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October 2008 Vol. 3 Issue 10


Fun and Games It’s All

THESE WISE MEN COULD NOT HAVE SAID IT BETTER: “It’s fun to have fun, but you have to know how.” D

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“When I grow up, I want to be a little boy.” J

Get Your Game On

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Shell Point residents and

ple play here at Shell

staff are a hard-working

Point. You’ll find this

bunch. You’ll find staff

compendium of gaming

working 24 hours a day –

groups starting on page 7.

seven days a week – and res-

As we were working on

idents put in thousands of

this story, we included the

volunteer hours a year, serv-

topic of bridge, but we re-

ing their community. But as

alized that there were so

the saying goes, all work and

many different bridge

no play makes us all very dull boys and girls

groups that they landed in a feature dedi-

indeed.

cated to the royal game of kings and queens

Plus, you can’t talk about games with-

to have some fun! And that is what this

out consulting our own Game Meister –

month’s issue of Shell Point Life is all about

Ted Yeatts – read all about him on page 3. Of course, Ted does not have a mo-

As we started doing the research for

nopoly on fun. This month you’ll also meet

this issue, we found that there were so

resident Jim Hooper who has discovered

many groups centered around creating in-

geocaching, the new method for treasure

teresting play and recreational opportuni-

hunting in the twenty-first century. Meet

ties, we realized that we had to postpone

Jim on page 11. Then enjoy your own ad-

covering sporting groups such as golf and

venture and try your hand with the series

tennis for another issue later on.

of treasure hunts outlined on page 16.

So, let’s roll the dice and get this game issue started! We begin with an in-depth article that takes a look at some of the games peo-

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“It is a happy talent to know how to play.” R

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E

M E R S O N

“No man is a failure who is enjoying life.” W

F

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E AT H E R

“Play is the highest form of research.” A

L B E R T

E

I N S T E I N

“Time you enjoyed wasting is not wasted time.” T.S. E

L L I O T

on page 20.

ation to help balance our lives. So, it’s time

– fun and games!

E L L E R

“If you watch a game, it’s fun. If you play it, it’s recreation. If you work at it, it’s golf.”

By Lynn Schneider, Editor

That’s why we need play and recre-

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O S E P H

In fact, this issue is chockablock with fun games and puzzles. So get your game on as we get serious about having fun at Shell Point!

ON THE COVER Resident Jim Hooper finds geocaching to be the perfect hobby.

Shell Point Life is published monthly for the residents of Shell Point Retirement Community. Editor Lynn Schneider Assistant Editor Rochelle Cherniawski Art Director Rich Cerrina Graphic Designer Wendy Iverson Contributors Gene McGonigle, Teri Kollath, Peggy Holton Linda Rakos, Robyn Church, Rachael Dula, Carol Cooper, Tom Frackenpohl, Jessica Clark, Mary Franklin, Bev Rademacher, Ted Yeatts, Linda Hicks, Jason Powers, Josh Strnad, Glenda Stephenson, Chuck Durrell, Sue Taylor

Do you have story ideas or photos to share? Contact Rochelle Cherniawski, communications specialist, by calling 239-454-2055 or e-mail: rochellecherniawski@shellpoint.org. Or you may submit suggestions in writing to Rochelle Cherniawski at the Shell Point Welcome Center.

15101 Shell Point Boulevard • Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 466-1131 • www.shellpoint.org Shell Point is a non-profit ministry of The Christian and Missionary Alliance Foundation, Inc.

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Shell Point Life | October 2008


The

Game Meister Move over Pat Sajak

Ted Yeatts Would Like to Take a Spin B

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You can’t talk about games at Shell Point without consulting our own Game Meister – Ted Yeatts. Ted is one of those folks that you would swear is made of cork – no matter what, he always just bounces to the surface and nothing gets him down! Ted’s job is a “puzzle”-ing “house of cards” as he “scrabbles” each month to “bridge” the gap between residents and fun. He “pools” Shell Point’s resources to create a “shuffle” of interesting and fun things to do each month, although it can sometimes be a challenging “risk” to come up with something new. Just don’t ask him to spell “Bingo” since it has never been one of the games that Ted, a master of gameology, has had to rely on. Ted is a program coordinator in the Resort Services department, and his responsibilities include planning the monthly programs that occur each month at Shell Point. His energy, enthusiasm, and fun-loving spirit make him the perfect person for the job. Florida Sunshine Ted is that rare species – a native Floridian. He was born and raised in Venice, Florida, which is just south of Sarasota here on the southwest coast of the state. When it came to games, Ted enjoyed playing games as a young boy with his brother Gavin. “We played a lot of games, when we were kids and we always got a new board game each Christmas,” said Ted. When Ted was sixteen, he began attending church and became very active in his church’s youth group. Ted attended the University of Florida where he received a Bachelor’s Continued on page 4

Shell Point Life | October 2008

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The Game Meister Continued from page 3

degree in Religion. “This confuses a lot of people because they think it is a divinity degree,” explained Ted. “Actually, it is the study of the world’s religions and is in essence a study of people. This degree included a lot of sociology and the study of different cultures from around the world. “Interest in this particular course of study increased dramatically after the 9-11 bombing of the World Trade Center in New York because so many people realized how much religion plays a role in how the world works,” he said. Serving Others Ted graduated from UF in 2001 and worked at The Salvation Army in Gainesville for three years as a program coordinator. “I ran all of the organization’s community and church programs for all ages,” said Ted. “A lot of people don’t realize that The Salvation Army is a church. My work with The Salvation Army was very important in my life because it totally changed how I viewed the work of the church. “The Salvation Army position really emphasized the importance of service to others, and it changed my life,” said Ted. “People define service a lot of ways, but it definitely changed my definition.” Ted was responsible for the various programs at The Salvation Army, such as the youth programs which included grades first through eighth. “When I

started with the organization, the programs were basically a ‘free for all,’ but I made the recruitment of volunteers an important part of the curriculum so that we would have more people to help maintain order with all the kids.” Ted also helped open a college student center. He ran the program and encouraged college students to get involved with the programs The Salvation Army offered. This is where Ted met his wife, Leah, who was one of the college student volunteers at the time. The couple got married following Leah’s graduation in 2005 and moved to Fort Myers where Ted took a position as the Program and Operations Director at The Salvation Army. Ted left The Salvation Army in June 2006, to go back to school. “I had always considered going back to school for my masters,” he said. Ted is currently completing the final semester for his Masters of Public Administration at FGCU and should be finished in December. Meanwhile, Leah is a sixth grade junior high school world history teacher at Oak Hammock Middle School in East Fort Myers. Shell Point Standards Ted came to Shell Point in June of 2007, and has been juggling his new career with his studies very effectively. “I was attracted to Shell Point when I visited the community for a Season of Praise concert. When Leah and I came to the community, our host for the evening gave us a tour of the island, and I connected that tour with some of the experiences I had in dealing with residents who had volunteered previ-

ously at The Salvation Army. I realized Shell Point wasn’t just any retirement community. I could tell it was something special. “There are so many things that impress me about Shell Point,” said Ted. “I am impressed every day by the level of professionalism here, which makes me a better coordinator than I would ever be somewhere else. I love the residents, and I think they are incredible people. “The standards at Shell Point are very high, which is good because it keeps me creative and I need something that is challenging and stimulating in my work.” Resort Services plans a broad variety of activities and programs each month to stimulate a wide and diverse audience of people. “We want a range of programming that will appeal to the diverse population we have here at Shell Point,” he said. “Music, sports, games, arts and culture, and so much more.” Of course, Ted does not have a “monopoly” on fun. Many residents help each month by planning and running some of the various game and group activities. “I hope that the residents will connect with one another more than anything. That’s probably why I always say things like bring a friend or neighbor, or come and join your friends and neighbors,” he said. “I think our role in Resort Services of connecting people, building relationships, and creating a sense of community is very important.” Maybe that’s why Ted takes having fun so seriously!

Ted Yeatts

Enjoy Games? Come on Down! Ted Yeatts and SPTV Launch New Trivia Game Show Resort Services invites you to attend the unveiling of Shelleopardy! Ted Yeatts has joined forces with SPTV to create a new trivia game show that is based on the popular television show Jeopardy. “We wanted to continue the tradition of hosting fun game shows here at Shell Point but with a new twist.” There will be five categories of general knowledge questions with fun and fantastic prizes for the winner. Multiple rounds will

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Shell Point Life | October 2008

allow for more players to participate, and each player will receive a Shelleopardy T-shirt. Plus, members of the audience will get in on the action and can win prizes too! “This is a lot of fun, because you will know these players,” said Ted. “They are you, your friends, and neighbors! It is always very hu-

morous and spontaneous.” Ted and the Shelleopardy crew invite you to attend the game show program to be held in the Grand Cypress Room in The Woodlands on Tuesday, October 14, at 1:00 p.m. Plus, the entire event will be filmed and replayed at a later date on SPTV.


DO NOT DELAY… PURCHASE YOUR FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS CONCERT SERIES TICKETS TODAY! B

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We know our residents can spot a great deal when they see it! Many of you have already taken advantage of the savings and purchased your Fine and Performing Arts Concert tickets. You can save $50 by purchasing the entire series of five concerts for only $125. That is only $25 a concert! This is a true bargain when you could expect to pay well over that at other concert halls.

A Musical Extravaganza 2008-2009 Season This season has something for everyone. Our first concert, scheduled for November 13, kicks off the season with the exciting brass quintet, Canadian Brass. “The enthralling sound of a brass choir…programs that feature virtu-

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osic musicianship, masterful interpretations and flashes of humor…repertoire that encompasses Bach to blues-all these ingredients make the Canadian Brass the world’s leading brass ensemble.” (Washington Post). January welcomes to the stage Chanticleer, considered “the world’s reigning male chorus,” by The New Yorker magazine. This year they were named by Musical America as the 2008 Musical Ensemble of the Year. You don’t want to miss the recording artist, Butch Thompson, a master for 40 years of traditional jazz and ragtime. Also featured will be nationally recognized jazz soloist, Topsy Chapman, along with the Chapman family Singers. What better way to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day than with the Irish favorite, Cherish the Ladies. They have grown from a onetime concert concept to an Irish traditional music sensation, literally the most successful and sought-after Irish-American group in Celtic music. They have been chosen Best Musical Group of the Year by Concert Series BBC. sponsored in part by: In April to close the concert series, we welcome Peter Richard Conte, Grand Court Organist of the world famous Wanamaker Organ in Philadelphia’s Macys department store. He is a skillful performer and

Cherish the Ladies

arranger of organ transcriptions, who is featured on National Public Radio and appeared on ABCs television shows, Good Morning America and World News Tonight.

Last Chance to Save $50 Where else can you hear these quality performers in a series of diverse musical offerings for only $25 a concert? Don’t delay because you have only until the first concert to purchase the entire series at the discounted price. After November 13th, the individual ticket price is $35, which is still a reasonable price for an evening of fine music. But why wait? Act now and save!

Tickets Make a Great Gift Idea Over the past couple of years we have seen several residents getting creative in their ticket purchases. They have purchased pairs of series tickets and then divided them out to give to family and friends as holiday, birthday or anniversary gifts. Now there’s a great giftgiving idea! Act now! Call the ticket desk for more information at 454-2067. Purchase your concert series tickets before the Canadian Brass concert and save $50.

The Canadian Brass

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The Games People Play A T

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Charlotte Bathon (Eagles Preserve), Lila Williamson (Periwinkle), Wanda Gerdis (Eagles Preserve), Karen Liberles (Eagles Preserve), Kay Storm (Parkwood)

Many people think retirement is, well, retiring, but that couldn’t be further from the truth at Shell Point. There are so many forms of personal growth, recreation, and activity here that residents often joke that they are busier now than when they were working full-time. Of course, many residents are busy with a variety of hobbies and personal projects that they always wanted to attempt but never had the time for in their earlier years. Add into the mix the thousands (literally!) of volunteer hours our residents work every year throughout the community, sprinkle in a few adult education classes just to keep the mind active, add a few trips both near and far, stir in a daily physical fitness regimen and it seems impossible that they might find the time for some fun and games! But just as with everything they do here at Shell Point, the fun and games are terrific, and most of them are organized and led by (you

guessed it!) Shell Point residents. Let’s take a look at just a few of the many games people play here at Shell Point. And if you are new to the community, then perhaps one of these might pique your interest. Remember, there’s always room for one more at the card table, bocce ball court, Scrabble board, or table tennis!

Mah-Jongg Mania Mah-Jongg was introduced to Shell Point in 2001. Since then this intriguing game of strategy has really caught on and captured the interest of several residents who enjoy the stimulating play. The earliest accounts of the Chinese strategy game, Mah-Jongg, date back to the nineteenth century. It came to the United States in the 1920s, where it quickly caught on in New York. The game was played pri-

marily by women and became a popular fad all around America. The rules of the game are similar to the card game Rummy but played with tiles instead of cards. Players try to match their tiles into prescribed hands. Mah-Jongg is a bit complicated and not especially easy to learn, but the challenge is part of the fun. Mah-Jongg is played at Shell Point every week as two groups meet, one in the Library Lounge on The Island and one in the Sabal Room in The Woodlands. Anyone who is interested in learning to play is invited to attend. For further information contact Lila Williamson (Periwinkle) at 433-0088 or Marie Marinin (Oakmont) at 466-9190.

Plenty of Pinochle On Monday evenings in the fall and Continued on page 8

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The Games People Play at Shell Point Continued from page 7

Table Tennis Is Tops

Pinochle players L-R Back row : Jim Heckler (Rosemont), Fred Fix (Lakewood), George McKinnel (Junonia), Richard Davis (Arbor). Middle Row: Beverly Berty (Sand Dollar), Harriet Heckler (Rosemont), Fran Herman (Periwinkle), Mary McGinnis (Arbor). Front row: June Bridges (Arbor), Mary Schubert (Nautilus), and June McKinnel (Junonia). P HO TO S B Y C HUC K D URREL L

winter, the Pinochle group welcomes a mix of residents – both men and women from all over the Shell Point community— to the Sabal Room in The Woodlands to enjoy this pleasant card game. Pinochle is a game based upon the concepts of bidding and taking tricks. It is a derivative of an old French game called Bezique or Binochle. Eventually, the name Binochle was mispronounced, misspelled Pinochle, and the name stuck. The Shell Point Pinochle group provides new players with rule sheets to help them keep track of the game. They sometimes play team-based partner games, and occasionally they play more cutthroat three-way matches. Group leader Harriett Heckler is quick to point out that they’re not an overly competitive bunch, though. “We don’t go for blood when we play,” she says. “We’re pretty lenient. The point isn’t winning; it’s just to get people together and have fun.” If you’d like to try your hand at Pinochle, give Harriett Heckler (Rosemont) a call at 481-7949.

ers of all skill levels, so why not drop by for some mental exercise. This activity is so informal that there is no designated leader. So, for more information, just stop by and watch (or play) a game.

