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BIKING MILWAUKEE Cyclists aren’t the only ones who benefit from bike lanes


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::NEWS&VIEWS STEVAN OVICIGOR

FEATURES | POLLS | TAKING LIBERTIES | ISSUE OF THE WEEK

Pedestrian and bicycle-focused urban planning is often framed as an issue for pedestrians and cyclists only. In a car-dependent city like Milwaukee, investments in other forms of transportation are often viewed as wasted resources (look no further than the streetcar debate). But research suggests that building pedestrian and bicyclefriendly infrastructure also drives economic growth. According to the Alliance for Biking & Walking’s 2016 Benchmarking Report, eight of its 10 recently studied complete streets projects (projects where bicyclists and pedestrians are considered equally to motorists) showed increased property values near the improved areas. A study of San Francisco’s Valencia Street found that two-thirds of business owners felt that new bike lanes had a positive impact on their business. A study of greater Portland, Ore., also found that bicycling customers spent more per month than drivers. Over the last decade, Milwaukee has been slowly getting in on this success.

‘Picking the Low-Hanging Fruit’

BUILDING A BETTER BIKING MILWAUKEE Cyclists aren’t the only ones who benefit from bike lanes ::BY ROB HULLUM

s Walker’s Point continues to shed its industrial roots and become a destination for trendy restaurants and bustling nightlife, the revitalization has raised property values and spurred a slew of new construction projects. While you would be remiss to discount the hard work individual restaurateurs, chefs and property developers put in to make that area what it is, experts also cite South Second Street’s 2011 roadway redesign as a factor in the neighborhood’s success. “South Second Street is one of the most thriving restaurant districts that we have in the city,” said Robert Schneider, a professor of urban planning at UW-Milwaukee. “This is a place that, while I don’t give all of the credit to redesigning the roadway, the redesign made that into a place where people would feel more comfortable walking, biking and feeling safe when they’re going to those restaurants.” Juli Kaufmann, who developed the Clock Shadow Building on the corner of South Second and Bruce streets as president of Fix Development, also partly credits Walker’s Point’s success to the roadway redesign. “I view the real estate development that followed the redesign as a direct result correlated, at least in part, to these enhancements,” she said. “I not only built the Clock Shadow Building but also redeveloped the Purple Door Ice Cream building. The roadway changes were pivotal to those developments.”

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In 2010, the City of Milwaukee released “Milwaukee by Bike,” a bicycle master plan. It laid out a vision that imagined by 2020 “Milwaukee’s neighborhoods will be filled with a noticeable diversity of people riding bicycles on innovative bicycle facilities.” The plan’s three overarching goals were to increase bicycle use so that 5% of all trips are made by bike; create an attractive, safe and accessible network of bicycle facilities within one-quarter mile of all city residents; and to reduce bicycle crashes by 50%. Since adopting the plan, the city has taken a number of steps to embrace bicycling. “The city has done a pretty good job at picking the low-hanging fruit,” Dave Schlabowske, executive director of the Wisconsin Bike Federation, said. “Pretty much everywhere where a bike lane fits just by adding those two lines of paint, they’ve been added. That’s great progress.” Milwaukee had fewer than 20 miles of bike lanes as recently as the mid-2000s. As a part of its High-Impact Paving Program, the city has made bike lanes a part of most roadway repaving projects, installing more than 120 miles. In an effort to improve bicyclist visibility, green thermoplastic markings have been added to some locations to highlight traffic “conflict zones.” Milwaukee DPW has also installed more than 1,500 bike racks throughout the city. The city has also developed its own trail network. The Beerline Trail opened in 2010 and has since expanded. The Kinnickinnic River Trail opened in 2013. These city projects add to the miles of trail that the county-owned Oak Leaf and state-owned Hank Aaron trails provide.

An Expansion of Bublr Bikes

Milwaukee’s most visible bicycle project has been the addition of Bublr Bikes, the city’s bike share program. Bike share has become an essential part of urban life across the country, with at least 55 programs nationwide and 28 million trips taken in 2016, according to the National Association of City Transportation Officials. “It’s just expected that a first-class city in 2018 is going to have a bike share program, and if you don’t that’s a ding,” said Sally Shepherdson, executive director of

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On the Bike Path to Platinum

On Bike to Work Day in June 2016, Mayor Tom Barrett announced the Path to Platinum initiative, a reference to the “platinum” status that the League of American Bicyclists gives out to certain cities. Madison was awarded platinum status in 2015. Milwaukee is currently a bronze city. The Path to Platinum committee released its first report in March 2017 and found that surveyed Milwaukeeans’ top barrier to cycling was driver behavior. This fear is backed by a 2017 Wisconsin Bike Federation report, which concluded, “The city of Milwaukee as a whole, and in each district, has a pedestrian safety problem.” The research showed that, while Milwaukee makes up 10.4% of the state’s population, it accounts for 29.1% of crashes in Wisconsin. One solution is to build separated bike lanes, which use planters, parked cars or curbs to separate bikes from drivers. “Currently with the bike lanes that we have in most parts of the city, or if there’s no bike lane at all, you only really see the most experienced bicyclists out in these locations,” said Schneider, who is also on the Path to Platinum committee. “Separated bike lanes make it possible for people of more ages and more abilities to feel comfortable out biking. It’s more like having a trail that goes through the street system.” The City of Milwaukee Department of Public Works will in-

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stall the city’s first separated bike lanes on the East Locust Street and East North Avenue bridges over the Milwaukee River this summer.

Riverwest Leading the Way

While 88% of Path to Platinum survey respondents desired more separation from vehicle traffic, separated bike lanes are costly and don’t fit everywhere in the city. Another option is to create bicycle boulevards, also known as neighborhood greenways or safe street networks. These are city streets with traffic-calming treatments such as speed bumps, traffic circles and curb extensions. The city is moving forward with plans for the first bicycle boulevard in Riverwest on North Fratney and East Wright streets to begin construction in 2020. “By building a safe local street network, it’s safer for everyone and it improves everyone’s property values,” Schlabowske said. “Who doesn’t want to live on a street that has fewer cars speeding down it? It turns out that if you build a safe street network that reduces speeding and reduces cutthrough traffic, at the same time you create great streets to ride bikes on if you do it right.” The biggest obstacle to achieving these goals is, of course, money. Installing a separated bike lane can cost between

$100,000-500,000 per mile, and a regular bike lane may cost around $15,000 per mile. Riverwest’s bicycle boulevard project will cost around $800,000, though a federal transportation grant will cover about 80% of that cost. These costs are very real, but pale in comparison to other transportation projects. “$100,000 per mile is miniscule compared to the cost of an urban freeway expansion,” Schneider said. “If you look at the proposed cost of the three-mile I-94 expansion project between 16th Street and 70th Street, the cost of that for is $800 million for three miles. It’s such a fraction of the cost when we think about these walking and biking improvements, and they have real benefits to the people in the local neighborhoods.” While bicycle infrastructure alone cannot solve a city’s problems, when teamed with other solutions, it can help combat a wide range of issues. “I recognize the many significant problems that face our city,” Schlabowske said. “The entrenched poverty, the racism, all that sort of stuff that is incredibly difficult to solve. I know all of those things should be a top priority. I would say though, that bicycling should always be considered as a simple, inexpensive strategy to address almost any of those problems.” Comment at shepherdexpress.com. n

PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE-FOCUSED URBAN PLANNING IS OFTEN FRAMED AS AN ISSUE FOR PEDESTRIANS AND CYCLISTS ONLY. BUT RESEARCH SUGGESTS THAT BUILDING PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE-FRIENDLY INFRASTRUCTURE ALSO DRIVES ECONOMIC GROWTH. SHEPHERD STAFF

Bublr Bikes, explaining: “It’s a factor used against you when companies are looking to locate or when potential employees are looking to come to your city.” The blue-biked nonprofit began in Milwaukee with 10 stations in August 2014. It now boasts 87 stations and 90,000 trips taken in 2017. Bublr is rapidly expanding, but a reliance on grants and donations, coupled with the $75,000 price tag per station, has made it difficult to serve every neighborhood. “They certainly aren’t reaching all parts of the city yet,” Schneider said. “Riverwest, the area that has the highest rate of bike commuting, doesn’t even have a Bublr station yet.” Bublr may not be able to put a station everywhere, but it has partnered with a number of local organizations to make access to cycling easier. A program with the Housing Authority allows residents of public housing to purchase annual Bublr passes for $8 (the regular price is $80). A recent grant will allow Bublr to expand this $8 membership to any Milwaukee resident that qualifies for FoodShare. Serving the unbanked is a common struggle for bike share programs across the nation, which typically require a credit or debit card to complete transactions. A network of community partners, including Pete’s Fruit Market, allows the unbanked to pay for their Bublr memberships with cash. A goal of both programs is to give more low-income Milwaukeeans the ability to get to work or run errands without having to purchase a costly car. “One of the pillars of the foundation is access for under-resourced areas,” Shepherdson said. “Equity was always baked in.” Bublr has also partnered with the Milwaukee County Transit System (MCTS) on the Buslr Pass. The program allows riders to pay for Bublr and MCTS buses with one card. “We have these different modes of transportation, and smart cities have integration of intermodal transportation,” Shepherdson said. She hopes to have a similar arrangement with the Milwaukee streetcar in the future and is making plans with the city to have streetcar stops coincide with Bublr stations whenever possible. All of these steps have made Milwaukee a much better bike city, but there is still a long way to go.

M AY 1 7 , 2 0 1 8 | 5


NEWS&VIEWS::FEATURE

The Unsettled Future of Milwaukee’s Winter Farmers Market

Can it survive without strong relocation prospects or prominent champions? ::BY VIRGINIA SMALL

A

recent decision by Milwaukee County officials to oust the weekly Milwaukee Winter Farmers Market from the Mitchell Park Domes Greenhouse Annex remains unresolved. The community-serving economic generator averaged nearly 1,800 visitors at Saturday markets during 2017-’18. Jennifer Casey, executive director of the Fondy Food Center, which operates both the winter market and Fondy’s seasonal outdoor market, said that a search committee comprised of Fondy staff, volunteers and vendors is seeking a new site, “but we have yet to identify a venue that meets all of our criteria.” According to Deborah Deacon, who managed the market’s move to the Domes in 2013, “there’s not much out there.” Casey outlined criteria identified by market customers and vendors: “Consistently available Saturday mornings till early afternoon between November and April; centrally located with easy freeway access; ease of loading and unloading for vendors; ample free and safe parking with accessible public transit; and at least 10,000 square feet of space with on-site restrooms, water and electricity.” She also added that “a sunny, attractive space would be preferred.” James Tarantino, chief of business services for Milwaukee County Parks, explained by email the county’s rationale for evicting the popular market. “The focus on rentals (weddings, corporate, proms) is a high priority going into 2019. Just four Saturday rentals [during market months] would amount to more than the revenue generated by the market in its 23 events.” A new parks department facility rental guide lists a rental fee of $3,500 to rent the annex for six hours on a Saturday evening, and $1,500-$2,500 for other evenings. Rates do not include entry to the Domes glasshouses. Evening rentals of the Domes lobby, after the horticultural conservatory closes at 5 p.m., are listed at $800-$2,450 and include access to the three Domes. In 2017-’18, the winter market paid $13,800 ($600 weekly) for 23 Saturday markets held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. A four-hour daytime rental of the Annex from Sunday through Friday is posted at $800. Tarantino said 16 catered events were held within the Domes complex in 2017, but did not specify whether any were in the Annex.

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Picking Winners and Losers

Zilli Hospitality Group’s pending contract with Milwaukee County (through its parent company, Grandview, Inc.) provides for exclusive catering rights at the Annex, as well as the Domes. During two Milwaukee County Board committee hearings in January, county attorney Paul Kuglitsch never mentioned that the winter market might be kicked out. The proposed terms sheet specified that the county and public could continue using the Annex (built with public funding) for non-catered events, “including 22 winter markets.” Kuglitsch confirmed on Monday, May 7, that Zilli’s contract had not yet been executed. Milwaukee County Supervisor John Weishan Jr., whose district includes part of the South Side, said, “Nothing indicated that the winter market’s Domes lease was ever in jeopardy.” However, the veteran supervisor also said he regrets giving county administrators “too much leeway” in executing a contract that the board will likely be unable to oversee. Eighty farmers and local producers participated this season—about 50 per week. Some Milwaukee Winter Farmers Market (MWFM) vendors and customers are miffed—even outraged—by the abrupt lease nonrenewal. They wonder why county officials did not consult any organizers, vendors or customers before deciding to shut down the popular community destination. Stalwart MWFM vendor Angela Moragne of Milwaukee called booting the market “a sacrilege.” Moragne—co-owner of That Salsa Lady, “the only Black and woman-owned salsa company in the U.S.”—adds, “Here in segregated Milwaukee, this is the one place where everyone comes together” from all socioeconomic backgrounds. Another longtime vendor (who asked not to be identified) wrote in an email: “I have come to realize it is a winter tourist attraction… Every week there would be international customers and people from all over the country. I have a means of tracking this because I hand out free shipping cards to out-of-towners. This way, I know customers at that market generate online business, which I love!” The vendor concluded: “The mystery corporation behind the decision may stand to profit from the ousting, but I hope it does not go unnoticed that farmers and small businesses will not.”

No Commitment to Milwaukee?

Ian Bautista, executive director of the Clarke Square Neighborhood Initiative, says that he hopes “there might be some way to keep the winter market at the Domes. It’s an important economic anchor and way for residents to access healthy local food.” Dave Boucher, a decades-long investor in Milwaukee’s West Side, is troubled that no Milwaukee leaders are advocating for keeping the winter market in the city. “Without leaders committing to this city beyond Downtown,” Boucher worries about Milwaukee’s overall economic development prospects, not just the market’s fate. Boucher co-owns and operates Amaranth Bakery & Café on 33rd and Lisbon. After moving here in 1993 to pursue a graduate degree in urban studies at UW-Milwaukee, he bought a historic home near Washington Park. He has since pursued private and collective efforts to improve his neighborhood and beyond. Amaranth was a winter market vendor when it was at State Fair Park and for several years at the Domes, resulting in “many connections that continue.” Boucher insists that “the winter market has created value” within an economically evolving South Side neighborhood. “We are losing an amenity with a proven track record. It required no tax subsidy and was paying a reasonable rent for a public park facility. Any effort that attracts nearly 2,000 people weekly in Milwaukee—that’s no joke.” Vendors and customers question the market’s ouster for what one vendor called “piein-the-sky rentals” in winter. Boucher asked: “What model is [Milwaukee County] employing to justify using park facilities primarily to generate revenue while closing off public amenities?”

Nourishing Community

Martha Davis Kipcak, a longtime activist for sustainable local food systems, also expressed concern. “It will be a shame if this unique treasure ends out of inertia,” she said by phone, adding, “when people leave this market, they are smiling.” Davis Kipcak cited Farmers Market Coalition statistics that “people who shop at farmer’s markets have 15-20 social interactions per visit,” compared to one or two interactions at grocery stores. “Yes, it’s about food but also so much more,” she said. “It’s been proven that isolation is more harmful to one’s health than obesity.” Kipcak also hopes that decision makers will consider “the power of the commons in building a resilient community.” A winter market cofounder, she appreciates how it “has evolved organically—no pun intended.” She also helped found the Milwaukee Food Council and formerly served as executive director of the nonprofit Center for Resilient Cities. Deacon, who cofounded the Milwaukee Winter Farmers Market and managed it until spring 2015, said, “A sense of a community has bloomed in the Domes. It is a sunlight-filled place to meet neighbors, catch up with friends and spend time with family while gathering locally grown ingredients for home-cooked meals.”

A Small Business Incubator

Milwaukee ranks near the bottom of major cities in terms of business startups. That’s why Deacon thinks it’s crucial that the Milwaukee Winter Farmers Market “serves as a small business incubator for farms and specialty food producers. Interactions between vendors and their customers that occur at a market are invaluable—not just in dollars, but in the sharing of ideas, stories and enthusiasm.” Deacon said the winter market has long been a “venue for entrepreneurs to develop a customer following, experiment with new products, pricing and marketing, and ramp up sales and perhaps move on to larger ventures or a permanent storefront.” She added that chefs and retailers also scout the market to check out offerings and network with vendors. One of the market’s most prominent startup launches has been Valentine Coffee. Deacon met owner Robb Kashevarof when he was still perfecting his coffee-roasting techniques in his garage and selling his beans out of the trunk of his car. He sold Valentine’s first cup at the winter market in 2009. Valentine has remained an anchor even after opening a café on 59th and Vliet and a second shop in Drexel Town Square, Oak Creek. Kashevarof said, “We have developed our own community of vendors at the winter market, along with a loyal and growing customer following.” Deacon said that at least seven other businesses went from being solely market vendors to having brick-and-mortar outlets during her six-year tenure. Katie Hassemer, Fondy’s director of farmers markets, said that since Fondy took over, about 12 vendors have either opened their own stores, began to also sell products in grocery stores or otherwise dramatically increased their businesses. That includes Chillwaukee fruit popsicles, Grafton Stone Mill, Healthy Roots cold-pressed juices, Tabal Chocolate, Tippecanoe Herbs, Wisconsin Soup Company, WOW meatless balls and Zymbiotics fermented vegetables. Tamerra Dykema of Dominion Valley Farm of Allenton has been another winter market anchor after first selling her grass-fed meats at summer markets. Initially hesitant, she signed up for alternate weeks and switched to weekly attendance after her first foray. She said the winter market has helped ensure steady, yearround sales for their small family farm. Deacon summarized the winter market’s wide-ranging benefits. “It has significantly raised the public profile of the Domes and surrounding neighborhoods, enabled residents of Metro Milwaukee to eat local longer, supplied a late-fall and winter source of revenue for farms, served as a small-business incubator for specialty food producers [and] exemplified the year-round demand for locally grown food. For low-income customers, it has provided equitable access to wholesome food through use of Quest cards and matching benefits of up to $20 per Quest shopper per week.” Comment at shepherdexpress.com. n

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M AY 17, 2 0 1 8 | 7


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All shows at 8 pm unless otherwise indicated Tickets available at Shank Hall Box Office, 866-468-3401, or at ticketweb.com

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NEWS&VIEWS

::SAVINGOURDEMOCRACY ( MAY 17 - MAY 23, 2018 )

T

he Shepherd Express serves as a clearinghouse for all activities in the greater Milwaukee area that peacefully push back against discriminatory, reactionary or authoritarian actions and policies of the Donald Trump administration, as well as other activities by all those who seek to thwart social justice. We will publicize and promote actions, demonstrations, planning meetings, teach-ins, party-building meetings, drinking-discussion get-togethers and any other actions that are directed toward fighting back to preserve our liberal democratic system.

