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T&T SHIPBUILDER & REPAIR NEWS ISSUE #036 – SEPTEMBER 2010.

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T&T SHIPBUILDING & REPAIR (S&R) CLUSTER

Diversifying our Economy, one Ship at a time©... Hello S&R Stakeholders, T&T SHIPBUILDER & REPAIR NEWS turns 36

36th

On this 36th Anniversay milestone, we have included in this month’s issue a special Question & Answer feature. We would like to thank our active stakeholders who have made this eNewsletter one of the leading resources in our shipbuilding and repair industry. As always, we do look forward to receiving your valuable comments and advice.

Residents of La Brea and environs visit shipyards and related facilities After several presentations held at La Brea and environs in August, an inaugural tour for the benefit of residents was organized with the assistance of the La Brea Concerned Citizens United (LBCCU) group to visit shipyards and related facilities in northern Trinidad. Special thanks to Caribbean Propellers Limited, Maritime Preservation Ltd., Tracmac Engineering Limited (N&M Group) and the T&T Coast Guard. To see tour photos, please visit Page 18 or our Flickr website: www.flickr.com/photos/ttshipbuildingandrepair/sets/72157624870944403/

Shipbuilding & Repair featured in Government of Trinidad & Tobago Budget The recently read fiscal budget for the Year 2010-11 mentioned various initiatives geared towards further development of the local Shipbuilding and Repair industry. We are pleased that the new government continues to recognize the importance of this sector intended to diversify our economy from the energy sector. To view the 2010-11 Budget document online with Shipbuilding & Repair highlights, please click on our issuu.com website: http://issuu.com/shipbuildingandrepairdocuments/docs/budget_statem ent_2011_highlite Sincerely, T&T Shipbuilding and Repair Cluster.

Wilfred de Gannes. Deputy Leader. Page 2 of 28


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INTERVIEW WITH WILFRED DE GANNES - DEPUTY LEADER / EDITOR Wilfred has been with the T&T Shipbuilding and Repair Cluster, an initiative of the Ministry of Trade and Industry since its inception in 2007. He is also the Editor of the region’s first dedicated Shipbuilding and Repair monthly eNewsletter which reaches a wide ranging audience of some 1,500+ persons locally, regionally and internationally.

What are your views on the recent 2010-11 Budget? Wilfred de Gannes The Budget mentioned various S&R areas including training, free trade zones and tax incentives. It provides a blueprint for the advancement of our industry in Trinidad and Tobago. The Minister of Finance Winston Dookeran was involved in the cruise shipbuilding industry having worked in Helsinki, Finland in 2008. Our new Minister of Trade and Industry was also involved in the service side of our industry. Is lobbying government important for our industry? The business model we operate is the Public-private partnership (PPP) model. Although, our S&R Cluster is an initiative of the Ministry of Trade and Industry, we have to continuously lobby the government for their support with various national initiatives, including our proposed world-class shipyard at La Brea, south western Trinidad and with the recently read Budget. Tell us more about the La Brea shipyard initiative? One of the main assets is the recently built 300m deepwater port which can accommodate Panamaxsized ships. Our New La Brea Vision together with our stakeholders proposes to create some 2,000 unskilled and skilled jobs. It includes the provision of community amenities, including health/cultural centre, gymnasium and a marine museum. Sir Walter Raleigh repaired his wooden ship at La Brea in 1595, exactly 415 years ago.

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T&T SHIPBUILDER & REPAIR NEWS ISSUE #036 – SEPTEMBER 2010.

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What shipbuilding ambitions does S&R have? In Q4 2009 we participated in our first international tender for the ‘Design and Build of Two (2) Harbour Tug boats for the National Energy Corporation of Trinidad and Tobago (NEC).’ There was a learning curve where we developed a “bid platform,” jointly with several of our S&R stakeholder companies and Robert Allan Ltd. Unfortunately, the international tender was recently cancelled, as the two tugs were to be utilized for the former Alutrint port. Nevertheless, we are prepared for future governmental and/or private sector tenders. What newbuilds are you looking at in 2010-11? We are looking at building 13m deep-sea steel fishing vessels, designed by Naval Architect Maurice Napier, Arbroath, Scotland. Recently, our local fishermen have suffered terrible incidents of larceny on the high seas, sometimes resulting in the tragic loss of life and limb. These vessels will allow them to fish for longer periods and will be more economical to operate, than traditional fishing craft. They will be built to plan and construction verified by a leading ship classification society. Has the local media been supportive of S&R? I have a strong deep-rooted feeling that our local media practitioners really like our industry. For them, I believe it is really exciting to visit our shipyards and undertake on-site interviews, etc. Not often do they have this type of physical access. We are highly appreciative of their dedication, professionalism and genuine interest in following this “new” industry. To view some of their work on our industry, please visit our You-Tube website. What part does television play in educating the population about Shipbuilding & Repair in T&T? It provides a convenient, far reaching interactive medium for informing the public at large on the numerous benefits to be derived from our S&R industry. Recently, we have been invited to appear on several television programmes which have gained the attention of the government and public alike.