Get Word Wise at Scrabble Get a “double letter score” when you play Scrabble in the Island Library Lounge on Mondays at 1:15. This is not an official group. Like chess, this is an informal group and anyone can stop by and join in playing a game.

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Lois Overpeck (Arbor) and Eleanor Whitecar (Cameo)

Wendell Shingler (Tellidora), Dayton Slayter (Sand Dollar), and Russell Peters (Cameo)

Shell Point Life | October 2008

Table Tennis brings out a crowd.

players even bringing their own paddles. There are actually two different sessions, one of which is for advanced players. Although anyone is welcome to give it a try, it’s fairly competitive. As such, it is not really for beginners but is intended more for seasoned players, looking for a challenge. As Don puts it, “We play to win.” Perhaps you might like to give it a try. For information contact Don Schneff (Royal Bonnet) at 481-5224.

Get the Ball in the Pocket

Match Wits with Chess Shell Point’s chess players are a friendly group of residents that meets for play in the Island Library Lounge every Wednesday and Saturday at 1:00 p.m. They always welcome new play-

Shell Point’s Table Tennis group has had a lot to be happy about recently, with the future installment of new flooring in their meeting place, the Tarpon Room, and a recent addition of a brand new table. Several times a week at 1:15 p.m. in the afternoon, men and women meet for fast, fierce, and friendly competition. Oh, and did we say, fun? This group really enjoys the game, and spending time with each other. Often there are even more people in the audience watching and cheering them. “It’s good exercise and great for handeye coordination,” says group leader Rev. Don Schneff of Royal Bonnet. This group takes the game fairly seriously, with many

Every Monday from 9:15 to 11:00 a.m., the pool sharks in the Billiards group meet right on cue to sink a few balls in the Resident Activities Center on The Island. It’s a game of wits and skill, a game in which players rely on a keen eyes and a cool mind. The game? 9 Ball. The rules? Fairly simple. As the name suggests, the game starts with nine balls on the table. What follows is a rotation of players in which they take turns pocketing the balls in numerical order, starting


with ball number 1. Whoever scores with the 9 ball wins the game. The Billiards group plays this variation of pool, particularly because of the virtue of its flexibility. Any number of players can play, and they can enter or leave at any time while the game is in progress and not affect the flow of Rick Johnston (Turban), Ray Nandal (Nautilus), John LIttlejohn (Tellidora), Carol Chihocky (Periwinkle) the competition. Anyone is welBill Wilson (King’s Crown), Jim Straup (Macoma) and Pat Powning (Lucina) come to play, including men, women, and children, for a good game of billiards can be a great family activ- ideal activity for everyone, ity. For more information on this fun group because although it’s an accontact Ray Nandal (Nautilus) at 481-0687. tive game that takes you outdoors, it’s not physically taxing and doesn’t require a great deal of strength to Shuffleboard’s history in Europe dates play. It’s also very easy to back more than 500 years. It was played learn but challenging among royalty, and at one point King Henry enough to remain fun. VIII even went so far as to make it illegal for The Shuffleboard group commoners to play. meets every Monday mornFortunately for present-day Shell Point- ing at 9:15 a.m. until Noers, everyone is allowed — and encouraged vember. On November 1, — to join in a game at the shuffleboard they will meet every Moncourts, which are located behind the Resi- day at 1:15 p.m. Contact dent Activity Center on The Island. There Herman Bips (King’s Crown) Bob Foote (Cellana), Herman Bips (King’s Crown), Harvey Stahle (Turban), Anne Parton (Rosemont) and Dayton Slayter (Sand Dollar) are plenty of openings for new players. It’s an at 267-2959.

Swing into Shuffleboard


THE HISTORY OF SHELL POINT

CHAPTER EIGHT – HARD TIMES a time of great sacrifice by the residents in terms of paying The mid-1970s were difficult years for Shell Point. more and expecting less, resident relations actually improved The economy was on a downturn, and the expense of during this time period. Upon arriving at his new office on his building the Mid-rises caused problems with the comfirst day as Executive Director, Bernard King walked to the munity’s cash flow. Shell Point had been borrowing large wall of windows overlooking the community’s center money to pay its debt, and the community was on the courtyard and flung open the heavy drapes, announcing that verge of financial disaster. This time of financial crisis was his office would be open for inspection at any time to anyone. deeply troubling to the Board of Directors. In 1977 Dr. There would be no secrecy between Dr. King and the resiBernard King, the board treasurer for The Christian and Bernard King dents. Every decision would be made with candor. It was a Missionary Alliance, was appointed to the role of Execsymbolic gesture, but an important one. utive Director for Shell Point. As a former treasurer, King had the knowledge and the fortitude to stem Shell Point’s financial The community slowly began to recover, and a snapshot of the losses, but it was a trying time for the community as layoffs of emIsland at that time would include Tellidora, Nautilus, Macoma, ployees and severe budget cuts caused a deep ripple of anxiety Royal Bonnet, Cameo, Periwinkle, Coquina, Sand Dollar, Cellana, throughout the organization. King, however, was forthright with the Junonia, Turban, Lucina, the Medical Center, the Pavilion, the Vilresidents and with the local media and was relentless in his drive to lage Church, a Village Center, amphitheater, and the motel. But raise money and cut costs. one thing the community did not have was an assisted living facility, which would be necessary to maintain industry standards, as well The Village Church initiated a fundraising campaign to raise one as protect against an overuse of the skilled nursing facility. In 1985 million dollars toward part of the expense of the construction of the plans began for a new assisted living facility church building. Additionally, The Christian that would be named King’s Crown. The and Missionary Alliance denomination changed name was selected for a variety of reasons, the nature of the “start-up loan” of $300,000 that first because it was in keeping with the overwas used to launch the community’s construcall pattern of naming buildings within the tion into a gift, plus absorbed an additional Village after popular sea shells but many peo$38,000 in expenses, thereby further reducing ple thought that the name was chosen to the community’s debt. The C&MA also prohonor Dr. King. However, he did not want vided the community with a one million dollar personal recognition for the facility and interest-free loan, which infused the organizawould frequently say that the King’s Crown tion with much-needed cash for its operating exKing’s Crown groundbreaking was another example of God’s grace and penses. Dr. King also handled an unpopular, but abundant blessings on Shell Point. necessary, increase in fees to ensure that residents were being charged fairly but appropriately for the services they were It was during Dr. King’s years that stability and confidence rereceiving. Prior to this time, residents were being charged far below the turned to Shell Point Village. Dr. King’s careful leadership proamount necessary to pay for the services and amenities, with the idea vided a turning point, and he was able to reverse the steep spiral that members of the C&MA from throughout the country would of debt and operational deficit. For the first time in the commumake gifts toward the care of retired missionaries. This plan did not nity’s history, Shell Point enjoyed relative financial stability. Dr. yield enough money to cover the true cost of caring for these residents, King was ready and eager to retire; and at his request, the Board and Dr. King realized that it was necessary to recalculate the fees for began to earnestly seek his replacement. new residents to adequately cover those expenses. Although this was 10

Shell Point Life | October 2008


Searching for Adventure

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GEOCACHING WITH “JUDGE JJ” JIM HOOPER

by Sue Taylor

hell Point residents are an adventurous bunch. When the new hobby of geo-caching began catching on in the Southwest Florida area, one of Shell Point's newest residents, Jim Hooper, was intrigued. Jim and his wife, Marilyn, moved into Lucina on The Island at Shell Point about two and a half years ago, and the geocaching bug soon infected Jim. When you first meet Jim, you wouldn't imagine him to be a modern-day treasure hunter. But once you get to know him and realize what a successful life and career he has had, it all becomes clear. Jim is one of those people who sets a goal and then points his personal compass directly toward it. And once his sights are set, there is no stopping him. Of course, saying "a successful career" is not quite accurate, because Jim has actually excelled in not one, but two very challenging careers. Jim graduated from high school in 1947. In June of 1950, when the Korean War broke out, Jim joined the Navy. Jim had met Marilyn, his wife-to-be, during that year; and in November of 1952 they were married. Marilyn joined him at the Naval Air Station in California where he was stationed, and their first son was born in 1955, while Jim was an undergraduate at Ohio State University. Jim graduated with a BS in 1957, and after a short stint at General Electric, he was recruited by the Raytheon Corporation of Wayland, Massachusetts, to work as a systems engineer on the guidance system of the Navy’s Tartar Missile program. In 1962, he moved to the Electronics Division of the Martin Company in Baltimore. He became a director of Martin-Marietta's Silver Springs Maryland Electronic Facility. In 1964 Jim, had a Continued on next page

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Geocaching with Jim Hooper Continued from page 11

career change in mind and moved to Dayton, Ohio as Director of the Middle West Region for the company and soon enrolled as a full time student at the Ohio Northern College of Law. With the support of his wife Marilyn, who was all for this change of careers, and with five sons in tow, Jim moved from what most of us would think of as a highly challenging career to try his hand at another challenging profession, the law. When asked about this career change, Jim claims that law was something he had always wanted to do, and he set his sights on reaching that goal. After obtaining his Juris DocJim Hooper (Lucina) zeros in on a cache torate degree, Jim “hung out his shingle” location, in Lakes Regional Park in Fort as a practicing attorney and had his own Myers, using his handheld Global Posilaw firm for eight years from 1967 until tioning Systems (GPS) unit. 1975. During this time, Jim put in about After searching for a while, Jim is suca year-and-a-half as a prosecutor for cessful in locating this cache! Miami County in Ohio, After locating a cache it is customary to and then in 1975, he sign the log sheet. was elected to his first full-time judgeship. He served as a judge at County, Municipal, and Common Pleas levels for about twenty-six years. Jim served as a judge at all the various levels in every State Court, except the Supreme Court, and moved from the trial bench to the appellate bench for four years by appointment of the Supreme Court. Once Jim retired, he and Marilyn decided it was time to move to Florida and seek the easy life of retirement. But Jim is just not one to sit back and relax as the day goes slowly by. While on Sanibel, Jim served as a “Rover” at Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge, conducted guided bird watching tours, performed biology tests for the NWR, served on the Board of Directors of the Sanibel Public Library, and served as President of the Board for three years. Because of his first career background, Jim knew that the United States government had declassified satellites three years ago, allowing for the development of personal GPS devices. Until that time, precise satellite information had been blocked to citizens, the government not wanting foreign powers to have that precision tracking so easily available to them. Add that background understanding to a Christmas present from wife Marilyn, his own personal GPS device, and you have the right mixture for Jim’s burgeoning interest in geocaching. Jim immediately set out to put his Garmin eTrex HC series GPS device to good use as he started to explore the new world of geocaching here in Southwest Florida. When asked what encouraged his interest in geocaching, Jim claims that it’s just an excuse to get outside, that it reminds him of old road rallies. But when he starts talking about his GPS, you see some of his first career knowledge coming to the fore. Jim has only been geocaching for a short time, so most of his experience with this hobby has been limited to Fort Myers and the northern and southern areas of Ohio where Jim and Marilyn own two summer homes on Lake Erie. It’s there where the kids come to visit during the summer, incorporating family time in those homes and swim time on a private beach. In addition to the challenge of the hunt and the reward for finding the cache, part of the fascination for many geocachers is becoming part of a family of geocachers. Unbeknownst to Jim, two of his five sons, Jim and Dave, had become in-


volved in geocaching at about the same time he did. In fact, son Jim has actually uncovered almost 600 geocaches this year alone! So it was no surprise that Jim and his sons would go geocaching together when in Ohio. Just one month ago in the mountains of southern Ohio, Jim used his GPS for hunting down some geocaches in the area. One geocache that Jim and his son found was particularly interesting because in it was a “travel bug” found in a plastic Tupperware box. Travel bugs are known as hitchhikers because they are discovered prizes that are to be carried from cache site to cache site by those geocachers that locate them. Its originator was from the state of Oregon, and he had taken this hitchhiking bug to the East Coast, hoping to see it make its way back to him in Oregon. The bug had already traveled to Ohio. And now, the geocachers locating that Ohio cache site and helping the bug get home were none other than Shell Point's Jim Hooper and his son. Jim’s code name, Judge JJ, was added to the cache’s logbook! Jim is enjoying his new hobby so much that he even managed to spend a little time researching geocaches online as he and his wife, Marilyn, traveled with another Shell Point couple to the Western Pacific Rim this past March. As Jim explains, “I’m a World War II buff, and I’ll read anything about that time period that I can get my hands on.” Jim combined both hobbies on their vacation trip. While Jim and Marilyn, with Shell Point friends Bob and Jean Fuchs, did a tour of the South and Central Pacific Islands, Jim had an opportunity to use his laptop and check out the caches registered on many WWII battle islands. Although Jim did not have time to take away from the tour to run around geocaching, he was able to make a computer file on caches located on islands that housed some of the most vicious battles of the Pacific theatre. Guadalcanal, Rabaul New Guinea, Yap, Guam, Saipan, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa were just a few of the Hooper and Fuchs’ travel sites this summer; and interestingly, Guam alone hosts eighty-two geocache sites.

Jim Hooper with a cache containing small household items and novelties that he discovered at a geocache location quite close to Shell Point. He removed a “travel bug” (center) — an object intended to move from cache to cache — from this particular geocache site so he could place it in a cache in Ohio, the next time he travels there. Travel bugs are common, and could travel to any geocache site worldwide. Often times Jim leaves behind one of the foreign coins he’s collected in his travels.

But geocaching closer to home has been interesting, as well, and some of that geocaching is actually close at hand to Shell Point residents. Both Jim and Marilyn knew that there was a geocache located near Shell Point. It would spoil the fun to give away too much information in this article, but despite the fact that Jim's GPS zeroed right in on the site, try as they might, the Hoopers visited the coordinates twice and just couldn't find the cache. Caching rules require that caches can not be totally hidden but must have some visibility, and Jim and Marilyn just weren't seeing it! On their third trip, the Hooper's realized that the cache had been cleverly hidden, and they finally found it! You'll have to ask them to explain! Jim says that another cache is located near the Lighthouse Restaurant close by. Jim has found caches in mulch and under trees, but his favorite was a magnetic key case on a guard rail on a bridge. All in all, Jim relates that there are easily four hundred registered geocaches in this area. And he says geocaching is really an easy venture. With his GPS in his pocket and his laptop on hand, he says he can “locate geocaches anywhere in the world; and with these tracking devices, you can get within inches of your goal.” According to Jim any visit to the www.geocaching.com website gives you an indication of places to go and caches to cash in on. With this many clues so close at hand, perhaps there should be more of us out there hunting treasure, just like Jim Hooper!


