Shepherd Express - January 2022

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JANUARY 2022

2021 brought to you by

Shepherd Express

IN THIS ISSUE: WINTER ARTS GUIDE | HEALTH & WELLNESS | SEXPRESS



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NEWS 08 Milwaukee Veterans at Risk of Homelessness 11 This Modern World 12 Gerrymandering Was Beginning of the End for Constitutional Rights — Taking Liberties 14 Jessica Sunier Redefines Fitness to be Inclusive — Hero of the Month 16 Milwaukee Police Chief Jeffrey Norman — Off the Cuff PUBLISHER & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF: Louis Fortis (ext. 3802)

FOOD & DRINK 20 Lazy Susan Diligently Pursues Excellence 22 Stir Fry at Home — Flash in the Pan 24 A Question About Why You Drink Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon — Beverages

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SPECIAL SECTION 26 Winter Arts Guide, Jan.-Feb. 2022 SPONSORED BY

2021 Presented by

Shepherd Express

36 Best of Milwaukee PRESENTED BY 36 Arts & Entertainment 38 City Confidential 40 Dining Out 47 Locally-Owned Food & Drink 48 Milwaukee Music 50 Out & About 53 Body, Mind & Spirit 54 Bought & Sold 58 Home Improvement 58 LGBT 59 Medical 60 Milwaukee Food & Beverages 61 Real Estate 61 Services Rendered 63 Sports & Recreation 64 What is Functional Medicine? Is it an Alternative for You? — Health & Wellness 66 Am I Normal—And What the Heck is Normal Anyway? — SexPress 68 You Can't Fix Stupid — Health & Wellness

CULTURE 70 This Month in Milwaukee

GENERAL MANAGER: Kevin Gardner (ext. 3825) MANAGING EDITOR: David Luhrssen (ext. 3804) BUSINESS MANAGER: Peggy Debnam (ext. 3832) EVENT COORDINATOR: Casey Trotter (ext. 3816) ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES: Bridgette Ard (ext. 3811) Tyler R. Klein (ext. 3815) SALES MANAGER: Jackie Butzler (ext. 3814) BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER: Chuck Hill (ext. 3822) IN MEMORY OF DUSTI FERGUSON (OCTOBER 18, 1971 – NOVEMBER 20, 2007) WEBMASTER: Barry Houlehen (ext. 3807) WEB WRITER: Allen Halas (ext. 3803) STAFF WRITER & CIRCULATION COORDINATOR: Blaine Schultz (ext. 3813)

Distribution: Shepherd Express is available free of charge. The Shepherd Express may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of the Shepherd Express, take more than one copy of each monthly issue. Mail subscriptions are available. No refunds for early cancellations. One year (12 issues) via First Class mail: $100.00

LIFESTYLE

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72 A Showplace Made From Secondhand Finds — Domicile 76 Refusing Cannabis Reform Drives Up Racial Inequalities — Cannabis

HEAR ME OUT

80 A Year of Temporary Respite for LGBTQs — My LGBTQ POV

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Advertising Inquiries: jackie@shepex.com e-mail: info@shepex.com URL: shepherdexpress.com

SPONSORED BY

78 Don't Let Age Keep You From Finding Love — Dear Ruthie

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207 E. Buffalo St., Suite 410, Milwaukee, WI 53202 Phone: 414/276-2222 Fax: 414/276-3312

ART FOR ART'S SAKE 82 From the City that Always Sweeps

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PUBLISHER'S LETTER

The Shepherd Express Turns 40 This Year

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his year is the 40th birthday of the Shepherd Express. Milwaukee has come a long way since 1982 when the Shepherd was created by a group of very committed UWM students. Milwaukee was a very different city in 1982 and America was in a recession. Our city was losing its manufacturing base to the anti-union South and across the border to Mexico and Central America. Milwaukee had a racist police chief, Harold Breier, who was given a lifetime appointment from the mayor and city council and who had total contempt for civil liberties.

Our Downtown was strictly an area for office workers and virtually went dark when the workers went home at 5 p.m. There were very few Downtown residential apartments and a very thin Downtown social life or entertainment. The Historic Third Ward was a produce market along with some light manufacturing. And no one could have accused Milwaukee of being a “cool place for young people to live.” This was the Milwaukee that the Crazy Shepherd was born into. Yes, that was its original name. Fortunately, that name didn’t last very long as the Shepherd began to grow in influence. Over the next 12 months, the Shepherd will have four special sections looking back at the development of the music scene, the dining scene and other cultural scenes that describe Milwaukee’s evolution. Like Milwaukee, the Crazy Shepherd came a long way in the past 40 years, from an eight page poorly laid out tabloid to a small media company with a vibrant and very popular website, a daily e-newsletter sent to over 70,000 subscribers, and for the past year a monthly glossy magazine, a format encouraged by our advertisers and which now has a pickup rate each month of over 99%. Yes, our returns are less than 1% each month.

THE SHEPHERD’S RAISON D’ETRE

From its first issue, the Shepherd was committed to accurate, honest, courageous, and intelligent news coverage and commentary provided free to everyone in the community. We at the Shepherd believe that no one should be deprived of the news because of an inability to pay. Democracies can only survive if there is honest and courageous news coverage, and unfortunately, we are in a period where our democracy is under serious threat. Thomas Jefferson’s famous quote says it all: if he had to choose between “a government without newspapers or newspapers without government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.”

We know our readers are smart, and we hire writers who write to a smart audience without talking down to anyone. The Shepherd’s mission is to support progressive efforts in our city, county and state, and to confront and expose the ridiculous, self-serving, corrupt or politically motivated actions of some elected officials or corporate leaders. The Shepherd will continue to support policies, programs, organizations and businesses that help Milwaukee continue to shift to a modern, interesting, exciting and forward-looking city. Many nonprofit organizations, with their heroic missions, will say that their coverage in the Shepherd helped them survive by putting their accomplishments in front of our readers. Many restaurants will tell you that it was a Shepherd review that kept them in business and in some cases enabled them to become Milwaukee institutions. We strongly support our local nonprofits, arts and entertainment organizations and small businesses because it is these entities that give Milwaukee its real character and make it a great place to live, work and play.

FIGHTING FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE FOR 40 YEARS

For the past 40 years the Shepherd has been a leader in social justice whether for gender, race, sexual orientation, immigration, voting rights, reproductive freedom, government overreach and corruption, environmental justice or income fairness and equality. We have fought various battles over the years in all these areas and, trust me, there has been push back. Possibly the most nasty, vulgar and threatening phone calls we received were related to the LGBTQ justice battles. Because we fight for all aspects of social justice, we have lost a number of advertisers and an even larger number of distribution points. We won’t name names, but when you see a business advertising in what appears to be everywhere, but never in the Shepherd despite our highly desirable demographics, it may well be because of our steadfast support for some area of social justice. We don’t back down from any fight for social justice and never will.

WHY I BELIEVE THE SHEPHERD IS SO IMPORTANT

On a personal level, I have been with the Shepherd for the past 24 years. I didn’t start out in the media business. I came to Milwaukee as a VISTA Volunteer and a community organizer in the Harambee neighborhood. I also taught economics at Smith College, ran the Wisconsin Community Development Finance Authority, did short-

term consulting in nine developing countries such as Mongolia and Uganda for the U.S. Agency for International Development and served in the Wisconsin State Assembly for three terms. Of all these activities, being editor/ publisher of the Shepherd has been the most challenging and, in my eyes, the most important work I’ve done. With the current challenges to our democracy including a losing presidential candidate who refuses to accept the results of the voters in hopes of undermining our 235 year old democracy, a U.S. Supreme Court that puts politics above the constitution, a state legislature working with a very politicized State Supreme Court to preserve extreme gerrymandered legislative districts that a federal three judge panel labeled unconstitutional and the most gerrymandered legislative districts in the country, I can’t think of anything more important for me to be doing than keeping the Shepherd alive and well. I don’t take a salary and haven’t taken a salary since the Great Recession of 2008. Media businesses are difficult but important. News publications especially are important to a community and play a unique role in building a “sense of community” in the areas they represent. News publications are tangible and seen by virtually everyone everyday whether they are reading it or not. Print has survived the coming of radio, television and now the internet. Facebook and Google have done an amazing job selling the story that “print is dead” and that Facebook and Google are the only way to go for advertising. However, studies show that print is still one of the top two or three most effective vehicles for advertising, but the Facebook/Google myth lives on. Some of you have been reading the Shepherd for many of the past 40 years and have wanted to help. Each year we receive some unsolicited checks from dedicated readers. Beside advertising, we earn monies from events and our Friends group. We put on about 12 events a year, from Cannabis Expo to Margarita Fest, and cordially invite you or your business to be a sponsor, a participating vendor or an attendee. Two years ago, we set up a Friends of the Shepherd Express group to enable loyal readers who believe in our mission to support the local free press in a simple and systematic way by clicking shepherdexpress.com/support. Thank you, please stay safe and hopefully 2022 will be better year for all of us. Louis Fortis Publisher/Editor-in-Chief

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NEWS

Milwaukee Veterans at Risk of Homelessness BY ANTHONY MARK HAPPEL

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magine what it is like to live outside, to be without a roof over your head, to be homeless. Everything you own is in your car or, maybe, a duffel bag. Think about all the things impacted by having no home. No respite from the elements. No safe place to sleep or store your belongings. No privacy. No place to hide out from the world. Think about what it is like to be without a kitchen or a bathroom. Now, imagine dealing with a chronic health or a mental health issue. With so many things already working against you, how do you manage? How do you make sure you have clean clothes for appointments? How do you groom yourself? The issue of self-care is central to everything we do, and critical to how we present in the workplace and the world. Being homeless challenges self-confidence and self-esteem. Being homeless is a constant reminder you are not fully functional because homelessness is a dysfunctional state, made worse when multiple issues need to be addressed. It is always a complex confluence of events that causes someone to become homeless. And something as simple as not having a vehicle, for example, can become a primary hindrance. Those with no or limited income are hustling agencies and social workers for bus passes and Uber gift cards. Not being able to travel freely causes more stress and anxiety while in an already stressful state. Of the approximately 9 million veterans currently enrolled in 8 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

MILWAUKEE SOLDIERS HOME OLD MAIN

the Veteran’s Administration system, 1.4 million are at risk of homelessness or are/have been intermittently homeless. In Milwaukee, they can turn to the VA’s Zablocki Medical Center, a 10-storey facility with 189 beds that provides primary, secondary and tertiary care, covering 16 Wisconsin counties. The VA is tasked by law with providing as much support as possible and reasonable in most areas of a veteran’s life, with safe, secure housing being central to everything. If a veteran is homeless or on the verge of homelessness, the VA will be concerned with housing as well as all other pertinent issues. The VA may already be involved in assisting a veteran, or the veteran may be in a temporary shelter or housing of some kind. Housing represents a long-term issue that can pose ongoing problems for years. The VA operates a national program, administered by outside agencies of various kinds, called Supportive Services for Veteran’s Families (SSVF), which assists veterans who are homeless and also keeps vets who need rental assistance in their homes, sometimes for a period of months so they can regain some control of their finances and their lives. In addition, there is a Housing & Urban Development (HUD) program called HUD-VASH (Veteran Assisted Supportive Housing) that provides longer-term rental assistance for qualifying veterans and their families who need an extended time to deal with financial and other matters. The agencies the VA utilizes to administer SSVF, Photo by Michael Burmesch.


like the Center for Veteran’s Issues in Milwaukee, also provide other assistance separate from housing to create added stability in a housing crisis situation. According to VA Public Affairs Officer Ann Knabe, “HUD-VASH is currently serving approximately 550 veterans in Southeastern Wisconsin. Our program has had to adapt to the [municipal] housing authorities being closed and adjust our practices of assisting veterans with their housing search due to the pandemic. We are also fortunate to have access to CARES Act funding to temporarily place our most vulnerable veterans in hotels. We also collaborate with several community agencies to share resources.”

FRUSTRATION, ALIENATION Despite the best efforts by the VA, veterans may be bouncing around from one office and agency to another. With mobility issues this can result in a lot of frustration and a sense of alienation. Veterans can find they are not getting the answers they need and are often also receiving what they perceive as incomplete or conflicting information. Marine veteran Mark Lalik, residing [as of this writing] at Vet’s Place Central, has dealt with substance abuse issues while homeless, and has experienced a level of frustration not unusual among some veterans, “Ninety percent of what I learned about the VA was through word of mouth. It’s a lot of runaround.”

DESPITE THE BEST EFFORTS BY THE VA, VETERANS MAY BE BOUNCING AROUND FROM ONE OFFICE AND AGENCY TO ANOTHER. WITH MOBILITY ISSUES THIS CAN RESULT IN A LOT OF FRUSTRATION AND A SENSE OF ALIENATION.

He also notes services at the VA tend to be compartmentalized and narrowly focused and not always adaptable, “The VA is very cookie cutter. I see how a lot of people get turned off, it’s such a big organization … and you have to be really specific about what question you ask. They won’t elaborate.” Army Veteran Spike Gavinski, who is also residing at Vet’s Place Central, commented that “the time it takes to get into the VA system is frustrating.” But he also noted that once you are in the system you get help, “as vets we look out for each other. If you ever watch the interaction of vets down at the VA hospital, at Zablocki, if there’s somebody that needs anything, if something falls on the floor, can I help you? Can I help you into your car?”

LEARNING BY ACCIDENT Some veterans learn about their benefits by accident. Air Force veteran Michael Arns, a dental assistant who had been involved in the Rapid Re-housing program while staying at the Salvation Army, learned he was eligible for VA benefits when he went to

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NEWS

the VA Community Resource and Referral Center, “During the application process of the Rapid Re-housing program I mentioned that I was a veteran and they informed me that I could be eligible for veteran’s benefits. They told me to pursue that, and they gave me the address to the Resource Center.” His message to veterans feeling lost in the system is, “Have patience and understanding … and realize that veterans—we’re a big family is what we are. We take care of each other. I’ve had a lot of people help me out of the blue, out of nowhere.” With COVID-19, shelters and programs shut down across the country, leaving homeless veterans more vulnerable to lack of proper shelter and temporary housing. And we apparently do not have the social and political will to improve the situation. Before COVID, HUD reported a 70% increase in homelessness among veterans from the previous year. That is a red flag and a clear indication we are not able to manage the care of veterans while also dealing with the issue of homelessness. Although COVID also made outreach to the homeless population very difficult, the Milwaukee County Veteran’s Service Office (CVSO) maintained operations throughout the pandemic. There is a CVSO in every county and every tribal nation in the state, per state statute. According to Director of Veteran’s Services for Milwaukee County, Rick Flowers, “Throughout COVID we have maintained the same services as pre-COVID levels. We did not disrupt any of our services during COVID.” The counties and CVSOs play an extremely important role in the lives of veterans in a number of areas. Flowers explains, “We assist veterans in obtaining a full range of federal, state and local benefits. We also partner with local agencies to provide other services including workforce readiness, legal services, counseling services, child support, energy assistance and eviction prevention.” They also assist veterans who are outside the VA system and not eligible for VA healthcare.

SOLDIERS HOME In March of 2021 the Soldiers Home opened in Milwaukee, a $44 million renovation project that repurposes an historic landmark to house homeless veterans. The building itself had been under re-use consideration of some kind since at least 2004. In 2016 the Alexander

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Company took the lead when the Department of Veteran’s Affairs issued a request for proposals, and they ultimately oversaw the design and construction. They then joined forces with the City of Milwaukee Housing Authority, the agency that administers the housing vouchers to veterans for the HUDVASH program at the Soldiers Home. The facility has 101 units of supportive housing, including 14 single room units. According to Amy Mauel, Program Manager of the Milwaukee VA Homeless Prevention Program, they are currently at about 85% capacity, “There are vouchers available and veterans can access the program through the homeless hotline, and they can also walk into the Community Resource and Referral Center on Martin Luther King Boulevard,” she says. They also assist veterans who want to live in the community. Army veteran Empson Rowell, who has been at the Soldiers Home since it opened, had faced numerous added obstacles while he living in a shelter and trying to resolve his housing, one of them involving dental care, “I had to be homeless to qualify for dental care, and I had to get that done while I was homeless,” he said. After receiving dental care, he was able to begin the process of addressing housing. While living at the shelter Rowell says, “I got a lot of help. HUD VASH had an open-door policy. It was a good fit.” He explains he knew there was something different about the Soldiers Home, “I was optimistic about coming here,” he continues, “it was going to be different, not like standard government housing.” The Soldiers Home is a special place with a special purpose, and it has already had a profound impact in our community and in the lives of the people who have found a home there. It stands as a powerful example of what can be done with a publicprivate partnership, and it is a model for other cities to examine to find their own pathways to something similar. We can see we need to do more, but what, exactly? Members of the medical community and social workers say we need both easier and more effective communication and better inter-integration of agencies, programs and services. Some veterans will tell you the VA needs better communication and better integration of services and agencies, and they need to be more transparent.

Photo by Michael Burmesch.


“I HAD TO BE HOMELESS TO QUALIFY FOR DENTAL CARE, AND I HAD TO GET THAT DONE WHILE I WAS HOMELESS.” Marine vet Mark Lalik has a suggestion, “The military has a manual for everything, why not a manual for how to navigate your benefits?” he asks. Homeless advocates all across the country say we need to raise awareness and make homelessness a national priority—to think of it as a national epidemic, which it is. To allow millions of people to live outside, including our disabled and chronically ill veterans, and not attacking the problem with a national focus and fervor, is a disgrace. We have come to accept homelessness as a necessary evil in this society and we make excuses for why we are not able to eradicate it, or even handle it better than we do. End the laws that persecute homeless people. Create safe spaces. There are ways to move forward together, starting with the process of re-humanizing homeless people. We can do better and we must do better.

Anthony Mark Happel is a freelance writer, filmmaker and parttime semiotician. He also plays guitar and sings in Navajo Ace.

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NEWS TAKING LIBERTIES

GERRYMANDERING WAS BEGINNING OF THE END FOR CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS BY JOEL MCNALLY

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ho could have predicted that in 2022 the U.S Supreme Court would begin destroying nearly 50 years of legal protections for a woman’s constitutional right to end an unwanted pregnancy by considering allowing individual states to decide for themselves whether to honor constitutional rights? Wasn’t that issue settled more than 150 years ago in a bloody Civil War? Actually, Wisconsin and many other states could have predicted that those questions might be reopened when the Supreme Court refused in 2019 to do anything to protect voting rights in states like Wisconsin after their legislatures corruptly distorted democracy through blatantly dishonest political gerrymandering.

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The 5-4 decision, written by Chief Justice John Roberts, agreed “such gerrymandering is ‘incompatible with democratic principles’” but then irrationally added that “does not mean the solution lies with the federal judiciary.”

DISHONEST GOP MAJORITIES Roberts ordered federal courts to stop interfering with states like Wisconsin when Republicans gerrymandered dishonest Republican majorities in their legislatures that didn’t represent the intentions of voters statewide by rendering hundreds of thousands of Democratic votes meaningless in elections.

Illustrations by Michael Burmesch.


A law firm hired by Wisconsin Republicans in 2011 worked in secret using sophisticated computer algorithms to perfect “packing and cracking”— redrawing boundaries of legislative and congressional districts packing Democratic voters into the fewest possible election districts and scattering all the rest into multiple Republican districts where they would always remain a permanent minority. The corruption of democracy was immediately apparent in 2012 when even though Republican legislators won only 48% of votes statewide, they won a lopsided majority of 60 seats in the Assembly and a smaller majority in the state Senate. They’ve won 60% of legislative seats ever since even in 2018 when Democrats swept every statewide election and in 2020 when Biden defeated Trump statewide.

RADICAL SUPREME COURT

not political ones. That’s demonstrably false. The court nearly always sides with the Republican legislature against Democratic Gov. Tony Evers. That started even before Evers took office when it approved a large package of lame-duck Republican legislation stripping Evers of the powers of previous governors.

RARE DECISION

TRAGICALLY, AMERICANS TODAY MAY NEVER AGAIN LIVE UNDER A U.S. SUPREME COURT MAJORITY THAT SUPPORTS ALL THE HARD-WON CONSTITUTIONAL PROTECTIONS FOR EQUAL RIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES AND FREE AND FAIR ELECTIONS THAT WERE ONCE THE HALLMARKS OF OUR DEMOCRACY.

A decade later after a new census, voting rights and other democratic rights Americans thought were constitutionally protected are now under even greater threat by a radical Supreme Court. The court now has a lopsided 6-3 Republicanappointed majority with three new justices appointed by Donald Trump, who sent a violent mob of his supporters to attack the U.S. Capitol to try to prevent Congress from certifying President Biden’s election. And despite that good talking to Justice Roberts gave to states about how dishonest political gerrymandering was “incompatible” with American democracy, a 4-3 Republican-friendly majority on Wisconsin’s state Supreme Court has approved the decision by Republican legislators to continue using that outdated, corruptly gerrymandered Republican voting map from 2011 with minimal changes as their model for statewide voting for the next 10 years.

The Wisconsin decision was written by Rebecca Bradley, the court’s most extreme justice. Bradley is former president of the Milwaukee chapter of the rightwing Federalist Society, the same organization that screened Trump’s appointees to Supreme Court to assure their willingness to overturn abortion rights for women and other constitutional rights. “Claims of political unfairness in the maps present political questions, not legal ones,” Bradley wrote, pretending the partisan Republican court majority only issues legal decisions,

A rare anti-Republican decision came last December when Trump’s state supporters attempted to steal the election for him by asking the court to throw out all 3.3 million legally cast votes and allow the gerrymandered Republican legislature to declare Trump the winner of Wisconsin’s 10 electoral votes. That was too much for conservative Justice Brian Hagedorn to stomach. He broke from his rightwing colleagues to prevent it. Bradley exposed her own twisted political views by condemning Hagedorn’s opposition to election theft as “a death blow to democracy.” Not the American democracy most of us have always lived under that used to be supported by both political parties.

Unfortunately, Wisconsin won’t have a chance to replace any of the politically deranged members of the court majority until April 2023 with the expiration of the term of Chief Justice Pat Roggensack, now 81. Tragically, Americans today may never again live under a U.S. Supreme Court majority that supports all the hard-won constitutional protections for equal rights and opportunities and free and fair elections that were once the hallmarks of our democracy. It could take decades before we have a more fairly balanced Supreme Court again.

Despite what Chief Justice Roberts wrote in 2019, the solution to the destruction of American democracy has to lie with federal courts including the U.S. Supreme Court that makes the final decisions on the law of the land. That’s why appointments are for life to shield them from petty political concerns. State judges like those on the Wisconsin Supreme Court who run for election can’t be trusted to rise above the politics of the moment.

Joel McNally was a critic and columnist for the Milwaukee Journal for 27 years. He has written the weekly Taking Liberties column for the Shepherd Express since 1996. JANUARY 2022 | 13


NEWS HERO OF THE MONTH

Jessica Sunier Redefines Fiłness ło be Inclusive BY ERIN BLOODGOOD

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he health and fitness industry has been built to serve a certain type of person. “Health looks white. Health looks like straight teeth. Health looks thin … So, health has a look and if you don’t match that look, people judge on outside appearances and they’re going to assume you’re not healthy,” explains Jessica Sunier, Owner and Founder of the gym FitPower LLC. Sunier studied health and worked in various gyms, but she was tired of being in an industry that was focused on appearances and making money. So, in 2011, she started her own gym.

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FitPower was founded with one main goal: to help people be strong, no matter their body type. Sunier makes a point to label the gym as LGBTQIA+ and BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color) friendly, and often says that any body is welcome. In its early days, the gym started with a few personal training clients, but has since developed into a powerlifting, jiu jitsu and judofocused facility located on Vliet Street.

Photo by Erin Bloodgood.


As the gym grew from a small basement room on 92nd and Bluemound, the space expanded and so did Sunier’s ideas for improving inclusivity. She continues to widen her and her staff’s understanding of what an antiracist, judgment-free space really means. The atmosphere she has built is one that fosters trust, community, and is a place where individuals are recognized for who they are. That is apparent when walking into the space and talking to any of the gym’s members.

STRENGTH IN ALL BODY TYPES In 2019, FitPower hosted its first Everybody Pulls Deadlift competition, which is a fundraiser for a Milwaukee-based nonprofit and a way for people of all body types to showcase their strength. It has since become an annual event and this year all the proceeds went to Black Space Milwaukee. The event was started, in part, as a response to power lifting federation bans to trans lifters on the platforms. Most mainstream competitions also have a dress code, so women who wear a niqāb, like one of FitPower’s clients, wouldn’t be allowed to compete. At Everybody Pulls, anyone can compete, regardless of how they identify or what they wear. Sunier’s annual competition continues to grow and make ripples in the community. It’s really the day-to-day things that show how FitPower lives its values, such as their non-men jiu jitsu class, labeled as such to be inclusive of nonbinary folks and a space where Muslim

women can remove their head coverings. The gym also modifies its personal training programs for all bodies to fit the needs of individuals, like their clients who are pregnant or in a wheelchair. “It doesn’t matter what body you’re in or how you come through our doors, you’re work is going to be programmed to you so you can hit your goals,” says Sunier. They even offer a three-month grace period for membership dues for any members who are having financial issues—something Sunier has built into her business model. When you walk into the small gym nestled in the Washington Heights neighborhood, it feels different than other gyms—it feels like a community, as many of FitPower’s clients refer to it. That’s because of the work Sunier put in over ten years to build a business for people, rather than making money. “You work with people,” says Sunier. “That’s how communities stay close.”

Learn more about FitPower on their website: www.fitpowermke.com. Erin Bloodgood is a Milwaukee photographer and storyteller. See more of her work on her website at www.bloodgoodfoto.com.

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NEWS OFF THE CUFF

Milwaukee Police Chief

JEFFREY NORMAN “TRUST IS THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE FOR THE MPD” BY TOM JENZ

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Photo by Tom Jenz.


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n Nov. 4, the Milwaukee Fire and Police Commission voted unanimously to appoint Jeffrey Norman to the police chief position for the next four years. Norman had served as acting police chief for nearly a year and has been a member of the Milwaukee Police Department for over 25 years. “He is the best man for the job. He’s the top cop that we need,” said Common Council President Cavalier Johnson. With crime and controversy on the increase, Norman’s job will be an enormous challenge and he comes well equipped. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice from UWM, a Masters of Public Administration from Kaplan University and a law degree from Marquette University. He grew up in Milwaukee and knows the streets. During our one hour discussion in the Downtown Police Administration Building, the enthusiasm for his job came shining through.

A while ago you told me, “What’s the number one challenge of the police department? Is it violence, is it reckless driving? No, it’s trust. Trust is the biggest challenge for the MPD.” What do you mean trust is the biggest challenge? Historically, police departments have been involved in some dark situations, locally and nationally. Many segments of our society have not forgotten those transgressions. As police, we have to own that narrative. We have to learn how to be better, how to be law enforcement for all citizens. You can go back as far as the civil rights movement, then George Floyd and—locally—Dontre Hamilton, Frank Jude, Jacob Blake. Those incidents burned negative images about improper police behavior. Citizens need to feel that police are hearing them, that a just process is taking place, that police can be trusted.

And so this concept of trust is something you pass onto people working for you? Absolutely. Police should be role models. In training, we teach fair and impartial policing, procedural justice. We teach “What can we as police do to change the narrative of mistrust?” There are parts of our city where we have very little trust.

