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June 2008 Vol. 3 Issue 6


Licensed to Thrill B Y

Life in the Fast Lane By Lynn Schneider, Editor June is the traditional month for packing up the family car and heading off for sights unseen on the all-American Road trip; however, with the price of gas these days, even a trip around the block is expensive. Undaunted, we decided to live vicariously this month through the stories of some of Shell Point’s most intrepid travelers and take the next best thing – a virtual road trip, if you will. I don’t know if this is exactly what President Eisenhower had in mind when he ordained the construction of our country’s interstate highway system, but ever since Ford rolled the first Model-T off the assembly line, people have been setting out on the open road. Planes, trains, boats, and automobiles — not to mention scooters, golf carts, Segways, motorcycles, and any other vehicle that takes us from here to there and back again — that’s what this month’s issue of Shell Point Life is all about. Our inspiration came when we got an eyeful of Paul Schnoes cruising down Shell Point Boulevard in his ruby red convertible Corvette. Being the investigative reporters that we pretend to be, we had to learn more, so we tracked down Paul at his home in Eagles Preserve and discovered to our delight the story of a man who enjoyed a lifelong career in his dream job with that venerable automotive giant, GM, during its heyday. His story is parked on page 16. Of course, if you enjoy traveling by car,

then there’s a good chance that you may have taken a trip at some point in your life along at least one section of America's most historic highway, Route 66. Reminisce with us on page 8 as we travel back in time to “that highway that’s the best.” And what road trip is complete without a stop at one of the ubiquitous roadside restaurants? Well, the Palm Grill is serving up the next best thing with a Route 66 dining event. Drive thru on page 23. Now, if traveling on land seems a bit mundane, then perhaps you might enjoy learning more about several Shell Point couples who have traveled the path less chosen. You can drop anchor for a while with Jerry and Phyliss Ingalls who took a whole year off to travel the high seas in a sailboat, or maybe you’d like to soar with Phil and Lois Gannon of Rosemont who are currently building their own airplane at their home up north in Michigan. They’re calling it the Spirit of Shell Point and plan to take it on it’s first flight when it is completed in July. And don’t forget Ron Terciak of Lucina. He spends his summers in Maine on the Songo River where he captains a large riverboat called the Songo River Queen. All these stories and more are explored in this month’s issue. So fasten your seat belt as we prepare to take a ride on some of Shell Point's most interesting forms of transportation. Happy motoring!

ON THE COVER Resident Paul Schnoes circles the fountain at his new home, Eagles Preserve.

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A stop at any red light can become a complicated mind game as you ponder the meaning of the vanity plate on the car in front of you. Although some are obvious and can even elicit a chuckle now and then, others can be downright obscure. There are a few license plates here at Shell Point that piqued our interest and we managed to catch up with a few of their owners recently to learn about the story behind them. You may have noticed the license plate on the automobile of Periwinkle residents Joseph and Janet Carastro. As Janet explained, their license “Hi Perch” refers to a special place with a meaningful family history. “Hi Perch refers to our home up north in New Hampshire,” said Janet. “In 1970, my father, Fred Albert, finished building a beautiful mountain home up on Middle Mountain and he called it High Perch. He and my mother, Judy, just loved that house and the view it offered. continued on page 9 Shell Point Life is published monthly for the residents of Shell Point Retirement Community. Editor Lynn Schneider Art Director Rich Cerrina Graphic Designer Wendy Iverson Staff Contributors Gene McGonigle, Teri Kollath, Linda Rakos, Randy Woods, Robyn Church, Rachael Dula, Glenda Stephenson, Carol Cooper, Tom Frackenpohl, Jessica Clark, Rochelle Cherniawski, Mary Franklin, Elizabeth Brown, Ted Yeatts, Linda Hicks, McKenzie Boren, Cassy Stranahan, Jason Powers Resident Contributors Peggy Holton Do you have photos to share or story ideas? Contact Rochelle Cherniawski, communications specialist, by calling 239-454-2055 or e-mail: rochellecherniawski@shellpoint.com. Or you may submit suggestions in writing to Lynn Schneider at Shell Point Welcome Center.

15101 Shell Point Boulevard • Fort Myers, FL 33908 (239) 466-1131 • www.shellpoint.org Shell Point is a non-profit ministry of The Christian and Missionary Alliance Foundation, Inc.


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But For Some, Getting There is Half the Fun! ou’ve probably seen Pastor Ken Nesselroade in church, on SPTV, or in this very magazine, but have you ever seen him getting from place to place on his Segway? This type of transportation is still somewhat new, and he loves using it to get where ever he has to go, even from Shell Point to home! He received the Segway as a gift from a Shell Point couple who purchased a new one and wanted to offer their first one to him. He went over to their home for a quick lesson, and now zooms all over the place. The Segway runs about 15 miles on a battery charge, leaves no emissions or carbon footprint, and recharges for approximately 10 cents per charge. “It is easy to balance upon and very intuitive to ride,” said Pastor Ken. “It maxes out at 12 miles per hour and is a lot of fun, not to mention it is also easy to park,” he added.

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Roaring on By

Some of you have also probably seen Steve Modrich on his 2000 Honda Shadow Spirit Cruiser motorcycle. Steve moved to Shell Point in 2004 and can often be seen riding, enjoying the beautiful sunny weather. In fact, he looks for any reason possible to ride his bike. Like most motorcycle riders, the noise is part of the fun, but he didn’t want to disturb his neighbors, so he added some mufflers to his bike to tone down the roar of the engine.

Steve started riding motor bikes as a kid, and his love for hitting the road with the wind in his hair never left. Typically he will drive about five miles slower on the motorcycle than he would drive his car, because they do not stop as quickly, and sometimes are not as easy to see. His wife, Penny, did a trial run once a few years ago, but leaves the riding to him. So keep your eyes peeled: you may see Steve on his bike with his beard blowing in the wind!

Company in Princeton, Minnesota, and it comes with all the bells and whistles. It can seat up to four people, has running lights, a radio and tape deck, as well as an “ooga” horn. It can also be altered, depending on the needs of the moment. The top comes off, as well as the doors, and the back seat has storage underneath and a cooler for drinks. Everyone loves to see them coming and wants them to stop and show off this unique form of transportation. So when you are out for your next drive watch for these individuals and their unique forms of transportation! Robert and Glenayr Crossman in their specialty golf cart, Pastor Ken Nesselroade of the Village Church on his Segway, and Steve Modrich on his 2000 Honda Shadow Spirit Cruiser.

Classic Cart has Charm

Since Shell Point is such a large community, many residents use a golf cart to move around on property. It saves on time, gas and parking. But Robert and Glenayr Crossman took the desire for golf carts to a whole new level. You may have seen them scooting around Shell Point on theirs which resembles a 1936 Ford Pick-Up Truck. They purchased it about 11 years ago from the Classic Golf Cart

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For the Ingalls, their year at sea was

In the fall of 1981, Jerry and Phyllis set out with their friends on a three-day sailing trip that quickly turned into a three-day sailing lesson. They knew right away that they were hooked “The bug had bitten,” explained Phyllis. Little did they know that ten years later they would depart for a year-long sailing excursion. When a couple makes real estate their life and renovation their love, it may come as a surprise to learn that they left it all to pursue their passion of sailing the open sea. Jerry and Phyllis Ingalls worked in real estate and property development, before retiring to a career in property management. Their quaint, two bedroom, two bathroom, Victorian home in Noank, Connecticut, was nestled along the Long Island Sound and it was completely customized, that is after Jerry and Phyllis got done with it. They stripped the house down to its 120-year-old frame, and transformed it into their dream home. The house was their pride and joy… until they got a taste of sailing.

From Land to Sea

Their first boat was a 25 foot Catalina. But their short sailing trips didn’t seem to be enough. Sailing magazines arrived at their home each month, filled with stories of amazing adventures, and Jerry and Phyllis knew there was more wind in their sails. So with the dream of a year-long excursion in mind, they upgraded to an American made, 35 foot O’Day Sloop, they named Gemini. The boat ran off a 25-horse power engine and two 12 volt batteries for lights and radio. Naturally, responsible sailors would not rely on reading materials alone to dictate their readiness for a serious sailing trip. So Jerry and Phyllis began educating themselves, by taking classes through the United States Power Squadron, a boater’s safety organization. They learned everything from seamanship, charting, and reading the weather to cruise planning, celestial navigation, and engine maintenance. They became certified EMTs and were also skilled in scuba. After ten years of planning and dreamWaving goodbye to friends as they set out to sea.

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ing, they were finally ready to trade in the security and comforts of life on land for the salty swells of the sea. They gave themselves a year to sail from New England to Florida, without setting any time frames or specific plans. “Schedules can get you in trouble at sea,” explained Jerry. “It’s important to respect the weather.” Their only goals were to see the Chesapeake and visit the Bahamas. And as their friends saw them off, watching their boat drift into the fog, Jerry and Phyllis’ smiles seemed to light the way. When it came time to eat, they didn’t reach into the refrigerator. In fact, they didn’t even have a refrigerator. They lived from the sea, catching just about everything they consumed, even water. Fish were caught using a spear or fishing pole. Shrimp were gathered in a throw net. Conchs were captured during snorkeling dives. And when they spotted rain, they set up to catch it by rigging a system so that all of the water that fell on the deck was piped to the water tanks below. They would catch up to 30 gallons at one time. “Water was more expensive than diesel fuel in some places,” said Jerry. They didn’t have cell phones on their trip, they didn’t follow an itinerary, and they didn’t dock at marinas along the way. So communicating with them throughout their journey was not easy. As a solution, continued on page 6


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Smooth Sailing continued from page 4

When asked what’s next for the fun-loving couple, Phyllis quickly responded, “Dog sledding!” Jerry reacted by choking on his water – no comment needed. So will they sail again? Absolutely! Will their trips take them to sea for years at a time? Not likely. Jerry and Phyllis have found comfort at Shell Point, and they are happy to rest their sea legs on dry land… with the Gulf just a breeze away.