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One memorable occasion in the last 12 months. Participating in the Commonwealth Business Forum (CBF) on-board the cruise ship “Serenade of the Seas.” Both Yuhanna Yusuf and I had a very hectic time. We were working on the NEC tug tender, viewing the Trinidad Dry Dock CBF presentation which we had arranged, taking care of our UK guest J.J. Hermans of ACI and networking over dinner with our S&R industry acquaintances. Again, I thank our S&R Sponsors, the CBF and eTecK for making this a memorable event. One reason why Trinidad and Tobago needs to diversify its economy from being energy based. An international energy firm, based in Texas, Houston, USA which evaluates oil and gas properties and independently certifies petroleum reserves quantities recently submitted its commissioned report indicating that the level of proven reserves of natural gas in T&T has fallen to detrimental levels. The Government of Trinidad and Tobago has decided that for future economic sustainability and social stability, it is paramount that our gas-based economy be diversified. One thing you do, that you are not supposed to do. I sometimes read the morning newspaper(s) while stuck in traffic. Probably, by the year 2020 they will have a specific statutory law prohibiting the reading of the Apple iPad®, while driving, similar to what has been recently proposed with mobile phones by government. In 2020, we may no longer have only vehicular, but water ferry traffic. Who knows what the future holds for the law and transportation in Trinidad and Tobago?

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WÄRTSILÄ TO SUPPLY A 106 MW FLOATING POWER PLANT TO DR Wärtsilä, a leading global supplier of decentralised power plant solutions, has been awarded a contract to supply equipment on a turnkey basis for a barge-mounted power plant power project for the Dominican Republic. The plant will run on natural gas, and will have an output of 106 MW to be supplied to the national grid. It is scheduled to be operational before the end of 2011. Seaboard Corporation, a US based Fortune 1000 company, has ordered Wärtsilä power generation equipment for a new bargemounted power plant for the country’s capital city, Santo Domingo. The barge will expand Seaboard's existing power generation operations in the Dominican Republic. The scope of supply for the order includes six Wärtsilä 18V50DF dual-fuel engines in combined cycle mode, including heat recovery boilers for each engine, and a complete steam turbine generator system. Computer rendering of 106 MW Wärtsilä Dominican Republic Plant.

In announcing the order, Sampo Suvisaari, General Manager, Power Plants, Central America and the Caribbean, commented: “To be able to supply a combined cycle power plant that fits in a barge 104 meters long and 32 meters wide is not only remarkable, it is almost certainly an industry first. The plant will have an exceptionally high guaranteed efficiency. Our ability to meet these challenging demands, together with our broad experience in gas fuelled operation were clearly key reasons in us being awarded this contract.” Seaboard was the first independent power producer (IPP) to operate in the Dominican Republic. This will be the company’s third and largest power barge project. The previous two floating power plants Estrella Del Norte and Estrella del Mar were also built by Wärtsilä, and equipped with Wärtsilä engines. Wärtsilä has a strong presence in the Dominican Republic with 800 MW of installed power generating equipment in operation. In floating power plants Wärtsilä has extensive experience having a total installed capacity of about 1400 MW on 25 power barges in the Caribbean and in Asia. ******************** Page 7 of 28


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AUSTAL The World’s Largest & Most Efficient Aluminium Shipbuilder Austal is the largest aluminium shipbuilder in the world. When it established a new shipyard in Alabama, USA in 1999, specifically targeting future US Defence requirements, the company knew that it would need to adopt “world’s best practice” shipbuilding methodologies in order to successfully cope with multiple vessel contracts and to meet the very stringent demands of the US Navy. While the training of a highly skilled aluminium workforce continued, senior managers started to consider the future need for a state-of-the-art Module Manufacturing Facility (MMF), to modify the company’s design procedures for greater production efficiency and to adopt best practice manufacturing procedures.

Austal state-of-the-art Module Manufacturing Facility (MMF) located in Mobile, Alabama, USA.