Geocaching By Sue Taylor

On the Hunt for Treasure

B

uried treasure…what child has not dreamed of such? It’s the stuff of pirates and adventure, of delight in discovery. It’s the uncovering of something hidden, the capturing of something sought. It’s the joy of solving a puzzle or ferreting out a mystery by finding and following the clues. And it’s part of our nature, whether young or old, to seek the illusive prize at the end of the hunt! But the treasure hunters in this instance are not children digging in the sand, or pirates, or Key West conchs salvaging offshore wrecks, but rather, geocachers. And like the prowling, catch-andrelease fisherman enraptured with a nonedible fish on his line, it’s all about the catching — or in this case the caching. When J.K. Rowling coined the word muggles, she painted for us a world of men and women oblivious to the parallel wizard world of her Harry Potter series. There in the midst of normal, everyday life, a subculture of the fantastical existed, hidden to the unobservant and uninformed. Just as an invisible railroad running inside a brick wall or a careening, transparent streetcar zooming in and out and over real traffic, the wizard world went about their remarkable activities with only an occasional glimpse by those without magical abilities. Muggles has been borrowed by these modern-day, treasure-hunting geocachers to label those of us who don’t yet know about

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geocaching. Rather than to live with this onerous designation suggesting boring and unimaginative natures, let’s have our eyes opened to this new subculture and its behind-the-scene activities. With a little information so that you know what geocachers are all about, you might actually catch them on the hunt or even decide to join them seeking the treasure. High Tech Fun

Just as in the word geography or geology, geo means earth, and the word cache (pronounced cash) is a secure place of storage, like a cache/collection of munitions or a treasure trove or chest. Very simply, geocaching is a treasure hunting game incorporating high technology. Geocachers are seekers equipped with global positioning system receivers (GPSs) trying to locate hidden geocaches (treasure), which they then share online with other geocachers or muggles, who may care to spectate. Using parallels of latitude measuring from the equator and meridians of longitude running from the north and south poles, angles from points on the earth’s surface and the equatorial plane or geographical poles can be drawn. Combining two angles, any horizontal position of any location on earth can be specified. This is what the GPS does for the geocacher. It’s like an instantaneous MapQuest, giving you street names and numbers, etc. You can find an exact location because the machine knows where you are and where you want to go. Eric Berger, a third-year medical student in Atlanta and geocacher when studies permit, relates that years ago, he was introduced to an old bargain GPS that he and his dad used when fishing down in Savannah. Keeping up with the evolution of the GPS, Eric was aware of the better and faster processors and of the increased precision of location as lag time was dimin-

ished between where you were and how it tracked you. Becoming familiar with geocaching and with the information offered on www.geocaching.com, one of the most complete and popular geocaching websites on the internet, Eric bought a hand-held GPS from Cabela magazine, the mapping software for it, and he left the world of muggles behind him. He claims it’s like a modern-day version of Boy Scout orienteering, where teams would go out with a map and compass and find their goal in the wilds. Here’s How it Works

Basically, geocaching works like this. Someone decides to make and place a cache. A cache is typically a small, waterproof container that can withstand the weather to which it’s subjected. Inside is a logbook and some kind of treasure. Don’t expect gold doubloons or pieces of eight; the treasure is usually very inexpensive. The cache may hold trinkets, toys, collector pins, coins, books, but usually something that means something to the placer or is indicative of the site or place of interest where it is hidden. Eric remembers seeking a cache registered online as Publix Enemy. It turned out to be a magnetic hide-a-key under a lamp post in a “Kroger” parking lot just across from the local Publix! The cache can be as small as often-used film canisters, called microcaches with tiny paper logs, or a large as a five-gallon plastic bucket. The placer can choose to hide his cache in plain sight or slightly underground (But remember, something has to show!). He can hide it in a state park, a parking lot, or a baseball field, near a monument, on a riverbank, or in someone’s vacant lot (Be


alerted that caching etiquette requires getting permission from the landowner!). The placer includes a logbook for the seeker’s signature and sometimes further directions or instructions for the finder to follow. The placer notes the cache’s coordinates and then posts that cache with its coordinates on an internet website of his choosing. Websites have their own set-ups for registering caches; one simply follows the directions to get the posting. Seekers go to these various websites to obtain coordinates and then set out to find the selected caches using their GPS devices.

ther help it accomplish its goal or move it to another cache along the way to its goal. Eric Berger relates finding a Beanie Baby in Missouri with a mission to be photographed in front of every major league baseball stadium. That Beanie Baby hitchhiked with Eric from Missouri to Marietta, Georgia, where he hoped it would be picked up and taken to a Braves game in Atlanta by its next finder. Caches can also be those called benchmarks. These are points that are known to have a high degree of tracking accuracy, such as markers that land surveyors, builders, engineers, or map-makers would use. They could be radio towers, church spires, or marks chiseled into stone. Seekers find these more by descriptions given than by coordinates, and the finds are posted by pictures that the seekers take. Geocaches can be simple hunts referred to as “drive-bys,” “park ‘n grabs,” or “cache and dash,” or the geocaches can become

them for clean-up at cache sites and are to remember to minimize environmental impact by sticking to trails whenever possible. These more complex caches usually require lengthy search and significant travel. Some of them involve underwater searches, long off-road drives, travel to mountain peaks, travel in frozen climates, and even international globe-trotting. Around the World

Remarkably, there are well over 800,000 registered geocaches to date on various websites. These caches are currently placed in over one hundred countries Leaving Your Mark on all seven continents, including AntarcWhen a seeker actually finds a cache, tica. The very first documented placement he must sign the included logbook and folof a cache was on May 3, 2000, by Dave low any directions left for him. Some of Ulmer of Beaver Creek, Oregon. By May 6, these directions might also include specific 2000, that cache had already been found warnings about the terrain or nearby haztwice and logged once. Geocaching origiards. In terms of the actual treasure, the nally was referred to as GPSstashing until rule is that if you take something the word ‘’stash” was felt to have too out of the cache, you must place negative a connotation. According something of equal or greater to Dave Ulmer’s message, the origiRemarkably, there are well over value back in it for the next nal stash was a black plastic bucket seeker to find. This keeps the buried most of the way in the 800,000 registered geocaches to date cache active. After the cache is ground, containing software, videos, on various websites. These caches found, the seeker communicates books, food, money, and a slingshot. his find in the logbook, often In addition to geocaching for are currently placed in over one with comments about his expethe fun of it, geocaching presents hundred countries on all seven rience for other seekers to share. some wonderful opportunities for Common acronyms are even deeducational ventures. Geocaching continents, including Antarctica. veloped for the logbooks, such as for kids sites are available on the inTNLN (took nothing, left nothternet with suggestions for making ing), TFTH (thanks for the nature, history, geography, writing, hike), or TFTC (thanks for the cache). If a and artistic connections. Teachers can accamera is included, the seekers will add tivate the learning environment with quite complex. “Multi-caches” consist of their photos as further visual documentahands-on experiences, whether tying in hismultiple discoveries of one or more intertion of the caching and its finders. tory lessons while caching on an historical mediate points containing the coordinates battlefield, taking along a wildflower guide for the next stage. Only the final stage has Stashes of Caches while treasure hunting in a state park, or the logbook. “Night caches” require seekers Of course, there are a lot of variations of experiencing the geography of natural to follow a series of reflectors with flashthis basic theme. Caches could contain areas offered in a dessert, seaside, or mounlights during the nighttime hours. “Puzzle trackable items, such as geocoins or travel tain waterfall cache. Getting children outcaches” may require the solving of a puzzle bugs! Geocoins are each assigned a unique doors and keeping them interested can be a of some kind in order to obtain the coorditracking number so that the coin’s progress, lot easier by tying in the excitement of the nates for the cache. “Locationless caches” sometimes around the world, can be tracked treasure hunt, and many consider geoare like scavenger hunts. Descriptions are online through posted logs by the finders. caching a new sport for families. given of something to find. The first seeker Travel bugs are items that have a trackable Perhaps you love problem solving or to locate the item takes a picture of his find, tag attached to them, such as dog tags, with the challenge of a hunt. Perhaps you might and that item can not be used twice. “Event unique tracking numbers stamped on them. like the connections you can build with felcaches” require all seekers to meet together. These bugs become hitchhikers that are carlow cachers, or you love being outdoors, A gathering is organized and attended by ried by seekers from cache to cache. Rule of being active, and caring for our environthe geocachers usually in order to effect thumb for seekers is to let the bug do a lot of ment. Perhaps you love discovery learning. some improvement in the environment, traveling by not hanging on to it for more Whatever the reason, geocaching may be such as a trash pick-up in a national park or than two weeks; and if you take one of these for you, and at the very least, no one may a beach clean-up. In fact, geocachers are little hitchhikers, it’s your responsibility to eiany longer call you a muggle. encouraged to always carry trash bags with Shell Point Life | October 2008

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According to one website Geocaching is a worldwide game of hiding and seeking treasure. A geocacher can place a geocache (pronounced geo-cash) anywhere in the world, pinpoint its location using Global Positioning System (GPS) technology and then share the geocache’s existence and location online. Anyone with a GPS unit can then try to locate the geocache.

That sounded like fun; however, Shell Point decided to go one further and has put together a number of various geocache games for you to enjoy this month. There are six geocache hunts and only one of them requires a GPS unit. The others use various methods for helping you track the clues and find the treasure. There will be prizes for each one and to allow for as many people as possible to play, we are going to place all of the correct solutions into a drawing at the end of the month to draw for the prizes – so everyone who solves one of the hunts has a chance to win. For more details you can contact the Resident Service Desk on The Island or in The Woodlands. So Let’s Get Started!

1.

Treasure Hunt Number One

2.

The Mathematical Safecracker’s Puzzle

Treasure Hunt Number Two

This one is just for you math whizzes out there. The treasure is hidden in a secret undisclosed room behind a combination lock. Your task is to solve three math problems. One will direct you to the room. The next two will give you the combination needed to unlock the safe and claim your treasure. If you think you are up to the challenge, pick up a Treasure Seeker’s guide that contains the math puzzles at either service desk starting on October 1st.

3.

Treasure Hunt Number Three

Island Treasure Trek

If you’re handy with computers and familiar with Microsoft Office programs, the internet, and email then you might want to try your hand at finding this treasure. Start by going to www.shellpoint.net. Hidden on the Salon’s web page will be a link to your first clue! Follow all the clues to find the treasure. This contest starts on October 1. Good luck!

4.

This treasure is easy to find and the path to find it will take you on a tour of the Island! There are no tricks or riddles, but you should be able to walk, climb stairs, and, of course, follow directions. You don’t need a compass, but you should wear a good pair of walking shoes and have your eyes peeled for clues. If you think you’re ready, pick up Clue #1 at the Island service desk in the Resident Activity Center beginning October 1st.

Computer Capers

Treasure Hunt Number Four

Geocache Stash

This geocache has been hidden using GPS coordinates. Pick up the first GPS coordinate at either of the Service Desks at the beginning of October. Find the first geocache and it will hold the coordinates to take you to the next location and so on. If you find each of the five geocaches, you will qualify for the prize drawing to be held on October 31.


5.

Treasure Hunt Number Five

A Pirate’s Poem A Tale of Treasure and Treachery

6.

What and Where Am I?

Take a close look at the photos below and see if you can identify the location of each image. Start by picking up a form at either service desk, on The Island or in The Woodlands. Record your answers and drop off completed forms back to the service desks by October 31.

Riches await for the brave at heart, who embark on a journey that today will start. The literary world has the treasure you seek, beyond what you read; or to whom you may speak. So take a turn with this map-like poem, which leads to the treasure and its secret home. This first clue is to ponder — as you likely are prone to wander — both near and afar. It will take you out on a Shell Point look by using the clues found in a book. Each of these rooms will hold a key to help you solve this mystery.

2

If you do well, dear wordsmith, and your aim is true, You’ll find the next poetic clue.

3

1

5

The Island’s the place to begin at best for when you look here you will start your quest. Go to the place where knowledge resides and Webster’s large volume now presides. Enter this domain in quiet step and immediately turn to your left. Like any good pirate you will seek a “map.” Look it up in this palaver habitat. This large lexicon will serve without insult On 1379 is the final result.

Treasure Hunt Number Six

6 4 9

11 7

8

10


2008 Shell Point Olympics November 10-14 “C

I T I U S

,

A

L T I U S

,

F

O R T I U S

The The Olympic Olympic motto motto translates translates into into “Faster, “Faster, Higher, Higher, Stronger”. Stronger”. The Olympic motto encourages athletes to give of his or her best during competition and The Olympic motto encourages athletes to give of his or her best during aa competition, and to to view this effort as a victory in itself. view this effort as a victory in itself.

The Spirit of the Shell Point

Olympics

Opening Ceremony

B Y M ARY F RANKLIN , M ANAGER

We hope to see everyone at the Opening Ceremony, Monday, November 10 at 2 p.m. at the Church Auditorium, where each court will have representatives carry in and present their court’s decorated flags. After the presentation of flags a heart-pounding performance will be heard by all!

OF

R ESOR T S ERVICES

The Shell Point Olympics will celebrate 23 courts — 3 neighborhoods — all joining in fun competition amongst friends living in one great community. This event will celebrate the true spirit of Shell Point. Throughout the week everyone is encouraged to participate, cheer others on, and celebrate victories. The Olympics is not only about the participants – but those standing beside them cheering them on to a victory or personal success. A Shell Point Olympics bus will be providing transportation between venues and chairs will be set up at each event so you can be there to support your friends and neighbors.

Presentation of Court Flags—

Closing Ceremony Medal Presentation— The Shell Point Olympic games will wrap up during the closing ceremonies on Friday, November 14, at 2 p.m. at The Church Auditorium. All medal recipients will be honored, everyone will get to view a week’s worth of pictures to celebrate the efforts of all athletes, and court flag awards will be presented.

Events Sign-up Commemorative T-shirt— Sign-up for the events will begin on Wednesday, October 1, at either the Island Service Desk (454-2282) or the Woodlands Service Desk (4542054). Whether you choose kayaking, biking or billiards, all athletes will receive a Shell Point Olympics T-shirt (the logo

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will be printed on the back.) If you are not participating in an event, but would like a T-shirt for a discounted price of $7, call either Service Desk by Wednesday, October 15 to place your order. After October 15, T-shirts will be on sale for $10. All athlete and pre-ordered T-shirts will be distributed on Monday, November 3, from 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. in the Resident Activity Center.

