as the times of the Gemara, we find that the assumption that people are trusted in matters of Isur ended. In Maseches Sota (48a) it says that when one purchases produce from an am ha’aretz, an unlearned person, and we are therefore uncertain as to whether terumah and maaser were separated, the buyer must separate maaser. In other words, it was researched and discovered that although people were being told that terumah and maaser had been separated, in reality they had not been, and therefore it must now be done.

Tosfos says that this is not only logical, but we find it clearly in halacha: with regards to whether a woman has the status of a nidah, the posuk says (Vayikra 15:28), “She counts (the days) for herself,” meaning that we trust the woman herself to say whether

In Maseches Avodah Zarah (39b) we find something similar: In Suria (Syria) you are not allowed to buy wine, fish stew, Salkondaris salt, chiltis (the sharp-tasting fruit of a certain plant), or cheese from someone who is not a Talmid Chacham and established w w w.f leishigs.com


expert in the dinim of kashrus. There is a machlokes whether this prohibition applies only to Suria or to other places as well, and Rambam rules that it applies equally everywhere. In Hilchos Ma’achalos Asuros (11,25) he writes, “When Eretz Yisroel was ruled by Yidden, you could buy wine from anyone in Eretz Yisroel, but outside of Eretz Yisroel it must be from a mumcha (an expert). Nowadays, no matter where you are, you can only buy from a mumcha. So we see that the trust and the concept of “eid echad neeman b’isurin” is gone. Since there are so many details and dinim with regard to the kashrus of food, we now must rely solely on those who are established mumchim, established experts. The Netziv, in his shaalos u’tshuvos Maishiv Davar, (Chelek Bais Siman 7), says that the chachomim differentiate between something served in private and something sold publicly. When it is something sold or served publicly, you need to be more strict.

Who Do We Trust?

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n Shulchan Aruch, Siman 111, the Rema says that today, to trust a person regarding kashrus, it isn’t enough that he is not suspect, but more than that, we must be able to say about him that he is muchzak be’kashrus. If not, you cannot buy any food from him, not even wine. (He adds wine, whose isur is only m’drabanan, to stress how serious this matter is). The Aruch Hashulchan gets even more specific. He says, how can you tell if someone is to be trusted? You need to be certain that he davens three times a day, that he puts on tefillin, and that he washes his

hands before eating. The Alter Rebbe, in Hilchos Shechitah (1,2) writes, “You must research this person (serving food) to see if he is kosher person, if he has yiras shomayim, and see that he can learn on his own, so that he knows by himself what is kosher and what is not.” Like the Mishnah says, “Ein boor yirei chet,” an unlearned person cannot have proper yiras shomayim. Nowadays, since we are not going into people’s homes to check on them and see how they behave, we rely on kashrus organizations to tell us who is to be trusted.

Why Can’t We Just Be More Trusting?

Why do we need a mashgiach even when the food is provided by someone who knows the halachos?

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he Alter Rebbe writes that we are machmir (stringent) and insist on a separate mashgiach because when nobody else is around, and you are the only one who knows the truth, you may be tempted to lie or sneak something that is not kosher into the food. However, when there is someone else who knows, you would be afraid to lie.

In conclusion, there was a time when kashrus was simpler and people were assumed to be trustworthy, but today, kashrus and food production has become very complex and people are not assumed to be trusted, and that’s why we have a mashgiach.

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ashrus, especially today, is so complex and involved, that even someone who in general would be trusted, cannot be expected to know the intricacies of kashrus and cannot be relied on. Take vegetarian or vegan food as an example. There are many who believe that if a food is marketed as vegetarian it must be kosher. However, even though it is vegetarian, it might contain milk or cheese, which is a kashrus problem! It might be cooked by a non-Jew, which is a problem. It might have bugs if the vegetables have not been thoroughly checked; it might have oils or fats, which is a kashrus problem; and it might contain non-kosher fish. Without a trusted mashgiach, these concerns may very likely be overlooked. This, says the Radvaz, is why you need a mashgiach, at home and at the company.

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By Rochie Pinson

PLANNING A DREAM: It’s June 2018 and I fulfill a long time dream and book tickets to Florence, Italy. The kids are all in camp and it’s the perfect time to get away. My dreams of Florence and the Tuscany region were always about the history and architecture, the museums and the art, and of course, outside of Florence itself, the gorgeous landscapes. Obviously, as a kosher traveler, I never even assumed that I would get to experience the food of the region…but I am in for a surprise.

STEP 1: GOOGLE Google search #1: Top 10 things to do in Tuscany. Visiting a winery in the famous Chianti region comes up on every list. So Google search #2: Kosher winery in Tuscany. I have to admit, I don’t have high hopes for this result. I have done a fair amount of traveling in remote (Jewishly remote that is) places, and while there are more and more kosher options these days—schnitzel and hummus are everywhere!— finding authentic local experiences that are also kosher is almost unheard of. But that’s where I am wrong! My search turns up Cantina Giuliano on the first try. I’m floored. A fully kosher winery and restaurant in Tuscany... only an hour drive from Florence, and half an hour from smaller, but also notable locations, like Pisa and Livorno. At first I check it out halfheartedly, not believing it could be both a real Tuscan experience and also really kosher, only to start getting really excited as I realize that this is the real thing, the fantasy of every kosher traveler. I send an email to Eli and Lara Gauthier, owners of Cantina Giuliano, and a friendship is born!