In 2005, facing the challenge of producing multiple orders of large, complex vessels for the U.S. Navy’s transformational fleet programs, Austal USA embarked on a development plan to expand its production capability and improve its productivity and efficiency. Starting with visits to leading shipyards in the U.S., Korea, Australia and Germany, and working with industry experts in shipbuilding and manufacturing, the company worked to combine Austal’s advanced three dimensional design and modular construction processes with a state-of-the-art Module Manufacturing Facility. The result of four years of detailed logistics and ergonomic planning, the MMF is designed to drive production efficiency in aluminium shipbuilding beyond anything previously achieved. Having already purchased 102 acres of suitable land in 2006, construction work began on the new facility’s first phase in July 2008 and was completed by September 2009. The completed MMF houses an 8.5 -acre, fully covered, manufacturing facility with two fully commissioned production lines. The facility is supplemented by a 1.7-acre drive-through warehouse for the

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T&T SHIPBUILDER & REPAIR NEWS ISSUE #036 – SEPTEMBER 2010.

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storage of equipment and materials and parking for over 2,000 employee vehicles in a secure, paved and fenced area. The Phase 1 production lines occupy half of the manufacturing facility and deliver a revolution in aluminium shipbuilding. Where most aluminium shipbuilders utilize a craft-based, keel up vessel construction process, Austal USA uses a three dimensional design process that divides construction into modules which are constructed entirely undercover in the MMF. Uncut metal enters at one end of the production line and modules, approximately 85% complete, emerge at the other end ready to be assembled in one of two large vessel assembly bays. Each module progresses down the production line through work stations where cross-functional trade teams install small components, pipes, heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) ductwork, machinery, electric cables, equipment and outfitting. The key to the new shipbuilding process is keeping the work flowing smoothly with the right materials, equipment and personnel available at the right time and in the right place, with the work coming to the craftsman rather than the craftsman moving to the work location.

MMF Pipe Bending Machine

Aluminium plate and extrusions enter at the eastern end of the building where two computernumerically controlled (CNC), three-axis routers cut the metal, in thicknesses up to 50mm, into

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T&T SHIPBUILDER & REPAIR NEWS ISSUE #036 – SEPTEMBER 2010.

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the required elements; at the same time marking each piece with a unique number that identifies the hull, module and sub-assembly to which it belongs. The cut metal then moves through the module assembly area, the first phase of the production line, a series of work stations where stiffeners and frames are fitted and welded and panels attached. The modules progressively take shape on inter-connectable, self propelled module trolleys, wheeled steel frames with a 1.2 metre frame spacing, the same as the frame spacing of the vessels under construction, that move the increasingly complex modules from one station to the next. Lifting of all materials and equipment is undertaken by 37 overhead gantry cranes of various lifting capacities that can reach all the storage and manufacturing floor of the facility. Welding is performed using digital pulse welding machines with welding gas supplied via a closed loop, bulk argon delivery system serving the entire building.

37 overhead gantry cranes can reach all the storage and manufacturing floor of the facility.

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At this point in the production process, modules that require more work than can be accomplished in one week, such as a complex wheelhouse module, can be broken out of the line to a separate part of the facility where work can progress without holding up production of following modules. Normal modules move to the second, outfitting, phase of the production line where work stations manufacture and install pipes and small components and where air-conditioning, electrical and engineering materials, equipment, machinery and internal outfit are progressively installed. Major equipment serving the outfitting area includes two CNC saw mills for cutting stiffeners and T-bars, two CNC pipe bending machines, two semiautomated cable coiling machines, two 20-foot shears, two 20-foot 400 ton press brakes and two CNC routers dedicated to the internal outfit shop. Once the modules emerge from the MMF they are transported to the vessel assembly bays using multiaxle transporters capable of lifting modules weighing over 400 tons and measuring up to 120 ft (length) x 50 ft (width) x 30 ft (height) (42m x 30m x 9m). The benefits of this giant production line process include: • • • • •

repeatability of design for configuration control, repeatability of work, resulting in productivity improvements, performing the work in the most convenient and ergonomic place for the worker, the ability to automate wherever possible, completion of as much equipment and material installation as possible during modular construction so that only connecting, commissioning and testing are required in the assembled vessel, a safer, more efficient working environment for staff.

