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Fa Oct ll I ob ss er ue 2 No 018 .2 2

Image JENNIFER BERNARD: Reaching the Pinnacle in a Foundation

Lifestyle YASER & MAYASA: A Model Family Business

BUSINESS T By Daniel Goes R OYA L FALL 2018 $4.99 CANADA

SMJ

FEATURE COUTURE CULTURE & ARTS Editorial Model Search 2018: Aaron McQuaid Named Top Model In Barcelona, Spain

EXCLUSIVE

Behind the #MeToo Story ...is a Film!


SMJ MAGAZINE

W’AT ABOWT US Producer, Director & Cast Photographer: Lubin Tasevski

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Instagram - @shelland_house_of_films Twitter - @FilmsofShelland YouTube - Shellandhouseoffilms Email: Shellandhouseoffilms@gmail.com


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Table of

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7. From The Desk of Shelley ... by Shelley Jarrett SMJ BEAUTY CLOSET 8. The Big Chop ... by Shelley Jarrett 9 . Black Hair Brunch ... by Michelle Moore 36. Jennifer Bernard: Reaching the Pinnacle in a Foundation ... by Andrew Terry Pasieka

Lifestyle

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AFRICAN FASHION WEEK TORONTO 12. Wrap-Up of the Sixth Annual AFWT ... by Andrew Terry Paseika 13 . Black Pride: AFWT 2018 ... by Leandra Vanessa Louis 15. The Empress Walk: Fashion with a Cause ... by Shelley Jarrett 16. Yaser & Mayasa: A Model Family Busines ... by Andrew Terry Pasieka 31. A Reflection on Toronto International Film Fesitval ... by Marisa Shepard 34. The Other Diva in Diva2Diva ... by Andrew Terry Pasieka 39. Your Health is Your Wealth ... by Dr. Lisa Ramsackal 42. Affairs of the Heart: Why Break-ups Happen Around Holidays ... by Akua Hinds

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BUSINESS 38. Women’s College Hospital: 135 Years of Legacy and Counting ... by Andrew Terry Pasieka 40. T By Daniel Goes Royal ... by Andrew Terry Pasieka

feature CCA EDITORIAL MODEL SEARCH 19. Toronto Top Nine ... by Meghan Durnford 20. New York Top Eight ... by Meghan Durnford 21. The Top Five ... by Meghan Durnford 25. Game of Thrones Finale in Spain ... by Claris Minas Manglicmot

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Exclusive

28. Behind the #MeToo Story .... is a Film! ... by Nakeisha Geddes

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Enjoy these past editions of SMJ Fall Issues online at smjmag.com

www.smjmag.com

Founder & Publisher Shelley Jarrett Editor-in-Chief Andrew Terry Pasieka Creative Director/Layout Sheri L. Lake Chief Photographer Lubin Tasevski Fashion & Design Editor Claris Minas Manglicmot Contributors Shelley Jarrett Andrew Terry Pasieka Claris Minas Manglicmot Dr. Lisa Ramsackal Akua Hinds Nakeisha Geddes Michelle Moore Leandra Vanessa Louis Meghan Durnford, Marisa Shepard Photos Caleb & Gladys Michelle Aristocrat Mike Noonan Edris Photography Darren Lee Lloyd Crawford Maria & Saba Bhokar Publicity LIM Media Group Inc. Website www.smjmag.com Contact publisher@smjmag.com

CCA Editorial Search Winner 2018: Aaron McQuaid (Toronto) Suit in Barcelona: Curtis and Elliot Photographers: Caleb and Gladys (New York) Hairstylist: Gary Allen (Toronto) Make Up: Mel Rose Rosal (Barcelona)

SMJ Magazine is a division of Seventh House Publishing Arts. Fall 2018 Issue No. 22

DISCLAIMER: We reserve the right to edit all content for space and clarity. All submissions when edited become the property of Seventh House Publishing Arts. No part of this magazine may be produced in any form without the expressed written consent of the publisher. We make a conscious effort to ensure complete accuracy of all content; however we accept no liability for any inaccurate information. SMJ Magazine is published with limited print editions four (4) times a year. To advertise in our publication, be featured or for more information, please contact us at publisher@smjmag.com or visit www.smjmag.com. For editorials contact atp11th@gmail.com FALL 2018

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Sheri L. Lake (647) 272-3624 i_dezign@outlook.com

SHELLEY JARRETT AWARD WINNING IMAGE/STYLE CONSULTANT, MENTOR, SPEAKER & PUBLISHER

416-839-2792

twitter.com/SJImageCreation www.linkedin.com/in/sjimagecreations www.facebook.com/SJImageCreations w

www.limmediagroup.com FALL 2018

www.sjimagecreations.com/www.smjmag.com www.youtube.com/user/SMJMagazine pinterest.com/shellyspix/


SMJ MAGAZINE

I am writing these Publisher Notes on the first full day of fall. The new season arrived right on time in southern Ontario, ushering in an immediate cool down. We had a traditionally hot summer in spades this year, so perhaps we will be having a typically cool autumn as well. However, this issue has four stories that are very atypical and unlike anything traditional. We have one such story representing each of our reporting interest areas. In the area of health & wellness, our Editor-in-Chief interviewed a fascinating lady who has navigated some wide twists and turns in her career path. None was bigger for Jennifer Bernard than the one that landed her in the position of President and CEO of the prestigious Women’s College Hospital Foundation. In the area of faith & community, we pay a return visit to an engaging entrepreneur who is part of a dedicated interracial husband-and-wife team like Andrew and me. We first reported on Daniel Lewis in our Summer/Anniversary 2015 issue. T By Daniel began out of his own medicinal recovery from a near-tragedy, but where this little tea business has taken him is something out of royal proportions! Elsewhere on this page, you may be seeing a photo of me unlike all others which have appeared in previous issues. In I Corinthians 11: 15 Paul writes, “If a woman has long hair, it is her ornament and glory. For her hair is given to her for a covering.” Black women, unlike all other women, have had to do more improvising with our hair because our ‘covering’ has been the most challenging. I think that is why over time the topic of black women wearing their natural hair and not ‘covering up’ has been so controversial. Well, after thinking about it (and doing nothing) for longer than I care to admit, I took the plunge and went natural. In SMJ Beauty Closet, which opens our fashion & design section, I talk about how I made the ‘big chop.’

I started SMJ Magazine five years ago because I wanted a larger platform to mentor and have more of a positive impact on women than what I was achieving as an image consultant. Over the past two years, I have attempted to move into the even larger platform of multimedia. After a number of opportunities (and an equal number of reluctant shelving), I can finally say that most artistic of all phrases, “Lights! Camera!! Action!!!”

About two and a half years ago we did a major re-branding, and among other things, realized that several of our published articles had a lot more to say than what had been printed. There was, in fact, a ‘story behind the story.’ More often than not, it involved visible minorities and marginalized communities. Our first project comes from a story written by our own Nakeisha Geddes in our Winter 2018 Issue No. 20 entitled “#MeToo Close To Home.” I think we can all agree that there is a problem of sexual violence in our communities. It is refreshing to know that we can finally have dialogue about secrets many have been carrying. A desire to be in the film industry comes with knowing we are in a very public forum because we put out a product that is a window to the world. The way we handle this watershed #MeToo moment by revealing its diverse scope in W’AT ABOWT US could become a template for future projects that originate as SMJ stories. We thought it most appropriate that Nakeisha be the one to interview us and report on our first documentary. We will be informing you of other developments with SMJ Magazine in future issues. Some are the inevitable changes that come with five years of publishing; others involve staying above ground on the cutting edge of change. Remember to follow us on all social media platforms and please continue to support us, tell your friends, family colleagues and co-workers about us. And as always, we welcome partnerships and collaborations!