Rochie Pinson is a rebbetzin and shlucha in downtown Brooklyn.She is also a mother, artist and author of “the world’s most gorgeous and comprehensive challah cookbook” Rising! The Book of Challah. (Feldheim, 2017). You can follow her—and her challah journey—through her website at www.therisinglife.net and on instagram @rochiepinson. FEBRUARY 2019

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STEP 2: ELI GAUTHIER

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li gets back to me immediately to verify the kashrus (see below) and answers all my annoying touristy questions in the most friendly and patient way. He helps us find a beautiful place to stay nearby for a night and recommends activities in the winery and in the region. Some of these include pasta making classes with Lara (yes, please!), a tour of the winery with a tasting (yes again!), and truffle hunting in the nearby forest with an authentic Tuscan truffle farmer (how could I say no to that?!). There are so many more options but our busy itinerary only gives us a day in the area, so I have to settle for whatever we could fit into a day. (sidebar, page 93, for a sample Tuscany itinerary, based on my trip.)

THE VISIT:

After a full day in Cinque Terre, we drive down the winding roads into Casciana Alta, arriving in the village at sunset. It is like stepping into a postcard. Nestled amongst the iconic rolling hills, sun soaked stucco villas, and rows of elegant cypress trees of Tuscany, the sun is just setting over the hills as we drive up to Cantina Giuliano. We enter into the nondescript crumbling stone house and in true Italian style, we are welcomed like family.

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THE FOOD AT CANTINA GIULIANO:

The Gauthiers see this as a unique opportunity for kosher travelers to experience the authentic cuisine of the region in a kosher way. Lara says she cooks the food the way her mother and grandmother cooked for their family. Everything is made from scratch, including the olive oil, butter, cheeses, jams, and bread! They offer a prix fixe menu, with 50 or 30 euro per diner options, featuring seasonal and locally grown produce. The night we arrive we start off with a table full of antipasti, such as olives and pickled vegetables, Lara's incredible crusty homemade bread, and a generous pour of the house wine, which is incredible. Next comes a selection of cheeses made by Lara, including authentic sheep Pecorino served with her homemade strawberry preserve. So, so good. Next up, homemade ravioli with fresh seasonal summer squash. We wrap up with the hot peach cobbler. Everything is so fresh, seasonal and simply delicious. It is exactly what I was dreaming of, a true Italian culinary experience. When I tell Lara how grateful I am to have such an authentically Italian meal, she laughs. “I keep getting requests for chummus!” The kosher traveler is so unused to getting authentic cuisine of the region that requests for chummus, Diet Coke, and ketchup abound. But Lara and Eli are passionate about their mission to provide simple, authentic Tuscan cuisine and wine to the kosher consumer, and good-humoredly shake off complaints of the lack of American condiments and drinks. “When in Italy, eat like the Italians,” they say. I couldn’t agree more. Unlike the uncomfortably full and bloated feeling we are used to after a big dairy meal in a restaurant, we leave to our villa feeling simply full and satisfied.

IT IS EXACTLY WHAT I WAS DREAMING OF: A TRUE ITALIAN CULINARY EXPERIENCE.

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The interior of the restaurant, with the original olive oil press intact.

THE STORY OF CANTINA GIULIANO:

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n person, Lara has a quiet and sweet demeanor, with a smile always at the ready, but you sense a solid strength behind her gentleness. She works with a quiet efficiency, and never seems to break a sweat, even as the dinner hour grows late, guests are being seated, and the food is being made quite literally on the spot. In the middle of our dinner, a friendly neighbor from the village walks in to offer Lara a crate of overripe peaches from her garden, and less than an hour later there is hot, buttery peach cobbler being served for dessert. Eli is the ebullience to Lara’s reserve, making friends with all the guests, pouring wine (and more wine) and telling their story to the newcomers over and over again. Everybody who walks in is intrigued. Lara and Eli are both the real deal as a frum couple, and yet also unmistakably Italian and French, respectively, and seem completely at home in this remote village. Lara explains patiently again and again throughout the evening to the many curious guests that yes, she grew up in this very village, yes, that is her mom running after her little boy, and this winery and restaurant is part of the land that her grandfather, Giuliano, once tended for the local landowner. Over dessert, as things are winding down, I finally have a chance to speak with them both and hear a little more of their fascinating story. Of course, I ask them how they met… he’s from Strasbourg, France, and she’s from a little village in Tuscany. They tell me that they crossed paths while both studying in college in London, but they parted as just friends and each went their own way. Lara moved to Israel and found her way to Torah and mitzvos, while Eli followed a similar journey in London. He eventually became a full Baal Teshuva and moved to Jerusalem, just one block from where Lara was already living!

They reconnected and eventually got married. They made their home in Eli’s hometown of Strasbourg, France, while they both pursued the careers that they had earned degrees in, and traveled back to visit Lara’s family in Tuscany whenever they could. Eli and Lara were always passionate about food and wine, and Eli was fascinated by the winemaking that was in Lara’s family history. Eli decided to leave his original career path, earn a degree in winemaking, and pursue his passion full-time in France. Whenever they visited Tuscany, Eli was always disappointed that there was no good kosher wine made in the region. Eventually, he decided to take matters into his own hands and start his own winery in the very same building that Lara’s grandfather had once used to make his own wine and olive oil. They decided to move to Casciana Alta every spring and summer to make wine. Cantina Giuliano, named for Lara’s grandfather, opened in 2014 and kicked off with the production of 12,000 bottles of superb Chianti. And how did the restaurant come to be? Eli laughs, “It all happens very organically with us.” They didn’t plan for it, but when you are open to all possibilities, anything can happen! Eli started offering wine tastings to kosher travelers, who would want to know if once they had traveled all the way to the winery, there was something to eat with the wine. So Lara got in the kitchen and started cooking. The restaurant started off in the small brick room off the wine production area and expanded from there, opening to include a beautiful outdoor eating area as well. Now Lara and Eli move to Tuscany each year from Pesach until Sukkot (approximately) and run the winery and restaurant as their full time job. FEBRUARY 2019

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The truffle hunter and his trained dog discovering black truffles.