Austal USA’s investment in the MMF totals approximately US$85 million and is already paying big dividends with experience in both the LCS and JHSV construction programmes confirming measurable improvements in production efficiency. As a result of the use of CNC routers, stiffener cutters and automated assembly line flow, incorporating lean manufacturing production processes, Austal USA has improved its fabrication productivity by 30% in just one year. Similarly the CNC pipe bender in the pipe shop and the semi-automated cable coiling machine in the electrical shop are responsible for a 40% increase in outfitting productivity. But this is only the beginning. By 2013, when the MMF will be operating at maximum efficiency, Austal USA will have the capability to deliver two 103-meter JHSVs and two 127Page 11 of 28


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meter LCSs each year. For a shipyard that started operations with the construction in 2000 of two 45-meter offshore support vessels, this is a remarkable transformation. Starting in 1999 with a 10-acre site, a single construction bay and under 100 workers, Austal USA is now the largest manufacturing company in Mobile, Alabama, and the largest aluminium shipbuilder in the world. With the first Austal-built LCS, USS Independence (LCS 2), now in service, the second, Coronado, heading for completion in late 2012 and construction of the first 103-meter Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) for the U.S. Army underway, Austal USA is awaiting news in August 2010 of whether its bid to construct the next 10 LCSs will be successful. Should Austal USA prevail, its workforce could grow from 1,600 to as large as 3,500. Austal CEO, Bob Browning commented “When I joined Austal as a Director in 2003 the company’s Western Australian shipyard was the acknowledged world leader in the production of aluminium ships. Today I am proud to lead an organization that has two shipyards, one in Australia and, now, one in the USA, that share equal first place. ” “The huge improvements in efficiency and productivity that we have seen at Austal USA in the first 12 months since it commissioned the MMF are a clear indication that the company is on track towards its goal of achieving world’s best practice in aluminium shipbuilding and is ideally placed to confidently secure multiple orders of large complex vessels”. WELCOME ABOARD! Merchant Marine

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Merchant Marine is a privately owned and managed marine services provider with specialties in Procurement of Vessel Supplies and Spares, Technical Support, Repair & Maintenance, ISM Implementation and Project Management. The company focuses squarely on meeting the numerous needs of its world-class clientele and unlike other maritime industry providers, delivers a broad array of services that enable you to increase productivity, maintain scheduled delivery dates and design and implement programs that improve your business’ margins. Their strategic parts sourcing capability keeps you on schedule. If we don’t have it, we find it – even if it’s half-way around the world – a specialized service only from Merchant Marine. The experienced staff at Merchant Marine looks forward to identifying and servicing your company’s maritime needs – from parts delivery to more productive logistics scheduling to preventive maintenance to prevent problems before they have an impact on your company’s bottom line. Please visit their website at http://www.merchantmarine.biz and call on them today!

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T&T SHIPBUILDER & REPAIR NEWS ISSUE #036 – SEPTEMBER 2010.

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MAN 32/44CR ENGINE ADOPTS SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION TO CRACK TIER-III The environmental performance of its engines is a key consideration for MAN Diesel & Turbo. As such, the company uses its unrivalled grasp of large engine technology to make its engines progressively cleaner, more efficient and yet more powerful. With its 32/44CR four-stroke engine, first introduced to the market in 2009, MAN Diesel & Turbo continues to target environmental emissions with an engine capable of meeting the tough IMO Tier-III limits. The centrepiece of MAN Diesel & Turbo’s stand at the SMM show, the type 20V32/44CR common rail large-bore diesel engine with SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) is ten metres long by six metres tall, and represents the largest exhibit MAN Diesel & Turbo has ever showcased at any trade fair. The company is using the engine to illustrate how MAN Diesel & Turbo is already complying with the strict Tier-III emission specifications set down by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and due to come into force from 2016 for coastal regions. The 20-cylinder, four-stroke engine is a lightweight construction version of the 32/44CR type, produced especially for the trade fair and weighs 89 tonnes. Equipped with common-rail injection, variable valve control (VVT) and variable turbocharger geometry (VTA), the 20V32/44CR is one of the most efficient engines in its class. Even without an SCR catalytic converter, it satisfies the IMO’s Tier-II emission limits, set to come into force in 2011, and calls for a 20% reduction in nitric oxide (NOx) emissions. With Tier-III coming into force in 2016, further technical measures and solutions will be needed to reduce NOx by 80%, which is the main reason behind MAN Diesel & Turbo unveiling the engine with integrated SCR at SMM 2010. The 32/44CR engine with SCR pictured during the setting-up of the MAN Diesel & Turbo stand in Hamburg