There is public confusion over whether there will be more or less police officers in 2022. For instance, not long ago, the Common Council adopted the 2022 city budget and approved a measure that allows the Milwaukee Police Department to hire 195 “additional officers." But I thought 120 positions had been eliminated in 2021. Will you actually have more officers this coming year than last year? First of all, the attrition was going on before 2020. In the last couple years, through attrition, we’ve lost about 200 police officers, and we still continue to lose some. Based on what I’ve been told and even with the replacement of 195 officers in 2022, we will be under 25 officers in authorized strength. I take exception to the words “additional officers” because really we are just getting replacement officers. Also, there is the process of hiring and six months of training. This all takes time. Our public needs more police officers to do sworn things.

What about efficiency? Can you improve efficiency to make up for loss of officers? We can improve our technology. The future plan is that police officers gather the information which is passed onto civilian computer data analysts who work together with investigators to further the prosecution. I am open to this kind of efficient process.

Here is my experience in spending time in the inner city. I find that 98% of the residents are law abiding residents and not criminals, drug dealers, or car thieves. But these residents seem to be reluctant to help the police sometimes, even to call 911. In other words, they want police in their neighborhoods, but yet they don’t. It’s almost a contradiction based on emotion. Not long ago, I did a story on one of your homicide detectives, Jeremiah Jackson. He concurred and said some residents who witness crimes are reluctant to come forward.

police have to work on better approaches to getting cooperation. We have to show we have the residents’ best interests in mind. That is why I support community engagement, talking to residents before a crisis happens. We need to engage people at the parks, events or community meetings. This is trust-building, a connection established. There are a lot of hurdles to overcome in our policecommunity relations. It starts with the grassroots groups like Running Rebels or Safe and Sound.

Let’s take an area that has its share of criminal activity, the Sherman Park area. Would it help to have the same police officers assigned to that area every week so that the residents get to know them? In other words, the oldfashioned cop walking the beat. With the reduction in officers, that is difficult. For example, District 7 encompasses Sherman Park. District 7 has squad areas, maybe 10 by10 block zones. For the same officers to patrol one squad area regularly would be a huge resource investment. Meaning our officers now have larger areas to patrol, and that does not give them the level of intimate service I’d like to see. Compare it to air travel. Twenty first class passengers might be served by three flight attendants who get to know them. But the 200 coach passengers won’t have enough flight attendants to give much personal service.

Is that your goal to get more officers who can do more community service like you describe? It works on relationship building. I tell my teammates that you won’t get more resources unless you do right with the resources you already have. You need to make inroads with your elected officials and community stakeholders, need them to understand what policing looks like in the 21st century. I’m trying to build relationships with elected officials and with residents. We need to be positive and interactive with our public. I’m trying to provide leadership to make sure this happens. This is who I am.

Detective Jackson made a valid point. There is a difference between snitches who might betray a friend compared to being a responsible witness who wants to protect their own community. A good witness is proactive, telling police which individuals are doing harm. But we as JANUARY 2022 | 17


NEWS OFF THE CUFF

I’d like to discuss a few of your comments from a Q&A session in the 5th Ward on the South Side Some women brought up the big problem of reckless drivers. You said, “When it comes to juvenile car stealing and reckless driving—the level of care is not there for kids in many families.” I assume you meant it is not law enforcement’s responsibility to change juvenile behavior. In regard to our young people, I’d like to make an analogy, the canary in the mine. Miners used to bring a canary into the underground mine. When the canary fell over, they knew methane gas was in the air, and it was time to get out of the mine. Our kids’ behavior is kind of like that canary. There are problems in our community not being addressed. Law enforcement is only one part of the solution. Police can’t do it all. We as a society need collaboration. Young people need mentors, need long term guidance, good parents, community support and involved activists who go into our schools and deliver positive advice. To “lock ‘em up and put ‘em away” is not the answer.

The ACLU seems like they lean toward criticizing police behavior. At the Q&A, I noticed that ACLU members and other activists seem to think that cops treat Black folks unfairly. You gave a pretty clear answer. You said—“I am Black. My wife is Black. My children are Black. I encourage our police force to treat people of all colors equally.” I do believe that. I respect the ACLU, their passion. Over history, the ACLU lawyers have won important cases to help with civil rights. Yet sometimes, they get too caught up in their passions and don’t realize police might be willing to work with them. I want to work with the ACLU and certain activists.

I don’t think the way to go about change is for groups to be combative. Another C word would work better: compromise. We can have differences of opinion but we don’t have to be disrespectful. Ideally, we can reach similar goals but with different ways of going about it. Win-Lose usually doesn’t do well with people or groups. Compromise usually does.

18 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

At the meeting, it was brought up that domestic violence is a big problem. You said, “Crime is generated out of societal ills, from troubled families. Cops can’t intervene in family matters.” Seems like you were saying that cops can’t control human dysfunction, right? Conflict resolution is what we deal with. It’s hard to intervene when you have issues of emotion, when someone is holding a gun or threatening another person. Police really can’t impact those kind of situations.

I’ve heard from a number of Black women in the inner city that a big issue for them is domestic violence. A man might be given a restraining order, but he ignores it. Regarding a restraining order, it does give police more leverage to make an arrest, assuming it’s reported. But other partners work hard to be part of interventions. There are classes in anger management and conflict resolution. Police react to violence, but not exactly prevention, and yet we can still collaborate with partners like Sojourner Family Peace Center or the Office of Violent Prevention. We can help victims of domestic abuse.

At that recent meeting, you said, “We have to rely on outside sources to help with policing.” This was in response to the search for the child Major Harris who was later found dead in a dumpster, having been murdered. Residents walked the streets and alleys and helped you search for Major Harris. That effort had never been done before. Our team realized that citizens wanted to do something. We used residents, the media and the city’s Office of Violence Prevention. We hope to use this as a template for future collaborations.

What can you tell the public to help them have a better understanding of police procedure or of the pressure policemen are under each day? We have the Citizen Training Academy. Over a period of several weeks, two hours a day, citizens can see what police training is like and also the rigors and stresses of a police officer. They have a real-world experience of what it’s like to be an officer in our community. And we welcome members of the media to go

through citizen training. You can also visit our Facebook page to read about what is happening with police. We get anywhere from 700,000 to a million hits a month. We need to be proactive in telling the public what we are doing.

You know, it’s kind of odd, but I’ve told a few of the Black street leaders that you would be happy to meet with them. But they seem reluctant. I guess I don’t understand this. Wouldn’t a dialog help heal the divide? Sometimes, the street activists don’t want to get too close with police because they might lose credibility with those they serve. I’d be willing to meet and talk, but I don’t like to do it in front of TV cameras because I want more meaningful conversation.

I’ve noticed with my own Facebook followers and friends that there is so much negative misinformation passed along about law enforcement. Kind of breaks my heart. The social media is a blessing and a curse. Blessing in our ability to reach so many people. Curse because if the wrong information is put out there, it goes viral. It’s important for the police to put out the counter-narrative because if only one narrative hangs out there, it becomes “the truth.” That leads to misunderstanding.

Tom Jenz is a Milwaukee writer and photographer. For his column, Central City Stories, visit shepherdexpress.com.


JANUARY 2022 | 19


FOOD & DRINK

Lazy Susan

Diligently Pursues Excellence

CASUAL FINE DINING IN SOCIALLY DISTANCED COMFORT BY SUSAN HARPT GRIMES

L

20 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

azy Susan closed for dine-in service when the pandemic hit and remained closed for all but carryout until summer 2021. The re-opened and refreshed indoor space is set up to keep diners safe, with well-spaced tables, and operating at 50% capacity. In the warmer months, there are also two outdoor seating areas. COVID safety is a top priority here, so the pleasant staff is masked, and it’s requested that diners also mask-up when not eating/drinking.

monthly. Typically, there are “small bites” which offer a taste for each person in a group of four, “for the table” with portions offering a couple of bites, and then more traditional portions in the “entree” section. It could be very easy to build a full meal, even for a table of four, sticking to Lazy Susan’s small plate offerings. Special note: gluten-free, vegan, and vegetarian diners will be very happy to see many dishes clearly marked as safe for them on the menu.

Lazy Susan’s culinary team are aces when it comes to creativity in the kitchen. They focus on what’s fresh and available, choosing local ingredients whenever possible to create their menu, which changes

On a recent visit, the Roman Artichokes ($6) were an excellent place to begin a meal. Perfectly crispy, fried artichokes with a hint of lemon, served with parmesan and an incredible lemon peppercorn aioli were

Photos by Michael Burmesch.


reminiscent of delicately fried eggplant strips. Another standout in “small bites” were the Pierogi ($10), stuffed with fluffy dilled potato and topped with amazing “sweet tooth” or hedgehog mushrooms cooked in white wine and dill. A great option “for the table” is the monthly flatbread. One recent flatbread favorite, Flammkuchen ($8/$15), featured a crisp, gluten free, flatbread topped with a creamy layer of quark, beautifully caramelized onions, tiny bits of apple, bacon, and fresh thyme. Traditional entrees are equally as tempting as the small plate options. Vegans and gluten free folks will be thrilled with the BBQ Pulled JackFruit Mac ($19). The macaroni is topped with a delicious creamy cashew butternut sauce and outstanding smokey jack fruit that’s so good it could convince a skeptical carnivore to consider going vegan. Another excellent entree, the expertly prepared coco rubbed Scallops ($25), is served with a wonderful parsnip puree, and a delicate fennel, celery, and pomegranate salad.

Perhaps one of the most fun items on the menu is one that changes weekly. Lazy Susan pays tribute to the television program “Bob’s Burgers” each week, featuring a creative burger like the phenomenal Pork and Mindy ($15), which topped a 1/2 pound angus beef patty with tender pulled pork, BBQ sauce, celery slaw, and cheddar cheese, served with hand cut fries, soup, or salad. All of the weekly burgers are posted to the restaurant’s Facebook page. Diners who like an adult beverage with their meal will be more than satisfied with the options at Lazy Susan. Tasty hand-crafted cocktails and a respectable wine list paired with a knowledgeable staff, makes it easy to find the perfect drink to go with your food.

LAZY SUSAN, MKE 2378 S. Howell Ave. (414) 988-7086 | lazysusanmke.com Reservations recommended | $$-$$$

Susan Harpt Grimes is a longtime restaurant and features writer for the Shepherd Express. JANUARY 2022 | 21


FOOD & DRINK FLASH IN THE PAN

Stir Fry at Home BY ARI LEVAUX

I

t had to be done, so it might as well be done by me, I told myself, as I dumped the thawed package of supermarket pot stickers into the vegetable stir fry. I may be crazy, but it’s a lock that my kids will like it. So how crazy could that be? Trying to make a stir-fry can get a home cook in trouble. It might seem like a simple kind of recipe until you try to make it, and the eggplant is chewy and the broccoli is mushy and it doesn’t taste like it does at the Chinese restaurant. Instead, it tastes like burnt soy sauce and perhaps balsamic or cider vinegar, because you didn’t have rice vinegar or sherry and figured that would be fine. Indeed, there are so many mistakes to be made, so many of which seem like good ideas at the time. I’ve made them all, many times, sometimes all at once. (Adding pot stickers to my stir fry, meanwhile, seemed like a good idea at the time and remains, by all accounts, a good idea and not a stir fry mistake.) Many stir fry mistakes start at the intention to make it in the first place. Why are we doing this? If we are making stir fry as a way to clean out the fridge on a Friday night, because the next day is farmers market, that’s not enough.

22 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

Here are the other most common stirfry mistakes, based on my extensive personal research. NOT HOT ENOUGH High heat is necessary for imbuing the contents of the wok with a smokey glow called wok hei, which translates to “breath of the wok.” NOT WOK ENOUGH Not heavy enough, that is. A light wok will lose its heat when stuff is added. NOT BLANCHED ENOUGH (use water, not steam). If we don’t blanch, we burn our aromatics. COOKING TOO MUCH AT A TIME An overfilled wok means the veggies don’t all get the time they need against the hot wok, in the hot oil. In fact, adding too much stuff can cool down the wok, killing that wok hei buzz. COOKING IN SESAME OIL Sesame oil— toasted sesame oil, I should emphasize—is for flavoring, not for cooking. Fry with a heat tolerant oil like safflower, peanut or frying blend. NOT ENOUGH OIL In these times of calorie counting, it can be tempting to pull back on the fry oil. But then your wok won’t get hei, and that’s no fun.

Executed properly, a stir-fry can be a celebration of fresh produce, not a waypoint between the back of the fridge and the compost pile. It should be a stage for the bright colors and crisp textures of the season.

ADDING SAUCE EARLY Have you ever burnt soy sauce? I have. It smells and tastes bad and makes the pan hard to clean. Any soy and soy-like sauces should be added toward the end of cooking to coat the food, but not cook with the food.

But like any stage, too many actors can get in each other’s way. Another common mistake is to get too busy with your stirfry. Even if each and every veggie is the freshest specimen under the sun, you don’t want to use them all. A stir-fry requires restraint. It is not some complex ecosystem that depends on diversity. Choose one or two veggies and let them be the main event. A star, balanced with a co-star and perhaps a supporting protein or two, bound together by a sauce that tastes like a stir-fry is supposed to, aka how it tastes in a Chinese restaurant.

The other day I made a stir fry with cauliflower and zucchini. I decided to add tomatoes to the sauce, so their savory flavor can mix with the soy sauce, oyster sauce and sesame oil, increasing that umami impact. Since I was too lazy to make rice, I decided to just add some pot stickers to the wok. They went perfectly with the crumbled tofu tomato stir fry sauce.

Photos by Ari LeVaux.


POT STICKER STIR FRY WITH TOMATO TOFU SAUCE AND VEGETABLES The tofu crumbles into the savory sauce, which drenches all it touches in a silken tapestry of flavor.

FOR THE SAUCE • 4 tablespoons oyster sauce • 2 tablespoons sesame oil • 2 tablespoons rice wine • 1 tablespoon sugar • 1 tablespoon sesame seeds • 1 tablespoon hoisin sauce • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper • ½ cup water • A clove of garlic, grated • A garlic clove-sized piece of ginger, grated • 1 block silken, firm tofu, pulled into inch chunks Combine all of the ingredients except the tofu and mix thoroughly. Add the tofu, stir it in, and let sit for at least an hour.

FOR THE STIR FRY • 3 tablespoons frying oil • 1 tablespoon minced garlic • 1 tablespoon minced ginger • ½ cup minced onions • 1 lb fresh, juicy tomatoes, chopped coarsely • 1 lb cauliflower, cut into 2-inch florets • 2 zucchini, in ½-inch rounds • 2 baby bok choy heads, quartered lengthwise • 10 frozen pot stickers (Asian dumplings), thawed Boil a pot of water in which to blanch the vegetables. Add them to the pot in order of longer cooking time: First the cauliflower. After three minutes, add the zucchini. After another minute, add the bok choy. Give it 30 seconds, boiling, and then remove all of the blanched veggies and plunge them in an ice bath. This will stop the cooking and keep the veggies crispy and bright colored. When the veggies are cool, drain them. Heat the oil on high in a wok or heavy bottomed pan. Add the garlic, ginger and onions. Let them fry for a minute or two in the sizzling oil. Add the tomatoes and let it cook into a sauce for about five minutes, stirring often. Add the veggies and stir fry! After about five minutes, add the marinated tofu and all the marinade. Add the pot stickers. Stir. Taste. Season with any of the ingredients from the marinade. Drain the excess sauce from the wok by tilting it over a pan and holding back the contents. Put the sauce on medium heat to thicken and set the wok back on high and continue cooking. More moisture will seep from the stir fry. Stop stirring and let the moisture cook off. When it’s nearly gone, turn off the heat. Add the reduced sauce back to the stir fry, mix again and serve.

Ari LeVaux has written about food for The Atlantic Online, Outside Online and Alternet. JANUARY 2022 | 23


FOOD & DRINK BEVERAGES

A Question About Why You Drink Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon BY GAETANO MARANGELLI

Y

ou’re at a dinner party. It’s the middle of winter. It’s the beginning of the evening. You’re drinking wine in a living room. You’re seeing old friends. You’re meeting new people. There are nine of you.

The host asks you and his other guests to seat yourselves in the dining room. The dining room has a round table with nine chairs—one for your host and his eight guests. Three of the nine people at the dinner party seat themselves before you, leaving two chairs between each of them. They are Guest A, Guest B, and Guest C. Who do you want to sit next to? Guest A is named Randy. You first met Randy when you were 17. You can’t say you were crazy about him then. But then you saw him everywhere. And then you accustomed yourself to him. Randy’s personality is big. It’s as big today as it was when you first met him. Maybe bigger. If you seat yourself next to Randy, he’ll entertain you. He’ll make you laugh. He’ll turn every subject of conversation into a story about him. You could say sitting next to Randy is easy. He asks nothing of you. Then again, he leaves you with nothing to say. Guest B is Chris. You kind of know Chris, but you don’t really. There are times you love being with him. There are times you don't know how you feel about him. Chris is different every time you see him. There are nights he’s garrulous and funny. There are others he’s serious and shy.

24 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

Guest C is Fiona. Being with Fiona can be challenging. She doesn’t talk when she doesn’t have anything to say. And when she doesn’t talk, it’s unsettling. But when she talks, what she says is charged with electricity. Fiona leaves you shifting in your seat. She makes you ask questions of yourself.

THE KEY TO GUESTS A, B, AND C Randy is a garden variety cabernet sauvignon from Napa Valley. You see him on the wine list of every restaurant and on the shelves of every wine shop. He’s a product of our society’s conventions. Lots of tannins. Lots of alcohol. A draft of heavily extracted grapes. If you like a dinner companion who asks nothing of you, Randy is who you should seat yourself next to. But don’t complain at the end of the evening when he leaves you weary. Chris is a Cotes du Rhones from the south of France. He can be made with up to 23 kinds of grapes but principally relies on three: grenache, syrah and mourvèdre. Chris can be as lovely as a midsummer day in an orchard of plums and a field of garrigue from hors d’oeuvres to dessert. Sit by Chris, and he’ll engage you all evening. Fiona is Nebbiolo from the region of Piedmont in the north of Italy. She’s roses and cherries. She appears delicate, then she asserts herself. Her tannins are sure and fine. She’s an autumn afternoon in the depths of a forest. She’s enchanting. She’s complex. She’s sublime. Sit by her and you may discover what you are. Illustration by Michael Burmesch.


WINES TO SIT BY THIS WINTER Piedmont Nebbiolo Colombera & Garella Coste della Sesia 2019 Nebbiolo from the appellation of Coste Della Sesia in northeast Piemonte, which is called Alto Piemonte. An elegant wine of 70% nebbiolo, 15% vespolina, and 15% croatina. Organic viticulture. Natural winemaking. Vietti Langhe Nebbiolo Perbacco 2018. A generous nebbiolo from the Piedmont appellation of Langhe. Organic viticulture. Conventional winemaking. Cotes du Rhone Eric Texier Cotes du Rhône Brézème 2018. So good it’s nasty. Syrah from the appellation of Brézème along the Rhone River. Organic viticulture. Natural winemaking. Eric Texier Cotes du Rhone Vaison la Romaine 2018. A classic Cotes du Rhone of Grenache, mourvèdre, and syrah. Organic viticulture. Natural winemaking.

Gaetano Marangelli is a sommelier and playwright. He was the managing director of a wine import and distribution company in New York and beverage director for restaurants and retailers in New York and Chicago before moving to Wauwatosa. JANUARY 2022 | 25


SPECIAL WINTER ARTS GUIDE | SPONSORED BY MARCUS PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

WINTER ARTS GUIDE JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2022 ACACIA THEATRE COMPANY

BREW CITY OPERA

acaciatheatre.com

brewcityopera.wixsite.com

Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol, through Jan. 8

BRONZEVILLE ARTS ENSEMBLE

ALFONS GALLERY alfonsgallery.org ALL IN PRODUCTIONS allin-mke.com APERI ANIMAM aperianimam.com ARTS @ LARGE artsatlargeinc.org

THE COMPANY OF STRANGERS THEATER thecompanyofstrangerstheater.com THE CONSTRUCTIVISTS

facebook.com/BronzevilleArtsEnsemble

theconstructivists.org CABARET MILWAUKEE

CONCORD CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

facebook.com/cabmke

concordorchestra.org CARROLL COLLEGE THEATRE

“Reconnecting to Each Other,” Jan. 30

carroll.edu

CONCORDIA UNIVERSITY

The Hijabis, Feb. 17-27

cuw.edu

CARROLL PLAYERS

COOPERATIVE PERFORMANCE

carrollplayers.weebly.com

cooperativeperformance.org CARTHAGE COLLEGE THEATRE

COVERED BRIDGE ART STUDIO TOUR

AURA THEATRE COLLECTIVE

carthage.edu/fine-arts

auratheatre.com

The Revolutionists, Feb. 25-27, March 3-5

BACH CHAMBER CHOIR

CATEY OTT DANCE COLLECTIVE

bachchoirmilwaukee.com

cateyott.com

“A Christmas Fantasy,” Jan. 9

CEDARBURG CULTURAL CENTER

BEL CANTO CHORUS belcanto.org BLACK ARTS MKE marcuscenter.org/series/black-arts-mke BLACK HOLOCAUST MUSEUM abhmuseum.org Opening planned for February BOERNER BOTANICAL GARDENS boernerbotanicalgardens.org BOULEVARD THEATRE milwaukeeboulevardtheatre.com

cedarburgculturalcenter.org “The Little Show” Juried Exhibit, through Jan. 16

DANCECIRCUS dancecircus.org DANCEWORKS PERFORMANCE MKE danceworksmke.org Sonder, Jan. 27-30 (at Next Act Theater)

chantclaire.org

From author John Koenig’s dictionary of made-up words: “sonder n.—the realization that each random passerby is living a life as vivid and complex as your own.” Guided by company dancer and choreographer Gina Laurenzi, the broadly diverse Danceworks professional company will be joined by Chicago jazz band Twin Talk and the Danceworks Intergenerational Performance Company. “Over 20 performers will come and go from a stage transformed into a living room,” Laurenzi says, “to reveal stories and intimate moments. The dance ebbs and flows to the complexities of Twin Talk’s compositions, leaving space for meandering happenings and improvisational tangents.” (John Schneider)

CHARLES ALLIS ART MUSEUM

DAVID BARNETT GALLERY

CEDARBURG PERFORMING ARTS CENTER cedarburgpac.com Swearingen & Kelli: Folk Anthems of the ‘70s, Jan. 21 Shaun Johnson and the Big Band Experience, Feb. 25 CHANT CLAIRE CHAMBER CHOIR

charlesallis.org

26 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

cedarburgartistsguild.com

davidbarnettgallery.com Illustration by Sophie Yufa. Background photo by PeskyMonkey/Getty Images.


JANUARY 2022 | 27


SPECIAL WINTER ARTS GUIDE | SPONSORED BY MARCUS PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

DEAD MAN’S CARNIVAL

FLORENTINE OPERA

INSPIRATION STUDIOS ART GALLERY

facebook.com/Dead-Mans-Carnival

florentineopera.org

inspirationstudiosgallery.com

EARLY MUSIC NOW

FRANK JUAREZ GALLERY

earlymusicnow.org

fjgmke.com

IRISH CULTURAL AND HERITAGE CENTER ichc.net

Photo courtesy of Early Music Now.

FRANKLY MUSIC franklymusic.org

JAZZ GALLERY CENTER FOR THE ARTS jazzgallerycenterforarts.org

GREENDALE COMMUNITY THEATRE greendaletheatre.org Little Women, Jan. 6-8, Jan. 13-15 Tapestry, “Faces of a Woman,” Jan. 29 Tapestry is an award-winning vocal quartet from Boston. They have performed in a variety of modes from the medieval to the modern, from Hildegard von Bingen through Steve Reich. For their performance at St. Paul Episcopal Church. Tapestry focus on a repertoire associated with women (Bingen among them) from the 12th through the 19th centuries whose lives have inspired composers. (David Luhrssen)

EX FABULA exfabula.org

GROHMANN MUSEUM msoe.edu/grohmann-museum “Robert O. Lahmann: Working in Wisconsin” Jan. 21-April 24

Graduating from Milwaukee’s Layton School of Art in 1949, Robert O. Lahmann was too young to have taken part in the WPA arts program under Franklin Roosevelt. However, his oils and pastels reveal a similar sensibility in their attention to the telling details, the everyday values, found in industrial and rural settings. (David Luhrssen)

GROVE GALLERY gallerygrove.com

FALLS PATIO PLAYERS fallspatioplayers.com

HAGGERTY MUSEUM OF ART

Always a Bridesmaid, Feb. 4-13

marquette.edu/haggerty-museum

FESTIVAL CITY SYMPHONY festivalcitysymphony.org FIRST STAGE firststage.org

“Art Asks, You Answer,” Jan. 14-May 22 “Expanding Our Horizons: Exploring and Encountering the Unknown,” Jan. 14-May 22 HARLEY-DAVIDSON MUSEUM harley-davidson.com “Off-Road Harley-Davidson,” continuing

The Watsons go to Birmingham-1963, Jan. 21-Feb. 13

The Watsons Go to Birmingham traces an African American family’s decision to travel from Michigan to Birmingham, Alabama to visit Grandma Sands. Birmingham will forever be etched in time for the 1963 church bombing that killed four Black girls. With this historic backdrop, viewers ride along and learn the enduring life lessons of family in this coming-of-age story. (Blaine Schultz) 28 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

jewishmuseummilwaukee.org “Scarp Yard: Innovators of Recycling,” through Jan. 30

“Scrap Yard” tells a story of men who—in some cases—turned rags into riches by selling and processing “junk” on a larger scale. Chudnow Iron & Metal and Miller Compressing (now owned by Alter Trading Corp.) are among the most familiar names locally. According to the leading trade association, the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries, 12 scrap yards are still operating in Milwaukee. Originally organized by the Jewish Museum of Maryland, the Milwaukee “Scrap Yard” exhibit is infused with Wisconsin names and faces by the Jewish Museum Milwaukee’s education director Ellie Gettinger, curator Molly Dubin and archives director Jay Hyland. (David Luhrssen)

“Then They Came for Me: Incarceration of Japanese American and the Demise of Civil Liberties,” Feb. 18-May 29 JOHN MICHAEL KOHLER ARTS CENTER jmkac.org/home.html “Annabeth Marks: Extender” through Jan. 9 “Jennifer Levonian: Cinnamon, Thunder,” through Jan. 23 “Allison Wade: The Good Parts,” through Feb. 6

Building a Milwaukee Icon: HD’s Juneau Ave. Factory, continuing

“High Touch,” through Feb. 13

Tsunami Motorcycle Display, continuing

“Collection Highlights: The Alchemists,” through Feb. 27

H. F. JOHNSON GALLERY OF ART Image courtesy of First Stage.

JEWISH MUSEUM MILWAUKEE

carthage.edu/art-gallery

“Ingrained in Wisconsin,” through Feb. 20

“Bernard Langlais: Live and Let Live On,” through May 1

“Annual Intercollegiate Exchange Show,” Jan. 6-28

KACM THEATRICAL PRODUCTIONS

“V Crushable,” Feb. 8-March 11

kacmtheatrical.weebly.com

HOVER CRAFT

KETTLE MORAINE SYMPHONY kmsymphony.org

HYPERLOCAL MKE hyperlocalmke.com

“Elgar, Grainger & Brahms,” Feb. 19

Background photo by PeskyMonkey/Getty Images.


