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the Griffin report / shelby publishinG presents

2014

in the food industry

www.foodindustrywomen.com


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The TheGriffin GriffinReport ReportofofFood FoodMarketing Marketing

Women of Influence in Food the Food Industry February Women of Influence in the Industry February 20142014

WELCOME to TO the THE Griffin GRIFFIN Welcome REPORT’S 9th 9TH AnnuAl ANNUAL listinG LISTING report’s OF Women WOMEN of OF influence INFLUENCE in IN of THE food FOOD industry. INDUSTRY. the This year’s r’s This yea

Karen Harty Harty Karen Executive Vice Vice President President Executive Griffin Publishing Publishing Company, Company, Inc. Inc. Griffin Shelby Publishing Publishing Company Company Shelby

list of of outoutlist standing females females ininstanding clude women from clude women from various backgrounds, backgrounds, various experience and chanchanexperience and nels. Categories innels. Categories include brokers, brokers, disdisclude tributors, retailers, tributors, retailers, franchises, manufacmanufacfranchises, turers, organizations/ organizations/ turers, associations, restaurestauassociations, rants and universities. rants and universities. II am am proud proud to to introduce introduce these women trendsetthese women trendsetters whose leadership, ters whose leadership, skill and and dedication dedication skill made,and andare aremaking making, have, a a difference and qualify difference, and qualify

them for for inclusion inclusion in in this this prestigious prestigious listing. listing. The The them honorees were chosen for their highly visible conhonorees were chosen for their highly visible contributions to to our our industry, industry, their their professionalism, professionalism tributions and the awareness they have generated for the the popoand the awareness they have generated for tential of of other other women women in in our our business. business. tential This year year we we are are profiling profiling 76 76 women women who, who, we we This have found, play a significant role in their company have found, play a significant role in their company through their their leadership, leadership, expertise, expertise and dedication through and dedication and even beyond through their charity, philanthroand even beyond through their charity, philanthropy and and civic civic work. work. py These highly highly successful successful honorees honorees also also have have some some These pretty ambitious ambitious pastimes: pastimes: they theyski, ski,kayak, kayak,scuba scupretty ba dive, hike, bike, run, golf, fish and paint. This dive, hike, bike, run, golf, fish and paint. This year’s honorees honorees include include aa sommelier, sommelier, aa NASCAR NASCAR year’s enthusiast, a hunting dog trainer, a glass-blower, enthusiast, a hunting dog trainer, a glass-blower, snowboarder and and aa genealogist... genealogist...to aa snowboarder to name name just just aa few. These women are passionate about their famfew.. These women are passionate about their families, their companies, their customers and their ilies, their companies, their customers, and their communities. communities. Shelby Publishing Publishing Company Company will will continue continue to to recrecShelby ognize women who make a difference. As always, ognize women who make a difference. As always we welcome welcome your your feedback feedback and and comments, comments, and and if if we you know a female leader, innovator, trendsetter or you know a female leader, innovator, trendsetter, someone special thatthat youyou feelfeel might qualify for our or someone special might qualify for

Women of Influence in the Food Industry list,list, I’d our Women of Influence in the Food Industry love to hear from you. You can nominate an honI’d love to hear from you. I hope you enjoy reading oree feature. by goingYou to our at www.foodindustry this canwebsite nominate an honoree by gowomen.com and clicking on the Nominate link. ing to our website at www.foodindustry Please join me applauding these 76 phenomenal women.com andinclicking on the Nominate link. women of influence. I hope you enjoy reading this Please join me in applauding these 76 phenomenal feature. women of influence. Regards, Regards, Karen Harty Karen Harty Executive Vice President Executive Vice President Griffin Publishing Company, Inc. Griffin Publishing Company, Shelby Company Inc. Shelby Publishing Company

The Women of Influence is an exclusive product of The Griffin Report and Shelby Publishing Company. The Women of Influence is an exclusive product of The Griffin Report and Shelby Publishing Company.

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Reach for the Stars! Congratulations To All 2014 Honorees! –From a Colleague


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Women of Influence in the Food Industry

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Credit Management). I was a board member for the Brain Injury Association of Massachusetts for many years and am a past president of the association. I also ran a support group for them for many years. I am a trustee of our church and am on the endowment committee.

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

GAYLE ALFREDS Imperial Distributors Inc.

Years with company: 13 Current position: Credit Manager

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: I have attended the University of Hartford, Worcester State University and the Worcester Art Museum. I have earned certificates from Dun & Bradstreet and Dale Carnegie and have attended various seminars and conferences for credit and collections through NACM (National Association of

The Griffin Report of Food Marketing

February 2014

I have been fortunate to have had many mentors throughout my years, both career-wise and personally. My first mentor in the credit field was the credit manager at Thom McAn Shoe Co. in Worcester, Mass. He took me under his wing and taught me all he knew. He sent me to my first credit management meeting with NACM, which at the time was mostly men. I was one of the first women who attended these meetings in New England. This group served as a mentor to me as well. These men were oldschool collectors and were very helpful to me in learning the field. At Imperial, our top management serves by example to be mentors to all of us that work here.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

I am most proud of the relationships that I have built throughout the years with the customers, both internal and external. The fact that our bad debt writeoffs have been minimal since I have been at Imperial is one of my measures of success. Also, my mentoring of employees and seeing them grow in their careers has been very rewarding.

Most challenging part of your job: Collecting money while maintaining good relationships.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Embrace learn-

ing, network with your peers – call people and talk to them, dress for success and be professional.

Hobbies: I enjoy photography and painting with watercolors and pastels. I also play the piano and organ, and love gardening – indoors and out.

charitable foundation, and I am a regional member of the Network of Executive Women.

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

DARCY ANDERSON

Associated Grocers of New England Years with company: 9½ Current position: Procure-

ment Merchandising and Development Specialist

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: I have my BA degree

in liberal arts from the University of New Hampshire and my MBA degree from Southern New Hampshire University. I am the co-chair of AG’s Community Connection Committee, our in-house

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One of my early mentors was one of my college professors, Mr. Doug Jack, who was instrumental in getting me involved in teaching as an adjunct faculty member at a community college. Doing this, in addition to my career as a procurement specialist, allowed me to stay current with business trends and discover my passion for teaching and the mentoring of others.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? This

passion for teaching has led to what I am most proud of in my career — the ability to teach and train others at Associated Grocers in the function of procurement. If I had to pick one defining moment, it would be when I was asked to be a co-chair for AG’s Community Connection. This role has allowed me to work with and help many of the

charitable organizations in our area.

Most challenging part of your job: The most challenging

part of my job is maintaining the appropriate work/life balance. Many of my responsibilities involve doing longterm projects. This, coupled with my desire to help and mentor others, has sometimes led to an imbalance between work and my personal life.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: My advice for up

and coming younger executives is to be willing to learn new ways of doing things and embrace change! If you are willing to do this, you will always learn something new.

Hobbies: My hobbies are very

diverse. I play indoor soccer, enjoy running and going to the gym. During the summer I go boating every weekend and belong to AG’s golf league, which I run. I like to kayak and ride my motorcycle. I like to sew, cook and play computer games. Lastly, one of my favorite hobbies is to play cards with my Dad and brother while watching football!