Saturday, May 19

Save the JobLines Community Rally @ Wisconsin Black Historical Society (2620 W. Center St.), 11 a.m.-2 p.m.

Author of The Pursuit of Happyness Chris Gardner will be the keynote speaker at this community rally to save Milwaukee County Transit System routes six and 61, also known as the JobLines, which are at risk for being cut at the end of 2018.

Peace Action Wisconsin: Stand for Peace @ The corner of 92nd Street and North Avenue, noon-1 p.m.

Every Saturday from noon-1 p.m., concerned citizens join with Peace Action Wisconsin to protest war and, quite literally, “Stand for Peace.” Signs will be provided for those who need them. Protesters are encouraged to stick around for conversation and coffee afterward.

Marching On: 50 Years in the Making @ North Division High School (1011 W. Center St.), 1-3 p.m.

Rep. Gwen Moore will deliver the keynote address at this celebration of the 50th anniversary of the open housing marches. Other confirmed speakers include Mayor Tom Barrett, Common Council President Ashanti Hamilton, America’s Black Holocaust Museum head griot Reggie Jackson and more.

Tuesday, May 22

Milwaukee Press Club Conversation with Matt Flynn @ UW-Milwaukee Zilber School of Public Health (1240 N. 10th St.), 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.

The Milwaukee Press Club is partnering with wispolitics.com for a special conversation with Wisconsin Democratic Party gubernatorial candidate Matt Flynn. The event is a part of a series of conversations with the state’s top Democratic candidates for Wisconsin governor.

Wednesday, May 23

Milwaukee Secure Detention Facility Picket @ Milwaukee County Courthouse (901 N. Ninth St.), 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

A coalition of local organizations has come together over the last year to try to shut down the Milwaukee Secure Detention Facility. The coalition protests in front of the Milwaukee County Courthouse on the 23rd of every month.

Community Listening Session with Sen. Chris Larson @ South Milwaukee Public Library (1907 10th Ave., South Milwaukee), 5-6:30 p.m.

State Sen. Chris Larson will host a community listening session at the South Milwaukee Public Library as an opportunity to directly hear the thoughts and concerns of his constituents.

Governor Candidate Forum @ UW-Waukesha Northview (1500 N. University Ave.), 7-9 p.m.

Our Wisconsin Revolution will host a “speed dating” style forum with a number of Democratic candidates for Wisconsin governor. Tony Evers, Matt Flynn, Mike McCabe, Mahlon Mitchell, Kelda Roys, Kathleen Vinehout and Dana Wachs have been invited. To submit to this column, please send a brief description of your action, including date and time, to savingourdemocracy@shepex.com. Together, we can fight to minimize the damage that Donald Trump and others of his kind have planned for our great country. Comment at shepherdexpress.com. n 8 | M AY 1 7 , 2 0 1 8

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M AY 17, 2 0 1 8 | 9


NEWS&VIEWS::TAKINGLIBERTIES

SCOTT WALKER’S ELECTION YEAR BRIBES ::BY JOEL MCNALLY

D

on’t forget to sign up beginning this week for your $100 election-year bribes from Republican Gov. Scott Walker. It’s becoming increasingly obvious to most Americans that Republicans have ushered in a new Golden Era of Political Corruption under their president. Law enforcement agents raided Donald Trump’s personal attorney’s home and office reportedly hauling out financial records tracking millions of dollars changing hands, burner phones and possibly even recorded conversations with the president and his associates. So much Sopranos-style excitement surrounding the presidency shouldn’t overshadow Walker’s own enthusiastic effort to return Wisconsin to those brazenly politically corrupt days when politicians would simply pass out cold, hard cash for votes.

If Walker’s vote-buying scheme works statewide, he may achieve what Republicans have failed spectacularly to do nationally. Voters in elections around the country have seen right through the $1.5 trillion Republican tax cut that went overwhelmingly to multimillion-dollar corporations and multimillionaires and billionaires.

The GOP’s Hard Sell

Since that tax cut for the ultra wealthy benefitting Trump and his family is the only legislative achievement by Republicans, they’d hoped to convince ordinary, working-class Americans that making the richest people on Earth even wealthier would somehow benefit them as well. That’s a really hard sell since it isn’t true. When wealthy corporations and investors get hundreds of millions of dollars in enormous tax windfalls, they don’t use it to pass out huge raises to all their employees or to create lots of high-paying new jobs. Instead, they spend it on themselves and hide much of it in offshore accounts so they won’t have to pay any taxes on it. Even Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, an excessively ambitious Republican, said recently there was “no evidence whatsoever” the Republican tax cut had resulted in any substantial benefits for American workers. They could have told him that. In the recent Pennsylvania congressional election won by Democrat Conor Lamb in a district Trump previously had won by 20 points, Republicans stopped running ads touting the tax cut because voters weren’t being fooled. So, instead of trying to sell the preposterous

idea that enormous tax cuts for wealthy Republican donors benefit ordinary people, Walker decided this election year simply to start handing out $100 bribes to voters. Walker doesn’t call them that, of course. He calls this one-time cash giveaway the Wisconsin Child Sales Tax Rebate. Now through July 2, parents with dependent children under 18 can sign up for checks of $100 per child. The more children they have, the bigger the check. That’s an astonishing reversal for Walker, who is better known for threatening to cut off food assistance and health care for struggling families.

Walker’s $122 Million Bribe

“It’s literally a guy saying, ‘I’m Scott Walker running for re-election. Have some money!’” said Mandela Barnes, the former Milwaukee Democratic legislator now running for lieutenant governor. “Everyone I’ve talked to sees it as a blatant payoff.” This election-year giveaway is expected to cost the state about $122 million dollars and benefit 671,000 families. Every one of those families should be encouraged to apply for every single dollar. But there is another thing everyone should realize about Walker’s one-time, nine-figure, election-year giveaway. It won’t make any difference at all to anyone’s life. It will disappear shortly after a family receives it, and no one will even remember where it went. That’s what makes this paltry election-year bribe very different from every other political payoff of more than $100 million that Walker

has passed out in his political career. The enormous cash giveaways that go to the big boys at the top with every single state or national tax cut by Republicans don’t get shared with every ordinary Tom, Dick and Harry off the street. They’re certainly not divided up into tiny $100 checks and tossed like chicken feed to hundreds of thousands of hard-pressed, ordinary families. No, the enormous public cash giveaways to the people who really matter to Walker are more likely to be in the hundreds of millions or even billions of dollars. For the next quarter-century, Wisconsin will be in hock for billions to Terry Gou, the Taiwanese billionaire who made glowing promises of high-tech jobs that, in the future, are more likely to be performed by high-tech robots than human beings. There’s something else you need to know about the insultingly small political payoffs Walker is passing out to families this election year. They won’t create a single job. They won’t hire a single teacher. They won’t reduce soaring college student loans by a cent. They won’t fill a single pothole. Every family absolutely should apply for their election-year bribe from Walker. They certainly can use the money. But then they should vote for someone in November who will begin restoring all the community services Walker has devastated. We need our tax dollars benefiting our fellow citizens rather than having our governor delivering semitrailers of cash to the people Walker and his Republican friends truly care about. Comment at shepherdexpress.com. n

NEWS&VIEWS::POLL

You Doubt Trump Can Successfully Negotiate with North Korea

Last week we asked if you believe Donald Trump can successfully negotiate and sign a significant deal with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un. You said: n Yes: 34% n No: 66%

What Do You Say?

Scott Walker has made the largest cuts to public education in the history of Wisconsin. Walker denies that those cuts have significantly hurt Milwaukee Public Schools. Do you agree with Walker? n Yes n No Vote online at shepherdexpress.com. We’ll publish the results of this poll in next week’s issue. 10 | M AY 1 7 , 2 0 1 8

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Marquette University Strategic Innovation Fund ::BY ERIN BLOODGOOD

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r. Kyana Young, a postdoctoral fellow at Marquette University (MU), began working in the Global Water Center in 2016. With a background in environmental engineering, Young’s passion is finding solutions for safe water to improve global and public health. Soon after she arrived, it occurred to her that there was a lack of diverse groups of people represented in the building. But it didn’t take her long to do something about that. She spoke with staff at Marshall High School and Milwaukee Public Schools (MPS)—including Larry Farris, Toby Hairston, Rochelle Sandrin, Jan Haven and Megan Sun—who helped her come up with an idea for a program that would provide opportunities to demographics that are underrepresented in scientific fields relating to water research. She applied for a grant from MU with the support of the group at MPS and was awarded the university’s Strategic Innovation Fund Grant. The grant made it possible for her to provide internships to students at Marshall and bring them to the labs of the Global Water Center to do hands-on research. When working in the classroom at the high school, the youth learn how to write lab reports and do data analysis with their teacher, Megan Sun. The students are taught how to apply their newly learned scientific knowledge to solve real world problems. Each student is assigned a project for the semester by participating companies and universities. Young asked these organizations to host and mentor the youth; organizations such as Stonehouse Water Technologies, Youth Rising Up, Solar Water Works, DRM International, Sun Yat Sen University, Grand Valley State University, Assembly of God, as well as MU. Young knew that the students needed more than community partners; they needed mentors like Moe Mukiibi, chief technology officer at Stonehouse Water Technologies (the company with the most interns in the program), to make the program a success. The program is meant to “create a path for [students] that could be life-changing, so that they can see why they are working in a lab and see what this can become,” says Mukiibi. “When you provide an opportunity, and you back that up with resources, this is what can happen,” says Young as she describes how the students have excelled far beyond expectations. “This impacts the global community.” Thanks to Kyana Young, our Hero of the Week, and the team at MPS, these students have a chance to explore their interests and realize career paths that can make a major difference in their lives. Comment at shepherdexpress.com. n

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::DININGOUT

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FEATURE | SHORT ORDER | EAT/DRINK

For more Dining, log onto shepherdexpress.com

The Hottest Tacos and Cocktails at Kompali Taqueria

ing for the smoky flavor they impart are the mezcal cocktails that hit the mark for their innovative flavor pairings. The house margarita is just as refreshing. The menu includes appetizers, Mexican sandwiches and salads, sides and desserts. We didn’t want to eat too many appetizers because the variety of tacos were so plentiful and interesting, but couldn’t resist the esquite (Mexican street corn) dripping in butter with a sprinkle of feta cheese for a nice balance with the sweet corn. The nopales (cactus) fries were crispy and delicious served with a chipotle cream. The prelude to our tacos, chips and guacamole, was a must. To our delight the chips were warm and crisp—the perfect vessel for the creamy avocado concoction. The tacos are broken into two categories: Paco’s and Karlos’. Paco’s taco ::BY ALISA MALAVENDA choices are more authentically Mexican with fillings on a house-made tortilla. The al pastor taco is built from marinated pork shoulder with grilled pineapple ompali is the newest addition to the food culture paired with a sprinkle of cilantro and onion. The more adventurous will want on Brady Street and represents the hottest trends to savor tacos de lengua (slow cooked tongue) or tacos de Tripa (sautéed in modern taquerias (places specializing in tacos, tripe). Two of my favorites were in the vegetarian category: the papa con rajas tequila and mezcal). Owners Karlos Soriano and of small diced potatoes, peppers, onion and cilantro with cotija cheese; and Paco Villar are not only business partners, but “comthe sautéed cactus taco. Both were well seasoned and had good texture. padres” as the name “Kompali” implies. The duo also own Karlos’ Tacos, offered on either a flour or corn tortilla, had us stamping our C-Viche in Bay View and you can see flavor passport from Vietnam to Peru with a few stops in some crossover in the flavor profiles of the between. The Argentinean steak with the bright chimistreet tacos that take you on an internachurri sauce and the Baja style fish taco with cabbage tional journey of big flavors. were tempting. The Cordero, braised lamb with the accent The space that was formerly Kompali Taqueria of pickled vegetables, and the very interesting Peruvian Cempazuchi has been trans1205 E. Brady St. quinoa and tomato taco were nice additions to our lineup. formed with bright walls and 414-210-3010 • $-$$ It’s hard to choose with so many wonderful options with a fantastic mural behind the such great value. Everything is under $13 with the tacos kompali.com bar telling the story of mezcal ranging from $2-$4. But save room for dessert. The fried from agave plant to bottle. EvHandicapped access: Yes ice cream, churros and—of course—the traditional flan eryone is friendly and engagCC, FB, GF, RS, SB were as fun to share as the rest of the meal. ing. The restaurant is unassuming and relaxing—a great Hours: M-Th 11 a.m.-10 place to unwind or meet friends. p.m., F-Sa 11 a.m.-11 p.m., Kompali Taqueria’s Tacos left - right, Papa Con Rajas, Lengua, There are quite a few tequila and mezcal cocktails to Argentinean Beef, Baja Style Fish Su 10 a.m.-8 p.m. choose from with thoughtful flavor combinations. Intrigu-

12 | M AY 1 7 , 2 0 1 8

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DININGOUT::SHORTORDER

Santa Fe Salad and Wrap from Grassroots Salad Company

EATING FAST AND HEALTHY at GRASSROOTS ::BY DAVID LUHRSSEN Looking for a quick and healthy lunch in Downtown Milwaukee? A newcomer to the area, Grassroots Salad Company (607 N. Water St.), just opened its latest venue in the Chase Building, filling the corner spot formerly occupied by Capriotti’s Sandwich Shop. As the name suggests, Grassroots is a salad bar with servers who assemble your choices in bowls or wraps. Options include tastes of the Southwest with the Santa Fe, the Greek islands with the Kriti and Italy with the Caesar. Grassroots uses fresh ingredients including organic lettuce, grilled anti-biotic free chicken (in its Asian salad) and Wisconsin cheese in all its preparations. And the dressings are gluten free. Grassroots’ other local venue is in the Brookfield Square Food Court. SHEPHERD EXPRESS

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Jive Turkey Burger from Mi Casa Su Café

Mi Casa Su Café Brings Healthy Options to Brewer’s Hill ::BY SHEILA JULSON

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n just more than four months, Mi Casa Su Café (1835 N. Martin Luther King Drive) has established itself as a premier breakfast, lunch and dinner spot in the Brewer’s Hill neighborhood, serving healthy fare with vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options. The café has quickly become popular among neighborhood residents, city officials and employees from nearby businesses, said Paul Whigham, who owns the restaurant with his cousin, Jameel Trotter. Mi Casa Su Café (Spanish for “My House Your Café”) lives up to the name with a warm, home-like feel with exposed brick, stylish pub tables, a hardwood floor and art from Whigham’s and Trotter’s homes. Breakfast is served from 7 to 10:30 a.m. Lunch options includes an array of sandwiches, salads, pitas and flatbreads, served from 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Due to the popularity of many of the lunch burgers and sandwiches, Whigham said those are also available during dinner hours, which also features entrées, from 4 to 7 p.m. Some sandwich favorites include the Portabella Burger, a juicy roasted portabella mushroom cap topped with garlic butter and a melted blend of three cheeses, along with green leaf lettuce and tomato. The Jive Turkey Burger is made with Cajun seasoned ground turkey, topped with strips of turkey bacon and coleslaw, garlic mayonnaise, pepper jack cheese and Creole mustard. Salads include Mandarin Orange and Kale, Caesar and 14 | M AY 1 7 , 2 0 1 8

Jerk Chicken. Sides such as hand-cut, seasoned grilled potato wedges are also available. Most items can be made vegetarian or gluten free. Prices for many items average less than $10. Whigham said they strive for consistency and to keep portion size ideal—filling, but not too large. They get fresh produce daily from nearby Pete’s Fruit Market, and bread from Fresh Thyme. Whigham grew up in a Muslim-Christian household, and he watched his mother and his aunts cook meals for special occasions. He started working in restaurants during his teens. While eating out, he noticed how many dining establishments had under-seasoned the food. “I wanted to open a place where the food is properly seasoned. I’m big on flavor, so I make good, seasoned food,” he said. “We put a healthy spin on the foods, and we don’t serve pork, we don’t serve soda and we don’t have a deep fryer.” Every recipe on the menu is Whigham’s own creation. Trotter has two business degrees and handles the business end of the café, as well as the beverage program. Mi Casa Su Café carries Stone Creek Coffee. Fresh fruit smoothies are made to order, and they have several varietals of wine, including four vegan wines. When Mi Casa Su Café opened at the end of December, they started out just serving lunch from 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Once kitchen operations fell into place and they got a feel for what customers wanted, hours were expanded for breakfast and dinner, the latter with choices like shrimp and grits, or salmon croquette. Weekly specials include Healthy Hump Day on Wednesday, featuring $3 smoothies, and salads and vegetarian menu items for $5. Sunday is vegan day, and chef Rain Truth of The Cultured Vegan comes in to prepare vegan brunch and dinner specials such as eggplant lasagna. Summer will bring patio seating, and Whigham said they plan to expand into the space next door. He’s excited to be part of the neighborhood revitalization, especially with the nearby Bucks arena almost complete. For more information, call 414-488-9916 or visit facebook.com/micasasucafe/. SHEPHERD EXPRESS