The homing pigeon wasn’t their only they made sure that their VHF radio was on every day at both 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. to allow visitor. A tiny bird stowed away for a few for any emergency messages. Thankfully, days, seeking solace in the collar of Jerry’s shirt. A stingray made its way aboard after they never received any. It would seem that the secluded life at swallowing their hook and getting tangled sea would cause some to go stir crazy, but not in their net. And a few friends from home Jerry and Phyllis. “We were having too even joined them along their journey to much fun,” Phyllis said. “And we really enjoy a taste of the good life. At the end of their year at sea, as the made the boat our home,” Jerry added. The couple’s creativity in custom design shined boat was pulling up to the mooring, Phyllis urged Jerry to turn the boat around. She through even in their floating, living space. They managed to convert their close- wasn’t ready to return to dry land. The couquarters cabin into a homey retreat and ple spent a few more moments sailing their v-birth into a cozy resting place. The around their mooring before wrapping up mast that once interrupted the middle of their memories for the trip home. They eventually sold the their cabin was transformed boat to a fellow dreamer — into a welcome support with someone who appreciated its the addition of wooden tamcustom detailing and wellbour. The wide space at the traveled sails. And they sold back of their v-birth was their Victorian dream home turned into a convenient too and moved to Shell Point nook with the simple addition to become the second resiof reading lights and swinging dents in the new Eagles wooden shelves. Preserve neighborhood. Jerry even rigged security Jerry and Phyllis are such lights to the spreader on the an on-the-go couple that they mast, which proved to be sucfit right into the Shell Point cessful in shocking an intrudlifestyle. If you want to hear er. One evening they retired more of their story, good luck to their cabin just as the pitch catching up with them! black sky engulfed their boat Between cruises on their into the night. They were power boat, attending mornshocked awake by a slamming noise that came from the deck When it came time to eat ing aerobics, playing in the jazz of their boat. Jerry flipped the they lived from the sea, band, singing in the choir, switch for the flood light, and catching just about every- building for Habitat, reading the couple bravely inched thing they consumed, even for theatre, rides on the Suzy their way toward the stairs to water. Fish were caught Q, golf outings, tennis matchinvestigate the noise. To their using a spear or fishing pole. es, Wii tournaments and even relieved surprise, they found a Shrimp were gathered in a renewing their marriage vows, confused homing pigeon throw net. Conchs were cap- there’s no telling where they sprawled out on the deck. are headed next. tured on snorkeling dives.

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Rules for Living at Sea With Your Spouse by Jerry and Phyllis Don’t live by a schedule. Wear lifejackets and harnesses at night. Wear goggles in a heavy storm. Always notify your partner if you are going below at night. Save yourselves, not the boat. Learn to live from the sea. If someone falls over, throw out everything that floats. Whoever is at the helm is the captain. Be great friends. Trust each other. Be equally educated on boat duties. Pull your weight. Have fun!


In Search of Old Fashioned

Southern Charm Shell Point Travel Group Heads to Charleston, Savannah, Jekyll and St. Simon’s Islands to Learn and Explore B

Ann and Bob Hartung (Parkwood)

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Two motor coaches, filled with travel loving Shell Pointers, recently pulled out of the Island and Woodlands for a five-day southern adventure. The journey began with a scenic drive from Shell Point to Port Wentworth, Georgia, where we settled into our hotel – our home away from home – for the next four nights. Day two began bright and early with our sights set on Charleston, South Carolina. After a visit to the visitor center in Charleston, we were guided around the moss-draped, oak-lined city by a knowledgeable guide from Diamond Tours who joined us on board the bus. There was also time to shop and enjoy lunch in the historic market area, as well as visit the Military College of South Carolina, The Citadel. Our next day was filled with the sights of beautiful St. Simons and Jekyll Island. We had the opportunity to explore the cemetery of the 1886 Christ Church, enjoy a tram ride around the Jekyll Island Club, and have some free time on these beautiful barrier islands. It’s obvious why these islands are popular

Barbara Wagner, Carole Palermo, Gwen Miller, Pat Capin, all of Royal Bonnet.

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for summer vacations. They are simply beautiful. The final day of sightseeing took us to the port city of Savannah, Georgia. We had another incredible guide join us on board the motor coach to show us the sights. Also part of our day, was a visit to the birthplace Juliette Gordon Lowe, the founder of Girl

Barbara Wagner (Royal Bonnet) at the Christ Church built in 1886.

Scouts. Then on to shopping and lunch in the waterfront area. As a final send-off to us, Diamond Tours arranged a delicious banquet which included a southern buffet dinner and dancing. What a great vacation!

Denny Lett (Parkwood) and Bob Fuchs (Palm Acres)


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When early settlers began to explore America’s Wild West, their travels were made on horseback and by covered wagon. Later, rich land barons set out to build a railroad that traversed the country and brought with it the refined civilization of such New England cities as Boston, Philadelphia, and New York. The romance of the Gold Rush in the mid-1800s made California a highly popular destination, and the state rapidly entered the union in 1850. By the turn of the century, America was eager to travel west, and in 1908, Ford’s first Model T rolled off the assembly line to provide individuals with a personal means of transportation; however, the vast span of wagon trails and railroad tracks served as a constant reminder of the lack of available roads for their new automobiles. Americans were tiring of being confined to the rural routes, surrounding their home towns, yet the shiny Tin Lizzie was not designed to traverse the rugged terrain leading to the new land. Amidst the rapidly changing demands of the growing country, entrepreneurs Cyrus Avery and John Woodruff devised a plan to connect hundreds of existing roads to form a new “super highway.” Route 66 began in Chicago, Illinois, and continued through Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, 8

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and Arizona before ending in Los Angeles, California. The complete highway spanned three time zones. When it officially opened in 1927, it became known as the “road to opportunity,” and changed America forever. The country was facing economic friction and instability, yet Route 66 continued to spur Westward movement and economic growth. Its diagonal course linked hundreds of rural communities, enabling farmers to transport grain and produce for redistribution. The diagonal design was also a significant benefit to the trucking industry, which was beginning to overcome the railroad in the American shipping industry. During World War II, Route 66 proved to be a valuable method of transporting troops and goods to armed forces bases in California. And when the war ended in 1945, it brought thousands of troops home. Following the war, tourism took off with new Mom and Pop shops, motels, service stations and diners that began popping up along the route. The journey became almost as much fun as the excitement of getting there. America was enchanted with Route 66. Bobby Troup said it with a song, “If you ever plan to motor west, Travel my way, the highway that’s the best. Get your kicks on Route 66!” John Steinbeck wrote about it in The Grapes of Wrath, calling the highway “The Mother Road.” And the U.S. Highway 66

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Association unofficially named it the Will Rogers Highway in 1952. While Route 66 served as a 2,400-mile lifeline of American travel from the 1920s through the 1960s, there was still a need for a more comprehensive road system. After observing the German Autobahn, President Eisenhower started the National Interstate Highway System. By 1970, nearly all segments of original Route 66 were bypassed. Although the modern highway system overtook the novelty of Route 66, the nostalgia lives on to this day. It is said that 85% of the road is still easily drivable today. And many of the historical landmarks still stand. Today’s travelers are eager to swing by Roy’s Motel and Café in Amboy, California. They visit the Gemini Giant in Wilmington, Illinois and dine at the Big Texan Steak Ranch in Amarillo, Texas. They can visit Lucille Hamons’ Station in Hydro, Oklahoma; hit the historic Phillips 66 in McLean, Texas; photograph the Round Barn in Arcadia, Oklahoma; relax at the Wigwam Village Motel in Rialto, California; and just enjoy the ride. So if you are thinking of heading west, travel that way; it’s said to be the best, and get your kicks on Route 66.


Licensed to Thrill continued from page 2 The home’s majestic view overlooked the town of Jackson, New Hampshire, which is located 1,000 feet below in the Mount Washington Valley. Our family would vacation there frequently. My parents moved to the Lucina building on The Island at Shell Point in 1985 and lived here for many years, while still enjoying trips up to the mountains in the summer. It was through my parents that my husband, Joe, and I discovered Shell Point, and we moved into our home here in Periwinkle in 2001. Joe and I own the house now and we travel to our “High Perch” as often as possible. Our license plate reminds us of all our good times there. Snow Be Gone Former Minneapolis residents Preston and Patricia Haglin remind many of us why we moved to Florida in the first place. Their first license plate I H8 SNO (I hate snow) was followed by their "Swedish" version VE H8 SNO (we hate snow) and their most recent one NO SHOVL (no shovel) says it all! The Haglins lived in Minneapolis for years, and as Preston is quick to point out, there are more Swedes in Minneapolis than there are in Sweden. He also seems convinced that there is more snow! “I am what you would call a Snow

Professional,” laughed Preston. “We would often get four feet of snow at a time, and you get really tired of having to deal with the white stuff every winter. We couldn't wait to get away from it when we moved down to Florida.” The couple lived nearby in Kelly Greens for a few years and then moved to the Nautilus building at Shell Point eight years ago. “We love it here at Shell Point,” he said. And when you ask him what he likes most about his Florida home, he'll be quick to tell you, “the weather!” Isn’t That Special Not only are specialty license plates a fun way to get your personal message across, they have also become a popular way for individuals to support their favorite causes. The sale of specialty license plates is administered by the Florida Department of Motor Vehicles and Highway Safety. According to the organization’s website, as of June 2007, there were 107 different types of specialty plates available from A to W, covering Agricultural Education to Warner Southern College and everything in between. In just one year, (June 2006 to June 2007) these specialty license plates generated $33,475,198 in revenue.

Preston and Patricia Haglin of Nautilus

One example of a successful specialty plate offering is the Save the Manatee license plate which was enacted on March 16, 1990. This plate has an annual fee of $20 (plus registration fees) and the money goes to the Save the Manatee Trust Fund. Last year, this license plate raised $1,319,120. Another popular animal protection plate for the (Florida) Panther generated $2,119,225 during that same time period. But don’t confuse the Panther license plate that provides money for the protection of panthers with the license plate for the Florida Panthers Hockey team – their license plate raised a mere $75,425. Top Sellers Environmental plates tend to be some of the top sellers with plates for manatees ($1,319,120), reef conservation ($1,025,825), sea turtles ($1,368,517), and wild dolphins ($1,674,980). Some popular license plates send a shout out to Florida’s colleges and universities with the top two contenders being the on-going rivalry between University of Florida (UF) with $2,459,850 and Florida State University (FSU) with $1,861,950. Other top money-makers last year included the Florida Challenger ($947,025) and Choose Life ($805,380). The three lowest yielding plates were Girls Scouts ($120), Tampa Bay Storm ($100), and Orlando Predators ($50). In addition to the ability to raise funds, organizations and special interest groups also benefit when their message is seen by thousands of drivers each day. Rolling Billboard Someday I think I might like to have a special license plate on my car. Who knows, perhaps I'll go with SHL PT 4U (Shell Point For You)!