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Beauty CLOSET

The BIG CHOP

by Shelley Jarrett

A woman’s beauty is her power, and her hair is a major source of that strength. Beauty and hair are intertwined because hair is what many people see first when they meet you. For a great majority of women, when we refer to hair we are talking about natural hair. Natural hair means hair that has not been treated or texturally modified by any chemicals. A black woman’s hair is unique from any of the other races. It is coarse and thick with a tendency to curl – and curl it will, if not corrected! This means avoiding rain/the pool/garden sprinklers at all costs – and even cancelling outdoor plans if you need to! However, in the last few years something has changed in the aesthetics department, and suddenly natural hair is in! Although natural hair is a physical manifestation of our beliefs, not everyone loves it. There will always be those who primp and preen; and that’s OK too. However, if we as black women have learned anything over the past few hundred years it better be to support one another, starting with our hair… straight, Afro, luminous, colored – whatever we want. Your hair is your decision. That has been a prevailing attitude. My hair journey started over 40 years ago when I subconsciously decided I would wear my hair braided for as long as I could. Then weaving became popular. I tried it and enjoyed wearing it, because, it gave me that softer look as well as straight hair. Then several years’ later wigs became my favorite, because it was easy to try different styles, such as long curly, long wavy, different shades of highlights, etc. It was so exciting and creative. When I launched SMJ Magazine in 2013, suddenly being in the media and the public eye became an important consideration. Today, five plus years later I am blazing trails and putting my reputation (and image) on the line even more. It is altogether scary and calming, knowing I am more exposed while having more control over my life, where I am heading and the legacy I want to leave for others. With this knowledge also came the realization that the journey with my hair had come full circle I know that a great part of my beauty and my strength is being comfortable in my skin and with my hair. It is an Inside Job and a state of mind. How you feel inside will show on the outside. If you feel good, you automatically look good and you will perform better. I see my hair as only part of who I am as a black woman. My personal standards are based on the work I do for others. Nevertheless, I immediately understood the spirit that said inside me “Do it!,” when I woke up one morning near the end of May. I went 8

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back to that image of a young girl I knew so well—before the wigs, before the weaves, before the braids. It has now been almost four months since the ‘big chop.’ I have come to know again what I always have known. My natural hair is a symbol of my black excellence. It is not just hair for me; it is my identity, my race, it is how I view myself as a woman, and how society views me. As we know black women are trendsetters in today’s pop culture. Everyone looks to black women for styles and trends in beauty starting with hair. I have had so many compliments, mostly among other black women (and some black men!) that I feel like a center of beauty influence within my own race. More than that, I feel liberated with a sense of pride in myself. My hair is now easier to maintain and looks great with whatever gear I am decked out in, which in turn boosts my self-esteem. I am enjoying my new look every day.


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Black Hair Brunch Hamilton Ontario ‘s 1st Black Hair Brunch took place on Sunday August 19th 2018 at The Spice Factory. I had the pleasure of attending this unquie event which specifically catered to women of color! As we all know Black women love to change thier hair frequently, whether they are wearing thier natural curls, rocking a weave, show-stoping in box-braids or strudding down the street after “The BIG CHOP”...we defintely know how to maxmize our options when it comes to hair choices! This event was the first of its kind in my hometown, and I was very excited to show my support. First, let’s get to know the visionaries of “Black Hair Brunch” Esther and Shaneece from Denoir Collective. What made you both want to start/create this organization which targets/focuses on Black Women? Shaneece’s answer: The idea for Denoire Collective came from both Esther and I wanting to find ways to collaborate to curate events and experiences for marginalized people of colour in our community. We as people of color aren’t equally represented and in order for this to change we have to come together to help build each other up. Esther Adjekum’s answer: Our organization focuses on black Hamiltonians and their allies. We want Denoire Collective to be an organization that brings people together. Do you feel that in today’s society Black women are totally accepted in a professional setting with their natural hair? Shaneece’s answer: I do not feel as if Black women are totally accepted in a professional setting with their natural hair. In many cases, and speaking from my own personal experience, we as a people are conditioned to change our appearance to suit the norm.

by Michelle Moore

Being a part of the norm means we are more likely to be accepted within social institutions, but we also become conditioned to believe that our hair in our natural state is not good enough. We do not look “put together,” which gives us the negative impression that in order to be successful we must adhere to our society’s standards of beauty. I have been on my hair journey for years, but it is only now that am I starting to feel confident in having my hair in its natural state. Going forward I know I will not listen to the negative talk; I will not compromise. Accept me as I am, and do not judge me on the way I choose to style my hair. We will set a precedent and it is a step in the right direction. Esther Adjekum’s answer: I think for black women to be “totally accepted” in professional setting with their natural hair black bodies in general would have to be accepted, and they aren’t. Our hair, our bodies and skin tones are considered the “other”. For me personally it is not so much about acceptance but more-so acknowledgment that there is differential treatment and prejudice when it comes to the natural state of black hair, and even the manipulation of it in protective styles. What would be your best advice for a woman of color thinking of going natural? Can you offer any tips? Shaneece’s answer :My best advice would be to be confident, and the confidence you need starts from within. Sometimes it is difficult to make a drastic change from being so conditioned to using perms, texturizers etc. that we feel as if we have lost touch with ourselves. We feel as if taking away our length, texture or hair color diminishes our connection to being feminine. My advice would be to do your research, make sure you find women with similar hair textures that you can trust and you can use their tips, videos and blog posts to help give you direction. I would also offer encouragement and push to make sure that you keep trying. Not every woman’s FALL 2018

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first twist out is going to be amazing – but we have to start somewhere. Not every “fail” is a fail. Practice makes perfect, and we are all just trying to find ways to love our hair and in turn, love ourselves. Esther Adjekum’s answer: Don’t compare yourself to others - Do take the time to find out what will work for you. Don’t be afraid to try something new Do remember that no matter what you do with your hair it is beautiful. Can you tell us what are the top 3 lessons in life so far have you learned that has propelled you both to success? Shaneece’s answer : We stand a much better chance of cultivating growth and prosperity when we work together instead of being competitive. Learning to listen to your instinct will bring you very far, and we have to make sure that we are always celebrating differences while being inclusive. Supporting each other will not take away from your own success! Esther Adjekum’s answer: I have learned to not look for validation from anyone; we believe in ourselves, in each other and in our dreams, and that has taken us pretty far. You have to do the work; we put our heart and soul into everything we do. We were going to bed and waking up thinking out this event; my partnership with Shaneece works because we ultimately want the same thing. We landed an exclusive interview with the Founder of “KinkyCurlyKayi” Vivian Kanye who was a major sponsor for this event. Fun Fact...Vivian & I actually went to High School together, Cathedral in Hamilton Ontario. What made her want to start/create the company “KinkyCurlyYaki”? Vivian Kaye’s answer: I wanted to make sure that my hair looked great without me having to worry about it. I was searching for quick and effortless hair extension styles for my natural curly hair. My research found that most hair extension companies carried mostly straight or synthetic curl textures that were not versatile or easy to maintain. In 2012 I decided to create a company that not only sold high quality, kinky, curly and natural-looking textured hair extensions but one that also celebrates the Black women who wear it. Can you tell us what the top 3 lessons in life are so far have you learned that has propelled you to success? Vivian Kaye’s answer: (1) Don’t Be Afraid To Be the Janitor. EVERYTHING becomes your responsibility when you start a business. (2) Ruthlessly Focus on Your Strengths. Hire people who are better in the areas where you have weakness. (3) Appreciate the BIG 10

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Little Steps Pace yourself. Entrepreneurship is a marathon, not a sprint. Do you feel that your faith assisted you in obtaining/achieving your goals? How about your friends/family? Vivian Kaye’s answer: Having a strong spiritual foundation have been crucial for me because there are times when things may not make sense or you won’t have any answers but you have to trust and believe that things are going to work out for your good. It also helps to have a strong support system around you whether that’s family, friends or shockingly even strangers on social media who can relate to the things that you’re dealing with at any particular moment. What struggles/obstacles have you had to face while building your empire? Vivian Kaye’s answer I love when someone asks this question, because it allows me to remind everyone that even when you experience success, there will still be obstacles to overcome. Keep pushing. Never give up. Do you feel that in today’s society Black women are totally accepted in a Professional setting with their natural hair? Vivian Kaye: While I would love to say yes, the reality is that this is still not yet the case. We all have either been or know someone who has been in a position where she was either told outright she needed to change her hairstyle or was otherwise made uncomfortable until she did. We have a long way to go until our hair becomes acceptable as professional or aesthetically pleasing to society. What would be your best advice for a woman of color thinking of going natural? Can you offer any tips? Vivian Kaye: The natural journey isn’t easy, but it’s so liberating when you can be yourself. And if you’re worried about how your hair will look as you transition, KinkyCurlyYaki is always here to help.