Your Athletic Photos Wanted! Do you have a picture of yourself from your past sports ventures back in high school or college? In celebration of the 2008 Shell Point Olympics, we would like to display your framed athletic pictures in common areas during Olympic Week for all your friends to enjoy and reminisce about. Yes, that is me in my High School Cross Country days. A few thoughts cross my mind as I reflect on that picture…memories of my teammates, the pride of a record that still stands today, and what was I thinking with that haircut! I am sure many of you have similar pictures of your past athletic days. Please drop off your framed athletic pictures by Saturday, November 1, with your name, the year it was taken and any other “side notes” you would like shared. Pictures will be returned the week of November 17.


2008 SH

ELL

POIN

T

OLYMP

IC

EV

ENT

SC

HEDULE

Let the Games Begin! SHELL POINT OLYMPIC EVENTS Sign-up at either the Woodlands (454-2054) or Island (454-2282) Service Desks.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11 8:00 Men’s Tennis Doubles Woodlands Tennis Court Draw for partner 9:00 Short or Distance Walk Start and Finish Island Park 9:30 Fishing Competition Lagoon Seawall Must have own equipment 10:15 Billiards – 9-Ball Resident Activity Center 1:00 Table Tennis Grand Cypress Room Draw for Partner 1:00 “Friendly” Duplicate Bridge Social Center Arrive at 12:30 Sign-up with partner 2:15 Bocce Ball Woodlands Bocce Court WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12 8:00 Mixed Doubles Tennis Woodlands Tennis Court Draw for partner 9:00 5K Bike Race Meet at Church Porte Cochere 10:15 Model Sailboat Racing Garden Apartment Pond 11:15 Wii Golf Church Hospitality Room

1:00 Chess Resident Activity Center 1:15 Shuffleboard Island Shuffleboard Court 2:15 Wii Tennis Church Hospitality Room 3:00 Pinochle Sabal Room/Woodlands THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13 8:00 Ladies’ Doubles Tennis Woodlands Tennis Courts Draw for partner 8:30 Putting and Chipping Competition Shell Point Golf Course Bring own clubs and balls, or they will be provided

Join the Olympic Games! Choose to participate in as many events as you like. Come out as a spectator and cheer others on!

ARBOR OLYMPIC EVENTS Sign-up for all events at the Arbor Front Desk (454-2292)

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11 12:30 Timed Puzzle Contest 3rd Fl. Discussion/Game Rm.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13 1:00 Memory Olympics Community Room

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12 10:00 Word Games 3rd Floor Activity Room 3rd floor residents

KING’S CROWN OLYMPIC EVENTS

10:15 Tennis Skills Competition Woodlands Tennis Court

Sign up for all events with Carol Cooper (454-2219)

10:15 Spelling Bee Church Auditorium

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11 1:15 Mind Olympics Community Room

2:15 Wii Bowling Church Hospitality Room

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11

10:30 Ring Toss 3rd Floor Activity Room 2nd and 3rd floor residents

9:00 Swimming Relays Woodlands Swimming Pool Draw for teams

1:00 Mah-Jongg Social Center

Sign-up for all events with the Activities Department

10:00 Horse Shoe Toss 3rd Floor Activity Room 2nd and 3rd floor residents

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12 1:00 Rummikub Community Room

9:00 Kayak Endurance Race Kayak Storage Must have own kayak

11:15 Wii Boxing Church Hospitality Room

PAVILION OLYMPIC EVENTS

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12 2:15 Name That Tune Contest Community Room THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13 1:15 Scrabble Tournament Community Room

1:30 Basketball Free Throw 2nd Floor Activity Room 2nd and 3rd floor residents 3:00 Connect Four 3rd Floor Activity Room 3rd floor residents THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13 10:00 Wii Bowling 3rd Floor Activity Room 3rd floor residents 10:00 Ramp Bowling 2nd Floor Activity Room 2nd floor residents 2:30 Throw for Distance 2nd Floor Activity Room 2nd floor residents

Shell Point Life | October 2008

19


Royal Upper Hand

The

Tracing the History and Mystery of Bridge

B

Y

S

U E

TAY

L O R

Were an Englishman to say “whist,” he might be trying to get you quiet with this English form of “shhh!” – or – he might just be asking you to play cards. A predecessor of our modern card game bridge, whist was a card game, played as early as the 1500s, following its own colorful prototypes, known as triumph, trump, ruff, slam, or even whisk and swabbers. It’s suggested that the name for this game was indicative of the silence demanded of the card players. Others have said it suggested the rapid action of sweeping up the cards after the winning of a trick. Whatever the real origin, there is no doubt that it is the card game from which our modern-day bridge has come. In a time before there were televisions, computers, and telephones, people came together to play cards for entertainment and society; and it mattered not who was playing or where the game was being played – be it in a tavern, inn, mansion, palace, or one’s private room. Mystery and Popularity While card playing has a great history, it is believed that the playing cards themselves have a longer history, dating back to the invention of paper in China around 1120. Cards were originally used for both fortune telling and gambling. It’s understandable that many of “the faithful” were warned of the evils of card playing. In 1432 St. Bernardo claimed

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Shell Point Life | October 2008

cards were invented by the Devil. And Puritans later descried them as “The Devil’s Picture Book.” In fact, Henry VII issued a decree forbidding his servants from playing cards except during the Christmas holidays! Elizabeth I, however, understood the popularity of playing cards and filled her official coffers by levying a tax on the manufacture of playing cards. To facilitate the collection of that tax, the Ace of Spades became the official stamp of certification that the tax had been paid. Forbidden to produce that Ace, card manufacturers had to acquire that card at the Stamp Office, where the only stock of pre-stamped Ace of Spades was kept. The Face Cards It is thought that face cards were developed by the French and originally represented historical and fictional personages of Hebrew, Greek, Roman, and Christian backgrounds. The four kings were understood to depict King David of the Scriptures, Julius Caesar, Alexander the Great, and Charlemagne. Some believe that the 12 honors of the deck refer to the 12 signs of the Zodiac or the 12 months of the year. They say the two colors (red and black) refer to the solstice and equinox phases. They see the four suits as the four seasons, the entire pack of 52 cards representing the 52 weeks of the year, and the 13 cards in each suit being the same as the weeks in each quarter of the year (winter, spring, summer, fall). Bridge Through the Ages The development from whist to bridge seems to have Russian or Turkish origins. The name bridge could come from the Russian

word biritch, meaning announcer or herald, such as players announcing their auction in the game. Others claim that the name came from the Galata Bridge, a bridge linking the old and new parts of European Istanbul, where British soldiers crossed every day to go to a coffeehouse to play cards. Although some of this history of the game is unclear to us, it is clear that bridge is a game that has endured and has loyal fans with a passion for the game. George Washington enjoyed playing bridge, and President Eisenhower played regularly on Saturday nights with top experts, often attending tournaments of play. In his enthusiasm for the game, American multi-millionaire Harold Vanderbilt is credited with the changing of auction bridge to contract bridge while playing on a steamship traveling from Los Angeles to Havana via the Panama Canal. On that cruise he introduced rules, principles, treatments, and exciting scoring bonuses to make the game what it is today. Overwhelming passion for the game has even led to a recorded death chalked up to bridge’s power when in 1931, a woman shot and killed her husband who had reached across the bridge table to slap her for her criticism of his faulty card playing! Fortunately, bridge playing finds a much gentler, refined, and easy-going home at Shell Point. Although there is a strong appreciation for the challenge and difficulty of the game, the society that it offers can not be denied. To find out when and where the next bridge group meets, just pick up a copy of the Weekly Reminder.


Progressive Bridge Bridge players players L-R: L-R: Peachy Peachy Fisher Fisher (Oakmont), (Oakmont), Libby Libby Linhart Linhart (Oakmont), (Oakmont), Progressive Dale Cue Cue (Lakewood), (Lakewood), and and Pat Pat Capin Capin (Royal (Royal Bonnet) Bonnet) Dale

Bridge to “Suit” You B

If you’re interested in learning the game of Kings and Queens — there are several bridge groups to choose from. Mixed Progressive Bridge For Dale Cue and Jim Bradford, mixed progressive bridge has become a regularly enjoyed activity, and an activity that they help organize each week in The Woodlands. Meeting on Tuesdays and Fridays at 12:45 year round, single bridge players show up for parlor bridge, bringing their love of cardplaying. At 12:45, players draw cards which designate the table and the player with whom

they’ll be partnered for the first six hands of bridge. At the end of the first six hands, scores are tallied, and the winning pair at each table moves to the next table while the losing pair stays at the table. Each person of the pairs also draws a card to see who is high and who is low. At the new table setup, the one of the winning pair who drew a high card is now partnered with the one of the losing pair who drew the high card. And, of course, the one of the winning pair who drew the low card is paired with the one of the losing pair who drew the low card. Sound confusing? It’s really not, and this is what mixes up the partners, the fun, and the competition. You never know whom you’ll be playing with, but you can be certain to have a good time. As you can imagine, the organization of such fun is a necessary function. Jim Bradford crosses over from his home in Oakmont to the game room of The Woodlands each Tuesday and Friday to set up the tables, put the felt pads on, and supply each table with cards, score cards, and pencils.

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Dale takes care of the rest by getting people to their assigned tables and ensuring that there are enough players to fill out the foursomes. This gets a little “tricky” because of never knowing how many players will show up and, of course, needing multiples of four at the tables. In order to make this work, Dale often places calls to try and round up some of “the regulars” when not enough people have shown up. And sometimes, Dale takes on the double duty of playing two hands, one for himself and one for the dummy – a bridge term not Dale, that is!. The group adheres strictly to the 12:45 start time, and people sign in at the door when they arrive. If Dale can’t make the numbers work, the last person to sign in gets sent home. Because the interest is high, a large circle of women and some men actually start arriving at 12:10, so that they don’t miss playing; and Dale says he gets there early enough so that he doesn’t have to send himself home! Continued next page

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ing the war with home responsibilities and working in an aircraft engines plant. Time seemed to move fast for Dale, as well. At sixteen, he graduated from high school and headed to college at Perdue. It was Progressive Bridge players L-R: Adeline Bauman (Oakmont), there in the game room of Polly Pinney (Lakewood), and Gwen Miller (Royal Bonnet.) the Student Union, that Bridge to Suit You Dale would learn to play Continued from page 21 bridge between his classes. Here he partnered up with another young man and soon Sure, Shell Point residents enjoy the solearned that he loved bridge and was good ciety that bridge offers. But, bridge is no simat it, as they went on to win the Perdue ple game and is often played at tournament bridge championship. His appetite for levels. The players that join in at Shell bridge was further whet when Dale Point often come with some knowledge joined the Navy and went to sea. The and background in the game. Jim Bradmen would often play on board ship. After ford relates how he played bridge years ago coming home from the Navy, Dale recalls when he worked at General Electric. He and meeting a cute little girl, named Toni, who three other guys would play during soon became his wife. When he found that lunchtime, and all the other workers would she didn’t play bridge, he set out to teach gather around to watch. Fifteen years ago in her. As Dale confesses, it took more than Pittsburgh, he played regularly with his wife knowledge of the game to be a good teacher and other couples. and due to his impatience, Toni decided that bridge just wasn’t fun; and Dale For Dale Cue, bridge was a game he stopped playing for fifty years. picked up in college. As a young man Dale relates that his parents didn’t play bridge, As an encouragement, however, to only a simpler card game called Seven-up. those Shell Point residents who might be inFor them there was never a lot of time durterested in learning how to play bridge, Dale

Progressive Bridge players: Jim Wimber (Eagles Preserve), Renee Fitzgerald (Rosemont), Jim Baumgarten (Rosemont), and Jim Bradford (Oakmont)

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came back to bridge at Shell Point through the Shell Point curriculum. In the Academy Dale signed up for bridge lessons by Susan Voorhees. Finding the game quite different, he forgot everything he knew and started over to learn the game. Now Dale has become a helper for some of the large classes with jillions of questions for Susan. He’s able to set up the tables, play in open spots, and even refine his own play. You might want to check out those Academy classes!

Duplicate Bridge If you’re interested in a little more competition and difficulty but still in an easygoing atmosphere, Pat Eichenlaub hopes you might consider joining the group at Shell Point playing duplicate bridge. Claiming that it’s good for your brain and a very social activity, Pat and her husband, John, hope that people, who have felt duplicate bridge too difficult, might give it a try in a comfortable and welcoming setting. They’re joined in their organization of the activity by Dottie and Dave Marano and by Dale Cue and Jim Bradford. You can find these games of duplicate bridge in the Woodlands Commons on Mondays at 7:00 p.m. and in the Manatee Room on Saturdays at 7:00 p.m. and Tuesdays at 12:30 p.m.

Progressive Bridge players standing L-R: Melina Eskew (Turban), Geneva Michael (Rosemont), Ruth Eder (Rosemont) and Harvey Widmark (Eagles Preserve.) Seated L-R: Marian Roeck (Parkwood), Dorothy McMillan (Oakmont), and Peggy Wimber (Eagles Preserve)


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Lunch Bunch Duplicate bridge players: Wayne Spielman (Eagles Preserve), Pat Stapinski (Harbor Court), Meta Spielman (Eagles Preserve), and Natalie Laney (Royal Bonnet).

unlike tournament play in some groups such as, the McGregor Point Bridge Club. In more competitive tourDuplicate bridge is nament play, points slightly different than are awarded and progressive bridge in players can reach that players are playing positions as Life Duplicate bridge players: Audrey Cortelyou the same hands at each Master (300 pts), (Harbor Court), Mary McHarg (Sand Dollar), table. Because they Bronze Master (500 Warren Deuber (Periwinkle), and Betty Bainhave the same cards pts), Silver Master bridge (Periwinkle.) and are trying to play (1,000 pts), and them better than player at other tables, this Gold Master (2,500 pts.). Pat, who is at the allows for less luck in the draw and more comSilver Master level, learned to play bridge at petition and difficulty between the players. In home because her parents, who often played order to accomplish this type of play, a bridge with other couples, taught Pat and her brothboard is used. Twenty-four duplicate hands are ers and sisters to play. Pat and her husband, placed in each bridge board located at each John, got involved in duplicate bridge table. The duplicate bridge group usually while living on Sanibel, and now they has six tables of players, with a few more love playing at Shell Point. players in the winter months. At the end of every three hands, the East and West positions So, whether you learned from your parmove to the next table, and the North and ents or spouse, at school or on board a ship, or South stay. Eventually everyone plays against whether you’re “game enough” to learn from each other. Scores are kept in each board, but scratch, bridge at Shell Point may be just the no prizes are awarded for play at Shell Point, game to “suit” you!