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SCR and 32/44 emission techniques With the SCR method, exhaust gas is treated with ammonia or urea and fed through a catalytic converter at a temperature of 300 to 400 degrees Celsius to reduce NOx emissions by up to 98%. However, while the SCR is essential for meeting Tier-III limits, the SMM engine, as previously mentioned, satisfies IMO Tier-II alone through its ultra-modern design. As such, the 32/44CR engine represents the latest technologies in the area of medium-speed, industrial diesel engines and is a synthesis of the most advanced large engine technologies available. These include: a higher compression ratio that gives a faster reduction in temperature after the ignition of the fuel, reducing NOx formation and the associated increase in SFOC, Miller valve timing that reduces the temperature peaks that promote NOx formation MAN Diesel & Turbo turbochargers equipped with the latest high-efficiency compressor wheels to alleviate the NOx-SFOC trade off. The higher pressure ratio increases engine efficiency, compensating for the increase in SFOC normally associated with lower NOx emissions, variable valve timing to compensate for the increase in SFOC associated with lower NOx emissions a common-rail injection system that allows flexible setting of injection timing, duration and pressure for each cylinder, facilitating the optimisation of the fuel consumption and emissions and the latest generation of SaCoSone, MAN Diesel & Turbo’s proven engine-management system. That offers integrated self-diagnosis, maximum reliability and availability, simple userinterface, quick exchange of modules (plug in), and trouble-free commissioning ********************

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WORLD MARITIME DAY 2010 2010: YEAR OF THE SEAFARER

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INTERNATIONAL NEWS Brazil's OSX aims to build $2B in rigs, tankers for Petrobras - Sept 27, 2010 OSX Brasil SA, which is building a shipyard in Brazil with South Korea's Hyundai Heavy Industry Co., said that it plans to bid for oil drilling rig and tanker contracts worth $2 billion that Brazil's state-led Petrobras wants to build. OSX, which already plans to build 48 ships and platforms for sister-company OGX Petroleo e Gas, Brazil's second-largest oil exploration group, plans to have spare capacity to build vessels for third parties when its $1.7 billion yard starts cutting its first steel in 2012, OSX CFO Roberto Monteiro told journalists at the Rio Oil & Gas 2010 conference in Rio de Janeiro. "We do not just plan to build ships for OGX, we have the room to expand and the technology to do assembly-line shipbuilding," Monteiro said. "We expect to become the biggest shipbuilder in Brazil." Both OSX and OGX are controlled by the Rio de Janeiro's EBX energy, mining and transportation group. Hyundai owns 10% of the OSX shipyard project, which will be built at EBX's port of Acu in Rio de Janeiro or near Florianopolis, Brazil, in the state of Santa Catarina. A decision on the site is expected by the end of the year, with construction of the shipyard starting in early 2011. The yard expects to deliver its first self-built vessel - a floating production, storage and offloading vessel in late 2013 or early 2014. It is building two other FPSOs in Singapore and seeking bids in Brazil for two wellhead fixed platforms from other yards for delivery in 2011 and 2012, Monteiro said. It also is seeking to build two deepwater drill rigs for Petrobras and up to four products tankers for a Petrobras-backed project known as Cia. Brazileira de Navegecao.

Russia sets aside 14B to support the Russian shipbuilding - Sept 25, 2010 Russian Government allocated 14 billion rubles from the state budget for 2011 to support of the Russian shipbuilding industry, Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin said yesterday. Mr. Putin noted that the industry remains a priority for the Russian government. Overall, Mr. Putin said, the government plans to spend next year 1.6 trillion rubles for modernization and economic development and infrastructure of Russia.

CO2 control measures high on agenda at IMO meeting - Sept 25, 2010 The reduction of greenhouse gases (GHGs) from international shipping will be a major focus for the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) of the International Maritime Organization (IMO), when it meets for its 61st session from 27 September to 1 October, 2010 at the IMO Headquarters in London. Also high on the agenda will be the expected adoption of the revised Annex III of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL), covering pollution from packaged goods, and consideration of issues relating to the implementation of the ballast water management and ship recycling conventions. Page 19 of 28


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Shipbuilding Orders Up 17% in January to June - Sept 23, 2010 Orders for new ships increased 17% on the year to the equivalent of 1.96 million compensated gross tons in the January-June period, according to data released Tuesday by the Shipbuilders' Association of Japan. Improving conditions in the global economy have fueled orders for bulk carriers and other vessels, reversing the steep decline that followed the 2008 global financial crisis. "This year's orders have been consistently higher on the year since spring," association Chairman Takao Motoyama said at a news conference Tuesday. But he acknowledged that the figure should be higher. First-half orders to Japanese shipbuilders fell far short of China's 5.24 million compensated gross tons and South Korea's 5.35 million compensated gross tons. China has benefited from brisk demand, while South Korea's containership orders have recovered sharply thanks to increased competitiveness on the back of a weak won.