SUMMER /ANNIVERSARY 2018


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WRAP UP OF THE SIXTH ANNUAL AFRICAN FASHION WEEK TORONTO By Andrew Terry Pasieka African Fashion Week Toronto celebrated six years this past August 30th to September 2nd at the top of the Toronto Globe & Mail Center in the heart of downtown Toronto. You will be reading elsewhere about highlights from Saturday the 1st. Student Designer Competition was featured in the first day, the winner being Eugenie Amegah of NYKWALE. The next two days had separate seven designer ensembles each night. Adebayo Jones had the runway to himself on Sunday the 2nd, right after the Industry Awards. And speaking of the Industry Awards, some of the 2017 winners were on the 2018 runway; Fashion Accessory winner Fanny Ngantcheu of Kwesiya and Kadeem Faustin of Kyle Gervacy both were part of the Saturday night group. Among the 2018 Industry Award winners, two of the most popular in the SMJ corner was the continued incredible story of the young man who modeled at the first AFWT, decided to try his hand as a novice designer in the Student Competition in the second year, and has been winning awards ever since the third year. Kyle Gervacy was a popular repeat winner of the Unisex award. The Emerging Designer award, won by Abiola Akinsiku of Precious Threads in 2017 (and who was featured in SMJ’s Fall-Holiday SMJ Issue No. 19) repeated as well, but this year taking the Women’s Wear Award. Finally came the King of Couture, Adebayo Jones, to pick up his third Lifetime Achievement Award (and second in the past six months), and to showcase his pan-Africana and luxury evening collections to close out AFWT 2018. He also was instrumental in church breaking out! Who knew that Adebayo Jones was also an accomplished gospel singer?! And he wasn’t a bad preacher either!! If that wasn’t enough, the aforementioned Mr. Jones was also instrumental in bringing a very special guest to AFWT 2018, styled of course in @africanaluxury by Adebayo Jones!! Her Royal Highness HRH Princess Tessy of western European duchy of Luxembourg received the Global Empowerment award for her charitable work with women and girls in Africa and around the world. The most popular photo op of the evening had to be the FACE of AFWT 2018 Kimberlee Brown Mighty @_kbm with the King of Couture @adebayojones and Her Royal Highness HRH Princess Tessy @hrhprincesstessy .

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Black Pride African Fashion Week

Toronto 2018 By Leandra Vanessa Louis

They came, they showcased, and they conquered. African Fashion Week Toronto 2018 lived up to its slogan “celebrating fashion, style and diversity.” This was exactly what I experienced on Saturday September 1, 2018, interacting with individual fashion, buyers, sellers, retailers, models, press and royalty, and a lot of diversity including the many shades of that sweet melanin. This was indeed a night when creativity was at a high point. The designers really delivered, led by the “King of Couture” Adebayo Jones debuting his new line Africana, to Kadeem Faustin, a young designer from the Caribbean island of St Lucia and his line Kyle Gervacy, to Fanny Ngantcheu from the African country of Cameroon and her collection Kwesiya. On this night, the designers did not come out to play, they came to SLAY, and slay they did. It was a glorious summer evening, in fact the last long weekend of summer and I was blessed to be in the presence of royalty, Princess Tessy of Luxembourg, not to mention the “King of Couture” himself. Both royals were a sight to behold in their couture attires. From the moment Adebayo Jones walked onto the red carpet decked out in what looked to be a pair of diamond covered sunglasses, I knew then that we were in for a treat of some amazing designs. FALL 2018

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And the King did not disappoint. Everything was showcased with the intent of maximum impact and the oohs and ahhs from those present cemented that fact. In their own way, the other designers more than held their own. I fell in love with Kyle Gervacy as I could readily see myself rocking all the pieces in Kadeem Faustin’s collection. There was impact, drama and a lot of modern styling to his pieces. From the flared and bell sleeves to the strategic cutouts, I was constantly at the edge of my seat every time a new model would grace the runway. In fairness, there were also designers who catered to the male body and they did the male physique justice!

The evening was an overall spectacle of glorious fabrics, vibrant colors and gorgeous models of all skin tones and sexes gracing the runway. Many of the audience opted to wear various patterns and designs of traditional African fabric themselves, so the love and beauty of and for African attire were very well represented throughout the venue. This was my first foray into the world of African Fashion Week Toronto, and if that Saturday September 1st was an accurate sampling of what it has been about, I am eager to see what is in store for AFWT 2019! 14

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the EMPRESS WALK: FASHION WITH A CAUSE By Shelley Jarrett Giselle Wilson is the Creator and Organizer, for The Empress Walk. She created The Empress Walk to help disadvantaged women overcome the effects of poverty, mental health and chronic disease. Disadvantaged women include those who are racialized, immigrant, aboriginal or culturally diverse, and are disproportionately affected by the effects of poverty and health issues. For example, the Ministry of Public Health reports that Canadians with the lowest incomes were twice as likely to report cardiovascular disease, and The Canadian Women’s Foundation states that 1.5 million women live below the poverty line. The Empress Walk addresses these factors in both its mission statement and its vision. Our mission is to help women of all backgrounds build confidence, look beautiful and take action towards living better, longer, healthier lives. Our vision is a globally recognized, socially responsible, progressive brand serving culturally diverse communities while raising awareness and donating to the cause of health equality & wellness for racialized women. The first The Empress Walk took place on Aug 18, 2018 in Toronto’s West End, from Jane St & Wilson to Jane & Finch. The second one will be held October 3rd with a fashion show and conference called Fashion with a Cause.

The focus of the first Empress Walk was women’s cancers, and was a success, due to the efforts of partners such as Women’s College Hospital. Giselle says, Our goal in working with our partners was to both provide awareness and raise funds for targeted health promotion and programs that effectively serve multicultural and multigenerational communities of women at risk in Toronto. The success of our fundraising efforts from our first event will for instance help a local woman living with cancer purchase a prosthetic leg. In future, we are hoping to serve women on an international scale. Racialized and immigrant women continue to be disproportionately affected due to socio-economic status, health behaviors related to culture, access to specialized care, environmental factors as well as direct and indirect systemic discrimination. For more information, or to support the upcoming Fashion with a Cause event, contact: info@empresswalk.org or phone 647-835-7544.

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YASER & MAYASA:

A MODEL FAMILY BUSINESS by Andrew Terry Pasieka

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SMJ Magazine first ran across Yaser & Mayasa Textiles at the 2015 African Fashion Week Toronto. Hussain Albeer made a very favorable impression and we were surprised and pleased that he attended one of our own events later that fall. It shouldn’t have been surprising, given the company or family moto which appears in one of their brochures:

“Build good relations with buyers because business is short-termed, and friendships remain for a lifetime.” Hussain said the moto came from his grandfather; it is a tradition that the family lives by. If someone comes by their location in Toronto, Hussain always insists on taking some Iraqi tea first and find out something about his potential client. We found out something very interesting about Yaser & Mayasa: their business has spanned five generations and has changed names four times. The name would change with each succeeding generation taking control; the company was always named after that generation’s name. The numbers of family members who have worked for the company in the five generations are sixteen. The present name is the first names of Hussain’s oldest siblings. The first two generations ran the company out of home in Iraq as a wholesale business. Hussain’s grandfather Yousif opened the first retail shop in Bagdad, Iraq. Since then, the operation has expanded to Dubai in the United Arab Emrites, Toronto & Montreal in Canada, and Shanghai in China. A cousin Ahmed runs the home base in Iraq, his oldest sibling Yaser heads up Dubai, Hussain leads the staff in both Toronto and Montreal, and Hussain’s father Yousif is in charge of their latest expansion into Shanghai, China in February 2017. In Hussain’s case, leading up in two different cities separated by one province, he travels to Montreal for a week every three weeks. And in the case of China, the reason for the latest expansion there instead of for example Europe has to do with the strong demand for wholesale business, which was the family’s bread-and-butter in the early years. Another brochure stated that the business began in 1920, and it doesn’t take a mathematician to figure out that their centennial is just around the corner. On behalf of the family, what are Hussain’s feelings as the company reaches this milestone.

“We are very pleased with the work we have done and the work we are doing. This business is in our blood. Already my oldest brother Yaser is teaching his 12 year old son the trade in Dubai. After the first two generations, all members of the family who have joined the company did so after apprenticing, starting at ages 8, 9, or 10 years of age. I myself started learning at age 8.” FALL 2018

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The family is already planning some sort of celebrations in 2020, trying to figure out how it will all fit. One thought is to fly all employees to one location so they can meet one another. It will be the ultimate opportunity to practice the company motto with each other. In fact, this interview went so smoothly that we just feel we have had that proverbial Iraqi tea! Let collaborations with Yaser & Mayasa begin!!

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CCA EDITORIAL MODEL SEARCH 2018

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Toronto’s Top Nine By Meghan Durnford

Couture Culture & Arts’ inaugural Editorial Model Search held their first photo shoot for the competition of Top Model on July, 21st, 2018 in Toronto.

The talented hair and make-up team for the shoot was comprised of Leanne Vanderham, Miriam Magno, and Ramiro Valpar. The HMUA team was essential to nailing the looks for each set-up.