A Ladies Card and Luncheon Group Thirty years ago on Sanibel, “The Lunch Bunch” started up – today there are four of the original players left! The eight ladies meet up at The Woodlands at Shell Point to have lunch at the Palm Grill; then afterwards, they head upstairs to spend the afternoon playing progressive bridge in the sunny, Woodlands Common area.

Margaret Hoorneman (King’s Crown), Barbara Hilton (Rosemont), Fran Nickens and Joan Thoms (Fort Myers.)

Gloria Lee Meyer (Rosemont), Helen Quimby (Fort Myers), Frankie Rad (Tellidora) & Marian Snyder (Eagles Preserve.)

A Favorite Pastime Special Bridge Club Accommodates Low Vision B

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Twice a week, for almost two years now, four Oakmont neighbors all challenged by diminished vision, have gathered for friendly and stimulating games of bridge. The group, who jokingly call themselves the “Blind Ladies Bridge Club,” was organized by Doris Malinconico who, a few years ago, attended a Shell Point Retirement Community information program on new products for the visually impaired. At that meeting, she was given her first set of playing cards designed for those with low vision. The cards, which look like a normal deck on the front, have jumbo sized numbers, letters, and graphics when turned over. The playing side of the cards also is available in a variety of colors and shades, to provide greater contrast for the players. Malinconico encouraged those who enjoyed bridge but had ceased playing due to vision problems to again pick up the game. She thought

bridge would not only be a social outlet but also would provide exercise for their eyes and mind. Other members of the group include Liz Helland, Gloria Valentine, and Eloise Brown, who gather in each other’s homes for the two-hour sessions. The group also has two substitutes, Sally Wilson and Genie Howard. The ladies admitted to talking a lot and playing a little bridge. The women acknowledged the support and kindness of family and friends, who continue to be helpful and understanding of their limitations. The group also admitted to being gracious toward one another. Helland explained, “If someone plays an obviously incorrect card, we suggest the player reconsider. Here, everyone is treated with respect and consideration.” Malinconico stressed that none in the group feel pity. “We are funloving and inclusive.” She humorously added, “We offer prestige to the person who comes in last.” At this time, the bridge group is closed to new members but they encourage others with low vision to consider establishing additional groups — it’s fun and great mental exercise! Shell Point Life | October 2008

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Shell Point Cross Word Puzzle Puzzled over what to do on a rainy Saturday in October? Well, test your skill with this Shell Point crossword puzzle. The solution can be found on page 36, or on the homepage of the resident website www.shellpoint.net.

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1 The choir wears _________s. 2 Easiest way to exercise. 3 Shell Point used to be called ________. 8 10 4 The latest fun and fitness craze at Shell 13 Point. 5 Sanibel is known for its ______ shells. 16 17 6 Hail, Hail the ________’s all here. 20 21 7 Shell Point’s newest neighborhood. 12 Golf speak for “Look out!” 23 24 13 Noise of table tennis crowd at match point. 14 Residents enjoy _____ such as dogs and cats. 28 15 Residents enjoy sitting in the tiki hut on 27 29 the _______. 17 To row, row, row your boat, don’t forget your _________. 35 19 One major method of transportation on the Island is the golf ________. 36 21 This Foundation helps residents with their 39 38 charitable contributions. 23 __________ is the first residential building 43 42 44 at Shell Point. 24 Today may be a good day to ____ fishing. 26 The Grand Cypress _______ 47 49 50 48 51 28 _______ Frackenpohl is the Resource Coordinator. 29 Residents of ________ Court have a great 57 58 59 view of the boat docks. 62 30 Initials of the doctor who is V.P. of Medical Services. 63 31 Tune in to Channel 11 to watch Shell Point __________. 32 Shell Point is a _________ investment. 34 What birds were the nesting towers built for? Across 38 Many Shell Point residents come from ACROSS 2 The second neighborhood built is named The ______________. nearby ________ Island. 4 Dolphins like to play in the ________ of the river. 6 to Originally 2 all ShellShell Point visitors stayed at the _________house. 39 The Shell Point Library is a good place Point’s second neighborhood is The 8 Bocce ______. ________. ______________. 10 This animal inspired the name for our third neighborhood. 40 Abbreviation for the Resident Activity 11 Shell Point4offersDolphins _____style with ______care. like to play in the ________ of 16 This is all wet. Center. the river. 18 Where balls get lost and found. 41 The sales counselors give ______s at20the______! it’s6 Spanish Originally Shell night at theall Palm Grill. Point visitors stayed at 22 There is nothing like an ice _____ on a hot day. Welcome Center. the _________House. 23 Last name of our first residents, Ralph and Emile __________. 43 V.P. of Operations, ______ Ficker. 25 Learn this8skill from Bocce ______. June Lockhart. 27 Great river, name.animal inspired the name for our third 45 A walk around the Island is slightly more 10funnyThis 33 The Palm Grill is located in the Woodlands ________. than one ________. neighborhood. 35 The ________ shelter, doubles as a parking garage. 49 The first neighborhood at Shell Point. 36 The busiest Island Cafe. 11time at theShell Point offers _____style with 37 Ship your packages here in the Tunnel. 50 Set sail for fun on this boat. ______care. 42 Frequent visitors to the Shell Point Lagoon. 51 Shell Point’s resident theater group. 44 Life long learning 16 This all wet. occursishere. 46 to “Oh, say can ____.” 52 Many residents say, “I ______ I’d come 18you Where balls get lost and found. 47 If you get all these questions right, you _____. Shell Point sooner”. 20 ______! It’s Night at the Palm 48 The three buildings at the end of the Spanish Island are called _________. Residents Grill. share a _______ on game night. 55 Many exotic blooms are on display in53the 54 The most important resident at Shell Point. ____________ House. 22 enjoy There is nothing like________ an ice _____ on a hot 56 Some residents working on the model (abbreviated). 59 Shell Point is just minutes from57the Game ________ day. Match. 58 Stands sentinel at the entrance to the Island and The Woodlands. _______ of Mexico. 23 Last name of our first residents, Ralph and 60 Most concerts are performed here. 60 Across the Caloosahatchee from Shell 63 The wood Emilie shop and__________. the art studio are located here. 64 The head honcho. Point is _______ Coral. 25 Learn this skill from resident June Lockhart. 66 Shell Point Court: ______wood. 61 ______mont was the second building in 27 Great river, funny name. The Woodlands. 33 The Palm Grill is located in the Woodlands 62 Shell Point offers fun in the ________. ________. 65 Initials of the V.P. of Finance.

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Down 1 The choir wears _________s. 2 Easiest way to exercise. 335 Shell Point used to be called _____________. The ________ shelter, doubles as a parking 4 The latest fun and fitness craze at Shell Point. garage. 5 Sanibel is known for its ______ shells. The timeallathere. the Island Cafe. 636 Hail, Hail busiest the ________’s 737 Shell Point’s newest neighborhood. Ship your packages here in the Tunnel. 12 Golf speak for “Look out!” 42 Noise Frequent visitors toatthe Shell 13 of table tennis crowd match point.Point Lagoon. 14 up to 20lbs. and otheroccurs ______ are allowed at Shell Point. 44 Dogs Lifelong learning here. 15 Residents enjoy sitting in the tiki hut on the _______. 46 “Oh, say can you ____?” 17 You may be up a creek if you forget to take these in your canoe. 19 of transportation on the Island is theyou golf ________. 47 OneIfmajor youmethod get all these questions right, 21 This Foundation helps residents with their charitable contributions. _____. 23 __________ is the first residential building at Shell Point. 48 Today Themay three buildings at the end of the Island 24 be a good day to ____ fishing. 26 Grand_________. Cypress _______ areThe called 28 _______ Frackenpohl handles activities set-up. 53 Residents Residents sharecourt a _______ onview game night. 29 of ________ have a great of the boat docks. 30 the doctor who is V.P.resident of Medicalat Services. 54 Initials Theofmost important Shell Point. 31 Tune in to Channel 11 to watch Shell Point __________. 56 Shell Some enjoy working on the model 32 Pointresidents is a _________ investment. 34 What birds(abbreviated). were the nesting towers built for? ________ 38 Many Shell Point residents come from nearby ________ Island. 57 Game ________ Match. 39 The Shell Point Library is a good place to ________. 58 Abbreviation Stands sentinel at theActivity entrance 40 for the Resident Center.to the Island 41 salesWoodlands. counselors give ______s at the Welcome Center. andThe The 43 V.P. of Operations, ______ Ficker. 60 A Most concerts areisperformed here. 45 walk around the Island slightly more than one ________. 49 firstwood neighborhood at Shell 63 The The shop and thePoint. art studio are located 50 Set sail for fun on this boat. here. 51 Shell Point’s resident theater group. 52 say, “I ______ I’d come to Shell Point sooner”. 64 Many Theresidents head honcho. 55 Many exotic blooms are on display in the ____________ house. 66 Shell Point Court: ______wood. 59 Shell Point is just minutes from the _______ of Mexico. 60 Across the Caloosahatchee from Shell Point is _______ Coral. 61 ______mont was the second building in The Woodlands. 62 Shell Point offers fun in the ________. 65 Initials of the V.P. of Finance.


A Stroll on the Champs-Elysees This year’s fall event promises to be an evening par excellence B

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You are cordially invited to experience A Stroll on the Champs-Elysees, the most famous avenue in Paris, France on Thursday, October 23! d’oeuvres, featuring sides of the Atlantic. pate on crustini, This signature ReArc de Triomphe, the famous monument in Paris. mini chicken cordon sort Services event bleu, assorted cheeses, will take place from dessert crepes and mini 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 As you arrive at the Administration napoleons. p.m., with food Courtyard on The Island, you will be The evening will also feaand music protransported to Paris’s most famous street for ture the captivating music of vided throughAnnie Royer, jazz an elegant evening event on Thursday, Ocjazz cabaret artist Annie Royer. out. Resort caberet artist. tober 23. Ms. Royer is a native of casual attire is Residents will have Paris who performs soulful and recommended. carte blanche to mingle haunting renditions of cabaret songs with friends and neighbors à la Edith Piaf and other popular while enjoying music and French tunes. She has received rave Assorted Cheeses French after-dinner hors reviews for performances on both

Sweetest Day Balloon Deliveries Although, it is thought of by many as a second Valentine’s Day, Sweetest Day is actually a day meant to celebrate all the people who make your life special and was founded by Herbert Birch Kingston, a candy company employee, in Ohio in 1922. Kingston wanted to bring cheer and some happiness to the lives of those who were often forgotten. He gathered up his friends and they delivered candy and gifts to children in orphanages, and to those stricken with illnesses. The Sweetest Day idea of spreading cheer to the underprivileged has expanded to those individuals whose helpfulness and kindness we have enjoyed during the year. It is a great way to give a thoughtful word

or a small gift to enrich the lives of those important to us. Sweetest Day is nationally observed on Saturday, October 18. However, Resort Services will help you spread some cheer with balloon orders on Friday, October 17. To place your order call or stop by either Service Desk. (Island 454-2282 or Woodlands 454-2054.)

Sweetest Day Balloon Delivery Package #1 1- Mylar Balloon 3 – Latex Balloons Delivery and a card — $15.00

Sweetest Day Balloon Delivery Package #2 2 – Mylar Balloons 6 – Latex Balloons Delivery and a card — $28.00

Add Hershey Kisses and Hugs to any order for $3.00!

Register for Annual Craft Bazaar Friday, November 7 The Shell Point Craft Bazaar is a Shell Point tradition held every November. The event will take place in The Woodlands Grand Cypress and Sabal rooms from 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Friday, November 7th. The Bazaar features handmade craft items, made by Shell Point residents. This year’s Craft Bazaar will put you in the Holiday mood with a special appearance by Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus. So bring your shopping bag and your cameras to get a jump on your Christmas shopping. Do you want to sell craft items at the Bazaar? Contact co-chairs Barbara Hilton at 267-4258 or Helen Remington at 482-7867. The cost is $5 to cover both your booth cost and Craft Club dues. The deadline for registration is October 15. The Craft Bazaar is open to the public, so tell your friends to put on their shopping shoes and plan on lunch at the Palm Grill – it will be a great day at Shell Point!

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Celebrate the Larsen Pavilion B

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This annual request for financial support is an opportunity to contribute to the operating budget of the seventeen Auxiliary committees that serve year round, day in and day out, in our skilled nursing facility. As the administrative liaison for this group of 225 residents, I have the unique opportunity to attend their monthly

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board meetings, quarterly committee chairmen meetings, and the meetings of the seventeen Auxiliary committees. So I can confidently confirm that the funds raised are spent with the highest integrity and potentiality for every Shell Point resident. The committee work includes everything that can possibly be done on a voluntary basis to enhance the lives of

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first and fourth floor patients and second and third floor residents. Like our dedicated staff, the Auxiliary volunteers have been serving in the midst of renovation challenges, and in addition to your financial contribution toward their Bakeless Bake Sale, I know you offer them thanks for their perseverance, with kindness intact!

What the Pavilion Auxiliary Means To Me… Quotes from Shell Point staff members and residents: Jan Vea (Sundial): “The best part of my volunteer work on the Pavilion Auxiliary Friendly Visitor committee is I made a new friend.”

Eileen Roulston (Parkwood): “Having been a patient in the Pavilion, I really appreciated the Auxiliary volunteers coming to visit. Their smiling faces and trolleys with drinks, snacks, books - and friendly conversation were the highlight of my days!”

Sue Stranahan, Minister of Spiritual Care and Healthcare Chaplain: “The color blue in biblical symbology signifies heaven, wisdom, and charity. Volunteers at their posts in The Pavilion present a compelling analogy: heaven sent angels moving among the residents performing acts of charity as they go and the wisdom to clad them in blue jackets!” Connie Tucker (Cameo): “People are my favorite hobby – having been trained for six years as a social worker and only working at it for two, I was so happy to find my niche in the Larsen Pavilion Auxiliary. I began in the mail committee around 1994. Today, fourteen years later I continue to work on five Auxiliary committees. I have made great friends and enjoy the camaraderie of volunteering together. Chef Melly Raposa, The Pavillion: “Now that we are in renovation, I visit the residents on Saturday at lunch time to get feedback on the food services. It makes my day to see the volunteers helping the residents. They are very much appreciated. When I look at them, I see the sky, and they remind me of angels. To me and to the residents of the Pavilion, that is just what they are!”