The Griffin Report of Food Marketing

February 2014

Women of Influence in the Food Industry

C&S WHOLESALE GROCERS WE PROUDLY CONGRATULATE

Debbie Belfiore

Perry Cohen

Holly Migliore

Debbie Belfiore, Perry Cohen and Holly Migliore, recognized by The Griffin Report as three of 2014’s Women of Influence in the Food Industry. LOCATIONS Buffalo NY | Chester NY | DuBois PA | Fresno CA | Indianapolis IN | Kapolei HI | Keene NH | Mauldin SC Montgomery NY | Newburgh NY | Northeast MD | North Hatfield MA | Sacramento CA | South Hatfield MA Stockton CA | Suffield CT | Upper Marlboro MD | Westfield MA | Windsor Locks CT | Woodbridge NJ | York PA

H E A D Q U A R T E R S 7 Corporate Drive | Keene, NH 03431 | 603.354.7000 | www.cswg.com

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Women of Influence in the Food Industry

and skills. I feel that I’ve learned something from each of them. Some have taught me what not to do. However, overall I’ve worked with many knowledgeable and positive people that understand the unique fresh meat industry that I’ve been part of for many years.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

DEBORAH BELFIORE

C&S Wholesale Grocers Years with company: 13 Current position:: Fresh Meat Director

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: B.S., Business Admin-

istration and Management, University of Massachusetts

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

Throughout my career, I have worked with many individuals, all with different management styles

The Griffin Report of Food Marketing

February 2014 sionate about. Not being able to put it aside until you get it right is what I find to be the key. Take something you genuinely enjoy and obtain a feeling that you’ve achieved what you set out to do is the best advice I can give anyone starting out.

Hobbies: Cooking, winter sports, music and enjoying a good book.

I am most proud working for a company like C&S. Being the meat director for a company the size of C&S is more of an achievement than I ever thought possible when I began my career in this industry.

SARAH BINNEY J. Polep Distribution Services

Years with company: 24 Current position: Assistant Director, Food Service

Most challenging part of your job: The most challenging

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: University of Syr-

part of my job is also what I enjoy the most. I have a fascination with working in the fast-paced, ever-changing conditions of the commodity markets.

acuse Bantal Leadership International Inc., Leadership Management Dynamics, Servsafe Certification

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Staying focused

Jeff Polep: Jeff has always been supportive in helping me with career advancement op-

and working hard isn’t what it’s all about. It’s finding something that you are pas-

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portunities. As customer service rep, food service administrative rep and as a sales rep, I was encouraged by Jeff to push myself to the next level. I learned from him how to develop strong relationships with our customer base. Jeff showed me the importance of getting to know our customers on a personal level. He has always offered an “open door” policy. Kenny Morse: Kenny inspired me to “think outside the box” in order to become a successful district sales manager. His pragmatic approach to problem-solving and goal-setting resulted in continued sales growth for my district. He also encouraged me to bring creative and innovative ideas to our customers so that they would see increased store sales and margins. Adam Kramer: Adam has been in the convenience store business for seven years and has learned all aspects of the Food Service Department in a short time. He is a valuable partner as I learn this side of the business. Adam’s likeability makes people very comfortable. He continues to encourage me to establish strong relationships with our vendors.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? I take great pride in the relationships that I have developed with our customer base. I have longstanding, strong relationships that are based on mutual trust. I have made it a point to personally meet each and every account in my territory. I grew my district from six sales reps in 1998 to 11 reps today with annual sales of over $140 million.

Most challenging part of your job: The most challenging part of my job is finding balance. Transitioning from district sales manager to assistant director of food service has been difficult but rewarding as I continue to uphold the highest standards of service and commitment to our customers.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: The advice that

I would like to share is that this is a “relationship” business that is built on trust. Follow-through and commitment are the keys to success in the convenience store industry. There are big opportunities out there for young executives who understand that hard work pays off.


The Griffin Report of Food Marketing

February 2014

Excellence & Integrity Thank you, 2014 Women of Influence honorees! You inspire us to work harder for sustainability and innovation! Your friends at

mobile email marketing solutions for your future.

Women of Influence in the Food Industry

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assisted you in your career: I

SARA ROSENBERG BITTORF

Boston Market Corp. Years with company: 1½ Current position: SVP, Chief

Brand Officer

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: B.S., Communica-

tions and Marketing, Boston University, member of Wise Women, a group of female executives that are part of The Leadership Investment, American Heart Association Vail Valley Foundation

Mentors and how they have

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February 2014

owe a huge debt to two bosses I had at Burger King, where I pretty much “grew up” in my career. Barry Schwartz hired me when I was young and green. I had a natural curiosity and basic knowledge of research techniques, and he taught me how to take data and turn it into usable business insights and actionable implications. The voice of the consumer will always be my foundation. Paul Clayton was instrumental in deepening my experience in marketing, via rotation through a number of roles in the marketing department. He saw my potential and moved me through positions in product, brand, advertising and promotions. He set me up to become an effective CMO by understanding the parts and how to make the whole greater than the sum of those parts.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

There are several new product launches I am proud of, but I’m more proud of the team effort around those

at Denton, PLP Program

launches. I learned early on that the best way to manage a big project is with a team of cross-functional people who collaborate and work together. One recent achievement I am proud of is the success of Boston Market 2013 holiday sales. We started right after last Thanksgiving was over, discussing what had worked and what needed rethinking, conducted consumer research, and developed objectives and strategies to improve our performance (which was up 14 percent vs. the prior year). Sales for 2013 were nearly double our goals and we were so successful that we ran out of supply in several markets.

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

TRUDY BOURGEOIS The Center for Workforce Excellence

Most challenging part of your job: For me, the most chal-

Years with company: 13½ (18 in consumer goods before that)

lenging part of any role, especially in a turnaround situation, is deciding what NOT to do. There is so much to address, the trick is to concentrate on a few critical activities that will have the greatest impact. I work very hard to create a plan that is focused on strategic choices, and then ensure flawless execution of that plan.

Current

position:

CEO and President

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: BBA in Marketing/

Business, Loyola University, New Orleans, Special Olympics volunteer, on the boards of Network of Executive Women, University of Texas

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Owner,

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The most important mentors in my life have been, without a doubt, my mother and grandmothers. They were all incredibly strong women. They were all women of conviction, character and resiliency. None of them ever worked a day in corporate America but each knew the secrets to succeed in life and in the business world. These women were born at a time when women of color didn’t have many opportunities, but they made the best of their season in life. I remember my mother, Gerdiest Reid, telling me, “Be kind as you achieve success because the same people you see going up the ladder will be the same people you see coming down the ladder as everyone’s career comes to an end.” What sage wisdom. And my mother’s mother, Mary Elizabeth Stallworth, taught me that the most important thing that any person can do is to lift the spirit of another person – to help them realize their own greatness. My father’s mom, Arzhelle Reid, taught me that character is everything.

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Congratulations,

Sara...

from all of us! Sara Rosenberg Bittorf Chief Brand Officer Boston Market Corporation

These women intrinsically knew the power of relationships, the value of developing others and the deeper meaning behind achieving success. I drew on all of this wisdom in my 18-year corporate career and continue to draw on it every day now as an entrepreneur.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? My most treasured career achievement came as a result of a coaching relationship that I had with a woman in the consumer goods industry. When I first met her she was a manager. She had so much capability but could not see it. Through coaching and self-discovery, she was able to find her voice and her power. I literally witnessed her change before my eyes. She became a better leader – a better person. She is now a vice president running a major business unit for a consumer goods organization. What touched me the most was when she said to me, “Trudy, you are like food for the soul. You infuse such a sense of empowerment in me. You make me feel like I can do better, achieve more.”