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Women’s Ministries Summer Wellness Series

The Women’s Ministries Summer Wellness Series is like a cool drink in the warm Florida summer. Both women and men are invited to these programs that provide up to date information on a variety of topics of interest to our residents at Shell Point. Two additional programs are planned for the summer. As a follow up to her informative presentation on Diabetes in May, Dr. Carol Clark will Bone Health address the often-confusing topic of Bone Program Health on Tuesday, June 3, at 9:45 a.m. in Dr. Carol Clark The Village Church Auditorium. Tuesday, June 3 Recent research has uncovered new 9:45 a.m. updated information about osteoporosis and how to best treat it, as well as how to maintain healthy bones as we age. With 32 years of experience and a passion for keeping up with the latest research on medical topics of interest to her geriatric practice, Dr. Clark is well positioned to present relevant material and answer questions from the audience. Men and women are invited to attend as Carol presents

another interesting and informative session devoted to wellness. You won’t want to miss the final session in the Wellness Series on Tuesday, July 1, at 9:45 a.m., also in the Church Auditorium. Dr. Sue Stranahan, Pavilion Chaplain at Shell Point Retirement Community, will be speaking on the topic of Healthy Spirits. As featured in the April Shell Point Life, Dr. Stranahan has recently published an article in the prestigious Journal of Religion and Health. Sue’s professional life began as a medical missionary in Congo, Africa. She branched into public health, obtaining both Masters and Doctoral level degrees, and using her gifts and skills in the US and abroad. While serving Shell Point residents in the Pavilion, Dr. Stranahan has explored the area of spiritual health, recognizing that all humans are spiritual beings and can experience spiritual distress. Dr. Stranahan says, “The majority of Americans consider themselves to be spiritual beings and believe that spirituality is a significant part of who they are. Ironically, Spiritual many people devote a large part of their resources addressing physical needs while Wellness giving little thought to the spiritual comProgram ponent, even though a spiritual condition Dr. Sue Stranahan may result in a physical manifestation. Tuesday, July 1 Both men and women are invited to come 9:45 a.m. hear Sue as she examines a definition of spirituality, describes spiritual health and spiritual distress and provides participants with an opportunity to gauge their degree of spiritual health.

Integrating Faith & Healing Dan and Miriam have many stories, insights and experiences to share about the blessings and challenges they have faced in their many years of bringing transformation to people’s lives through health care and the gospel. For 35 years, Shell Point residents, Dr. Dan Fountain and his wife, Miriam, an RN, labored under often difficult circumstances in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Africa, to transform the lives of the impoverished through health care and the gospel. Their missions work was under the auspices of American Baptist Churches and focused on caring for the whole person. Over their career Dan and Miriam built a large health service, composed of a hospital, a nursing school, community health programs and a Family Practice Residency to train other physicians. The Fountains took seriously the mandate Christ gave to his disciples to heal the sick. But the goal in their medical work was not to highlight the benefits of medical science; rather they sought

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to demonstrate the power of God at work in the world through the integration of faith and healing. Dr. Dan shares that promoting health (physical and spiritual) of people and communities should be the basic goal, not just a curative approach. To that end, their medical work focused on training competent healthcare workers and encouraging community health – what people do to promote their own health. They placed a strong emphasis on partnership with the nationals. Even in retirement Dr. Fountain is passionate about intercultural health ministries, and since 1996 has been involved extensively in Global Health teaching and training in many parts of the world including Indonesia, Thailand, Haiti, Ecuador and India. He has also authored books and articles.

The Village Church Women’s Ministries has invited Dr. Dan and Miriam Fountain to give a presentation at the Global Outreach Program on Tuesday, June 18, at 10:15 a.m. in the Village Church Hospitality Room. Dan and Miriam have many stories, insights and experiences to share about the blessings and challenges they have faced in their many years of bringing transformation to people’s lives through health care and the gospel. Men and ladies are invited to attend. GLOBAL OUTREACH PROGRAM PRESENTS: Dr. Dan and Miriam Fountain Tuesday, June 18, at 10:15 a.m. Village Church Hospitality Room


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lmost everyone has tackled our three children and just handling the a “Do it Yourself” project at daily details of our lives.” Although Phil one time or another and was still flying regularly for the Ready there are thousands of Reserves, there really wasn’t a lot of time almost straight bookcases to prove it, but for extra-curricular hobbies. So when the couple retired to Shell Phil and Lois Gannon of Rosemont have taken “do it yourself” to a whole new level. Point in 2001 to be among the first wave of This industrious couple has been build- residents to move into the newly completing their own airplane from a kit for the ed Rosemont building of The Woodlands past three years in the garage of their sum- neighborhood, they decided to try something that Phil had always dreamed of – mer home in Traverse City, Michigan. Phil was always interested in airplanes building his own airplane. For the next year or so, Phil did his in his youth and spent hours pouring over copies of Popular Mechanics magazine and research and found a kit that he felt would be building dozens of model airplanes. At 21, appropriate. The experimental airplane is made he got his pilot’s license in 1944 when he by Quad City Ultralight Aircraft Corporation went into the Navy during World War II. of Moline, Illinois. The Challenger II plane, weighs about 460 pounds He was stationed as a and seats two people. It flight instructor in runs on a 52 horsepower Pensacola, Florida, until Rotax motor that takes 87 1945. Following the war, octane gas. The plane has he served in the Ready a 30 foot wingspan, can Reserves for another 22 reach altitudes of up to years, flying fleet aircraft 10,000 feet and speeds of and ultimately com75 mph. manding a helicop- Lois enjoys working on the airplane. “Of course,” said Phil, “I only plan to go ter/anti-submarine squadron. He retired from his military career as a Navy Captain up to about two or three thousand feet.” Originally, the couple started building USNR in 1968. Phil’s civilian life was equally impres- the airplane in the garage of their sive. While still serving in the Ready Michigan home, but as the plane started Reserves, Phil Gannon founded and was nearing completion this year, they moved president of Lansing Community College it to a nearby airport so that they would have enough room to finish its assembly. for 32 years. When the airplane project took off and The successful college grew from a student base of 424 students during its first Phil started spending more and more of his time out in the garage, Lois decided she had year to 22,000 when he officially retired. “That was a busy time in our lives,” better get involved if she was ever going to get said Phil. “Lois and I were very busy raising to spend time with him. Late one night, after

eleven o’clock, Phil had been pondering a particularly tricky detail of the construction, when he hit upon an idea that he wanted to try out immediately. So, although Lois was already in her pajamas, the two went out to the garage and she held the parts in place as Phil riveted them onto the plane. “The rest,” laughs Lois, “is aviation history!” The couple has named their plane-

At 86, Phil admits that it takes longer these days to get up and down from underneath the plane, but he still enjoys the challenge.

in-the-making the Spirit of Shell Point and plan to take it up for its first test flight sometime in July. Naturally, they will have stories to tell to all their friends when they return to Shell Point in the fall. “This is one of those lifelong dreams,” said Phil. And as far as dreams go for this adventurous couple, even the sky is no limit!

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Shell Point Staff Member Looks Back on an Amazing Experience

Her trip was a true “voyage of discovery,” taking her to 12 ports of call, including: Nassau, Bahamas; Havana, Cuba; Salvador, Brazil; Cape Town, South Africa; Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania; Chennai, India; Nagasaki, Japan; As a communications specialist Busan, South Korea; Osaka, Japan; in the marketing department, Seward, Alaska; Victoria, British Rochelle Cherniawski is responsible for Columbia; and Seattle, Washington. scheduling and interviewing residents The ship set sail from the Bahamas, on SPTV, as well as writing articles for and immediately the students knew Shell Point Life. they were in for an “When I first came to Shell Point,” adventure. Things said Rochelle, “I had no idea I would got off to an amazmeet so many interesting and unique ing start when their people. Every resident has a story and ship landed in each time I interview a new resident, I Havana, Cuba, and am constantly impressed by their life the students were experiences.” More than ever, Rochelle whisked away to a Fidel Castro spoke private speaking has come to appreciate a unique opporto the students tunity she experienced while attending engagement and Michigan State University. party hosted by none other than Fidel Rochelle wanted to see the world. So Castro himself. “We couldn’t believe it,” as a junior at Michigan State University, she said. “There he was, up close and she hopped aboard a renovated cruise personal, and he spoke without notes ship, the S.S. Universe Explorer, for a and without stopping for more than four four-month journey hours.” Following around the world. the speech, a huge The trip was part of fiesta with free the Semester at Sea food and music was program offered by held for the stuthe University of dents. Pittsburgh. The rest of the Snake Charmers in Agra, India trip proved to be just as eventful. Taj Mahal Tour Rochelle skydived over Table Mountain in Cape Town, South Africa, and then climbed it that same day. During a safari in Tanzania, she relaxed by a pool as an elephant strolled in for an afternoon drink. She toured the romantic Taj Mahal in Agra, India; experienced a quiet

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On Safari in Tanzania

moment of reflection at the Nagasaki memorial in Nagasaki, Japan; and saw the sun rise and set over the ocean every day. And of course, she made lasting memories and unforgettable friends. Each day of that eventful semester brought her new Nagasaki experiences that Memorial helped shape the person she is today. Rochelle’s Semester at Sea was truly the experience of a lifetime. As she has settled into her position in the marketing and communications department here at Shell Point, she continues to reflect on her experience, which widened her frame of reference and gave her a better understanding of the world. This has helped her relate to the many remarkable events and stories that she hears every day from the Shell Point residents she meets. S.S. Universe Explorer docked in Cape Town


THE HISTORY OF SHELL POINT

In last month’s chapter of the Shell Point history, we looked at the extraordinary amount of infrastructure and construction that was being undertaken on the island. This month, we look back at some of the highlights from those first years and some of the many leaders who played important roles.

CHAPTER SIX: BUILDING THE TEAM Just as construction was occurring to build the infrastructure and facilities; likewise, a leadership team was being constructed as well. The development of Shell Point Village and its operations was directed by the executive committee of the Christian and Missionary Alliance Foundation, which met each month. This committee included Dr. Nathan Bailey,

Members of the executive committee, headed by Dr. Nathan Bailey (center left) enjoy a meal in the dining room.

president of the national C&MA office; Reverend Bernard King, treasurer of the C&MA office; Dr. Robert Battles, secretary of the C&MA; T.M.Y. Wilson, the community’s executive director; and Louis G. Christiansen, a Fort Myers electric contractor.