JANUARY 2022 | 29


SPECIAL WINTER ARTS GUIDE | SPONSORED BY MARCUS PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

KO-THI DANCE COMPANY

MEMORIES DINNER THEATRE

MILWAUKEE CHILDREN'S CHOIR

ko-thi.org

memoriesballroom.com

milwaukeechildrenschoir.org

LAKE ARTS PROJECT

MENOMONEE FALLS SYMPHONY

lakeartsproject.com MILWAUKEE ART MUSEUM LATINO ARTS, INC. latinoartsinc.org “Carolos Barberena: I Have Been a Stranger in My Own Land,” through March 11 9th Annual Guitar Festival Concert, Feb. 5 LILY PAD GALLERY WEST lilypadgallery.com “Into the Mystic,” Jan. 21-Feb. 20 LYNDEN SCULPTURE GARDEN lyndensculpturegarden.org Scott Barton, “Buried in the Heart: A Repast for Angels and Martyrs,” opens in January MAD ROGUES madrogues.com MARCUS PERFORMING ARTS CENTER marcuscenter.org 38th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday Celebration, Jan. 17 National Geographic Live—Untamed with Filipe DeAndrade, Jan. 21 Broadway Series: Mean Girls, Jan. 25-Jan. 30 Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Feb. 1

mam.org “An-My Lê: On Contested Terrain,” through March 27

Originating from Pittsburgh’s Carnegie Museum of Art, “On Contested Terrain” consists of more than 100 photographs, many offering what the Vietnamese American artist calls “a side-glance view” of war and its impact. Lê uses a view camera sitting on a tripod, the same technology used by photographers of the American Civil War. Her pictures aren’t snapped on the fly and meant to be scrolled superficially. They are layered, complicated images that demand attention as they whisper questions about the human condition that they refuse to answer. (David Luhrssen)

“Genesis,” Feb. 3-13

“Genesis” has always been an international choreographic competition. Due to uncertain travel restrictions, this year’s contest is only open to U.S.-based choreographers. No matter. It’s always thrilling to see world premieres built on the strengths of this company’s excellent dancers by forward-looking young choreographers. “In reviewing submissions,” Artistic Director Michael Pink says, “I’m searching for choreographers that demonstrate musicality and structure and an understanding of their craft that makes for an interesting competition.” We’ll see it all close-up this year at the intimate Baumgartner Center for Dance, before voting for our favorite to return and make a second work. (John Schneider)

National Geographic Live—Exploring Mars with Kobie Boykins, Feb. 24

Directed by MCT’s Artistic Director Brent Hazelton, Mala is an irreverent, funny and cathartic exploration of how the changes in the lives of those closest to us impact our own as a daughter strives for grace as her mother nears the end of her life. Evocative and surprisingly humorous, this powerful one-woman show starring Milwaukee’s own Rána Roman. (Morton Shlabotnik)

MATERIAL STUDIOS + GALLERY materialstudiosandgallery.com

milwaukeeentertainmentgroup.com The Diary of Anne Frank, Jan. 7-22 MILWAUKEE FESTIVAL BRASS mfbrass.org MILWAUKEE INSTITUTE OF ART & DESIGN miad.edu “Sandra Bridges & African American Artists,” Jan. 17-March 11

milwaukeemakersmarket.com

milwaukeechambertheatre.org

mastersingersofmilwaukee.org

MILWAUKEE ENTERTAINMENT GROUP

MILWAUKEE MAKERS MARKET

MILWAUKEE CHAMBER THEATER

MASTER SINGERS OF MILWAUKEE

milwaukeecomedy.com

milwaukeeballet.org

Ballet Folklorico de Mexico de Amalia Hernandez, Feb. 10

marquette.edu/communication/ theatre-arts.php

MILWAUKEE COMEDY

MILWAUKEE BALLET

Black Violin, Feb. 3

MARQUETTE UNIVERSITY THEATRE

All Choir Concert, Feb. 26

Mala, Jan. 21-Feb. 13

MILWAUKEE MUSAIK milwaukeemusaik.org “Brass Splendor,” TBD MILWAUKEE OPERA THEATRE milwaukeeoperatheatre.org MILWAUKEE REPERTORY THEATER milwaukeerep.com Quadracci Powerhouse: Toni Stone, Jan. 4-Jan. 30

Marcenia “Toni” Stone was the first woman to play professional baseball. Stone played for the Indianapolis Clowns of the Negro League and took the spot of Henry Aaron who left for the Milwaukee Braves. Against all odds, Stone blazes a path in the male-dominated sports world, shattering expectations and creating her own set of rules. With spring training just around the corner, follow Toni’s journey as she fights for love, equality and a chance to do what she wants the most—play baseball. Filled with humor and the love of the game, this intimate and profoundly relevant portrait of America will have you cheering along. (Blaine Schultz)

Stackner Cabaret: Piano Men Men, Jan. 7-Feb. 27 Stiemke Studio: Antonio’s Song: I Was Dreaming of a Son Son, Jan. 26-March 6 As You Like It It, Feb. 15-March 20

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MILWAUKEE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA mso.org “Stage to Screen,” Jan. 21-22 “All That Jazz,” Jan. 28-29 Gershwin’s Second Rhapsody, Feb. 4-6 Beethoven’s Pastoral, Feb. 18-20 MILWAUKEE YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA myso.org Rhythmic Revolution Concert, Jan. 28 Progressions Winter Wonders Concert, Feb. 2 MILWAUKEE YOUTH THEATRE

MOWA ON THE LAKE (ST. JOHN’S ON THE LAKE) NEXT ACT THEATRE nextact.org Pipeline, Feb. 10-March 6

MacArthur Fellowship winner Dominique Morisseau began as an actor and turned to writing plays about African Americans because there were so few roles for her to play. Her award-winning 2017 play Pipeline concerns an inner-city public-school teacher who worked hard to give her son opportunities by sending him to an elite private school, only for misunderstandings and rage to follow. (David Luhrssen)

NŌ STUDIOS nostudios.com

milwaukeeyouththeatre.org

portraitsocietygallery.com NORTH SHORE ACADEMY OF THE ARTS

MUSEUM OF WISCONSIN ART wisconsinart.org Photo courtesy of Museum of Wisconsin Art.

facebook.com/ northshoreacademyofthearts NORTHERN SKY THEATER northernskytheater.com OCONOMOWOC ARTS CENTER oasd.k12.wi.us OIL GALLERY MILWAUKEE oilmilwaukee.com OPTIMIST THEATRE

“The Studio Glass Movement in Wisconsin: The Hyde Collection,” through Jan. 23 One of the least known, but surely the most striking of these Badger State achievements is its role and helping birth the studio glass art movement. Credit the late artist and educator Harvey K. Littleton, a ceramist, for establishing the first university-level “hot glass” program at UW-Madison in the mid1960s. The collection on display, accumulated by benefactors James and Karen Hyde, includes more than 100 works developed by some 30 Wisconsin-based artists and educators, including works by Littleton himself and husband-and-wife duo Jeremy Propelka and Stephanie Trenchard, who helped turn Door County into a studio glass haven. (Michael Muckian)

PORTRAIT SOCIETY GALLERY Romano Johnson, “The Yellow Moon Healing God,” through Jan. 8 PRESENT MUSIC presentmusic.org QUASIMONDO PHYSICAL THEATRE quasimondo.org RACINE ART MUSEUM ramart.org “Collection Focus: Mara Superior,” through Jan. 15

optimisttheatre.org

“Alien Invasion: (Un)Familiar Forms in Contemporary Art,” through Jan. 22

OUTSKIRTS THEATRE facebook.com/outskirtstheatre

“Get a Bead On: Jewelry and Small Objects,” through Jan. 22

OVER OUR HEAD PLAYERS

“Component Parts: Artworks Made of Multiple Elements,” through Feb. 12

overourheadplayers.org “Snowdance,” Feb. 4

“Playful/Pensive: Contemporary Artists and Contemporary Issues,” through July 9

PENINSULA PLAYERS

RACINE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

peninsulaplayers.com

racinesymphony.org

2022 Wisconsin Artists Biennial, Feb. 12-April 24 MOWA | DTN (SAINT KATE-THE ARTS HOTEL) Suzanne Rose, “Blind Spot: To Pass Among Them,” through Feb. 22

Illustrations by Sophie Yufa. Background photo by PeskyMonkey/Getty Images.

RACINE THEATRE GUILD racinetheatre.org Nunsense, Jan. 7-23 Guys on Ice, Feb. 11-27 RENAISSANCE THEATERWORKS r-t-w.com

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SPECIAL WINTER ARTS GUIDE | SPONSORED BY MARCUS PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

SAINT KATE - THE ARTS HOTEL saintkatearts.com “Visual Sirens: Collections of Final Warnings Curated by David Najib Kasir,” through Jan. 23 “The Wonder Makers: A Cabinet of Curiosities,” through April 3 SHARON LYNNE WILSON CENTER FOR THE ARTS wilson-center.com Liam Nugent, Jan. 7 Natural Satellite Duo, Jan. 14 Ted Yoder Band with String Quartet, Jan. 21 7000 Apart, Feb. 11 “What Would You Do with Petula Clark,” Feb. 23 Marcya Danielle Quartet, Feb. 25 SKYLIGHT MUSIC THEATRE

SOUTH MILWAUKEE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

toryfolliard.com

southmilwaukeepac.org UW-PARKSIDE THEATRE

Four Guyz in Dinner Jackets, Feb. 25 SUNSET PLAYHOUSE

uwp.edu/the rita/ theatreperformances.cfm

sunsetplayhouse.com

Circle Mirror Transformation, Feb. 18-19

Bombshell Theatre Co. presents Funny Girl, Jan. 7-16 4 Weddings and an Elvis, Jan. 20-Feb. 6 Surf’s Up, Jan. 24-25 BoyGirlBoyGirl, Feb. 10-13

If you love the four-part harmonies—and all that jazz—of Manhattan Transfer, here’s the group that bills itself as Milwaukee’s echo of those Grammy winners. The Boys are Tommy Lueck and Don Lobacz, once half of that popular outfit called Four Guyz in Dinner Jackets (Lobacz retired his jacket a few years ago but the band plays on). The Girls, Laura Monagle and Michaela Ristaino, are familiar faces (and voices) to local theatergoers. They perform a swingin’ repertoire that spans the ‘30s through the ‘50s. (David Luhrssen)

skylightmusictheatre.org

Tessa’s Tip-Tapping Toes, Feb. 16-19

Ernest Shackleton Loves Me, Jan. 14-30

THEATRE GIGANTE

Raisin, Feb. 11-27

theatregigante.org

The 1974 Tony Award-winner remains relevant as Americans come to grips with a racist past and the barriers that remain. The musical by Judd Woldin, Robert Brittan, Robert Nemiroff and Charlotte Zaltzberg is an adaptation of Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun and tells (and sings) the story a Black family buying a house in an all-white neighborhood. Drawn from gospel, jazz and pop, Raisin’s score won a Grammy. Choreographer and dancer Kenneth L. Roberson (Avenue Q) will direct Skylight’s production. (David Luhrssen)

TORY FOLLIARD GALLERY

UW-MILWAUKEE PECK SCHOOL OF THE ARTS uwm.edu/arts/events Department of Dance: “Winter Dances 2022: All That You Touch You Change,” Feb. 3-5

Our responsibility for the planet is the subject of premieres by faculty and guest choreographers for young dancers. Physical and emotional, “dance is a powerful conveyor of meaning,” says artistic director Maria Gillespie. “We all want the impact of our actions be of healing, of creation.” Using repurposed plastic costumes and scenery, choreographer Simone Ferro explores the effects of climate change on daily lives. Gillespie examines how our bodies carry knowledge, trauma and joy. Guest artist Parijat Desai explores the relationship between individual wounds and our world’s wounds. To his own music, hip hop choreographer Anthony ‘YNOT’ Denaro’s examines time’s passage. (John Schneider)

MKE Unplugged Presents: Ogni Suono, Feb. 10

THEATRICAL TENDENCIES theatricaltendencies.com

UW-WHITEWATER CROSSMAN GALLERY

THIRD AVENUE PLAYHOUSE, STURGEON BAY

uww.edu

thirdavenueplayworks.org

UW-WHITEWATER THEATRE uww.edu

THRASHER OPERA HOUSE, GREEN LAKE

Florentine Children’s Opera, Jan. 23

thrasheroperahouse.com VAR GALLERY & STUDIOS

Skerryvore, Jan. 15 Missoula Children’s Theatre, Red Riding Hood, Jan. 22 Mike Farris, Feb. 11 Willy Porter, Feb. 12 Pokey LaFarge, Feb. 18

vargallery.com VILLAGE PLAYHOUSE villageplayhouse.org Original One Act Festival, Feb. 4-6, Feb. 11-13

Dervish,, Feb. 25 VILLA TERRACE DECORATIVE ARTS MUSEUM villaterrace.org “Villa Incognito: Latent Narratives in the Permanent Collection,” through March 6 VOICES FOUND REPERTORY voicesfoundrep.com 32 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

Illustrations by Sophie Yufa. Background photo by PeskyMonkey/Getty Images.


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SPECIAL WINTER ARTS GUIDE | SPONSORED BY MARCUS PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

WALKER'S POINT CENTER FOR THE ARTS

WEST ALLIS PLAYERS westallisplayers.org

wpca-milwaukee.org WEST PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

WATER STREET DANCE MILWAUKEE

nbexcellence.org/community/ westpac.cfm

waterstreetdancemke.com

Mamma Mia!, Feb. 4-6

WAUKESHA CIVIC THEATRE waukeshacivictheatre.org [Title of Show], Jan. 7-16 Cats, Jan. 10 Academy Live!, Jan. 22 Silent Sky, Feb. 11-27

Among the positive developments in recent years is the attention paid to overlooked women of the past, those pioneers in art and science whose accomplishments were eclipsed by the men they worked with. Lauren Gunderson’s Silent Sky dramatizes the achievements of astronomer Henrietta Leavitt. At the Harvard Observatory in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Leavitt scrutinized the night sky, measuring the brightness of stars. Her work enabled the discovery by Edwin Hubble that the universe we inhabit is immeasurably larger than we imagined. (David Luhrssen)

“Couples Therapy: The Doctor is In,” Feb. 17

The peppy 1975 ABBA hit inspired British playwright Catherine Johnson to compose a storyline around a string of the Swedish group’s Euro-pop hits—“Dancing Queen,” “Knowing Me, Knowing You” et. al.—in the jukebox musical that enjoyed one of the longest runs ever on the West End and Broadway. And if Broadway ticket prices make you want to sing “SOS”—and you’ve seen Meryl Streep several times in the lively 2008 Hollywood adaptation—here’s a chance to enjoy the production on stage and close to home. (David Luhrssen)

WILD SPACE DANCE wildspacedance.org WINDFALL THEATRE windfalltheatre.com WISCONSIN CRAFT wisconsincraft.org WISCONSIN LUTHERAN COLLEGE CENTER FOR ARTS AND PERFORMANCE wlc.edu 10-Minute Original Play Showcase, Feb. 17-20 Philomusica Quartet, Feb. 21 WISCONSIN PHILHARMONIC wisphil.org WOODLAND PATTERN BOOK CENTER woodlandpattern.org Poetry Marathon, Jan. 29-30

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Illustrations by Sophie Yufa. Background photo by PeskyMonkey/Getty Images.


JANUARY 2022 | 35


SPECIAL BEST OF MILWAUKEE | PRESENTED BY BUNZEL'S OLD-FASHIONED MEAT MARKET & CATERING

CHURCH FESTIVAL

St. Gregory the Great Festival 3160 S. 63rd St.

This four-day late-summer event includes rides, children’s games, a raffle, fish fry, chicken dinner, an outdoor mass on Sunday and a raft of popular local cover bands. (Morton Shlabotnik)

FINALISTS:

2021 brought to you by

Shepherd Express

ARTS & ENTE RTAI N M ENT ART GALLERY (NON-MUSEUM)

Saint KateThe Arts Hotel 139 E. Kilbourn Ave. saintkatearts.com

Since 2019, Saint Kate-The Arts Hotel, has offered music, theater and food from steak to pizza. But the galleries, one of them run by MOWA and the other by the hotel, are alone worth a visit. (Blaine Schultz)

FINALISTS:

• Dream Lab • Var Gallery • The Warehouse

ART MUSEUM

Milwaukee Art Museum

ART & CRAFT FAIR/ MAKER’S MARKET

Milwaukee Makers Market

MilwaukeeMakersMarket.com The maker community in Milwaukee is thriving, and Ryan Laessig’s Milwaukee Makers Market is one of the reasons why. From crafts to artwork as well as local food, the experience of the regular markets goes far beyond your typical craft fair. Milwaukee Makers Market uplifts local small business with their events. (Allen Halas)

FINALISTS:

• Cream City Creatives • The MKE Youth Collective Fair • West Allis Farmers Market

CHORAL GROUP/MUSIC EDUCATION

700 N. Art Museum Drive mam.org

Kids From Wisconsin

With an eclectic collection as its base, spanning the ancient world through the moderns, MAM continues to host increasingly ambitious programming with multi-media aspects and contemporary relevance for Milwaukee and the wider world. The soaring spikes of the museum’s Santiago Calatrava addition have become Milwaukee’s symbol— and you can’t beat that heated underground parking garage on cold days. The year opens with a timely exhibit by Vietnamese American photographer An-My Lê. (David Luhrssen)

The Kids from Wisconsin are an extremely talented group of singers, musicians, and dancers. Do yourself a favor and check out one of their suitable-for-all-ages shows. These 36 “kids” will blow your socks off with their high-energy renditions of classic tunes, Broadway hits, pop and country songs. (Susan Harpt Grimes)

FINALISTS:

• Grohmann Museum • Haggerty Museum of Art • Villa Terrace Decorative Arts Museum

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kidsfromwisconsin.org

FINALISTS: CHORAL GROUP • Bach Chamber Choir • Bel Canto Chorus • Master Singers of Milwaukee

FINALISTS: MUSIC EDUCATION • Isharai Artist Management • Milwaukee Jazz Institute • Music Together North Shore

• • • • •

St Mark's Episcopal Church St. Dominic Catholic Parish St. John Vianney Catholic Parish St. Robert's Parish St. Roman Parish

CLASSICAL MUSIC ENSEMBLE

Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra (MSO)

mso.org

Things may never look the same again for this flagship Milwaukee arts organization. The Bradley Symphony Center is the fully re-furnished Warner Theater, a grand artifact of the Art Deco period hidden away for decades like a great urban mystery. The venue now transports the MSO concert experience into an era of cultural splendor. This wholly befits an organization that, by its nature, mines a cultural treasure trove of the past, the classical music repertoire, while striving to attract an audience distracted by a myriad of 21st century entertainment possibilities. (Kevin Lynch)

FINALISTS:

• Bach Chamber Choir • Frankly Music • Present Music

COMEDIAN

Charlie Berens

In December 2020, the National Bobblehead Hall of Fame and Museum unveiled a limitededition Charlie Berens bobblehead, an honor recognizing the mind behind “Manitowoc Minute” and other Wisconsin-themed comedy videos. (Morton Shlabotnik)

FINALISTS: • • • • •

Dana Ehrmann John McGivern Myron Jewel Ton Johnson William Krolowitz

DANCE COMPANY

Milwaukee Ballet milwaukeeballet.org

Milwaukee Ballet stands with the best in the country in quality and creativity. Able to safely train and perform for the past year, the dancers are in top form. The current “Season of Inspiration” continues with a new iteration of the careerenhancing choreographic competition, Genesis. PUSH (as in boundaries) follows with a world premiere by 2019 Genesis winner Aleix Mañé, another by in-demand


ARTS & ENTE RTAI N M ENT choreographer Stephanie Martinez, and a revival of Alejandro Cerrudo’s unforgettable Extremely Close, performed by the company in 2012. The season will close with the longawaited return of Michael Pink’s deeply felt story ballet, Beauty and the Beast. (John Schneider)

FINALISTS:

• Catey Ott Dance Collective • Danceworks, Inc. • Signature Dance Company

LOCAL RADIO PERSONALITY

Tarik Moody (88Nine Radio Milwaukee)

As the director of digital strategy and innovation for 88Nine Radio Milwaukee as well as an on-air personality, “The Architect” Tarik Moody has his eyes on the future at all times. His “Rhythm Lab Radio” show has become syndicated beyond Milwaukee, as he aims to redefine the urban sound. (Allen Halas)

FINALISTS: • • • •

Bob & Brian Dori Zori Gene Mueller Mandy Scott

LOCAL TV PERSONALITY/ STAGE ACTOR

John McGivern

Offstage, John McGivern is as nice a man as you will ever meet. Onstage, in any of his enormously popular one-man shows, he’s just as nice but funnier. His Milwaukee PBS series “Around the Corner” has earned Emmys as the actor/playwright chats with residents of a different Wisconsin town while historian John Gurda explores the town’s history. (John Schneider)

FINALISTS: LOCAL TV PERSONALITY • • • •

Mark Baden Steve Chamraz Ted Perry Toya Washington

FINALSTS: STAGE ACTOR • Andrew Varela • Lee Ernst • Norman Moses

MILWAUEE AUTHOR

John Gurda

What other author has done more to awaken Milwaukeeans to the unique history of our city? His book, The Making of Milwaukee, was transformed into an Emmy Award-winning PBS special that aired coast to coast. He continues to produce lavishly illustrated and solidly researched accounts, such as City Built on Water and Milwaukee: City of Neighborhoods. (David Luhrssen)

FINALISTS:

• Britney Morgan • Mikey Cody Apollo • Steven Binko

MOVIE THEATER

FINALISTS:

Oriental Theatre

• Jammin' 98.3 • Milwaukee's NPR 89.7 WUWM-FM • WMSE 91.7 FM

Among many of Milwaukee’s unique attractions is the handful of still-operating cinemas that date from Hollywood’s golden age. The Oriental is truly a movie palace with its eclectic Near East-Far East décor. The landmark underwent an expensive renovation before reopening last fall as a venue for indie and foreign films. (David Luhrssen)

STAGE ACTRESS

2230 N. Farwell Ave. mkefilm.org

FINALISTS:

• Avalon Atmospheric Theater • Downer Theatre • Marcus Majestic Cinema

MUSEUM (NON-ART)

Milwaukee Public Museum

800 W. Wells St. mpm.edu

Laura Gordon

Decades of perfect acting in town, in particular at the Rep, have endeared Laura Gordon to audiences and to her fellow theatre artists. She’s equally celebrated these days for her perfect directing, here and around the country. That she’s honored as best actress this year might just stem from her tour de force, pre-lockdown January 2020 performance as Winnie in Samuel Beckett’s play Happy Days at Renaissance Theaterworks. “With virtually non-stop monologues, Gordon gives a career defining performance,” wrote the Shepherd’s Russ Bickerstaff. “Her Winnie is so real, so three-dimensional we forget her physical entrapment in the mound of earth.” (John Schneider)

FINALISTS:

OUTDOOR FESTIVAL

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Summerfest

THEATER COMPANY

Milwaukee Public Museum collections contain more than four million specimens. Visit the turn-of-the-century Streets of Old Milwaukee, European Village and ancient Mediterranean civilizations. Or take a giant leap back more than 65 million years to The Third Planet and see one of the largest dinosaur skulls ever found. (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS:

• Discovery World • Harley-Davidson Museum • Jewish Museum Milwaukee

200 N. Harbor Drive summerfest.com

Milwaukee’s premier music festival and outdoor venue puts the “summer” in the festival setting. The internationally known— and renowned—music fest literally features every type of music and entertainment possible under the sun, the moon and the stars. In fact, that’s the best way to enjoy it. (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS:

• Irish Fest • MusiConnect • Wisconsin State Fair

RADIO STATION

88Nine

radiomilwaukee.org Few local radio stations have been able to make the strides in Milwaukee that 88Nine Radio Milwaukee has. While the station provides an eclectic mix of trendy music from around the world daily, the communityfocused organization has also looked to showcase the diversity of the city with on-air and online programming. (Allen Halas)

Gabriella Ashlin Marcee Doherty-Elst Marti Gobel Laura Gray Carrie Hitchcock Sandra Hollander Mary MacDonald Kerr Isabelle Kralj Rana Roman Amber Smith Samantha Sostarich Jennifer Vosters Tami Workentin Anna Marie Zorn

Milwaukee Repertory Theater milwaukeerep.com

The Rep is recognized as a leading regional theater in the U.S. Its decadelong commitment to equity, diversity and inclusion onstage and off sets a very high standard. So does its commitment to new play development, which expanded during the pandemic. This season’s big productions are ahead: an adaptation of Shakespeare’s rom-com As You Like It featuring 20 Beatles’ songs; a new dramatization of Agatha Christie’s whodunit, Murder on the Orient Express; the giant Titanic The Musical; two commissioned world premieres by Dael Orlandersmith; musical tributes to Frank Sinatra and Judy Garland, and the genre-defying virtuosity of the Piano Men. (John Schneider)

FINALISTS:

• Next Act Theatre • Renaissance Theaterworks • Skylight Music Theatre

JANUARY 2022 | 37


SPECIAL BEST OF MILWAUKEE | PRESENTED BY BUNZEL'S OLD-FASHIONED MEAT MARKET & CATERING

C IT Y CO N FI D ENTIAL LOCAL ACTIVIST

Frank Nitty

Frank Nitty has become a Black activist phenomenon. In post-George Floyd 2020, dressed in his trademark dreadlocks under a flat-billed cap, he has attracted nearly 100,00 followers across Wisconsin and the U.S. That same year, Nitty walked from Milwaukee to Washington D.C. to speak at a protest rally. Although Nitty has not been as active in 2021, his style of activism is always free-wheeling and improvisational. (Tom Jenz)

FINALISTS:

• Steven Binko • Elle Halo • Monique Liston

LOCAL CHARACTER

Milverine

The stuff of legend or just a guy who prefers to walk? Milwaukee has a rich history of local characters including John Hamann (aka Milverine), whose resemblance to a certain Marvel Comics character has made him a recognizable face in his hometown for little more than walking, sometimes with his small dog and shirtless—weather permitting—from Downtown to Bay View. (Blaine Schultz)

FINALISTS:

• Steven Binko • Ryan Laessig • John McGivern

LOCAL ENTREPRENEUR

Lilo Allen

Bronzeville Collective bronzevillecollective.com The Bronzeville Collective MKE is a collaborative store in its namesake neighborhood that bolsters the works of local artisans, in particular black, brown and LGBTQ creatives. More than 25 artisans have their products—jewelry, wellness products, clothing, artwork, etc.—available in a space that honors Bronzeville’s rich history of blackowned businesses. (Jean-Gabriel Fernandez)

FINALISTS:

• Geoff Hoen • Ryan Laessig • Chauntel McKenzie

LOCAL PODCAST

podcast features stories and events from the community, insights and rider resources for motorcyclists. It also serves as a way for listeners to ask questions about personal injury lawsuits. (Blaine Schultz)

FINALISTS:

• Experience MKE • Geekset Podcast • Local First Podcast

MILWAUKEE ALDERPERSON

Marina Dimitrijevic

In 2004, Marina Dimitrijevic became the youngest woman ever elected to the county board and became chairwoman of the board in 2012. The longtime Bay View resident was elected alderperson for the district in 2020. Throughout her public life, she has been a champion for families and children, concentrating on energy and environmental standards and job creation-economic development. (David Luhrssen)

FINALISTS:

• Milele A. Coggs • Cavalier Johnson • Nik Kovac

MILWAUKEE COUNTY SUPERVISOR

Ryan Clancy

Before becoming a county supervisor in 2020, Ryan Clancy was known as an activist. He was arrested while attending a protest honoring George Floyd. He is also an MPS teacher and owner of Bounce Milwaukee, an activity center that has become a hub for Milwaukee’s progressive community. His agenda includes increased investments in health and human services. (Frank Grey)

FINALISTS:

• Priscilla Coggs-Jones • Jason Haas • Marcelia Nicholson

• • • •

Bronzeville Collective MKE Cream City Print Lounge Maranta Plant Shop Ruby’s Bagels