The Griffin Report of Food Marketing

KAREN BREMER

Georgia Restaurant Association Years with company: 3 Current position: Executive Director

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: “Most Notables Georgians” Georgia Trend Magazine 2013, 2014 Life Time Achievement Award 2009 Georgia Restaurant Association Member of the Year 2002 ACVB National Restaurant Association 1999-2001State Food Service Leader Recognition

Atlanta CitiMag 1999 Hall of Fame Inductee 1997 Food Service Industry Leader of the Year (GHTA) Interim CEO GHTA 2002 Treasurer GHTA Host PAC 2000-2002 Past President of Georgia Restaurant Association (GHTA) Founding Member Georgia Restaurant Council (GRA) Founder Atlanta Downtown Restaurant Week Founding Member The Essential Economy (TEI) Professional Advisor Cecil B. Day School of Hospitality Georgia State University Professional Advisor to 1996 Atlanta Olympic Organizing Committee Advisor Atlanta Community Food Bank Member Les Dames D ‘Escoffier’ Member International Women’s Forum Member Georgia Professional Lobbyist Association Board Member Council of State Restaurant Associations (CSRA) Board Member Team Georgia Board Member Atlanta Con-

February 2014 vention & Visitor Board (ACVB) Board Member DeKalb Convention & Visitor Board (DCVB)

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

George McKerrow, founder & partner in Ted’s Montana Grill and founder of Long Horn Steaks, and Phil Hickey Jr., CEO of the National Restaurant Association. Both of these gentlemen have served as role models, sounding boards and encouragers. Both have opened doors for me and have supported me through my career. They both understand how to lead others to create a great organization.

Most challenging part of your job: Making sure that the voice of Georgia Restaurants is heard throughout the state.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Do not be afraid

to ask for help, always create an environment of dignity and respect in your work space.

JULIE A. CASWELL

Department of Resource Economics, University of Massachusetts Amherst Years with company: 30 Current position: Professor of Resource Economics

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations:

Women of Influence in the Food Industry

M.S. University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1980, Economics Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1984, Joint degree in Agricultural Economics and Economics Agricultural and Applied Economics Association (American Agricultural Economics Association): President, 2013-14 Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association: President, 1994-1995.

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career: Undergraduate professors and advisor: Jim Bonnen, Jim Shaffer and Bernie Shaffer encouraged me to go to graduate school. Graduate professors Fritz Mueller and Bruce Marion, research mentors Food safety research program: Tanya Roberts and Clark Burbee interested me in research in this area.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? I am very proud of the undergraduate and graduate food marketing students I have taught and learned with. I am also very proud of working on the development of better food quality policy in the United States and internationally.

Most challenging part of your job: Working on projects with very different time scales: teaching, research and policy development.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Quality work always wins out—work hard and build bridges.

Hobbies: Walking and hiking, kayaking, movies and books.

B.S., Michigan State University (with high honor), 1976, Public Affairs Management

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Congratulations Julie! Thanks for your many contributions to the food industry and department through research, teaching and service. You’re an inspiration to us all! From the Department of Resource Economics, University of Massachusetts Amherst, students, staff and faculty. Dr. Julie Caswell,Department of Resource Economics, UMass Amherst The Department of Resource Economics offers degrees in Managerial Economics in Food and Resource Industries, concentrating on applications of microeconomic principles to business decision-making. Students develop expertise in quantitative analysis, business strategies, and market demand analysis. Career opportunities for students pursuing this track include research, planning, marketing, and managerial positions in a wide range of firms and governmental agencies in food and related industries. Visit us online at http://www.umass.edu/resec/index.shtml

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NANCY M. CHILDS

Saint Joseph’s University, Philadelphia, Pa. Years with company: 23 Current position: Professor of Food Marketing and Peck Fellow

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: B.S. Duke University, M.S. California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Ph.D. Century University International Food Informa-

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tion Council (IFIC Foundation Trustee and officer), Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), USDA Secretary’s National Agricultural Research Education Extension and Economics Advisory Board (NAREEE National representative for Food Retailing and Marketing), White House workshop on Healthy Communication of Dietary Guidance Messages and food marketing to children, Peck Fellowship, Innova Database editorial board, Nutraceutical’s World editorial board

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

Most challenging part of your job: Molding the next generation of food industry leaders with a sense of passion and a commitment to innovation. Advancing sound science-based food policy that delivers delicious, safe, nutritious and affordable food to all.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Be positive and don’t allow millennial collaboration to obscure personal integrity.

Hobbies: Beachcombing and the food film genre.

DIANE COLGAN

TOPS Markets, LLC Years with company: 5 Current position: Vice Presi-

My mom for grit and grace, and Jesuit values of service for others.

dent, Sales & Marketing

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: B.S. in Business Administration College of Charleston, Charleston, S.C. Cornell University, Food Industry Management Program

Invitation from First Lady Michelle Obama and the White House Domestic Policy Council to the Convening for Food Marketing to Children (2013)

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Wharton School of Business, Competitive Retailing Executive Program Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (Western NY Chapter), Board of Directors

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

Most challenging part of your job:

Being a daughter to immigrant parents, they encouraged me to dream big and believe in myself — that really anything is possible if you continuously learn, try hard and give your best. Later, as I started building my career, I was very fortunate to work with and learn from many of the best in retailing and specifically in the food industry. They took the time to share their knowledge, to encourage, to provide new opportunities to learn and to be a part of all aspects of the business. One of those mentors was Frank Curci, who I worked with 16 years ago, and am fortunate enough after 11 years to work with again at TOPS Markets where he is the chief executive officer and more recently, the new owner.

That I’ve been successful in a career that I love!

Communication. Almost every breakdown or misunderstanding occurs from a lack of clear communication. Whether communicating to each other, a large group of associates, to a community of people or to millions of customers, speak as you are speaking to one person. Be prepared, know what you want to say and speak clearly and simply...and then listen and provide the opportunity for feedback.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Take every opportunity to learn, stay open to new opportunities and embrace change. It is inevitable whether in your personal or professional life.

Hobbies: To support my family’s hobbies, especially those of my two sons. I also love to read and to play tennis.

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A faculty with influence on public policy and nutrition. Haub Has It.

Haub School of Business Saint Joseph’s University’s Haub School of Business congratulates Professor of Food Marketing Nancy Childs, Ph.D., for her notable contributions to the food industry. Through her research and tenure as the national representative for food marketing and retailing with the USDA, Childs has informed public policy and thus created a more nutritious and sustainable food supply for our nation. To learn more about graduate food marketing at Saint Joseph’s University’s Haub School of Business, or to visit a class for free, visit sju.edu/executivefood.


The Griffin Report of Food Marketing My dad. He taught me all he knows about business, and caring for customers and people.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

PERRY COHEN C&S Wholesale Grocers, Inc.

Years with company: 7 Current position: VP Talent

Management

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: MSEd – University of Pennsylvania BA – University of Pennsylvania EdD – University of Pennsylvania – anticipated 2015 Board of Directors, Antioch University New England

February 2014

Hobbies: Skiing, cycling, running, playing with my 3-year- old twins.

Establishing leadership competencies to really emphasize the importance of how we do things, not just what we do. Creating the BA program, watching our young talent grow and develop into successful leaders themselves. Defining moment: Governor’s Citation for Leadership Program of the Year in NH – 2013.

IRENE COOK Panera, LLC

Years with company: 10 Current position: Senior Vice

Most challenging part of your job:

President, Retail Operations & Joint Venture Operations

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: MBA from Suffolk

Making a big organization feel like a family.

Advice for upcoming younger executives:

University, Women’s Food Service Network, RFK for Children, Adopt a Student

Be true to yourself and trust your convictions. Build and nourish your relationships they are the key to your success. Have fun.