Tom Wilson By 1970, T. M.Y. Wilson (Tom Wilson) had served as executive director of Shell Point Village for seven years, starting during the early years of its development through to the first years of actual construction. Wilson was ready to

start winding down his career at Shell Point and began to shine the spotlight on several other key men on the management team. In the November 1970 issue of the Shell Point Village News, a small monthly gazette published for the community’s residents and interested prospects, Wilson described the management Tom Wilson team and staff. Probably best-known to all of the residents at that time, Reverend Samuel G. Ferrell, director of spiritual ministry, had been involved in the early development of Shell Point Village, when he joined the staff in 1965. In late 1968, Reverend Ferrell began leading the early church services in the courtyard of Tellidora. On Easter Sunday of 1969, the first official service of The Village Church was held in what was called the Village Chapel at that time. This 350-seat meeting room, located in one of the early Administration buildings, is now the location of the Crystal Dining Room. The resident dining room was located in the area that is now the Sam Ferrell employee cafeteria. Some of the Sunday School classes for the church met in the Social Center next door to the Chapel. Because of the large number of “family” men and women working at Shell Point Village, there was a rather large youth program at the church, and the youth groups also met in the Social Center, as well. Shell Point Life | May 2008

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The Early Days of the Village Church The Village Church was already fulfilling many of the early dreams of the leadership of the community with the introduction of several special church programs. The Shell Point Village Winter Bible Conference was slated to begin at the end of the year (1970) with the Family Missions Week from December 27 to 31. Shell Point Village Weekend Conferences were scheduled to begin on January 10, 1971 and continue through April 18, 1971 with the Moody Chorale closing out the final evening concert. The Second Annual World Missions Week was also scheduled to convene January 31 and conclude February 7, 1971. A Deeper Life week was planned for March of that same year. According to an article by Reverend Ferrell in the

Reverend Ferrell used the community swimming pool to baptize Village Church members in the early 1970s.

vations for the upcoming season. Rates in the motel from fall of 1970 to January 1, of 1971 were $6 per person, $8 per double, and $2 for every extra person thereafter. Children under 12 were free and if a guest or guests stayed for a week, the seventh day was free. In season from January to May, the rates went up to $10 for a single and $12 for a double.

The Team Grows

Easter sunrise service at the ampitheater

November 1970 issue of the Shell Point Village News, 105 charter members were received into membership during the one-year anniversary service of the Village Church on Easter Sunday, 1970. The church had five adult division Sunday School classes, and a teenage program was started in the summer of 1970 with an attendance as high as 41, and an average attendance of 30 each week. Many young people accepted Christ and a number of baptisms would be held in the soon-to-be-completed swimming pool.

A Popular Place to Visit Other areas of the community were also abuzz. The Shell Point Village Motel (now known as the Guest House) was recommending that visitors make early reser-

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Tom Wilson often referred to Ferrell as his “right hand man” and Ferrell was involved in a great deal of the planning and development throughout the community. Another man who played a very important part of the development of the Village was Bernie Lagerborg, director of public relations, who joined Shell Point in mid-1967. Lagerborg served a the community’s first sales counselor and also handled the sale of bonds used to finance the community’s continuing construction. Lagerborg’s background was in manufacturing and sales and formerly served as a vice president in a company in Michigan. Also in 1970, G. Irvin Sir Louis was added to the Village staff as operations administrator. Sir Louis moved to Shell Point from Akron, Ohio where he operated his own insurance company for 22 years. His new role was to see to the day-to-day operations for the community. Another recent addition to the staff was Russell Rhea who was selected to serve as comptroller and Irvin Sir Louis office manager. Rhea came from New York in a top position with Sun Chemical Company of America. In addition to setting up the accounting department and hiring its staff, Rhea also was an accomplished organist and began sharing his talent in the Village Church. By the end of that year, almost 40 men and women were employed at Shell Point Village, not including all the others who were working on the construction of the community. More than 140 people were now living in the community as residents, with almost all of the available apartments full at that time.


Wilson Retires Tom Wilson, who had masterfully led the construction of the early phase of Shell Point Village, retired from his position in 1970. His years of service spanned from 1963 through the end of 1970. In a ceremony of recognition held in Wilson’s honor, the board of directors presented this faithful servant with a plaque mounted with seven crisp one-dollar bills, along with an inscription of sincere appreciation. Each dollar bill symbolized a year of his voluntary, unpaid service to the community. He had made an enormous and distinct contribution in launching Shell Point into the mainstream of its operation as a retirement facility. The members of the board recognized his generous gift of time and service, and the tangible contribution that this one man had made to the community. As such, they gifted Wilson and his wife with lifetime residency an apartment at 309 Nautilus as a means of thanking him for his years of service and dedication. Wilson lived at Shell Point for 20 years and saw Shell Point Village become the community he and others had dreamed it could be.

Samuel Ferrell Takes Charge Wilson retired at the end of 1970. It was only natural that the board selected Reverend Samuel Ferrell to become the second executive director of Shell Point Village in January 1971. Managing the community was a natural position for Ferrell. Gifted with charisma and trained as a minister, he met the public with ease. He had the ability to describe to friends, and strangers alike, the potential of Shell Point Village. Sam Ferrell had exciting dreams for the community. Together he and Dr. Richard Harvey, superintendent of the S.E. district of the C&MA, envisioned a great national Bible conference center that would attract well-known and respected evangelical leaders; and that ministers and laypeople from all over the country could visit Shell Point Village for Biblical training and spiritual refreshment in the atmosphere of beauty and peace offered by the community’s idyllic location. This idea had been discussed throughout the early years and plans had even been drawn in the planning stages of

the Village to depict what it might look like with this type

of conference complex. However, once the retirement services concept had been adopted, the idea of the conference center waned, and Ferrell focused on providing strong leadership for the senior community. There was activity in every corner of the growing community. Residents who had moved into the community as early as 1968, and were guaranteed skilled nursing care as part of their contract, were eager for the Pavilion skilled nursing center to be built. Until its completion, a temporary skilled nursing center was established in the nearby Medical Center. It was an exciting day, in January of 1971, when residents, staff, management, and leaders from the national office of the C&MA gathered together at the entrance of the newly completed Pavilion for a grand opening. Residents toured the new facility, which was state-of-the-art for its time. These early years, in the 1970s, were a time a time of ambitious activity. Additional garden courts such as Royal Bonnet, Periwinkle, and Coquina were rising up from the drifting sand and shell fill on the island. And construction continued on building for the future church, which was located on a site near the entrance to the community. Dr. Ferrell was in a unique position at Shell Point Village during that time because he oversaw the day-to-day operation of the Village during the week, and then served as pastor for the residents who were temporarily holding Sam Ferrell their church services in one of the administration buildings. Ferrell was truly immersed in every aspect of community life. Often, immediately following the services on Sunday mornings, he would make announcements pertinent to the Village’s operation. This weekly appearance before the residents of the community kept Ferrell in touch with the population of the Village and provided a method for sharing information with the residents and maintaining open lines of communication.

The Village Church Construction of The Village Church was completed and the congregation eagerly moved from its temporary meeting place into its new, large facility. While the church body was not nearly large enough at that time to fill a facility of such capacity, it was an astute decision to build it with the future in mind. Although the facility never became a national Bible conference center, the building was large enough to house the entire community population for any variety of meetings or functions and as the community continued to grow, the facility more than kept up with the demands placed upon it. The Village Church auditorium has served thousands of residents and visitors alike for events and services throughout the past 40 years. In many immeasurable ways, God blessed Shell Point as it was being designed and constructed, residents continue to enjoy those blessings to this very day. Shell Point Life | June 2008

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Around Shell Point Paul is known as “Mr. Corvette” and his passion for America’s only true sports car – the car that looks like it is going fast, even when it is standing still – is unquestionably contagious. ars have always fascinated Paul Schnoes. His brother, who was eight years older, talked constantly about cars. Paul remembers watching him tear a car down and put it back together. Observing that process is what convinced Paul he wanted to be an engineer. When his older brother returned from serving in World War II and began working for General Motors, he fed Paul information about the GM Institute located in Flint, Michigan. Paul eagerly explored the option and was soon involved in their co-op program. Any individual involved with the GM Institute had

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to be sponsored by a GM plant. Consequently, Paul was sponsored by a Cadillac plant in Cleveland that was building tanks for the Korean War. It meant alternating school for eight weeks in Flint, followed by eight weeks at the plant, and back and forth he went with only four weeks off a year. The program was a five-year program. When the Korean War ended mid-way through his schooling, Paul was transferred to an assembly plant in Cincinnati, Ohio. Looking back, Paul remembers, “When I walked in and saw all the beautiful 1955 Chevys on the assembly line, I decided then and there that I had found a

home. I absolutely loved being part of the assembly process.” Paul graduated from the GM Institute, known now as Kettering University, with a degree in industrial engineering. With his new bride, Barbara (Babs), at his side, he began a career that would literally take him from coast to coast and would fulfill his wildest dreams.

On The Move Paul and his family spent time in Detroit, Michigan; as well as Ypsilanti, Michigan – home of the Corvair; St. Louis, Missouri – where he worked on trucks; and Los Angeles – known for the big Chevy cars. That was


where he had the privilege of meeting Dinah Shore, the official voice of Chevrolet. From there he went back to Cincinnati, Ohio, as chief inspector for the start up of the 1967 Camaro; Ypsilanti again in 1970, as the general superintendent of production; Linden, New Jersey, in 1977 as director of quality control; and Lordstown, Ohio, as production manager. When he got a call in 1984 to go to Bowling Green, Kentucky – home of the Chevy Corvette – to be the plant manager, Paul says, “It took me all of two seconds to say ‘Yes!’ It was a great assignment – the greatest place to finish my career.” Paul arrived at the beginning of production for the C-4, the 4th generation Corvette, which was built from 1984 to 1996. He remembers fondly the 1,400 employees who worked on the Corvette. He says, “They came to work every day and did their best.”

“They worked hard to understand what the customer wanted and to build the cars accordingly.”