The five ladies and four gentlemen each donned four different looks over the course of the day. Stylist Mason Lyle Schlueter was kept busy finessing each and every outfit for each model. The looks themselves were striking and featured fantastic pieces from talented designers Bone & Busk by Katharina Mior, Christopher Bates, Narces, Karen McFarlane, Steven Lejambe, Willces, and TFL Couture by Tristan Licud. The ensembles made a big impact and left a lasting impression with the nine finalists, many considering this the best part of the day.

The first three looks were shot at a studio in the east end of the city before trekking to Graffiti Alley for the final set-up of the day. The fashion inspiration for the east end looks consisted of a simple and understated digital shot; a bold swimwear look accessorized with remarkable jewelry; and an elegant yet casual ensemble. The fourth and final wardrobe was a glamorous artistic look, dramatically set off by the graffiti-riddled alleyways.

The Top Nine finalists were: Mary Bobko, Greis Dodona Dragoti, Díon Ducass, Nathan Hibbert, Denny Lafleur, Aaron McQuaid, Karen Pastrana, Milla Rosauro, and Maddie Warner. Each of the models was professional, showed tremendous promise, and brought something unique to the set, both on and off camera. CCA founder Claris Minas Manglicmot kept everything flowing smoothly. With her sunny personality and maternal sensitivity, she made everyone feel at ease and able to do their best work. Director of Editorial Photography Michelle Aristocrat along with Sands of Modeles LCP and Tristan Licud coached the finalists and helped them perfect their poses as they took their turns in front of the lens. As an added treat, CFL star Carl-Olivier (aka C.O.) Primé played host for the day and interviewed the models for CCA’s Instagram live feed. He brought a great energy to the day, and was a natural on camera. Gorgeous photographer Maria Bokhari, assisted by her stunning twin sister Saba, shot the four distinct looks with a keen eye and brought a relaxed vibe to the set. The photos turned out beautifully and will be an excellent addition to each of the Top Nine contestant’s professional books.

All in all, the day was a terrific success, and the Top Nine finalists had only good things to say about their experience. Many of them graciously mentioned that they truly respect their fellow finalists and wish them all success in the future. Next up the CCA team travels to New York City, where more finalists will do another editorial photo shoot, this time in the Wall Street district.

FULL PRODUCTION CREDITS Claris Minas Manglicmot: Producer and Organizer Mason Lyle Schlueter: Senior Stylist Maria Bhokari: EditorialPhotographer (assistant Saba) Michelle Aristocrat: Shoot Coach Support & Social Media live Video Feed Direction & Social Media live Video Feed Direction Tristan Fiesta Licud: Designer, Social Media and Shoot Coach Support Sands LCP: Shoot Coach Support HMUA: Leanne Vanderham, Ramiro Valpar. Miriam Magno Willces Galace: Designer & Production Support C.O. Prime: Influencer/BTS Video Anchor Patricia Olivas: Outdoor Shoot leader/Social Media Support Meghan Durnford: PR/ Blogger Kavi Thavanesan, Marwa Aziz, Carolyn Isabella: Dressers

CCA EDITORIAL MODEL SEARCH 2018 . CCA EDITORIAL MODEL SEARCH 2018 FALL 2018

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CCA EDITORIAL MODEL SEARCH 2018 . CCA EDITORIAL MODEL SEARCH 2018

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The Big Apple’s Top Eight By Meghan Durnford

The Couture Culture & Arts’ Editorial Model Search travelled to Manhattan, New York for the next phase of the competition. From August 3rd-6th the CCA team assembled wardrobe from New York fashion designers, held a casting in Manhattan, and photo shoot in the Wall Street Financial District. I-Fashion Magazine, a shootsponsor and collaborator, assisted in the New York casting of models to join the editorial search with their Editor-in-Chief, Lloyd Crawford, helping to hand-select the American competitors. The eight that were selected in New York who took part in the editorial shoot with photographers Lloyd Crawford and Troi Santos were: Angeline Jalbuena Arlantico, Quann Boyd, Carina Castagna, Stephanie Kaiser, Jason Ortiz, Chelsea Scalzo, Laryssa Veiga, and Jewelrie Haven Wehrli. All of the Toronto Top Nine finalists were invited on the trip, and three made the trip to Manhattan: Greis Dodona Dragoti, Denny Lafleur, and Maddie Warner. Denny travelled to the city a day early to assist the stylist Mason Lyle Schlueter in collecting the wardrobe from the designers and also interviewed the New York finalists. Greis helped Mason in returning all of the pieces to the designers following the shoot. All three got to do an editorial photo shoot in the heart of NYC, Times Square, with photographer RJ Ensalada with Velzon Hizon Velez. 20

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Claris Mingas Manglicmot, founder of Couture Culture & Arts, produced the trip as well as the photo shoot, seeing it from conception to completion. CCA’s Tristan Licud was the Shoot Director and PR Patricia Olivas along with the three Toronto finalists did the behind the scene documentation and set up tents to accommodate the models at the outdoor shoot location. CCA’s resident stylist Mason did a fabulous job of putting together each diverse visual for the assortment of shots throughout the day. I-Fashion Magazine stylist Rosena Nelson put her elegant finishing touches on the L’Antonio Resort Wear outfits. The wardrobe production support by Willces Galace and Samantha Claudio made the outfit changes smooth and on time.


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The three themes for the shoot consisted of swimwear, a casual yet sophisticated look, and an artistic and couture ensemble. These striking set-ups were comprised of garments and accessories from the generous sponsors: L’Antonio Resort Wear, Jewels Box, Sentaler, Cat + King, Namesake, JM Trends, TFL Couture by Tristan Lucid, Willces Designs, Busk & Bone, Stoned & Gilt Jewelry, Rock ‘N Karma, Christopher Bates, and MayerMan.

Toronto Team: *Claris Minas Manglicmot: Producer *Mason Lyle Schlueter: Stylist *Tristan Licud: Social Media/Designer/ Shoot Director *Miriam Magno: HMUA Design/Production /Trip Leader *CCA PR/ behind the scene documentation: Manager Patricia Olivas with models Denny, Maddie and Greis. *Willces Galace: Designer/Production Support

The swimwear look was shot amidst bushes and gardens of Wall Street, which gave the photos a sense of surrealism. The artistic look utilized the Brooklyn Bridge and provided a dramatic contrast. For many of the models, having a chance to chat with and learn from one another made the day a memorable one.

New York Team: *Lloyd Crawford and I-Fashion Magazine: New York Editorial Shoot Partner with Assistant Chanise Smith *Hair and Make Up Team: Lead by Schanica Pickens with Fabiola Reyes, Betzaida Orengo, Malka Cohen, Nicole Gaston and Kcoey Simones *Photographers: Lloyd Crawford *Production Support: Samantha Claudio *Velzon Hizon Velez: Models’ Sponsor

The seventeen finalists from Toronto and New York will be narrowed down to the Top Five and will take part in a photo shoot & runway show onboard a cruise ship in Toronto.

The Top Five By Meghan Durnford

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The Couture Culture & Arts’ Editorial Model Search narrowed down the competition from the seventeen Toronto & New York finalists to the Top Five after two successful photo shoots in Toronto and New York City. The Top Five are Toronto models Greis Dodona Dragoti, Denny Lafleur, Aaron McQuaid, and Maddie Warner, with New York model Jewelrie Haven Wehrli. Unfortunately, Jewelrie was unable to continue on in the contest and so Mary Bobko was the Wild Card addition. On August 26th, the Top Five took part in an editorial photo shoot on the Yankee Lady IV. Rand El-Sheikh made it possible for CCA to use the cruise vessel for the shoot before dinner.