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

Early in my career, I was fortunate enough to work with Bill Gagnon. He was the toughest, but he taught me so much about myself and

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

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in my life. She taught me at a young age that anything worth doing was worth doing right. That has always stuck with me and I still to this day strive to do the very best I can at whatever I do and I feel I hold myself to a high standard because of it.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

CARMELA CRAWFORD

Lomar Distributing, a Hy-Vee Company Years with company: 16 Current position: Specialty

Food Buyer

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Des Moines Area Com-

munity College, AS Degree Expanded Studies at Iowa State University

Mentors and how have they assisted you in your career? My grandmother would be the most important mentor

The defining moment in my career was when I was given the opportunity to be a buyer for Lomar. I found that I really had a knack for my job and I felt like this was what I was meant to do. I am proud of the hard work I do and that my colleagues appreciate the efforts I make.

Most challenging part of your job: The most challenging part of my job is staying on top of the ever-changing industry and being ahead of the trends. Specialty food trends can change very quickly and sometimes we can’t react quickly enough for our consumers.

Advice for upcoming younger

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What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? I am

most proud of the teams I have worked with and having the honor to lead them. 

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

Always keep your word, be trustworthy and follow through. This industry is very fast paced and people appreciate a response in a timely manner and appreciate someone they know they can trust and count on. Don’t be afraid to give your opinion or suggestion about something because your opinion might the one your company needed to hear. Boating and spending time with my family.

human capacity. No matter what you do, do it with a perspective of whether or not you will have pride in the end result. Choose to be excellent in what you do, as your work is a reflection of your expectations of others. He was also famous for stretching me to go beyond where I thought was possible. You don’t know where you can be or how far you can go with an assignment unless you look beyond today into a future of possibility. Charlie Cocotas was also a role model that influenced me. He is one of the most gregarious people I know. He would light up a room when he walked in. He wouldn’t get down to business until he said hello personally to everyone. Connecting with people first, then things second has been a valuable lesson. This is a business of relationships — with each other and our customers. Trust and relationships are invaluable.

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My greatest pride is seeing a team come together and become stronger than the sum. Each time I have been part of a team like this, we have faced challenges and excelled beyond the challenge. A defining moment for me is when people say “thank you” for making a difference in their lives! To me, the small moments are the ones that fill me up and re-energize me.

Most challenging part of your job: For me, the most chal-

lenging part of my job is time. The limited resource of time and the decisions that go along with where you invest it, and where you can’t, is a challenge.

Advice for upcoming young executives: My advice would

be you are where you are because of the choices you make. Choose for the longterm, not the short-term.  As painful as choices can be, make choices for what you stand for. Your choices in your business and career have to align with whom you choose to be as a person.  Every action you do defines who you are for the people who are watching you and growing from you.

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executives :

Hobbies:

Women of Influence in the Food Industry

SELENA CUFFE Heritage Link Brands, LLC

Years with company: 8 Current position: President & CEO

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Stanford Univer-

sity graduate (bachelor in International Relations with minors in Spanish and Portuguese), MBA with honors from Harvard University. Certified, with merit, by Wine & Spirit Education Trust (WSET). Vice President, Harvard Business School Alumni Board. Member: Stanford University’s Bing Overseas Studies Advisory Council, House of Mandela Advisory Board, Director: Global Elevation Board

Lillian Lambert Lincoln Mary Akpovi Daniel Isenberg Both Lillian and Mary have shown me by example and continuous encouragement that it is indeed possible to be a successful entrepreneur, mother and wife. They also constantly reinforce this message through inspirational cards, books, messages, etc. Dan has been very instrumental in helping me see the forest through the trees, so to speak, in terms of building a business from the ground up. He’s always reinforced that while this path is less glamorous and unconventional, it is more common than not! He is also a “gut check” when evaluating select business opportunities and potential partners.

What are you most proud of in your achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? My

proudest career achievement is that HLB demonstrates that it’s possible to “do well, while doing good!” We are transforming the way the world perceives Africa and the African diaspora, through the medium of wine. The residual effects of apartheid mean that South Africa’s burgeoning $3 billion wine industry has less than 2 percent black ownership, which is appalling considering blacks represent more than 80 percent of the country’s population. We are improving these stats, “with every sip!” By working to make our wines household names across America, we strive for more than fair wages for our producers—we are committed to expanding economic opportunity for them and for the more than 250,000 Africans in the industry. A defining moment in my career was not succumbing to second thoughts after taking the leap of faith into entrepreneurship and founding HLB. I beat back many fears and kept moving forward. That entrepreneurial “grit” has served me well ever since!


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Women of Influence in the Food Industry

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Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

Advice for upcoming younger executives:

My father, André Daguin, and Roger Duffour, who taught me everything about the culinary traditions of Gascony. Julia Child, who counseled and encouraged the beginning of D’Artagnan.

Surround yourself with people smarter than you.

rum (WFF), committee volunteer, and lead for McCain Foods Women Impacting Storebrand Excellence (WISE) founder and Board Chair, 2011-present

Hobbies: Cooking, traveling, music.

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? :

ARIANE DAGUIN D’Artagnan

Years with company: 28 Current position: CEO Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: French Baccalaureat mention Organizations: James Beard Foundation, City Harvest, Share our Strength, Les Dames de l’Escoffier.

PEGGY S. DAVIES

Last June, end of our 28th year, realizing that at $70 million in sales, we are debt free and achieved efficiencies both in Chicago and in Newark to continually improve profitability while growing sales.

McCain Foods USA, Inc.

Years with company: 14 Current position: VP Indus-

trial Sales and Vegetable Business Unit

Most challenging part of your job:

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: BA Sociology, Wilkes

Sourcing. Not compromising the quality of the meats we provide means that we have to constantly identify, convince and add farmers to our group.

University, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. PLMA Board of Directors, 1993 to present Global Women’s Leadership Forum, Advisory Board, 2012-Present Women’s Food Service Fo-

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Walt Sunkel (Dad): think before you speak Irene Sunkel (Mom): demonstrated through her personal success that you can do anything you set your mind to and be successful while being a lady Harry Mattern (owner, Mattern’s Florist - college years): it’s OK to try and fail Paul Nester (manager, late ’70s/early ’80s, while employed at James O. Brown & Sons): private brand creation and marketing, partnering with private brand manufacturers and retailers to successfully market private brand products Ben Frega (manager, ’90s, while employed at Agrilink Foods): saw my potential with promotion from sales manager to VP Sales Maureen O’Brien (CEO, Global Women’s Leadership Forum): getting out of your

comfort zone

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Moving from inside sales to outside sales Marrying my husband, Paul

Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? VP Sales at Birds Eye and McCain Foods USA Inc. Chair-PLMA Board of Directors 2003-2004, first and to date only female Lead McCain Foods Women’s Business Resource Group (2011)

Achievements: Inception of WISE 11/2011, introduced to the store brand industry 11/2012, 11/2013. Organization in one year has partnered with more than 25 companies and 170 members to foster diverse collaboration and provide leadership that drives the continued success of the industry PLMA Hall of Fame: inducted March 2013 Top Women in Grocery, November 2013 Illinois Commission on Diversity and Human Relations, Annual Martin Luther King honor (January 2014).