On July 2, 1992, the 1,000,000th Corvette rolled off the assembly line. 40,000 people – including top GM leadership and all the major networks – watched as Paul Schnoes drove the car off the line.

Setting the Pace In 1986 the Corvette Convertible was produced again after a 10-year absence and became the Pace Car for the Indy 500. Chuck Yeager was chosen to drive the Pace Car and made an appearance at the plant in preparation. Paul was privileged to attend the Indianapolis 500 that year to proudly watch the Corvette circling that famous track. Several additional highlights during Paul’s time at the plant included the introduction of the high performance ZR-1 engine in 1990. Rick Mears, a former Indy 500 winner, was present for the big celebration, surrounding that milestone, and took possession of the first production ZR-1 Corvette produced. The following year in 1991, they celebrated the 10-year anniversary of the Corvette plant being moved from it. St. Louis, Missouri to Bowling Green, Kentucky. Shell Point Life | June 2008

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Driven continued from page 17 given car will be completed. If a customer desires, he or she can be present to watch their own customordered Corvette roll off the assembly line. When Paul retired after forty years with GM, it coincided with the 40th anniversary edition of the Paul and Babs at the Corvette Museum that opened in 1994 Chevy Corvette. alongside the Corvette plant in Bowling Green. He ordered his one and only Corvette – a 1993, Close to 20,000 people turned out for 40th anniversary edition, ruby red the event. According to Paul, “Most peoCorvette. It was built the ple don’t know where their car is built, but month after he retired. everyone who buys a Corvette knows Paul says, “Even though exactly where it is built. We have the technology has advanced most demanding, most loyal customers in since then, I love my 1993 anniversary the business.” edition Corvette. It is the only one I will In fact, customer service is such a priever own.” His wife, Babs, loves it equalority that they are able to determine three ly. Together, they make it a point to weeks in advance just exactly when a

attend Corvette shows around the country. The largest is held in September, in Effingham, Illinois. Paul’s other legacy is the Corvette Museum that opened in 1994 alongside the Corvette plant in Bowling Green. Paul worked hard to see that the project was funded. The museum is open 363 days a year and has been very successful. At any given time, there are 60-70 Corvettes displayed at the museum. They move the cars in and out, allowing proud owners to display their show cars where everyone who walks through the museum can enjoy and appreciate them. For an extra fee, customers can have a car built and delivered to the museum to be picked up. “Everyone who buys a Corvette, buys a Corvette because they want a Corvette. They buy, not because they need it, but because they want it.” “It is a statement of who they are – a passion,” says Paul Schnoes.

AHOY SAILORS! Possible New Hobby Club Looking for Model Sailboat Enthusiasts How would you like to participate in American Cup sailboat racing right here at Shell Point? Charlie Picek, (Junonia) a new, full-time resident, had been sailing his Victoria class radio controlled model sailboat in Baltimore, Maryland, and wonders if there might be a group here. He is willing to meet with anyone to give a demo and discuss interests. He was instrumental in the operation and development of a racing club up North. His club was called the Blue Heron Yacht Club and they had 19 boats in the club. The bi-weekly races included judges, scorers, trophies, and all the trimmings like America Cup. However, the only rules were a 360 degree penalty if one hit a mark and if one forgot to be a “gentleman” and give sea room! The Victoria class boat was picked namely for its convenient size. It is only 34 inches long and easily fits into the trunk of a

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normal size car or behind the front seat. It is also an exceptionally realistic sailing vessel. It is the third most popular model boat in the American Model Yacht Association. The Victoria comes in kit form and can be assembled in less than a week. Charlie has built 10 of them and claims it is so routine now that he can do one in two days and will work with anyone who might need help. In addition to the boat kit, a radio transmitter is required. The kits sell for approximately $95 and the transmitter $80. If you are interested in learning more about Victoria class sailing, come to the informational meeting on June 18, at 9:00 a.m. The meeting will be held at the pond located in the middle of the Island, between the Administration building and the Mid-rises. Charlie will give a demo and talk about starting our very own club here at Shell Point and who knows, maybe we’ll have our very own Shell Point Cup!

Learn more about model sailboats by joining Charlie Picek (Junonia) for an informational meeting on Wednesday, June 18, at 9:00 a.m. at pond located in the middle of The Island, between the Admin building and the Mid-rises. He will be demonstrating how to operate a radiocontrolled model sailboat and taking names of those interested in starting a club. All are welcome to join the fun.


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Each June Shell Point resident Ron Terciak, heads up to Maine to captain a 300-passenger paddle wheel boat.

t’s not breaking news that Shell Point residents are an active bunch. Everywhere you look you see sleek boats, fancy cars, one-of-a-kind golf carts, bicycles, and more. It is very apparent that Shell Point residents still love their toys. And one Shell Point resident gets to experience his love for boating as the captain of two boats! One boat is docked at the Shell Point marina, called the Irish Rover; and the other boat is in Naples, Maine. Ron Terciak (Lucina) heads up to Naples, Maine, every June to steer the Songo River Queen through the calm waters of the Songo River. And he always has company. The Songo River Queen is a 93 foot, 76 ton, genuine paddle wheeler that can hold up to 300 passengers. It was modeled after the famed Mississippi Stern Paddle Wheeler. When working on the Songo River Queen, Ron hits the deck at 6 a.m. and commonly works 16 hour days. He makes 5 trips a day, 7 days a week, and loves every minute of it. Leisurely one and two hour cruises include breathtaking views of Mount Washington, as well as trips through swing bridges and the famous Songo Lock. The evening cruises come complete with spectacular sunsets. Ron particularly loves the weekly charter trip with local school children, called the “Hey, You!” cruise. In what seems to be the coolest field trip of all time, local science teachers take their students out to explore the waters by dropping cameras down to investi-

gate the river bottom. The best part of the trip, however, comes when the Songo River Queen passes staged events along the shore line. For example, one home along the lake has numerous pine trees lining the water that are marked with orange ribbons. When the paddle wheeler is cruising by, an actor comes out with a chainsaw to chop down the tree. The children all yell out, “Hey, You!,” scaring the pine tree poacher into the woods and saving the day!

the Songo Lock with an extraordinarily tight 18 inch clearance. Meanwhile, all other boaters float behind, waiting their turn while watching in sheer amazement.

It takes finesse to maneuver the 76 ton paddle wheel boat through the lock.

Ron and Carole Terciak in the cabin of the Songo River Queen.

But it’s not all fun and games. Navigating through the waters in the enormous paddle wheeler can be quite the challenge. Especially when the Songo River Queen passes through one of the last hand-operated locks in the United States. Ron is challenged to defy the odds by squeezing the Songo River Queen into

With all of that excitement and responsibility, Ron is still aware that he is no match for the energetic owner who works tirelessly to check and handle all of the paddle wheeler’s maintenance. The 80-year-old former pilot and shrimper fixes everything on the boat himself and can commonly be found balancing on ladders and rigging. Ron says that as long as an 80-year-old can do it, so can he! And he plans to continue to make the annual trip to Maine to resume his post as the captain of the Songo River Queen. Although Ron loves his time spent behind the wheel of the Songo River Queen, he is always delighted to return back to his Shell Point home and his loyal Irish Rover. Shell Point Life | June 2008

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Hurricane Helpers B

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SPTV will replay the hurricane shelter seminar on Channel 12 on Tues., June 10 and Wed., June 11.

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Hurry up! And then, wait. That pretty much explains what happens with a hurricane evacuation. We learned a lot from Hurricanes Charley and Wilma. For both of these hurricanes we packed our kits and moved them to our own hurricane shelter, which is known as the employee parking garage at any other time. For Hurricane Charley we followed our kits into the shelter and actually waited out the storm together as a community. There is nothing like preparing for evacuation, hunkering down together in a hurricane shelter, then moving back home all at once to create a sense of community. As always Shell Point residents were helping each other. That is our basic Hurricane Helper plan, just formalized a bit so you know how you can help and when. Right now you can let your Court Rep know that you are willing to serve as a

Hurricane Helper Volunteer for your court. There are things your Court Rep might want you to help with right now, like: Help with the assessment Court Reps make for those in the court who have special needs for assistance and equipment prior to evacuation. Gather/make copies of word games, crossword puzzles, or short articles to read to help pass the time spent in the shelter. If copies can be made ahead of time for distribution in the shelter, they would be a welcome diversion. Check with your neighbors who might need assistance with getting their Hurricane Kit ready or getting their hurricane chair purchased. During the “Hurry Up” phase your Court Rep might ask you to help the people they have identified as needing help. You could assist with getting the kits packed, and moved

to the pickup spot outside of your court. During the “Wait it Out” phase, there will be plenty of opportunity to help within your court area in the shelter, such as passing out food, water and those welcome diversions some of you will be collecting ahead of time. Residents who volunteer with the Pavilion Auxiliary are currently being poled by their committee chairman to create the A, B, C plan which identifies Auxiliary volunteers who are planning to help with Pavilion residents before, during and after a hurricane evacuation. Having 225 resident volunteers all ready, willing, and trained to help with everything from hydration to feeding, and committed to caring for our most vulnerable residents, is a comfort to all. Watch Shell Point TV for information should a hurricane evacuation become a possibility. Your Court Rep will be your information source for preparation within your court.

National Nursing Home Week Celebrated The Larsen Pavilion celebrated National Nursing Home Week with a special luncheon hosted by the Pavilion Auxiliary to salute the approximately 200 staff members who provide the loving care throughout the facility 24 hours per day, seven days per week. Pavilion Auxiliary volunteers served the meal to the staff in the Village

Church as a way of thanking these hard working and dedicated individuals. “National Nursing Home Week is the time for us to recognize all of our staff who provide loving care to the residents each day,” said Sherry Brown, director of long term care. “We used this opportunity to thank them for a job well done.”

Admissions Coordinator Pam Saltsman, Nutrition Services Manager Sandi Brower, and Admissions Coordinator Sherry Greenhill

Volunteer Bill Staples and Chef Melly Raposa

Volunteers Bill Maruchi and Gordon Cathey served lunch to RN Bill Cunningham

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LPN Liz Topliff, Volunteer Anita DeWeese, LPN Teresa Curvin, CNA Nesley Boyer


Pavilion Auxiliary Volunteers are Busy Bees 17 Committees Stay Busy Working Through the Summer Only in the Pavilion, would we consider launching a smorgasbord of new volunteer opportunities at the beginning of summer! That is because the Pavilion Auxiliary never takes a vacation. Individual volunteers take vacations, but the services of the seventeen committees go on year-round. NEW! Opportunities in the Pavilion Auxiliary The Pavilion Auxiliary Activities staff is looking for volunteers to help in a variety of new ways. If you have an interest, chances are you can share it. Do you have an interest in the following?