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CCA was very fortunate and grateful to have internationally renowned designer and creative director Furne Oné of Amato Couture, and Vincent Law, a contributor of Vogue Talents as our judges. Furne Oné previously made the Canadian debut of his Spring/Summer 2018 collection with CCA last fall during Toronto Women’s Fashion Week, and had a chance to meet a few members of the Top Five when they walked in his show. Vincent Law met with some of the Top Five along with Couture Culture & Arts founder Claris Minas Manglicmot at a fashion luncheon and gave the finalists valuable advice and guidance to grow in the fashion industry. Tristan Licud jumped in to assist and oversaw the high fashion photo shoot, ensuring that the artistic concept was executed flawlessly. He also designed the all-white collections for men while Rachel Sin did the same for women. The shoot was captured by Michelle Aristocrat with the Top Five in a coastal yet glamorous pictorial, taking advantage of the interesting paraphernalia and nautical props around the ship, which figured prominently into the photos. Edris Photography shot the second look onboard the ship, with the models donning formal wear for women by TFL Couture and for men by JM Trends complete with Jaycow Milliner headpieces. The photographs from the shoot were striking and very haute couture. All of the Top Five models perfected their on-camera movements and expressions, reflected in the photos. The shoot was followed by a runway show onboard the ship during a dinner cruise. The Cruise Runway show was a production of CCA with His and Her Model Management, Inc. Along with the Top Five finalists, some familiar faces from the Top Nine Toronto models walked in the runway show: Díon Ducass and Karen Pastrana. They were joined by Kirsten Ligon, Tristan Smallwood,

both from His and Her Model Management, Inc., Natalia Kargbo, and Benjamin Quaiattini. When another model

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CCA EDITORIAL MODEL SEARCH 2018 . CCA EDITORIAL MODEL SEARCH 2018 from HH Model Management, Inc. was unable to attend, CCA’s in-house stylist Mason Lyle Schlueter stomped down the runway. Mason did double-duty as he took part in the Willces Designs segment of the show, in addition to styling the models for all three segments. The show featured first the chic Willces Designs on the ladies and Mason, the second saw the gentlemen showcasing the dapper JM Trends, the third ladies walked dressed this time in Parler La Mode with hats by Jaycow Milliner, and the ladies final look were designs by Nesy Nou.

The climax of CCA Editorial Model Search will be choosing the winner. They then will receive an all-expense paid trip to Girona and Barcelona, Spain, where they will be given a professional photo shoot with top International Editorial Duo Photographers Caleb and Gladys!!

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TOP FIVE PHOTO SHOOT & RUNWAY SHOW *Producer: Couture Culture and Arts (CCA) *Presenting Sponsor & Co-Producer: His and Her Model Management, Inc. (HH) *Creative Director & Organizer: Claris Minas Manglicmot *Photographers: Edris Photography (both) Michelle Aristocrat; Darren Lee (runway) *Female Wardrobe Designer: Tristan Licud, and Rachel Sin *Male Wardrobe Designer: JM Trends and Tristan Licud *Styling: Claris Minas Manglicmot *Wardrobe and Runway Styling: Mason Lyle Schlueter *Female Runway Wardrobe Designers and Labels: Willces Designs, Parler La Mode, and designs by Nesy Nou *Male Runway Wardrobe Designer: JM Trends *HMUA: Candace David assisted by Beth Malcolm (both) *Hats: Jaycow Milliner (both) *Models: Maddie, Mary, Greis, Denny and Aaron *Location: Yankee Lady IV Shipping Lines *Location Shoot Sponsor: Rand El-Sheikh (both) *PR: Meghan Durnford (both)

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Calling on aspiring models, designers and artists: stay tuned for

CCA’s Editorial Model Search 2019!

‘Game of Thrones’ Finale in Spain by Claris Minas Manglicmot

The 4-month long CCA Editorial Model Search came down to an extremely successful finale in Barcelona and Girona Spain on September 10-17, 2018. The production team of Couture Culture and Arts (CCA) with the full support of our presenting sponsor His and Her Modeling Management (HH) made it all possible. The Top Model chosen from The Top Five was Aaron McQuaid. Scouting for locations was fun. On the second day, our team with photographer duo from New York, Caleb and Gladys and our Barcelona Tour Operator sponsor, GY Travel and Tours, headed by Michael Martinez checked out Girona Cathedral which is a twohour drive from Barcelona, and a location spot of blockbuster series Game of Thrones. Most of us are fans of the show; we felt like we are at Braavos! We were right at the spot where Arya Stark was begging by the steps and at the Cathedral’s Arab bath where Arya bathed the dead. We had lunch in a cafe at the bottom of the kings’ landing and we walked at the alley right where Cersei Lannister walked in shame naked with chopped hair in the 5th seasoned finale. We also checked around Barcelona. We opted to shoot at Barcelona Cathedral instead to showcase not just popular tourist spot but something that will represent Spain’s culture and historical depth. Spain was voted by UNESCO as having the third highest number of World Heritage Sites in the world. The two days shoot in Barcelona and Girona was a feel good from the start. We mixed local wardrobe collections such as Zara and

Mango with suits from our very own Canadian designer from Calgary, Curtis Eliott Designs. Gladys was very kind in assisting in putting together six major looks for each model. CCA had many challenges as a producer and organizer of this series. The CCA journey, which took us from Toronto’s graffiti alleys to New York’s Wall Street District back to Toronto’s Queen’s Quay culminated in historic and artistic Spain. It is not easy running a production over two continents and three countries with very limited funding while maintaining a high degree of professionalism at the same time. What drives CCA to keep going is seeing young artists who want to pursue their dreams while knowing Toronto is lacking opportunities for them to be discovered. We wish Aaron McQuaid much future success in the modeling industry. I want to thank our generous and talented volunteers and sponsors for their support. It is our joint efforts that made the 2018 CCA Editorial Model Search a success. Spain Editorial Shoot Team (September 10-17, 2018) Producer: Couture Culture and Art (CCA) www.couturecultureandarts.com Presenting Sponsor: His and Her Model Management, Inc (HH) Organizer: Claris Minas Manglicmot (Toronto) Photographers: Caleb and Gladys (New York) www.calebgladys.com CCA Editorial Search Winner 2018: Aaron McQuaid (Toronto) Model: Natalia Kargbo (Sault Sainte Marie) Hairstylist: Gary Allen (Toronto) Make Up: Mel Rose Rosal (Barcelona) Spain Tour and Logistic Sponsor: Michael Martinez Suit in Girona: Zara and Mango

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THE

BEHIND #METOO STORY… IS A FILM! By Nakeisha Geddes

Tarana Burke started the #MeToo movement in 2006 to encourage women to show solidarity with each other against sexual harassment. This movement went viral in 2017 with women around the world standing together to speak their truth and expose men with high influence. In December 2017 (Editor-in-Chief ) Andrew approached me about writing my article for SMJ Winter 2018 (Issue No. 20) and we agreed it seemed fitting for me to look at ‘ #MeToo Closer to Home.’ The magazine story was intended to give every day women a chance to share their experience and to lay claim to the diversity of the issue. Five amazing women from different cultural backgrounds shared their store with me, with the intention to heal themselves and encourage others to take a stand and speak their truth. Their stories were powerful and moving. (Publisher) Shelley recognized that we should take the story to a bigger platform…the big sceen. The upcoming documentary entitled W’AT ABOWT US (WHAT ABOUT US) is the first film for Andrew and Shelly, the power couple behind SMJ Magazine. By raising the bar they continue to push themselves, seeking new ways to give back within their community by living out their passion. I had the pleasure of interviewing them just weeks before the filming of the documentary, to get an insight of who they are and of this project . NG: Tell me about your feelings when you sat down and interviewed each lady about their #MeToo experience. SJ: Iwas interested to hear each lady’s story because I know they need to be told. I am coming from a social worker background and over the years I have supported many women who have experienced sexual abuse. The timing for this story in SMJ Magazine was perfect because Oprah Winfrey had just done her #MeToo speech at the 2018 Golden Globes Award. Each story is different, each story is heart wrenching and I think this documentary will help women. We want to bring attention to everyone that this is happening to every day women and it is time to expand the conversation around sexual abuse to motivate others to speak up. We hope it will help to change the behavior of men from being potential perpetrators. NG: How do you want this documentary to influence your audience? SJ: My goal is to take this documentary into the community-at-large such as schools, colleges, universities and shelters to inspire women to start talking and seeking help because most suffer in silence. (…) Future generations need to have a male and female behavioral shift, because we know children learn by example. NG: What’s your goal of this documentary? SJ: The goal is to bring awareness and to educate. By including panel discussions with private screenings we want to encourage more open discussion. I want to help build a safe space for women to be able to speak their truth and seek help when needed. I also want to educate men on how to control their behavior toward women. We must change the way we raise boys and girls.

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NG: What’s next for Shelley Jarrett? SJ: I want to continue to expand more of our magazine stories into documentaries. I believe this platform is my true calling and is the ultimate extension of my social worker background. (…) This is the legacy I want to leave. NG: What impact did each woman and their story have on you when you met them face to face? ATP: I have always approached this from a journalist point of view. I love writing and honor the freedom of the press. (…) I want to be able to ensure the story gets out the way it’s supposed to be told. I felt like this story was going to be great and it was a perfect idea to touch on the #metoo story, but from a different angle, the whole diverse aspect. I want to not only get the truth, but get the facts. I never thought that this story was getting the proper attention it deserved. It is a diverse issue that happens in diverse cultures. NG: Have you ever been in a situation where you witness a woman being abused? ATP: God demands that we learn and grow from each other, so we do not continue with the same behavior. That is why we are on this earth. I unfortunately had to intervene with my mother and father more than a few times in my teenage years. I know now looking back at the situation my dad was going through a lot of personal stress with unemployment and other stuff and that was the way it came out. I unfortunately to be the one protecting my mother and being the only child I had to stand up to my father and that was hard for me to do.