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Traditional, Whole Grain & Specialty Flours • Edible Seeds • Sweet Spices • Custom Blends Serving the Independent and In-Store Baker, Distribution, Food Service & Manufacturing Industries www.baystatemilling.com


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Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career: I have crossed paths with many individuals in my career who have offered some nugget of advice or encouragement – big or small - that helped shape who I am today.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

LISA DEROSA Acosta Sales & Marketing

Years with company: 7 Current position: Branch

Business Insights Manager

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: B.S. in Business,

University of Connecticut, MBA, Boston College, Certified Professional Category Manager designation from the Category Management Association

Not being afraid to pursue my career objectives. The manager at my first job told me I would not be able to move to the next level because I lacked a background in retail. I was able find other ways to prove my ability and before long was promoted. I am happy now to be involved with the Leadership Development Program at Acosta where my team and I mentor the LDPs during the business insights phase – helping these individuals recognize their career objectives.

February 2014

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career: No one makes it alone! I have been so fortunate to have incredible mentors throughout my career. They have served as guides, counselors and friends during my career journey. They are people I admire and respect — they lead by example.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: My advice for upcoming younger executives is to not accept the word “no.” Your career growth may take time, but you can accomplish your goals through hard work and networking. Spending time with family, playing with my dog, photography, baking, gardening.

DIANE DIETZ Safeway Inc.

Years with company: 5½ Current position: Executive

Vice President/Chief Marketing Officer

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Degree from Northern Ill. University - Marketing & Economics Marketing Board of Directors Boys & Girls Clubs of America 2000-05 United Way Chair P&G 2003

Most challenging part of your job: The most challenging part of my job is giving every project the amount of attention

Whirlpool Board of Directors- current

it deserves. Deadlines are often short. It is important to be organized and understand the resources available to work efficiently.

Hobbies:

Women of Influence in the Food Industry

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? I am proud of developing, launching and leading great brands. During my time at P&G I led iconic brands like Crest, Scope, Glide, Whitestrips and Oral B. I am very proud of the role my team played in turning around the P&G Oral Care business. It was an incredible journey. I have also been fortunate to play a leadership role at Safeway. Another amazing brand! I am most proud of the role I have played in helping people reach their career goals. I think defining moments

happen throughout your career. The most defining is picking the companies you work for. I have always been guided by aligning with companies that share my core values.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: My advice is follow your passion and surround yourself with people you admire/ respect. Life is short and a career is over in the blink of an eye. Find a company that is aligned with your core values.

Hobbies: My hobby is spending time with my family. I have two little girls and a wonderful husband. When I am out of the office, they are my focus.

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Congratulations Lisa, Cynthia, Wendy, and Cathy from all of us at Acosta. At Acosta, we value community involvement and foster a corporate culture in which giving back is both encouraged and rewarded. It’s just one of the ways our associates embrace and demonstrate our core values. We congratulate Lisa DeRosa, Cynthia Martin, Wendy Rice, and Cathy Riegler on being honored as 2014 Women of Influence in the Food Industry. S A L E S

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February 2014

your own standards even if they are higher than those around you. Currently I belong to Vistage, a peer advisory group for CEOs and Key Executives, and we help each other with best practices and in observing our own behavior and participation in my work dynamics.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

LENA DIGENTI

Locals 8 Restaurant Group Years with company: 7 Current position: Chief Strategy Officer

Education degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: B.S.-ED, MS – Community Psychology, Vistage Member, Farm to Chef Board Member, Founding member of Sustainable Farm School, Food Not Bombs Volunteer

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career: My first mentor was my boss at a waitressing job in college. He taught me the importance of working to

I adopted my three children, which was the happiest day of my life. I left my career to be with them while they were small. When I returned to my career, rebuilding it from scratch was so much harder than I thought it would be. The day I worked my way back to an executive level meant so much to me, for my own personal sense of achievement and the fact that I was able to model for others that you can write your own story and create your own definition of success based on your own values.

Most challenging part of your job: The most challenging part of my job is trying to simultaneously engage in the dayto-day while keeping a big-

F.A.M.E. (Fund for the Advancement of Minorities through Education) Board Member FMI Future Connect Committee Member Girl Scouts of America volunteer Christ’s Lutheran ChurchLiturgical Deacon Parent Teacher Association volunteer

picture perspective. Some days the balance is great, others it’s like a pendulum, but it’s always a growth opportunity.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Take every opportunity to challenge yourself. Listen, observe, self-reflect, find people that challenge you to think strategically about yourself and the issues your company is facing. Create your own pathway to success based on your values and stay true to yourself.

Hobbies: In all honesty I love experiencing life, whether it’s snowboarding in the winter, hiking with my dog on the weekends, cooking a huge meal for a group of friends, discovering a new restaurant, curling up with a good book or going to a show. I guess my hobby is tasting life.

Women of Influence in the Food Industry

LORA DIKUN Giant Eagle, Inc.

Years with company: 10 Current position: Vice Presi-

dent, Talent Development & Labor Relations

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Education: B.S. in Accounting with Honors & High Distinction MS in Taxation Leadership Pittsburgh XXVIII Graduate Volunteer Organizations: Blind and Vision Rehabilitation Services Board Member Team Member Care Fund Executive Director

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

I have had many mentors throughout my career, starting with my parents. My mother taught me the importance of being a good person first and foremost and the power of quiet strength. My father taught me that I can achieve anything that I set my mind on. Professionally I have had mentors that have taught me about the business and understanding how to successfully navigate difficult waters when you encounter them.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? I am most proud of my team. I love to see how much each person on the team has grown and developed over the years and how much they accomplish every day. There

is nothing better than to see your leaders flourish!

Most challenging part of your job: The most challenging

part is achieving the right balance at work and at home. Juggling competing priorities and multiple demands for my time and ensuring my team has the tools they need to be successful. Another challenge is trying not to feel guilty for being at work when I need to be at work and, at the same time, not feeling guilty for being at home when I need to be home. Thankfully, I have a tremendously supportive husband who enables me to pursue my career knowing my children are in good hands!

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Make sure that

you love what you do and good things will come. You spend too much time at work not to love it. Don’t be afraid to try something different. Twenty-plus years ago as a recent graduate working as a CPA, I would have never predicted that I would later move into human resources.

Congratulations TO ALL 2014 HONOREES For all of your hard work and continued dedication to the Food Industry; we would like to take this opportunity to thank you for doing an outstanding job and for being recognized as 2014 Women of Influence in the Food Industry.

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Women of Influence in the Food Industry

Member, FMI Government Relations Committee Member, FMI State Government Relations Committee Board Member, Hallowell Food Bank

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

SHELLEY F. DOAK

Maine Grocers & Food Producers Association Years with company: 5 Current position: Executive

Director. Eaton Peabody provides MGFPA with association management services.

Education degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: A.A. Pine Manor College President, Maine Society of Association Executives

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I give much credit to my mother and grandmother who surmounted terrible losses and pressed on with courage, humor and kindness. They taught me to believe in myself and to take time to give back.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

Most challenging part of your job:

it grows with a baby’s body, eliminating the need for so many surgeries throughout their life. We have raised $600,000 in six years and are hoping to raise another $150,000 at our Benefit Gala on March 1, 2014, at the New Bedford Whaling Museum.

Never a shortage of great ideas, just not enough time in the day!

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Be mindful, listen and build relationships, face to face. Unplug and ask questions, take the time to listen, to really hear what others have to say.

Hobbies: Spending time with my husband, children, granddaughter and family members. Gardening, hiking, cooking and spending time with friends.

After nearly three years, we succeeded in securing a significant increase in the purchase discount rates for our State Agency Liquor Stores. I know that my diverse career in business, in state government and in managing this association enabled me to maintain patience and conviction for all those many months.