Abby Rosman, resident and family services coordinator and Auxiliary Activities Committee Chairman Peg Richmond discuss new volunteer opportunities in the Pavilion.

Lenore Sparkman, Auxiliary Receptionist Committee, represents volunteers who man the desk 7 days a week

Sharing the News

Would you be interested in reading selections from the morning paper to a group and leading some discussion around the news? Story Telling

Do you enjoy a good story and have the knack for telling one? Would you like to share this talent with others in the skilled nursing facility? Men’s Group

Are you a man who would enjoy a regular get-together with other men to share topics of interest? Biography

Auxiliary volunteer Helen VanBuskirk takes the library book cart to residents.

Are you interested in helping residents preserve their personal story for their posterity?

The best part of being an Auxiliary volunteer is the smiles exchanged — like the on Lynn Haas’s face. Don’t you wish you could see the other smile?

Gardening

If you enjoy gardening, imagine the possibilities with all the bay windows in the Pavilion? Travel Around The World

Most of us have gone somewhere of interest. Would you like to help residents discuss a special place each time they gather around the map? If you enjoy helping others to enjoy an activity, you will have ample opportunity to assist with: Bingo– Help, or even call the numbers; Watercolor Class– Help, encourage and appreciate the painters; or Out-of-doors Train Ride Excursion– Residents regularly go out for a ride around the island, and ride guides are needed. Share your love of nature. Opportunities to Substitute in the Summer If you find that you have some extra time this summer because your usual activity groups are taking the summer off, why not consider joining this group of caring volunteers to fill in for those taking a well-earned break from service. We also have substitute opportunity on the following committees: Dining, Beverage Cart, Menu Selection

It takes many volunteers on the Mail Committee to handle the sorting and delivery of mail.

Auxiliary Board President Nita DeWeese gets a lot of support from her first vice president and Bill Staples.

Auxiliary Dining Chairman Barbara Maruchi loves bringing new volunteers to her committee as much as she loves serving by providing dining companionship.

Assistance, Friendly Visitors, Activities and Hospitality.

Volunteer opportunities appear regularly, so call Teri Kollath, Manager of Academy and Volunteer services at 4542254 if you are interested in any of the 17 committees. Orientation is provided on the fourth Friday of each month. Auxiliary Activities committee volunteers work with staff to provide Fishing fun for Pavilion residents.

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Opportunity to Earn Maximum Benefit on Popular Charitable Gift Annuities Ends June 30 B Y

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Charitable Gift Annuities are among the The Legacy Foundation’s most popular life income plans. Recently a friend of the Ministry asked how the recent drop in interest rates may affect Charitable Gift Annuities. Due to the continuing decline in interest rates, the American Council on Gift Annuities has announced a modest decrease in gift annuity rates effective July 1. If you are considering a gift annuity this year, you would receive greater financial benefit by making your move before July 1, as lower rates will take effect on that day. Don’t worry – all the benefits that make Charitable Gift Annuities a wonderful tool, will still be available to you after July 1. But if you would like to get the maximum benefit from your gift annuity, consider letting us go to work for you now.

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RANGE OF BENEFITS • Annuities are a sound financial option and have their appeal because they offer a combination of benefits to suit many types of donors. • Charitable Gift Annuities generally pay a higher rate of return than comparable life-income gifts. • Payments are fixed for lifetime, giving donors the security of stable, predictable income. • Payments are favorably taxed, including a portion that is paid as the taxfree return of principle. • Donors can use a gift annuity to exchange appreciated but low-yielding assets for a fixed, lifetime payment stream with no up-front capital gains liability. • Gift annuities are simpler to set up and administer than charitable trusts.

$100 FOR ONE; $400 FOR TWO Following are two examples of the upcoming changes: A 75-year-old donor would see a drop in her payment rate from 7.1% to 6.7% if she waits past June 30th to make her gift. On a $25,000 annuity, that translates into $100 less in payments each year. Similarly, a two-life gift annuity for a couple aged 80 and 75 will lower its payment rate from 6.6% to 6.2% on July 1st. If the couple funds the annuity at $100,000, that means $400 less in payments per year. Want to learn more? Can we help you and your advisors evaluate whether a gift annuity makes sense for you? Just give us a call at the Legacy Foundation Office, 466-8484.

CRAB-TACULAR! Crab Fest was Best at Palm Grill Residents, and their guests alike, agreed that the Crab Fest at the Palm Grill was one of the best specialty nights yet. Over one hundred seafood lovers enjoyed the special Rose and John Sclafani (Royal Bonnet) menu which included appetizers like she-crab soup, crab dip, and a crab cocktail with tangy sauce. Popular entrees such as Alaskan King Crab, Soft Shell Crab, plus a traditional Shrimp and Crab Newburg were among the favorites. Guests rounded off their meals with a selection of delicious desserts. Live entertainment provided light background music for the event.

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Marcia & John Stokes (Royal Bonnet) Wayne & Meta Spielman (Palm Acres)

L-R: Dorothy and Albert Boldoso (friends of the Seers), Joyce and Dr. Don Brown (Parkwood), and Harold and Sylvia Seer (Parkwood)


June Dining Events Fathers Day Brunch

Fathers Day—an Important Day to Honor Dear Old Dad

Crystal Dining Room Sunday, June 15, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. The Crystal Dining Room is recognizing all fathers by hosting a Father’s Day Brunch. Start off with a cup of homemade cream of asparagus soup, visit the extensive salad bar, warm dinner rolls, assorted brunch items. The day’s feature will be roasted lamb with mint jelly, steak Diane with a dijon mushroom sauce, stuffed grouper, Eggs Benedict, omelets, and waffles. A variety of delicious sides will accompany such as Au Gratin Potatoes, Green Bean Casserole, and Herbed Medley of Carrots and Broccoli. And don’t forget dessert! The large dessert buffet will feature a variety of delicious pastries, cakes, and pies. In honor of this special occasion all gentleman will receive a surprise gift. The Crystal Dining Room will be open from 10 a.m. to 2p.m., and the price of the buffet is $ 17.76 per person. The entire staff invites you and your family to join us for a memorable Father’s Day brunch.

Route 66 Crystal Dining Room Thursday, June 19, 4 - 7 p.m. Nat King Cole said it best when singing about Route 66. "If you ever plan to motor west, Travel my way, take the highway that’s the best. Get your kicks on Route Sixty-Six." Come join us on a tasty journey of only the best food from the city of Chicago to the lights of Los Angeles. Pass through Oklahoma for a piping-hot cup of Oklahoma soup before heading to the banks of the Missouri River for some Grilled Trout. Upon arriving in Santa Fe, enjoy delicious Chicken Tortellini Casserole or California-style Chicken Fried Steak. While we are featuring 2,000 miles of the best dishes, be sure to grab some Texas Scalloped Corn; Arizona Blue Corn Pancakes; Kansas Summer Bean Salad; Illinois Pork and Beans; and so much more! So “If you get hip to this timely tip, come take that California trip. Get your kicks on Route Sixty-Six.”

Georgia on my Mind Palm Grill Thursday, June 26, 4 – 8 p.m. This special “Georgia on my Mind” dining event is sure to satisfy those with a love of Southern food. For an appetizer, you might like to start with some lightly seasoned Catfish nuggets with Bleu cheese dipping sauce or the Pinto bean and Ham soup. Entrees choices will include the slow-roasted Springer Mountain BBQ Pork Tenderloin, pecan crusted chicken breast with a Georgia peach chutney, Red Snapper with a Jimmy Carter sauce topped with dried peaches, or the popular Filet Mignon with a sweet Vidalia onion relish. Entrée prices will be from $15.95 to $20.95 and will include an Augusta salad. And why not finish off your Southern meal with a truly Southern dessert — like the famous Southern Peach Melba or a slice of pecan pie, a la mode. The staff from the Palm Grill hope to see you there!

If You Love Southern Food, You Don’t Want Miss This Event!

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To include a listing for an upcoming event or activity, please contact Mary Franklin, resort services manager, at 454-2152 or email: maryfranklin@shellpoint.org

Organ Concert with Crawford Wiley Tuesday, June 3 7:15 p.m. Church Auditorium/IS Crawford Wiley, 19, is currently majoring in organ performance at Bob Jones University under the instruction of Ed Dunbar. He previously held the post of organist at Gospel Baptist Church from the age of 13, studied organ with Claire Marie Faasse, and played for National Public Radio’s popular “From the Top” program which was recorded right here at Shell Point. This program will feature classical and sacred music that highlights the church organ’s attributes.

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Shopping and Lunch Outing Thursday, June 5 9:00 a.m. Island court pickup 9:10 a.m. Woodlands pickup 9:20 a.m. Eagles Preserve pickup 2:00 p.m. Approximate return Cost: $6.00 (lunch on your own)

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Explore the brand new Kohl’s department store at Colonial and Six Mile Cypress. From its humble beginnings as a single store chain in Wisconsin, Kohl’s has quickly become one of the nation’s largest retailers. You will love perusing the clothes, electronics, bed and bath items and home décor. Best of all, the prices are super reasonable! After shopping, enjoy a relaxing lunch at Applebee’s.

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Dancing with Deano by Gulfshore Ballet School

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Friday, June 6 7:15 p.m. Church Auditorium/IS Welcome the talented 14–18-year-old students of Gulfshore Ballet School as they present a program, designed to educate and entertain. Tony Award nominated choreographer and former principal dancer at the New York City Ballet from 1989-1996, Melinda Roy will present a classical ballet warm-up followed by a jazz performance to Dean Martin that also includes classical soloists, dancing on Pointe.

Summer Documentary: 1968 with Tom Brokaw

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Monday, June 9 1:00 p.m. Grand Cypress/WDL Join your Resort Services host and view this insightful documentary in which television news legend, Tom Brokaw, takes a retrospective look at 1968 – a pivotal year in American history that saw the assassinations of MLK and RFK, the Tet Offensive, a sea of change in pop culture and more. Including rare archival footage, recent interviews of key players and the perspective of four intervening decades, this provocative documentary brings to life the tragedies and triumphs of the sixties’ most memorable year. Light will be refreshments served.