MOST BELOVED POLITICIAN

Tammy Baldwin

Tammy Baldwin has been a fighter for her Wisconsin constituents and all Americans. As our U.S. Senator, she has pushed to lower prescription drug prices and extend high-quality health care for all; she has advocated for veterans and dairy farmers and for holding Wall Street accountable. (David Luhrssen)

FINALISTS:

• Mandela Barnes • Tom Barrett • Gwen Moore

MOST DESPISED POLITICIAN

Ron Johnson

As the other U.S. Senator for Wisconsin, Ron Johnson remains a tireless campaigner for Donald Trump, eagerly spreading the Big Lie that Trump somehow won the November 2020 election. His resume also includes voting for tax cuts that benefitted millionaires like himself, denying the science of climate change and opposing raising the minimum wage. What’s not to despise? (David Luhrssen)

FINALISTS:

MILWAUKEEAN OF THE YEAR

Giannis Antetokounmpo

MOST TRUSTED PUBLIC OFFICIAL

With a laundry list of accomplishments, including leading the Milwaukee Bucks to their first NBA title in 50 years, it’s no surprise that the Greek Freak was voted Milwaukeean of the Year. His dominant performance on the court, as well as his endearing personality off when, has won the hearts of the city. (Allen Halas)

FINALISTS:

Before 1977, lawyers could not advertise on television. Today things are different. “Tell Them You Mean Business” is a podcast created by the personal injury law firm Hupy and Abraham. The savvy firm’s

MINORITY-OWNED BUSINESS

38 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

FINALISTS:

• Tony Evers • Robin Vos • Scott Walker

Tell Them You Mean Business by Hupy and Abraham hupy.com

At Funky Fresh, spring rolls become a blank slate of unique culinary expression. That is to say, Funky Fresh doesn’t serve the kind of deep-fried fingerlings one is apt to find at buffets. The fillings are imaginative and nutritional beyond the standard ground pork, cabbage and carrot combination. (Jamie Lee Rake)

• Steven Binko • Samer Ghani • Derek Mosley

Funky Fresh Spring Rolls

3536 W. Fond du Lac Ave. funkyfreshspringrolls.com

Derek Mosely

Derek Mosley has been the Municipal Court Branch 2 Judge for almost 20 years. He handles municipal ordinance violations, juvenile cases, traffic offenses, and code violations. Judge Mosley sits on the Board of Directors for many non-profit organizations. He is also a “food influencer” with nearly 16,000 followers on Facebook and Instagram. How can you not trust a public official who loves food? (Tom Jenz)

FINALISTS: • • • •

Tom Barrett Ryan Clancy Hannah Dugan Marina Dimitrijevic


C IT Y CO N FI D ENTIAL NON-PROFIT/HUMAN SERVICES ORGANIZATION

Planned Parenthood plannedparenthood.org

Planned Parenthood provides many services including the morning after pill (emergency contraception), pregnancy testing, STD treatment, birth control, and sexual and reproductive health care. (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS: • • • •

Ignite The Spirit Love on Black Women Mattie's Memory Street Angels

ORGANIZATION SUPPORTING VETERANS

Dryhootch Coffeehouse 1030 E Brady St. dryhootch.org

Dryhootch—“hootch” being military slang for a safe place to sleep during combat, and “dry” meaning alcohol-free— offers veterans a place where they can gather informally and talk in a safe, comfortable, drugand-alcohol-free environment. Their many programs, which include art therapy, have been helping veterans and their families heal for more than a decade. (Sheila Julson)

FINALISTS:

• Center for Veterans Issues • Disabled American Veterans • Milwaukee Homeless Veterans Initiative • Wisconsin Veterans Chamber of Commerce

PHILANTHROPIST

Herb Kohl

Herb Kohl is a local hero. The Milwaukee native was part of the family business, Kohl’s Department Stores, he served four six-year terms in the U.S. Senate. As a philanthropist and former owner of the Milwaukee Bucks he has made his mark on his community. Like his childhood friend Bud Selig, Kohl continues to honor his roots. (Blaine Schultz)

FINALISTS:

• Chris Abele • Daniel Bader • Shavonda Sisson

PLACE TO PICK UP THE SHEPHERD EXPRESS

Colectivo Coffee Multiple locations colectivocoffee.com

Colectivo Coffee, which began with humble beginnings in 1993 as Alterra, has grown to 12 locations throughout the Milwaukee Area, along with cafés in Madison and Chicago.

Their picturesque lakefront location is housed in an 1888 historic Milwaukee River Flushing Station. (Sheila Julson)

FINALISTS: • • • • •

Metro Market Milwaukee Public Market Outpost Natural Foods - Bay View Pick 'n Save Piggly Wiggly

PLACE TO WORK FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE

BLOC (Black Leaders Organizing Communities) blocbybloc.org

Social justice ensures that everyone deserves equal economic, political, and social rights. The people of BLOC (Black Leaders Organizing Committee) call themselves uniters, and they work to lift up Black citizens, leaders, and businesses in the Milwaukee community, and that includes community-based organizing and face-toface conversations. BLOC practically defines hands-on work for social justice. (Tom Jenz)

FINALISTS:

• Citizen Action of Wisconsin • UBUNTU Research & Evaluation • Voces de la Frontera

PLACE TO WORK FOR ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE

Urban Ecology Center Multiple locations urbanecologycenter.org

The Urban Ecology Center, a nonprofit organization that began with informal park cleanups in 1991, educates the Milwaukee community about the environment, conservation, sustainability and other issues related to urban ecology while highlighting the natural assets of the city. Their multifaceted programs for adults and children promote environmental stewardship in the city. (Sheila Julson)

FINALISTS:

• Alice's Garden • Milwaukee Riverkeeper

RISING STAR IN POLITICS

Mandela Barnes

Democrat Lieutenant Governor Mandela Barnes was the state assemblyman for Milwaukee’s District 11 and served four years. He is Wisconsin’s first Black lieutenant governor and maybe the youngest at 33. He is now running for the Wisconsin U.S. Senate seat currently held by Ron Johnson. His style is low key, and he knows how to listen. Even his opponents would call him a nice guy. (Tom Jenz)

FINALISTS:

• Ryan Clancy • David Crowley • Cavalier Johnson

STATE LEGISLATOR

Chris Larson

Respect for Chris Larson has grown throughout his years in public service from the Milwaukee county board through the Wisconsin state senate. Throughout, he has been a champion for public schools, equality, job creation and health care for all Wisconsinites. (Frank Grey)

FINALISTS:

• David Bowen • Jonathan Brostoff

WOMAN-OWNED BUSINESS

Maranta Plant Shop 112 S. Second St. MarantaPlantShop.com

When the pandemic first began to hit, people everywhere looked to spruce up their home offices. That led to the success of Maranta Plant Shop’s pop-up events, and eventually the opening of their Walker’s Point storefront. Looking to create a community beyond their customers, future developments are planned to increase Maranta’s presence within the city. (Allen Halas)

FINALISTS: • • • • •

Bandit MKE Bronzeville Collective MKE Jen's Sweet Treats MKE Style Concierge UBUNTU Research & Evaluation

JANUARY 2022 | 39


SPECIAL BEST OF MILWAUKEE | PRESENTED BY BUNZEL'S OLD-FASHIONED MEAT MARKET & CATERING

D I N I N G O UT AFRICAN RESTAURANT

BREAKFAST/BRUNCH

Ethiopian Cottage Restaurant

Blue's Egg

ethiopiancottagerest.com 1824 N. Farwell Ave.

The restaurant's name refers to the traditional dwellings of Ethiopia, where the delicious stews redolent of Africa and the Near East were prepared over open fires and arrayed on a crepe-like sourdough called injera. The hearty tradition is kept alive at Ethiopian Cottage, which features an assortment of meat and vegetarian options plus Ethiopian beer, coffee, tea and honey wine. (David Luhrssen)

FINALISTS:

• Alem Ethiopian Village • Blue Star Cafe • Immy's African Cuisine

BAR FOOD

Camino

434 S. Second St. CaminoMKE.com Located in Walker’s Point, Camino combines the charm of a dive bar with the food of a top-notch eatery. A craft beer pairs well with plenty of deep-fried options, as well as an array of pierogis, wings and sandwiches. A quick bite to go with your drink or a full meal are available here, and all of their specialties are done very well. (Allen Halas)

FINALISTS:

• Pete's Pub • Steny's Tavern & Grill • The Stillery

BARBECUE/RIBS

Double B's BBQ Restaurant & Timbers MKE Style BBQ Food Truck 7420 W. Greenfield Ave. doublebs.com

Double B’s believes barbecue is an art. Their hickory-smoked ribs, brisket and chicken are cooked low and slow. They’ve got burgers, too, and along with mac and cheese, coleslaw and cornbread that compliment a true barbecue meal.(Sheila Julson)

FINALISTS: BARBECUE • Heaven's Table BBQ • Iron Grate BBQ Co. • Smoke Shack

FINALISTS: RIBS

• Pitch's Lounge & Restaurant • Sandras On The Park • Smoke Shack

40 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

317 N. 76th St. bluesegg.com

If it’s breakfast or brunch (or both), then Blue’s Egg is the place to go for unique approaches to traditional dishes. Hash browns get special treatment: pulled ham, aged Provolone, chicken Chorizo roasted mushroom. And for those watching their calories, there’s even skinny browns. And that’s just the beginning. (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS: BREAKFAST • Honey Butter Cafe • Mad Rooster Cafe • Sweet Diner

FINALISTS: BRUNCH • Sweet Diner • The Noble • Sabrosa Cafe

BREW PUB/FISH FRY FRIED CHEESE CURDS

Lakefront Brewery 1872 N. Commerce St. lakefrontbrewery.com

More of a beer hall than a pub, Lakefront’s hospitality is legendary, and so are their beers. Their spacious bar and dining area, overlooking the river, feature their array of beers and an extensive restaurant menu with everything from Friday fish fry and cheese curds to mac & cheese, brats and kielbasa. Don’t miss their famous brewery tour! (Barry Houlehen)

FINALISTS: BREW PUB

• Eagle Park Brewing Company • Faklandia Brewing • The Explorium Brewpub Third Ward

FINALISTS: FISH FRY • • • •

Kegel's Inn The Packing House Sandras on the Park The Stillery

FINALISTS: FRIED CHEESE CURDS • AJ Bombers • Camino • Faklandia Brewing

BUFFET

Maharaja

1550 N. Farwell Ave. maharajahrestaurants.com After the pandemic, Maharaja cut back its famously popular lunch buffet to Saturday and Sunday only. On weekdays, they offer instead a $13 lunch special with many options to satisfy longtime fans of the restaurant (unless you were one of those people who filled your plate four times at the buffet line). (David Luhrssen)

FINALISTS: • • • • •

Casablanca Golden Corral Buffet & Grill India Garden New China Buffet Singha Thai Restaurant

BURGERS/ICE CREAM-FROZEN CUSTARD STANDS

Kopp’s

Multiple locations kopps.com Kopp’s opened its first location in 1950 and is considered one of the “Big Three” of Milwaukee’s frozen custard legacy. Although they offer standard vanilla, chocolate and strawberry flavored frozen custard, they’re known for more exotic concoctions like blueberry cheesecake, tiramisu or peanut butter, along with a “flavor of the day.” Their generously sized “jumbo” burgers are available with a range of toppings. (Sheila Julson)

FINALISTS: BURGERS • AJ Bombers • Crafty Cow • Oscar's Pub & Grill

FINALISTS: ICE CREAM-FROZEN CUSTARD STAND: • Gilles Frozen Custard • Kilwins Milwaukee Bayshore • Leon's Frozen Custard

BURRITO/MEXICAN RESTAURANT/TACO

Café Corazón

Multiple Locations corazonmilwaukee.com Clearly there is a lot to like about Café Corazon. When you have Milwaukee’s best burrito, taco, and margarita, you’ve got to be the best Mexican restaurant! The fun and colorful decor, pleasant waitstaff, locally sourced ingredients, and excellent vegan and gluten free options only add to Corazon’s popularity. (Susan Harpt Grimes)

FINALISTS: BURRITO • • • •

Botanas Restaurant Electric Lime Taqueria Jalisco Restaurant Mr. Señor's

FINALISTS: MEXICAN RESTAURANT • Botanas Restaurant • Electric Lime Taqueria • Guanajuato Mexican Restaurant

FINALISTS: TACO

• Blue Bat Kitchen & Tequilaria • Electric Lime Taqueria • Paloma Taco and Tequila


JANUARY 2022 | 41


SPECIAL BEST OF MILWAUKEE | PRESENTED BY BUNZEL'S OLD-FASHIONED MEAT MARKET & CATERING

D I N I N G O UT CARIBBEAN RESTAURANT

Sabor Tropical sabortropicalmke.com

Sabor means flavor. Ready to venture beyond Milwaukee’s many fine Mexican restaurants? Sabor’s menu offers a great stepping off point for culinary explorations. Try the Mofongo Rellenos, fried green plantains stuffed chicken, shrimp, fish, or lobster cooked in Caribbean creole sauce topped with pork skins and cilantro. (Blaine Schultz)

FINALISTS:

• Island Jam • Mobay Cafe • Uppa Yard

CENTRAL/SOUTH AMERICAN RESTAURANT

Chef Paz Restaurant 9039 W. National Ave. chefpaz.com

Chef Paz is all about bringing in the freshest ingredients and turning those ingredients into lovely Peruvian foods. Phenomenal empanadas, beautifully prepared seafood, beef, or chicken, all brightened with special seasoning, fresh lime and cilantro. Chef Paz truly brings the delicious flavors of South America to West Allis. (Susan Harpt Grimes)

FINALISTS: • • • •

C-viche El Salvador Restaurant MKE Noche Restaurant & Bar Triciclo Peru

CHEAP EATS

Conjejitos Place 539 W. Virginia St. conejitos-place.com

Opened in 1972 by Jose “Conejito” Garza, this fan favorite still serves many of the original offerings debuted nearly 50 years ago—and at extremely affordable prices. And then there’s those classic paper plates that make it all the more special. (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS:

• Louie's Char Dogs & Butter Burgers • Real Chili • Taco Mike’s

CHEF

Adam Pawlak

greateffingpasta.com Nationwide, Adam Pawlak might be known for his stint on the popular chef’s competition Hell’s Kitchen. But the founder of Egg & Flour Pasta Bar, which debuted at Crossroads Collective on the East Side, launched this talented chef to local stardom. Look for his creations at his three Egg & Flour locations or at E&F Pizzeria, also at Crossroads Collective. (Sheila Julson)

42 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

FINALISTS:

• John Chandler • Chris Ghobrial • Gregory Leon

CHICKEN WINGS

Points East Pub 1501 N. Jackson St. ThePointsEastPub.com

While some wing establishments pride themselves on having a variety of sauces and styles to their offerings, Point’s East has long been the gold standard for chicken wings in Milwaukee. With a dry rub that is second to none, the bar is tucked away on the East Side, and has gained popularity largely on word of mouth. (Allen Halas)

FINALISTS:

• Limanski's Pub • Steny's Tavern & Grill • TomKen's Bar & Grill

sandwiches, lunches and hot ham and rolls on Sunday. But it’s the crullers. (Benjamin Dover)

FINALISTS:

• Cranky Al's • Donut monster • Sugar Cube Donuts

FAMILY FRIENDLY RESTAURANT

SafeHouse 777 N. Front St. safe-house.com

Part restaurant, part “spy bar,” this is the place for more than just good food and drink. Once you figure out the location (SE has conveniently provided the address), “spy recruits” have to pass a test to enter. And then the fun really begins. That is, if you can get in. (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS:

CHINESE RESTAURANT

• Meyer's Restaurant Bar & Banquet Hall • Papa Luigi's Pizza • The Stillery

DanDan

FARM-TO-TABLE RESTAURANT

360 E. Erie St. dandanmke.com Co-Founders Dan Jacobs and Dan Van Rite take Asian fusion cuisine and serve it up in a stylish yet relaxed setting right in the heart of Milwaukee’s Third Ward. From dim sum and dumplings to the ever popular DanDan Noodles (ground pork with chili oil), it’s all there—and a whole lot more. (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS: • • • •

Emperor of China Jing's Momo Mee Asian Cuisine Sze Chuan Restaurant

COFFEE SHOP

Colectivo Coffee Lakefront

1701 N. Lincoln Memorial Drive colectivocoffee.com Colectivo Coffee, which began with humble beginnings in 1993 as Alterra, has grown to 12 locations throughout the Milwaukee Area, along with cafés in Madison and Chicago. Their picturesque lakefront location is housed in an 1888 historic Milwaukee River Flushing Station. (Sheila Julson)

FINALISTS:

• Anodyne Coffee Roasting Co. • Dream Lab • Valentine Coffee Co.

DONUTS

Grebe's Bakery grebesbakery.com

A cruller from Grebe’s. End of story. OK, they also offer donuts, cookies, breakfast

Odd Duck

2352 S. Kinnickinnic Ave. oddduckrestaurant.com When Odd Duck opened a decade ago, the buzz about “farm-to-table” was just beginning. This cozy eatery in Bay View has since become a forerunner in sourcing fresh, seasonal produce and ingredients from local farms and producers. In early 2022, Odd Duck owners Melissa Buchholz and Ross Bachhuber will move the restaurant to a new location in Walker’s Point. (Sheila Julson)

FINALISTS:

• Braise Restaurant & Culinary School • Morel • Parkside 23

FRENCH RESTAURANT

Le Reve Pâtisserie & Café

7610 Harwood Ave., Wauwatosa lerevecafe.com French food at its finest and a menu guaranteed to have you speaking French in no time. The menu is extensive and easy to follow. And If your motto in life is, “eat dessert first,” then look no further. The dazzling, colorful display of macarons (baked almond meringue cookies with flavored French buttercream filling), will be a great start, or finish, or both. (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS:

• Bartolotta's Lake Park Bistro • Pastiche Bistro • Sanford Restaurant


D I N I N G O UT FROZEN YOGURT SHOP

FINALISTS:

FINALISTS: KITCHEN OPEN AFTER 10 P.M.

Yo Mama!

• Cafe Manna • Electric Lime Taqueria • Wauwatiki Bar & Grill

The best way to approach Yo Mama’s selfserve fro-yo dispensers is to tell yourself that it’s a “healthy” choice. There are always several flavors of yogurt and a full bar of toppings. Cost is determined by the weight of your creation, a fact that may be hard to remember in the face of such delicious options. (Susan Harpt Grimes)

GOURMET RESTAURANT/ ROMANTIC RESTAURANT

• Blackwood Brothers Restaurant & Social Club • Electric Lime Taqueria • Pete's Pub • Real Chili

Lake Park Bistro

HOTEL RESTAURANT

Multiple Locations yomamagoodness.com

FINALISTS:

• My Yo My • Smart Cow Yogurt Shop • Yo Factory

GELATO SHOP

Cold Spoons Gelato 5924 W. Vliet St. coldspoonsgelato.com

Cold Spoons Gelato produces 24 rotating classic and custom flavors of gelati and sorbetti on site in small batches. Got a favorite flavor you can’t get enough of? Stop in each Tuesday for Upgrade Day; get a medium serving for the price of a small, or a large serving for the price of a medium. (Sheila Julson)

FINALISTS:

• Divino Gelato Cafe Ltd • Golosi Gelato Cafe

GERMAN RESTAURANT

Mader's Restaurant 1041 N. Old World Third St. madersrestaurant.com

Founded in 1902, the majority of Milwaukee’s population then were German immigrants and they drank, what else? Beer. It’s still as popular as ever today, serving traditional German dishes in Bavarian decor with plenty of unique German brews. (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS:

• Bavarian Bierhaus • Kegel's Inn • Von Trier

GLUTEN-FREE FRIENDLY RESTAURANT

Lazy Susan MKE 2378 S. Howell Ave. lazysusanmke.com

Lazy Susan’s culinary team are aces when it comes to creativity in the kitchen. They focus on what’s fresh and available, choosing local ingredients whenever possible to create their menu, which changes monthly. Gluten-free, vegan and vegetarian dishes are clearly marked on the menu. (Susan Harpt Grimes)

3133 E .Newberry Blvd. bartolottas.com/lake-park-bistro

Mason Street Grill

It’s not hard to understand why so many date nights, engagements, and anniversary dinners happen at Lake Park Bistro. Soft lighting, intimate dining spaces, and pretty views of the lake set the stage for a special evening. The outstanding food, prepared and presented with utmost care will turn it into a spectacularly special evening. (Susan Harpt Grimes)

425 E. Mason St. masonstreetgrill.com

FINALISTS: GOURMET RESTAURANT

FINALISTS:

• Ardent • Coco's Seafood and Steakhouse • Sanford Restaurant

FINALISTS: ROMANTIC RESTAURANT • Onesto • SALA - Modern Sicilian Dining • The Pasta Tree Restaurant & Wine Bar

GREEK RESTAURANT

Oakland Gyros Multiple locations oaklandgyros.com

The original Oakland Gyros benefited from its location near the UW-Milwaukee campus and on the same block as a popular student bar, Axel's. It’s nothing fancy, but it offers generous portions of tasty Greek food at reasonable prices and served up quickly. The formula was so successful that Oakland Gyros has replicated itself on the South Side with name and menu intact. (David Luhrssen)

FINALISTS:

• Apollo Cafe • Cosmos Cafe • Ouzo Cafe

HOT DOG/KITCHEN OPEN AFTER 10 P.M.

The Vanguard

2659 S. Kinnickinnic Ave. VanguardBar.com

Located in the Pfister Hotel on the main floor, Mason Street Grill is the classic place for steaks and other chophouse fare cooked on wood-fire grills, featuring live jazz music. But there’s plenty of other choices including fish, chicken and barley risotto. Something for every palate. (Harry Cherkinian) • • • • •

ARIA – The Restaurant at Saint Kate Eldr+Rime Kimpton Journeyman Hotel The Iron Horse Hotel Tre Rivali

INDIAN/PAKISTANI RESTAURANT

Cafe India Bay View 2201 S. Kinnickinnic Ave. cafeindiamke.us

Cafe India began as a counter service location in Walker's Point that drew business for its lunch buffet. A few years later, a second location was added down the street in Bay View. It’s larger with seating for up to 90, plus a full bar with a focus on Indian beer and wine. The space was remodeled and includes an outdoor patio. (Morton Shlabotnik)

FINALISTS:

• Cafe India Walker’s Point • India Garden • Maharaja

IRISH RESTAURANT

County Clare Irish Inn & Pub 1234 N. Astor St. countyclare-inn.com

While they offer a full menu of scrumptious sausages, The Vanguard in Bay View knows exactly what they’re doing with their all-beef hot dogs. Smoked with paprika and served with mustard, you can also up the ante on your dog by styling it after cities around North America. (Allen Halas)

Yes, they have corned beef and cabbage, and plenty of potato dishes, but County Clare also offers a creative menu of Irish American fare for dinner and Sunday brunch, served in their charming dining room. Shepherd's pie, smoked salmon, Irish pudding, bangers (sausages), and a full Irish breakfast are just a few of the offerings. And hey, where else can you buy the entire kitchen staff a round of pints? (Barry Houlehen)

FINALISTS: HOT DOG

FINALISTS:

• • • •

Dr. Dawg | Glendale Martino's Italian Beef and Hot Dogs Real Chili Riley's Good Dogs

• • • •

McBob's Pub & Grill Mo's Irish Pub Wauwatosa Moran’s Pub Mulligans Irish Pub & Grill JANUARY 2022 | 43


SPECIAL BEST OF MILWAUKEE | PRESENTED BY BUNZEL'S OLD-FASHIONED MEAT MARKET & CATERING

D I N I N G O UT ITALIAN RESTAURANT

Tenuta's Italian Restaurant 2995 S. Clement Ave. tenutasitalian.com

Although tucked onto a quiet Bay View street, Tenuta’s is a destination for diners across the metro area for its authentic, wellserved Italian dishes. The pizza is so good that some of us seldom venture into the other half of the menu. (David Luhrssen)

FINALISTS:

• Papa Luigi's Pizza • SALA - Modern Sicilian Dining • Tavolino | Wine + Pasta + Pizza

JAPANESE RESTAURANT

Hungry Sumo

2663 S. Kinnickinnic Ave. hungrysumosushibar.com When the pandemic hit, Hungry Sumo took precautions, continued as takeout only and continued offering tasty food in stride. With classic maki, teriyaki, nigiri/sashimi, ramen and more the menu offers plenty of navigation. If you’ve never tried black rice, you should. (Blaine Schultz)

FINALISTS:

• Fujiyama (West Allis) • Kawa Ramen and Sushi • Kyoto

JEWISH/KOSHER-STYLE RESTAURANT/SANDWICH

Benji's Deli

Multiple Locations benjisdeliandrestaurant.com If you’re craving an authentic Reuben or a piping hot bowl of matzo ball soup, but have no plans for a trip to NYC, head on over to Benji’s Deli. All-day breakfasts, including fan favorite hoppel popple, are also quite popular. Try the exceptional potato pancakes, which are always served with applesauce and sour cream. (Susan Harpt Grimes)

FINALISTS: JEWISH-KOSHER STYE RESTAURANT

• Allie Boy’s Bagelry & Luncheonette • Jake's Deli North

FINALISTS: SANDWICH • • • •

Bavette La Boucherie Boo Boo's Sandwich Shop Cousins Subs Riley's Sandwich Co.

KOREAN RESTAURANT

Momo Mee Asian Cuisine 10 E. Greenfield Ave. momomeerestaurant.com

The dumpling and noodle-centric restaurant

44 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

receives rave reviews, which might easily be traced to executive chef and owner Tony Ho’s philosophy “I want people to experience delicious and flavorful food … people should walk out knowing they just experienced something great.” (Blaine Schultz)

FINALISTS: • • • • •

Char'd Lucky Ginger Merge | Korean Fried Chicken + Soju Bar Seoul Korean Restaurant Stone Bowl Grill

LOUISIANA-SOUTHERN RESTAURANT/SOUL FOOD

Maxie’s

6732 W. Fairview Ave. maxiesmke.com A winner in two categories, it’s easy to understand why, when it comes to Maxie’s choice of cuisines—Cajun, Creole, BBQ. And then there’s all that seafood: Blue Point oysters, shrimp & grits. and of course, there must be fried green tomatoes! (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS: LOUISIANA-SOUTHERN • Crawdaddy's on Greenfield • On the Bayou • Tupelo Honey

FINALISTS: SOUL FOOD

• Daddy's Soul Food & Grille • Nino's Southern Sides • Perkins Boyz On Tha Grill

NEW RESTAURANT (OPENED IN 2021)

Tupelo Honey 911 N. Broadway tupelohoneycafe.com

Tupelo Honey has quickly made its mark in Milwaukee with its homemade Southernstyle dishes and innovative cocktails. There’s the classics like bone-in fried chicken. But how about meatloaf with a bourbon peppercorn glaze? Wash it down with a turmeric ginger tonic and settle in. (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS:

• Blackwood Brothers Restaurant & Social Club • Electric Lime Taqueria • Fool's Errand MKE • Middle East Side

OUTDOOR DINING

Zócalo Food Park 363 S. Sixth St. zocalomke.com

Milwaukee’s first food truck park opened in 2019 with a diverse array of vendors, a tavern and outdoor and indoor seating. It has grown to become not just a premier launchpad for food entrepreneurs but a solid community hub. (Sheila Julson)

FINALISTS:

MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT/ MIDDLE EASTERN RESTAURANT

• • • •

Casablanca

PIZZERIA - DEEP DISH

Multiple locations casablanceonbrady.com Middle Eastern food wasn’t well known in Milwaukee when the original Casablanca opened on Mitchell Street. Now located on Brady Street and Bluemound Road, Casablanca serves beef, lamb, chicken, seafood and many vegetarian dishes in traditional style. Look for everything from falafel to baklava. (David Luhrssen)

FINALISTS: MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT • • • •

Aladdin Middle East Side Pita Palace Mediterranean Cuisine Taqwas Bakery and Restaurant

FINALISTS: MIDDLE EASTERN RESTAURANT

• Damascus Gate Restaurant • Middle East Side • Taqwas Bakery and Restaurant

Café Benelux Electric Lime Taqueria Lakefront Brewery Sandras On The Park

Lou Malnati's Pizzeria Multiple Locations LouMalnatis.com

With a history of deep dish excellence, few know pizza like Lou Malnati’s. With the classic Chicago-style recipe and a crisp, golden crust, the restaurant’s pizza is instant comfort food. Their pies come from a lineage of pizza perfection, and are sure to make your mouth water upon first sight. (Allen Halas)

FINALISTS: • • • •

Falbo Bros Pizzeria Fixture Pizza Pub Rosati's Pizza Tenuta's Italian Restaurant

PIZZERIA - THIN CRUST

Zaffiro's Pizza & Bar 1724 N Farwell Ave zaffirospizza.com

Beloved by generations for their Milwaukeestyle, thin crust pizza, Zaffiro’s has maintained their high standards and continued to generate new legions of fans.