Mentors and how have they assisted you in your career: I

SUE DUHAMEL Shaw’s Supermarkets

Years with company: 25 Current position: Seafood/

Deli/Prepared Foods Buyer

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Bachelor Degree from

UMASS Dartmouth I am so proud to be involved in a charity called Healing little Hearts. The monies raised are to benefit Boston’s Children’s Hospital Pediatric Cardiac Research. The doctors are developing a tissue engineered heart valve, instead of an artificial one, so

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have had many key, instrumental mentors at Shaw’s: Joe Callanan, Ken Hoffman and Gail Lewis, to name a few. But when I was a young buyer trainee in 1995, Alan McRae took me under his wing and taught me everything I needed to know to be the buyer I am today. He taught me that getting the lowest cost was the main part of my job but treating people with respect was most important.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

My defining moment was in 1998, when I was promoted to seafood buyer. During my three years in that role, I flourished and really came into my own as a buyer. I cultivated strong vendor re-

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2014 Woman of Influence

Sue Duhamel Seafood/Deli/ Prepared Foods Buyer

lationships, developed ownbrand products and executed successful marketing and promotional campaigns to drive growth. One highlight was when I visited shrimp facilities in Honduras and Thailand, which gave me the immense knowledge to understand the complexities of the shrimp market. I, along with my boss at the time, Joe Callanan, achieved tremendous sales success in all categories.

Most challenging part of your job: Every day there is a

new challenge to overcome, whether it be a late truck, an ad error, service level issues, etc. How you handle that particular challenging situation is what differentiates you from your peers.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Work hard, al-

ways ask questions, believe in yourself, and be kind/ respectful to everyone you work for/with so you never burn a bridge.

Hobbies: I have a wonderful group of six women, including myself, who have been in a book club for 10 years. Reading the book is just a premise for a get-together.


The Griffin Report of Food Marketing The Griffin Report of Food Marketing

Momma Knows Best. Momma Dietz knows what it takes to be a Woman of Influence. She's celebrating her 89th Birthday, and Dietz and Watson turns 75 this year... so she knows all about being a success in the food industry. We wish all 2014 honorees a warm congratulations! From Momma Dietz, and all of us here at Dietz & Watson.

DIETZ & WATSON, INC. 5701 Tacony St., Phila., PA 19135 800-333-1974 • Fax: 215-831-8719 DietzAndWatson.com

Ruth ‘Momma’ Dietz Eni Chairman and Chief Executive Momma A 2013 Woman of Influence in the Food Industry

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Women of Influence in the Food Industry

SHARON FALVEY

Imperial Distributors Inc. Years with company: 14 at

Imperial, 31 in the industry

Current position: Assistant Controller

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: I have a Masters Degree in Business Management from Anna Maria College and a Bachelors Degree in Economics from Worcester State College.

Mentors and how they have

The Griffin Report of Food Marketing

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assisted you in your career:

executives:

I have been one of the fortunate people to have had a number of mentors throughout my career. In the beginning of my career with the food distribution industry, I had a mentor who taught me to take each project to be completed and dissect it into small goals. Each hurdle became more of an achievement for all involved. I work with my current team with this concept in mind.

Work hard and do not sacrifice quality. Be patient and follow through on your commitments.

Hobbies: Golf, shopping and spending time with family and friends.

ANNA LISA FAMANIA

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

Mt. Pleasant Ice Cream

I, myself, have been able to coach individuals who started at entry-level positions and watch them over the years be promoted to management positions.

Years with company: 2½ Current position: Vice Presi-

dent of Operations

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations:

Most challenging part of your job:

AAS Business Management LIU

The most challenging part of my job is to recognize the individual talents of my team. We utilize these talents to educate and guide our team to advance in their personal and professional career.

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career: Jay Zweibaum (Aramark)Jay’s mentorship paved my career growth in foodservice

Advice for upcoming younger

in how to manage an operation with specific foundations of a well marketed program, with an emphasis on profitability while encouraging a team environment for company success. He infused a daily regimen to provide a strong associate award program to build collaboration for a successful guest experience in our restaurants. Owen Moore (NYU)-Owen always showed diversification in the workplace. He was influential in teaching me that branching out leads to personal growth in and outside of our daily environments. This also helps you build an ongoing networking community that fosters new experiences and leads to a well-rounded career path. Both mentors foster professional women to flourish and develop in the workplace.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? I am most proud of being awarded my current position. Upon being recruited into Mt. Pleasant it was a boutique distribution organization

that has grown tremendously competing in the arena of the larger broad-liners. Under the direction of the president and I, we have been listed as one of largest independent distributor in the Northeast for one of Dannon’s frozen product lines called YoCream.

Most challenging part of your job: The most challenging item in my current position is keeping up with company’s growth initiatives in the face of the ever-changing climate of the economy. Our business has been greatly affected by the environmental atmospheric change. We are evolving at a historic pace to stay ahead of competition.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Build a strong network of colleagues and a support system.

Hobbies: Watching Food Network or the Cooking Channel with my family.

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Calise Bakery Congratulates all of the 2014 Women of Influence

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The Griffin Report of Food Marketing as many of their functions throughout the year as I can.

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

MEAGHAN MAYER FITZGERALD Jacob Wirth Restaurant

Years with company: 3 ½ Current position: General

Manager

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: I began culinary school but did not complete my degree. In the last two years I have been responsible for fundraisers that Jacob Wirth has hosted which have raised over $28,000 for the MGH Burn Center. I also work closely with the Burn Survivors of New England and provide catering and help at

I was lucky enough to grow up in a family business. A family business can become like a person not an entity. Seeing how my father managed this was an education I could not ever have learned in school. My mother taught me to look at the small things, that every detail is important, even a crooked light, and that consistency is paramount. Both my parents spent all their free time giving to others, which shaped me to be driven to give back as much and as often as I can.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? My dad was severely burned in a gasoline tanker accident. It is hard to go through a major tragedy, when it involves someone you are close to and running a business with—it seems impossible. Surviving that and growing the business through that time changed my view of my job and myself for the better.

February 2014

Women of Influence in the Food Industry

Most challenging part of your job:

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

Always smiling.

Many individuals have had an impact on my life and my career, some in the form of a friend, while others were mentors and role models. I believe that we are all a product of influence and I have been fortunate to have had many great influences in my life. Dedra Castle Newman introduced me to the corporate structure of the grocery industry. Her insights and guidance assisted me in learning how to work through many channels to achieve greater results. Mike Byars has been a friend and mentor for many years. His strong leadership and ability to transform organizations is a gift that he shares with those willing to learn. I appreciate all of the long discussions and learning events that he has provided to me during my career.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Three things: Don’t take things too personally. You will always have upset customers or staff, and there is always the chance to make things better if you stay calm and keep perspective on the situation. Actually read all the industry magazines you are sent. Some things may not be pertinent or applicable but they may spark an idea in your mind that is. When a customer has a good experience they will tell two or three friends if you are lucky. If they have a bad experience they will tell 10 friends. With the aspect of online review sites multiply that number infinitely. So serve every customer like they are your first.

Hobbies: Traveling with my husband. In this industry vacations are important because more often than not your job is 24/7.

JENNIE FOTOVICH Roche Bros. Supermarkets

Years with company: I have been with Roche Bros for five years and have spent more than 30 in the food industry. Current position: Vice President of Human Resources Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: I hold the designation of SPHR (Senior Professional Human Resources)

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What are you most proud of in your career achievements? I am proud to have been in positions that allowed me to have an impact on others. Encouraging young talent to grow and develop is by far the greatest reward and the best part of my job. I am honored to have been

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part of their lives and enjoy celebrating their successes throughout their careers. Contributing to each community is equally important and it is possible to do this and develop young talent in retail business. The future of our industry depends upon our communities and our next generations.

Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? My defining moment was many years ago when I realized how sharing my experiences with others may be a positive learning event for the next generation.

Most challenging part of your job: Helping others acknowledge and embrace change and how it is a vital part of our lives and industry.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Be passionate about what you do, be honest in your endeavors and always look out for others. While we live in a very large world, we frequently have a greater impact than we realize, so make it count.


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JULIE GORDON

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

Advice for upcoming younger executives:

Bob and Brad Johnson have been my mentors in this industry. They have not only taught me the skill set needed to succeed in foodservice, but they have also shown me how to lead by example and build business relationships based on honesty and integrity.

Do not be afraid of hard work and always keep a positive attitude. Learn from your mistakes and become a stronger and wiser person because of them.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

Years with company: 15 Current position: VP Sales Education degrees and proessional/volunteer organizations:

I am most proud of workingwith our team to consistently achieve the goals of our manufacturers as well as helping Yankee Marketers maintain a leadership role in the ever-changing broker community.

Attended University South Carolina.

Most challenging part of your job:

Yankee Marketers

of

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Past board member of the board of directors of the North American Meat Association, and the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council-West.

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career: I

Hobbies: I enjoy traveling, gardening, outdoor activities, live music and theatre.

KELLY GREEN Birko

Years with company: I was born into the family business in 1974. I’ve worked for the company for 16 years. Current position: I am the

third-generation owner, chairman of the board and vice president of business development for Birko.

Meeting the goals of our manufacturers while balancing the objectives of our customers.

Education degrees and proessional/volunteer organizations: BA, communications,

the University of Colorado (1997), Executive MBA, Colorado State University (2004). Member of Vistage International, a global network for chief executives.

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New England Dairy Promotion Board Years with company: 8 Current position: Director of

Marketing Services (*As of Jan. 1, 2014, Lisa is VP of Strategic Planning at Dairy Management Inc.)

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: B.S. in Communication, Boston University College of Communications, psychology minor

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Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

Most challenging part of your job:

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

Celeste Contois, SVP of human resources for Papa Gino’s, drew me to strive for the next level — mediocre isn’t sufficient. She taught me that being kind and fair doesn’t mean that you are soft or ineffective.

Balance of family and work. I want the best for both and that is not always achievable.

Throughout my career, I have been fortunate enough to have always found people around me that excel in certain areas. I try to learn how they approach situations then incorporate those learnings into my own style. I’ve had many official and non-official mentors and have gained wisdom from both.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

LISA HATCH

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have been fortunate to have many mentors and advisors along my career path. The two significant people I will credit for my accomplishments today are: My grandmother, Florence Smith Powers, who founded Birko with my grandfather, Ward Smith, in 1953. She instilled in me the importance of hard work, respecting others and never taking short cuts. Most importantly, she taught me how to make the world a better place by doing what you do best. These fundamental characteristics hold true with my most recent mentor, the CEO of Birko, Mark Swanson. His leadership characteristics mirror these traits. Mark has challenged me to think outside of the box and to focus on what I do best while integrating the traits my grandmother instilled in me at a young age. Today our core principle is food safety and helping our customers fight food pathogens in their plants—this is

I believe in what I do and who I work for. That is something that is truly important to me. The fact that I get to have fun doing it is something that I feel very lucky about. Defining moments or proud moments have been a big part of my time here. I am proud when the New England division is recognized nationally, which we are often. But I guess a defining moment was when the national office asked me to join them because they recognize what I have been able to do locally and want to tap into that nationally.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Raise your hand, never say it can’t be done, take chances, be fair, work hard. And sick time is for when you are sick.

Hobbies: Family, skiing.

ANNETTE HATER

The Kroger Co. Years with company: 14 Current position: IS&S Director Store Systems

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics, Thomas Moore College Associate of Arts in Information Systems, Thomas Moore College

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? I am most proud of the people I have developed and mentored through the years. I have such fantastic teams and am proud to have had the opportunity to influence and help them in their career. I wouldn’t say that I have one specific defining moment of my career however, I am very proud of always staying true to who I am, what I stand for and being diligent about keeping those values core in everything I do. Someone I worked with once said, “Core

what Birko does best. Under Mark’s leadership, Birko has become the industry leader in this arena.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? This fall, Birko was named the top company in manufacturing by ColoradoBiz magazine. This achievement is significant to me personally and to the entire team since it demonstrates our dedication to food safety and our 60-year loyalty to our customers.

Most challenging part of your job: As a business owner, the

challenging part of the job is satisfying the customer and making sure all your employees are in the right seats to execute on delivery. Helping our customers meet their needs and specific challenges in food safety is our main objective.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: No matter what,

listen to your customer— whether internal or external—and their pain points, and find a way to solve them.

Hobbies: Golf, cycling and doing anything in the Colorado great outdoors.

beliefs are ones you’d be fired for before you would compromise,” and I often think about that to determine if the issue/situation is something that is a core belief/value or an “in-the-moment” situation that isn’t really critical to the big picture.

Most challenging part of your job: I’d consider the most challenging part of my job trying to find the balance between my work and personal life.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Don’t be afraid to make decisions and be accountable for those decisions. I find too often others looking for someone else to make the decision. The world needs more people willing to make the call.

Hobbies: I love to cook. It completely relaxes me after a long, stressful day. I also enjoy reading, golfing and spending time with my husband.


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Women of Influence in the Food Industry

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

KIRSTEN HOGAN UNFI

Years with company: 13 Current position: National

Vice President, Retail Category Management

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: B.A. in Communications from Boston College Volunteer organizations: Board Member, Central Massachusetts March of Dimes

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February 2014

My first and most significant mentor has always been my father. He taught me the value of working hard, working with integrity and leading by example. As I progressed in my career, I sought to surround myself with others of the same value set. Industry veterans such as Kathy Ferguson and Marc Ghidotti have had an immeasurable impact on my career and the path that I have chosen to follow.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? In 2007, Millbrook was sold to UNFI. I had been with Millbrook for nearly seven years, so the change in both culture and management was paramount. I am very proud to say that I was able to integrate into UNFI very successfully, show the organization not only my value but the value of category management. I was promoted to VP early in 2012, and at that point had the privilege to help formulate

and grow the retail category management department to where it is today.

Longtime standing member and volunteer of the New England Convenience Store Association, New England Ice Cream and Restaurant Association and School Nutrition Association.

Most challenging part of your job: The most challenging part of my job is being able to dedicate myself to my associates and to my young family at the same time. Balancing work and family is both challenging and rewarding, and being able to do that well is something of an “art form” that is constantly evolving!

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Operate and behave with integrity, no matter what situation you are facing. Always be true to yourself and to your values. If what you are trying to do feels wrong, it probably is.

Hobbies: I have three young children, so spending time with them, going to all of their activities and events is very rewarding. When I do have some time to myself, I enjoy running and just completed my first half-marathon.

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

KIM IMBORNONE New England Ice Cream Co.

Years with company: I have

been fortunate to work in the foodservice and retail ice cream industry since 1989 and with New England Ice Cream for the past 11 years.

Current position: Vice President of Sales, Segment Leader Foodservice/Noncommercial Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Suffolk University,

Boston, Mass.