EVENTS

PROGRAMS • PARTIES • MOVIES

OUTINGS • EXCURSIONS

Senator Burt Saunders Visit Tuesday, June 10 10:15 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. Church Auditorium/IS

Saturday DVD: Bella (2007)

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Senator Saunders will speak at an Academy presentation about recent legislative activity that has had a direct effect on Shell Point and other senior communities. President Peter Dys has been actively involved in discussions with Florida’s governing officials in Tallahassee and will open the presentation with introductory comments, sharing his insights into the process and recent decisions made by the Legislature. Senator Saunders has a long and valuable history of involvement with Shell Point and we are excited to welcome him back for this special Academy presentation.

Dinner Outing: Roadhouse Cafe

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Tuesday, June 10 5:00 p.m. Island court pickup 5:10 p.m. Woodlands pickup 5:20 p.m. Eagles Preserve pickup 8:00 p.m. Approximate return Cost: $4.00 (dinner on your own) Billed as a “nice place to be,” this newer restaurant is located right around the corner from Shell Point. Choose amazing steak, filling Italian or delicious seafood all served in a cozy, inviting atmosphere. Also featured are some dishes from the original Roadhouse in Cape Cod. Entrees begin at $16.

High Tide Steel Drummers

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Thursday, June 12 6:15 p.m. Amphitheater/IS Spend a perfect summer evening outdoors with friends and neighbors for entertaining tropical sounds performed before the beautiful backdrop of the lagoon at sunset. This concert of Caribbean music will mix steel drums, guitars, vocals and percussion. Make plans to enjoy a meal at the Crystal Dining Room before!

NOAA: Coastal Data and SWFL

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Friday, June 13 10:15 a.m. Church Auditorium/IS Join Russell Beard, Director of NOAA’s National Coastal Data Development Center, for an informative look at two areas of interest in Southwest Florida. First we will investigate the science behind NOAA’s hurricane awareness and preparedness monitoring. Then we will explore other work done by NOAA including monitoring harmful algae blooms and phytoplankton.

Consignment Shopping and Lunch

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Exploring Ave Maria

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Thursday, June 12 9:00 a.m. Island court pickup 9:10 a.m. Woodlands court pickup 9:20 a.m. Eagles Preserve pickup 3:00 p.m. Approximate return Cost: $25.00 (lunch included) Find out what this new town is all about as we take a guided bus tour through the well-planned community. Our day will also include an opportunity to see the interior of the Oratory, lunch at a town café and a bit of walking around the beautiful piazza.

Saturday, June 14 2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. Grand Cypress Room/WDL An international soccer star is on his way to sign a multi-million dollar contract when something happens that brings his career to an abrupt end. A waitress, struggling to make it in New York City, discovers something about herself that she’s unprepared for. In one irreversible moment, their lives are turned upside down...until an impetuous action brings them together and turns an ordinary day into an unforgettable experience. This film is an uplifting story of love, hope and forgiveness!

Saturday, June 14 10:00 a.m. Island court pickup 10:10 a.m. Woodlands pickup 10:20 a.m. Eagles Preserve pickup 3:00 p.m. Approximate Return Cost: $6.00 (lunch on your own) Everything old is new again, including fashions from 1968. Be on the lookout for bellbottoms and wide ties! Whatever you’re looking for (or not looking for), you’ll be sure to find as we peruse some of the best shops in the area. Before heading home, we’ll sit down for a relaxing lunch at Starz Pizza.

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Mote Marine

Monday, June 16 8:00 a.m. Island court pickup 8:10 a.m. Woodlands pickup 8:20 a.m. Eagles Preserve pickup 3:00 p.m. Approximate return Cost: $25.00 (lunch on your own) Explore the secrets of the sea at Mote Marine Laboratory and Aquarium. This Sarasota aquarium will amaze and delight you. From touch tanks and an immersion theater to great exhibits, you are sure to have fun while learning something new. Check out www.mote.org for more information on current exhibits. We will stop for lunch at Cracker Barrel before returning to Shell Point. This trip involves a 2hour bus ride with a rest stop.

Basin Street River Band

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Tuesday, June 17 7:00 p.m. Grand Cypress Room/WDL Enjoy some toe-tapping Dixieland music as this great band returns to Shell Point! They’re fun, enthusiastic, and perform an eclectic mix of Dixie favorites and other traditional American music. This will be a great way to cap off a warm June day!

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HAPPENINGS PLACES

TO GO,

Model Sailing Club Informational Meeting

PEOPLE

MEET, & THINGS

Library Book Talk

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Wednesday, June 18 9:00 a.m. Garden Apartment Pond/IS Are you interested in sailing? Meet Charlie Picek (Junonia) about the possibility of starting up a model boat sailing club right here at Shell Point. Learn about the model sail boats, how to make them and race them. Everyone is welcome.

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Tuesday, June 24 2:00 p.m. Grand Cypress Rm/WDL Betty Boers (Oakmont) will discusses The Life of Pi by Yann Martel as part of the regular Library Book Talk series. The entire Shell Point community is welcome.

Steinway Young Artists Piano Recital

Lunch Outing: Gramma Dots

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Thursday, June 19 11:30 a.m. Island court pickup 11:40 a.m. Woodlands pickup 11:50 a.m. Eagles Preserve pickup 2:00 p.m. Approximate return Cost: $6.00 (lunch on your own) Enjoy your meal overlooking the marina at this fun nautically decorated and moderately priced lunch spot just over the bridge on Sanibel. You have your choice of delectable salads, hearty sandwiches and other favorites. I’ve heard they serve up a great burger that is served with homemade fries!

Route 66 Thursday, June 19 4:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Crystal Dining Room/IS

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Come join us on a tasty road trip along Route 66, full of only the best food from the city of Chicago to the lights of Los Angeles, including Grilled Trout, Chicken Tortellini Casserole and California-style Chicken Fried Steak, Texas Scalloped Corn, Arizona Blue Corn Pancakes, Kansas Summer Bean Salad; Illinois Pork and Beans, and so much more! See page 23 for more info. 26

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Tuesday, June 24 2:15 p.m. Church Auditorium/IS Attend this special piano recital and hear the rising stars of tomorrow! Hosted by Greg Billings, owner of the Steinway Piano Gallery in North Naples and founder of the Steinway Piano Society, this recital will feature the winning performers of the 2008 FGCU/Steinway Piano Competition for children between the ages of 6 and 18.

Beach Day

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Wednesday, June 25 8:30 a.m. Island court pickup 8:40 a.m. Woodlands pickup 8:50 a.m. Eagles Preserve pickup 3:30 p.m. Approximate Return Cost: $15.00 It’s time to hit the beach! We will bring along the picnic lunch. You just need your beach gear. Never joined us for Beach Day? What are you waiting for? Call Elizabeth at 454-2239 to get the ins and outs of this monthly beach adventure. SIGN UP REQ.

Author Elizabeth Becka

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Thursday, June 26 3:30 p.m. Grand Cypress Room/WDL Welcome acclaimed author and forensic scientist, Elizabeth Becka, back to Shell Point as she speaks about forensics and writing. Her latest novel, Unknown Means, is a locked-room mystery with a forensic science twist. Signed copies of her book will be available for purchase.

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Georgia on my Mind

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Thursday, June 26 4:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Palm Grill/WDL If you like Southern food with style, plan on attending this special event at the Palm Grill on Thursday, June 26. Southern entrees choices will include slow-roasted Springer Mountain BBQ Pork Tenderloin; Pecan crusted chicken breast with Georgia peach chutney, and warm pecan pie a la mode! Turn to page 23 for more information.

BeachCat Lunch Trip: Cabbage Key

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Friday, June 27 9:30 a.m. Board at the Macoma Dock 3:00 p.m. Approximate Return Cost: $41.00 (boat crew gratuity included, lunch on your own) Travel via the 41 foot, power catamaran to Cabbage Key, home of the Cabbage Key Inn. Thousands of one-dollar bills are taped to every surface of the main dining room, where you will be enjoying your lunch. It’s rumored that a meal here was the inspiration for the Jimmy Buffett tune Cheeseburger in Paradise. Sign up/ boating attire steps

Movie Night: The Producers (1968)

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Monday, June 30—7:15 p.m. Manatee Room/IS Our year-long celebration of Shell Point’s 40th Anniversary continues with this Academy Award winner for Best Screenplay. In this hysterical farce, rapacious but lovable producer, Max Bialystock (Zero Mostel), hasn’t had a hit in years. Quite by accident, he and his meek, neurotic accountant, Leo Bloom (Gene Wilder), come up with a plot to oversell shares in a surefire flop musical and make off with the profits — using the worst play ever written, Springtime for Hitler.


Sign-up required for this activity. Call Island (454-2282) or Woodlands (454-2054)

EVENTS

PROGRAMS • PARTIES • MOVIES

July 4th Festivities Get Your Tickets Now You are invited to join your Shell Point friends and neighbors at the Church Auditorium to celebrate Independence Day with an old-fashioned ice cream social. The cool treats will be served from 2 – 3 p.m., followed by a patriotic performance from 3 – 4 p.m. by the Liberty Voices, a world famous eight-part a cappella singing group. A Slice of A Cappella Americana The Liberty Voices have toured the country, been featured on national television, and sung in numerous parades. They have also performed for five United States

Walking up and down stairs

Walking required

Special event bus will be running

Boating attire

OUTINGS • EXCURSIONS

presidents and showcased at national, as well as at international conventions. “We expect an awesome patriotic celebration with these world-class singers,” said Ted Yeatts, program coordinator. The Liberty Voices have been regular performers at Disney’s EPCOT Center and have even been called “America’s premier a cappella stylists… and the United States vocal ambassadors to the world!” Tickets Tickets are complimentary to Shell Point residents and are available at either Service Desk. Guest tickets are $5.00 each, and will be available starting June 2nd. Doors will open at 2 p.m.; no early birds please. Join us in celebrating our nation’s freedom !

Enjoy entertainment by the talented a capella singing group, The Liberty Voices, as they take the stage at 3:00 p.m. on Friday, July 4th, for an uplifting patriotic program to celebrate our country’s independence.