Satellite locations in select Marcus theaters now allow you to enjoy the same great pizza while watching the latest films—minus the classic red and white checked tablecloths, of course. (Susan Harpt Grimes)

RAMEN

FINALISTS:

This time of year, what is better than ramen? Returning BOM champ, the subterranean Red Light Ramen grew from a pop-up by the good folks at Ardent into a destination. The traditional ramen offerings are complemented by sake, slushie cocktails, fusion appetizers and desserts. (Blaine Schultz)

• Balistreri's Italian-American Ristorante • Ned's Pizza • Papa Luigi's Pizza

PIZZERIA - WOOD-FIRED OVEN

Santino's Little Italy 352 E. Stewart St. Santinoslittleitaly.com

That wood-fired oven and the unique pizza crust are only two reasons for dining at Santino’s. Sophia Loren is usually behind the bar—not filling wine glasses but on the big screen in colorful scenes from Italy via vintage movies. The long bar-dining rooms are dark and comfortable and suggests something theatrical—the perfect setting for a restaurant that refines Italian classics to a high level. (David Luhrssen)

FINALISTS:

• Flour Girl and Flame • San Giorgio Pizzeria Napoletana • Wy'east Pizza

PLACE TO EAT ALONE

Beerline Cafe 2076 N. Commerce St. beerlinecafe.com

Want to get away without getting away? The Beerline Café offers a sunny hideaway tucked in Commerce Street aka the Beerline. The informal restaurant is an inexpensive to moderately priced low-environmentalimpact vegetarian “fresh-casual” café specializing in unique, sweet and savory crepe creations, panini-style sandwiches, soups, salads, healthy smoothies and fresh juices. (Blaine Schultz)

FINALISTS: • • • •

Electric Lime Taqueria Pete's Pub Real Chili Taco Mike’s

Red Light Ramen 1749 N. Farwell Ave. redlightramen.com

FINALISTS:

• Hungry Sumo • Kawa Ramen and Sushi • Tanpopo Ramen & Sushi Restaurant

RESTAURANT OPEN ON CHRISTMAS DAY

The Packing House 900 E. Layton Ave. packinghousemke.com

The Packing House is an always comfortable reminder of the golden age of supperclub dining with its generous portions and array of appetizers, soups, steaks, poultry, veal, seafood—and great fish frys. (David Luhrssen)

FINALISTS:

• Andreas Family Restaurant • Pallas Restaurant

RESTAURANT SERVICE

Steny's Tavern & Grill

800 S. Second St. StenysTavern.com

Walker’s Point sports bar Steny’s Tavern & Grill knows how to do game day right. A large staff behind the bar and throughout the sprawling restaurant area keeps thousands of patrons satisfied every year. When you add in shuttle service to major events and the general atmosphere of the establishment, Steny’s will get you to the game as only they know how. (Allen Halas)

FINALISTS: • • • •

Coco's Seafood and Steakhouse Electric Lime Taqueria Sandras on the park The Stillery JANUARY 2022 | 45


SPECIAL BEST OF MILWAUKEE | PRESENTED BY BUNZEL'S OLD-FASHIONED MEAT MARKET & CATERING

D I N I N G O UT RESTAURANT WITH A VIEW

Harbor House

550 N. Harbor Drive bartolottas.com/harbor-house The stunning views of Lake Michigan offered by the windows inside the restaurant are pretty tough to top. Depending on the season, weather, and time of day you can marvel at the many moods of the lake and sky while dining on delicious, fresh seafood prepared with the care you’d expect from a Bartolotta restaurant. (Susan Harpt Grimes)

FINALISTS:

• Bartolotta's Lake Park Bistro • Lake Park Bistro • Lakefront Brewery

SEAFOOD RESTAURANT

St. Paul Fish Company stpaulfish.com

If it’s fish you’re wanting, this is the place with every choice imaginable. The New England style boils are the newest addition to the menu, with your choice of lobster, crab or seafood. But the lobster roll is as good as its East Coast. versions. (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS:

• Coco's Seafood and Steakhouse • Harbor House • Third Coast Provisions

SOUPS

Soup Market Multiple locations thesoupmarket.com

The Soup Market’s scratch-made soups start with a foundation of stocks simmered from fresh beef, poultry, vegetables and herbs. Daily standards include chicken noodle and a weekly featured chili, along with three to six featured soups including vegetarian options. They’ve also got salads, sandwiches and desserts. (Sheila Julson)

FINALISTS: • • • •

Benji's Deli LOUP - Soup with a Local Twist Pete's Pub Soup Bros.

STEAKHOUSE/SUPPER CLUB

Five O'Clock Steakhouse 2416 W. State St. fiveoclocksteakhouse.com

Few things in life are better than enjoying a perfectly prepared steak from a proper supper club. Five O’Clock has mastered how to deliver that experience. Top-notch service, comfortable yet elegant surroundings, tasty classic cocktails, and high-quality meats cooked to your specifications. Bon Appétit! (Susan Harpt Grimes)

46 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

FINALISTS: STEAKHOUSE

• Carnevor • Coco's Seafood and Steakhouse • Mason Street Grill

FINALISTS: SUPPER CLUB

• Joey Gerard's - A Bartolotta Supper Club • The Packing House • Sandra’s on the Park

STREET FOOD VENDOR

Pedro's South American Food

facebook.com/empanadasmke Milwaukeeans love empanadas. While there are many great choices in the area to indulge in this delicacy that originated in Spain and Portugal, Pedro’s South American Food adds Latin American influences to take this tasty street food to new heights. Their empanada varieties like pulled pork, chicken mole or a vegetarian offering of spinach feta were a hit around town at the Shorewood Farmers Market, Pridetoberfest, the Deer District and Black Husky Brewing. (Sheila Julson)

FINALISTS:

FINALISTS:

• Hungry Sumo • Rice N Roll Bistro • Screaming Tuna Milwaukee

TAKEOUT/CURBSIDE PICKUP

Twisted Plants

4905 S. Packard Ave., Cudahy twistedplants.com Twisted Plants took the leap from a food truck to opening a brick-and-mortar location just as the pandemic shutdown hit, but customers readily took advantage of the restaurant’s curbside pickup model to get their vegan comfort food. The initmate dining room has since opened, but the curbside option remains popular. Bonus: the environmentally friendly carryout containers are biodegradable. (Sheila Julson)

FINALISTS:

• Electric Lime Taqueria • Sandras on the Park • The Stillery

TAPAS (SMALL PLATES)

• Shorty's Grilled Cheese • That Taco Guy • Vocado MKE

La Merenda

SUB SANDWICH

For nearly 15 years, La Merenda has been a Walker’s Point go-to for excellent world cuisine. Everything is creatively prepared from locally sourced food and presented in a bite-sized way that has charmed diners from the beginning. (Susan Harpt Grimes)

Cheba Hut Toasted Subs 2907 N. Oakland Ave. chebahut.com

You won’t find cannabis-infused foods at Cheba Hut, but this shop has fun with a ganja theme and sandwich names that play on cannabis strains. Known for its laid-back atmosphere and “toasted subs,” this Arizona-based chain opened its first store in Milwaukee this past year. While the gourmet subs are tasty, the shop’s popularity might also be further testament that Wisconsinites are ready to embrace all things cannabis (ahem, Wisconsin State Legislature). (Sheila Julson)

FINALISTS:

• Cousins Subs • Riley's Sandwich Co. • Suburpia

SUSHI

Kyoto

7453 W. Layton Ave. kyotomke.com As sushi has become more and more popular, so has Kyoto which serves up a wide variety of this classic Japanese dish. “Sushi” refers to fish and other seafood and sometimes made with egg or vegetables like cucumber and avocado. You’ll find even more exotic dishes like Peruvian mango roll along with its Bubble Tea beverages. (Harry Cherkinian)

125 E. National Ave. lamerenda125.com

FINALISTS:

• Balzac • Movida at Hotel Madrid • Odd Duck

THAI RESTAURANT

Thai-namite Multiple locations thai-namite.com

This is as close to classic Thai food you can get short of visiting the country. It’s all here from curries and stir-fried rice and noodles to sushi and sashimi. There’s traditional and flavored sakes and, perfect for our town, “Sake Bomb” (sake with beer). (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS: • • • • • •

Bangkok House Restaurant EE-Sane Thai-Lao Cuisine Kim's Thai Restaurant Siam Express Singha Thai Restaurant Thai A Kitchen


D I N I N G O UT VEGAN-FRIENDLY RESTAURANT

Twisted Plants

4905 S. Packard Ave., Cudahy twistedplants.com Twisted Plants’ vegan burgers and sides have wooed vegetarians and vegans as well as omnivores. The 100 % plant-based burgers and sandwiches, each named after a cannabis-themed movie, has unique housemade sauces and seasonings and come with crispy seasoned waffle fries. Sides like cauliflower bites and vegan shakes round out the menu. In addition to the brick-andmortar restaurant, Twisted Plants’ food truck makes the rounds to area events and businesses. (Sheila Julson)

FINALISTS:

• Beerline Cafe • Cafe Manna • Electric Lime Taqueria

Beans & Barley began as a small health food store in 1973 and has since grown to a café-deli-market known for consistently healthy foods. They’ve got a fine selection of vegetarian and vegan appetizers, salads, soups, hot and cold sandwiches and entrées. Vegetarians that like to cook can find just about any meat-free ingredient on the market shelves to craft a home-cooked meal. (Sheila Julson)

FINALISTS:

Beans & Barley 1901 E. North Ave. beansandbarley.com

FINALISTS:

• PHO 4 U Vietnamese Cuisine • Pho Cali • Pho Viet

WINE LIST

• Cafe Manna • Electric Lime Taqueria • Twisted Plants

Balzac

VIETNAMESE RESTAURANT

Balzac has an extensive list featuring prices ranges for all types of sipping and dining in a cozy setting. Try a Skin Contact wine, which are white wines made like red wines (fermented with grape skins). And if you try a wine you really like, you can take home a bottle for half off the menu price. (Harry Cherkinian)

HuÉ Vietnamese Restaurant 2691 S. Kinnickinnic Ave. huerestaurants.com

VEGETARIAN-FRIENDLY RESTAURANT

swai is served with garlic fried rice, Asian slaw and Thai basil aioli. Their food truck is ubiquitous at summer events around town as well. (Blaine Schultz)

Everything changes. Hué is slated to move a few doors east, to the corner spot that formerly housed Sven’s Café. Sure, Milwaukee is home to the weekly fish fry, but Hue’s Vietnamese fish Ffy is a delightful twist on a classic. Turmeric marinated, beer battered

1716 N. Arlington Place balzawinebar.com

FINALISTS:

• Coco's Seafood and Steakhouse • Milwaukee ChopHouse • Onesto

LO C ALLY- OW N E D FOO D & D R I N K BAKERY

Rocket Baby Bakery 6822 W. North Ave. rocketbabybakery.com

Rocket Baby is a great place to pick up a freshly baked loaf of bread, and then let yourself be tempted into a scratch-made pastry, croissant, scone, or cookie. The bakery switched over to an outdoor service window, during covid, but there is a patio heater to keep folks warm while ordering or picking up. (Susan Harpt Grimes)

FINALISTS:

• Aggie's Bakery & Cake Shop • Jen's Sweet Treats • Simma's Bakery

BEER SELECTION/LIQUOR STORE

Discount Liquor Inc Multiple locations discountliquorinc.com

If you can’t find it here, it probably can’t be found. They stock some 1,500 import, craft and domestic beers and more than 8,000 wines, from many countries across the globe. More than 3,500 varieties of spirits from both national and local distillers line the shelves. (Frank Grey)

FINALISTS: BEER SELECTION • Avenue Wine & Liquor • Otto's Wine & Spirits on Oakland • Ray's Wine & Spirits

FINALISTS: LIQUOR STORE • Consumer Outlet Beverage • Otto’s Wine & Spirits • Ray's Wine & Spirits

BUTCHER SHOP/MEAT SELECTION/ SAUSAGE SHOP

Bunzel's Meat Market 9015 W. Burleigh St. bunzels.com

Whether you’re preparing a special dinner, making your award-winning chili, or grilling out before the big game, check out Bunzel’s meat and sausage selection before you cook. The helpful staff is always willing to make a special cut if that’s what you need. Do yourself a favor and pick up some of their Honey Mustard sausages today! (Susan Harpt Grimes)

FINALISTS: BUTCHER SHOP

• Becher Meats • Ray's Butcher Shoppe • South Milwaukee Sausage and Meats

FINALISTS: MEAT SELECTION

FINALISTS: SAUSAGE SHOP • • • • •

Foltz Family Market Ray's Butcher Shoppe Rupena's Fine Foods South Milwaukee Sausage and Meats West Allis Cheese & Sausage Shoppe

CHEESE SELECTION

West Allis Cheese & Sausage Shoppe 6832 W. Becher St. westallischeese.com

West Allis Cheese & Sausage Shoppe touts they’ve got “all the cheese your heart could desire”—and they’re right. The shop’s myriad selection includes products by Wisconsin’s top cheesemakers, along with artisan creameries. There are also Wisconsin meats and locally made specialty foods. The West Allis location’s adjoining restaurant is a popular gathering spot. They can also be found at Milwaukee Public Market. (Sheila Julson)

FINALISTS: • • • •

G. Groppi Food Market Glorioso's Italian Market Larry's Market Wisconsin Cheese Mart

• Becher Meats • Kettle Range Meat Company • Ray's Butcher Shoppe

JANUARY 2022 | 47


SPECIAL BEST OF MILWAUKEE | PRESENTED BY BUNZEL'S OLD-FASHIONED MEAT MARKET & CATERING

LO C ALLY- OW N E D FOO D & D R I N K CHOCOLATIER

Indulgence Chocolatiers 211 S. Second St. indulgencechocalatiers.com

Chocolates and truffles and bars. Oh my! Is this the stairway to chocolate heaven? The vote is in. And the answer is “yes!” There’s cocoa mix and dipped fruit and seasonal chocolate and ... well you know the rest. Simply, indulge. (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS:

• Freese's Candy Shoppe • Kilwins Milwaukee Bayshore • Tabal Chocolate

FARMERS MARKET

West Allis Farmers Market

6501 W. National Ave. thatswhywestallis.com/farmers-market From mid-May until the end of November, three times a week, the West Allis Farmers Market plays host to a changing line-up of farmers, gardeners, food trucks and other vendors. The permanent stalls with a solid roof overhead means rain or shine the market goes on. (Susan Harpt Grimes)

FINALISTS:

• Shorewood Farmers Market • South Shore Farmers Market • Tosa Farmers Market

GROCERY - ALL PURPOSE

Outpost Natural Foods - Bay View 2826 S. Kinnickinnic Ave. outpost.coop

Founded at the start of the ’70s, Milwaukee's longest-running natural food co-op helped

introduce the city to the concept of healthy eating. All four locations of Outpost Natural Foods are good places to look for organic, seasonable produce, as well as a fantastic array of wholesome packaged goods hard to find elsewhere. You don’t have to be a member to shop at Outpost. (David Luhrssen)

business has been serving the Milwaukee community for over 70 years. So, they definitely know their way around a meatball with pasta. What could be easier while you shop for food is to order it up and eat it too? (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS: GROCERY – ALL PURPOSE

• G. Groppi Food Market • Sendik's Food Market • Whole Foods Market

• • • • •

Festival Foods Fresh Thyme Market Metro Market Sendik's Food Market Woodman's Food Market

FINALISTS: GOURMET GROCERY

FINALISTS: TAKE-OUT DELI

GROCERY - ETHNIC

• • • • • • • •

Cermak Fresh Market

WINE SELECTION

FINALISTS: GROCERY – ORGANIC • Beans & Barley • Fresh Thyme Market • Whole Foods Market

Multiple locations cermakfreshmarket.com

The Chicago-based chain is a natural fit for Milwaukee. In the competitive world of groceries Cermak offers variety of ethnic foods catering to Mexican, Puerto Rican, Greek, Italian, Polish, Russian and other European and Latin American cultures. (Blaine Schultz)

FINALISTS:

• Glorioso's Italian Market • El Rey • Pacific Produce

GROCERY-GOURMET/TAKE-OUT DELI

Glorioso's Italian Market

Allie Boy’s Bagelry & Luncheonette Beans & Barley Benji's Deli Bunzel's Meat Market Danielle's Deli G. Groppi Food Market Rupena's Fine Foods West Allis Cheese & Sausage Shoppe

Ray's Wine & Spirits 8930 W. North Ave. rayswine.com

Over the past 60 years, Ray’s Wine and Spirits has become well-established as the local go-to place for a big wine selection with a knowledgeable staff who can help you navigate your options. With over 8,000 wines from all around the globe, you’re sure to find a new or different wine every time you visit. (Susan Harpt Grimes)

FINALISTS: • • • •

Corvina Wine Company Discount Liquor Inc Nonfiction Natural Wines Thief Wine Shop & Bar

1011 E. Brady St.

Voted a readers’ favorite for both grocery and take-out deli, this family-owned

M I LWAU K E E M US I C ACOUSTIC MUSICIAN

ALT COUNTRY

BLUEGRASS BAND

Peter Thomas

Bella Cain

The Whiskeybelles

Peter Thomas is a cellist with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra but he is also a co-founder of MusiConnect, which brings music to people in safe spaces during this pandemic. The concerts are free and typically done in driveways of people’s homes. (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS:

• Catelyn Picco • Jake Williams • Matt Davies

48 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

Few groups in Milwaukee’s music scene operate to the scale of country band Bella Cain. In a normal year, the band plays over 100 shows, with regularly touring production crew as a full-fledged unit. The band’s sound has gradually started to incorporate original material, transforming the once cover-only band into new territory. (Allen Halas)

FINALISTS: • • • •

RAT BATH Rebel Grace Richie Allen The Midnight Purchase

Purists may scoff at characterizing the Whiskeybelles as a Bluegrass band. With music based in traditional country, the female trio are familiar faces at local outdoor festivals. Sure, all bands faced challenges during the pandemic but Whiskeybelles guitarist-vocalist Chrissy Dzioba Clobes became a mother of twins and had weathered carpal tunnel surgery. (Blaine Schultz)

FINALISTS:

• Chicken Wire Empire • The MilBillies • Thriftones


M I LWAU K E E M US I C BLUES BAND

Milwaukee Blues Rock Collective

Playing for the love of the music, the quintet adds piano and Hammond organ sounds to Alison Helf Ryan’s vocals. MBRC’s solid grooves appeal to fans of high caliber blues and rock, as their energetic State Fair shows demonstrate. (Benjamin Dover)

FINALISTS:

• Altered Five Blues Band • Blues Disciples • Tweed

CLUB DJ

DJ Shawna

young Americana band whose sound is wise being their years. After a winter break for family and holiday time they are slated for more recording. (Blaine Schulz)

FINALISTS:

JAZZ COMBO

B.U.

We Six

The resident faculty ensemble of the Milwaukee Jazz Institute, the long-running sextet includes some of Milwaukee’s most acclaimed jazz musicians. They released an album, Vivid Dreams, performed with Phil Woods and Brian Lynch and conduct music education workshops. (Frank Grey)

FINALISTS

Failure to Launch

FTL has been a Cover Band Finalist for a number of years and given their high energy performances, audiences keep coming back for more. They do it all: country, pop, dance, hip-hop, rock—music for every generation. (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS:

• FM Rodeo • Smart Mouth • The Now

ELECTRONIC ARTIST

Immortal Girlfriend

• Ellen Winters Group • J. Ryan Trio • The Carlos Adames Group

METAL BAND

ROCK BAND

Tigera

FINALISTS:

FINALISTS:

• Conniption • Illusion of Fate • Sam McCullough

• Sam McCullough • Wonderful Bluffer • Xposed 4Heads

MUSIC PRODUCER

VOCALIST - FEMALE

Vincent Van Great

Vincent Van Great has evolved greatly in his time around Milwaukee music. From producer to performer, hip hop to R&B, Van Great has touched on it all. His Troublemakers EP alongside songstress Amanda Huff is certainly a local highlight for 2021. (Allen Halas)

Anchored by Mike Chaltrey’s distinct sousaphone and drummer-vocalist Michael Eells; driven by the twin Baldoni accordions of Linda Mueller (lead accordion) and Pamela Scesniak (rhythm accordion), this polka-inspired group blends humor and tradition. Where else but Milwaukee would you find such a high-energy band fronted by ex-burlesque chanteuse-turned-oldschool torch singer, Chanel le Meaux? (Benjamin Dover)

Led by songwriter Orlando Pena, whose story dates back to woodshedding at an Illinois goat farm, the Midnight Purchase is a

• Browns Crew • Ernie Z • Gego y Nony

Merging the sounds of post-hardcore and conventional metal with environmentally themed content, snag. deliver outward angst to the world at every opportunity. The band’s album Death Doula has earned them national acclaim as one of the next big acts in screamo. (Allen Halas)

FINALISTS:

The Midnight Purchase

FINALISTS:

There seems to be a definite personal chemistry that make this young band go, as evidenced by the short documentary video behind their song “Moment Maker.” They’ve also released a new tune “Every Other Day,” just in time for Christmas. If guitarist Ben Koshick’s name sounds familiar, his family tree leads back to Jack Koshick and the Odd Rock Café. (Benjamin Dover)

FINALISTS:

FOLK BAND

A combination producer/emcee, B.U., short for Better Understanding, can be lethal on the microphone when given the opportunity. Citing influences from a variety of genres, his emotional delivery commands attention. The Blackworld Music Group head is sure to make you remember his name. (Allen Halas)

snag

The duo of brothers Kevin and William Bush continue to push themselves and the subgenre of chillwave music to Milwaukee’s masses. With a sound that feels like the chase scene in a cool indie movie, Immortal Girlfriend have quickly become one of Milwaukee’s most buzzed about bands. (Allen Halas) • LUXI • Moonbow • Ronco

Copperbox November Criminals The Happy Schnapps Combo Val Sigal

RAP/HIP-HOP ARTIST

FINALISTS:

COVER/TRIBUTE BAND

• • • •

• Chris Haise Band • Thriftones

DJ Shawna has evolved over the past several years, picking up plenty of high-profile gigs, such as the official DJ of the Milwaukee Bucks as well as a Pridefest fixture. There’s good reason for that as well, as she looks to incorporate Milwaukee music into her open-format sets and get crowds moving no matter what the occasion. (Allen Halas) • DJ Kenny Perez • DJ King James • Mr. New York

FINALISTS:

• Moonbow • Rizzy B • SpaceCrime

POLKA BAND

The Squeezettes

Amanda Huff

As a solo act, part of the duo You Win!!! or on her 2021 collaboration EP with Vincent Van Great, Amanda Huff can win you over with her powerful vocal range. Her bellowing vocals wash over any audience she’s performed for, with raw talent and a flare for the dramatic that are unforgettable. (Allen Halas)

FINALISTS:

• B~Free • Valerie Lighthart • Ashley Patin (Smart Mouth)

VOCALIST - MALE

Adam Fettig fmrodeo.net

Known as the voice and guitarist for country band FM Rodeo, Adam Fettig is well-known musician at many local area clubs, pubs and universities. Check out his next shows—solo and with the band—when he’s in town. (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS:

• Steven Binko • Austin Riche (Smart Mouth) • Jü JANUARY 2022 | 49


SPECIAL BEST OF MILWAUKEE | PRESENTED BY BUNZEL'S OLD-FASHIONED MEAT MARKET & CATERING

O UT AN D AB O UT ALL-AGES VENUE

Milwaukee’s symbol—and you can’t beat that heated underground parking garage on cold days. This year’s programming opens with a timely exhibit by Vietnamese American photographer An-My Lê. (David Luhrssen)

BAR TO BE SEEN IN

Bay View’s indie music institution, Cactus Club, has been advocating for all-ages music venues city-wide, and chooses to lead by example. With regular matinees as well as giving performance opportunities to bands below the legal drinking age, the venue is using music and community programming to unite the city’s artists. (Allen Halas)

FINALISTS:

Since 2019, Saint Kate-The Arts Hotel, has offered music, visual art, theater and food from steak to pizza. The bar has a commanding view of a Downtown intersection and has become an intersection for visitors and locals. (Morton Shlabotnik)

FINALISTS:

1924 E. Kenilworth Place, Milwaukee axemke.com

Cactus Club

2496 S. Wentworth Ave. CactusClubMilwaukee.com

• Bud Pavilion • Hangout MKE Café & Lounge • X-Ray Arcade

ARCADE/GAMING/VIDEO ARCADE

Up-Down MKE

updownarcadebar.com Up-Down Milwaukee is an arcade and nostalgia-based bar featuring more than 60 arcade games from the ‘80s and ‘90s, pinball machines, three classic skee-ball alleys, Nintendo 64 console gaming, and an array of patio activities on our 2 floors of outdoor patio. All games cost just 25 cents. (Benjamin Dover)

FINALISTS: ARCADE GAMING • Binary: Games, Foods & Spirits • Faklandia Gaming • X-Ray Arcade

FINALISTS: VIDEO ARCADE • • • •

Binary: Games, Foods & Spirits Dead Bird Brewing Company Landmark Lanes X-Ray Arcade

ART STUDIO/CLASSES (NON-BAR)

Splash Studio 175 S. Water St. splashmilwaukee.com

Splash Milwaukee is a combination art school, painting bar and studio offering an innovative experience for artists of all skill levels. During a time when the nation seems to be losing sight of its soul, Splash Studio’s Take & Make kits, project videos and virtual classes have helped people heal through creativity. (Sheila Julson)

FINALISTS:

• Cream City Print Lounge Cream City Clay, Inc. Pottery School & Art Studio • Neighbor Art Studio

• Lakefront Brewery • Mitchell Park Horticultural Conservatory • NorthSouth Club

AXE THROWING BAR

AXE MKE

Who would have thought that axe-throwing bars would be a category? If you've never experienced the exultation of heaving a metal-bladed weapon across the room, you've been missing out. AXE MKE on the East Side sets you up, shows you how, and lets you have at it, and with your favorite drink in one hand. You'll get the hang of it sooner than you think. (Barry Houlehen)

FINALISTS:

• Bounce Milwaukee • NorthSouth Club

BAR FOR QUIET CONVERSATION

• • • •

Elsa's on the Park Moran's Pub Nettie's Irish Pub - NIP’S The Stillery

BAR TO WATCH SOCCER

The Highbury Pub 2322 S. Kinnickinnic Ave. TheHighbury.com

No matter if you’re a red, a blue, Gooner, Cityzen or in between, The Highbury Pub is a welcome destination for footy fans. With multiple televisions, each tuned to a different match or league from around the world, the Bay View pub creates a lively atmosphere on every match day. (Allen Halas)

Cuddle up to your sweetie, or catch up with your besties, and enjoy a masterpiece cocktail while taking in the cool vintage vibe of Bryant’s. Cozy, high-backed booths and sound-dampening ceiling tiles help to mute the conversions of the tables around you, making it easier to chat with your own party. (Susan Harpt Grimes)

BAR WITH A PATIO

1579 S. Ninth St. bryantscocktaillounge.com

FINALISTS: • • • • • •

Charles E. Fromage Creed's Foggy Dew Draft and Vessel Sugar Maple The Tin Widow Tied House Milwaukee

BAR ON A BUDGET

Landmark Lanes 2220 N. Farwell Ave. landmarklanes.com

The soaring spikes of the museum’s Santiago Calatrava addition have become

• Ray & Dot's Tap • Redbar • The Newport

50 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

FINALISTS:

FINALISTS:

Milwaukee Art Museum 700 N. Art Museum Drive mam.org

Saint Kate-The Arts Hotel saintkatearts.com

Bryant's Cocktail Lounge

Since 1972, Landmark Lanes has been an East Side entertainment destination with bowling, live music and a full bar with daily specials. Their deals like Tuesday Pint Night, (tap beers for $3), and two-for-one rail mixers each Wednesday, makes it easy to enjoy libations without emptying the wallet. (Sheila Julson)

ATTRACTION FOR OUT-OF-TOWN GUESTS

The Bar at Saint Kate

FINALISTS:

• Moran's Pub • Nomad World Pub • Three Lions Pub

Boone & Crockett 818 S. Water St. BooneMilwaukee.com

With a wonderful view of the Hoan Bridge, the patio at Boone & Crockett is a summertime must. With the addition of Taco Moto food truck on the premises, as well as The Cooperage music venue and the Paddle Tavern launching station, there’s no shortage of things to check out at the bar. (Allen Halas)

FINALISTS: • • • •

Charles E. Fromage Nettie's Irish Pub - NIP’S Nomad World Pub Tied House Milwaukee

BEER GARDEN

South Shore Terrace Kitchen & Beer Garden 2900 S. Shore Drive southshoreterrace.com

Milwaukee’s beer gardens of yesteryear were picturesque hubs nestled along Milwaukee’s waterways. With the 21st century revival of these Brew City traditions, the South Shore Terrace delivers with a serene view of Lake Michigan, along with a good beer selection, decent wine (no cheap, single-serving bottles of “this is for you wine drinkers” vino) and a


O UT AN D AB O UT menu of snacks, entrées and sides. (Sheila Julson)

FINALISTS:

• Estabrook Beer Garden • Franksville Craft Beer Garden • Hubbard Park Beer Garden

BLOODY MARY

Sobelmans

Multiple locations sobelmanspubandgrill.com Sobelmans Bloody Marys are a drink and “meal” with those over-the-top toppings: Colby jack cheese, a pickled Polish sausage, a pickled mushroom, a pickled Brussels sprout, an asparagus, a celery stalk, a green onion, and on another toothpick a shrimp, a lemon wedge and a grape tomato. (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS: • • • •

Café Benelux Centraal Grand Café & Tappery Steny's Tavern & Grill The Wicked Hop

BREWERY TOUR

Lakefront Brewery 1872 N. Commerce St. lakefrontbrewery.com

Lakefront’s famous tour isn’t your typical brewery tour; you never know what you’re going to get, but it's generally a bit wacky, definitely funny, and there’s plenty of, well, attitude. Not only will you learn about the brewing process and brewing history, you’ll see all the cool stuff they have back there, and enjoy a couple pints afterward. (Barry Houlehen)

FINALISTS:

• Black Husky Brewing • Milwaukee Brewing Company • Sprecher Brewing Co.