TRUFFLE HUNTING:

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e awake the next morning to a bird -chirping symphony in this picture perfect setting and head just five minutes down the windy road to Cantina Giuliano for breakfast, Eli and Lara style. Lara looks fresh and rested. I would never guess that when we left the restaurant late the night before, she was still sitting with the chef going over the menus for the following day. Fresh eggs and butter are served alongside a fresh loaf of Lara’s bread, along with plenty of other treats. A minyan is underway, made up of travelers from everywhere who came together in this magical location. The day unfolds like a dream. After a perfect breakfast, I head off to the address Eli provided me with and meet with Matteo, a truffle hunter and as authentic an Italian character as one could wish for. Matteo chooses his hunting dog for the day, a scruffy beagle he calls Miro. He laughs when I ask him about using pigs to find truffles. “That’s a myth,” he tells me, “dogs are much better!” He trains his practically from birth. Off we go into the neighboring forest of oak trees, where the magical and elusive truffles are hiding deep under the twisted roots, equipped with nothing more than a stick and Miro’s golden nose. The process of finding these prized black truffles is intense and fascinating. The truffle hunter and his dog work in wordless synchrony, and within an hour we have four beautifully sized black truffles that smell like nothing else on this earth. Matteo packs them in a jar for me with dry rice kernels to absorb any moisture, and warns me to use them within the next 7-10 days, because they won’t last longer than that. With his warnings in mind, I cradle these delicate and delicious treasures and head back to Cantina Giuliano for lunch.

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THE TRUFFLE BOUNTY:

I proudly present my morning's pickings to Lara and she claps her hands with excitement at my bounty and calls over her chef to show him my black gold. They both exclaim that they will make me the most perfect dish for lunch. They are not kidding. The simple dish they serve me of pasta, Parmesan, and fresh-fromthe-earth truffles is quite easily the most delicious meal I have ever eaten.

Zucchini Flowers

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WINE TOUR:

Fresh truffle pasta dish

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he day continues with a tour of the winery and a tasting of all of Eli’s varietals. His wine is superb, even to a non-connoisseur like me. By the time we’re done I am pleasantly buzzed. I go back to my villa for an afternoon nap, and set my alarm so I don’t miss the next activity of the day, a pasta making class with Lara.

Rochie holding prized, freshly foraged truffles.

THE PROCESS OF FINDING THESE PRIZED BLACK TRUFFLES IS INTENSE AND FASCINATING.

GE GUEST EDITOR

KOSHER GURU ON TRAVEL TO TUSCANY

My greatest memory of my trip to Tuscany was meeting Eli & Leah. Walking over to the farm, Eli picks fresh produce and milks sheep for the cheese while his wife Leah is rolling fresh pasta which is served with their homemade olive oil. The experience of this couple cooking farm to table, fully kosher, in the middle of Tuscany, is the ultimate food adventure.

PASTA WORKSHOP:

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ara does not disappoint. She tells our little group that we are going to make ravioli, which we will be eating for dinner soon. Although I’m known as the “challah lady” and spend a large amount of time elbow deep in dough, the concept of making my own pasta dough is completely novel to me! I am pleasantly surprised to discover that the process couldn’t be simpler, and soon I am in my happy place, working a ball of tough dough into pliability. We leave the dough to rest and Lara grabs a pair of shears and leads us out the back of the restaurant, through the little parking area, and into a magical little garden. As city people, we are amazed to see so much life thriving in this small plot of land. It’s fascinating to see these vegetables we take for granted, like the humble zucchini and eggplant, grow from these gorgeous flowers. Lara announces that we will be picking zucchini for our ravioli. We each take a turn with the shears to pick a few ripe and fragrant little zucchinis.

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EATING MY OWN DELICATE RAVIOLI, IS ANOTHER REVELATION IN CLEAN, AUTHENTIC ITALIAN CUISINE.

Yes, I’m talking about zucchinis and yes, I said fragrant. These zucchinis are unlike any I have seen or tasted in my life. We take them back to the kitchen, wash and chop them, and watch as Lara tosses them in a pan with some fresh olive oil, crushed garlic, and some fresh herbs she just picked in the garden. Within five minutes, these garden picked beauties are blended into a fragrant and bright green filling, and stuffed into a piping bag. Time to shape and fill the ravioli! This type of cooking is so satisfying and real, I feel like I could happily spend days in the kitchen if this is what it could be like! Dinner that night, eating my own delicate ravioli, is another revelation in

clean, authentic Italian cuisine. At the end of the evening, it is so hard to leave Lara and Eli and their little idyllic spot on Earth. We exchange lots of hugs, as well as our phone numbers, and of course, I leave Lara with a copy of Rising, which she promptly displays with her other favorite cookbooks in the restaurant. We leave with arms full of their homemade treats, including preserves, limoncello, a bottle of wine, and our hearts full of new memories and friendship. Driving out of the village with the sun setting behind us, I crane my neck to get a last glimpse of this piece of heaven in Tuscany, and start counting down the days until my return.