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Dick Rockstroh (Turban) Chairman, Resident Council: “One of the most impressive facts about Shell Point, and one of the first I share with friends who are not residents, is the incredible percentage of residents who volunteer at the Pavilion. What a testimony to a caring community! Ruth Deuber (Periwinkle) Auxiliary Volunteer: “The Auxiliary is such a great part of what Shell Point stands for in our lives. Companionship, safety, and education are just a few things we enjoy. My husband and I really like bringing patients in the Pavilion a smile, conversation, and something refreshing from the Beverage Cart. Peter Dys, President Shell Point Retirement Community: “Auxiliary volunteers are the hands and legs that provide quality of life for our Pavilion residents by providing services that add to the required services that are provided by our staff. The time, talent and treasure provided by the Auxiliary encourages our staff and enhances life for residents. They also act as the vicarious love and support of distant and absent family for our patient population.” Dot Beard (Cellana): I thoroughly enjoy my volunteer service work in the Memory Care Unit. I always get more than I give!

Bobbi Brown (Nautilus) Chairman, Auxiliary Tuition Reimbursement Committee, Past President, The Pavilion Auxiliary: The Pavilion Auxiliary offered me an opportunity to utilize the skills I developed through my professional career.


What is a Bakeless Bake Sale? It is the one time of the year that the Pavilion Auxiliary raises money to fund their various activities. Personally, I would love to have goodies to actually eat, but then we would have to run around asking all of Shell Point to bake something yummy. Next we’d have to find a place to hold a gigantic Bake Sale. And, of course, we’d need volunteers to man the food booths and collect the money. That’s a lot of work! Since we’re all retired (at least most of us!), who wants to go to all that effort when we can say “Let’s pretend we baked and just collect the money”? We at the Auxiliary run a pretty tight organization, so we only come to you once a year to ask for money. Of course, should you ever want to send an additional gift, we won’t send it back!

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But in the past Shell Point residents’ generosity has always provided enough funds to support our seventeen committees, which by the way, are manned by over two hundred and twenty-five volunteers. We are hoping that will again be the case. All of the money raised is used to enhance the lives of residents and patients, as well as assisting staff with further education that translates into even more professional care. Here are just a few of the things The proceeds from the Bakeless Bake Sale benefit the our funds purchase: materials for residents of The Larsen Pavilion at Shell Point. those lovely lap robes you see residents using, books for their reading pleasure, the Pavilion staff, such as hurricane chairs or wheelchair supplies, resiwall-mounted televisions. Anything and dents’ Christmas gift (a everything we can do to make daily living at LARSEN PAVILION AUXILIARY Wii game this last year), our beautiful Pavilion as pleasant as possible, birthday cards and flowwe do. And we do it with tender, loving care! Bakeless ers, as well as a Staff Our theme this year is “Celebrate the Recognition Day. Quite Larsen Pavilion.” Please be generous, and often there is a large exhelp us reach our goal of $ 30,000. Thank penditure requested by you!

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Not only is it never too late to enhance the quality of life for our Larsen Pavilion residents, it also happens to be the name of the latest piece of equipment we are pursuing. It’s Never 2 Late is a computer workstation that will enable us to realize the full benefits of interactive, adaptive technology. What exactly does that mean? We will be able to provide a whole new level of person-centered care. Our residents can even have a voice in their therapies and activities. For instance, depending on a resident’s interest, they could be bicycling in the mountains of West Virginia, not just sitting in a room staring at a wall and pedaling until the therapist says, “time’s up.” We can reach treatment goals in ways that are innovative and enjoyable for each resident. This system will allow us to challenge our residents and mentally engage them in fun activities that will deeply enrich their quality of life.

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Go to IN2L.com for a more detailed look. As the website states, “At It’s Never 2 Late, we develop life-changing solutions that empower individuals to benefit from today’s technology.” In addition, we are purchasing a product that offers an effective and non-invasive drug-free solution with no known side effects. It’s called Phototherapy and it stimulates the body’s natural repair processes. This hand-held device is a low level laser that provides a temporary increase in micro circulation, temporary relief of minor muscle pains and stiffness, muscle spasms, and minor pain. We’ve been trying out this equipment and have found it also is a marvelous wound-healer. It comes complete with a compact console for power. I’m quite excited about the benefits of these two pieces of equipment. Funding and budgets can dampen excitement in a hurry. However, we here at Shell Point are blessed with an Auxiliary whose motto is “Our Spe-

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ciality is Caring.” Their main goal is to enhance the care for Pavilion residents and patients through a variety of ways such as holding their Annual Bakeless Bake Sale each October. There are five areas where the Auxiliary spends the money raised by the Bakesale. One is to provide funds for equipment that will enhance resident comfort and safety. Naturally, I approached the Auxiliary about these two wonderful pieces of equipment, and they agreed to purchase both items. Excitement can be contagious, obviously. Once the Pavilion renovation is complete, I invite you to stop in and see, not only the physical changes that have taken place but perhaps get a glimpse of the new equipment. Please keep the Auxiliary in mind when you receive your Bakeless Bake Sale invitations. They truly do enhance the lives of your friends and neighbors in our Larsen Pavilion.

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To include a listing for an upcoming event or activity, please contact Mary Franklin, Resort Services Manager, at 454-2152 or email: maryfranklin@shellpoint.org

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Thursday, October 2 1:15 p.m. Manatee Room/IS Many of you are making plans for your Christmas letter. The MAC Computer is a great platform for this due to its strong graphics capabilities. Marty Shaw has used her MAC with Print Explosion to create many attractive and unique letters and cards. Come and enjoy this program at our fall kickoff meeting!

The Ransom of Red Chief by the Baillie Players

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Friday, October 3 3:15 p.m. Church Auditorium/IS Welcome back this talented family acting troupe as they present a cabaret version of Tim Brosnan’s wonderful musical comedy, The Ransom. The play is based upon the turn of the century short story, written by O. Henry. There are lots of laughs and some great music. You’ll enjoy this one.

Beach day

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Monday, October 6 8:30 a.m. Island court pickup 8:40 a.m. Woodlands pickup 8:50 a.m. Eagles Preserve pickup 3:00 p.m. Approximate return Cost: $15.00 (ice cream on your own) Pack up your beach gear for our monthly excursion to Delnor Wiggins State Park in Naples. You will be provided a picnic lunch and beverages so just bring along your friends, favorite beach chair and other “day at the beach” accessories.

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Shell Point Singers Fall Concert

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Tuesday, October 7 7:15 p.m. Church Auditorium/IS Our very own choir of more than 50 voices will treat our community to a wide variety of selections from popular art songs to show tunes from favorite Broadway musicals and traditional spirituals. You can look forward to hearing the popular song “Alexander’s Ragtime Band’ by Irving Berlin. And, no doubt everyone will enjoy hearing the chorus sing the lighthearted twentieth century art song, entitled “Some Little Bug,” based on Roy Atwell’s poem in These Days of Indigestion. The program will also include several solos and a special presentation of Native American Flute music by Nancy MacDowell of Tellidora.

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Wednesday, October 8 5:00 – 5:30 p.m. Palm Grill/WDL Meet & Greets are back! Hosted by Shell Point management, they are a great way to get to know friends and neighbors. Enjoy an offering of hors d’oeuvres while resident pianist John Bendall plays. Be sure to make plans to enjoy dinner the Palm Grill afterward.

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Thursday, October 9 2:15 p.m. Manatee Room/Tunnel/IS A brief organizational meeting will be followed by a program on Macro Photography by Mary McCoy (Harbor Court). Club meetings will be held on the second Thursday of each month through May.


EVENTS

PROGRAMS • PARTIES • MOVIES • OUTINGS • EXCURSIONS

Ariani’s : Fine Dining in Cape Coral Thursday, October 9 4:15 p.m. Island Court pickup 4:25 p.m. Woodlands pickup 4:35 p.m. Eagles Preserve pickup 8:00 p.m. Approximate return Cost: $12.00 (dinner on your own) Ariani’s has been given “four stars” by restaurant critic Jean Lebouf every year since 1994 and has won the “best of the Cape” dining award six years in a row! Numerous Shell Point employees have touted this as their favorite restaurant for a lovely evening out. An early sign-up for this event is surely advised. Entrees are priced from $15.95 to $28.00.

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Organ Concert with Stephen Brittain

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Friday, October 10 2:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m. Woodlands Commons Shell Point’s next theater organ concert will feature local artist Stephen Brittain. Stephen has made a number of previous appearances at Shell Point and his performances are always memorable and entertaining. He is a member of the American Theatre Organ Society, and past Dean of the Southwest Florida Chapter of the American Guild of Organists. He is presently the Music Director of St. John the Apostle, MCC in Fort Myers.

Gulf Coast Town Center Shopping Day: Beat the Holiday Rush!

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Saturday, October 11 9:30 a.m. Island court pickup 9:40 a.m. Woodlands pickup 9:50 a.m. Eagles Preserve pickup 3:00 p.m. Approximate return Cost: $7.00 (lunch on your own) Gulf Coast Town Center has grown! If you have not shopped there recently, be prepared to be amazed at how this shopping and dining mecca has evolved. Beat those holiday crowds and spend the day shopping with friends and neighbors from Shell Point. Stores such as Belk’s, Bass Pro Shops, and JC Penney’s are there but so are some more unusual shops such as Happy Feet, Go Fish, Rue 21 and Golf Galaxy. Bev Rademacher from Resort Services has a complete list of retailers,or you can see the list on the internet at www.gulfcoasttowncenter.com. *This is an outdoor mall and may require more walking than usual.

Information Forum Presents: Aging and Spirituality

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Saturday, October 11 10:00 a.m. Grand Cypress Room/WDL Spirituality is commonly recognized as an essential component of human existence and a major contributor to overall wellness. Many of the events that occur in the life span have an accompanying spiritual component. Dr. Sue Stranahan, Minister of Spiritual Care and Village Church Chaplain, will explore the spiritual dimension of major developmental tasks in the aging process and suggest strategies for maintaining spiritual wellness.

Saturday DVD: The Bucket List (2008)

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Saturday, October 11 2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. Grand Cypress Rm/WDL You only live once, so why not go out in style? When corporate mogul Edward Cole (Jack Nicholson) and mechanic Carter Chambers (Morgan Freeman) wind up in the same hospital room, the two terminally ill men bust out of the cancer ward with a plan to experience life to the fullest. They compose a bucket list—a list of things to do before kicking the bucket. In a race against the reaper, the new friends hit the tables in Monte Carlo, tear up the road in supercharged cars, gaze at the Great Pyramid of Khufu, and discover the joy in their lives before it’s too late. Rob Reiner directs this comic caper.

Bistro 41, A Lunch Outing

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Monday, October 13 10:15 a.m. Island court pickup 10:25 a.m. Woodlands pickup 10:35 a.m. Eagles Preserve pickup 2:15 p.m. Approximate return Cost: $7.00 (lunch on your own) Bistro 41 has a little something on the menu for everyone. Whether you like oakgrilled black angus burgers, BBQ pork, quiche of the day, or are a big salad fan, there is something on the menu we know you will enjoy. A little free time will be provided for an extra long lunch or a stroll through the Bell Tower shops. Lunch entrees are priced from $7.00 to $14.00.

German Night

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Thursday, October 16 Dining: 4:00 – 8:00 p.m. Entertainment: 5:00 – 8:00 p.m. Palm Grill/WDL Enjoy delicious German fare, such as sauerbraten, bratwurst, schnitzel and of course strudel! Eat and be merry while being entertained by the authentic German sounds of the talented Manni Daum. Guten tag! Reservations not accepted.

Trinkets and Treasures Bazaar

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Friday, October 17 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Grand Cypress Room/WDL Cost: $5.00 (per person) Attention treasure seekers and bargain hunters! You never know what you’ll find at this event, so bring a bag and your looking glasses. If you are interested in selling your things, sign ups will begin on Wednesday, October 1 at either service desk. Selling tables are limited, so sign up early. A lottery will be held at 9:15 a.m. on Thursday, October 9th to determine table locations. Only residents may sell and sellers must man their own tables. Sign-up is required to sell goods.

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SUZY Q IV Dedication

Friday, October 17 2:00 p.m. Boat Docks/IS The new boat is here! This summer a custom 26 foot Fiesta Tritoon boat was built with all of the bells and whistles. Join the Suzy Q crew and Shell Point Administration as the Suzy Q IV boat is dedicated and blessed for a future of smooth sailing.

“Live and work but do not forget to play, to have fun in life and really enjoy it.” Eileen Caddy

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HAPPENINGS Sign-up required for this activity. Call Island (454-2282) or Woodlands (454-2054)

Standing room only.

Teddy Roosevelt Day at Ding Darling Wildlife Refuge

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Wednesday, October 22 8:15 a.m. Island court pickup 8:25 a.m. Woodlands pickup 8:35 a.m. Eagles Preserve pickup 12:30 p.m. Approximate return Cost: $15.00 One hundred years ago this fall, Teddy Roosevelt signed three National Wildlife Refuges into being. As part of “Ding Darling Days” Ding Darling’s own “Teddy Roosevelt” will be on site to speak about Wildlife Refuges and their importance for helping keep nature in balance. Before we join “the President” for cake (and gift shop browsing), we will enjoy a Refuge birding and wildlife tour with our own private tour guide.

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A Stroll on the Champs-Elysees

Thursday, October 23 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. Amphitheater and Courtyard/IS This enchanted evening will have you feeling as if you’re strolling along Paris’s most famous street. Mingle with friends and neighbors while enjoying savory and sweet French hors d’oeuvres. Behold the beautiful sounds of vocalist and native Parisian Annie Royer as the sun sets. This event promises to be an evening par excellence.

Everblades Hockey Game

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Friday, October 24 6:00 p.m. Island court pickup 6:10 p.m. Woodlands pickup 6:20 p.m. Eagles Preserve pickup 10:30 p.m. Approximate return Cost: $24.00 (includes ticket, snacks on your own) The South Carolina Sting Rays will be in town to challenge Florida’s own East Coast Hockey League team the “Everblades” to an action packed early season game. Let’s help Germain Arena fill to capacity, cheer for our local skaters, and show our support for their 2008-2009 season.

Walking required

Special event bus will be running

Beach Cat Lunch Outing Venture up the River to Joe’s Crab Shack

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Monday, October 27 10:00 a.m. Board at the Macoma Dock 3:00 p.m. Approximate return Cost: $34.00 (lunch on your own, Beach Cat crew gratuity included) All aboard The Beach Catt catamaran! Our voyage will take us up the Caloosahatchee on the 41-foot Beach Cat to where we will anchor at Joe’s Crab Shack, the “hippest seafood restaurant in town.” Do you dare try their “Joe’s Chocolate Shack Attack” dessert? Since fun is always on the menu at Joe’s Crab Shack, we will also spend a little time in the surf shop.