::SPORTS Freddy Peralta’s Near-Historic Sunday::BY KYLE LOBNER

F

reddy Peralta wasn’t even supposed to be in the majors on Sunday, but he made the most of the opportunity. Summoned from Colorado Springs at least in part due to Zach Davies’ ongoing shoulder issues and Chase Anderson’s sudden illness, Peralta was the youngest Milwaukee Brewer to make his Major League Baseball (MLB) debut as a starting pitcher since Yovani Gallardo in 2007, and he had the Rockies off balance all afternoon, working 5.2 scoreless innings, striking out 13 and waiting until the sixth inning to allow his first hit. “Game Score,” a metric developed by Bill James, is designed to rank performances by starting pitchers. Peralta’s Sunday performance scored a 78—the best outing by a Brewers pitcher in 2018. By that measure, it was also the second-best starting pitching debut in franchise history, although the company at the top of that list is somewhat dubious, as you’ll see. Steve Woodard No discussion of debuting Brewers starting pitchers is complete, of course, without a mention of Steve Woodard. Woodard’s first appearance in 1997 was one of the best outings by a Brewers starter in any environment, debut or not. Facing Roger Clemens and the Blue Jays in the first game of a doubleheader, Woodard allowed a leadoff double to outfielder Otis Nixon and then never allowed another hit, pitching eight shutout innings in a 1-0 victory. His Game Score for the outing was 91. Unfortunately, this performance was perhaps the most notable moment in an otherwise forgettable MLB career for Woodard. He made a grand total of 94 MLB starts over seven seasons from 1997-’03 (including 73 as a Brewer from 1997-’00) and finished his career with a 4.94 ERA. Baseball Reference suggests his entire MLB run had an estimated value of 3.5 Wins Above Replacement. Chris Saenz The others on the list of best debuts behind Woodard and Peralta would likely all trade their careers for Woodard’s success. The most curious case is Chris Saenz, who posted a 72 Game Score in a spot start against the Cardinals in April of 2004. Saenz worked six scoreless innings in the game, allowed just two hits and struck out seven. He returned to AA after the spot start, but never made it back to the big leagues. He made just 14 appearances for the Huntsville Stars in 2004 before suffering a catastrophic arm injury that derailed his career. He made a few comeback attempts but was effectively done with professional baseball following his age-22 season. Taylor Jungmann Jungmann was the 12th overall pick in the 2011 draft, and Baseball America listed him as SHEPHERD EXPRESS

the 70th-ranked prospect in all of baseball before the ’12 season. He showed flashes of the potential that earned him those accolades in his major league debut on June 9, 2015. He faced the Pirates that day and allowed one run over seven innings, allowing just three hits and recording five strikeouts. He walked just one batter in that contest despite struggling with control throughout his career. His Game Score was 71. Jungmann finished the season in the Brewers rotation and performed admirably, recording a 3.77 ERA in 119 and 1/3rd innings. He never replicated that success, however. He opened the season in the starting rotation in 2016 but was demoted to the minors after posting a 9.15 ERA in his first five starts. In 2017, he made the Brewers’ Opening Day roster again but was demoted after just one outing. The Brewers released Jungmann over the winter to allow him to pitch in Japan, where he has a 2.04 ERA in six appearances for the Yomiuri Giants’ minor league affiliate. Tyler Cravy Compared to Jungmann, Cravy had toiled in obscurity for quite some time before getting the call to the majors. A 17th-round pick in 2009, Cravy reached the majors a week to the day before Jungmann and had a very similar outing, working seven innings and allowing the Cardinals a single run on four hits, walking two and striking out six. He had a 69 Game Score for the outing. Cravy bounced back and forth between the majors and minors over the season and a half that followed and experienced some success in 2016, posting a 2.86 ERA in 20 appearances, including two starts. He was one of the last players cut by the Brewers at the end of spring training in 2017 and publicly lashed out at the organization, then was not recalled during the year and was allowed to leave as a minor league free agent following the season. He has not played in the majors or affiliated minors so far this year. Gary Ryerson For a long time, the greatest starting pitching debut in Brewers franchise history belonged to a player most fans probably couldn’t name. Gary Ryerson (not Ned Ryerson of Groundhog Day fame!) was playing his seventh professional season in the minors when he got the call to the big leagues for the first time on June 28, 1972. He pitched the first game of a doubleheader that day and worked a complete game, allowing two runs on eight hits with no walks and five strikeouts in a win over Cleveland. His Game Score for that outing was 68. He made a total of 18 MLB starts over two seasons. The Brewers sent him to the Angels in a nine-player deal following the ’73 season, and he never played in the majors again. Freddy Peralta won’t turn 22 until June, so he’s younger than any of these pitchers were at the time of their MLB debuts and, with the possible exception of Jungmann, he’s also more highly regarded as a prospect than any of them ever were. Nonetheless, he has some work to do to ensure his career doesn’t end up on the list above. Comment at shepherdexpress.com. n

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FEATURE | FILM | THEATRE | ART | BOOKS | CLASSICAL MUSIC | DANCE

Skylight’s ‘Urinetown’

Skylight’s ‘Urinetown’ an Entertaining Satire for Our Times ::BY SELENA MILEWSKI

s the world reeled under the horror of 9/11, a subversive and oddly prescient musical made its Broadway debut. Mark Hollmann and Greg Kotis’ Urinetown, which satirizes both modern politics and the musical genre itself, has only grown more relevant over the past 17 years as droughts worsen and corporate malfeasance abounds. Skylight Music Theatre’s production under Ray Jivoff’s direction sets the piece 20 years in the future and asks the question: What will the world look like two decades down the line if environmental crises continue and corporations conspire with government to control such basic utilities as restrooms? Featuring a pair of meta-narrators who let the audience in on the joke of the show’s musical-defying-musical structure, the show is as entertainingly tongue-in-cheek in presentation as it is serious in subject matter. For those who fear that Urinetown’s socio-political undertones may make for a heavy-handed, didactic piece of theater, Jivoff assures, “What really works about the show is that there is a political and social commentary, but it’s so entertaining and funny and over the top.” Full of “hysterical production numbers one after another of varying styles,” he says, “it’s able to walk that fine line between making commentary and being entertainment.” He continues, “You’re left with questions and I think a message of needing to find a compromise. No one answer is the answer. Somewhere in the middle is usually the answer.” The show’s insight goes beyond satirical treatment of modern social mores to interrogate the nature of musical storytelling in our time. Jivoff asserts, “Because it’s the 21st century, the show is commenting on how we can’t have a boy-meets-girl love story that necessarily ends happily anymore. We’re too self-aware and perhaps the culture has become too jaded for that kind of happy ending, but even its unhappy ending is comically presented.”

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Creating a Satirical Dystopia An impressive roster of production and performance artists facilitate the look of Skylight’s Urinetown. Eschewing the Depression-esque setting the musical usually receives, Skylight’s scenic designer, Brandon Kirkham, has utilized metal and plastic storage containers, metal catwalks and sliding grates to create a world that looks more like a modern industrial park than a Works Progress Administration camp. Similarly, Karin Kopischke’s costumes highlight a distinctly modern disparity between rich and poor and reflect the culture’s response to a prolonged drought. While the corporate characters wear welltailored suits, the impoverished revolutionaries are outfitted in dust-encrusted assemblage. Think steampunk patchwork, well-worn work boots and lots of layers. Urinetown’s music and choreography provide its greatest tie to self-conscious satire, and in Skylight’s production, all the stops have been pulled out. Under David Bonofiglio’s musical direction and Ryan Cappleman’s choreographic direction, the crack performance ensemble explores a million-and-one references to other musicals presented in rapid-fire succession. While audiences familiar with the show can enjoy the score’s overt nods to classics like Fiddler on the Roof, Les Misérables and Three Penny Opera, we can also look forward to new insertions by Cappleman himself. For instance, Jivoff shares that, in staging the closing number of act one, “Look At The Sky,” Skylight Cappleman immediately Music saw potential to tie in Theatre imagery from Wicked’s hit number “Defying Urinetown Gravity.” Undoubtedly Cabot Theatre there will be extravagant May 18 entertainment for all—as June 10 well as many Easter eggs for musical theater buffs. Visually stunning and satirically exemplary, Skylight’s Urinetown reflects the company’s mission to present a diverse range of entertainment each season. As Jivoff points out, “In a season where we’ve done an adaptation of a Gilbert and Sullivan operetta; a family show, Annie; a wacky, silly cartoon show, Zombies from the Beyond; and then a grand opera reduced and reimagined [The Tales of Hoffmann], Urinetown seemed to fit that spectrum.” Urinetown runs May 18-June 10 in the Broadway Theatre Center’s Cabot Theatre, 158 N. Broadway. For tickets, call 414-291-7800 or visit skylightmusictheatre.org.

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::THISWEEKINMILWAUKEE

THURSDAY, MAY 17 Gloss Weekend @ multiple venues

No Milwaukee record label in recent memory has left quite the same mark on the city as Gloss Records, which over the last four years has cultivated a roster featuring many of the city’s most popular bands, as well as a quite a few fascinating cult favorites. Once again this spring the label will showcase its talent at its annual Gloss Weekend celebration, a four-day festival spread across several Riverwest venues. NO/ NO, (ORB) and Dashcam kick things off Thursday, May 17 at Linneman’s Riverwest Inn. The party heads to Club Timbuktu on Friday for a show featuring Lorde Fredd33, Soup Moat, Sex Scenes and Storm Chaser, while Saturday features Surgeons in Heat and Wet Piss (from Chicago) at High Dive and a four-band lineup at Mad Planet that includes a reunion performance from The Delphines. Moon Rats and Gnarly Davidson (from Kansas) close out the festival Sunday at High Dive. Select shows will feature DJ performances from Dripsweat, Luxi, Luvseat and Uncle JBYRD. Weekend passes are $25; entry to individual showcases is $10.

The Mutineers @ Boone & Crockett, 8 p.m.

The Portland husband-and-wife country duo The Mutineers fashion themselves as a modern Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash, and their vocals can’t help but recall those of that iconic couple. But their music is more rowdy, raucous and untamed than anything the Cashes ever recorded; it owes as much to modern punkabilly as it does outlaw country. The two showcased their loud spin on country-rock on their revved-up 2017 album, Live at B-Side. They’ll play this show at Boone & Crockett’s just-opened new location at 818 S. Water St.

Terence Blanchard featuring The E-Collective @ Turner Hall Ballroom, 8 p.m.

Trumpeter Terence Blanchard got his first big break in the early ’80s, when he replaced Wynton Marsalis in Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers, but for many listeners he’s better known for his many collaborations with Spike Lee. Blanchard has written the score for every one of the director’s films since 1991’s Jungle Fever, including memorable ones for Malcolm X, Clockers and 25th Hour. Throughout his storied career he’s been nominated for 12 Grammys, and taken home five of them. His most recent studio album is 2015’s Breathless, which he recorded with his new band The E-Collective, which will accompany him at this show. Earlier this year Blanchard and the group released a live album, simply titled Live.

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Listening Party PHOTO BY AARON JANKOWSKI

FRIDAY, MAY 18

Listening Party @ Twisted Path Distillery, 8 p.m.

The Milwaukee folk-rock trio Listening Party should sound right at home to fans of The Lumineers, Mumford & Sons, Avett Brothers and other similarly bombastic folk and bluegrass revival bands, though the band puts a hopeful, redemptive spin on the music that’s all their own. The trio will celebrate the release of their latest set of passionate ballads and toe-tapping shanties, Less is More, with this free show at the Twisted Path Distillery, though if you miss it you’ll have plenty more chances to catch them this summer. They’re also playing Summerfest (Wednesday, July 4); Bastille Days (Friday, July 13); Ayre in the Square (Saturday, July 14); and Wisconsin State Fair (Wednesday, Aug. 8).

Wye Oak w/ Palm @ The Back Room at Colectivo, 8 p.m.

Wye Oak has never been afraid to mess with a winning formula. On their earliest records, the Baltimore-born indie-rock band laced their spine-chilling dream-pop with some blistering guitar riffs from singer Jenn Wasner. That guitar was the defining quality of 2011’s masterful Civilian, the album that introduced Wye Oak to a bigger audience than ever, but for 2014’s divisive follow-up Shriek, Wasner abandoned the guitar completely, letting her bass and drummer Andy Stack’s thick synthesizers carry the record. 2016’s Tween split the difference between those two albums (it was comprised of eight songs the band wrote then shelved between the two) but this year’s wonderful new The Louder I Call, The Faster It Runs mines new muses altogether. Forgoing the murky, mysterious sounds of its predecessors, it spotlights some of the band’s brightest, most direct songwriting yet.

Robert Elder @ Boswell Book Company, 7 p.m.

Over his career in music journalism, Robert Elder has interviewed and photographed artists like Dave Navarro, Marilyn Manson and Pearl Jam. For his latest project, the book The Mixtape of My Life: A Do It Yourself Music Memoir, the Chicago author looks at music’s power to evoke emotions and memories. The book features more than 200 questions and prompts designed to get readers to chronicle their lives through music (it features lots of dinner-party questions like “What was the first record you owned.”) At this appearance Elder will play some music, share some memories and invite the crowd to share their own.

SATURDAY, MAY 19 Pabst Milwaukee Brewery Street Festival @ Pabst Milwaukee Brewery, noon

Terrence Blanchard PHOTO BY HENRY ADEBONOJO

Buoyed by some truly perfect weather, last year the Pabst Milwaukee Brewery and Taproom drew more than 7,000 people to its street party celebrating the opening of the new microbrewery. Thankfully, it wasn’t just a one-off event. The Pabst Street Festival returns this year for a lineup (presented by the Cactus Club) that features Platinum Boys, Zed Kenzo, Mary Allen and The Percolators, Ric Wilson, Caroline Smith and No Stress Collective. Chicago rapper Nnamdi Ogbonnaya headlines. There will also be a marketplace showcasing area artists and artisans, food trucks and, of course, beer from the brewery. There will be an after party inside the brewery at 9 p.m. featuring the funk/soul spin The Get Down. SHEPHERD EXPRESS


A LITTLE REFLECTION OF OUR CITY’S FINEST FARE. MAY 31 - JUNE 7 | 35+ RESTAURANTS | THREE COURSES | LUNCH - $12.50 | DINNER - $25/$35 Savor the flavors of downtown Milwaukee by sampling the city’s top restaurants. For eight days, enjoy three-course meals at $12.50 for lunch and $25 or $35 for dinner at both fresh and familiar eateries. Simply choose your starter, entrée and dessert from a list of preselected favorites, then taste your way through our city’s finest fare. #downtowndiningmke

After your meal, share your experience by completing a Downtown Dining Week survey online. Four diners will be randomly drawn and awarded $450 in dining gift cards.

WWW.M ILWAUKEEDOWNTOWN.COM l 414-220-4700 SHEPHERD EXPRESS DMK24254-AD4_ddwShepEx_Insert.indd 1

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n n n

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$12.50 LUNCH $25 DINNER $35 DINNER

MADER’S

MILWAUKEE CHOPHOUSE

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PREVIEW MENUS ONLINE

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ROCK BOTTOM RESTAURANT & BREWERY

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THE RUMPUS ROOM

MONDAY – THURSDAY: 11AM – 11PM FRIDAY & SATURDAY: 11AM – 12AM SUNDAY: 11AM – 11PM

rockbottom.com | 414-276-3030

740 N. Plankinton Avenue

VAGABOND

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1122 N. Edison Street

vagabondmke.com | 414-223-1122

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zarletti.net | 414-225-0000

741 N. Milwaukee Street

ZARLETTI

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MONDAY – WEDNESDAY: 11AM – 11PM THURSDAY: 11AM – 1AM FRIDAY: 11AM – 2AM SATURDAY: 10AM – 2AM SUNDAY: 10AM – 11PM

whosonthirdmke.com | 414-897-8373

1007 N. Old World 3rd Street

WHO’S ON THIRD

MONDAY – FRIDAY: 11AM – 2AM SATURDAY & SUNDAY: 10AM – 2AM

waterstreetbrewery.com | 414-272-1195

1101 N. Water Street

WATER STREET BREWERY

MONDAY – FRIDAY: 11AM – 2PM; 5PM – 10PM SATURDAY: 5PM – 10PM SUNDAY: CLOSED

wardshouseofprime.com | 414-223-0135

540 E. Mason Street

WARD’S HOUSE OF PRIME

1030 N. Water Street

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MONDAY – THURSDAY: 5PM – 10PM FRIDAY & SATURDAY: 5PM – 11PM SUNDAY: CLOSED

thirdcoastprovisions.com | 414-323-7434

724 N. Milwaukee Street

THIRD COAST PROVISIONS

Map out your Downtown Dining Week stops by previewing menus in advance. Lunch and dinner menus are available at www.milwaukeedowntown.com/diningweek. Spot a menu that whets your appetite? Reserve your dining hour through our Open Table reservation links or call ahead. Reservations are strongly encouraged during this popular week.

ONESTO

221 N. Broadway

n n

onestomke.com | 414-308-1600

KANPAI

633 N. 5th Street

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1041 N. Old World 3rd Street

CANTINA MILWAUKEE 408 E. Chicago Street

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1110 N. Old World 3rd Street

ALE ASYLUM RIVERHOUSE 1110 N. Old World 3rd Street

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411 E. Mason Street

PASTICHE AT THE METRO

MONDAY – SATURDAY: 11AM – 10PM SUNDAY: 4PM – 9PM n

pastichebistro.com | 414-225-3270

n n

MONDAY – SUNDAY: 11AM – 2AM

n n

MONDAY – FRIDAY: 11AM – 10PM SATURDAY: 10AM – 10PM SUNDAY: 10AM – 9PM

smoke-shack.com | 414-431-1119

332 N. Milwaukee Street

SMOKE SHACK

MONDAY & TUESDAY: 11AM – 12AM WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY: 11AM – 1AM FRIDAY & SATURDAY: 11AM – 2AM SUNDAY: 11AM – 12AM

safe-house.com | 414-271-2007

779 N. Front Street

SAFEHOUSE

rumpusroommke.com | 414-292-0100

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720 N. Plankinton Avenue

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mosaplaceforsteaks.com | 414-272-0720

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MONDAY – SATURDAY: 5PM – 11PM SUNDAY: CLOSED

OAK BARREL PUBLIC HOUSE

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217 N. Broadway

SWIG milwaukee.raresteakandseafood.com 414-273-7273

MONDAY – FRIDAY: 11AM – 10PM SATURDAY: 10AM – 10PM SUNDAY: 10AM – 3PM

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M AY 17, 2 0 1 8 | 21

#downtowndiningmke

MONDAY – THURSDAY: 11AM – 3PM; 5PM – 10PM FRIDAY: 11AM – 3PM; 5PM – 10:30PM SATURDAY: 5PM – 10:30PM SUNDAY: CLOSED

During Downtown Dining Week, $3 parking will be offered at select Interstate Parking lots. Visit www.milwaukeedowntown.com/diningweek to explore parking options near your destination.