ENDNOTE: Lara and Eli Gauthier will be running a Pesach program in a nearby village for their second year. For more information please visit www.cantinagiuliano.com. They are also planning to expand their offering this season to include a fleishig menu on Mondays and Wednesdays, and for Shabbos as well. Please check their website as the summer season draws closer to confirm details. They also have recommended places to stay in the area, and a list of available seasonal activities. 92

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5 DAYS IN TUSCANY:

A SAMPLE ITINERARY DAY ONE Arrive in Florence on Sunday evening. Rent car at airport, settle into hotel. Suggested Hotel: Hotel Regency Piazza M. D’Azeglio, 3, Florence, FI, 50121 Italy Great location, a block from the old synagogue, the Chabad House, and the kosher restaurant. There is also a grocery store down the block that has lots of kosher items, including some Chalav Yisrael cheeses and Italian salamis! The rooms are small but luxurious. There is a beautiful outdoor eating area where we brought our own food in the morning to enjoy breakfast outdoors. Head down the block to Ruth’s for dinner. (Be sure to make reservations for all your meals there, they get very packed in the summer.) They don’t open until noon, so don’t count on it for breakfast! Ruth’s is certified

Chalav Yisroel and Pas Yisroel, and everything is delicious and fresh. Buy some extra pitas from Ruth’s, and head around the corner to the grocery store to pick up some kosher salami and condiments for the following day’s trip. Put food away into the hotel room fridge and head over to the Westin Excelsior for drinks on the rooftop with the most magnificent view of Florence at night.

more, see https://www. wheremilan.com/events/ palio-siena-tuscanyjuly-2018/ Livorno has plenty of rich Jewish history, and of course, Pisa is home to the famous leaning tower! Wherever you go, there are fascinating things to see and do.

Palazzo Vecchio I found it less impressive than the Pitti Palace, but I’ve been told that with a guided tour it’s fascinating.

They’ll pack it up beautifully so you can have a ready made lunch for Cinque Terre, where there is no kosher food to be had.

Uffizi Gallery A must for art lovers.

Cinque Terre is a must see, and is a group of five iconic coastal Italian villages. Filled with preserved architecture and charm, these villages evoke a peaceful feeling that the outside world doesn’t exist.

Ponte Vecchio The oldest and most famous of Florence’s covered walking bridges.

Spend the day in Cinque Terre, then drive to Casciana Alta.

DAY TWO

There is an extensive article about Cinque Terre on www.lonelyplanet.com that is a wonderful resource.

Monday - Tour Siena and nearby towns Note: All of the museums in Florence are closed on Mondays, so this is a good day to head out to one of the smaller cities around Tuscany for some touring. Some options are: Pisa, Livorno, Lucca, or Siena. We headed to Siena to catch the oncea-year event, the Palio, which is the highlight of their year. To find out

DAY THREE Tour Florence Florence is an easily walkable city. Just grab a map from the hotel’s front desk and ask them to circle the main points of interest. Here are some of the must-see stops in Florence! Even if you only get to some of them, you will still have an amazing day.

Piazza Del Duomo Even though we don’t visit the churches, this square, named after the church it surrounds, is much more than just that, it has some some great shopping and sights to see.

DAY FIVE Casciana Alta, Cantina Giuliano The one and only kosher winery. See above feature.

Piazzale Michelangelo Make sure to come in time to watch the sun set over Florence!

Great Synagogue of Florence Right next door to the kosher restaurant

DAY FOUR

Palazzo Pitti and adjoining Boboli gardens

When you go for dinner at Ruth’s, order some extra food for lunch.

Cinque Terre and Casciana Alta

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RISOTTO: THE TECHNIQUE Almost all risotti are made with the same basic procedure, with minor variations: 1. Begin by making a good vegetable stock (or chicken stock for a fleishig risotto) with onion, celery, tomato, and carrot. 2. Mince a small volume of onion and whichever herbs the recipe calls for. 3. Saute the mixture in abundant olive oil or butter, until the onion is cooked. 4. Stir in the rice and saute until it becomes translucent (7-10 minutes), stirring constantly to keep it from sticking.

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5. Stir in some wine and let evaporate completely. 6. Add a ladle of simmering broth; once almost all the stock is absorbed, stir in the next ladleful. 7. Continue cooking, stirring, and adding broth as the rice absorbs it, until rice barely reaches the al dente stage. 8. Stir in butter and grated cheese (if using), cover risotto, and turn off the flame. Let sit, covered, for 2-3 minutes, and serve.

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recipe WILD ASPARAGUS RISOTTO This dish is traditionally made in the spring when the Asparagus (acutifolius) grows in huge amounts in the forests around our town. The risotto is typically made with chicken stock and toasted bacon - a remarkable combination. If you can’t get wild asparagus, the regular variety will also work fine; just try to choose thinner, very fresh asparagus spears. If using thicker asparagus, you may want to slice the tips in half lengthwise. SERVES 4 1 (6-ounce) package beef or duck bacon 2 cloves garlic, crushed 1 small onion or shallot 1 bunch of wild asparagus, or thin asparagus, chopped into two inch chunks 1 ½ cups Italian risotto rice, such as Carnaroli, Arborio or Vialone Nano ½ cup dry white wine 4 cups warm vegetable or chicken stock Salt Freshly ground pepper Place bacon slices in cold pan. Turn heat to medium and cook for five minutes, until bacon crisps up and fat is rendered out. Remove bacon, leaving rendered fat in the pan. Lower the heat, add onion, and saute for 3-4 minutes, until translucent. Add garlic and asparagus and cook an additional two minutes. Remove a few asparagus tips (reserve for garnish) and add rice, stirring until translucent but not browned. Pour in wine and let

it bubble until it evaporates completely. Start adding warm stock one ladle at a time, and stir until risotto is ready. Rice should be tender but still have a slight firmness to the grain; about 25-30 minutes. Allow to settle for 2-3 minutes before serving. Serve with bacon and reserved asparagus tips.