Movie Night: Planet of the Apes (1968)

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Monday, October 27 7:15 p.m. Manatee Room/IS Charlton Heston stars in one of 1968s most beloved camp classics. Bewildered astronaut George Taylor (Heston) crash-lands on a strange planet ruled by intelligent apes who use primitive humans for experimentation and sport. Taylor quickly finds himself among the hunted as he struggles to escape the apes’ power — and uncover their darkest secret.

Bocce Party

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Tuesday, October 28 10:00 a.m. Bocce Court/WDL Bocce lovers and newbies alike are cordially invited to learn all about the game of bocce while enjoying the company of your friends and neighbors. Enjoy light refreshments while trying out this precision party game. Eat, play, try a new (or old) hobby and make a new friend!

Walking up and down stairs

Library Book Talk

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Tuesday, October 28 2:00 p.m. Grand Cypress Room/WDL Dick Jacker (Palm Acres) will discuss My Dearest Friend: Letters Of Abigail and John Adams edited by Margaret A. Hogan and C. James Taylor. Refreshments will be served and the entire Shell Point community is welcome.

The Domain of the Calusa: Speaker Series at Rutenberg Park Sponsored by the Calusa Blueway Paddling Festival

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Friday, October 31 6:15 p.m. Island court pickup 6:25 p.m. Woodlands pickup 6:35 p.m. Eagles Preserve pickup 9:30 p.m. Approximate return Cost: $8.00 Between the high rises and golf course communities of southwest Florida, another landscape is revealed which expresses the complexities of a society that occupied this area for at least 2,000 years. Archaeologist Theresa Schober will compare the developed landscape of the past and present, as well as interpret these cultural symbols on the land in terms of the social history of the powerful Calusa Indians who once controlled these Southwest Florida waters.

Mark Your Calendar: Fall Dance 2008 Tuesday, November 11 7:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. Grand Cypress/WDL Cost: $20.00 Let’s celebrate autumn and the return of friends and neighbors by dancing the night away with Kelly and Shelly! Light refreshments will be served. Sign up begins November 3rd.

Hurricane Seminar on DVD in Library For information on Shell Point’s hurricane policies and procedures, visit the Shell Point Island Library. The library has a DVD of the Shell Point hurricane shelter seminar that can be checked out and reviewed at your convenience. LIBRARY HOURS: Mon-Sat 9:30-3:30 , Sun 2:00-4:00 Telephone: 454-2180

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Boating attire


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As we enter the fall season and the snow birds return to their nests at Shell Point, it is time to start thinking about what we can do to say thank you to all those wonderful employees who cater to us so competently with a smile. The tradition of rewarding our employees at Christmastime started years ago, when our Residents’ Council was looking for a way to enhance the appreciation for what the

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employees had done for the residents throughout the year. Today we include the front line employees, their supervisors, and their managers – not only those whom we see every day, but also those who work behind the scenes. The 2008 Employee Christmas Fund drive will be kicked off officially on October 15. But for now, you might want to start thinking about what you would like to contribute to the fund. Last spring, 40 snowbirds made their contributions before they headed for their summer homes. 28 of them con-

tributed around $350, eight around $700, and four around $1,000 or more. We will gradually be passing more detailed information on to you over the next few weeks, but in the meantime if you have any questions, please call me, Chuck Durrell, Chairman of the Employee Christmas Fund Committee, at 482-4062, or one of our committee members: Island: Herb Wilcox at 2183181, Woodlands; Betty Mueller at 267-6593, Eagles Preserve; or Myrtle Hearn at 699-7684.

Mark Your Calendar The following activities are planned by a variety of groups. All Shell Point residents are welcome to attend. Check your current Weekly Reminder, or watch SPTV for locations and/or changes.

SUNDAY 9:00 Christian Studies (WDL) 9:15 Christian Life Studies 10:15 Morning Worship 1:15 Mixer Golf League 3:00 CD Surround (Oct 5, 19) 6:15 Evening Service

1:00 Mixed Progressive Pairs’ Bridge 1:30 Stamp Project (Sabal Room/WDL) 1:45 The Rollicking Recorderists 6:45 Hymn Sing (Oct 14)

WEDNESDAY

8:45 Lap Robes (Oct 6, 20) 9:15 Billiards 9:15 Pottery 10:15 Virtual Bowling 10:30 Disciple Men’s Bible Study 12:00 Mah-Jongg (Sabal Room, WDL) 1:15 Table Tennis 1:15 Scrabble 1:15 Shuffleboard 1:15 Tone Chimes 2:00 Beading Club 3:00 Bible Study (Arbor) 3:00 Spanish Club 7:00 Pinochle 7:00 Duplicate Bridge

7:45 Men’s Bible Study 9:00-12:00 Geraci Travel 9:15 Model Yacht Club Mtg (Oct 1) 9:15 Watercolor Group 9:45 Ladies’ Bible Study 10:15 Model Yacht Club (Garden Apt Pond) 11:00 Computer Q & A (Oct 1, 29) 11:15 Computer Q & A (Oct 15) 1:00 Chess 1:15 Table Tennis 2:15 Knitter’s Anonymous (Oct15) 2:30 Jazz ‘N Stuff 3:00 Bible Study (King’s Crown) 3:00 Spanish Club 5:45 Village Church Choir Rehearsal 7:15 Bible Study & Prayer

TUESDAY

THURSDAY

8:30 Women’s Golf League 9:15 Painting Class 9:15 Stamp Project (Stamp Rm//IS) 10:15 Trim & Healthy 12:45 Intro to Duplicate Bridge

8:00 Men’s Golf League 9:00 Paddler’s Club/IS 9:30 Current Events Group 1:15 Mac User (Oct2)

MONDAY

1:15 Mah-Jongg (Library Lounge, RAC) 1:15 SPOT Play Readers (Oct 2, 16) 1:45 The Shield (Oct 23) 2:15 Handwork Group (Oct 9, 23) 2:15 Photo Club (Oct 9) 7:00 Trailblazers Bible Study

FRIDAY 8:00 Intrepid Bike Riders (Oct 10, 24) 9:15 Stamp Project (Stamp Rm/IS) 10:15 Inquiring Minds (Oct 10, 17, 24, 31)

10:15 Genealogy (Oct 10) 1:00 Mixed Progressive Pairs’ Bridge 1:15 Quilters 1:15 Table Tennis 1:30 Vespers (Arbor) 2:00 Diabetes Group Appt (Oct 3, 24) 2:45 Vespers (KC) 3:15 Great Decisions (Oct 3, 17) 6:45 Game Night

SATURDAY 8:00 Adopt-a-Road (Oct 18) 9:00 Coffee Social 9:45 Bridge Supervised Play 10:00 Information Forum (Oct 11) 10:15 Model Yacht Club (Garden Apt Pond) 1:00 Chess 7:00 Duplicate Bridge

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Lots of Love in the Salon for Locks of Love B

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Diane Biolchini is the reness or some kind of disadvanceptionist and assistant in tage. Hair loss can be a very the Island Salon. As a mother traumatic experience, especially and grandmother, Diane has a for a child. All donations need deep love of children and a givto be at least ten inches of hair ing spirit which is demonstrated secured in a braided pony tail. in Diane’s most recent act of August 12th was Diane’s giving. She has been growing 50th birthday, and this was the her hair for five years with the day! The Island Salon not only intent of donating her hair to cut 15 inches in length of Diane’s “Locks of Love” on her 50th Diane grew her hair hair – she received a complete out for five years birthday. makeover! The transformation is with the intention woodlands “Locks of Love” is a charitafabulous! Diane’s hair was colored of donating it to ble organization that takes donaa rich chestnut, and highlights village church Locks of Love. tions of hair from generous were added in a dark golden golf course donors and creates wigs and hair pieces for blonde. Her hair was cut and shaped with osprey room children who have lost their hair due to illlong layers, fringe around her face, and an

pool island cafe guest house pharmacy Shell Point Word Search health club eagles preserve For residents who enjoy living at Shell Point AND solving puzzles, we have just the game for pottery you. Here is a Shell Point Word Search. See lake how many of these Shell Point terms you can orchid house find. The solution can be found on page 36, or crystal room on the homepage of the resident website www.shellpoint.net. suzy q palm grill Woodlands Marina tikiVillage hut Church Medical Center welcome center Golf Course Hurricane Shelter Osprey Room Art salon Pool Pond marina Island Café Home Care medical center Guest House Oakmont hurricane Pharmacyshelter UPS Pavilion art Health Club Eagles Preserve Kings Crown pond Pottery Arbor home Lakecare Caloosahatchee oakmont Orchid House Park Crystal Room Lagoon ups Suzy Q Bank pavilion Palm Grill RAC kings crown Tiki Hut Stamp Room arbor Welcome Center TV Studio Salon caloosahatchee park lagoon bank 34 Shell Point Life | October 2008 rac

Diane now wears a collar-length style, colored chestnut with gold highlights.

abundance of texture for softness and movement. We discovered during the haircut that Diane has a beautiful natural wave that allows her low maintenance in her style. Stop by the Island Salon and see Diane’s new look and how a complimentary color and style can truly “turn back the hands of time.” Since the makeover, many customers often don’t even recognize her and will ask “Where is Diane?”


October Dining Events German Night at the Palm Grill — Thursday, October 16

Celebrate Autumn!

With the Florida-version of the crisp scent of autumn in the air, you'll want to mark your calendar and plan on attending German Night at the Palm Grill on Thursday, October 16. Chef Joel will revisit his classic German heritage for some authentic Rhineland cooking! For starters enjoy cheese soup or pickled herring, then it's on to the main courses of Bratwurst, Sauerbraten, and Veal Rouladen, all served with your favorite German side dishes. Of course, you'll want to finish it off with Chef Joel's secret recipe (handed down by his own mother) apple strudel, served warm and topped off with ice cream! Dinner will be served from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., and authentic German music will be playing from 5 p.m. till 8 p.m. No reservations will be accepted. Seating will begin at 4 p.m. so get their early! See you soon!

Palm Grill Re-Opens with New Menu

Meet and Greet to Resume in October Enjoy a Nibble while Visiting with Neighbors The Palm Grill will be featuring a Meet & Greet on Wednesday, October 8 from 5:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. in the Woodlands Commons. This popular event will feature John Bendall at the piano and there will be complimentary appetizers and punch for your refreshment. Please plan on joining us for some fun and consider staying for dinner to try out our new menu in the Palm Grill afterward. The Meet & Greet is from 5:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. and the Palm Grill is open for dinner from 4:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. Please join us!

The Palm Grill has reopened after being closed for September. During this time Chef Joel has whipped up a new menu of delicious items that we are sure you will enjoy. For lunch we will still be featuring the popular Blue Plate Special, or you can try some new items like the spinach salad or our healthy version of the classic Reuben sandwich – this one made with turkey. Plus, we will still have your old favorites including our delicious soups, salads, scallops and pasta, cheeseburgers, and many others to choose from. For dinner may we offer the new Petite Gourmet Coconut Shrimp with a Thai Noodle Salad or such popular entrees as the Soft Shell Crabs or Chicken Marsala. Plus, don’t forget the succulent Bacon-wrapped Filet Mignon, Liver and Onions, Tilapia Piccata, and many others. The Palm Grill is open for lunch from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Tuesday thru Saturday. Dinner is served from 4:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. Tuesday thru Saturday.

Mark Your Calendar! •Fun & Food •Great Prizes Shell Point Golf Club Friday, November 7, 2008 Tee Off - 8:30 a.m. • Lunch - 1:00 p.m. Hosted by

The Legacy Foundation at Shell Point

Sponsored by

Hole-in-one Prize 2008 Ford Mustang

The Scoggins / Moreland Group

Actual prize may vary from model shown

Shell Point Life | October 2008

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Meet Phil Nedeau Shell Point Woodshop Supervisor The men and women of types of wood: Spanish the Shell Point Resident Cedar, Honduras MaWoodshop were very excited hogany, South American to welcome back Woodshop Walnut, and Bass Wood. Supervisor, Phil Nedeau. Phil has spent so much When the position became time building it that he available this winter, a few of stopped keeping track at the residents spoke so highly 200 hours! A true labor of Phil and his past work here of love! at Shell Point we had to inPhil’s responsibilities terview him. Now that Phil is in the woodshop are to here, the woodshop is running maintain the equipment, as smoothly as a well-sanded teach the residents new table! woodworking techniques Early on in Phil’s career he and, most importantly, Resident Tom Young, with help from Phil Nedeau, Shell Point’s Woodshop Superviworked with oil companies as a stress the need for safety. sor, has been working on building a Murphy bed for his spare room where he lives at diving supervisor for thirteen “We like to have fun and Harbor Court on The Island. Phil helps residents with their woodworking projects in years. Due to the economic show off our talents, but a variety of ways. He picked up the lumber and materials for the Murphy bed project downturn of the oil industry, we have to make sure we and helped Tom cut up the plywood. Tom started with a “kit” for the Murphy bed, Phil began building custom follow proper safety prowhich included just the hardware and the plans. boats and cabinets. Combincedures.” ing his past experiences has not only made Phil ing, fishing, camping, and basically anything When asked about Phil’s work in the a true craftsman but gave him the knowledge to do with the outdoors. Of course, Phil spends woodshop, Wes Allison of Junonia, a woodto maintain and fix all of the carpentry ma- quite a bit of time woodworking. He is curshop member, stated, “We are so happy to have chinery in the Woodshop. rently working on one of his favorite projects, Phil back. Like Frank Sinatra said ‘It is better During Phil’s free time, he enjoys kayak- a kayak. The kayak is built of four different the second time around.’”

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Down 1 The choir wears _________s. Shell Point Life | October 2008 2 Easiest way to exercise.

The second neighborhood built is named The ______________. Dolphins like to play in the ________ of the river. Originally all Shell Point visitors stayed at the _________house. Bocce ______.

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Shell Point used to be called _____________. The latest fun and fitness craze at Shell Point.


How Safe Is Our Money In The Bank? B Y T I M O T H Y A . S T E P H E N S O N , E X E C U T I V E D I R E C T O R , T H E L E G A C Y F O U N D AT I O N

You are Invited to a special October seminar

Counsel to Ethical & Spiritual Investors Presenter: Gary Moore

Especially with the widespread problems associated with the current mortgage crisis, we are hearing from time to time of bank failures. Most recently, the July failure of California-based IndyMac Bank has prompted more and more people to ask, “How safe is my money in the bank?” For the most part the answer is “extremely safe.” Prior to the founding of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) in 1933, bank failures often meant financial disaster for depositors, but now the FDIC guarantees most bank deposits. What Is the FDIC?