ENJOY $3 PARKING

swigmilwaukee.com | 414-431-7944 MONDAY – THURSDAY: 11AM – 10PM FRIDAY: 11AM – 11PM SATURDAY: 5PM – 11PM SUNDAY: CLOSED

833 E. Michigan Street

RARE STEAKHOUSE

MONDAY – FRIDAY: 4PM – 10PM SATURDAY & SUNDAY: 11AM – 10PM

mke.thepubclubmilwaukee.com | 414-988-5000

1103 N. Old World 3rd Street

THE PUB CLUB

MONDAY – THURSDAY: 11AM – 9PM FRIDAY & SATURDAY: 11AM – 10PM SUNDAY: 11AM – 9PM

pier106seafoodtavern.com | 414-273-7678

PIER 106 SEAFOOD TAVERN

MONDAY – THURSDAY: 5PM – 9PM FRIDAY & SATURDAY: 5PM – 10PM SUNDAY: 4PM – 8PM

1033 N. Old World 3rd Street oakbarrelmilwaukee.com | 414-897-8320 MONDAY – WEDNESDAY: 11AM – 11PM THURSDAY & FRIDAY: 11AM – 12AM SATURDAY: 10AM – 12AM SUNDAY: 10AM – 10PM

SHEPHERD EXPRESS

106 W. Wells Street

MONDAY – THURSDAY: 11AM – 3PM; 4PM – 10PM FRIDAY & SATURDAY: 11AM – 3PM; 4PM – 12AM SUNDAY: 11AM – 3PM; 4PM – 10PM

MO’S...A PLACE FOR STEAKS

chophouse411.com | 414-226-2467

MASON STREET GRILL

n n

MONDAY & TUESDAY: 11AM – 9PM WEDNESDAY – SUNDAY: 11AM – 10PM

mikeysmke.com | 414-273-5397

811 N. Jefferson Street

MI-KEY’S

MONDAY – FRIDAY: 11AM – 10PM SATURDAY & SUNDAY: 5PM – 10PM

masonstreetgrill.com | 414-298-3131

425 E. Mason Street

MONDAY – SATURDAY: 11:30AM- 9PM SUNDAY: 11AM – 9PM

MONDAY – SATURDAY: 5PM – 10PM SUNDAY: CLOSED

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madersrestaurant.com | 414-271-3377

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MONDAY – THURSDAY: 11AM – 11PM FRIDAY: 11AM – 12AM SATURDAY: 10AM – 12AM SUNDAY: 10AM – 10PM

louiseswisconsin.com | 414-273-4224

801 N. Jefferson Street

LOUISE’S

MONDAY – SUNDAY: 10AM – 10PM

theloadedslate.com | 414-273-5700

1137 N. Old World 3rd Street

THE LOADED SLATE

MONDAY – FRIDAY: 11AM – 12AM SATURDAY & SUNDAY: 9AM – 2PM (DINING WEEK MENU NOT OFFERED); 3PM – 12AM

theknickrestaurant.com | 414-272-0011

1030 E. Juneau Avenue

THE KNICK

MONDAY – THURSDAY: 11AM – 2PM; 5PM – 9PM FRIDAY & SATURDAY: 11AM – 2PM; 5PM – 10PM SUNDAY: 11AM – 2PM

kilawatcuisine.com | 414-291-4793

139 E. Kilbourn Avenue

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kanpaimilwaukee.com | 414-220-1155

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KIL@WAT

cantinamilwaukee.com | 414-897-8137

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riverhousemke.com | 414-269-8700

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DOC’S COMMERCE SMOKEHOUSE

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MONDAY – SUNDAY: 11AM – 10PM

flannerysmilwaukee.com | 414-278-8586

425 E. Wells Street

FLANNERY’S

MONDAY – SATURDAY: 11AM – 11PM SUNDAY: 11AM – 10PM

docsbbq.net | 414-935-2029

754 N. 4th Street

MONDAY – SUNDAY: 11AM – 3PM; 5PM – 9PM

clubcharlies.com | 414-763-8548

320 E. Menomonee Street

CLUB CHARLIES

MONDAY – THURSDAY: 11:30AM – 11PM FRIDAY & SATURDAY: 11:30AM – 12AM SUNDAY: 11:30AM – 11PM

ribs.com | 414-223-3311

301 W. Juneau Avenue

CARSON’S RIBS

MONDAY – THURSDAY: 11AM – 2PM; 4PM – 10PM FRIDAY: 11AM – 2PM; 4PM – 11PM SATURDAY: 4PM – 11PM SUNDAY: 4PM – 9PM

thecapitalgrille.com | 414-223-0600

310 W. Wisconsin Avenue

THE CAPITAL GRILLE

MONDAY & TUESDAY: 4PM – 11PM WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY: 11AM – 11PM FRIDAY & SATURDAY: 11AM – 1AM SUNDAY: 11AM – 1AM

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MONDAY – THURSDAY: 3PM – 10PM FRIDAY & SATURDAY: 11AM – 11PM SUNDAY: 11AM – 10PM

SHEPHERD EXPRESS

MONDAY – THURSDAY: 11AM – 2:30PM; 4:30PM – 10PM FRIDAY: 11AM – 2:30PM; 4:30PM – 11PM SATURDAY: 4PM – 11PM SUNDAY: 4PM – 9PM

BENIHANA 850 N. Plankinton Avenue benihana.com | 414-270-0890 MONDAY – THURSDAY: 11:30AM – 2PM; 5PM – 9:30PM FRIDAY: 11:30AM – 2PM; 5PM – 10PM SATURDAY: 4PM – 10PM SUNDAY: 4PM – 9PM

BLUE BAT KITCHEN & TEQUILARIA n n 249 N. Water Street bluebatkitchen.com | 414-431-1133

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MONDAY – SUNDAY: 11AM – 10PM

THE BRASS ALLEY 1023 N. Old World 3rd Street thebrassalley.com | 414-800-6240

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MONDAY – SUNDAY: 11AM – 9PM

BRUNCH 800 N. Plankinton Avenue brunchmke.com | 414-210-5381

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MONDAY – FRIDAY: 7AM – 3PM SATURDAY & SUNDAY: 8AM – 3PM

CAFÉ AT THE PFISTER 424 E. Wisconsin Avenue thepfisterhotel.com | 414-390-3878 MONDAY – SUNDAY: 6AM – 2PM; LUNCH 11AM – 2PM

DINE & WIN!

After your meal, share your Downtown Dining Week experience by completing a survey online. At the conclusion of the event, four downtown diners will be randomly selected to win $450 in dining gift cards! Complete your survey at www.milwaukeedowntown.com/diningweek by June 11 for your chance to win.

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MEL KENDRICK, MARKER #2, 2009. CAST CONCRETE.

2 0 + S C U L P T U R E S L I N I N G W I S CO N S I N AV E N U E TO LO V E O R C R I T I Q U E . A L L A C C E S S. A L L S E A S O N. | T H R O U G H O C T O B E R 2 1 S T A R T, A R T I S T & E V E N T I N F O AT S C U L P T U R E M I LWA U K E E .C O M.

22 | M AY 17, 2 0 1 8 DMK24254-AD4_ddwShepEx_Insert.indd 3

SHEPHERD EXPRESS 5/11/18 8:57 AM


Read our daily events guide, Today in Milwaukee, on shepherdexpress.com

B r o n z e vil l e A r t s E n s e m b l e P r e s e n ts...

SUNDAY, MAY 20

Joey Bada$$ w/ Boogie and Buddy and Chuck Strangers @ Turner Hall Ballroom, 8 p.m.

There’s nothing all that novel about looking to classic East Coast rap for inspiration—rappers have been going back to basics for as long as there have been basics to go back to—but Joey Bada$$ does it better than most. Released when he was still a teenager, his debut 2012 mixtape 1999 made a splash with its jazzy vibe and lively samples. He’s updated his sound quite a bit in the years since, without ever completely turning his back on the Golden Age spirit that made that debut so charming. Last year he released his sophomore commercial album, All-Amerikkkan Badass, an overtly political affair that meditates on what it means to be young and black in America.

Directed by Sheri Williams Pannell

May 24 - 27, 2018

Josh Rouse w/ Bobby Flowers and Dan Hinz @ The Back Room at Colectivo, 8 p.m.

Wilson Theatre at Vogel Hall Marcus Center

Roots-pop singer-songwriter Josh Rouse’s army brat upbringing led him to write a series of inspired concept albums about the many places he’s lived. His 1998 debut Dressed Up Like Nebraska honored his native state, while 2005’s Nashville reflected on his move to Tennessee. Rouse’s recent albums have explored the culture shock following an even more dramatic relocation to Spain, where in 2007 he recorded an EP with his soon-to-be wife Paz Suay, She’s Spanish, I’m American. His latest album, this year’s Love in the Modern Age, is one of the most daring of his career. Leaving behind the relaxed, ’70s singer/songwriter vibe of some of its predecessors, the album indulges in the rich, sophisticated, synth-soaked sounds of ’80s acts like The Blue Nile and Soft Cell.

Marcus Center Box Office: 414.273.7206 MarcusCenter.org | Ticketmaster.com Groups of 10+ Call 414.273.7121 x210 or 213

WEDNESDAY, MAY 23

To Be Fair, Not All the Art Loves You Either

Ana Popovic w/ Young Revelators @ Shank Hall, 8 p.m.

RUBEN TOMAS

Even before Ana Popovic released her first album, she was in the company of some blues greats. In 2000 the Serbia-born singer/guitarist appeared on a Jimi Hendrix tribute album alongside established players like Buddy Miles, Eric Burdon and Taj Mahal, and over the 10 albums she’s released since she’s proven herself one of the most virtuosic blues players of her generation. Her most recent album, 2016’s Trilogy, is a triple album with each disc dedicated to a different style (funk and soul on the first disc, blues rock on the second and jazz on the third). It features guest spots from guitar greats Joe Bonamassa and Robert Randolph, drummers Bernard Purdie and Cody Dickinson (of North Mississippi Allstars) and rapper Al Kapone.

All sorts of art for all sorts of tastes.

Drossos P. Skyllas, Young Girl With a Cat, ca. 1955. Oil on canvas. Milwaukee Art Museum, The Michael and Julie Hall Collection of American Folk Art M1989.211.

Ana Popovic

SHEPHERD EXPRESS

M AY 1 7 , 2 0 1 8 | 23


::PERFORMINGARTSWEEK For More to Do, visit shepherdexpress.com

CLASSICALMUSIC

‘Kindermusaik, and the Kitchen Sink!’ The Milwaukee Musaik ensemble—10 professional classical instrumentalists playing violins, violas, flutes, clarinets, trumpets and more—have put together a program of music that, for the most part, was devoted to children and childhood memories by its composers. As a result, the works on the program for their concert entitled “Kindermusaik, and the Kitchen Sink!” is open, expressive and accessible. Note that it is not “light” music a la Leroy Anderson or Victor Herbert, but cherished music that evokes dance, pantomime and fairy tales. Claude Debussy’s Children Corner is a six-movement work originally written for solo piano (later orchestrated by Debussy’s friend André Caplet); Debussy was inspired by—and dedicated the work to—his daughter, Claude-Emma. Robert Schumann’s Fairy Tale Narrations is a four-movement trio not intended to invoke a specific fairytale but the picturesque and fanciful ambiance of the whole genre. Czech composer Bohuslav Martinů’s La Revue de Cuisine is a jazz ballet created for sextet, which received its premiere in Paris in 1930. Uniquely and enchantingly, it’s a ballet for various cooking utensils that swagger their way through life in a kitchen. The concert’s topped off by the majestically glorious Kaiser-Walzer (“Emperor Waltz”) by Johann Strauss Jr. (John Jahn) Monday, May 21, at 7 p.m. at the Wisconsin Conservatory of Music’s Helen Bader Recital Hall, 1584 N. Prospect Ave. For tickets, visit milwaukeemusaik.org.

THEATRE

MELISSA LEE JOHNSON

Oregon Trail: The Play

Shepherd

Swag Get it here: theshepstore.com

24 | M AY 1 7 , 2 0 1 8

It’s Too Darn Hot: The Sizzling Songs of Cole Porter

Hot off Sunset Playhouse’s tribute to Judy Garland (C’mon Get Happy) is another concert dedicated to an American song-and-dance icon, Cole Porter (1891-1964). The classically trained young Porter was drawn to musical theater and, after a somewhat slow start, began to gain popular traction such that, by the 1930s, he had become one of Broadway’s biggest star songwriters. Porter’s musicals—enduring classics like Anything Goes, Can-Can, Silk Stockings and Kiss Me, Kate—fairly brim with songs still being recorded by singers today. Sunset Playhouse, as part of its SideNotes Cabaret Series, welcomes singer Becky Spice who, accompanied by pianist Jack Wilson, will present many of Porter’s wittiest and sassiest songs. Sure to be included will be such as “Let’s Misbehave,” “What is This Thing Called Love?” and “I Get a Kick Out of You.” Given the somewhat raunchy nature of some of Porter’s lyrics, Sunset recommends this show for mature audiences only. So, if you were “Born to Dance,” you might just find out that “You’re the Top” and may even find “True Love” at Sunset Playhouse this month. (John Jahn) May 17-20 at Sunset Playhouse, 800 Elm Grove Road, Elm Grove. For tickets, call 262782-4430 or visit sunsetplayhouse.com.

The classic American western film was famously skewered by Mel Brooks in one of his greatest comedies, Blazing Saddles, but how about a send-up of a videogame based on the Old West—a musical theater one at that? This is just what Over Our Head Players has in store for us with A.J. Allegra’s Oregon Trail: The Play, which pays homage to the traditions of Westerns, dysfunctional families and cross-country road trips—but above all offers a tribute many of us Gen-Xers and Gen-Yers will especially appreciate: to that traumatizing/treasured educational videogame of the 1980s and ’90s, Oregon Trail. The play follows the Bootsmeyer family, populated with stereotypical, over-the-top western characters, as they set off on a troubled journey westward—not quite the Donner Party but close to it. Along the way, they face various privations as Allegra’s parody of the game’s (and history’s) off-the-cuff sexism, racism and natural resource destruction—intentionally designed to make us uneasy—emerge throughout the narrative. This is dark comedy, for sure. (John Jahn) May 18-June 2 at the Sixth Street Theatre, 318 Sixth St., Racine. For tickets, call 262-632-6802 or visit overourheadplayers.org.

SHEPHERD EXPRESS


MARK FROHNA

A&E::INREVIEW

Milwaukee Opera Theatre and Wild Space’s Breathtaking High-Wire Act ::BY JOHN SCHNEIDER

S Florentine’s ‘Magic Flute’

MUSIC

Serenity and Humor in the Florentine Opera’s ‘Magic Flute’

T

::BY STEVE SPICE

he Florentine Opera’s season finale, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s The Magic Flute, offered new delights. It rose to moments of understated inspiration in a well-mounted production of minimalistic vertical planes, subtly lit and readily movable, subtly adding a quiet dimension to this gentle, serene work. Mozart’s lovely metaphysical fantasy has been an audience pleaser for centuries, and the full house on opening night was further testimony to the enduring popularity of the composer’s final opera, completed only months before his death. The Magic Flute is a gentle opera beguiling in its warm simplicity, seemingly less complex than the composer’s other stage work but requiring a cast with whom audiences will easily identify. The Florentine’s provided some outstanding soloists who seemed to take their roles to heart in an eager-to-please manner. As the idealistic Tamino, tenor Noah Stewart employed his reedy instrument to full advantage, but his voice became more fluid and warmer as he gradually developed his characterization with greater authority. Soprano Jamie-Rose Guarrine employed her lovely, full-ranged, ringing soprano to full advantage as Pamina and cut an appealing figure onstage. A beautifully costumed Laura Pisani made her U.S. stage début in the famously difficult role of the evil queen of the night, bravely assaying the treacherously challenging coloratura passages above the staff. She almost flounders at first but wins rising applause in the second act. As her foil, the virtuous Sarastro, guardian of the temple of wisdom, Jeffrey Beruan cut an imposing figure with his rich, low-ranging bass baritone. Tenor Thomas Leighton provided a more genuine touch of evil in his stunning portrayal of the licentious Monastatos tormenting the hapless Pamina. Perhaps the most winning performance was baritone Will Liverman’s well-sung characterization of the hapless bird catcher Papageno whose humorous foibles remind us that not everyone qualifies for the temple of wisdom and that Mozart intended Magic Flute as a satiric romantic fable. Subsidiary characters performed equally well in this beautifully directed, easy-on-the-eyes production, sadly reminding us that director William Florescu will not be with the Florentines next year.