NG: How did you ensure you are different and wasn’t going to follow your father’s footstep? ATP: While I ensured I was not going to be a physical imposing person in a relationship: however, what caused me problem earlier in my life was that I kept things inside and was uncommunicative because we were raised to come up with solutions ourselves as men. When I would explode I know now it was because I didn’t communicate the way that I should which was a major reason my first marriage ended. Now I am sometimes too communicative to the point where Shelley will say I am talking too much. That’s me overcompensating; I guess I am still a work in progress. NG: If you have super powers, what changes would you make to the current #MeToo situation? ATP: It all begins with our caregivers, from how we are raised to interact with the opposite sex. I wish people would love and care for one another the way we are supposed to. There are only two genders and people are just the gender of their creation. I think a related problem is sexual identity confusion. NG: What’s next for Andrew Pasieka? ATP: I would like to be the person that keeps Shelley’s visions alive. I want to provide the nuts and bolts that line it up, so that whatever the ship it will sail. I too am about leaving a legacy. It’s all about changing our little part of the world so that we can help people understand how we can make a change one person at a time. In summary, this has been an amazing year, and this is the time for documentaries like W’AT ABOWT US. We are our sisters keepers, and we want to eliminate sexual abuse towards women.

Dress: My Mama’s Closet Photographer: Lubin Tasevski Hair: Freshmen Style Make-up: Imelda Conception

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A Reflection on Canadian Film and the Toronto International Film Festival from an Outsider By Marisa Shepard

I can spot the question on a person’s face before they ask. “Why would an American move to Canada to become a filmmaker?!” The answer was initially quite simple: I had always wanted to live in Canada, and I also wanted to make films. These desires were unrelated— until they weren’t. Just last year, but what seems like a lifetime ago, I was familiar with only one Canadian filmmaker. I knew Matt Johnson from my favorite show, the cult-following ten-episode web series Nirvana the Band the Show, produced from 2007-2009. I watched the show religiously with a small group of friends in Ohio. As I became more familiar with Johnson’s work, including his two incredible feature films, The Dirties and Operation Avalanche, I became reinvigorated about the possibility of becoming a filmmaker after five years of dismissing the idea. I also paid increasing attention to his outspokenness about issues in the Canadian film industry. His 2016 interview on the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) podcast Well, Nobody’s Perfect... was the primary impetus for my curiosity about Canadian film. In it he made a blunt but compelling argument: “I think [the idea of too many Canadian films being made] is a myth [...] We have institutions like TIFF to protect us from that. [...] Too many movies is great. I want a million bad movies, so I can get two great ones. [...] The higher our numbers are at the beginning, the better our numbers

are with the really good filmmakers we’ll get five, ten years from now. It’s the filmmakers we lose because they couldn’t make movies— because they couldn’t overcome their own circumstances— that I’m worried about. [...] I don’t care if [a filmmaker is] bad at [the] moment. [...] They can make garbage. What I want is their second film, or their third film. And if Telefilm [would make] 140 of these movies, maybe twenty of those are great [...], and then all of a sudden we have this thriving national culture [...]…there will be no more brain drain of these people.” Following that interview, I began educating myself on Canada’s film industry. I quickly recognized the problems that new and underrepresented filmmakers face in this country. The more I learned, the more I realized I had hardly scratched the surface. Attending the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) for the first time felt like the culmination of everything. After volunteering fifty-seven hours, standing in rush lines, attending panels and parties, and seeing eighteen films, I felt like I got the ‘full’ festival experience. One of the standout memories was attending the annual Women in Film and Television of Toronto (WIFT-T ) TIFF reception. WIFT-T celebrates and uplifts the work of amazing women in this city’s film industry. And when I say they’re amazing, I speak from a place of total sincerity.

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Out of my top five favorites I watched at the festival, four were directed by women, and two were Toronto-based. One was Patricia Rozema, a director I already knew and loved, premiering her refreshingly original screen adaptation of the Toronto-born stage play Mouthpiece. The other was Jasmin Mozaffari, a name with which I was familiar from buzz in the community, premiering her groundbreaking feature debut, Firecrackers. I was excited to see a new hybrid-fiction short, Veslemøy’s Song, from Sofia Bohdanowicz, whose Maison du Bonheur I had watched in August at the TIFF Bell Lightbox. Programmers at TIFF did an excellent job filtering their selections, and if there were any bad Canadian films at the festival, I certainly didn’t know about them. The more I pondered the brilliance of these films, the more disheartened I felt knowing that, out of Canada’s most globally-famous directors (think Atom Egoyan, David Cronenberg, Norman Jewison), arguably two or three of them— Sarah Polley, Deepa Mehta, and possibly Rozema— are women, and many have moved to Hollywood (like James Cameron and Denis Villeneuve). Consequently, events like the WIFT-TIFF reception are bittersweet; while the passion for women’s stories is intoxicating, the constraining realities Canadian women face as filmmakers are ever-present. Many of the talented individuals being celebrated by WIFT-T will skyrocket beyond Canada’s allocated means. At some point, they will hit a wall in their struggle for funding and wider distribution, so they will take risks, or they will go to the United States. Despite many filmmakers, including Rozema and Johnson, who have been firm in their plans to stay in Canada, the inevitable cycle of brain-drain of Canadian talent continues.

I believe Toronto is a fantastic place to create and screen films, and I want nothing more than to become a part of that. At this time, I consider myself, first and foremost, a student of Canadian (and particularly Torontonian) film. One day, I hope to contribute to the canon. I am fortunate to live in a city where there is so much to learn from so many gifted people. I have become engrossed by this fight for opportunities and recognition.

I am viewing these issues from an outsider’s perspective. It is the passion and vision of filmmakers like Johnson, Rozema, Mozaffari, and Bohdanowicz, among others, which has fostered my desire to involve myself in Canada’s film industry rather than heading to New York or Hollywood. Canadian film, though in a paradoxical state of simultaneously grim and promising prospects, is stronger than its national or international reputation. It is world class events like TIFF which brings that into focus each passing year.

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The Other Diva in Diva2Diva By Andrew Terry Pasieka

It has been a few days since the success of the massive international Dia2Diva production at the Toronto Pavillion in the eastern part of the city, but Chiqui Pineda is still in a daze. In addition to floating on cloud nine, she admits to be woozy from exhaustion. Chiqui’s journey to that ‘diva’ night begins with her birth in Manilla, Philippines. She was one of four siblings; three girls and one boy. No one in the immediate family had an artistic ability; Chiqui only recalls a great-grandmother who sang at church.

Chiqui Pineda had more than five minutes of fame. Much more. Between 1994 and 1998 she was a Viva recording artist with a huge hit single? ‘How Did You Know.’ She was a TV hostess, and in 1999 starred in the musical theater production of Rama at Sita. What was her take away from her five years of stardom in the Philippines? “Where do I begin? It was a lot of hard work, a lot of unexpected twists and turns, Part of it was what is called the #MeToo movement today, something that is important to shed a light. On stage it was all bright lights and accolades, but off stage there was a darker side, where I got offered all sorts of strange things. No matter how much I tried to distance myself from it, the talk, the gossip mill, will force it back on you…that are what made me decide just to leave it all behind when I did.” Chiqui moved to Canada in 2000 and ‘left it all behind.’ She married and became a mother of three. She kept her creative spirit alive by setting up something online called Flickr Gallery, and formed the company Kat Shots Photography.

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She put together an unpublished musical in 2013 entitled Borrowed Time, and over the next two years had her own radio show at Pinoy Radio, which was important in that there was a commitment to talk about issues back home. She went on hiatus for two years, still trying to determine how best to fulfill a desire to mentor young Filipino artists. Her answer was to form production company Chiqui Crown Media in May of this year. Diva2Diva was “my maiden voyage. Being a producer was very different than being a performer. I felt the joy and gratitude that I used feel from performing, but I also felt fulfilled in that it was me and my God in control of this concert. I was not a puppet of anyone.� Chiqui knows that production is her future. She has a couple of shows in the works for 2019, and a couple more knocking on the door. She also is discovering what a lot of us fledgling producers also know: she is getting queries about sponsoring future productions now that she has had one successful production. We wish Chiqui Pineda all the best as she parlays those sponsorships into greater successes.