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Ravioli 3 Ways FRESH EGG DOUGH SPRING ARTICHOKE RAVIOLI

3 ½ cups all-purpose flour 4 eggs 1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil

TIPS

Put flour in a bowl or on a board and make a well in the center. Crack eggs in the well, add olive oil, and use a fork to start breaking the eggs and mixing into the flour. Continue drawing in the flour until you get a thick mass. Start kneading with your hand by pressing the heel of your hand into the ball of dough, pushing forward and down. Fold the dough over and repeat the movement. Knead until the dough no longer looks powdery—it should have a smooth, elastic texture, similar to a firm ball of Play-Doh. If your dough feels wet and tacky, add more flour as necessary. Once dough is done, wrap tightly in clingfilm and let rest at room temperature for 30 minutes.

THE EXCESS PASTA DOUGH OR FILLING CAN BE EASILY REFRIGERATED OR FROZEN.

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with Lemon Sauce and Bottarga

After dough has rested, dust some flour on the counter. Unwrap dough and cut into 4 pieces. If rolling the dough with a rolling pin, always roll away from you, starting in the center and rolling only the half that is farthest from you. Then lift the sheet on your rolling pin and rotate it by 45 degrees. Work as fast as you can to make sure you finish before the dough starts drying and becomes unmanageable. The sheet of dough should be thin enough to see your fingers through it. Use a cutter to cut dough immediately and stuff with your favorite filling.

This is the first ravioli dish of the season, since artichoke is the king of the spring garden. We serve it with grated bottarga, which is cured fish roe that is widely used in Italian but also in Sephardic cuisine. For the filling: 1 (10-ounce) bag fresh or frozen artichoke hearts 1 tablespoon olive oil 4 cloves garlic 1 egg Salt Black pepper For the sauce: 2 tablespoons olive oil (or butter, for dairy meals) Zest of 2 lemons Pinch of salt Small piece of bottarga, to garnish Start by preparing the filling. In a pan, heat olive oil with garlic. Add artichokes and cook until tender. Remove garlic and puree with a blender. Add egg and season to taste. Fill piping bag with filling and pipe a small amount on each pre-cut piece of dough. Seal and reserve. Bring a large pot of salted water to boil. Drop in the ravioli and cook for 4-5 minutes. While pasta is cooking, make your sauce. Heat olive oil with lemon zest in a saucepan, then add two full ladles of pasta cooking liquid. Season with salt and let simmer until the pasta is cooked, then remove ravioli from water with a skimmer and add them to sauce. Let liquid reduce until it forms a thicker sauce that coats the pasta. Serve with grated bottarga. Using fresh artichokes? Pull off the outer leaves, cut the stem, and trim the prickly top. Cut in half and remove the furry choke, then roughly chop. Follow with filling instructions above. w w w.f leishigs.com


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FALL PUMPKIN RAVIOLI with Toasted Nuts and Candied Orange Zest This is the summer version of our ravioli dish. The smaller the zucchini, the better, since bigger ones give a lot of water while cooking and result in a soggy sauce that can wet the pasta dough too much. We garnish the plates with a typical Tuscan herb called nepitella that grows that grows wild in the region, but if you don’t have that on hand you can replace it with thyme. (see recipe on next page)

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FALL PUMPKIN RAVIOLI with Toasted Nuts and Candied Orange Zest For the candied orange zests: 5 organic oranges

SUMMER ZUCCHINI RAVIOLI with Lemon and Herbs For the filling: 2 tablespoons olive oil 4 cloves garlic 4 cups baby zucchini, the smallest that you can find, chopped 1 egg ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon black pepper For the sauce: 2 tablespoons olive oil (or butter, for dairy meals) Zest of 2 lemons Pinch of salt Fresh aromatic herbs Start by preparing the filling. Heat olive oil and garlic, then add zucchini and saute until soft. Remove garlic and puree with a blender. Add egg and season with salt and pepper. After pureeing, let drain in a colander if soggy. Fill piping bag with filling and pipe a small amount on each pre-cut piece of dough. Seal and reserve. Bring a large pot of salted water to boil. Drop in the ravioli and cook for 4-5 minutes. While pasta is cooking, make your sauce. Heat olive oil with lemon zest in a saucepan, then add two full ladles of pasta cooking liquid. Season with salt and let simmer until the pasta is cooked, then remove ravioli from water with a skimmer and add them to sauce. Let liquid reduce until it forms a thicker sauce that coats the pasta. Serve with fresh herbs.

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For the filling: 1 ½ cups canned pumpkin puree 1 tablespoon olive oil Salt Black pepper 1 egg 2 tablespoons grated Parmesan, optional, for dairy meals For the sauce: 2 tablespoons olive oil (or butter, for dairy meals) 2 tablespoons candied orange zests Pinch of salt 3 tablespoons toasted sliced almonds or pine nuts Freshly ground black pepper Start by preparing the candied orange zests. Peel oranges with a knife, avoiding the white pith. Cut peels into thin long stripes, just under ¼” wide. This can be easily done straight from the orange

by using a zester, the top of which is perforated with a row of round holes with sharpened rims. Blanch the zests in boiling water, three times, changing the water each time to remove excess bitterness. Squeeze the oranges and put the zests back into the pot with the orange juice. Let the juice boil out fast enough to candy the zests without them getting too soft, about 5 minutes. Reserve. Puree pumpkin with olive oil, salt and pepper in a blender (with Parmesan, if desired) and season to taste. Fill piping bag with filling and pipe a small amount on each pre-cut piece of dough. Seal and reserve. Bring a large pot of salted water to boil. Drop in the ravioli and cook for 4-5 minutes. While pasta is cooking, make the sauce. Heat olive oil with candied zest in a saucepan, then add two full ladles of pasta cooking liquid. Season with salt and let simmer until the pasta is cooked, then remove ravioli from water with a skimmer and add them to sauce. Let liquid reduce until it forms a thicker sauce that coats the pasta. Serve with almond flakes and some freshly ground black pepper.