SHEPHERD EXPRESS

ome things need to be done again. The extraordinary coproduction by Milwaukee Opera Theatre and Wild Space Dance Company of composer Ana Sokolović’s ferociously challenging a cappella opera Svadba-Wedding shouldn’t disappear after three weeknight shows for a combined audience of maybe 300. The 12 young women performers worked for four months, unusually long in opera, to understand, memorize, master and bring this crazily original piece about a girl on her wedding night to the fullest life it’s ever had since it appeared in 2011, giving the chamber piece a fully realized site-specific theater production in a popular Milwaukee wedding venue. It was like watching a breathtaking high-wire act. After taking bows, the performers on opening night began to laugh and impulsively hug each other, clearly thrilled, like the audience, by what had just transpired. The audience sat comfortably with strangers at large round tables in the long Great Hall of Best Place, where Captain Pabst once kept his office. Huge windows at both ends allowed natural light to illuminate the playful early scenes, and to darken with dusk as the mood turned first drunken, then increasingly serious, spiritual, mythic, and performers

began to carry candles and the theater lighting of AntiShadows LLC began to work its magic. Six singers and six dancers poured from Pabst’s office at the start, a dozen best girlfriends excited that one of them would wed tomorrow. Sokolović’s libretto is spare and representative, fortunately, since it’s sung entirely in Serbian. Much of what’s vocalized are the kinds of emotive non-verbal noises we make instinctively, but they’re delivered in complex rhythms and dissonant harmonies, often at great speed. There’s no accompaniment. Nothing cues the singers in pitch, yet they break out in multiple harmonies. Music director Adam Qutaishat lightly conducted from ever-changing spots as singers and dancers moved all around, but I rarely saw the singers watch him. Instead, they focused on acting the scenes, sensing when to start and stop with the same ensemble awareness as the dancers who moved to music that came more in waves than in counts. Jill Anna Ponasik directed. Debra Loewen choreographed. With great warmth, intelligence and power, Lydia Rose Eiche as the bride dressed for her wedding, sang a moving farewell—first alone, with frightened high notes, then joined by her friends’ voices quietly supporting her from darkened corners. Trailing rose petals, she left to a new life.

‘Svabda-Wedding’ PHOTO BY MARK FROHNA

M AY 1 7 , 2 0 1 8 | 25


PURE JOY!

A&E::VISUALART

—The New York Times

SPONSORED BY

VISUALART|PREVIEWS

AN AMERICAN IN PARIS MUSIC AND LYRICS BY

GEORGE GERSHWIN AND IRA GERSHWIN BOOK BY

CRAIG LUCAS DIRECTED AND CHOREOGRAPHED BY

CHRISTOPHER WHEELDON

ON SALE NOW! JUNE 26 - JULY 1 MARCUS CENTER

MarcusCenter.org • Ticketmaster.com • 414-273-7206 Groups 10+ Save! Call 414-273-7121 ext 210

Illustration: Don Oehl; Logo: Esther Wu

‘LOVE’ on Wisconsin Ave.

O

::BY TYLER FRIEDMAN

ne of the most distinctive characteristics of modern art is its relentless challenging of traditional notions of art. Marcel Duchamp famously submitted a signed urinal to a 1917 exhibition. And with his infamous Brillo boxes—nearly indistinguishable from the actual packaging of the soap pads—Andy Warhol similarly thumbed his nose at the art establishment. Pop artist Robert Indiana shares this disregard for unquestioned conventions. Why, for instance, should an artist paint on a canvas? Why not the floor of a basketball court? Among Indiana’s most adventurous works was the MECCA Arena floor on which the Milwaukee Bucks played from the late ’70s until moving to the BMO Harris Bradley Center in the late ’80s. The MECCA floor is currently in storage somewhere in the state, but another of Indiana’s works will now grace the city, courtesy of Sculpture Milwaukee. LOVE, 1996-1999 will be installed on Wisconsin Avenue outside Northwestern Mutual’s Tower and Commons through Oct. 21, providing Milwaukeeans with a poignant and simple maxim.

“Puebla: Sierra Mágica” Walker’s Point Center for the Arts • 839 S. Fifth St. Fernando Sosa Macip’s collection of photographs “Puebla: Sierra Mágica” arrives at the Walker’s Point Center for the Arts for the brief span of May 21-25. In the exhibition, the contemporary photographer focuses on the northeastern mountain state of Puebla, Mexico. The lush colors of nature and culture complement one another, suggesting a harmonious way of life often lost to modern urbanites. “Puebla: Sierra Mágica” opens with a reception at 6 p.m. on Monday, May 21.

Ann Thomas, Artist-in-Residence Cedarburg Cultural Center • W62 N546 Washington Ave. Illustrator Ann Thomas is the Cedarburg Cultural Center’s May artist-inresidence. For her work with pen and ink, watercolor and colored pencil, the former Mount Mary University instructor has received the Moonbeam Award for Children’s literature and the Silver Benjamin Franklin Award for children’s book illustration. Thomas will be present on May 18 and 25, from 12-4 p.m., to chat about her work and creative process. Interested parties can also sign up for a workshop on simplified perspective and pen techniques with watercolor wash taking place on Thursday, June 28.

26 | M AY 1 7 , 2 0 1 8

SHEPHERD EXPRESS


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www.skylightmusictheatre.org • (414) 291-7800 158 N. Broadway, Milwaukee, WI 53202

RIDE FOR THE ARTS

S U N DAY, J U N E 3 R D, 2 0 1 8 Join us for UPAF's largest annual fundraising event. Ride and raise pledges to benefit 14 outstanding performing arts groups in Southeastern Wisconsin. For more information or to register, visit UPAFRide.org or call (414) 276-RIDE.

SHEPHERD EXPRESS

M AY 17, 2 0 1 8 | 27


A&E::FILM

[ FILM CLIPS ] Book Club PG-13

Starring four actresses between the ages of 64 and 80, Book Club examines the inspiration provided by 50 Shades of Grey when Vivian (Jane Fonda, still beaming at 80) selects it for her book club’s new read. The book prompts each of four women to either seek romance or reinvigorate her existing love life. Sharon (Candice Bergen, 71) trolls online dating sites until she meets hot-totrot George (Richard Dreyfuss). Vivian is intrigued by Arthur (Don Johnson, whose real-life daughter, Dakota, stars in the movie version of 50 Shades). Diane (Diane Keaton, 71), is attracted to Mitchell (Andy Garcia), the hunky younger man she meets on a plane. Mary Steenburgen’s (65) Carol attempts to spice things up with Bruce (Craig T. Nelson)—the husband seemingly immune to her feminine wiles. Why not “Sex and the City” for seniors? After all, these actresses persuade us that, if we still live and breathe, we deserve to be loved, or failing that, lust will do. (Lisa Miller)

‘The Life of the Party’

Melissa McCarthy is ‘The Life of the Party’ ::BY DAVID LUHRSSEN

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ife as Deanna knew it ends pastel sweaters, the eye-rolling mean girls abruptly after dropping off have a field day at her expense. The cringeher beloved daughter Mad- worthy stories she tells about Maddie as a die (Molly Gordon) at Decatur girl are enough to make her daughter hide. University. As they drive away But the fish-out-of-water comedy evaporates in their Ford SUV, her husband Dan (Matt soon enough into a tale of go-girl empowerWalsh) announces (“in the interest of trans- ment when Maddie’s sorority sisters accept parency”) that he’s divorcing her. Trading up her without qualms. After Maddie gives mom for a real estate agent whose face is on ev- a quick fashion makeover in the women’s ery bus bench, he wants to “facilitate a clean room during a shots-of-tequila college party, break.” Dan is dull and soulless as the clichés Deanna is suddenly hot stuff on campus with that drip from his mouth, and it’s a measure of a boyfriend half her age. She also becomes an Melissa McCarthy’s acting talent that Dean- advice-dispensing life coach to Maddie and na’s surprise, dismay and pain are evident— her friends. even in the midst of a comedy. Life of the Party could have been an ongoDirected by McCarthy’s husband Ben Fal- ing gag about an out-of-touch suburban mom cone who co-wrote the script with her, Life who thinks she’s down with the kids. Instead, of the Party is less about diit spreads its laughs around, vorce than about a woman relosing steam in some scenes claiming her life. Twenty-two but maintaining a consistent Life of years earlier when she behum of humor. The jokes are the Party came pregnant with Maddie, on the awkwardness of crossMelissa McCarthy Deanna left college and put generational camaraderie as Molly Gordon her life’s ambitions on pause. well as those all-too-pertinent Directed by What now? Moving back questions surrounding changBen Falcone with her parents is as unating direction in midlife. McRated PG tractive as living alone. Much Carthy is the spark that keeps to Maddie’s horror, Deanna Life of the Party lit. Her apdecides to enroll at Decatur proachable, can-do persona and finish her degree. Won’t that be fun, mom provides wish fulfillment for anyone—but and daughter in school together? especially for women—convinced that they When Deanna turns up on campus with her will never escape the rut they have dug for bad perm, middle-aged eyeglasses and baggy themselves. 28 | M AY 1 7 , 2 0 1 8

Deadpool 2 R

Ryan Reynolds returns as R-Rated superhero Deadpool. The first Deadpool movie’s director, Tim Miller, envisioned a big-budget follow-up while Reynolds was determined to stick with the formula of raunchy jokes and acerbic one-liners. Reynolds won out and received a co-writing credit. Subsequently, David Leitch stepped in to direct the sequel. Josh Brolin appears as Cable—a villain who was once Deadpool’s friend but is now determined to kill mutant boy Russell (Julian Dennison). Deadpool grapples with Cable’s superior

strength due to bionic augmentation, and eventually Deadpool recruits mutants Domino (Zazie Beetz) and Negasonic Teenage Warhead (Brianna Hildebrand) to help keep Cable at bay. As an interesting side note: On Monday, April 9, T.J. Miller (who appears as Deadpool’s best friend, Weasel) was arrested and charged with falsely reporting that a woman he argued with on a passenger train, had a bomb in her bag. The incident sounds like something out of the movie, which all goes to show that life is at least as strange as fiction. (L.M.)

Mo & Me Not Rated

African filmmaker Salim Amin and Milwaukeebased photographer and filmmaker Chip Duncan will be on hand to meet and greet attendees of a special screening of Amin’s 2006 documentary that chronicles the life of his father, Mo & Me. Mohamed Amin was a photographer and cameraman famous for his coverage of the mid-1980s Ethiopian famine, which inspired numerous international relief efforts, including BandAid and USA for Africa. Mo & Me has been recognized for Best Documentary awards 15 times in various countries around the world. For a small donation ($10 is encouraged) to the Charles Allis Art Museum, guests can enjoy the aforementioned meet and greet, the screening of the film and a post-screening Q&A session with Amin and Duncan. (John Jahn) Friday, May 18, at the Charles Allis Art Museum, 1801 N. Prospect Ave. Registration is encouraged by emailing “Can Attend May 18 Event” to rsvp@cavtmuseums.org.

[ HOME MOVIES / NOW STREAMING ] Shakespeare Wallah

As explained in one of the bonus interviews on the new Blu-ray release, “wallah” means “seller,” perhaps even proponent. Although not the debut by Ismail Merchant, James Ivory and Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, this 1966 black-and-white feature brought them to the attention of cineastes worldwide. Shakespeare Wallah tracks an Anglo-Indian theater troupe’s up and down tour of India and registers the retreat of Western high art (and Indian tradition) against the advancing monoculture of banality.

That Girl in Yellow Boots

British-born Ruth (Kalki Koechlin) is seeking her long-lost father in India but finds trouble instead. Filmed with handheld high-definition cameras, That Girl in Yellow Boots (2010) captures the heat and perspiration, the bribery and bureaucracy—the crowded sense of place. Working illegally as a masseuse, Ruth slips easily into the sex trade amid the isolation and anxiety. Drugs and predatory men are everywhere in this poignant journey of a stranger in a strange land.

The Maze

William Cameron Menzies (Things to Come) was called in to direct this lowbudget entry in the original wave of 3D pictures. The Maze (1953) stars Grace Kelly stand-in Veronica Hurst who worries about her missing fiancé called suddenly to the ancestral castle in Scotland. The servants are weird, the fog is thick and the best moments recall the dark shadows of German Expressionism. No need for glasses. The Blu-ray includes 2D as well as 3D versions.

Henry Miller Asleep & Awake

This curious 1973 documentary by Tom Schiller (later known for his short films on “Saturday Night Live”) features author Henry Miller (Sexus) waking from bed and conducting a tour of the many pictures pasted on his bathroom wall. The idiosyncratic gallery triggers a series of associative thoughts—on sex to be sure, but also art, religion, literature and life’s unanswerable questions. End quote: “My whole past seems like one long dream punctuated by nightmares.” —David Luhrssen

SHEPHERD EXPRESS


A&E::BOOKS

BOOK|REVIEWS

Lost Milwaukee

(THE HISTORY PRESS), BY CARL SWANSON Milwaukee’s unique history continues to draw interest from authors and readers. The newest addition to the lengthening shelf of books is focused on buildings that no longer exist, starting with the three county courthouses that preceded the present structure (built in 1931). Lost Milwaukee also takes in the landscape, reprinting an early pioneer’s description of the beauty of the place where rivers meet, and collects funny and interesting stories. Who knew that Hubbard Park is all that remains of a raucous amusement park whose noise and traffic triggered neighbors to break away from Milwaukee and form their own village, Shorewood? (David Luhrssen)

The Bridge: How the Roeblings Connected Brooklyn to New York

(ABRAMS COMICARTS), BY PETER J. TOMASI AND SARA DUVALL

More than a century ago, painters executed elaborate tableaus illustrating sequences of historic events. Nowadays hardcover graphic histories, illustrated in comic-book style, similarly relate stories of the past in a sequence of panels but in a format anyone can own. One of the latest titles in this growing genre, The Bridge, illustrates the conception and construction of one of New York’s—and the world’s—familiar landmarks. The birth of the Brooklyn Bridge is depicted in pictures and captions and explores the project’s human side—the drama of its designer, John Augustus Roebling, who died before the structure was completed, and his son, Washington, who finished his father’s work. (David Luhrssen) SHEPHERD EXPRESS

BOOK|PREVIEW

Girls Can Do Anything Boys Can Do in ‘Franny’s Father is a Feminist’::BY JENNI HERRICK

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ranny’s father is a feminist, a fact that strengthens the bond she has with her father and empowers her to grow up smart, strong and full of self-confidence. The term "feminist" can be a loaded word for some, encompassing wide-ranging political ideologies and vast social movements, but in a new picture book written by Rhonda Leet and illustrated by Megan Walker, Franny’s dad thinks feminism is pretty simple, and he is raising his daughter to believe that she deserves the same rights, freedoms and opportunities that he had. Leet’s children’s book Franny’s Father is a Feminist helps young readers recognize that girls can do anything boys can do and illustrates many real-world examples of how feminism influences Franny’s development. Franny’s father is her primary caretaker, as her mother has an unnamed, important job outside the home, so it is daddy who attends ballet recitals and hockey games, who isn’t afraid to cry and who normally bucks gender norms, upending stereotypes about feminism with an honest, childlike understanding. Precious illustrations show young Franny (complete with her pink hair and kitty T-shirt) alongside her father (a strong-looking man with a gnarly beard) engaged in activities from fixing Rhonda Leet her bike to baiting her own fish hook in obvious examples that this loving dad is teaching his growing child that she deserves the best. Leet is a teacher and child advocate who grew up in Green Bay and graduated from St. Norbert College with a degree in education. She will visit Boswell Book Co. for an after-school event perfect for children, regardless of gender, and their parents at 4 p.m. on Friday, May 18.

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DAVE ZYLSTRA

::OFFTHECUFF

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Best of Milwaukee 2016 BEST DENTIST WINNER

BEST COSMETIC DENTIST 7040 N. Port Washington Rd. Suite 410 Glendale, Wisconsin 53217 414-367-6337 stephaniemurphydds.com

Tessa Koller (left) and one of her designs

Investing in Your Strengths (right) (right)

Off the Cuff with fashion designer and 22q advocate Tessa Koller ::BY SELENA MILEWSKI

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his week, Off the Cuff interviews Tessa Koller, owner of Tessa’s Tailoring and Alterations. Koller is also affected by a genetic disorder known as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, which is related to anomalies down the center of the body; the disorder has more than 200 associated symptoms, including heart and lung disease. Although 22q is nearly as common as Down Syndrome, it is still relatively little known to the general public. Koller has devoted her life to raising awareness of 22q in the media and using her abilities to encourage and give hope to those affected. She is also a regular online writer for Arianna Huffington’s new wellness company, Thrive Global, and the digital health community The Mighty. Here, we discuss her advocacy work, 22q at the Zoo Worldwide Awareness Day (Sunday, May 20), her love of fashion and the importance of a positive mindset through adversity. Please tell me about your advocacy work for 22q. Every year, I travel with different organizations I’m working with. The 22q Family Foundation is national, but they do a lot of events here in Wisconsin. We do these events to take the mystery out of 22q and to educate the public, as well as doctors and specialists. I wasn’t diagnosed with this until I was 24 years old. I went my whole life not knowing the name of it, not knowing what it was. I had always thought heart disease was my primary and pretty much only problem. I only do fashion shows through 22q organizations because it’s the way I can give back. The International 22q Foundation is stationed all over the place—China, Australia, Italy, Ireland, Sweden—and I travel with them. It’s the strangest thing doing these fashion shows in the middle of the conferences, but it’s an interesting way to attract international press. I think the more information about the syndrome that’s available, the more parents and families who are affected by it will feel like, “Oh, my kid can do this, too.” Please tell me about your decision to open your own business.

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In 2015, on the Christmas holiday, my lung collapsed. It happened on an airplane flying between the East Coast and Milwaukee. I was in and out of consciousness by the time it landed and was rushed to the emergency room. Two days later, I found myself having lung surgery and with two large tubes coming out of my chest. By February 2016, I was diagnosed with chronic pain, Fibromyalgia and another condition relating to the lung. For more than a year, I was in an intensive physical therapy program that I still do daily, but sewing, creating outfits and even tailoring and alterations are like therapy to me. They’ve become my way of life and how I survive. Before the lung collapse, I was taking classes with a seamstress, and when I made the decision to come back to fashion, I wanted a business. I wanted to be really making money and actually supporting myself. Tell me about the 22q at the Zoo event being held in Milwaukee. The people who organized it are a couple. Their names are Eric and Jenny. It’s to support their daughter, Audrey Hohenwalter, who has 22q. Similar events are happening on Sunday, May 20, in 20 or 30 other countries and also in more than 50 cities throughout the U.S. The events allow families to get together and spread awareness about the syndrome. These events are resources for families that don’t have a lot of financial backing for support and help, and it’s just a great network. Press events really give people the right information about the syndrome—what it is and what to expect if you have it. The way you deliver this information is critical. These events put parents, children and young adults at ease. What is the most important thing for people facing a 22q diagnosis to know? I want them to know that you are far more than your diagnosis. You are far more than the compilation of all your struggles, and all your symptoms, and all the things that you feel hold you back. By focusing on how you view yourself, your abilities and the things that really make you who you are, aside from your health, you’re going to be OK. And it doesn’t have to be scary and dark all the time. You can have the syndrome and you can have really great friends and a great life and find a way to do something that you love. And that’s really what makes life good. It’s the small things more than any big thing that makes life really good. To learn more about Koller and her work, visit tessakoller.com. For more about the 22q Family Foundation, which offers free educational support, scholarship consultation and career coaching for young adults, visit 22qfamilyfoundation.org. For more on the International 22q Foundation, which connects 22q families across the world, delivers cutting-edge information and organizes events for 22q at the Zoo Worldwide Awareness Day (Sunday, May 20), visit 22q.org. SHEPHERD EXPRESS


::HEARMEOUT

::MYLGBTQPoint of View

ASK RUTHIE | UPCOMING EVENTS | PAUL MASTERSON

May the Best Woman Win!