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JENNIFER BERNARD: REACHING THE PINNACLE IN A FOUNDATION By Andrew Terry Pasieka

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To say that that appointment of Jennifer Bernard to the post of President and CEO of Women’s College Hospital Foundation (WCHF) was symbiotic is putting it mildly. It was the right time in Ms. Bernard’s career trajectory, which has been all about advocacy and sales for a cause. It was also the right time in Women’s College Hospital’s (WCH) history, which has been all about diversity and equality. Founded on the second principle, WCH has adopted the first principle serving today’s world populated by victims of sexual violence, victims of poverty, the stigma of mental illness, the stress of being a single mother, and the alternate lifestyle of the LGBTQ. Jennifer is proud to note, “We have staked out our place as a defender of women’s equity.” Jennifer Bernard was born in Trinidad of Grenadian parents, and came to Canada when she was two. She grew up in Malton, a community in the extreme northeast corner of Mississauga. Its diversity transitioned over the decades, from Italian and Irish when she arrived, to Caribbean through most of her schooling, to a large influx of south Asians in the past generation. Being constantly surrounded by so much and variations of diversity, she developed an insight and respect for its strengths that remains today.


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Jennifer went to law school, but never wound up articling; the summer before she was to return she obtained a position with the Board of Trade which she said “involved a lot of advocacy, so like a lot of my contemporaries, I just continued working.” She credits her spirituality for helping her understand the lesson early on that ‘you can’t take it with you.’ As she explains, her career choices were in large measure determined by having the challenge of showing people “everything they have ever worked for can be put to best use by taking advantage of opportunities placed before them to help those in need.” Fundraising has been a major part of Jennifer Bernard’s corporate life. It is a unique kind of sales which involves special skills. People are not being approached to buy anything material like a product or anything tangible like a service. They are buying with faith into a vision or cause that can’t be quantified by anything more than the amount they want to give. The larger the donation there is, the larger the impact, and the greater the payback. Jennifer expanded on that. “I get such a high from something that enables. You are persuading people to give past the point of pain until it feels good. When people have given six-figure or seven figure donations, they have told me, ‘I thought I would miss the money, but what I’ve gotten back is so much more.’ I have been told it was more fun giving away the money than actually making it!” In her newly appointed dual role, Ms. Bernard is heading up a team at WCHF that tackles the priorities set by WCH armed with some important facts to assist them in their quest. For example, two phrases that are ‘buzz words’ in the philanthropic community are visible minorities and marginalized communities. Women were the original members of both groups, and to some extent, still are. WCH was founded decades before

women had the right to vote. Up until the last quarter century, almost all medical research was done on men, so the pharmaceutical industry has formulated their drugs based on male results. Until recently, all recognized symptoms of heart attacks were male-related; female symptoms were not documented or even widely known. Just as the concept of WCH as realized by founder Dr. Emily Stowe was considered revolutionary, it is Jennifer Bernard’s goal to, as she has been quoted, “take that revolution to the next level by changing the focus from a philanthropic point of view.” It starts with the fact that women have been outliving men for several generations now, so much so that the average woman is likely to be the recipient of an inheritance twice in their lifetime, while for the average man it is only once. In addition, evidence has shown that women recently immigrated to Canada give about 25% more than women who are first generation Canadians or older. “We are going to have partnerships that are special and unique because we are women. Unique because of how we can treat a maximum of patients. WCH is Canada’s only fully ambulatory hospital; no one stays here more than 18 hours. Special because some professions have major portions of their executive and/

or almost their entire work force who are women, so they have a vested interest in giving financial support to WCH. We are caring for their stakeholders and their staff.” A very interesting artistic sideline is our final point. One of Ms. Bernard’s previous positions was head of major gifts for the Royal Conservatory of Music. It might seem a curious interlude in her climb up the corporate fundraising ladder until one finds out a young Jennifer spent 15 years studying classical piano and singing classical music. We wondered how that resonated in her life against the backdrop of her body of work experience. “Well, it was like learning another language, like knowing that music is essential to human development, like understanding arts is key to learning about different cultures. So much of what we do in selling people on becoming philanthropists is being able to own the moment in front of a discerning audience, which can vary from one to thousands. Just like on stage. I use this side of me every day.” No matter if it is Royal Conservatory of Music or Women’s College Hospital Foundation, it comes down to one thing. Maya Angelou said it best, “People only remember only how you made them feel.” For more information, go to womenscollegehospitalfoundation.com/

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WOMEN’S COLLEGE HOSPITAL: YEARS OF LEGACY AND COUNTING

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By Andrew Terry Pasieka

Women’s College Hospital is recognized as the only collaborating center in women’s health in the Western Hemisphere as reported by the World Health Organization. Women’s College Hospital began as Woman’s Medical College in 1883. On June 13th, Dr. Emily Stowe, the second woman licensed to practice medicine in Canada, told supporters in a meeting at the Toronto Women’s Suffrage Club, “that medical education for women is a recognized necessity, and consequently facilities for such instruction should be provided,” and later, “that the establishment of such a school was a public necessity and in the interests of the community.” Less than six months after, on October 1, 1883, Toronto Mayor A.R. Boswell formally opened Women’s Medical College. It was ironic that the College was formed four decades before women actually obtained suffrage. We at SMJ wondered if October 1st, 1883 should be marked as a watershed moment for women in general, and were put in contact with Archivist Heather Gardiner for this and other questions that follow. • I just watched the Ruth Bader Ginsburg documentary on CNN. She has a great quote, which I think is relevant. “Real change, enduring change happens one step at a time.” • Impact of the opening: 1) Opening of WMC met the educational and professional needs of medical women in Canada. Women no longer had to travel the U.S. to receive medical education. 2) Early women doctors began focusing on women’s health issues (an area that was often overlooked by male doctors). Advances were made in public health and preventative medicine.

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3) It helped to change how the public viewed medical women their role in the community. Women’s College Hospital moved to its current location in Toronto in 1935, and became a teaching hospital affiliated with the University of Toronto in 1961. In the sixties, WCH became one of the pre-eminent hospitals for neo-natal care. Ms. Gardiner provided a timeline of its development. • WCH held a long reputation as a leader in perinatology, and a high standard of excellence in obstetrical and neonatal care. • 1967 – Two perinatologists were hired by WCH; • 1971 – WCH established Canada’s first Perinatal Intensive Care Unit; • 1981 – WCH established Canada’s first Regional High Risk Pregnancy Unit; • 1981 – MOH approved expansion of WCH’s High Risk Unit from 15-beds to 48-bed perinatal unit; • 2006 -- Women and Babies Program became part of Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre on April 1st (although it was physically located at WCH until 2010). In 2006 Women’s College Hospital became the first independent, academic, ambulatory care hospital in Ontario and the only hospital in Ontario with a primary focus on women’s health. By then, WCH consisted of three wings built in 1935, 1956 and 1971. The hospital was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1995. In 2013 Women’s College Hospital moved from its original building at 76 Grenville

Street to its new state-of-the-art facility. The rebuild was completed in 2015. WCH had to come up with new strategies in maintaining original principles and in honoring its historical legacy in the new complex. Ms. Gardiner summarizes them. • WCH has continued to maintain an independent board of directors. • WCH property has remained designated a National Historic Site. • Historic architectural and decorative elements of the old WCH have been integrated into the new building (e.g. cornerstones, stone work, brass bannister, fireplace/mantel, “Woman” statue). • Archives are open to the public, preserving the historic records and artifacts of WCH by promoting the history of WCH through archival photographs and displays throughout the new building. For more information, go to https://www. womenscollegehospital.ca/