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EVERYDAY SECRET RESTAURANT RECIPES From Your Favorite Kosher Cafes, Take-outs and Restaurants

T

he second book in the kosher restaurant series and fifth cookbook of the dynamic duo Leah Schapira & Victoria Dwek, Everyday Secret Restaurant Recipes delivers on its title’s promise of sharing approachable, easy-enough-to-replicate restaurant recipes. While printed and released in 2015, this 3-year old cookbook reflects this issue’s restaurant theme, but even more, showcases an insight into food trends by its authors. Literally speaking, in the beginning chapters of the book, Leah and Victoria share a list of food trends which are pretty much on target with a lot of what is still happening today. Some of the trends include; burgers, artisanal bread, coffeehouses, small plates, Crown Heights and ethnic cuisine. We are not sure what that says about the growth of the kosher restaurant scene, but it definitely indicates a high interest level in this book. Additionally, many popular dishes, like whole roasted eggplant, roasted chickpeas, and buffalo cauliflower (thus predicting the trend of using cauliflower in creative ways), are undoubtedly cooking techniques and trends that are being celebrated today. The book begins with the basics. Basic sauces and condiments, tools, and kitchenware plus tips and tricks on smoking at home. It then transitions into dividing the 100

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100+ recipes into chapters based on meal type. Starters and sides include goodies like Mediterranean Eggplant from Mozart Cafe in South Florida, Izzy’s Smokehouse (Crown Heights) smoked hot wings, and maple chickpeas from the now defunct Ditmas (Los Angeles). Some sandwiches that are drool worthy include Boeuf and Bun’s (Crown Heights) morning scramble and Holy Schnitzel’s (multiple locations) Cali love panini. The meat, fish, and brunch & lunch chapters are filled with enough recipes to give you weeks’ worth of food inspiration. Even Zak the Baker makes an appearance with two decadent pastries.

CHURROS

COOKBOOK REVIEW

After Chef Daniel Rivera’s Bourbon BBQ Ribs were one of the most popular recipes in Secret Restaurant Recipes, we returned for another gem. These churros were the most requested recipe we were asked to include in our second edition. “What is the secret to that delicious dipping sauce?” people asked. We learned that little secret, and once again, it became clear why diners forgo Manhattan, with a restaurant of T Fusion’s caliber right in the neighborhood.

This book is great for cooks who enjoy trying new techniques and dishes. It is also interesting to read about so many different restaurants, and that storyline differentiates this book from many other cookbooks on the market. Another point of interest? Reading about now closed restaurants like Chagall Bistro (Park Slope, Brooklyn) and Ditmas (Los Angeles) is intriguing and provides these wonderful establishments a legacy of sorts to remember them by. The 336 page book includes 100+ recipes each with its own full page, full color photo and a clear, easy-to-follow index. This book definitely brings restaurant experience to your kitchen.

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Yield  10 churros

Strawberry-Ginger Coulis: 1 pint strawberries, hulled ½ cup sugar ¼ cup water 1-inch chunk ginger, peeled

In a saucepan, combine margarine, sugar, salt, and water. Bring to a boil, allowing the margarine to melt. Add in flour all at once; mix with a wooden spoon to form a ball of dough. Remove from heat; transfer dough to bowl of an electric mixer. With the mixer running on low speed, add eggs, one at a time, until eggs are fully incorporated. Heat oil in a deep fryer to 350ºF. Add batter to a piping bag fitted with a 1mm tip. Pipe into

hot oil. Using a knife, cut batter at about every 4 inches, allowing strip to drop into oil. Repeat, frying in batches of 4 churros until golden, about 4 minutes. Prepare the strawberry-ginger coulis. Combine strawberries, sugar, and water in a saucepan. Bring to a boil; lower heat and simmer until strawberries are soft. Purée. Use a microplane, zest the fresh ginger to extract the liquid (about 1 teaspoon). Add liquid to the purée to taste. Serve alongside churros.

TIPS

2 sticks (1 cup) margarine 2½ tablespoons sugar 1¼ tablespoons salt 2½ cups water 2½ cups flour 5 eggs Oil, for frying

CHEFS TIPS: “I find that ginger often has different strengths. That’s why I add ginger liquid to taste, and not a specific amount, until the coulis is perfectly balanced.” Don’t waste any extra ginger you may be left with. Zest the whole piece of ginger and freeze in an in a clean, empty frozen-herb cube tray.


INTERVIEW

Can you tell us a bit about how your media company, Great Kosher Restaurants, began?

Elan 102

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I started my own marketing company in Brooklyn College. I used to get ads from local stores around the college and make a school planner and sell it to the bookstores. After college, I started working in a media company, selling commercial time for TV and radio stations. After that, I went on to start a full-color, glossy restaurant magazine, called Great Kosher Restaurants International, when I saw there was nothing like that in the kosher market. It’s a coffee table book about all the beautiful restaurants we have around the world with pictures, menus, and articles. I wanted to show that kosher can be cool, and we should be proud of it.