The FDIC is an independent agency of the United States government. The FDIC protects you against the loss of your deposits if an FDIC-insured bank or savings association fails. FDIC insurance is backed by $53 billion in assets and the full faith and credit of the United States government. The term “insured bank” is used to mean any bank or savings association with FDIC insurance. Why Is FDIC Insurance Important to You?

All FDIC-insured banks must meet high standards for financial strength and stability. The FDIC, with other federal and state regulatory agencies, regularly reviews the operations of insured banks to ensure these standards are met. Even with these safeguards, some insured banks fail. If your insured bank fails, FDIC insurance will cover your deposits, dollar for dollar, including principal and any accrued interest, up to the insurance limit. The basic insurance amount is $100,000 per person, per bank. If you and your family have $100,000 or less in all of your deposit accounts at the same insured bank, you do not need to worry about your insurance coverage; your deposits are fully insured. Certain retire-

ment accounts, such as Individual Retirement Accounts, are insured up to $250,000 per depositor per insured bank. However, if you have deposits of more than $100,000 in any one bank and FDIC insurance is important to you, you may want to consult your banker or financial advisor about the status of your accounts just to make sure you are covered. Some advisors suggest that one should hold no more than $95,000 in any one bank so that any accrued interest would not be put at risk. Depositors have options for insuring balances higher than $100,000. Remember the $100,000 per person, per bank rule is the standard. But a simple step for married couples is to open a joint account, which will automatically be insured for up to $200,000. There are also complex rules regarding trusts and POD accounts that may enable you to hold more than $100,000 in any one bank. The FDIC has an enormous amount of information available at their website, www.fdic.gov. The Legacy Foundation has a supply of the FDIC brochure, Insuring Your Deposits available. Stop by the office if you would like a complimentary copy. In this day of renewed caution, we are all prudent to pay a little more attention to our investments — including our bank accounts. The Legacy Foundation at Shell Point is here to assist you with the complexities of your financial life. Please call us for a free consultation on banking and a broad array of topics if you feel it would provide an extra measure of peace of mind.

President of Gary Moore & Company

The Legacy Foundation presents Financial Counsel to Ethical and Spiritual Investors with Gary Moore, President of Gary Moore and Company. Moore is the founder of The Financial Seminary, a nonprofit organization whose sole interest is to encourage the reintegration of spirit and ethics, regardless of religious orientation, into political-economy and personal finances, “transforming hearts, souls, and minds over money.”

Gary, who has authored five books on faith and wealth and has served as an advisor to many nationally known non-profit organizations, will explore penetrating questions like: As the media gives so much time to anxiety-producing subjects, such as the national debt, have we properly counted America’s assets or blessings? From the global marketplace to our city, what is ahead? Where is the U. S. economy going and how will it affect you? What industry sectors will thrive in the midst of an economic crisis?

A friend and student of the late Sir John Templeton, Gary is a prolific writer, engaging speaker and a financial advisor sought out by many. A proponent of socially responsible investing, Gary will challenge us all to rethink our approach to building and managing wealth.

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Women’s Ministries

Special Seven-Week Bible Study Have you ever left a conversation feeling like shredded wheat? Stuck your foot in your mouth? Had difficulty getting your point across? Or been talked into doing something you didn’t want to do? No matter what activities or relationships we are involved in, interaction is at the root of them all. And the majority of that interaction is through conversation. From the time we were infants, we’ve been struggling to understand and to be understood. Though we all overcame the initial obstacles by learning to speak and using language at a very young age, who among us can say life has been a smooth sail without communication problems? Problems in communication have hindered every relationship we’ve entered into. Mary Kassian, a Canadian author, speaker, and Bible Study leader says, “At

their deepest root, communication problems are spiritual problems. As such, they require spiritual solutions, and for that we must turn to God.” For the final word on how to transform our words, the Bible is the book to turn to. It sets a high standard for speech as well as for thoughts and actions. Mary has studied God’s Word to find the secrets to transform speech into effective communication. She has authored a Bible study entitled Conversational Peace: The Power of Transformed Speech. The Women’s Ministries at The Village Church invites all ladies to participate in a seven-week interactive study of the speechtransforming elements Scripture has to offer, using Mary Kassian’s book. Each week will open with a 20 minute video session to present one speech-transforming element, fol-

lowed by time together with other ladies in small groups to discuss what was presented and encourage each other to putting into practice some of the practical techniques to improve our communication. A workbook (available at the church office for $10) will accompany the study to allow for individual exploration into God’s Word. The studies will begin on Tuesday, September 30 at 9:45 a.m. in the Hospitality Room at The Village Church and will continue for a total of seven Tuesday mornings, ending on November 18. Note that there will be no Bible Study on November 4 due to voting. So whether you are at a loss for words, or seem to have too many tumble out of your mouth at the wrong time, you’ll find this to be a transforming study and an enjoyable time of interaction with other women.

Global Outreach Mission Critical: Women in Crisis — Embracing the Needs of Women Around the World Around the globe, women, young girls, and children are suffering from lack of nutrition and proper drinking water. Many suffer internally, as well, because of oppression, abuse, and injustices done to them. Their plight is a painful one, usually borne in silence because no one will come to their rescue. Forced child prostitution, molestation, domestic violence, abortions, incest, AIDS, starvation, coercive labor, human trafficking, rape, and adult prostitution are just a few of

the ways that women suffer in silence. Their very souls are parched to know about a living and loving God who can come alongside them and minister in the inner depths of their hearts. Often the way to reach their inner souls is to bring relief to some of the exterior plights they face. This opens the door for them to listen to others tell about the love of God and the power of Jesus to bring inner peace. This year the Alliance Women Ministries Na-

tional Project, Thirst Quenchers, will raise funds to enable C&MA workers to bring relief to many of the women who are living in humiliation and stress. On Sunday evening, October 19, at 6:15 p.m., The Village Church ladies will present a program sharing about several of the specific projects of hope that The Village Church Women’s Ministries will be sponsoring this coming year. All ladies and men are invited to this interesting program.

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us, than letting life happen TO us. Early in life, I tended to see myself as a dart board. Life was coming at me, and I felt powerless. It took much of my strength just to shield myself from the trials of life. Happily though, dodging darts is not the only option. It is possible to become a pipeline through which God can channel His love and grace to others. Being a pipeline blesses me on the way to blessing others. In his book, The Likeability Factor, Tim Sanders says that a person who provides others with “a sense of joy, happiness, relaxation

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or rejuvenation” is more likely to be admired, desired, and fulfilled. Being “others-focused” is much more rewarding, but some days I still revert to being a dart board. Through confessing, believing, and obeying, I restore touch with my Heavenly Father and resume being a pipeline. In one of his New Testament letters, Paul mentions the many troubles he is facing, and then he determines to be a channel of blessing by allowing God to work through him. The Apostle Paul was a pipeline. Are you?


Healing Journey Grieving the loss of a loved one is a reality for many in the Shell Point community. Over the course of the past few years, a number of Shell Point residents have benefitted from the support group ministry of Griefshare, led by Janet Howard. This fall Dotty Morrison and Jerry Palmquist will be leading this ministry under a new name and format. Healing Journey is a series of lessons drawn from numerous sources. The lessons bring understanding to the grief process and offer suggestions for actions that will promote healing. Dotty helped develop Healing Journey at First Baptist Church in Plano, Texas, prior to

moving to Shell Point. She writes the following: “Grief is a like a journey. Sometimes you’re fine traveling by yourself. Other times, however, you’re in a place where you can’t read the signs. You need someone to help you interpret them. Sometimes you can read the signs, but you don’t know which road to take because they all are unfamiliar. Sometimes the journey is hard, and having someone else along makes it easier to bear. And sometimes something so joyful happens, that having someone with you on the journey increases the joy.” In Healing Journey we’ll help each other read the signs, discuss which roads are the best ones to take, support each other on

the rough trails, and rejoice together when the journey goes well. To participate in Healing Journey, please register prior to or at the October 7 session. We will ask for a commitment to participate in all six sessions, and registration will be closed after October 14. A companion book, Grieving the Loss of a Loved One, by Kathe Wunnenberg, will be offered to participants for $10. If you or someone you know would like to participate in discussions, concerning the journey through grief, please call the church office at 454-2147 to register. Sessions will be held on Tuesdays at 2:45 p.m. in the Hospitality Room of The Village Church, beginning October 7.

World Focus Weekend During World Focus Weekend, October 10-12, The Village Church will turn its attention to the faces of the world and how missions work impacts the lives of people around the world. From the first discussion Friday morning on the topic of Do Missionaries Destroy or Redeem Culture? to Leaving a Legacy on Sunday evening, World Focus Weekend promises to challenge and deepen each participant’s understanding and involvement in missions. Steve Hoke, a former missionary kid who describes himself as an encourager and teacher, is well-equipped to provide an indepth look at the work of missions. As a boy growing up in Tokyo, Japan, with his missionary parents, Don and Martha Hoke (Martha currently resides at Shell Point), Steve gained an early understanding of missions work as he observed his parents’ interactions with the national people and other missionaries. As a student Dr. Hoke came to understand missions from an educational perspective. The theory behind his childhood observations became clear as he studied for his M.A. in Mission/Communication Strategy from Wheaton Graduate School and his M.Div. in Mission/Theology from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. Blessed with both his rich life experience and his training in missiology, Hoke began his

professional career in missions-rediscussion will follow at 10:00 a.m. lated organizations. As a professor Friday evening at 7:15 p.m., and director of campus ministries at come get a glimpse of The Big Seattle Pacific University, he helped Picture, as Steve Hoke draws on establish international internships his distinct perspectives and exand practicum sites for the interculperience to broaden our view of tural studies program and had overmissions work throughout the sight of summer missions’ projects for world. This expansive overview over 600 students annually. As diwill be held in The Village Steve Hoke rector of field training for World Vision Church auditorium. The refreshInternational, president of LIFE Ministries ment and fellowship time that follows will (Japan), and presently as Vice President of provide ample opportunity for interaction. Training for Church Resource Ministries Drawing on the experience of some of (CRM), Steve has developed customized Shell Point’s own residents who have served training for new staff and life-long training op- as missionaries, Steve will lead a panel disportunities for all staff. cussion Saturday morning on, Why Cross“My passion in the years ahead is to help Cultural Missions is Such a Crucible for raise up the next generation of mission lead- Character Development. Panelists will iners from churches across North America and clude Steve’s mother, Martha Hoke, Dan the world, and to see that they are effective in Fountain, and Peter Nanfelt. Refreshments their roles as intercultural servant-leaders,” will be served at 9:45 a.m. in the Hospitality Dr. Hoke said. It is that passion that brings Room followed by the panel discussion at Dr. Hoke to The Village Church as he desires 10:15 a.m. to help equip churches nationwide to particOn Sunday, October 12, the focus will ipate in global ministries. become a little more personal as Dr. Hoke adDo Missionaries Destroy or Redeem Cul- dresses in the 10:15 a.m. service, how we ture? will be the basis of the Academy Class should be Serving as Senders and Leaving a discussion held Friday morning, October Legacy in the 6:15 p.m. service. These two 10, in the Grand Cypress Room at The services will serve to sharpen our mission viWoodlands. Come prepared to interact with sion, enabling us to more strategically partSteve and your fellow residents as the cultural ner in the worldwide work of missions. impact of missions work is examined. ReDon’t miss this opportunity to refocus on freshments will be served at 9:30 a.m., and the the faces of the world!

Shell Point Life | October 2008

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hen Barbara Milligan moved to Shell Point almost two years ago from Houston, Texas, her greatest concern was that she would not have any friends. “My husband, Jimmy, and I had been members of the Elks Lodge in Houston for years,” she said, “and we had so many friends there.” Even after Jimmy passed away, Barbara still continued to visit the lodge several nights a week for potluck suppers, games, and dances. So, when she decided to move to Shell Point, she was concerned about how she would fit in and meet new people. “I guess I shouldn’t have worried,” she said. “When I moved into Periwinkle, several of the residents in my new court welcomed me to the community. I had a number of very nice people stop in to visit me in my new home the very first week I was here. Plus, I heard about Game Night and when I went the first time, I realized that there were a lot of people here that I could get to know.”

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Similar stories are not that “new people are always uncommon. Barbara Boynwelcome and invited to join a ton came by herself about game or watch.” Players are six months after moving in very accommodating to differbecause she loved card ences in rules because although games. She has now been a some players like to win, “others “regular” for two and a half are there just for the fun of years. “Game night is loose, being with other people,” says relaxed, and there’s no Steve. “I think they all have a stress,” she said. She comes good time.” Carolyn Erhst (Sand Dollar) and to game night every week Of course, some residents Jean Ormsby (King’s Crown) because it adds fun to her found the fun of Game Night life. “Fun things like this balance with the in- long after they moved in. Mike Klein had been tellectual and physical things I do.” a resident for over seven years before he first Steve and Penny Modrich started at- dropped in on game night. He wandered into tending Game Night about three years ago. the Resident Activity Center one evening to They had only see what it was all about when he became inlived at Shell trigued by dominos. Point for a cou“I had played dominos as a kid, but that was ple of months a simple game. I started watching over their and saw it as shoulders as they played Mexican Train and an good op- then they invited me to join in.” The players portunity to taught Mike the game, and now he is one of meet other about eight who play every Friday evening. r e s i d e n t s . “We have a group that is very congenial,” Klein Steve says says. “We have a good time and it’s a nice way to spend the evening.” nwell et), Marilyn Brow nn Bo al oy (R ld chard Esther Gou ock (Cellana), Ri ac Pe an Je ), et (Royal Bonn ein (Nautilus) or) and Mike Kl Davis “Red” (Arb

and Dollar), Barb Boynton (S , e) kl in iw er (P (Nautilus) Barbara Milligan Penny Modrich d an ) na la el (C Gayle Richardson

Dayton and Lessie+ Slater

of Sand Dollar.

Get in on the Action Game Night occurs every Friday evening in the Resident Activity Center at 6:45 p.m. As folks show up, they join in at one of the many tables to play a game such as cards, dominos, or one of many board games. “We’ve got a whole cabinet full,” says Mike Klein. Drinks are provided by the Resort Services staff and a few of the residents bring snacks each week. There is plenty of room for new players or new groups of players. So why not stop by and try your hand at Game Night?


Shell Point Life October 2008  

Monthly magazine that highlights the amazing lifestyle and wonderful persons that make Shell Point Retirement Community truly unique.

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