COCKTAIL LOUNGE/ROMANTIC BAR

At Random

2501 S. Delaware Ave. atrandommke.com Although located on a corner in Bay View, it’s no ordinary corner bar. At Random is more like the side room in Vegas circa 1955—there’s Frank and Dino and Sammy, chuckling quietly as they trade quips over luscious tropical and ice cream drinks topped with colored umbrellas. You want beer or wine—you can find it down the street. (David Luhrssen)

FINALISTS: COCKTAIL LOUNGE • Bryant's Cocktail Lounge • Giggly at Saint Kate • Tied House Milwaukee

FINALISTS: ROMANTIC BAR • Blu • Charles E. Fromage • Tied House Milwaukee

COCKTAIL KIT

Lost Whale

2151 S. Kinnickinnic Ave. lostwhalemke.com Founded by cocktail industry veterans Tripper Duval and Daniel Beres, Lost Whale quickly generated a buzz as a fun, whimsical place to enjoy a craft cocktail. Like many businesses that had to retool during the pandemic, they created cocktail kits available via a curbside window, with everything to build a Manhattan, a Sconnie Old Fashioned or a Harvey Wallbanger. (Sheila Julson)

FINALISTS:

• Bittercube Bazaar • Style Up Group • The Stillery

CRAFT BEER SELECTION AT A BAR

Sugar Maple 441 E. Lincoln Ave. mysugarmaple.com

Making up your mind which beer to order, as you go through the formidable beer list, is half the fun at Bay View's Sugar Maple. The other half is, of course, trying some of the 60—yes, we said 60—rotating tap beers they have at any given time. You’ll need to come back. And if you're really not sure, order a flight of samples and do some tasting. (Barry Houlehen)

FINALISTS:

• Binary: Games, Foods & Spirits • Draft and Vessel • New Barons Brewing Cooperative

DANCE CLUB

Mad Planet

inspired room called “The Dig” is a fanfavorite. Find the clues, solve the mystery, and escape the room! Special note - the rooms here are private, limited to your group members. (Susan Harpt Grimes)

FINALISTS:

• 60 to Escape • Seven Keys to Escape | Escape Room • TeamEscape 262

HAPPY HOUR

Duke's on Water

158 E. Juneau Ave. facebook.com/Dukesonwater There’s plenty of Happy Hour specials every day of the week at Duke’s. And while the choices vary, you can always be assured of the games that make it so, well, happy: beer pong, bar dice, pull tab machines, dartboards and slots as well. (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS:

• Mason Street Grill • Maxie's • Moran's Pub

HOOKAH LOUNGE

Casablanca

Multiple locations casablancaonbrady.com Smoking the hookah is a pleasant experience with the rough edges of tobacco and the flavored favors smoothed through the ornate waterpipe. Casablanca has moved its hookah lounge outdoors. (Frank Grey)

FINALISTS:

• Dream Lab • Hookah Live • Revel Bar

533 E. Center St. mad-planet.net

HOTEL LOUNGE

Mad Planet has been a staple of the Milwaukee nightlife scene since it was established in 1990. The dance club has also been host to national acts, including Jason and the Scorchers, Tortoise, Arcade Fire, the Black Lips and Lucero, as well as providing a stage for some of the best hometown acts Milwaukee has to offer. (Benjamin Dover)

500 W. Florida St. theironhorsehotel.com

FINALISTS: • • • • • •

District on Water Freight 38 LaCage NiteClub Points View Boîte Room Seven RWB Milwaukee

ESCAPE ROOM

Escape the Room Milwaukee

222 E Erie St Suite 110 escapetheroom.com/milwaukee Escape the Room Milwaukee offers four different escape scenarios. An Indian Jones

The Iron Horse Hotel This warehouse-style boutique hotel features an eclectic mix of style and design amid its cream city brick interiors and wooden pillars. Harleys, American flags, cushy leather sofas. A perfect place to see and be seen. Or just simply ... unwind. (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS:

• Blu • The Bar at Saint Kate – The Arts Hotel • The Pfister Hotel

IMPORT BEER SELECTION AT A BAR

Von Trier

2235 N. Farwell Ave. vontriers.com While the incredible German décor is reason enough to visit East Side landmark Von Trier, the import beer selection is nothing short of impressive – and we’re just talking JANUARY 2022 | 51


SPECIAL BEST OF MILWAUKEE | PRESENTED BY BUNZEL'S OLD-FASHIONED MEAT MARKET & CATERING

O UT AN D AB O UT about what’s on tap. You'll find a dazzling array of German weiss, bocks and lagers, and Belgian, Flemish, Czech, Dutch, French and Irish beers either on tap or bottled. And that's not to mention their American craft beers! (Barry Houlehen)

FINALISTS:

• Benno's • The Brass Tap • The Drunk Uncle

IRISH PUB

County Clare Irish Inn & Pub 1234 N. Astor St., Milwaukee countyclare-inn.com

A true Irish pub requires more than just an authentic Irish look. It's the craic – a word meaning good conversation and company – that makes it. County Clare has both, and it's the kind of pub where you'll find yourself making friends with complete strangers in a matter of minutes, while enjoying a pint from the fine beer selection. Throw in some Irish culture, like the Friday night Irish music session, and you're all set. (Barry Houlehen)

FINALISTS:

• Moran's Pub • Mulligans Irish Pub & Grill • Nettie's Irish Pub - NIP’S

JAZZ CLUB

The Jazz Estate 2423 N. Murray Ave. jazzestate.com

Milwaukee’s jazz scene remains vibrant, if slightly off the radar. Once again, The Jazz Estate takes the BOM honors. The club’s four-decade pedigree means you can count on the nightspot for some serious jazz. If you are looking for an intimate lounge with a timeless vibe, this is it. (Benjamin Dover)

FINALISTS:

• Caroline's • Sam's Place Jazz Cafe

KARAOKE BAR

The High Note Karaoke Lounge 645 N. James Lovell St. HighNoteMKE.com

Rather than just a regular weeknight novelty, The High Note Karaoke Lounge takes karaoke seriously. Belt out some of your favorite tunes along with impressive talent from all over the city. Located in the heart of Downtown, a visit to The High Note will have you singing its praises afterward. (Allen Halas)

FINALISTS: • • • • •

Bremen Cafe Faklandia Brewing Grainger's Pub & Grill Landmark Lanes Lincoln Pub

52 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

LIVE MUSIC VENUE

Summerfest 200 N. Harbor Drive summerfest.com

Milwaukee’s premier music festival and outdoor venue puts the “summer” in the festival setting. The internationally known— and renowned—music fest literally features every type of music and entertainment possible under the sun, the moon and the stars. In fact, that’s the best way to enjoy it. (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS:

• Bud Pavilion • Cactus Club • Saloon on Calhoun with Bacon

MARGARITA

Café Corazón

Multiple Locations corazonmilwaukee.com

FINALISTS: MICROBREWERY

• Enlightened Brewing Company • Faklandia Brewing • New Barons Brewing Cooperative

FINALISTS: PET-FRIENDLY ESTABLISHMENT • • • •

New Barons Brewing Cooperative Riley's Sandwich Co. Sip & Purr Cat Café The Hounds & Tap

MILWAUKEE TOUR

City Tours MKE citytoursmke.com

If you want to seek out the best of Milwaukee’s dive bars, find haunted sites throughout Milwaukee or see murals or sculptures throughout the city, City Tours MKE has got you covered. This full-service tour company has a range of options for groups of all sizes and preferences. (Sheila Julson)

FINALISTS:

Clearly there is a lot to like about Café Corazon. When you have Milwaukee’s best burrito, taco, and margarita, you’ve got to be the best Mexican restaurant! The fun and colorful decor, pleasant waitstaff, locally sourced ingredients, and excellent vegan and gluten free options only add to Corazon’s popularity. (Susan Harpt Grimes)

• • • •

FINALISTS:

4035 S. Clement Ave. badmoonmilwaukee.com

• Charles E. Fromage • Moran's Pub • Tied House Milwaukee

MARTINI

Elsa's on the Park

833 N. Jefferson St. elsas.com

Shaken. Stirred. Neat. On the Rocks. Elsa’s does all that with the martini and infinitely more. Lemon Drop. Grapefruit. Espresso. Sourtini. Flirtini. The choices are endless. So stop in. Sit down. And sip the night away. (Harry Cherkinian)

FINALISTS:

• Blu • JoJo's Martini Lounge • Tied House Milwaukee

MICROBREWERY/TAPROOM

Black Husky Brewing 909 E. Locust St. blackhuskybrewing.com

It takes more than just a good location and good beers to make a great microbrewery: it takes a great vibe. Black Husky, in Riverwest, with its warm and welcoming atmosphere and generous tap selection, fits the bill for a cool neighborhood brewery. Black Husky not only welcomes (well-behaved) dogs in their Riverwest taproom; their whole identity is built around their love for dogs. (Barry Houlehen)

Gothic Milwaukee Milwaukee Paddle Tavern Milwaukee Pedal Tavern Tippecanoe Herbs (Herb Walks)

NEW BAR (OPENED IN 2021)

Bad Moon Saloon This almost out-of-the-way roadhouse boasts enough space, indoors and out, to host motorcycle and custom van events, live music and plenty more. Open since April, Bad Moon Saloon is a rustic addition to Bay View. (Benjamin Dover)

FINALISTS:

• Creed's Foggy Dew • Stalley Cats • Upper East Bar

PAINT & WINE BAR

The Farmhouse Paint & Sip 4511 S. Sixth St. farmhouseart.com

The Farmhouse’s in-person and virtual painting classes and private parties lets people explore their creativity in a unique way. This South Side activity spot offers paint-and-sip parties for adults, kids painting parties, in person and virtual events, open studio, individual classes and hall rentals. (Sheila Julson)

FINALISTS:

• Cream City Print Lounge • Painting with a Twist


B O DY, M I N D & S PI R IT

O UT AN D AB O UT PLACE FOR FAMILY FUN

FINALISTS:

Safehouse

• Heart Breakers • On The Border Gentlemen's Club • Rickey's on State

Part restaurant, part “spy bar,” this is the place for more than just good food and drink. Once you figure out the location (SE has conveniently provided the address), “spy recruits” have to pass a test to enter. And then the fun really begins. That is, if you can get in. (Harry Cherkinian)

TRIVIA NIGHT

777 N. Front St. safe-house.com

FINALISTS:

• Hangout MKE Cafe & Lounge Co. • Little Sprouts Play Cafe • Nine Below

ROCK CLUB

Cactus Club

2496 S. Wentworth Ave. CactusClubMilwaukee.com Cactus Club has a storied history in local rock music. Bands like The White Stripes, Spoon, Queens of the Stone Age and more have cut their teeth at the venue, alongside some of Milwaukee’s most revered local acts. You can find your next favorite band playing any night of the week. (Allen Halas)

FINALISTS:

• Paulie's Pub & Eatery • Saloon on Calhoun with Bacon • Shank Hall

SPORTS BAR

Steny’s Tavern & Grill 800 S. 2nd St. StenysTavern.com

With televisions lining the wall, shuttles to major sporting events and a lively atmosphere, any sports fan can feel at home at Steny’s. Whether you’re getting a quick bite to eat during the pre-game show or celebrating a win, the Walker’s Point bar has you covered. (Allen Halas)

Blackbird Bar blackbirdbayview.com

Where do Milwaukee trivia fans want to be on Thursday nights at 7 p.m.? At Blackbird Bar in Bay View! This popular team trivia event has been going strong for over a decade. Frequent attendees recommend getting there early to grab a tasty brew and secure a spot, or you may be out of luck. (Susan Harpt Grimes)

FINALISTS: • • • • • •

Black Husky Brewing Lakefront Brewery Moran's Pub Mulligans Irish Pub & Grill Painting With a Twist Pete's Pub

WHISKEY SELECTION AT A BAR

The Vanguard

2659 S. Kinnickinnic Ave. VanguardBar.com One look at the back wall of The Vanguard’s Bay View location will tell you why they’ve won this category. In addition to the barrage of bottles both rare and common, the bar also has previously worked with Maker’s Mark to create their own special blends. Get a shot or a cocktail on tap, and be somebody at The Vanguard. (Allen Halas)

ACUPUNCTURIST

Milwaukee Community Acupuncture FINALISTS:

• Acupuncture & Holistic Health Associates • Epic MedSpa • MKE MindBody Wellness

ALTERNATIVE MEDICAL CLINIC

MKE MindBody Wellness FINALISTS:

• Lakeside Natural Medicine • Thrive Holistic Medicine • Zuza's Way Integrative Care

BOUTIQUE FITNESS

Shred415 East Side FINALISTS:

• Armored Athlete Health & Performance • Legacy Gym MKE • Pete Mueller Group

CROSSFIT-STYLE GYM

BrewCity CrossFit FINALISTS: • • • •

Badger CrossFit CrossFit 100 Evolution Fitness Legacy Gym MKE

FINALISTS:

• The Stillery • Tied House Milwaukee • Trailer Park Tavern

FINALISTS:

• Kelly's Bleachers • Moran's Pub • SportClub

STRIP CLUB

Silk Exotic Downtown MKE Gentlemen's Club Multiple locations silkexotic.com

Who’da guessed every night at a gentleman’s club would come to look like the Dance of the Seven Veils minus six? The newest location, Silk Exotic on Water—the former home of Art’s Performing Center, for art’s sake—completes a trifecta of local locations here in the city that always sweeps ain’a’? I’m Benjamin Dover and I told you so. (Benjamin Dover)

JANUARY 2022 | 53


SPECIAL BEST OF MILWAUKEE | PRESENTED BY BUNZEL'S OLD-FASHIONED MEAT MARKET & CATERING

B O DY, M I N D & S PI R IT GYM

PILATES STUDIO

REIKI STUDIO

Wisconsin Athletic Club

Flying Squirrel Pilates

MKE MindBody Wellness

FINALISTS:

• Burn Boot Camp • Legacy Gym MKE • Peak Physique Personal Training

MASSAGE THERAPIST

FINALISTS:

• Club Pilates • East Side Pilates • Kinetic MKE

Jay by the Bay Massage and Wellness

FINALISTS:

• Ascended Gifts, Llc • Kristine Joy • The Zen Dragonfly

SPA

Neroli Salon & Spa

FINALISTS:

FINALISTS:

• MKE MindBody Wellness • Muscle Alchemy • Zen Garden Bodywork

• • • •

Epic MedSpa High Brow Boutique Love Based Beauty Well Spa + Salon

PERSONAL TRAINER

YOGA STUDIO

Ambrose WB

Healium Hot Yoga

• Alex Rosencutter • Michael McVicker • Tim Mikulance

• Embody Yoga • Empower Yoga • Tosa Yoga Center

FINALISTS:

FINALISTS:

B O U G HT & S O LD ADULT RETAIL STORE

AUTO DEALERSHIP - PREOWNED

CAMPING EQUIPMENT

The Tool Shed

Wilde Toyota

Sherper's

• Super Video II • Temptations • After Hours Lingerie & Gifts

• • • •

• Yellow Wood

FINALISTS:

ANTIQUE STORE

FINALISTS:

John Paul's Buick GMC Manyo Motors Car Sales Rosen Kia Milwaukee Schlossmann Honda City

Antiques On Pierce

BIKE SHOP

• • • •

FINALISTS:

FINALISTS:

Antiques & Uniques On Main Barbie's 2nd Time Around BC Modern Clocktower Antiques

Wheel & Sprocket • Dream Bikes - Milwaukee • The Bikesmiths • Truly Spoken Cycles

AUTO DEALERSHIP - DOMESTIC

BOOKSTORE

Heiser Ford

Boswell Book Company

• Boucher Chevrolet • Mike Juneau’s Buick GMC • Soerens Ford, Inc.

• • • •

FINALISTS:

AUTO DEALERSHIP - IMPORT

Schlossmann Subaru City of Milwaukee FINALISTS: • • • •

David Hobbs Honda Rosen Nissan Milwaukee Schlossmann Honda City Umansky Motor Cars

54 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

FINALISTS:

Downtown Books Bought & Sold Lion's Tooth Rainbow Booksellers Voyageur Book Shop

FINALISTS:

CARPET/FINE RUGS

Shabahang and Sons Persian Carpets FINALISTS:

• Kerns Carpet One Floor & Home • Persian Rug Gallery • Suri Persian & Oriental Rugs

CBD RETAIL SHOP

Knuckleheads CBD & Vapes FINALISTS:

• Canni Hemp Co. Milwaukee's CBD Shop • Kind Oasis Premium CBD & Delta 8 from Milwaukee • TerraSol Dispensary

BOUTIQUE CLOTHING

CLOTHING - CHILDREN'S

Sparrow Collective

Little Monsters

• • • •

• BlackBear Children's Boutique • Creatively Yours Gift Baskets • Sparrow Collective

FINALISTS:

Bandit MKE Fayes Haus of Oge SoHo Boutique by Stephanie Horne

FINALISTS:


JANUARY 2022 | 55


SPECIAL BEST OF MILWAUKEE | PRESENTED BY BUNZEL'S OLD-FASHIONED MEAT MARKET & CATERING

B O U G HT & S O LD CLOTHING - MEN'S

FURNITURE - NEW

MOTORCYCLE DEALERSHIP

Moda3

FINALISTS:

BILTRITE FurnitureLeather-Mattresses

House of Harley-Davidson® • Suburban Motors • Wisconsin Harley-Davidson

CLOTHING - WOMEN'S

• Colder’s Furniture, Appliances, and Mattresses • Penny Mustard Furnishings • Warren Barnett Interiors

Bandit MKE

FURNITURE - RESTORED

• Beard MKE • Haus of Oge • MILWORKS

FINALISTS:

• All About Workout • Fifth-Main • Haus of Oge

COMIC BOOK STORE

FINALISTS:

Cream City Restoration

FINALISTS:

• Barbie's 2nd Time Around • Ormson Supply

Collector's Edge Comics South

GARDEN CENTER

Plant Land

FINALISTS:

FINALISTS:

• Lion's Tooth • Lost World of Wonders • The Turning Page

• Bayside Garden Center • Minor's Garden Center, Inc. • Stein's Garden & Home

EYEWEAR

GIFT SHOP

Optix On Downer

Sparrow Collective

• • • •

• Beard MKE • Oniomania • The Bronzeville Collective MKE

FINALISTS:

Be Spectacled Metro Eye Milwaukee Eye Care Quality Optical Service

FASHION ACCESSORIES

The Bronzeville Collective MKE FINALISTS:

• Beard MKE • Bandit MKE • Sparrow Collective

FINE JEWELRY STORE

A Trio Jewelry Design Studio FINALISTS: • • • •

Cival Collective MKB Jewelry Rohr Jewelers Tobin Jewelers Mequon

FLORIST

414loral FINALISTS: • • • •

Belle Fiori, Ltd. Flowers for Dreams Parkway Floral Inc. Unordinary Omen Floristry

FINALISTS:

MUSICAL INSTRUMENT STORE

Cream City Music FINALISTS:

• Lincoln Music House • Music Go Round • Wade's Guitar Shop

NEW RETAIL STORE (OPENED IN (2021)

Maranta Plant Shop FINALISTS:

• Bandit MKE • ReNew Sports and Fitness Supply

NOVELTY / VARIETY STORE

American Science & Surplus FINALISTS:

HARDWARE STORE

• Art Smart’s Dart Mart & Juggling Emporium • Beard MKE • Fischberger's Variety • Winkie's

Bliffert Hardware

PET RETAIL STORE

FINALISTS:

• Elliott Ace Hardware • Village Ace Hardware • Village Ace Hardware Prospect

HEAD SHOP

Knuckleheads CBD & Vapes FINALISTS:

• Closet Classics • Pipe Dreams LLC • VCT Vape

LIGHTING SHOWROOM

BBC Lighting

FINALISTS:

Bark N' Scratch Outpost FINALISTS: • • • •

Bentley's Pet Stuff Mac's Pet Depot Barkery Pet Supplies Plus Glendale Skilos, A Family Pet Store

RECORD STORE

Rush-Mor Ltd Music & Video FINALISTS:

• Acme Records • Record Head • The Exclusive Company

• Brass Light Gallery • Elektra Lights & Fans Inc. • Luce Lighting

SHOE STORE

MATTRESS STORE

FINALISTS:

BILTRITE FurnitureLeather-Mattresses FINALISTS:

• Colder’s Furniture, Appliances, and Mattresses • HassleLess Mattress • Verlo Mattress 56 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

FINALISTS:

Stan's Fit For Your Feet • • • •

Allen Edmonds DSW Designer Shoe Warehouse Milwaukee Boot Company Performance Running Outfitters


TOBACCO SHOP

VAPE SHOP

VINTAGE/THRIFT STORE

Knuckleheads CBD & Vapes

Knuckleheads CBD & Vapes

BC Modern

• Famous SmokeShop • Uhle Tobacco Company

• TerraSol Dispensary • The Glasshouse Vape and Smoke • VCT Vapes

FINALISTS:

FINALISTS:

FINALISTS: • • • •

Alive and Fine Bandit MKE Lost & Found MKE Plume JANUARY 2022 | 57


SPECIAL BEST OF MILWAUKEE | PRESENTED BY BUNZEL'S OLD-FASHIONED MEAT MARKET & CATERING

H O M E I M PROV E M ENT

LG BTQ

ARCHITECT

KITCHEN REMODELER

DRAG SHOW

Racinowski Design Studio

Design Tech Remodeling

This is it!

• J&J Contractors I LLC • LaBonte Construction • Refined Renovations

• D.I.X • Drag Queen Bingo at Lakefront Brewery • Hamburger Mary's Milwaukee

FINALISTS: • • • •

HB Designs Kahler Slater Lakeside Development Companies Source 1 Project Solutions Inc

BASEMENT/REC ROOM REMODELER

Refined Renovations FINALISTS:

• J&J Contractors I LLC • LaBonte Construction • S.J. Janis Company, Inc.

FINALISTS:

LANDSCAPER/ LAWN MAINTENANCE

FINALISTS:

LGBTQ ADVOCATE

Cream City Landscaping

Elle Halo

FINALISTS:

FINALISTS:

• J L Blohm's Landscaping • MC Green Services • Turf Tech Elite

• Aichelle S. White • Arika Kaosa • Steven Binko

PLUMBER

LGBTQ EVENT

Budiac Plumbing Inc

Pridefest • Hamburger Mary's Milwaukee • March With Pride for BLM

• Design Tech Remodeling • J&J Contractors I LLC • Refined Renovations

• • • • •

CLOSET DESIGN

ROOFER

Closet Concepts

Allrite Home & Remodeling

BATHROOM REMODELER

LaBonte Construction FINALISTS:

FINALISTS:

• Design Tech Remodeling • LaBonte Construction

ELECTRICIAN

Current Electric Co. FINALISTS:

• Edge Electric • Pieper Electric, Inc. • Roman Electric, Plumbing, Heating & Cooling

HOME BUILDER

Bielinski Homes FINALISTS:

• J&J Contractors I LLC • LaBonte construction • Lakeside Development Companies

HOME REMODELING

LaBonte Construction Allrite Home & Remodeling FINALISTS:

• J&J Contractors I LLC • Refined Renovations

58 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

FINALISTS:

Alpine Plumbing Inc Bontempo Plumbing Milestone Plumbing, Inc. Schoofs Plumbing Co Inc Viking Plumbing

FINALISTS:

• J&J Contractors I LLC • Reimer Roofing & Remodeling

WINDOW & SIDING

Allrite Home & Remodeling FINALISTS:

• J&J Contractors I LLC • Reimer Roofing & Remodeling • Weather Tight Corporation

FINALISTS:

LGBTQ-INCLUSIVE BUSINESS

The Bronzeville Collective MKE FINALISTS:

• Beard MKE • Dead Bird Brewing Company • Isharai Artist Management

LGBTQ-OWNED BUSINESS

Maranta Plant Shop FINALISTS:

• Beard MKE • Isharai Artist Management • This Is It!