Russia to Send Venezuela 10 Oil Tankers worth $700M - Sept 23, 2010 Russia will send Venezuela 10 Aframax crude oil tankers valued at $700 million, state-owned United Shipbuilding Company said. “The agreement foresees delivery of 10 tankers to Venezuela through 2016,” USC official spokesman Igor Riabov said, referring to the document signed on September 22, with Venezuela’s state shipping company. He added that three of the vessels will be built at Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering’s shipyards in South Korea, while three others will be built in Russia with help from experts from the South Korean firm and the other four are to be built in Russia without assistance. The USC-Daewoo joint venture Zvezda DSME will erect a special wharf to produce the tankers between 2012 and 2015 in Russia’s Primorsky Krai territory, which borders China. Aframax oil tankers, which can transport more than 100,000 tons of cargo, measure more than 250 meters (820 feet) in length and more than 45 meters in width and have a maximum draught of 15 meters (50 feet).

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WORLD MARITIME DAY 2010: YEAR OF THE SEAFARER A message from the Secretary–General of the International Maritime Organization Mr. Efthimios E. Mitropoulos in connection with this year's celebrations of World Maritime Day to take place during the week of 20 to 24 September 2010 In today's global economy, hundreds of millions of people all over the world rely on ships to transport the great multitude of commodities, fuel, foodstuffs, goods and products on which we all depend. Yet, for most of them, shipping, not to mention the huge range of related maritime activities that, together, go to make up what is loosely termed ''the shipping industry'', does not register a particularly strong echo on their personal radar. The very nature of shipping makes it something of a ''background'' industry. For most people, most of the time, ships are simply ''out of sight and out of mind''. And the same, as a consequence, can be said of the seafarers that operate the world's fleet, despite the fact that the global economy depends utterly on their presence. Seafarers are, in effect, the lubricant without which the engine of trade would simply grind to a halt. It is, of course, sad when workforces are unrecognized and more or less taken for granted. When, for example, we switch on a light, we do not, generally, pause to think of all those who have laboured in the various sectors of the oil exploration and production process and, subsequently, in power generation and transmission industries to make it happen. Nor, when we sit at the table to eat our daily bread, do we pause to think of who brought the grain that enabled our local baker to bake it. Nor when, faced with a severe winter, do we pause to think of who carried, from its sources afar, the oil that heats our homes or fuels the energy on which we all so much depend these days. Well, perhaps we should; and we certainly should not use that as an excuse to continue to allow the seafarer, who helps these happen, to be ignored at best, and poorly treated at worst. Seafaring is a difficult and demanding job, with its own set of unique pressures and risks. At the end of a long and stressful day, there is no return home to the family; no evening with friends at the tavern or the pub; no change of scenery; no chance to properly relax, unwind or de–stress. Just the relentless drone of the diesels and the never–ending movement of the vessel that is not only the seafarers' place of work but also their home, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, for weeks and often for months on end; and, ever–present in the back of their mind, the possibility of natural and other, invidious hazards such as pirate attacks, unwarranted detention and abandonment in foreign ports. In this, the Year of the Seafarer, our intention has been not only to draw attention to the unique circumstances within which seafarers spend their working lives, while rendering their indispensable services, but also to make a palpable and beneficial difference. In selecting the "Year of the Seafarer" theme, our intention was also to use it as an excellent

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T&T SHIPBUILDER & REPAIR NEWS ISSUE #036 – SEPTEMBER 2010.