How has your brand evolved? Back when I started 15 years ago, I always had a full website directory with lots of info and a newsletter to tens of thousands of people. But with the food network and advance of social media, I saw that the marketing industry was going in a much more interactive, visual direction. So while we already had our own Facebook page, when I started my Great Kosher Restaurant Foodies Group, it changed everything and has revolutionized the kosher restaurant information industry. No longer was I just putting out information, now we had a group and platform where thousands of people can interact with each other, share their experiences, ask questions, and recommend their favorite spots. A kosher foodie community was born and it took off. So I phased out the magazine, which was very time-consuming and expensive, and focused my efforts on my website, Facebook, Instagram, and newsletter, and now an app as well.

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What are some of the most memorable dishes you’ve eaten? Maybe the first time I had Izzy’s BBQ brisket, or the first Halachic Dinner. But I’ve eaten in over 1000 restaurants, so it’s hard to put down a few. Maybe I’ll get back to you on that.

Any advice for someone who wants to go into the restaurant business? Don’t do it :) Half kidding. It is one of the most stressful, difficult, time consuming, overwhelming, thankless professions where most people don’t survive. But it’s also one of the most rewarding, fun, satisfying, challenging jobs and if you make it, there is nothing better. Best advice is to do as much research as possible before you make a decision and decide to take a place. Have enough capital, have a good understanding of what you’re doing, serving, and offering. Take a mentor or professional consultant to help guide you. Try to offer something different. And get this guy Elan Kornblum, The Restaurant Guy, to help market your restaurant :)

Do you ever go out to eat incognito? Only when owner is not around. If he is, I usually schmooze and talk with them. Usually I talk, then eat, then talk some more with them. I find out about the restaurant, see how things are doing, talk shop. I like to talk to them. If my wife and kids are with me, they don’t like it as much. They just want to go home.

Tips on eating out: Go in with a positive attitude. You’re there to enjoy and talk to those who you’re with. Don’t go in rushed and in a bad mood. Be patient, talk to your tablemates, say thank you to your waiters. Say something there if you’re not happy or have a question. Always speak up so they can fix something. But be adventurous, try new places, try new dishes. You may be surprised that you like more than you think.

Favorite home-cooked meal: Slop, a childhood dish. Ground beef, mashed potatoes, mashed carrots, sautéed onions with ketchup. I don’t eat fancy at home because I eat out so much.

What is the hardest thing about owning a restaurant?

What’s missing in the kosher market?

The hours, being away from your family, getting good staff to help you, not knowing everything about the industry, the everyday life struggles. Chef doesn’t show up, waiter quits, AC breaks, trying to make a profit on slim margins, being closed 100 days out of the year, rent goes up, the list goes on and on.

More ethnic restaurants. Indian, Spanish, Ethiopian, Thai, Korean. Owners are scared, it’s a big risk if people don’t like it. It’s also harder to get authentic chefs. It’s easier to go with safer choices like sushi and steakhouse, dairy cafe, or Israeli schwarma-falafel place. I’d love to see kosher versions of non-kosher places like IHOP, Chipotle, or White Castle. Bring back Kosher Delight.

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Most Memorable Stories: Wow, so many. The time my sister went on a date with a guy. She asked him how he heard about the restaurant. He said he called the Restaurant Guy. The time I was able to help get an early reservation for a family whose son has autism. The mother ended up writing a beautiful post in our Facebook group which started the conversation about special needs kids at restaurants. The story got picked up by TV and newspapers and we started the FoodieFoward initiative, where restaurants started doing events for the less fortunate. I got a request to post about a funeral where the niftar didn’t have a minyan. We got hundreds of people there and I started a Facebook group called Jewish Funeral & Shiva Volunteers so no one should be buried or mourn without a minyan. To this day, we’ve helped numerous people. The time another patron paid for the meal of a couple who was about to go on their honeymoon.

Other Kosher Restaurant Sources:

Follow:

1. www.yeahthatskosher.com Founded by Dani Klein in 2008 after an extended trip through Northern Europe, YeahThatsKosher.com is a blog aiding the kosher traveler. Dani's posts are designed to assist Jewish travelers with unique travel tips & advice as well as personal Kosher restaurant recommendations as they traverse the globe. For more info, follow Dani on Instagram @yeahthatskosher.

Facebook: Great Kosher Restaurants Foodies Instagram: @GreatKosherRestaurants Our website: www.GreatKosher Restaurants.com or www.gkrm.net for short and subscribe to our newsletter. Download the Great Kosher Restaurants app

2. www.kosherrestaurantsgps.com Kosher Restaurants GPS now allows you to subscribe to a database containing over 1,000 kosher restaurants. Additionally, there is a database containing almost 3,000 Orthodox minyanim, a list of mikvah's, and Tefillos Haderech for your GPS device.

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RECIPE INDEX

RECIPES FROM TUSCANY: 95 96 96 98 98

Asparagus Risotto Homemade Ravioli Dough Artichoke Ravioli Pumpkin-Orange Ravioli Zucchini Ravioli

MEAT & VEAL: 13 3-Bone Flanken Roast 16 Fancy Boneless Short Ribs 17 Korean Short Ribs 17 Heimish French Onion Flanken 37 Soho’s Mongolian Beef 45 Jeff’s Sliced Steak Sandwich 45 Levy’s Trump burger 63 Tierra Sur’s Veal Carnitas 41 Marani’s Khinkali

CHICKEN: 35 Beverly Hills Thai’s Chicken Pad Thai 48 Mikes Crunchers Hot Poppers 39 Chicken Ramen 43 Wolf & Lamb’s Chicken Salad

FISH: 47 Fish Grill’s Tacos 44 NoiDue Carne’s Salmon Carpaccio

DESSERT & COCKTAILS: 101 T-Fusion’s Churros 42 Tevere 84’s Napoleon 36 Boru Boru’s Tiki Hurricane

CONDIMENTS & EXTRAS: 17 17 17 17 17 48 60 60 39

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Smoked Cherry BBQ Sauce Charred Scallion Relish Balsamic Fig Jam Pickled Chilis Grilled Pineapple Salsa Creamy Ranch Savory Profiteroles Cippolini Onion Jam Tare Marinated Eggs

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A WEEK OF DINNERS  FISH GRILL’S TACOS Follow the recipe but replace with any fish your family likes. It can be made with salmon, halibut or any fish that is great on the grill and can be broiled. You can also use chicken breasts and make chicken tacos following the same technique.