Dear Confused,

Dear Ruthie,

My husband is obsessed with “RuPaul’s Drag Race.” No lie. Obsessed. We started watching it last season, and since then he’s gone back and downloaded all the previous seasons to “catch up.” At first, I thought it was cute and fun, and I was proud to have a husband with such an open mind—someone that comfortable with himself. But now it’s getting stupid. He talks about the show all the time, often watches episodes twice and posts on social media fan pages. He’s even gotten into arguments with our gay friends about who should have won what and other show outcomes. Is he just a RuPaul superfan or do I need to be worried? He often tells me how “hot” the contestants on the show are, and he has no qualms about telling me who his favorites are. I don’t think he’s into transsexual women, but things are starting to feel awkward when we watch the show together. I don’t know. Am I crazy? His obsession with the show is getting annoying. I’m sure it’s nothing, but I wanted to ask what you thought.

Hit Me with Your Best Shot, Feeling Confused

Start your engines, girlie, and may the best woman win! And that woman is you! You said it yourself; you landed a great, confident, well-adjusted man. You don’t mention any problems in the boudoir, concerns that he might be cheating, or feelings of loneliness or inadequacy, so I’m thinking your relationship is fine. I don’t think you have anything to worry about, sweetie. Yep...sexuality is varied and can be complex to an outsider looking in. Some men, for instance, are attracted to transsexual women, some simply want to hook up with a drag queen for a night, and there are a few men who like to wear women’s undies in the bedroom. It doesn’t sound to me like that’s the case with your man. He’s just a guy watching a TV show. Some guys are into watching Sunday football, others home improvement shows. Yours is currently into a show about drag queens. No biggie. Let him enjoy himself, while you focus on all the wonderful traits he has to offer.

::RUTHIE’SSOCIALCALENDAR May 16: RuffDraft Night at This Is It (418 E. Wells St.): The city can’t get enough of the monthly RuFFHouse nights at This Is It, so the bar is hosting a midmonth party to hold everyone over! RuffHouse staple, DJ 5am spins the beats during this change-of-pace workweek bash that starts at 10 p.m. May 17: LGBT Business Equality Summit at Manpower Group (100 Manpower Place): Help your business thrive with this 8-11:45 a.m. opportunity to network and learn how to grow your business. Enjoy experienced speakers and breakout sessions to help you harness success. Hosted by the Wisconsin LGBT Chamber of Commerce, the event is free to charter members or $10 to the public. Register at eventbrite. com. May 18: Old Fashioned Fest–Last Call! at Harley Davidson Museum Garage (540 W Canal St.): So many folks hit Old Fashioned Fest that the kids at Shepherd Express decided to do it again. Sample traditional and reimagined Old Fashioneds from numerous bars and restaurants, and vote for your favorites in both the whiskey and bourbon categories. Tickets to the 6-9 p.m. tasting start at $29 and can be purchased at shepherdtickets.com. May 19: Art with a Heart at Courage House (1544 S. Sixth St.): Enjoy an open house at Courage Milwaukee with a garden party and art show. Hosted by Fluid Bar, the noon event allows you to check out the house everyone’s been talking about, enjoy an outdoor cash bar and view the artwork dozens of Milwaukee supporters created themselves. Open to all ages, the family friendly party ends at 4 p.m. SHEPHERD EXPRESS

May 19: Adult Inflatable Night at Midwest Orthopedic Sports Complex (19485 W. Lisbon Road): Relive your childhood silliness with bounce houses, bubble soccer, bounce slides and more... for adults only! Kick off your shoes and get crazy during this nutty 7-11 p.m. night. Visit ticckettailor. com for $15 tickets. May 19: Pajama Party at D.I.X. (739 S. First St.): The team at this hot spot invite you to drink and dance the night away in you PJs! The 10 p.m. party features drink specials and hunky DJ Chomper as well as a photographer to capture the fun. May 20: ‘Mary’s Kingdom Gets Nerdy & Dirty’ Show at Hamburger Mary’s (730 S. Fifth St.): When the girls hang up their heels, the boys come out to play at Hamburger Mary’s! Eat, drink and be “Mary” with a 7 p.m. variety show featuring drag kings, drag queens, burgers and beverages. Call 414-488-2555. May 22: Open House at LVL Complex (801 S. Second St.): Come and learn what LVL can do for your party, fundraiser, corporate event or wedding. Tour the space, meet local vendors, and enjoy an open bar and gourmet appetizers during this 4-8 p.m. open house. Learn more and preregister at lvlcomplex.com. Want to share an event with Ruthie? Need her advice? Email DearRuthie@Shepex.com and follow her on Instagram @ruthiekeester and Facebook at Dear Ruthie.

For LGBTQs, the 2018 Election Means Our Future ::BY PAUL MASTERSON

I

t’s only six months until the Nov. 6 midterm election. For the LGBTQ community the future of our rights is at stake. Throughout the country, under the guise of “religious freedom” laws, marriage equality and the transgender population are being attacked. Oklahoma just passed a law allowing discrimination against same-sex couples seeking to adopt. In Washington, the regime continues its campaign against transgender persons in the military while appointing conservative judges whose animus towards LGBTQ rights is among their qualifications. Locally, under Gov. Scott “Wississippi” Walker, transgender people have been targeted. Wisconsin’s senate race is getting national attention. Opposing incumbent Sen. Tammy Baldwin is a pair of Republicans. Former Democrat turned Republican Kevin Nicholson has been endorsed by the Great America PAC and conservative Richard Uihlein. However, at its recent conference, by a 73% to 27% margin, the Wisconsin GOP endorsed state Sen. Leah Vukmir. A virulent homophobe with an extensive record against LGBTQ equality, reproductive rights, education, voting rights and health care equality, Vukmir has been criticized for featuring a campaign ad with Tammy Baldwin depicted as a terrorist. Even a fellow Republican thought the imagery went too far. But that’s to be expected. Both candidates are trying to out-conservative each other, invoking border walls and right-wing extremism that will certainly dog-whistle Baldwin as a lesbian. Meanwhile, there are already 17 opposition candidates in the gubernatorial race. A Trans MKE member posted her text conversation she had with Libertarian Phil Anderson. When she asked him about conversion therapy, he knew nothing about it. After a short explanation, he called it “barbaric.” Fine. Just remember, Anderson was the 2016 congressional candidate who divided the vote and helped defeat the Democrat, Russ Feingold. The field of 16 Democratic gubernatorial hopefuls implies a healthy engagement. However, it’s time to thin out the herd. Among the top contenders are Madison Mayor Paul Soglin; state Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Evers; and state Sen. Kathleen Vinehout. Retired attorney and former Wisconsin Democratic Party chair Matt Flynn is also running. Flynn’s unfortunate claim to fame is his role representing the Archdiocese of Milwaukee against victims in the sex abuse scandal. Elsewhere, the national LGBTQ civil rights organization, the Human Rights Campaign has endorsed the Josh Kaul who is running against Republican Attorney General Brad Schimel. Schimel recently attended a religious liberty summit (and was paid $4,000 to speak there) held by the Alliance Defending Freedom, an organization classified by the Southern Poverty Law Center as a extremist hate group seeking to criminalize homosexuality. For Wisconsin’s LGBTQ voters, choices should be clear. M AY 1 7 , 2 0 1 8 | 31


::MUSIC

For more MUSIC, log onto shepherdexpress.com

MICHAEL WOLEVER

FEATURE | ALBUM REVIEWS | CONCERT REVIEWS | LOCAL MUSIC

Sheer Mag Stick to Their Guns he punk rock lifestyle is synonymous with nonstop partying, excessive drinking and shiny leather jackets covered in safety pins. Yet while those aesthetics have always been the face of punk, the genre’s do it yourself (DIY) ethos has always been just as crucial to its identity—even if those self-imposed values aren’t always easy to maintain when punk rockers face the trials and tribulations of impending stardom. Philadelphia’s Sheer Mag is a rock ’n’ roll band with an ever-growing reach. The band last played Milwaukee in April 2015 to a tiny crowd at the dive bar Bremen Café. Last month, the band performed to a crowd of thousands at Coachella. They’ve performed on late-night TV and have been profiled in Rolling Stone. Their rise to indie-rock stardom has been rapid, and they’ve only continued to pick up the pace. Led by soulful vocalist Tina Halladay, Sheer Mag’s sound is unlike most of their contemporaries. The band is frequently compared to arena rock gods Thin Lizzy, and their power-poppy melodies pay tribute to the genre’s founding fathers. Their production style is reminiscent of rock’s glory days; their analog-tracked tunes possess a grittiness rarely heard in 2018. Even through high-fidelity headphones or Bluetooth speakers, the tracks sound like they’re being spun off a dusty old turntable. Though their sound is derivative of rock ’n’ roll’s heyday, Sheer Mag’s lyrical content looks to decades past. Their politically charged lyrics separate their anthems from those of their guitar-licking predecessors. The sleazy world of hard rock has been appropriated by a socially conscious generation, and Sheer Mag has traded in the genre’s longstanding misogyny and homophobia for groovy storytelling. On Need to Feel Your Love, the band’s most recent release, tracks about lesser-known historical events take

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center stage. The murder of anti-Nazi activist Sophie Scholl and the riots at Stonewall in New York City may now be in the distant past, but their context remains relevant in the current political climate. “I think with a lot of those kinds of histories, the story really hasn’t been told, and it’s being kind of hidden,” says Halladay. “It’s like an old cliché, but that is why things like that repeat themselves. No one is learning from it because it’s being hidden and not talked about. They’re all important things that we can look to and learn from. They’re mistakes you don’t want to make again.” Sheer Mag’s political sensibility extends far beyond the band’s songwriting. The five-piece are committed to operating almost completely independently. After three EPs and one full-length album, the band remains unsigned to a major label. Near the beginning of their career, they actively resisted hype and avoided press. “We just felt a little bit foolish doing interviews because we didn’t even have a full-length record out—we just had the seven inches,” says Halla-

::BY LAUREN KEENE

Sheer Mag

day. “We just kind of wanted to do it for real when we put the record out. I think that was the point we were waiting for.” The band has no manager and only recently hired a publicist. Halladay says she hopes Sheer Mag’s commitment to independence can inspire other bands to blaze their own trails, too. “We just want to do it to show that it is possible to have your own terms,” she says. “You don’t have to just stick to this model of what bands are supposed to do. We’re trying to make other people realize that it’s not written in stone. You can still have your ethics, do what you feel is right and move forward as a band. You don’t have to just give in.” As their popularity continues to rise, Halladay says Sheer Mag remains committed to keeping their shows accessible and their platform morally sound. The band fights to keep ticket prices low in order to appeal to fans of all income levels, and their T-shirts are unionSheer Mag made. Halladay says her Cactus Club bandmates have always Friday May 18, been keen on doing things a certain way. 9 p.m. “I don’t think we’ll ever compromise,” she says. “I don’t think that Sheer Mag will be Sheer Mag if we don’t have the morals that we’ve stood by—that we all have for ourselves as individuals. I don’t think those will go away.” Sheer Mag headline Cactus Club on Friday, May 18, with Fury and Red Death at 9 p.m.

SHEPHERD EXPRESS


::LOCALMUSIC MIKE SMOLAREK

MUSIC::CONCERTREVIEW

Damien Jurado Showcased Some of his Finest Songs Yet ::BY EVAN RYTLEWSKI

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or his last album, 2016’s Visions of Us on the Land, Damien Jurado toured with a six-piece psych rock band, playing long, loud sets each night. A lot of people weren’t into it, Jurado admitted to the crowd at his show Sunday night at the Back Room at Colectivo. This concert looked a lot more like what listeners probably expect from the singer-songwriter: just Jurado, seated on a folding chair with an acoustic guitar, playing with occasional contributions from a second acoustic guitarist and a backup vocalist who colored some of his songs with just the faintest traces of harmonies. Jurado mostly stuck to material from his sensational new album, The Horizon Just Laughed, one of his most straightforward in years and a master class in economical songwriting. Even more so than usual, these songs are packed to the brim with characters, memories, emotions, geographical details and existential revelations. “What good is living if you can’t write your ending?” he sang on gorgeous “The Last Great Washington State,” raising his usually hushed voice as the song built to a knockout finale. It’s one of his finest yet—which is saying something, since over the last two decades he’s written plenty of fine ones—and for many in the crowd, it was the first chance to hear it. Breaking from industry norms, Jurado announced that he wouldn’t post the new album to digital platforms until this summer—months after its physical release. His performances were as potent as you’d expect, yet the show itself was sometimes pokey, marked by endless guitar-tuning breaks (he blamed the weather for throwing his guitar out of whack) and meandering stories he sometimes seemed to be telling out of obligation. If his heart sometimes didn’t seem to be completely in the show, there may be something to that. During some banter toward the end of the night, he swatted away a couple of song requests but happily answered questions from the crowd. When one fan asked which he prefers more, the heavy psychedelic rock of his previous tours or the acoustic setup of this one, he didn’t pause. He much prefers doing the loud stuff. There are some acoustic acts who only listen to acoustic music, he explained during his illuminating rant, but he’s not one of them. Contrary to what listeners might expect, he insisted that he doesn’t own so much as a single album by Neil Young, Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen, Nick Drake or Elliott Smith. And while he puts plenty of himself in his songs, he said he primarily thinks of himself as a medium who channels the voice of others (he likened himself to Whoopi Goldberg in Ghost). There’s a power in this style of performance, he acknowledged. It’s just not his first love.

SHEPHERD EXPRESS

R. Mutt

The Many Lives of R. Mutt FOUR LINEUPS OF THE BAND REGROUP FOR THEIR 30TH ANNIVERSARY ::BY DAVID LUHRSSEN

R.

Mutt began in the ’80s as a cool cover band. By the ’90s they were described by one writer as a head-on collision of Black Sabbath and James Brown. In the ’00s they drifted toward Americana. Their most recent album, Dash, draws comparisons to Bruce Springsteen. Each of those R. Mutts will be heard at their 30th anniversary show this Saturday at Club Garibaldi. Four distinct lineups with a total of 11 musicians will take turns on stage and work through the eclectic catalog that has been performed under the R. Mutt moniker. Bassist and songwriter Jim Dier (a founding member) recalls a casual beginning for the band amongst a group of Marquette University, UW-Milwaukee and UW-Madison students. “Our main concentration was on the music of The Clash, Velvet Underground, Lou Reed—the songs we grew up loving—which would have been considered ’80s alternative.” Drummer Paul Leckie, an art major, suggested the band’s name. “R. Mutt” was how Dadaist Marcel Duchamp signed the urinal he shockingly displayed as a sculpture at a 1917 art exhibition. “It was the art of reclaimed objects,” Dier says, alluding to R. Mutt’s re-contextualization of familiar songs. “Even as a cover band, we pulled songs together from different genres and put them together with new ideas.” They were popular on the circuit of bars and house parties in the Marquette neighborhood but soon developed the ambition of becoming an all-original band. They didn’t lose their original following. According to Dier, the fans were impressed by R. Mutt’s release of a CD, Steamin’ Hot Coolie (1991), at a time when local bands were largely confined to cassette tapes. “Back then, we tried hard to be difficult to classify,” he says. “We liked odd tempo breaks, unexpected key changes and time signatures.” Black Sabbath-James Brown mash-up aside, Dier thought of R. Mutt as working the same field as the Red Hot Chili Peppers and R. Mutt Urban Dance Squad. “We were bending styles.” Saturday, May 19 The band has broken up, gone dormant and reformed several times over the past three decades, changing personnel as well as Club Garibaldi changing their sound along with the personal evolution of longtime members. “Family. Jobs. It was often too tough to commit to being in a band,” Dier recalls. And yet, R. Mutt kept coming back. Their albums Heptane (2007) and Leash on Life (2011) leaned toward Americana. “You can hear it,” Dier says. “Both had a ‘Hey, we’re getting older—let’s play more serious music’ feel.” The Dash shifts course again. Producing the newest recording was Sassparilla’s Kevin Blackwell, a longtime fan whom Dier ran into on a trip out west. “He said, ‘Yeah, those [recent] albums sound good, but it’s not the R. Mutt I remember. What I used to love was the unexpected, the fun, the fire,’” Dier recalls. Blackwell recorded The Dash in Milwaukee and mixed it back in Portland, Ore., with Eels guitarist Chet Lyster. Dier likes the results. “It sounds like an improved version of what we used to sound like,” he says. “I softened things too much on Heptane and Leash on Life—took the edge off, I hate to admit. This sounds more like us.” R. Mutt performs Saturday, May 19, at Club Garibaldi, 2501 S. Superior St. M AY 1 7 , 2 0 1 8 | 33