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opportunity to reassure those, who labour at the ''sharp end'' of the industry – the seafarers themselves – that those of us who work in other areas of the maritime community, and yet whose actions have a direct bearing on seafarers' everyday lives, understand the extreme pressures they face and approach our tasks with genuine interest and concern for them and their families. In this respect, the most significant achievement of the year undoubtedly came in June, with the adoption, by a Diplomatic Conference in Manila, of major revisions to the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers – the STCW Convention – and its associated Code. Scheduled to enter into force on 1 January 2012, these revisions will ensure that the necessary global standards will be in place to train and certify seafarers to operate technologically advanced ships for some time to come. The Manila Conference also agreed to a series of new provisions on the issue of ''fitness for duty –hours of rest'', to provide watchkeepers aboard ships with sufficient rest periods. This important new provision will create better conditions for seafarers and help ensure they are adequately rested before they undertake their duties. Fatigue has been found to be a contributory factor to several accidents at sea and to ensure that seafarers are adequately rested before they take over their watch will certainly play an important role in safe sailing and the prevention of casualties. I am particularly pleased that the new STCW requirements on this crucial issue are consistent with the corresponding provisions of the International Labour Organization's 2006 Maritime Labour Convention, which I hope will come into force soon. While the amendments to the STCW Convention and Code and the resolutions adopted by the Manila Conference can rightly be considered as the pinnacle of our regulatory efforts this year to create a better, safer and more secure world in which seafarers can operate, other efforts continue in parallel; because, at IMO, the human element and the interests of seafarers' work and life on board are always at the forefront of all our legislative work. When IMO first mooted the idea that our theme for 2010 should focus on ''the seafarer'', we wanted to do two things; first, we wanted to draw attention to a workforce that is largely unheralded and unacknowledged, often even within the industry it serves: and, second, we wanted to extend the theme beyond the regular World Maritime Day celebrations and to galvanize a momentum that would last for the whole year and, indeed, beyond. We wanted 2010 to be the start of this momentum; but we certainly do not want the end of 2010 to be the end of the initiative. To this end, I welcomed and embraced enthusiastically the decision of the Manila Conference that the unique contribution made by seafarers from all over the world to international seaborne trade, the world economy and civil society as a whole, should, from now on, be marked annually with a ''Day of the Seafarer'', to be held on 25 June of each year. The date chosen was that on which the Conference was concluded and acknowledges the significance of the STCW amendments then adopted for the maritime community and those who serve it on board ships. And I would warmly encourage Governments, shipping organizations, companies, owners, operators, managers and all other parties concerned to promote the Day of the Seafarer. Page 22 of 28


T&T SHIPBUILDER & REPAIR NEWS ISSUE #036 – SEPTEMBER 2010.

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Earlier in the year, I identified three targets that I would be happy to see achieved in conjunction with our ''Year of the Seafarer'' initiative. They were: – one, increased awareness among the general public of the indispensable services seafarers render to civil society at large; – two, a clear message to seafarers that we recognize and appreciate their services; that we do care about them; and that we do all that we can to look after and protect them when the circumstances of their life at sea so warrant; and – three, redoubled efforts at the regulatory level to move from words to deeds to create a better world in which seafarers can offer their services. I think I can safely say that, so far, good progress has been made towards achieving all three of the set objectives. It is, therefore, very pleasing to see that the theme, which was selected in order to act as the focal point around which the maritime community as a whole would rally to seek ways to recognize and pay tribute to seafarers for their unique contribution to society and the vital part they play in the facilitation of global trade, has achieved, and is achieving, its aim. This has undoubtedly been happening and there have been numerous manifestations of this from all over the world. The ''Year of the Seafarer'' has also helped to re–focus attention on the pressing need to come to grips with the long–predicted labour– supply shortage in the shipping industry – an issue that makes it imperative for shipping to re–launch itself as a career of choice for the high–calibre, high–quality young people of today. In this context, the ''Year of the Seafarer'' has added valuable impetus to the ''Go to Sea!'' campaign, which we launched at IMO in November 2008, in association with ILO, the ''Round Table'' of shipping industry associations and the International Transport Workers' Federation. I should like to conclude by using the opportunity of this World Maritime Day message in order to communicate with a few segments of the community – especially those within and in the periphery of the shipping industry. This is what I would like to tell them: – to members of the shipping industry: maintain high standards; enshrine best practices; embrace corporate social responsibility; provide a clean, safe and comforting workplace; recognize and reward those on whose labours your profits depend; – to politicians: work towards the ratification, entry into force and implementation of all the international measures that have a bearing on seafarers' safety and security and living and working conditions; show that you really are in touch with the people at the sharp end;

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T&T SHIPBUILDER & REPAIR NEWS ISSUE #036 – SEPTEMBER 2010.