Mark Your Calendar The following activities are planned by a variety of groups. All Shell Point residents are welcome to attend. Check your current Weekly Reminder or watch SPTV for locations and/or changes.

SUNDAY 9:00 Christian Studies (WDL) 9:15 Christian Life Studies 10:15 Morning Worship 1:15 Mixer Golf League 6:15 Evening Service

12:45 Intro to Duplicate Bridge 1:00 Mixed Progressive Pairs’ Bridge 1:30 Stamp Project (Sabal Rm/WDL) 1:45 The Rollicking Recorderists 6:45 Hymn Sing (June 3)

FRIDAY WEDNESDAY

MONDAY 8:45 Lap Robes (June 2, 16) 9:15 Billiards 9:15 Pottery 9:15 Shuffleboard 10:15 Virtual Bowling 10:30 Disciple Men’s Bible Study 12:00 Mah-Jongg (Sabal Room, WDL) 1:15 Advanced Table Tennis 1:15 Scrabble 1:15 Tone Chimes 2:00 Beading Club 3:00 Bible Study (Arbor) 7:00 Duplicate Bridge

TUESDAY 8:30 Women’s Golf League 9:15 Painting Class 9:15 Stamp Project (Tunnel/IS)

2:00 Mended Hearts (June 26) 2:15 Computer Club (June 19) 2:15 Handwork (June 12, 26) 7:00 Trailblazers Bible Study

7:45 Men’s Bible Study (June 4) 8:45 Resident Council (June 4) 9:00-12:00 Geraci Travel 9:15 Watercolor Group 9:45 Ladies’ Bible Study (no meeting June 4) 1:00 Chess 1:15 Table Tennis 2:15 Huggie Hearts 2:30 Jazz ‘n Stuff 3:00 Bible Study (King’s Crown) 5:45 Village Church Choir Rehearsal 7:15 Bible Study & Prayer

8:00 Intrepid Bike Riders (June 13, 27) 9:15 Stamp Project (Tunnel/IS) 10:00 Genealogy (June 13) 11:15 Fit & Healthy 1:00 Mixed Progressive Pairs’ Bridge 1:15 Quilters 1:15 Table Tennis 1:30 Vespers (Arbor) 2:00 Diabetes Group Appointment (June 6, 27) 2:45 Vespers (KC) 3:15 Ballroom Dancing 6:45 Game Night

THURSDAY 8:00 Men’s Golf League 9:00 Paddlers’ Club/IS 9:30 Current Events Group 1:15 SPOT Play Readers (June 5) 1:15 Mah-Jongg (Library Lounge, RAC) 1:45 The Shield (June 26)

SATURDAY 8:00 Adopt-a-Road (June 21) 9:00 Coffee Social 9:45 Bridge Supervised Play 1:00 Chess 7:00 Duplicate Bridge

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A Better You… Hairstyle Do’s and Don’ts For Your Face’s Shape B

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Now that you have determined your face shape using the tips from last month’s article, let’s explore the do’s and don’ts for your face shape! Your stylists look forward to discussing these valuable tips with you. Consultations are always complimentary in The Salons at Shell Point Oval: Short or long, straight or curly –

ovals can wear just about any hair style. To highlight an attractive facial feature, such as your eyes, add a few strategic layers around your face where you want to attract attention. Avoid too much height in the crown or layers that are too short on top of your head – this will make your face appear longer. Ovals with thick or curly hair should avoid blunt cuts which will add too much volume to the bottom; go for soft layers to complement your already balanced face shape. Bangs can enhance facial features such as: center parts bring attention to your nose; bangs above eyebrows give focus to the eyes. Square: Soften the face with feathered

or graduated layers beginning at the cheekbone. Soft curls or waves offset the squareness, but keep the volume through the sides to a minimum. Avoid echoing your face shape with a one-length bob and wide, blunt bangs. This makes the forehead and jaw appear broader. Try a wispy bang or a longer bang swept to the side. The shorter the hair, the more off-center the part should be in order to offset the square shape.

Shell Point residents Ruth Deuber, Jane Small, Willie Demerest, and Ginny Barnitz sport the latest hairstyles, from the stylists at The Island and Arbor Salon. These hairstyles complement the shape of each of their faces to bring out their best features.

will make your face appear narrower and your neck longer. Keep curly hair a bit longer to keep extra bulk through the sides to a minimum. Face framing layers are most flattering, especially those that graze the cheek. Keep hair length above or below the chin. Hair at chin length will accentuate the round face shape. Avoid a heavy bang close to the eyebrows in length. You can’t go wrong with an off-center part, but you may be able to elongate the face with a center part if the hair is past the chin in length. Oblong: Aim to balance out your features by avoiding styles that have too much height in the crown or width at the bottom. Add the appearance of width with rounder cuts such as a bob with lots of volume at the sides. Bangs should be eyebrow length or longer to shorten the total length of the face. Always go with an off center part.

Almost any length style looks good. Accent a well-defined jaw line with soft layers or loose curls, beginning at the cheeks or lower, to add fullness to the bottom. Face-framing layers accent eyes or Diamond:

Round: Create fullness in the crown and sleeker through the sides with texturized layers with softness. An angled bob that is longer in the front and shorter in the back

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Shell Point Life | June 2008

Heart: This shape is flattered by soft layers or loose curls beginning at the cheeks or lower which adds fullness to the bottom. For short styles keep the top length long. Super short pixie cuts work well, as long as the top is flat and not spiky. Avoid blunt bobs as they will bring attention to the jaw line and chin. For a wider face; wear your hair forward rather than tucked behind your ears and off your face. Straight, wispy bangs that reach the eyebrow or below will hide wide foreheads. An off-center part is best. Pear: Balance the narrow forehead and wider jaw line with volume through the crown and temple area. You will feel like you had a mini face lift if you keep the volume in these areas. Keep volume to a minimum at the cheekbone. Use soft layers from the cheekbones to the bottom. Avoid too much bulk at the bottom, such as in a blunt bob.

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cheekbones. If your chin is too pointed, avoid a center part. Avoid short layers or height in the crown. The longer the face, the more off center the part should be. For a wider face, angled bangs narrow cheeks.

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Variety Show One Incredible Evening of Entertainment!

Bud Smith, Tom Frackenpohl

Paul Peterson Russ Reider, Carol Cooper, and Scott Moore

If you missed this year’s Variety Show, then you missed one incredible evening of entertainment! The Second Annual Shell Point Variety Show kicked off in the Village Church on April 29 with an opening monologue from Shell Point’s own version of Johnny Carson (aka Scott Dan Philgreen Moore) and his sidekick, Russ Rieder. Lakewood resident, Ginny Barrett, kicked off the performances with a poetry reading about her fiberglass penguin friend, Willy Cool. King’s Crown Activities leader, Carol Cooper, wowed the audience with a vocal performance. Dr. Harold Greenlee of Sue Goodell, desk bells Coquina kept the laughs going with Double Entendre jokes before Lucina resident Sue Goodell got the audience humming along to her performance on the desk bells. Just before the Tone Chimes took the stage, Scott Moore performed as one of Johnny Carson’s most famous characters, Carnac. Highlights from the second half Scott Moore of the program included the Line Dancers and a performance by Pavilion resident

JoAuda Wilkin who sang a song from her childhood. Employees joined in the fun too as the multi-talented Dan Philgreen from SPTV played guitar, harmonica, and sang two songs. Larry and Marj Fose sang with their daughter, Kim, and transportation driver Michael Anthony performed Flamenco Guitar. One act combined the talents of an employee and a resident as Bud Smith of Parkwood and Tom Frackenpohl took on a couple of Johnny Cash songs. The show was closed out with a humorous song about the making of Tuna Casserole by Paul and Carolyn Peterson (Rosemont) followed by the audience joining in to sing “Take Me Out to the Ball Game!” One of the things that make the Variety Show such a special event is that it brings together residents, employees, and families from all around the community. The Variety Show is yet another event that shows how special Shell Point is.

Shell Point Line Dancers

Harold Greenlee

Marj, Kim and Larry Fose

JoAuda Wilkin Tone Chimes

Paul and Carolyn Peterson

Michael Anthony

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Gear Heads Hot Chili Rods Show Off Their Amazing Cars When Communications Specialist Jessica Clark set out to find a few antique and classic cars for the Shell Point Open House in January, little did she know that almost 50 classic cars would arrive on the scene. Recently, Jessica presented the Hot Chili Rods Car Club with an award of appreciation for their group’s generous participation at the event. “We really appreciated all of the car club members who brought their classic and antique cars to our open house,” said Jessica. “We had cars that represented each of the different decades of time that were depicted at the event, which featured ‘A Stroll Through the Decades,’” she added. “They all enjoyed visiting Shell Point and being a part of our big annual event.”

Easy Rider Alvah Crocker Cruises on a Goldwing

If you’re driving down Shell Point Boulevard and see a streak of gold fly by, it’s probably Alvah Crocker on his Honda Goldwing motorcycle. A resident of Nautilus court, Alvah enjoys cruising on his 2005 Goldwing with his wife, Nancy. They have been riding together for four years and have put over 22,000 miles on the touring bike. That includes trips to California, the Rockies, and trips to and from Alaska. The Crockers have even taken trips to the

Canadian Maritime Provinces for their fiftieth wedding anniversary, and to New England where they both grew up. One thing is for sure, Alvah and Nancy sure know how to ride in style. Their golden Honda motorcycle features a Global Positioning System (GPS), CD player, and an intercom system the couple use to communicate with one another. This bike also has the ability to reverse and a safety feature in which, if the kickstand is still up and the rider tries to put the motorcycle into first gear, the engine will stall. Although you can’t switch the bike over to auto pilot like an airplane, it does have a cruise control feature like a car, and if the

footbrake is used while in cruise control, the cruise control will be canceled. Speaking of cars, this Honda Goldwing motorcycle has a bigger engine than many of Honda’s automobiles! In addition, it requires more wiring than even a Honda Accord! This bike is so high tech, “it practically drives itself,” says Alvah. So the next time you’re on the road, keep a lookout for a brilliant golden motorcycle. If the vanity plate says “Go Bear” and a teddy bear watches from the back seat, it’s Alvah and Nancy Crocker on their 2005 Honda Goldwing motorcycle.

Shell Point Life June 2008  

Monthly magazine that highlights the amazing lifestyle and wonderful persons that make Shell Point Retirement Community truly unique.