 VEAL SLIDERS Make Chef Gabe Garcia’s veal carnitas and take it up a notch by piling them high onto slider buns slathered in dijon mustard, topped with shredded lettuce and Chef Isaac's pickled chilis.

 LEVY’S TRUMP BURGERS Use leftover challah dough or pizza dough to create these juicy bites. Serve with sliced pickles and Israeli salad on the side.

 CHINESE TAKEOUT The Mongolian beef recipe can be made with any protein you prefer. Dark meat chicken, chicken breasts and even tofu will work.

 FRESH & LIGHT Wolf & Lamb’s chicken salad is a meal in a bowl. To make it more dinner appropriate, serve all ingredients separately on a platter. It looks gorgeous and feels more substantial than a salad preparation.

SHABBAT RESTAURANT INSPIRED FEAST:

Course 1: • Salmon Carpaccio • Wolf & Lamb’s Chicken Salad (leave out the chicken)

Course 2: • Chicken Ramen

Course 3: • Chef Isaac’s Heimish French Onion Flanken • Asparagus Risotto

Dessert: • Tevere 84’s Napoleon

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AD


LIFE

:

A Restaurant

Mashgiach

A

D AY I N

E H T

We spoke with Rabbi Kalman Weinfeld of the OK to find out what a mashgiach actually does and why his responsibilities are so crucial to maintain the kashrut standards in restaurants. A mashgiach is a Jew who supervises the kashrut status of a kosher establishment. In every restaurant certified under OK Kosher there is a clear list and order of roles a mashgiach needs to follow in order to ensure consistency and highest standards of kosher. There are many different kosher certifying agencies who provide kashrut status for restaurants, hotels, caterers and kosher products. The OK is one of the leading kashrut agencies in the world and provides certification for hundreds of restaurants.

ROLE: Unlocks fridges and freezers. WHY? Only the mashgiach has the keys to the to the fridges and freezers which holds crucial proteins like fish, meat, and poultry. The fridges and freezers are locked by the mashgiach at the end of each night of service. This ensures that all food is 100% kosher and not cooked or worked on by non-Jewish cooks and chefs without the Mashgiach’s presence. ROLE: Turns on oven.

WHY? The mashgiach is trained to check and wash produce to ensure that fruits and vegetables are free and clear of bugs, which is a basic standard of kashrut. The OK set up a system where all washed and checked vegetables are placed in plastic containers so all restaurant staff know to only use vegetables from those containers. This can take a few hours but varies based on restaurant. 106

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3:00 p.m. - Closing

WHY? To maintain the concept of bishul yisrael, food cooked by a Jew.

10:00 a.m.

10:30 a.m.

ROLE: Deliveries all have to go out with a kosher symbol.

Check deliveries.

WHY? According to halacha, there is a double process for sending out food for delivery, to ensure kashrus. 1. Kosher tape 2. Invoice to indicate that it is kosher. The reason for this is based on the concept of basar she’mitalem meha'ayin, meat or chicken or fish that did not have the eye of a Jew on it at all times. To ensure that nothing changed in the kashrut standards of the food, two symbols need to be present.

Assist in

11:00 a.m.

WHY? To avoid mistakes of not kosher or non-approved ingredients entering the restaurant. This can happen to anyone with the best of intentions, so the mashgiach oversees all food that enters the restaurant.

ROLE: Wash and check all fruits and vegetables.

2:00 p.m.

WHY? Eggs need to be checked for blood. At this point, depending on the restaurant there are last minute tasks that may need the attention of the mashgiach.

ROLE: Check that stove top fires stay on all day, check deliveries, assist in restaurant service and oversee general kashrut standards.

WHY? Another crucial step to ensure kashrut is enforcing the concept of bishul yisrael, which states that in order for food to be kosher, the fire must be started by a Jew. Kosher food fired by a non-Jew will deem food not kosher and in such cases, all equipment used will need to be kashered, so all steps are taken to avoid this. ROLE: Accepting and signing deliveries and invoices.

ROLE: Check eggs and assist with last minute prep.

11:30 a.m.

ROLE: The general philosophy of the OK regard- restaurant service. ing a restaurant mashgiach is that he works with two open eyes, but does not act like a police officer, and simply provides the restaurant with the tools to succeed in kashrut. At the same time, the mashgiach and chef have an understanding that they don't overlap into each other's roles. There is a viewpoint of positive cooperation. WHY? The Mashgiach needs to cooperate with the staff members of the kitchen and help as needed. The OK does not allow a mashgiach to be dedicated to a specific station and have full time restaurant responsibilities because the mashgiach needs to be available full time for any kashrut questions from customers and oversee general kashrut issues. Rabbi Weinfeld also shares that he has found that when a mashgiach gets involved in helping out in a restaurant it actually enhances his role as he gains a better grasp of the inner workings of the restaurant.

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Profile for Fleishigs Magazine

Fleishigs Magazine Issue 004 - Feb 2019  

The Restaurant Issue!!

Fleishigs Magazine Issue 004 - Feb 2019  

The Restaurant Issue!!