M E D I C AL ALCOHOL & DRUG REHAB CENTER

LASIK SURGEON

Shorewood House

Milwaukee Eye Care

• Rogers Behavioral Health • Zusa’s Way Integrative Care

• Jason N. Edmonds, M.D. Milwaukee Eye Care • LasikPlus

FINALISTS:

CHIROPRACTOR

FINALISTS:

Chiropractic Company • Milwaukee East

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST

• Ascent Sports & Wellness Chiropractic Brookfield • Monica Maroney, DC • Shorewood Family Chiropractic

FINALISTS:

COSMETIC DENTIST

Bell Orthodontic Solutions

FINALISTS:

Eastside Dental FINALISTS:

• Major Dental Clinics of Milwaukee • Stephanie Murphy, DDS

COSMETIC SURGEON

Aurora St Luke's Medical Center • Freedom Physical Therapy Services • Watertown Regional Medical Center

ORTHODONTIST

FINALISTS:

• Grafton Orthodontics • Holzhauer, Hewett & Barta Orthodontics

Lorelle L. Kramer, MD

PERIODONTIST

• Bonness MD Cosmetic Surgery • Thomas G. Korkos, MD • Visage Facial Plastic Surgery

FINALISTS:

FINALISTS:

DENTIST

Stephanie Murphy, DDS FINALISTS: • • • • •

American Dental Professionals Firefly Family Dentistry Harris Family Dental Robe Ralph S DDS The Dentists South Shore

Eddie Morales, DDS • Carlos Mendez • Dale A. Newman DDS, SC • Jarzembinski, Cynthia T DDS

PHYSICAL THERAPIST

Chiropractic Company • Menomonee Falls FINALISTS:

EYE DOCTOR

• Chiropractic Company • Milwaukee East • Freedom Physical Therapy Services • Wisconsin Orthopedic Physical Therapy

Milwaukee Eye Care

PSYCHIATRIST / PSYCHOLOGIST

• Metro Eye • MyEyeDr.

Lakeshore Psychology Services

FINALISTS:

HOME MEDICAL CARE

Hearts To Home Senior Home Care FINALISTS:

• Comfort Keepers Home Care • Exceptional Living Adult Family Homes LLC • Horizon Home Care & Hospice

HOSPITAL

Froedtert Hospital

FINALISTS:

• Carlyle H. Chan, MD • Lakiesha Russell • New Insights, LLC

TELEMEDICINE PROVIDER

WOMEN'S MEDICAL SERVICES

Aurora St Luke's Medical Center

Planned Parenthood

FINALISTS: • • • •

Mark G. Eberhage, PHD Shorehaven Behavioral Health Thrive Holistic Medicine Zuza's Way Integrative Care

FINALISTS:

• Moreland OB-GYN Associates, S.C. • Thrive Holistic Medicine • Zuza's Way Integrative Care

FINALISTS:

• Ascension Columbia St. Mary's • Aurora St Luke's Medical Center • West Allis Memorial Hospital JANUARY 2022 | 59


SPECIAL BEST OF MILWAUKEE | PRESENTED BY BUNZEL'S OLD-FASHIONED MEAT MARKET & CATERING

M I LWAU K E E FOO D & B E V E R AG ES ARTISANAL CHEESE

CRAFT BEER

HARD CIDER

West Allis Cheese& Sausage Shoppe

Lakefront Brewery

Lost Valley Cider Co.

• Black Husky Brewing • Faklandia Brewing • New Barons Brewing Cooperative

• Cache Cider • Lakefront Brewery • MobCraft Brewing

FINALISTS:

• Clock Shadow Creamery • The Village Cheese Shop • Wisconsin Cheese Mart

BACON

Bunzel's Meat Market FINALISTS: • • • • • •

Becher Meats Held's Meat and Cheese Market Kettle Range Meat Company Patrick Cudahy by Smithfield Culinary Ray's Butcher Shoppe Usinger's™ Famous Sausage

BRATWURST

Usinger's Famous Sausage FINALISTS:

• Karl's Country Market (World Famous Sausage) • Kettle Range Meat Company • Ray's Butcher Shoppe • South Milwaukee Sausage and Meats

CHEESE CURDS

FINALISTS:

CUPCAKES

HOME COOKING MEAL KITS

Classy Girl Cupcakes FINALISTS:

Funky Fresh Spring Rolls

DISTILLED SPIRITS

• • • •

• Aggie's Bakery & Cake Shop • CupKate • Jen's Sweet Treats

Great Lakes Distillery & Tasting Room FINALISTS:

• Central Standard Craft Distillery • Eagle Park Brewing & Distilling • Twisted Path Distillery

FROZEN PIZZA

SAUSAGE

The Vanguard FINALISTS:

• Ray's Butcher Shoppe • South Milwaukee Sausage and Meats • Usinger's™ Famous Sausage

• Cedar Teeth • Foltz Family Market

FINALISTS:

FINALISTS:

• • • • •

FINALISTS:

60 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

Kettle Range Meat Company Miltown Eats Simple Eats MKE The Real Good Life

SODA

GOURMET POPCORN

Binary: Games, Foods & Spirits Clock Shadow Creamery Crafty Cow Faklandia Brewing Water Street Brewery

FINALISTS:

Palermo's Pizza

Lakefront Brewery FINALISTS:

FINALISTS:

Sprecher Brewery

• Dead Bird Brewing Company • Lakefront Brewery

Lush Popcorn

TEA

• Goody Gourmets • Kilwins Milwaukee Bayshore • Pop's Kettle Corn

FINALISTS:

Rishi Tea • HoneyBee Sage Wellness & Apothecary • Tippecanoe Herbs and Apothecary • Urbal Tea


R EAL ES TATE REAL ESTATE AGENCY

REAL ESTATE AGENT/BROKER

Shorewest Realtors

Caitlin Dennis, Shorewest Realtors

FINALISTS:

FINALISTS:

• Founders 3 Real Estate Services • Mahler Sotheby's International Realty • Mid-Coast Realty

• Brandon Tyler Real Estate - Mahler Sotheby's International Realty • Emily Bear • Marie Janzen

RENTAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT GROUP

Founders 3 Real Estate Services FINALISTS:

• Bielinski Management • My Dwelling • Vandelay Group

S E RV I C ES R EN D E R E D ACCOUNTANT/TAX ADVISER

AUTO SERVICE & REPAIR

CATERER

Jaquilla Ross

Riverside Automotive Service Schlossmann Honda City

Bunzel's Meat Market

FINALISTS: • • • •

CLA (CliftonLarsonAllen) Daroda Accounting KLM Accounting and Tax Associates Nelson

FINALISTS:

AESTHETICIAN

• Manyo Motors • REIS Automotive

High Brow Boutique

BANK

FINALISTS:

• Dear Dahlia • District 108 Salon & Spa • Epic MedSpa

ANIMAL WELFARE ORGANIZATION

Wisconsin Humane Society Milwaukee Campus

Associated Bank FINALISTS:

• Bank Five Nine • North Shore Bank • U.S. Bank

BED AND BREAKFAST

FINALISTS:

• Emerald City Catering/The Enchanted Forest Event Venue • Over the Moon Bartending • Tall Guy and a Grill Catering

COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

FINALISTS:

• Alverno College • Marquette University • Milwaukee Area Technical College Downtown Milwaukee Campus • Mount Mary University

CREDIT UNION

FINALISTS:

County Clare Irish Inn & Pub

• Landmark Credit Union • Summit Credit Union • UW Credit Union

AUTO BODY SHOP

• • • • • •

Manyo Motors

BODY PIERCING STUDIO

• Elmbrook Humane Society • Humane Animal Welfare Society HAWS of Waukesha County • Milwaukee Area Domestic Animal Control Commission

FINALISTS:

• Leonard Auto Body Inc • Schlossmann Honda City • VCA Auto Body, Repair & Sales

AUTO DETAILER

Metro Car Wash FINALISTS:

• Detail Doctors • Full Service Car Wash • Schlossmann Honda City

FINALISTS:

Brumder Mansion Bed & Breakfast Dubbel Dutch Hotel Manderley Bed & Breakfast Inn Sanger House Gardens Schuster Mansion Bed & Breakfast The Muse Gallery Guesthouse

Avant-Garde FINALISTS: • • • •

Atomic Tattoos Bay Street Tattoo Co. Body Ritual Golden Crystal Body Piercing

BOUTIQUE HOTEL

Saint Kate The Arts Hotel FINALISTS:

Educators Credit Union FINALISTS:

DOGGY DAY CARE/BOARDING

Bay View Bark FINALISTS:

• Central Bark Doggy Day Care: Downtown • Dog City Hotel & Spa • Playtime Doggy Daycare

FINANCIAL INSTITUTION FOR GETTING A BUSINESS LOAN

Educators Credit Union FINALISTS:

• Summit Credit Union • Total Mortgage • U.S. Bank

• Dubbel Dutch Hotel • Kimpton Journeyman Hotel • The Iron Horse Hotel JANUARY 2022 | 61


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S E RV I C ES R EN D E R E D FINANCIAL INSTITUTION FOR GETTING A HOME MORTGAGE

Educators Credit Union FINALISTS:

• Landmark Credit Union • Summit Credit Union • Wisconsin Mortgage Corporation

FINANCIAL INSTITUTION FOR OPENING A CHECKING ACCOUNT

Educators Credit Union FINALISTS: • • • •

Associated Bank North Shore Bank Summit Credit Union UW Credit Union

FINANCIAL INSTITUTION PROVIDING BEST CUSTOMER SERVICE

Educators Credit Union FINALISTS:

• Landmark Credit Union • Summit Credit Union • UW Credit Union

FINANCIAL PLANNER/ STOCK BROKER

Educators Credit Union FINALISTS:

• Annex Wealth Management • Merrill Lynch Wealth Management Advisor Matthew R. Wolf • Summit Credit Union

GREEN BUSINESS

Vance Global FINALISTS:

• Tippecanoe Herbs • Bounce Milwaukee • Everything Grows

HAIR REMOVAL

High Brow Boutique FINALISTS:

• District 108 Salon & Spa • Epic MedSpa • European Wax Center

HAIR SALON - MEN'S

Stag Barbershop FINALISTS:

• Beard MKE • District 108 Salon & Spa • VitaBella Salon

HAIR SALON - WOMEN'S

LAW FIRM - DIVORCE

District 108 Salon & Spa

Nelson, Krueger & Millenbach, LLC Schmidlkofer, Toth, Loeb & Drosen, LLC

FINALISTS:

• Marie & Ebe Salon • Monarch Loft, LLC • VitaBella Salon

HOTEL ROOMS

The Pfister Hotel FINALISTS:

• Dubbel Dutch Hotel • Saint Kate - The Arts Hotel • The Iron Horse Hotel

INSURANCE AGENCY

Shorewest Insurance Associates LLC FINALISTS:

• Cream City Insurance • Reilly Insurance Services

INSURANCE AGENT/BROKER

Claudia Reilly FINALISTS:

• Bob Vitt - State Farm Insurance Agent • Jerad Steinfeld • Joe Woelfle - State Farm Insurance Agent

LAW FIRM - BANKRUPTCY

Debt Advisors Law Offices Milwaukee FINALISTS:

• Bankruptcy Law Office of Richard A. Check S. C. • Gimbel, Reilly, Guerin & Brown, LLP • Peter Francis Geraci Law L.L.C.

LAW FIRM - BUSINESS

Gimbel, Reilly, Guerin & Brown, LLP

FINALISTS:

• Gagne McChrystal De Lorenzo & Burghardt • Gimbel, Reilly, Guerin & Brown, LLP

LAW FIRM - ESTATE PLANNING

Gimbel, Reilly, Guerin & Brown, LLP FINALISTS:

• Fox, O'Neill & Shannon • Bruce A. Tammi • von Briesen & Roper, S.C.

LAW FIRM - FAMILY LAW

Nelson, Krueger & Millenbach, LLC FINALISTS:

• Gagne McChrystal De Lorenzo & Burghardt • Gimbel, Reilly, Guerin & Brown, LLP • Hansen & Hildebrand S.C.

LAW FIRM - FULL SERVICE

Legal Aid Society of Milwaukee, Inc. FINALISTS:

• Fox, O'Neill & Shannon • Gimbel, Reilly, Guerin & Brown, LLP

LAW FIRM - PERSONAL INJURY

Hupy and Abraham, S.C. FINALISTS:

• Gimbel, Reilly, Guerin & Brown, LLP • Groth Law Firm, S.C. • Gruber Law Offices, LLC

FINALISTS:

PET GROOMING/SERVICES

LAW FIRM - CRIMINAL DEFENSE

FINALISTS:

• Fox, O'Neill & Shannon • Hansen and Reynolds • OVB Law & Consulting, S.C.

Community Bark Dog Wash & Groom - Bay View

Jones Law Firm LLC

• Embark Pet Spa • Petlicious Pet Spa • SideKick Dog Training

• Gimbel, Reilly, Guerin & Brown, LLP • Jacob Manian • Kim & LaVoy, S.C.

PHOTOGRAPHER

FINALISTS:

Jamie Robarge Photography FINALISTS:

• Ashley Beller: Peachy Paradigm Portraits • Azure Mahara Photography • Eric Ellis 62 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS


PICTURE FRAMING GALLERY

RIDE SERVICE

VETERINARIAN

South Shore Gallery & Framing

Milwaukee County Transit System

Bayshore Veterinary Clinic

• Bresler Eitel Framing Gallery • Noble Arts • SB Framing Gallery

• Bublr Bikes • The Hop MKE • Yellow Cab Co-Op Milwaukee

• • • •

FINALISTS:

FINALISTS:

FINALISTS:

Brentwood Animal Campus Community Veterinary Clinic Integrative Veterinary Service Milwaukee Vet Clinic

NAIL SALON

TATTOO PARLOR

Nail Bar Milwaukee Walker's Point

Str8 Klownin Ink

WEDDING VENUE

• • • • •

FINALISTS:

FINALISTS:

• Gloss Nail Spa • Studio Nails • Well Spa + Salon

FINALISTS:

Atomic Tattoos Ghost Light Tattoo Parlor Good Land Tattoo Honey Wraith Tattoo Walker's Point Tattoo Co.

The Ivy House • Story Hill FireHouse • The Gage • The Pfister Hotel

S PO RTS & R EC R EATI O N BOWLING ALLEY

FAVORITE BUCKS PLAYER

MINI GOLF COURSE

Bay View Bowl

Giannis Antetokounmpo

River Falls Family Fun Center

• Classic Lanes Greenfield • Landmark Lanes • South Shore Bowl

• Bobby Portis • Jrue Holiday • Khris Middleton

FINALISTS:

FINALISTS:

ENDURANCE EVENT

FAVORITE PACKERS PLAYER

Riverwest 24

Davante Adams

• • • • • •

• Aaron Jones • Aaron Rodgers • Randall Cobb

FINALISTS:

Ice Age Trail 50 Joe's Run Milwaukee Beer Run 5k & .05k Milwaukee Lakefront Marathon Scenic Shore 150 USA Triathlon

FAVORITE BREWERS PLAYER

Christian Yelich FINALISTS:

• Corbin Burnes • Lorenzo Cain • Willy Adames

FINALISTS:

GOLF COURSE

Grant Park Golf Course FINALISTS: • • • • •

Brown Deer Park Golf Course Lake Park Morningstar Golf Club Muskego Lakes Country Club Washington County Golf Course

FINALISTS:

• Moorland Road Golf Center • Nine Below • Prairieville Park

PADDLESPORTS - RENT OR BUY

Milwaukee Kayak Company FINALISTS:

• Brew City Kayak - Milwaukee Kayak Rentals and Tours • Lakeshore Paddle Sport Rentals • Sherper's

ROCK CLIMBING VENUE

Adventure Rock FINALISTS:

• Bounce Milwaukee • The Rock • Turner Hall Climbing Gym JANUARY 2022 | 63


SPECIAL HEALTH & WELLNESS

What is Functional Medicine? Is it an Alternative for You? BY KATHERINE BAYLISS, MD

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eri was in her late 40s when she first came to my functional medicine practice. For years she has struggled with fatigue, insomnia, weight gain, anxiety and joint pain. Because of recurrent indigestion, Teri generally felt better when she didn’t eat. She tried many types of diets: paleo, vegetarian, low carb—with

little success and found the information available contradictory and confusing. She had been seen by several physicians. In addition to her primary care doctor, she was evaluated by a gastroenterologist, gynecologist and rheumatologist, but did not receive any specific answers. She rejected the antidepressant medication that was offered. She was frustrated. How might functional medicine be different? Can it help Teri?

ATTENTION TO PREVENTION Conventional medicine tends to be disease and symptom focused most often using pharmaceuticals and procedures. Different body systems (head/neck, digestive, reproductive, etc.) are treated by specialists. Practicing in conventional medicine for 25 years, I saw the advantage of deep expertise that comes with specialization. But I also witnessed the disadvantages that stemmed from fragmentation. Conventional medicine is great at addressing many types of illness. For example, with trauma, acute cardiac events or even some types of cancer, our high-tech 64 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

health care can be amazing. However, there is minimal attention to prevention and when patients have more vague chronic symptoms that don’t fit neatly into our “diagnostic paradigms,” conventional medicine falters. Functional medicine uses a patient-centered holistic approach recognizing that everything is interconnected. It more often employs natural modalities that support the body’s innate ability to heal. Beyond seeking ways to minimize symptoms, there is a focus on uncovering root causes. Functional medicine proactively seeks ways to help individuals reach their greatest health potential and wellbeing. We take time to go broad and deep to learn our patient’s story. With Teri, testing disclosed systemic inflammation and some nutrient gaps. Her gut microbiome (bacteria and yeast that live in our intestines) was imbalanced with overgrowth of certain bacteria that can be inflammatory. She was entering into menopause and had hormonal imbalances.

Illustration by Ali Bachmann.


Sleep disturbance, anxiety, weight loss resistance and joint pain can all be related to these underlying imbalances. Together, we created an individualized plan to optimize her gut health and balance hormones. We used supplements to help support nutrients. Over time, Teri has instituted several lifestyle changes including a sustainable plant-forward clean diet, a daily meditation practice and improved sleep habits. Today Teri has much more energy and is calm. Her joint pain is gone and she is sleeping much better. Her renewed energy has helped fuel regular exercise. She is delighted with the eight pounds she has dropped.

COMPLEMENTARY MEDICINE While there are marked philosophical differences in approach to health between conventional and Functional Medicine, they can be complementary. Both are important and serve a purpose. Unfortunately, while many professionals in the Functional Medicine space recognize and respect aspects of conventional care, those in the conventional care space often regard Functional Medicine with skepticism and sometimes disdain. The term “alternative medicine,” often applied to Functional Medicine, tends to imply lack of validity or science. In fairness, there is a spectrum of practitioners that hang “functional medicine” signs, some perhaps deserving the “woo-woo” designation. Yet in my experience, my traditionally trained Functional Medicine physician colleagues are all about science and seek evidence when it can be found. It is distressing that our healthcare constructs and payor systems have yet to recognize the true value of the approaches used in Functional Medicine. Insurance rarely covers the cost of such in-depth, time intensive and individualized care plans. While the successful and credible Cleveland Clinic’s Functional Medicine Center suggests that inroads are slowly being made, it seems unlikely that a similar holistic approach will be widespread within our entrenched healthcare systems any time soon. My hope is that small Functional Medicine practices that are taking root around mainstream medicine will flourish regardless, fueled by the desires of healthcare professionals and the needs of patients like Teri. Perhaps then Functional Medicine is an alternative? I find that every patient’s story offers a fascinating approach to healing and I look forward to sharing my learning and experiences with you through this column. Send your questions or indicate topics of interest to bayliss@shepex.com

Katherine Bayliss, MD, a Milwaukee native, practiced in conventional medicine as a pathologist for 25 years. She now lives her passion, helping others through the more holistic Functional Medicine model, seeking root cause of symptoms and proactively promoting health.

JANUARY 2022 | 65


SPECIAL HEALTH & WELLNESS

SEXPRESS

Am I Normal— And What the Heck is Normal, Anyway? BY HUDSON NUMMERDOR

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eing a sexuality educator is pretty much a guarantee that you’ll rarely have dull cocktail party conversations. It also means fielding lots of questions about sex in a variety of different venues. In my case, this ranges from formal classroom settings to question-and-answer events at colleges, church basements, and bars (and informally at those cocktail parties). The idea of question-and-answer events will often pique folks’ curiosity. What kinds of things do people ask? Is it like Jeopardy, but with sex trivia? (I’ll take Fetishes for $400, please.) At Q&A sessions, participants ask about anything that is on their minds, and questions are submitted anonymously—thus removing any embarrassment factor. Topics range from lighthearted to profound, often reflecting vulnerability and honesty. While there are usually a few quiz-show-style entries (i.e., “How many calories are in semen?”), a large portion of submissions can be categorized as “Am I Normal?” questions. “Am I Normal” questions can sometimes overlap with what seems like the pursuit of trivia, but they are undergirded by concerns about what is considered “normal,” either socio-culturally or medically. Queries such as “How big is the average penis?” or “When does menopause start?”—while asking for data on their face, are also asking larger questions about where we fit in with our peers. “It is OK that one of my breasts is bigger than the other?” or 66 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

Illustration by Michael Burmesch.


“My erections aren’t like they used to be—should I worry?” are questions that may arise from worries about whether our bodies are healthy. And inquiries like “I’m a 40 year old cisgender woman who has never had an orgasm during intercourse—what can I do?” or “I’ve been in an open relationship with my partner for a year … why do I still feel jealousy?” may stem from feelings that we’re doing sex or relationships “wrong,” or that we’re somehow at fault when our experiences don’t live up to pre-conceived notions or culturally-imposed norms. Whenever we ask “Am I Normal” questions, it can be helpful to examine our underlying assumptions about what is “normal” to begin with, and then start to think critically about whether those assumptions are accurate or beneficial to our well-being.

IS BIGGER BETTER? For example, let’s revisit the question about average penis size. There have been lots of penis size studies over the years—some better than others in terms of methodology. A 2014 review published in the British Journal of Urology International (BJUI) considered 17 studies totaling over 15,000 participants, finding average flaccid penis size to be 3.6 inches, and average erect penis size to be 5.16 inches. Note, this is an average; 90% of participants fell within a range of 4.13 to 6.2 inches erect. Interestingly, an erect penis length of 6.3 inches fell into the 95th percentile—meaning out of 100 people with penises, only about 5 of them will measure 6.3 inches or longer.

position. And let’s not forget those for whom penetration just isn’t their interest during sex! Finally, while some folks might choose their partners based on penis size, it is not usually the sole factor that influences who we want to get busy with. Our attraction to other human beings is based on a host of factors, and the ways we enjoy sexual activity is also quite varied. To believe claims that a large penis is of utmost importance to satisfying sex is to ignore the incredible variation in human sexuality. So when we find ourselves wondering whether our bodies, relationships, or sexual activities are “normal,” I encourage folks to consider the words of sexuality educator Emily Nagoski from a 2018 TED talk: “What even is normal, and why is that what you want your sexuality to be?” Nagoski continues, “What [people] are really asking is ‘Do I belong?’ Do I belong in this relationship? Do I belong in this community of people? Do I belong on earth as a sexual person? To which the answer is always a resounding yes … There is no script, no box you have to fit into.” I couldn’t agree more. It is often outside of restrictive boxes where we are able to find joyful expression of our sexual selves.

Hudson Nummerdor is a sexuality educator at The Tool Shed, Milwaukee’s mission-driven, education-based sexuality boutique.

Regarding our underlying assumptions about “normal,” many people—especially many men—believe that larger-thanaverage penises are far more common than they are. Couple this misperception with persistent cultural messages telling us that larger penises are better, and you’ve got a recipe for a whole bunch of people believing their penises to be inadequate. Indeed, many guys who seek penis enlargement via pumps, unproven supplements, or surgery have average-sized penises, or sometimes larger than average! The anxiety in these cases is fueled by narratives around penis size, masculinity, and attractiveness, as well as a cultural tendency to reduce male sexuality to the performance of an erect penis to the exclusion of all else. The ubiquity of porn may also contribute to the problem, where larger penises are overrepresented, and photography techniques can negatively impact viewer body image. And what of the “bigger is better” messaging that we’re led to believe about penis size? Better for what? Better to gaze upon, or to adorn with holiday lights? The assumption here is that all people who engage in sex involving a partner with a penis will want to be penetrated by that penis, and that a larger-thanaverage size will be more pleasurable. But is that a universal truth? While some people do indeed enjoy a partner with a larger-than-average penis, plenty of others find a large size to be uncomfortable or even painful during penetration. Many partners report size doesn’t matter for them as much as technique or

JANUARY 2022 | 67


SPECIAL HEALTH & WELLNESS

You Can’ł Fix Słupid BY PHILIP CHARD

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instein said there are only two things that are infinite—the universe and human stupidity. He added, “And I’m not sure about the universe.”

Even a cursory review of human history, not to mention our current circumstances, reinforces this iconic egghead’s assertion that many of our species act like idiots. Sure, we all make dumb mistakes on occasion, but I’m referring to those folks who embrace foolishness as a lifestyle, not just a behavioral hiccup. Count among them deluded conspiracy theorists, like QAnon whackos, “It will magnetize you” anti-vaxxers and a long list of politicians, pundits and contenders for the Darwin Awards who are seemingly detached from anything resembling factual reality. Regarding political types, Napoleon said, “In politics, stupidity is not a handicap.” Sadly so. Increasingly, people ask me, “How can (fill in name of person or group) be so stupid?”, often followed by, “How can I talk sense into them?” Well, as the trope goes, you can’t fix stupid. And while there are occasional exceptions, they are disappointingly rare. Occasionally, we hear of some conspiracy saturated lap dog who has awakened from their delusion to see the light. Think of an anti-vax, ‘It’s a hoax” COVID sufferer who, after a close brush with death, realizes they’ve been duped and exits the looney bin in their mind and walks toward the nearest vaccination site. Credit to them. It’s not easy admitting one has been walking around in a fog of “duh.”

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MEASURING BEHAVIOR While it seems counterintuitive, education is no guarantee one won’t behave stupidly. Many highly educated folks, some from prestigious universities, get on the stupid bandwagon, so an elevated IQ is not always protective in this regard. Consequently, determining whether someone is stupid requires focusing much more on how they behave rather than on their intellectual capacity. Sure, the term stupid is sometimes applied to a person who struggles cognitively, but more often it is an individual’s behavior that earns that label. So, stupid is less about the absence of head smarts or innate intelligence and more about a paucity of what we refer to as common sense. To quote Forrest Gump, “Stupid is as stupid does.” Whoa, you may be thinking: Who am I to define what is or is not stupid? Fair enough, so let’s reference research on the subject. Surveys show we tend to consider someone stupid when they (1) engage in impulsive or risky behavior, (2) absent-mindedly make lots of unforced errors, or (3) express and act on preposterous beliefs untethered from facts or evidence. For the most part, when we observe someone behaving in one of these manners, we shake our heads and think “how dumb.” With respect to those who profess delusional beliefs, like conspiratorial types, many of us throw in an additional label . . . “crazy.” So, what are the drivers behind behaving stupidly? Most often, a profound lack of self-awareness, an inflated sense of personal intelligence and mastery, and never-a-doubt certainty that one Illustration by Ali Bachmann.


is right about . . . well, everything. In other words, stupid people don’t realize they’re clueless. One psychologist who studied them extensively found the stupid among us over-estimate their smarts and skills by a multiplier of six. That’s big. The critical element these folks lack is the willingness to question their own beliefs. As philosopher Bertrand Russell said, “The stupid are cocksure, while the intelligent are full of doubt.” Which leads to another driver underlying stupid behavior—the fear of uncertainty. Being cocksure, as Russell put it, lowers anxiety by conjuring the delusion of certainty, of “I’ve got this.” Whenever that delusion is challenged, say by verifiable facts or contrary experiences, stupid folks feel threatened and dig in their mental heels, while smart ones re-examine their beliefs in light of new information. The delusion of certainty, which is a hallmark of human stupidity, requires believing we know more than we actually do. Which is why trying to “talk sense’ to someone with a penchant for stupid behavior is usually spitting into the interpersonal wind. One’s recitation of evidence and reasoned arguments are no match for that person’s baseless arrogance ensconced in a largely impenetrable mental shield of self-delusion. As Euripides reminded us, “Talk sense to a fool and he calls you foolish.”