MUSIC::LISTINGS THURSDAY, MAY 17

Amelia's, Jackson Dordel Jazz Quintet (4pm) Beulah Brinton House, Bill Staines in Concert Boone & Crockett, The Mutineers Cactus Club, [The Chosen Few] w/King Ameas, Class M, Kewii, AG DA GIFT, L.R. & host Rich P. Circle-A Cafe, Alive at Eight: Aquariums w/BBys (8pm); DJ: Andy Junk (10pm) Company Brewing, Riverwest FemFest 2018 Beer Release Party w/Liam O'Brien's Faithless Followers, Ben Yela & Fuzzyhead County Clare Irish Inn & Pub, Acoustic Irish Folk w/Barry Dodd Jazz Estate, Organ Night: Dan Schneck Kochanski's Concertina Beer Hall, Open Jam: Roadhouse Rave Up Linneman's Riverwest Inn, Gloss Weekend 2018: NO/NO, (ORB) & Dashcam Mason Street Grill, Mark Thierfelder Jazz Trio (5:30pm) Miramar Theatre, Skism w/Trolley Snatcha (all-ages, 9pm) On the Bayou, Open Mic Comedy w/host The Original Darryl Hill Potawatomi Hotel & Casino, In Bar 360: Bourbon House (8pm), In the Fire Pit: Post Monroe w/Myles Wangerin (8:30pm) Potbelly Sandwich Shop (East Side), Texas Dave (12pm) Rave / Eagles Club, Veil Of Maya w/LIMBS & Monorail Central (all-ages, 7pm) Rounding Third Bar and Grill, World's Funniest Free Comedy Show Shank Hall, Wild Adriatic w/Richard Buckner The Bay Restaurant, Pat McCurdy The Packing House Restaurant, Barbara Stephan & Peter Mac (6pm) The Suburban Bourbon (Muskego), The All-Star SUPERband w/ The Muskego High School Big Band (6pm) Transfer Pizzeria Cafe, Martini Jazz Lounge: Anthony Deutsch Trio Turner Hall Ballroom, Trumpeter Terence Blanchard w/The E-Collective Uncorkt Wine All You Want!, Mike DeRose Smooth Jazz Guitar Up & Under Pub, A No Vacancy Comedy Open Mic Urban Harvest Brewing Company, The Brewery Comedy Tour

FRIDAY, MAY 18

1175 Sports Park & Eatery (Kansasville), Cactii Alley Cat Lounge (Five O'Clock Steakhouse), Pierre Live American Legion Post #399 (Okauchee), The Larry Lynne Trio American Legion Post #449 (Brookfield), Bobby Way & Frineds Angelo's Piano Lounge, Julie's Piano Karaoke Art*Bar, Caleb Miller Cackle Jacks (Racine), Roy Edwards Bluesband Cactus Club, Sheer Ma gw/Fury & Red Death Cafe Carpe (Fort Atkinson), Eric Miller Circle-A Cafe, Alive at Eight: The Safes w/ Cabin Essence (8pm); DJ: Daniel James (10pm) Clarke Hotel (Waukesha), Dick Eliot Jazz Guitar (6pm) Club Garibaldi, Underground Hive w/The Form & The Cutouts ComedySportz Milwaukee, ComedySportz Milwaukee! Company Brewing, Collections of Colonies of Bees w/ Strangelander County Clare Irish Inn & Pub, Traditional Irish Ceilidh Session

Crawdaddy's, Terry James & Dave Smith (6pm) Frank's Power Plant, Viogression w/Petrification, Pigsblood & Apocalyptic Session Greenfield Park, Traveling Beer Garden w/music (5pm) Harry's Bar & Grill, 5 Card Studs Hops & Leisure (Oconomowoc), Bottoms Up Iron Mike's (Franklin), Jam Session w/Steve Nitros & Friends Jazz Estate, Emmet Cohen Trio (8pm), Late Night Session: Tommy Antonic Trio (11:30pm) Juneau Park, Traveling Beer Garden w/music (5pm) KNE Soundstage (Grafton), Live@KNE: Post Monroe (noon) Lakefront Brewery, Brewhaus Polka Kings (5:30pm) Linneman's Riverwest Inn, Bella Brutto w/The Tritonics Mamie's, The Blues Disciples Mason Street Grill, Phil Seed Trio (6pm) Miramar Theatre, The Red Jumpsuit w/Apparatus & Rivals (all-ages, 6:30pm) Potawatomi Hotel & Casino, In Bar 360: 3D (9pm), In the Fire Pit: Post Monroe w/Alyssia Dominguez (9:30pm) Rave / Eagles Club, Southern Accents - Tribute to Tom Petty (all-ages, 8pm), Joe Nichols w/Spencer Crandall (all-ages, 8pm), Banda Potrillos Banda Peñasco de Zacatecas, Banda Dorado Show, Grupo Dos Banderas, Norteñisimo Zierra Azul, Grupo Veloz, El Mayito Alvarado (all-ages, 8pm) Saloon on Calhoun, Rev. Raven & The Chain Smokin' Altar Boys w/Westside Andy Shank Hall, Copper Box Site 1A, Kill Paris w/Crystal Knives & N!CO The Bay Restaurant, Larry Moore Trio The Brass Tap, Robert Allen Jr. Band The Packing House Restaurant, Carmen Nickerson & Kostia w/ Scott Wenzel & John Wheeler (6:30pm) Turner Hall Ballroom, Ex Fabula ALL STARS: Connection (6:30pm) Twisted Path Distillery, Listening Party Up & Under Pub, Charles Walker Band Westallion Brewing Company, Derek Byrne & Paddygrass

SATURDAY, MAY 19

7 Mile Fair (Caledonia), JP Cyr and the Midnightmen (12pm) American Legion Post #449 (Brookfield), Nostalgia Arriba Mexican Restaurant (Butler), Jonny T-Bird & the MPs Art*Bar, L.J. & Bill Butcher & Barrel Gastropub (Racine), Mike DeRose Smooth Jazz Guitar Cactus Club, Agua de Rosas w/La Favi Cafe Carpe (Fort Atkinson), Von Strantz w/Native Land Cedarburg Cultural Center, Rebels & Renegades: Davina and The Vagabonds Circle-A Cafe, Alive at Eight: Northside Creeps w/Floor Model (8pm); DJ: WarLock (10pm) City Lights Brewing Company, Swing & A Miss Club Garibaldi, R. Mutt 30th Anniversary Spectacular Club Timbuktu, Get Lit Showcase ComedySportz Milwaukee, ComedySportz Milwaukee! Company Brewing, KiNG KENDRiCK w/the new school [DJ BiZZON dance party] Cue Club of Wisconsin (Waukesha), Ten Feet Tall

Five O'Clock Steakhouse, Rafael Mendez Fox & Hounds Restaurant, Rev. Raven & The Chain Smokin' Altar Boys w/Westside Andy Frank's Power Plant, Planned Parenthood Fundraiser: Man Random, Astrokadaaver, Curbsitter, The Meatcurtains & Dead Is Dead Greenfield Park, Traveling Beer Garden w/music (5pm) Hilton Milwaukee City Center, Vocals & Keys Hops & Leisure (Oconomowoc), The Rush Tribute Band Jazz Estate, Emmet Cohen Trio (8pm), Late Night Session: Jordan Rattner Group (11:30pm) Juneau Park, Traveling Beer Garden w/music (5pm) Linneman's Riverwest Inn, Tigernite "Sublunary" record release party w/Indonesian Junk & Bruiser Queen Mason Street Grill, Jonathan Wade Trio (6pm) McAuliffe's Pub (Racine), Sultry Sounds of the Underground w/ Mary Vaughn Milwaukee Parkside School for the Arts, Benefit Concert w/ Greg Koch (6pm) Miramar Theatre, Stylust and Esseks w/Cntrlla & UNKNWN (all-ages, 9pm) MugZ's Pub and Grill (Muskego), Open Jam w/host Willow Creek Oasis Jazz Bar and Grill, Bluesfest: American Blues Trio w/ Jimmy Burns, Harvey Westmoreland and Knee Deep Two, Stephen Hull Blues Band w/Pierre Lee, Demetria Taylor Blues Band, & The Kenny Walker Band (1pm) Pabst Milwaukee Brewery & Taproom, Pabst Milwaukee Street Festival: Nnamdi Ogbonnaya, Platinum Boys, ZED KENZO, Mary Allen and The Percolators, Ric Wilson, Caroline Smith, and No Stress Collective (12pm) Potawatomi Hotel & Casino, In Bar 360: The Twig & Berries Show (9pm), In the Fire Pit: Post Monroe w/Myles Wangerin (9:30pm) Riverside Theater, Dennis Miller Rock Country, Blacktop Kings CD release party Rosco's Restaurant & Sports Bar, The Falcons Route 20 Outhouse (Sturtevant), Texas Hippie Coalition w/ Kobra And The Lotus, Brand of Julez & Granny 4 Barrel Shank Hall, The Lovin' Kind w/Failure To Launch The Bay Restaurant, Karen Cameron Trio The Cheel (Thiensville), Jeannine Rivers Trio w/John Hefter & John Paul Simon The Packing House Restaurant, Lem Banks, Jeff Stoll, Alvin Turner & Omar (6:30pm) The Underground Collaborative, Improv Show-Down! (6pm) Traditions Pub (West Bend), Maple Road Blues Band Trinity Three Irish Pubs, Dirty Boogie w/DJ Zovo Turner Hall Ballroom, Heather McDonald w/Chris Franjola Up & Under Pub, Brew City Bombshells: Babes in Nerdland

SUNDAY, MAY 20

7 Mile Fair (Caledonia), Sonic Soul (12pm) Angelo's Piano Lounge, Live Karaoke w/Julie Brandenburg Cactus Club, Snailmate w/Moth Light, Billy Dreamer & Bo & Airo Cafe Carpe (Fort Atkinson), SistaStrings w/Bill Camplin Circle-A Cafe, Alive at Eight: Long Mama w/Grasping At Straws (8pm); DJ: John Riepenhoff & Sara Caron (10pm) Company Brewing, The Fainting Room album release show w/ Derek Pritzl (2:30pm) Dugout 54, Dugout 54 Sunday Open Jam Frank's Power Plant, Welcome Back, Matt-The-Ratt: The Exotics, Honolulu Millionaires, JP Cyr & The Midnightmen, and DJ sets (2pm) Hops & Leisure (Oconomowoc), Full Band Open Jam w/host Wapatui (5pm)

Miramar Theatre, Blacklit w/Wrath & Greyhound (all-ages, 9pm) Riverwest Public House, Rent Strike w/Deep Femme, Andrew the Red, & SINP Rounding Third Bar and Grill, The Dangerously Strong Comedy Open Mic Sussex Village Park, Acoustic Blu Duo (1pm) The Back Room at Colectivo, Josh Rouse Turner Hall Ballroom, Joey Bada$$ w/Boogie and Buddy and Dessy Hinds

MONDAY, MAY 21

Jazz Estate, Latin Jam Session Linneman's Riverwest Inn, Poet's Monday w/host Timothy Kloss & featured reader Timothy Kloss (sign-up 7:30pm, 8-11pm) Mason Street Grill, Joel Burt Duo (5:30pm) Paulie's Pub and Eatery, Open Jam w/Christopher John & Dave Wacker Up & Under Pub, Open Mic w/Marshall McGhee and the Wanderers

TUESDAY, MAY 22

Be Sound Music Studio, Torch Singer Tuesdays C Notes Upscale Sports Lounge, Another Night-Another Mic Open Mic w/host The Original Darryl Hill Frank's Power Plant, Duck and Cover Comedy Open Mic Jazz Estate, MATC Jazz Group with Steve Peplin/Neil Davis Duo Mamie's, Open Blues Jam w/Kenny J Mason Street Grill, Jamie Breiwick Group (5:30pm) McAuliffe's Pub (Racine), Jim Yorgan Sextet Miramar Theatre, Tuesday Open Mic w/host Sandy Weisto (sign-up 7:30pm, all-ages)) Potbelly Sandwich Shop (East Side), Texas Dave (12pm) The Jazz Gallery Center for the Arts, Jazz Jam Session Transfer Pizzeria Cafe, Transfer House Band w/Brenda Smith

WEDNESDAY, MAY 23

Art*Bar, Justin Howl Cactus Club, Chrome w/AK, Drugs Dragons & DJ Dolls Conway's Smokin' Bar & Grill, Open Jam w/Big Wisconsin Johnson Frank's Power Plant, The Bbys w/Orca Welles & Fellow Kinsman High Dive, The Voodoohoney Pirates Jazz Estate, Duo Sessions with Lou Cucunato Kochanski's Concertina Beer Hall, Polka Open Jam Linneman's Riverwest Inn, Acoustic Open Stage w/feature Gio-The Softone (sign-up 8:30pm, start 9pm) Mason Street Grill, Jamie Breiwick Group (5:30pm) Mezcalero Restaurant, Larry Lynne Trio Miramar Theatre, Boodah Darr w/Wave Chapelle, Lucien Parker, Marrated R & Trip (all-ages, 8pm) Morton's (Cedarburg), Jim Liban Combo w/Roger Brotherhood (6:30pm) Paulie's Field Trip, Humpday Jam w/Dave Wacker & Mitch Cooper Shank Hall, Ana Popovic w/Young Revelators The Cheel (Thiensville), Val Sigal w/Wayne Groth (6pm) The Packing House Restaurant, Carmen Nickerson & Kostia Efimov (6pm) Totalgame Sports Bar, Wacky Wednesdays w/host The Original Darryl Hill Westallion Brewing Company, Rick Holmes Pro Jam w/host Robert Allen Jr.

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34 | M AY 1 7 , 2 0 1 8 MZP24238_Shepherd_May17.indd 1

4/20/18 8:39 AM


::ONTHECOUCH

Something bugging you? Find out what the Shrink thinks

SPRING CLEANING BLUES Four steps to relieve anxiety over purging your chronic mess

My house is a disaster! There’s stuff all over the place. I’m out of closet space and there are piles everywhere. My sister calls me a hoarder. It all feels so overwhelming. I’m motivated to do a big Spring Cleaning, but I have no idea where to start. Help!

The Shrink Replies, Yep, it’s that time of year. We’ve all been sequestered inside for way too long and are feeling the itch to throw open the windows, air out the house and freshen things up. Unless you are one of those compulsively tidy people (enviable!) or live in an austere state of minimalism (worth considering!), you probably have at least a few chronically messy areas in your home. After being inside with our messes and piles all winter, the chronic issue feels more acute. Let’s seize the moment, and your motivation, and make a plan. Here’s a push to get you started. Break it Down. Go into each room, survey the situation and make a master “to-do” list. When you’re faced with what looks like an overwhelming task, your brain shuts down, your body freezes and Netflix beckons. Look at each room as a separate project, a house within a house. Start with “mandatory” items (e.g., fold and put away laundry that’s been in the basket for six weeks) then add some “optional” things (e.g. throw out those old, dusty candles and replace with one new fresh one.) Tape this list somewhere obvious in the room, like on the door. You’ll appreciate having had all of this thinking done when you’re ready to tackle the actual cleaning. Small is Beautiful. In each room there are drawers, closets and piles. So now add to each room’s master list some small, bite-size tasks. These tiny jobs are the things that will give you great satisfaction once you get started, because you’ll actually be able to cross things off your list much quicker than you think. SHEPHERD EXPRESS

Timing is Everything. What’s your cleaning style? Some people are marathon-binge cleaners. Once they set their minds to it, they muster superhuman energy and endurance and plow through a room in no time flat. Others do better with a daily vow to tackle one small job at a time. They might jump from room to room depending on the mood of the day, or they might finish a 15-minute task one day and a two-hour job the next. It doesn’t matter how you roll, it matters that you get rolling. Either approach results in the same reward: a list full of checkmarks and a neat, clean space that you can breathe in again. Purge, Purge, Purge. This is where your sister’s judgy comment about your “hoarding” comes in. There’s a difference between people who, clinically speaking, are pathological accumulators; their relationship with their “stuff” is just that—a relationship, and that’s why it takes a skilled interventionist to help a true hoarder part with their prized possessions. The majority of us are not true hoarders, but people who simply have too much stuff and not enough room for it. So back to the plan. In each room, do a look-around and decide which things are: 1. Essential for living. 2. Essential for joy. 3. Things to give away. 4. Things to throw away. 5. Things to decide the final fate of in 30 days. As you work you way around each area, you’ll look at and touch things that are typically out of your reach and view. Out of sight, out of mind? Conventional wisdom says if you haven’t used or worn something in a year, out with it. It’s not really that easy for people, but if you really are torn about an item and need to sleep on it, there’s always category 5! There are lots of books written on this subject; The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, Clear Your Clutter with Feng Shui, Minimalism, The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning, etc. The plot is similar in all of them: get rid of some things, keep the true gems of your existence in their rightful places and clean up on a regular basis. Sounds simple, but it’s not that easy for most of us. However, once you commit to making your living space one you feel happy to live in, you will feel great! Do it now, before the balmy summer weather arrives. You will soon be romping outdoors enjoying life knowing you’ll be returning home to a peaceful, relaxing, tidy place. On the Couch is written by a licensed mental health professional. Her advice is not meant to be a substitute for mental health care. Send your questions to onthecouch@shepex.com. Comment at shepherdexpress.com.