YOUR

SMJ MAGAZINE

is your

By Dr. Lisa Ramsackal

Do you often find yourself rummaging through your closet to try to find clothes that look good on you? Or, spend hours upon hours at the mall trying on outfit after outfit with no luck in finding the right look or fit? Have the stores just stopped making clothes for your body type? What’s the deal? I’m here to help put that bounce back in your step and feel confident the next time you put on that gorgeous party dress you’ve been dying to wear! Sometimes it’s not what we wear that makes us look or feel great, it’s HOW we wear it. If you look at models walking down the runway or that mannequin in the widow with the dress that looks like yours but somehow doesn’t look like yours, there is one thing they showcase that perhaps you don’t… GOOD POSTURE! Let’s face it; outfits are hot because good posture is hot! Good posture makes us look and feel great. It gives the perception of confidence, strength and good health. Who wouldn’t want to have it? The sad reality is that many of us have taken our posture for granted and let it slip away with our long and tiring work days at the office. Our young and youthful appearance has gradually been changed to tired and well, let’s face it…it shows! If it is time to bring sexy back in your appearance, start with your posture. Here are a few tips to help train your body to improve your posture. Practice how to sit, stand and walk tall. Sitting tall: To start, scoot your bum all the way back in your chair so that your back is snug to the back rest. Then straighten up your back maintaining the natural curve in your low back. Always make sure your feet are shoulder width apart and flat on the floor. We want to keep good pelvic alignment to minimize stress on our hips and low back. Next, bring your shoulders back and down so that you feel a bit of muscle contraction in between your shoulder blades and keep you elbows midline or slightly behind midline. Gently lengthen your neck and tuck your chin inwards to give that final look and feel of good posture. Standing tall: Stand with your feel about hip width apart to give your body a good base of support. Straighten up

your back and maintain your shoulders in the back and down position. Keep the chest in a slightly “pushed out” position or “opened chest” position. Maintain good neck alignment by keeping the neck in a lengthened position and chin slightly tucked. Walking tall: A walking tall posture can be achieved in the same manner as standing tall. Always remember to look straight ahead and not down as you head follows where your eyes go. Having the right height of shoes can also make a difference in overall posture. Shoes that are too flat like ballet flats or flip flops can result in your body accentuating flat feet and turning of the ankles and knees that often go along with flat footedness (pronation). Having a heel that is about one inch in height will help to prevent those arches from collapsing and bringing old habits back. Now that you have to tools to rock the runway yourself, it’s time to dig deep into your closet and pull out that special number and strut your stuff! Dr. Lisa Ramsackal H.BSc., D.C., R.Ac. Chiropractor, Registered Acupuncturist, Health & Wellness Educator Green Health Clinic, #3-265 Queen St South, Miss, ON, L5M 1L9 T: 905-997-4468 / M: 647-234-3747 W: www.chiropractor-drlisa.ca / E: drramsackal@gmail.com www.facebook.com/DrLisaR/ FALL 2018

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SMJ MAGAZINE

T BY DANIEL GOES ROYAL By Andrew Terry Pasieka

Daniel Lewis was the subject of a 2015 story by SMJ Magazine (Summer/Anniversary Issue No. 8). It ended with this sentence: “ T By Daniel plans for the future include continuing to work hard, do the best they can each day, and impact as many people as possible.” Three years later, did he ever think in his wildest dreams that he could count the Royal Family among his clients?!? Daniel laughs and shakes his head. “We never thought that our tea business would take us to Buckingham Palace. When we started we thought the formula for success would be if we made our tea memorable then people would remember us.” And did Daniel ever put that formula into practice! A opportunity to be in Trenton, Ontario during the Prince Charles Canadian tour last year for his Charities Canada resulted in Daniel serving the Prince his own blend he called Polo with the Prince. It got such a favorable reaction that Charles has already reached out and ordered his ‘personal stash’ for back home. 40

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Hoping that lightning would strike twice, Daniel created a blend this summer for the ‘wedding of the decade,’ the nuptials of Prince Harry, Charles younger son, and Meghan Markle. The name he gave the tea was ‘When Harry Met Meghan,’ a cheeky reference to a big screen comedy from the 1980s, but was not able to score an invitation to Windsor. With these intriguing names for original tea blends, we wondered if Daniel has made a practice of tea creations. He shook his head in reply. “I wish I had the time. I think I have only created three. Each tea blend took a week or more to research my potential client or clients, blending the various ingredients I selected in various combinations and various strengths. I receive special blends from five tea masters in different parts of the world, so this both achieves my goal of giving my customers a global flavor experience and satisfies the urge to be more original myself.” Daniel Lewis and wife Renata are in their eighth year of business. For the first 3 ½ years or so, they operated out of his father’s kitchen and living room. They were originally just going to be an online wholesale shipping business. Sales quickly dwindled, and they realized that they had to go where the customers were: trade shows, market conventions, and the like. They met a lot of people and gave out a lot of samples. But when asked if this strategy caused a steep debt regardless, Daniel quickly put up his hand in disagreement, saying that they would invest small amounts; such as $100 for a permit; $75 for a new supply of labels; $200 for packaging. They were quickly able to pay off any debts with orders from events. They opened their first retail location on Main Street in Brampton in their 4th year. The real major investment came earlier this year, when they moved into a more spacious location in Bramalea City Center. Does moving into larger premises mean a greater responsibility and an expansion of roles? Daniel’s background was music so he is the natural showman of T By Daniel. Wife Renata has more of flair with figures, so she is in the background. “While Renata keeps our business organized and on solid ground, I keep it entertaining and exciting. It comes down to the fact the she is everything I’m not and vice versa.” Renata. This brings us back full circle to the beginning of this article. In that SMJ article from 2015, there was a reference to the fact that they met at age 8. Having just turned 30, does that mean they have known each other for over 2/3 of their lives? Daniel is quick to point out that, “we have known of each other for that

long, but it wasn’t continuous.” Apparently Renata’s family moved away after they had been ‘boyfriend and girlfriend’ for much of that first school year, and didn’t meet again until age 12 at a much smaller Bramalea City Center, and then again at age 16. It was after age 18 that they became a couple to stay. Daniel is Jamaican; Renata is Spanish from Honduras. A final question. The Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of SMJ Magazine are an interracial couple. So are the Lewis;’ albeit three decades younger! Have there been any problems with the business because of this? “The world is becoming more diverse. We’ve actually had more raised eyebrows about our age than about our race. People have asked for the owners, and when we have said that it’s us, they have said, ‘no, not the managers, we were asking for the owners.’ But what you say does happen. I once was asked to introduce my wife, and when I pointed in her direction, the person assumed I was referring to the black female employee beside her.” T By Daniel is in good hands, and the hands belong to husband Daniel and wife Renata. And we have no doubt that their customer base will continue to grow, including the now visibly diverse Royal Family!! For more information, go to: www.tbydaniel.com. You can contact them at: renata@tbydaniel.com.

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By Akua Hinds

Breaking up is hard to do, but in some cases, breaking up is an easier solution than staying together would be. According to research, relationship breakups usually happen before holidays like Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Valentine’s Day. If you are wondering why people would be so callous as to break up with their significant others around such significant holidays, breakups most likely occur around the holidays because few people want to spend their special holiday season with someone who no longer fits into their lives. It can be tough to break up with someone just before the holidays, but if you reflect carefully about it, you might realize that breaking up close to the holiday season could be a blessing in disguise. It is bad enough when you are forced to spend the holidays with family members who do not get along. Do you really want to spend your special holiday time with a mate who you do not feel close to anymore? Just because you are involved with someone it does not mean that the relationship is close and affectionate. Strange as it may seem, many incompatible couples stay together because they do not want to go through a difficult breakup process. However, it cannot be too much fun to suffer through the holidays feeling pressured to put on a happy face when you have no confidence in the person who you are committed to. Ending your relationship before significant days that you treasure; personal days such as a birthday, or a statutory holiday like Thanksgiving, could be wonderful for you in the long run. It is important for you to act quickly when you sense that a relationship is no longer a good fit for your life. The sooner that you free yourself from an unsuitable situation means that you will have more time to focus on preparing yourself for a better situation. Something needs to happen first. You are bound to have lingering memories of the person who once meant so much to you, so you will need time to emotionally release the relationship from your mind. Getting through the holidays without your former life mate will feel tough at first, and that is why you need to

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Why Breakups Usually Happen Around Holidays


SMJ MAGAZINE

push yourself to get involved in activities that will help you to focus on things other than your ex. Ask your friends and family members to spend some quality time with you during the upcoming holiday. If you are secretly hoping that you will be included in your loved ones’ special events but you have not received an invitation, rise up to the occasion and become the person who reaches out to cheer up someone else. Volunteer at a church or at a homeless shelter over that long weekend and brighten someone else’s day. Keep yourself busy and focused on something other than your breakup.

When one door closes, another door opens. I have found this to be true throughout my life, but sometimes, you need to train your mind to recognize that disappointments can be opportunities to experience greater faith and understanding. Each breakup happens for a reason, and there is a reason why you needed to part ways with the person who you once thought you would be with forever. Breaking up around the holidays is an unforgettable experience, but it does need to haunt your heart forever. Your heart will only heal if you allow it to heal. When life gives you lemons, you can choose to make lemonade. Turn the situation around and use this tough time as an opportunity to prepare for the future. Akua Hinds, journalist, actress, music performer & instructor, founder & marketing owner of dating sites www.InterracialDesires.net, www.RichSinglesDate.net, www.ChristianPartner.co & independent business owner at www.PureRomance.ca/AkuaHinds and www.PureRomance.com/AkuaHinds. Please visit www.AkuaHinds.com

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SMJ Magazine Fall 2018 (Issue No. 22)  

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SMJ Magazine Fall 2018 (Issue No. 22)  

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