Philip Chard is a psychotherapist and author with a focus on lasting behavior change, emotional healing and adaptation to health challenges. For more, visit philipchard.com. JANUARY 2022 | 69


CULTURE

This Month in Milwaukee

EIGHT THINGS TO DO IN JANUARY BY ALLEN HALAS, BARRY HOULEHEN AND DAVID LUHRSSEN

JANUARY 16

Photo by jdwfoto/Getty Images.

A Night Of Consciousness: Roy Washington, Atheists and Airplanes, BeautyAndTheBeast, Chico Manolo Cactus Club A mixed-bill, all-ages show will take place at Cactus Club starting at 6:30 p.m. Gospel rapper Roy Washington will hit the stage, along with indie band Atheists and Airplanes, hip hop duo BeautyAndTheBeast, and rapper Chico Manolo will provide for a unique evening of diverse music offerings.

THURSDAYS AND FRIDAYS

SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS Ice Skating at the Lynden Sculpture Garden In January, the Lynden Sculpture Garden is open daily from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. (closed Thursdays). Thanks to the generosity of donors, admission is free all month long. Weather permitting, ice skating will be offered on one of ponds in the Lynden’s 40 acres of park and woodland. For updates, visit lyndensculpturegarden.org. JANUARY 6 An Evening With Guerrilla Ghost and Spoy at Best Place Pabst Brewery Best Place at the Historic Pabst Brewery provides a picturesque venue for local musicians to host a concert, and a pair of bands are going to test the structural integrity of the longstanding building on Jan. 6. Noise-rap hybrid Guerrilla Ghost will headline the evening, with support from experimental post-hardcore act Spoy. Guerrilla Ghost will also be celebrating their fifth anniversary of politically charged musical chaos at that show.

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JANUARY 18 Nick Petrie Boswell Books For the seventh novel in his fast-paced Peter Ash series, Milwaukee author Nick Petrie packs his war veteran protagonist off to Nebraska. In The Runaway, Ash rescues a pregnant woman stranded on a roadside, only to be embroiled in a desperate clash with her ex-cop husband. The prestigious Kirkus book review journal calls The Runaway “Downright frightening fun” and “one hellacious ride for crime fiction fans.” Ash’s talk will be held at 6:30 p.m. in-person and virtually via Zoom. Registration is required.

JANUARY 20 Courtney Barnett Pabst Theater Aussie indie rocker Courtney Barnett will visit Milwaukee, bringing an always-energetic live show to the Pabst. A one-woman powerhouse on stage, Barnett is touring behind her fourth album, Things Take Time, Take Time, which was released this past November. Hits like “Pedestrian At Best” and “Nameless Faceless” will feel familiar to indie rock fans, with the newer material featuring more of Barnett at her best. JANUARY 29 The Regrettes The Rave Indie rock darlings The Regrettes have turned heads for the past few years, making appearances at Summerfest, Lollapalooza and Riot Fest all by the time they would be graduating high school. Frontwoman Lydia Knight and co. will make their first appearance at The Rave with an allages headlining show. You’ve likely heard songs like “Hey Now” and “Come Through” in various commercial placements, but the young band’s catalogue only gets stronger as they mature.

Photo by PaulFleet/Getty Images.

Irish Music Sessions at Paddy’s Pub and County Clare Milwaukee Irish pubs County Clare and Paddy’s Pub offer weekly Irish music open mics, commonly known as “sessions,” where musicians gather to play instrumental tunes together. Musicians are invited to bring their acoustic instruments and join in on jigs, reels, and other types of Irish and Scottish tunes. The Paddy’s Pub session begins at 7 p.m. on Thursdays in their upstairs room. The County Clare session begins at 9 p.m. on Fridays. County Clare is a smaller space and tends to attract more advanced players, while Paddy’s space is larger and is open to musicians of all ability levels, including beginners. Bring your instrument and sit in, or just grab a pint and enjoy the tunes


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To advertise on this page, contact BRIDGETTE at 414.292.3811 or bridgette@shepex.com

JANUARY 2022 | 71


LIFESTYLE DOMICILE

A Showplace Made From

Secondhand Finds THIS RACINE HOMEOWNER TURNED THRIFT-SHOP KNOW-HOW INTO EXTRAORDINARY RESULTS. BY MARK HAGEN

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Photos by Michael Burmesch.


Racine’s Dan Gazzana relied on resale finds to create the home of his dreams. Photos by Michael Burmesch.

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he moment Dan Gazzana stepped into a 1910 California craftsman in Racine, he realized he found his home. “The first time I walked into this house I was incredibly overwhelmed by its beauty,” he says. “By the time I got to the walk-up attic, I knew I wanted it.” That was 11 years ago, and Gazzana has since transformed the roomy abode into a showplace of style, sophistication and extraordinary comfort. The 10-room house features 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, a welcoming sunroom and a cozy den any homeowner would envy. Perhaps the most striking aspect of the house, however, are the thousands of fine details in décor. From exquisitely refurbished antique furniture and multiple sets of china and crystal (all on display) to original artworks and miniature figurines, the home is truly a feast for the eyes. Each item is placed with museumlike care and thought concerning light, color, texture and how it complements the area that surrounds it. “The den is a great example of what you can do with a small space,” says Gazzana. “My realtor told me it was originally used as a cigar-and-brandy lounge for gentlemen. I added numerous accents that layer on texture, giving the tiny room depth. It’s a great spot to settle in on cold nights, particularly when I have the fireplace roaring.” When asked his secret for displaying items without creating clutter, Gazzana laughs. “Doesn’t it look cluttered to you? But JANUARY 2022 | 73


LIFESTYLE DOMICILE

seriously, it can be a challenge to form vignettes that create interest. You have to take your time with them. Many of my guests ask if they can walk through the house just to take it all in. I consider that a compliment.”

RESTORING RESALE FINDS What guest don’t realize is that the majority of the home’s furnishings, accents and art came from antique shops, estate sales and resale stores. “I’d say 95-percent of the items you see are from secondhand sources,” says Gazzana. “When I first moved in, shopping for bargains was a necessity. I needed to be frugal and realized I could find high-end items at a fraction of the retail cost. I can’t explain the high I feel when I discover artwork, silver or crystal for next to nothing. My favorite find was a grandfather clock for $25.” Gazzana quickly became a pro at refurbishing pieces, and a striking dining room chandelier is a shining example of his no-fuss restoration know-how. “I came across a chandelier for $50 but it was missing nearly half the crystals,” he explains. “I later found another chandelier and I picked it up for $25. I scavenged the crystal from the less-expensive fixture and filled in the missing pieces on the chandelier I wanted for the dining room.” The final result created a spectacular focal point for the room that would likely sell in the upper hundreds. 74 | SHEPHERD EXPRESS

SECONDHAND SUCCESS Decorating with upcycled items can be tricky, and this homeowner has some advice for those new to antiquing. “Try to have a plan before shopping,” Gazzana recommends. “Know what you’re looking for and take your time. Try not to feel rushed to make a buying decision. “Look over your cart and think about your purchases before heading to the cashier, otherwise, you could end up with buyer’s remorse. I have an entire attic full of buyer’s remorse,” he laughs. “Today, hitting up local resale shops is a hobby for me,” says Gazzana. “I still collect Haeger pottery, slag glass lamps and vintage barware, but I don’t shop nearly as often as I used to. The house is pretty set as is.” Gazzana’s guests would likely agree. Based on its beauty, extreme detail and extraordinary interest, there is little that could be added to make this house any more impressive than it already is.

Mark Hagen is a décor enthusiast whose home has been featured in numerous national publications. His work has appeared in Fresh Home and Your Family magazines.

Photos by Michael Burmesch.


JANUARY 2022 | 75


LIFESTYLE CANNABIS

Researchers compared arrest data in 43 states, half of which passed some form of cannabis reform, from decriminalization to full legalization, from January 2008 to December 2019, to determine the effect of each policy change on race-based arrest data. The results are consistent across the board, showing a seemingly inevitable correlation between changing marijuana enforcement policy with the racial disparity within arrest numbers.

REDUCING BLACK ARRESTS

Refusing Cannabis Reform Drives Up Racial Inequalities BY JEAN-GABRIEL FERNANDEZ

D

ecriminalization and legalization of cannabis both lead to a significant reduction in racial imbalance in arrests, a new country-wide study found. Led by researchers from Saint Louis University and Eastern Virginia Medical School, and published by the American Medical Association, the study highlights the intimate link between the criminalization of marijuana and the disproportionate arrest rates that black people—Black youths in particular—are subjected to. Naturally, this is not news to anybody who pays attention to the fundamentally racist mechanisms of the so-called War on Drugs. Despite having the same marijuana consumption rates, white Americans are arrested at a much lower frequency than Black Americans. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) published research showing that Black people are arrested roughly four times more often than their white counterparts for similar marijuana habits, and almost always for simple possession. Despite the racial bias inherent to the violent repression of drug possession being welldocumented, there is little research proving that we could collectively end this racial imbalance by enacting policy changes. This is what researchers set out to do with this most recent study.

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Legalizing marijuana reduced the arrest rate of Black Americans by 561 out of 100,000 on average. In California, for instance, this corresponds to 13,000 Black individuals who would have been arrested in the previous status quo but who avoided seeing the inside of a cell for minor, non-violent possession of a harmless plant. Legalizing marijuana also reduced arrests of white Americans by 195 out of 100,000, keeping true with numbers demonstrating that white people were arrested much less often for the same offense. When a state passed decriminalization instead of legalizations, arrests were reduced by 448 per 100.000 for Black people and 117 per 100.000 for white people respectively. However, make no mistake: Legalization is not in any way inferior to decriminalization when it comes to tackling systemic racism. Seeing that Black youths fare better under decriminalization and that the reduction in arrest rates (minus 561 for legalization and minus 448 for decriminalization), it could be easy to conclude that both are somewhat equivalent. This is not the case, because states that choose to refuse legalization in favor of simple decriminalization are viewed as racist to begin with. The final arrest rates in 2019 in states that legalized marijuana are 38 and 15.9 arrests per 100,000 Black and white folks respectively. The same year, states that only decriminalized marijuana boast arrest rates of 361.4 and 102.9 per 100,000 Black and white people respectively. Decriminalization leads to an arrest rate far greater than full legalization. States that favored full legalization are more liberal to begin with; states that consistently shunned legalization also arrested Black people at a much higher rate before any cannabis reform. While these states used to arrest white people at about the same rate as legalization-friendly states, these decriminalization-friendly states used to arrest Black people at nearly 150% of the rate of their more liberal neighbor before cannabis reform came to pass. “States that implemented legalization saw a reduction in the arrest disparity from 2018 to 2019, whereas states that had no policy changes saw an increase in the relative racial disparity during this period,” researchers conclude. States that refuse cannabis reform all see a consistent increase in arrests for Black people but not for white people, thus deepening the race gap among arrestees.

LONG-LASTING IMPACT One interesting conclusion from this study is that the reduction in racial disparities started on average two years before Illustrations by Michael Burmesch.


legalization passed, in states that picked legalization, and the reduction in racial inequalities is long-lasting. Researchers suggest that this pre-legalization reaction is due to “social factors, such as changing social norms that drove statewide ballot initiatives and led to local jurisdictions deciding not to arrest for possession of small amounts of cannabis.”

THE RESULTS ARE CONSISTENT ACROSS THE BOARD, SHOWING A SEEMINGLY INEVITABLE CORRELATION BETWEEN CHANGING MARIJUANA ENFORCEMENT POLICY WITH THE RACIAL DISPARITY WITHIN ARREST NUMBERS.

In states that only passed decriminalization, the decrease in arrests among the Black community is immediate upon adopting the law, but the reduction in racial disparities is short-lived, often returning to a status quo that disproportionately disadvantages Black people within three years. “Decriminalization, which is a civil penalty, may still exacerbate existing racial disparities,” the researchers write. “For example, a small fine may be merely a nuisance to those with means but serve as a burden to those without.” Regardless of the merits of decriminalization versus legalization, one key point cannot be overlooked: In states where no cannabis

reform was approved, “there was a clear increase in racial disparity as possession arrest rates remained stable for white individuals and increased consistently for Black individuals. This increase is concerning and highlights the need for immediate policy change and implementation. This is in stark contrast to the increase in arrests seen in states without a cannabis policy change, suggesting that adult arrest rate disparities will likely continue to increase in states absent an intentional effort to address the issue.”

Jean-Gabriel Fernandez is a journalist and Sorbonne graduate living in Milwaukee.

JANUARY 2022 | 77


HEAR ME OUT DEAR RUTHIE | SPONSORED BY UW CREDIT UNION

DON’T LET AGE KEEP YOU FROM FINDING LOVE DEAR RUTHIE, How did I wake up to find myself 66 years old and single? I don’t mind my alone time, but now I regret not working harder to find someone so I wouldn’t be alone all of the time. I have friends, and I do things with them but I’m starting to feel like a third wheel, and I’m getting sick of it. Any ideas how an old man with a young heart can find love?

LET ME KNOW,

Milwaukee's Oldesł Millennial DEAR SENIOR MILLENIAL, Don’t let age get in the way of finding love. Make it a New Year’s resolution to put yourself out there more. Volunteer someplace or join a social club to meet new people. Start feeling more comfortable and confident with yourself. After all, an air of confidence is pretty darn attractive. Most important, remain positive that the universe wants you to find love and be happy. I know it sounds a bit hippy-dippy, but if you believe your next lover is out there waiting for you, then you’ll meet them sooner than you think.

XXOO

Ruthie

Have a question for Ruthie? Want to share an event with her? Contact Ruthie at dearruthie@shepex.com. Follow her on social media, too! Facebook: Dear Ruthie | Instagram: RuthieKeester | Twitter: @DearRuthie

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DEAR RUTHIE BROUGHT TO YOU BY

Ruthie's Social Calendar JANUARY 7 JANUARY 7—PIANO MEN AT MILWAUKEE REP (108 E. WELLS ST., STACKNER CABARET): Put two pianos on stage along with two hilarious piano players and you get this incredible show! Part sing-along, part concert and all fun, this change-of-pace revue is one you’ll want to see a few times before the show closes on February 27. Stop by www. milwaukeerep.com for schedules and tickets. JANUARY 7 NUNSENSE AT RACINE THEATRE GROUP (2519 NORTHWESTERN AVE., RACINE): What happens when the Little Sisters of Hoboken put on a variety show to save the convent? Find out during this hilarious musical comedy. The production runs through Jan. 23 but see www.racinetheatre. org for show times, tickets and more. JANUARY 9 SUNDAY NIGHT FEVER AT LACAGE NITECLUB (801 S. SECOND ST.): Sundays just got sickening at LaCage with this 11 p.m. drag show. Emcee Mimi Verace wraps up your Sunday Funday with her special guests, no cover charge, DJ, dancing and more. JANUARY 12 LGBTQIA+ YOUTH (VIRTUAL) SUPPORT GROUP: Every Wednesday at 4:30 p.m. the Milwaukee LGBT Community Center facilitates this peer group. The 1-hour meeting offers a free safe spot for the city’s youth to openly discuss issues they face. Interested participants should contact mnoorlander@mkelgbt.org to learn more, including the link to the Google meeting. JANUARY 20 DIVAS DE LA NOCHE AT HAMBURGER MARY’S (730 S. FIFTH ST.): Spice up the workweek with this exciting show that combines Latin music with the city’s hottest drag performers. The fun starts at 8 p.m. but arrive early to enjoy some food and take advantage of the night’s drink specials. JANUARY 22 “RUMOR HAS IT: A TRIBUTE TO THE MUSIC OF ADELE” (144 E. WELLS ST.): Singer Jennifer Schafer and an impressive group of musicians pay homage to Adele in this soulful concert. See www. pabsttheatergroup.com for tickets ($25 to $35) to the 7:30 p.m. show. JANUARY 25 MEAN GIRLS AT MARCUS PERFORMING ARTS CENTER (929 N. WATER ST.): The tour you’ve been waiting for (thanks for nothing Covid!) finally rolls into Cream City for a five-day run. The hilarious show offers all of the campy fun of the movie with great production numbers and more. Swing by www.marcuscenter.org for performance schedules and tickets, ranging in price from $35 to $131. JANUARY 27 - JANUARY 30 MR. CHICAGO LEATHER 2022 AT TOUCHÉ (6412 N. HALSTEAD ST., CHICAGO): Get ready for one wild weekend! Mr. Chicago Leather is back! From mixers and parties to the big contest, this event is always one heck of a good time. Visit www.touchechicago.com for schedules, passes and weekend packages. JANUARY 29 TRANS NAME & GENDER CHANGE (ONLINE) CLINIC: The team at Trans Law Help Wisconsin brings back this popular virtual class that reviews processes regarding name and gender-marker changes. Not only does the 1 p.m. class offer a Q&A portion, but participants can meet one-on-one with a legal expert for additional guidance. Registration is necessary so email info@translawhelp.com for details. JANUARY 2022 | 79


HEAR ME OUT | SPONSORED BY UW CREDIT UNION

A Year of Temporary Respite for LGBTQs BY PAUL MASTERSON

L

ast year, 2021, began ominously. On Jan. 6 right wing terrorists inspired by the former president and with the complicity of the Republican Party attempted to violently overthrow the American democracy. Had they succeeded, we would have been thrown into the abyss of authoritarianism. It would have meant an end to LGBTQ rights as we know them.

Republicans again protected its practice statewide, Gov. Tony Evers blocked the funding of conversion therapy with state money. Meanwhile, the culture wars raged as certain school boards, buttressed by the Republican State Assembly, moved to erase LGBTQ recognition in public schools.

Two weeks later, we let out a collective sigh of relief with President Joe Biden’s inauguration. It signaled a return to the advance of LGBTQ equality. Just days after his inauguration, by executive order, Biden reversed the previous regime’s ban of transgender members of the armed forces. Later, history would be made when the U.S. Senate confirmed Pete Buttigieg, a gay married man, as the Secretary of Transportation, and a transgender woman, Dr. Rachel Levin, as Assistant Health Secretary. She would later be promoted to four-star admiral of the U.S. Public Health Service, becoming the first openly transgender person to achieve that rank.

In March, the Brett Blomme child porn scandal shook the city’s LGBTQ community that had celebrated Blomme as a rising star.

It was a year of celebrity comings-out with NFL footballer Carl Nassib leading the pack. A record number of out athletes competed in the Tokyo Olympics. Speaking of Olympians, like clockwork, Caitlyn Jenner embarrassed us, again. However, transwoman Amy Schneider became a Jeopardy Tournament of Champions contestant, launching her run of victories in the middle of Transgender Awareness Week. On the dark side, murders of transgender women were record setting worldwide.

HISTORY LESSONS In 2021 Wisconsin joined 31 other states in requiring the teaching of Holocaust history. Wausau and Sun Prairie joined 11 other cities in banning conversion therapy. While State Legislature

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Due to the pandemic, June’s traditional Pride Parade was cancelled for the second year. Milwaukee Pride, Inc, aside from organizing Pride Month events in June that included the launch of the first MCTS Pride Bus and the Hoan Bridge illuminated in rainbow colors, managed to produce a smaller PrideFest, appropriately called PridetoberFest, in October. In the political and cultural realms, as part of June Pride, the second March with Pride for Black Lives Matter took place, again organized by activist Broderick Pearson. Jessica Katzenmeyer announced her congressional campaign to challenge Republican incumbent Scott Fitzpatrick. Transman artist Nykoli Koslow was the Pfister Hotel’s Artist in Residence and a dozen queer artists were featured on city billboards for a unique “Queering the Cream City” public art exhibit. Both nationally and locally, 2021 was an anniversary year for many historic events. It was the 40th anniversary of the first report in the New York Native of HIV as an “exotic new disease,” the 20th anniversary of the death of Mathew Shepherd, the 10th of the end of the U.S. military’s “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy, and the fifth of the Pulse Massacre in Orlando.

Illustration by Michael Burmesch.


BLACK AND WHITE TOGETHER Milwaukee commemorated the 60th anniversary of the Black Nite Brawl, a bar fight between straight sailors and gay bar patrons dubbed Milwaukee’s LGBTQ uprising. Gay People’s Union and the Metropolitan Community Church celebrated their golden anniversaries while Black and White Men Together marked its 40th. It was the 30th anniversary of the 1991 arrest of serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer and the 25th of the Lambda Legal victory in the landmark case Nabozny v. Podlesny on behalf of Wisconsin teen, Jamie Nabozny (the first ruling in which a court decided a school district could be liable for failing to stop anti-gay bullying). Other historic silver anniversaries were PrideFest’s move to Henry Maier Festival Park and Karen Gotzler’s run for alderperson as the first LGBTQ person to do so. The year was also the 20th anniversary of Walker’s Pint, one the nation’s few remaining lesbian bars, and the 10th of the arson fire that destroyed a local leather and Levi bar, the Boot Camp Saloon. In other bar news, drag celebrity Trixie Mattel joined George Schneider as co-owner of This Is It, Milwaukee’s oldest gay bar. LaCage went up for sale, again. Miraculously, all of Cream City’s remaining queer bars successfully weathered another year of COVID. LGBTQ sports made a comeback after their pandemic hiatus with teams back on their respective pitch, fields, courts and

lanes. SSBL’s annual softball tournament, the Dairyland Classic also returned after being cancelled in 2020. Leadership changes took place in 2021 as well. Hired in August 2020, Cream City Foundation President and CEO Gary Balcerzak resigned in March of 2021. Amy Orta, the LGBTQ Community Center’s executive director since October 2018, left her office shortly after the Center’s move back to Court Street. Kevin Turner has been named Interim Executive Director. To wrap up the year on an up note, Milwaukee again earned a perfect 100 score on the Human Rights Campaign’s Municipal Equality Index. So, whether you’re hearing that Frank Sinatra classic “It Was a Very Good Year” in your head or not, 2021 proved to be something of a roller coaster ride. It’s certainly time for some optimistic New Year’s resolutions. Meanwhile, 2022, an election year, is upon us. With the fight for reproductive rights in full swing, abrogating LGBTQ rights are certainly next on the right-wing agenda … so buckle up, it’s going to be another bumpy year.

Paul Masterson is an LGBTQ activist and writer and has served on the boards of the Milwaukee Gay Arts Center, Milwaukee Pride, GAMMA and other organizations.

JANUARY 2022 | 81


ART FOR ART'S SAKE

From The City That Always Sweeps BY ART KUMBALEK

I

’m Art Kumbalek and man oh manischewitz what a world, ain’a? So listen, hard to believe it’s another full month of January already. Didn’t we just have a January last year, that one when a contagious clique of pale Trumpian anarchists sought to bring in the New Year by bringing down the U.S. Capitol Building? Still hoping the Department of Justice will not forget all those old acquaintances and raise a cup of whup-ass, finally, what the fock.

For example, here from Dec. 30, 1993:

Yeah, so January, again, for cripes sakes— that time of year that reminds me of what Roald (The Magic Finger, The Twits) said: “If I had my way, I’d remove January from the calendar altogether and have an extra July instead.” Amen, I’ll buy that, and I might also put a down payment on this, from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory: “You should never, never doubt something that no one is sure of.” Could be, ain’a?

And what about January 2017? Here:

And so here we go again, now that it is January 2022, good lord, I ask you’s: Do I dare offer my traditional top-of-theyear Look Back/Watch Out Ahead essay, once again? To refresh the memories of you constant, if not exactly gentle readers, to wit: In early January 2021, I wrote: And now, without further ado, my “Look Back/Watch Out Ahead” essay, and remember that pithiness is the soul of brevity; so here it is for you to pith on: The Year 2020: Sucked, but good, major big-time. Watch Out Ahead, 2021: Will suck, even more. Hard to believe, ain’a? No sir, retrospectively not hard to believe at all and so not possible to argue that kind of accuracy, what the fock. And just so you know, I’ve been putting out these essays for more than 30 years and dag-focking-nabit if I’ve ever been off the mark.

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1993: Sucked. 1994: Will suck And let’s go back to Dec. 30, 2004, when I opined: The Year 2004: Sucked. A Look Ahead, 2005: Will suck, even more.

The Year 2016: Sucked, but good. Watch Out Ahead, 2017: Will suck, even more. Can you believe it? And the only surefire thing I predict is that there will be a sucker born at least every minute. As you can see, when it comes to flinging the soothsaying, who else deserves one of those Noble prizes but me? Hey, you tell me. And then I’ll lay the new sooth thusly: 2021: Sucked, jeez louise, I’m telling you, and now we got the inflation while millions of yahoo wannabe fascists still turn down the vaccine??? 2022: Will suck humongously when/if these knobshine Republicans regain topdog control of Congress. There you go. Clean, economical and near-elegant with the pith, ain’a? And that’s all I’ve got to say about that ’cause I’d like to break this off right here, right now, and do something nice for myself like crank up the thermostat and mix another hot focking toddy, after all, it’s focking January again. But before I go, perhaps we can look at January as a month-long holiday from the holidays, that period we’ve needed to suffer through since, what, Halo-focking-ween, Columbus Day, United Nations Day, way back in October, which seems to be but a dream ago, I kid you not.

But January? Focking holidays are done and done, finally, unless us current and lapsed (my hand is raised) Catholics go all out for the Epiphany on the January 6, which according to my memory and sources on the internet is this: “Christian holiday commemorating the first manifestation of Jesus Christ to the Gentiles,” represented by the Magi (yeah, those guys, with the one carting around the ferkakta myrrh). I don’t remember ever getting candy or any kind of present on this such a holiday, but I do recall a little story, here in my later age: Imagine the shy young man’s surprise when Pope Francis sat down in the seat next to him for the flight destined for New York City. Shortly after takeoff, the pope began a crossword puzzle. “This is really swell,” the young man thought, “I’m really good at crosswords and if the pope gets stuck, perhaps he’ll ask me for assistance and I’ll get a gold pass to heaven.” Shortly thereafter, the pope turned to the young man and said, “Excuse me son, but I seem to be blocked on this puzzle. Do you happen to know a four-letter word that ends in ‘unt,’ u-n-t, and that refers to a woman?” Only one such word leapt to mind, a word the young man felt should not be uttered in the pope’s presence. He thought a moment, and as a bolt from the blue, turned to the pope and said, “I believe your holiness, that it is the word ‘aunt’ you seek—a-u-n-t.” And the pope said, “Of course, my son. ‘A-u-n-t.’ God bless you. I don’t suppose you happen to have an eraser?” Ba-ding! So I wish you’s all a happy new year—hey, at my age I still do like to think anything’s possible, what the fock, ’cause I’m Art Kumbalek and I told you so.

Photo by gpointstudio/Getty Images.



Hupy & Abraham 9.25 x 11.125


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