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M AY 1 7 , 2 0 1 8 | 35


FOODByFACT James Barrick

THEME CROSSWORD

PSYCHO SUDOKU! “Movie Sudoku”

Solve this as you would a regular sudoku, except using the nine given letters instead of numbers. When you’re done, each row, column, and 3x3 box will contain each of the nine given letters exactly one time. In addition, one row or column will reveal, either backward or forward, the name of a famous movie. psychosudoku@gmail.com

Y

L

B U

L I D F

Y D

A

© 2018 United Feature Syndicate, Dist. by Andrews McMeel Syndication

ACROSS 1. Date: Abbr. 5. Preferred reviews 10. Wood for hope chests 15. Ka-boom! 19. My sister’s 20. — wolfhound 21. In reserve 22. Precept 23. Sphere 24. — brevis 25. Cramp 26. Seed appendage 27. Old word for “laud” 29. Tag 31. First-aid essential 33. River in France 34. “Pomp and Circumstance” composer 35. Abbr. in bus. 36. A letter 37. Start of a quip by Eddie Murphy: 4 wds. 41. City in the Gem State 42. Commedia dell’— 43. Certainly not! 44. Navigational aid: Abbr. 47. Wild water buffalo 48. Old Greek city-state 50. Charger 51. Valise 52. Performers’ union 53. Pirogue 54. Pinch 55. Thicket 56. More achy 57. Glides over snow 58. Kicked 59. Part 2 of quip: 5 wds. 64. Coats with a powdery substance 65. Pets 66. Nostrils 36 | M A Y 1 7 , 2 0 1 8

67. Curtail 68. Barbarous one 70. Young haddock 71. Books pro, for short 74. Made a hole-in-one 75. Flows 76. Strange 77. Sound loudly 78. Snood 79. Rose oil 80. Kind of jacket 81. Medicinal plant 82. End of the quip: 5 wds. 86. Deplete 89. Compass pt. 90. Fruits of the blackthorn 91. Backslide 92. Name in a Defoe title 94. Sacred song 95. Clip 98. “— She Sweet” 99. Indigenous Alaskan 101. Braid 103. Mob boss 104. Plexus 105. Literary category 106. Term in grammar 107. Cookie brand 108. Imperfection 109. Ceased 110. More wise 111. — -in-the-wool DOWN 1. The Pequod’s captain 2. “Le — Goriot” 3. Settling an anticipated debt 4. Russian noble: Var. 5. Francesca da — 6. Come to be 7. Clamp 8. Serpentine letter 9. Edible bulbs 10. Arab citadel

11. Speaker of a constructed language 12. Face 13. Classifieds 14. Sent 15. Hardware item 16. Sensational 17. Garment shape: Hyph. 18. Ruckus 28. Tennis great 30. Shivering fit 32. Bouquet 34. Eagle’s nest 35. Reception 37. Mythical king of Argos 38. Ibsen character 39. Aplenty 40. DC bigwig 44. Persona non — 45. Colorado’s — Peak 46. Raced 48. Lover of Helen 49. Sockdolager 50. Helvetian 51. Burgeons 53. Tribunal 54. Flat-bodied fish 55. Used an auger 56. Calamari 57. Data, for short 58. Metalloid element

59. Juvenile heroine 60. Orbiting body 61. Shiatsu 62. Part of LA 63. Get along 64. Creme caramel 68. Davis or Midler 69. 500 sheets 70. Casino offering 71. Hundredth anniversary 72. Glass piece 73. Arkin or Alda 75. Time long past: 2 wds. 76. Shots 77. Seed vessel: Arch. 79. Part of AD 80. Organic compound 81. Cal. abbr. 83. Winged 84. Pascal or Zabini 85. Pasch 86. Muffler 87. Sprite in a play 88. — del Este 93. Cook in water 94. Await judgment 95. Tooth 96. Foil cousin 97. Crucifix 100. Writer Deighton 102. Grassland

Solution to last week’s puzzle

Y U

A I N G V R O M I T R C Y F U L L C U T E O U U I R I S A I A L N

R F R N

I

F U R R I

D U

5/10 Solution

L

D

WORD FIND This is a theme puzzle with the subject stated below. Find the listed words in the grid. (They may run in any direction but always in a straight line. Some letters are used more than once.) Ring each word as you find it and when you have completed the puzzle, there will be 16 letters left over. They spell out the alternative theme of the puzzle.

Time to Rug Up Solution: 16 Letters

© 2018 Australian Word Games Dist. by Creators Syndicate Inc.

F

A J B A T R O N I Z O L C M M E T R Y I C A C K P L A C E U M M O X A A N O G D A I Q I U R A C R I F I C T S

Boots Break Buller Coat Comfortable Cosy Dams Dark Drinks Drop Edges Fall FIS Fog Fresh Gates Glare Grey

Handkerchief Hat Hire Hole Ice Icy Jacket Jindabyne Lakes Leg Lone Lost Mist Nature Neve Numb Omeo

Rain Run Ski Sleet Slick Sneeze Snow Socks Soup Stem Sun Trees Urge Warm Wax Wet Yaouk

5/10 Solution: These women are famous for a reason

Solution: Winter playground

S W

P S Y C H O L O G I S T

Creators Syndicate

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Date: 5/17/18 SHEPHERD EXPRESS


::FREEWILLASTROLOGY ::BY ROB BREZSNY TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A chemist named Marcellus Gilmore Edson got a patent on peanut butter in 1894. A businessperson named George Bayle started selling peanut butter as a snack in 1894. In 1901, a genius named Julia David Chandler published the first recipe for a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. In 1922, another pioneer came up with a new process for producing peanut butter that made it taste better and last longer. In 1928, two trailblazers invented loaves of sliced bread, setting the stage for the ascension of the peanut butter and jelly sandwich to its full glory. According to my analysis, Taurus, you’re partway through your own process of generating a very practical marvel. I suspect you’re now at a phase equivalent to Julia David Chandler’s original recipe. Onward! Keep going! GEMINI (May 21-June 20): One of the most popular brands of candy in North America is Milk Duds. They’re irregularly shaped globs of chocolate caramel. When they were first invented in 1926, the manufacturer’s plan was to make them perfect little spheres. But with the rather primitive technology available at that time, this proved impossible. The finished products were blobs, not globes. They tasted good, though. Workers jokingly suggested that the new confection’s name include “dud,” a word meaning “failure” or “flop.” Having sold well now for more than 90 years, Milk Duds have proved that success doesn’t necessarily require perfection. Who knows? Maybe their dud-ness has been an essential part of their charm. I suspect there’s a metaphorical version of Milk Duds in your future, Gemini. CANCER (June 21-July 22): In my vision of your life in the coming weeks, you’re hunting for the intimate power that you lost a while back. After many twists and trials, you find it almost by accident in a seemingly unimportant location, a place you have paid little attention to for a long time. When you recognize it, and realize you can reclaim it, your demeanor transforms. Your eyes brighten, your skin glows, your body language galvanizes. A vivid hope arises in your imagination: how to make that once-lost, now-rediscovered power come alive again and be of use to you in the present time. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The etymological dictionary says that the English slang word “cool” meant “calmly audacious” as far back as 1825. The term “groovy” was first used by jazz musicians in the 1930s to signify “performing well without grandstanding.” “Hip,” which was originally “hep,” was also popularized by the jazz community. It meant, “informed, aware, up-to-date.” I’m bringing these words to your attention because I regard them as your words of power in the coming weeks. You can be and should be as hip, cool and groovy as you have been in a long time. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I hope you will seek out influences that give you grinning power over your worries. I hope you’ll be daring enough to risk a breakthrough in service to your most demanding dream. I hope you will make an effort to understand yourself as your best teacher might understand you. I hope you will find out how to summon more faith in yourself—a faith not rooted in lazy wishes but in a rigorous self-assessment. Now here’s my prediction: You will fulfill at least one of my hopes, and probably more. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The Polish pianist Ignacy Jan Paderewski once performed for England’s Queen Victoria. Since she possessed that bygone era’s equivalent of a backstage pass, she was able to converse with him after the show. “You’re a genius,” she told him, having been impressed with his artistry. “Perhaps, Your Majesty,” Paderewski said. “But before that I was a drudge.” He meant that he had labored long and hard before reaching the mastery the queen attributed to him. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you Libras are currently in an extended “drudge” phase of your own. That’s a good thing! Take maximum advantage of this opportunity to slowly and surely improve your skills. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The ancient Greek poet Simonides was among the first of his profession to charge a fee for his services. He made money by composing verses on demand. On one occasion, he was asked to write a stir-

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ring tribute to the victor of a mule race. He declined, declaring that his sensibilities were too fine to create art for such a vulgar activity. In response, his potential patron dramatically boosted the proposed price. Soon thereafter, Simonides produced a rousing ode that included the phrase “wind-swift steeds.” I offer the poet as a role model for you in the coming weeks, Scorpio. Be more flexible than usual about what you’ll do to get the reward you’d like. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Here’s the operative metaphor for you these days: You’re like a painter who has had a vision of an interesting work of art you could create—but who lacks some of the paint colors you would require to actualize this art. You may also need new types of brushes you haven’t used before. So here’s how I suggest you proceed: Be aggressive in tracking down the missing ingredients or tools that will enable you to accomplish your as-yet imaginary masterpiece. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Useful revelations and provocative epiphanies are headed your way. But they probably won’t arrive sheathed in sweetness and light, accompanied by tinkling swells of celestial music. It’s more likely they’ll come barging in with a clatter, bringing bristly marvels and rough hope. In a related matter: At least one breakthrough is in your imminent future. But this blessing is more likely to resemble a wrestle in the mud than a dance on a mountaintop. None of this should be a problem, however! I suggest you enjoy the rugged but interesting fun. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): One of the saddest aspects of our lives as humans is the disparity between love and romance. Real love is hard work. It’s unselfish, unwavering and rooted in generous empathy. Romance, on the other hand, tends to be capricious and inconstant, often dependent on the fluctuations of mood and chemistry. Is there anything you could do about this crazymaking problem, Aquarius? Like could you maybe arrange for your romantic experiences to be more thoroughly suffused with the primal power of unconditional love? I think this is a realistic request, especially in the coming weeks. You will have exceptional potential to bring more compassion and spiritual affection into your practice of intimacy. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In accordance with astrological omens, I invite you to dream up new rituals. The traditional observances and ceremonies bequeathed to you by your family and culture may satisfy your need for comfort and nostalgia, but not your need for renewal and reinvention. Imagine celebrating homemade rites of passage designed not for who you once were but for the new person you’ve become. You may be delighted to discover how much power they provide you to shape your life’s long-term cycles. Ready to conjure up a new ritual right now? Take a piece of paper and write down two fears that inhibit your drive to create a totally interesting kind of success for yourself. Then burn that paper and those fears in the kitchen sink while chanting “I am a swashbuckling incinerator of fears!” ARIES (March 21-April 19): According to my assessment of the astrological omens, your duty right now is to be a brave observer and fair-minded intermediary and honest storyteller. Your people need you to help them do the right thing. They require your influence in order to make good decisions. So if you encounter lazy communication, dispel it with your clear and concise speech. If you find that foggy thinking has started to infect important discussions, inject your clear and concise insights. Homework: Do something that you will remember with pride and passion until the end of your days. Testify at freewillastrology.com. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

::NEWS OF THE WEIRD ::BY THE EDITORS OF ANDREWS MCMEEL SYNDICATION

He Always Ran Number Two

N

eighbors of the so-called “Pooperintendent”—a New Jersey school superintendent nabbed for repeatedly relieving himself on a high school running track—were nonplussed by the news. Thomas Tramaglini, 42, superintendent of schools in nearby Kenilworth, N.J., was charged on Monday, April 30, in Holmdel Municipal Court for defecating in public, lewdness and littering after being caught on surveillance video relieving himself on a daily basis during his run at the Holmdel High School track, which is about three miles from Tramaglini’s home. But neighbors told nj.com that Tramaglini always struck them as a nice guy, “Except for pooping on the field,” one added.

Art Au Naturel The Palais de Tokyo, a contemporary art museum in Paris, France, has made a name for itself by granting special visiting hours to nudists. On Saturday, May 5, Reuters reported that naturists were invited to tour an exhibit, with about 160 attendees taking advantage of the sans-clothing event. Paris is seeing an increase in naturist events, according to Julien Claude-Penegry, communications director of the Paris Naturists Association. “The naturists’ way of life is to be naked. Naturists are pushing past barriers, taboos or mentalities that were obstructive,” he said. Next up for French nudists: a clubbing night later this year.

Maybe it was Mellow Yellow? Angelique Sanchez, 26, of Denver was asked to provide a urine sample for a prospective employer on Thursday, May 3, so, of course, she stopped off at a 7-Eleven store en route to apply the final touch: She put the urine-filled bottle in a microwave and turned it on, whereupon the bottle exploded. A 7-Eleven clerk, who observed a “yellow liquid dripping from the microwave,” confronted

Sanchez, who quickly wiped down the microwave and the floor underneath and walked out. KUSA TV reported that police caught up with her and issued a summons for damaged property. Medical expert Comilla Sasson guessed that Sanchez was trying to restore the sample to body temperature.

Where There’s Smoke There’s “Fire!” When Leroy Mason, 68, of Barton, Vt., takes care of a problem, he doesn’t do things halfway. On Monday, April 30, as his smoke detector blared yet again, Mason aimed his 20-gauge shotgun at the cursed piece of electronics and fired twice. The detector was blown to bits, but unfortunately, the shots also hit the adjoining wall of an occupied apartment. Fire and EMS crews called to the scene had been there before (according to a Vermont State Police news release quoted by Boston25 News) as “Mr. Mason has complained in the past about frequent false alarms and was upset that fire crews would not relocate the detector.” When first responders relieved him of his shotgun, Mason rearmed himself with a Colt .45 handgun and demanded his shotgun back. Mason was finally subdued and charged with aggravated assault with a weapon and reckless endangerment.

When At First You Don’t Succeed… Wednesday, April 11, was a great day for Markiko Sonnie Lewis of Maple Heights, Ohio: He got out of jail after a stint in state prison for robbing a Cleveland Key Bank branch in 2015. To celebrate his newfound freedom, Lewis returned to the same bank on the next day and robbed it again, according to WIOI, leaving with about $1,000. Lewis was indicted on Tuesday, May 1, with one count of bank robbery.

Not Exactly Police Officer of the Year Caliber Jose Arreola, 49, of Bellflower, Calif., was more angry than scared when a police officer drew a gun on him on Friday, March 16, mistakenly thinking Arreola had stolen a $1.19 roll of Mentos. A security camera at an Orange County service station captured the incident, showing Arreola placing the Mentos on the counter along with a $20 bill. As he waited for his change, Arreola put the mints in his pocket, which is when an off-duty officer behind him pulled a gun out of the pocket of his hoody and ordered him to put the mints back on the counter. When the clerk confirmed Arreola had paid, the officer said, “My apologies.” © 2018 ANDREWS MCMEEL SYNDICATION M AY 1 7 , 2 0 1 8 | 37


THEBACK::ARTFORART’SSAKE

Spooky Action at a Distance ::BY ART KUMBALEK

I

’m Art Kumbalek and man oh manischewitz what a world, ain’a? Listen, I’m way past due to get my campaign to be your governor off on the good foot; so time to meet with mine own brain trust up over by the Uptowner tavern/ charm school situated at the corner of Hysteric Center Street & Humboldt. Come along if you’d like, but you buy the first round. Let’s get going. Herbie: A toast to our Supreme Court that we can now all be millionaires thanks to their green light for all kinds of sports betting. Fellas, time to grab a seat on the gravy train about to pull into the station. Little Jimmy Iodine: Soon as I come up with a spare couple, three grand, I’m putting it on the Cleveland Browns to go unbeaten and win the Super Bowl next year. Herbie: I swear the Russians have learned to dick with our U.S. weather through their fancy commie computers, I kid you not. Ray: And somehow Putin will fix it so’s the torture queen what’s-her-name Gina Haspel is top spook at the CIA and before you know it all American Democrats get a ride on the Catherine wheel before getting stuffed into the iron maiden. Emil: I wonder if they had torture on the Star Trek

Enterprise that we never learned about. Ernie: You talk like a sausage, Emil. Of course they would’ve had to what-you-call “tortureâ€? at some point. Listen, you’re on a five-year mission for the United Federation of Planets to explore strange, new worlds and every time you turn around, all you’re getting is some-kind-of shit from space aliens whose only purpose in the universe is to fock you up; and not in a good way. Julius: Sounds logical. I can imagine that while the Captain Quirk and that pointy-eared Nimrod what’shis-name are shoveling their dime-store philosophy in front of the cameras up on the bridge of the ship, deep in the bowels are a couple-three beefy redshirt uncredited crew members kicking the ever-loving crap out of some three-eyed squishy-headed piece-of-work from the planet Upyerz II, ’cause they’re trying to get this pus-bag to fess up to messing with one of those bullshit crystals focking Scotty was always whining about, ain’a? Little Jimmy Iodine: Hey, Artie! Over here. Put a load on your keister. Art: Hey gents. What do you hear, what do you know. Emil: I hear there was torture on the Star Trek Enterprise. Art: If the Geneva Convention covered acting, I suppose a William Shatner line-reading could be‌ construed as‌ ag-‌ ainst‌ the rule‌ s. Little Jimmy: He always did seem a little wooden, ain’a? Ray: He was the only actor on that show who didn’t go to make-up before a scene. They used varnish instead. Ernie: I watched some old Star Trek movies last weekend ’cause it’s been a while, so what the fock. Remember Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan?

Herbie: Fockin’A. That’s the one where Ricardo Montalban with long hair looks like Kellyanne Conway with big knockers, ain’a? Julius: No. I thought he looked more like the other Republican bitchharpy, Ann Coulter, but with bigger knockers. Ray: “De ship! De ship!� Yeah, TV’s “Mr. Roarke� with the hair and a set of jugs, por favor, not my kind of fantasy. But I’ll tell you’s, when Rumpel-thinskin gets kicked out of office, he can be the bad guy in a Star Trek movie called “The Wrath of Con.� Art: I never saw that Khan movie ’cause it’s like Groucho said, he never went to a picture where the leading man’s tits were bigger than the leading lady’s. Ernie: Doesn’t it always seem like the future’s here before you know it and when it shows up, it’s like “big focking deal�? Julius: You got a point, Ernie. There was that movie, “2001: Space something-or-another� that was actually made in 1968. So what the fock, it’s 2018 now and we still haven’t stepped on another planet? Emil: You’re full of a crap. I seem to recall that as a species we’ve been to the moon, have we not, Mr. Einstein?

Ernie: Fock the moon. All those millions and millions of dollars spent so a couple, three flyboys could knock a golf ball around a place that looks just like the middle of Nevada but without all the gambling and legalized prostitution. Like I said: Big focking deal. Little Jimmy: The future has always been hard to figure for mankind. Again, like Groucho said: “Time flies like an arrow; fruit flies like a banana.� Herbie: And don’t forget, about man’s yearning for knowledge of his place in the universe, he said: “Outside of a dog, a book is man’s best friend. Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read.� (Hey, it’s getting late and I know you got to go, but thanks for letting us bend your ear, ’cause I’m Art Kumbalek and I told you so.)

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4UI4U'SBOLMJO 8*t 38 | M AY 1 7 , 2 0 1 8

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