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– to legislators and law enforcers: aim at striking a fair balance in all of your actions concerning seafarers so that they do not become scapegoats caught up in the aftermath of accidents and incidents; treat them fairly and decently – they deserve every empathy and compassion; – to educators: tell the younger generations about seafaring, the debt we owe to shipping and the attractions of the maritime professions; it should not take too great a leap of the imagination to stir maritime ingredients into the pot of learning through history, geography, biology, environmental studies, economics, business studies and many more; – to port and immigration authorities: treat seafarers with the respect they deserve; welcome them as visitors and guests to your countries –as professionals that are also serving the interests and development of your nations and fellow citizens; – to those in a position to shape and influence public opinion, particularly newspaper and TV journalists: take the time and trouble to seek out both sides of the story next time you report on an accident involving a ship; place the accident in its proper context, that of millions upon millions of tonnes of cargo safely delivered over billions of miles to all four corners of the earth by a talented, highly trained, highly specialized and highly dedicated workforce; and, finally, to the 1.5 million seafarers of the world, I should like to convey this message: the entire maritime community appreciates you and your indispensable services; is aware of the conditions under which you operate; shows compassion for the sacrifices you make; does care for you; and works to ensure your safety and security, praying that you always have calm seas, fair winds and a safe return home – which it wishes you wholeheartedly. Audio version of the above Message from the Secretary General of the International Maritime Organization, Mr. Efthimios E. Mitropoulos To Listen, Click: http://www.imo.org/static/wmd2010/wmd2010.mp3

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T&T SHIPBUILDER & REPAIR NEWS ISSUE #036 – SEPTEMBER 2010.

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T&T SHIPBUILDER & REPAIR NEWS

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ISSUE #036 – SEPTEMBER 2010.

+1 (868) 384 - SHIP

MARITIME INDUSTRY WEB LINKS ALL PURPOSE DIESEL LIMITED - www.allpurposediesel.com/ ASSOCIATED MARINE DESIGN - www.associatedmarinedesign.com/ AUSTAL - www.austal.com/ BAE SYSTEMS - www.baesystems.com/ CARIBBEAN PROPELLERS - www.caribprops.com/ CATERPILLAR LOCAL DEALERSHIP - www.tracmac.com/ COMPREHENSIVE INSURANCE BROKERS - www.insurance.co.tt/ CONRADO BEACH RESORT LIMITED - www.conradotobago.com/ ENERGY CARIBBEAN - www.meppublishers.com/online/energy/ ENGINE TECH COMPANY LIMITED - www.man-mec.com/ GAC-ALSTONS - www.alstonsshipping.com/ INTERNATIONAL MARITIME ORGANIZATION - www.imo.org/ LLOYD'S REGISTER GROUP - www.lr.org/ MERCHANT MARINE SALES AND SERVICE - www.merchantmarine.biz/ MINISTRY OF FINANCE - www.finance.gov.tt/ MINISTRY OF TRADE & INDUSTRY - www.tradeind.gov.tt/ NEW LA BREA VISION

- www.issuu.com/newlabreavision/

PROTEC INTELLIGENCE SERVICES LIMITED - www.protec-tt.com/ T&T SHIPBUILDING & REPAIR

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THE PHI GROUP - www.phigroup.net WARTSILA - www.wartsila.com/ ************************ Blue highlighted links indicate additional websites added in this month’s newsletter. Red highlighted links indicate Advertisers for the current issue. Page 26 of 28


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T&T SHIPBUILDER & REPAIR NEWS ISSUE #036 – SEPTEMBER 2010.

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T&T SHIPBUILDER & REPAIR NEWS ISSUE #036 – SEPTEMBER 2010.

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FOR YOUR INFORMATION

GORTT CANCELS OPV PROGRAMME BAE Systems announces that it has received written notice from the Government of Trinidad and Tobago (GORTT) that it wishes to cancel the programme under which BAE Systems is providing three Offshore Patrol Vessels and support to the Trinidad and Tobago Coast Guard. The contract was entered into in April 2007 by the previous Trinidad and Tobago government and VT Shipbuilding International Limited; BAE Systems acquired full control of VT Shipbuilding International Limited in October 2009. To view: ‘BAE Systems - T&T OPV contract’ http://production.investis.com/baeir/rns/rnsitem?id=3702016

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CONTACT INFORMATION Mr. Wilfred de Gannes, Deputy Leader, T&T Shipbuilding and Repair Cluster, Post Office Box 2853, Chaguaramas, Trinidad and Tobago. Tel: +1(868) 753-6057 Tel: +1(868) 384-SHIP(7447) Fax:+1(868) 662-6326 E-mail: ttshipbuildingandrepaircluster@yahoo.com Website: http://www.tts-r.com Trinidad and Tobago Shipbuilder & Repair News is edited by T&T Shipbuilding and Repair Deputy Leader Wilfred de Gannes, and published monthly by the Shipbuilding and Repair Development Company of Trinidad and Tobago Limited. This newsletter is available complimentary via email. © All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior permission of the publisher. Quotation(s) from the publication is allowable with appropriate credit.

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Newsletter 036  

September 2010

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