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Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

KATE JASPON

Dunkin’ Brands Inc. Years with company: 8 Current position: Vice Presi-

dent, Corporate Controller & Treasurer

Education degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Bachelor of Science, Babson College Licensed CPA, Massachusetts Member of the Board of Directors, Beat NB and DDBR Community Foundation Board and Executive Council Member, MCX

I have been fortunate to have had a number of mentors to help guide me throughout my career. I think it is important to have mentors but also have to have a sponsor who will not only talk to you about your development but will also talk about you and advocate on your behalf. As women we are often over-mentored and under-sponsored. I was fortunate to have found both in Dunkin’ Brands’ former CFO, Kate Lavelle. Even today, after retiring from Dunkin’, Kate remains a sounding board for me.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? I have been fortunate to have been part of many financial transactions at Dunkin’. I would have to say having the opportunity to play a lead role in the process of taking Dunkin’ Brands public in July 2011 and standing on the floor of the NASDAQ as the first shares traded was a moment I will forever be proud

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Unified Grocers Women’s Network, Executive Sponsor City of Hope, Food Industries Circle Advisor Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Orange County, Advisory Board Member

Most challenging part of your job: Finding a way to fit everything in is challenging. Being a mother, a wife and a professional can be difficult. I have found there really is no such thing as work/life balance — there has to be a blend and each takes priority at different times.

Surround yourself with people that complement your skill sets. Hire those that are stronger in areas that you are weaker and do not be afraid to hire someone more experienced than you. Your team is part of your personal brand. Build it and manage it wisely.

Hobbies: Crossfit, running and spending time with family.

greatest privilege of my role is the opportunity I have had to train and mentor rising talent. It is incredibly gratifying to see inexperienced business people evolve into successful and strong team members.

Most challenging part of your job: My greatest challenge is constantly juggling all aspects of my job — more specifically, balancing my time with our team members, industry partners and ongoing internal projects.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Stay relevant and

constantly educate yourself about industry trends so you can share these with customers and fellow team members. Always remember to reflect before you react in a professional world. Stay positive and be happy.

Hobbies: Family, fitness and

I’m an avid New England sports fan.

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of.

Advice for upcoming younger executives:

I was raised in an entrepreneurial family and was given the opportunity to learn about the industry throughout my youth. My parents taught me grit, responsibility and the importance of being a person of good character. The strong values I learned from our family business have enabled me to meet with success in my adult career. When I arrived at New England Ice Cream, I was fortunate enough to work for Bob Frotten, the chief operating officer. Bob’s mentoring helped me apply my knowledge from our family business to a more corporate environment. His professionalism and integrity helped mold me into the person I am today. Collectively, these instrumental mentors have provided me the opportunity to become a more well rounded

leader and business woman.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? The

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

SUE KLUG

Unified Grocers Years with company: 1 Current position: Chief Mar-

keting Officer

Education degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: B.S., University of

Southern California, Food Industry Management MBA, University of Southern California, Advertising and Promotion Management WAFC (Western Association of Food Chains) Board Member and Vice President IGA (Independent Grocers Association) Board Member Network of Executive Women, Southern California, PR Committee Lead

I have been blessed with several important mentors and sponsors. Bill Davila taught me to take calculated risks and “color outside the lines.” Larry Del Santo and Dick Goodspeed taught me how to strategically assemble talent and pull disparate individuals together as a single powerful team Jeff Noddle taught me the importance of connecting to associates at all levels in the organization Dan Granger taught me to have fun and be my authentic self My husband reminds me to always keep my sense of humor through thick and thin.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

I am most proud of the associates that I have mentored and sponsored in my career. Watching them take on new assignments and achieve their dreams provides tremendous satisfaction.

Most challenging part of your job: It can be challenging

when team members stay rooted in the past and do not creatively tackle issues that impact the business today. We have to resist the temptation to say, “we tried that before” or “we can’t fix that.” There are so many new tools and opportunities — we just need to keep pushing for solutions and have an open mind.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Find your pas-

sion and pursue it...that is where and when you will truly excel. Don’t be afraid to take on risks and new assignments. You need to demonstrate your ability to succeed across many different environments and situations. Listen more, talk less.


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Women of Influence in the Food Industry

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Women of Influence in the Food Industry

February 2014

The Griffin Report of Food Marketing

Unified Grocers Salutes Sue Klug! Truly a Woman of Influence in the Food Industry. Leader. Pioneer. Champion. Humanitarian. Inspiration.

Sue Klug is Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer for Unified Grocers, the largest member-owned cooperative wholesale grocer in the western United States.

Unified Grocers is proud to have Sue Klug as part of our team. Sue, our sincere appreciation for your many contributions to our Company and our industry.

Congratulations!

www.unifiedgrocers.com


The Griffin Report of Food Marketing Chair, Chariton Volunteer Fireman’s Auxiliary, Sacred Heart Alter and Rosary Society

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

SHEILA M. LAING Hy-Vee

Years with company: 28 Current position: Vice President, Health and Wellness Solutions

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: B.A./B.S. Loras College, SPHR and then member Retail Industry Leadership Association Healthcare Committee, Food Marketing Institute Future Connect Committee, Iowa Capitol Crossroads Wellness Co-

I value the roles mentors have played in helping me understand retailing and helping me grow as a communicator and administrator. One who is responsible for me being with Hy-Vee is Bob Kirsch. Bob was my first store director and he taught me to open my eyes to the possibilities within Hy-Vee, to look beyond one store in one town, he helped me grow from a college student to a professional.

February 2014

Women of Influence in the Food Industry

Most challenging part of your job:

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

All that is involved in the ever-evolving world of healthcare.

During my career at Coca-Cola, I have worked with a number of outstanding professionals who have guided me though critical transitions and provided good counsel when faced with both opportunities and challenges. My most influential mentor is Bill Derbyshire, whose unwavering support, extensive industry knowledge and willingness to provide direct constructive feedback help me to continue to grow as a professional.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Listen to what others say and do and then contribute— speak up, offer suggestions and solutions.

Hobbies: I enjoy following NASCAR and attending what races I can and taking photographs to share with others.

DIANE LAWLESS

Coca-Cola Refreshments Years with company: 19 Current position: Key Ac-

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? I’m

count Executive

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations:

proud of the fact that in my company I’ve worked in all facets of our operations— retail, distribution and corporate. My defining moment to date is the development of our Healthy Lifestyles program.

B.S Salve Regina University Coca-Cola Women’s LINC Volunteer Projects through Coca-Cola’s “Live Positively” Initiative

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What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? While I have been fortunate to receive recognition for my performance throughout my career, interestingly it is perhaps the success in my first role at the company that provides me with the greatest sense of achievement. I joined Coca-Cola 19 years ago as the first female account manager in my sales center. Not an easy job or environment to succeed in as the mother of a young family. The work was demanding but provided me with many opportunities to prove myself as a valuable member of the larger team.

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There were long hours and times that I struggled to balance competing demands of work and home but I made it work and learned a lot about integrity and resilience in the process. My success today as a key acccount executive is rooted in the critical personal and professional lessons learned during these early days of my career and the unique perspective provided during 19 years of experiences across the organization.

Most challenging part of your job: We work in a fast-paced industry with ever-changing circumstances, resources and demands. Managing key accounts in this environment requires a strong understanding of how to deliver on customer needs and expectations while meeting company objectives. At times, balancing these priorities can be the biggest challenge but it can also be the most rewarding.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: As I reflect on what has helped me to advance in my career, the following advice comes to mind: Be steadfast—Don’t give up.


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The TheGriffin GriffinReport ReportofofFood FoodMarketing Marketing

Women Women of Influence of Influence in the in Food the Food Industry Industry February February 2014 2014

Mentors Mentorsand andhow howhave they they have assisted assistedyou youininyour yourcareer: career:

DEBORAH DEBORAH LEBLANC LEBLANC

Imperial Imperial Distributors, Distributors Inc. Inc. Years Yearswith withcompany: company:28 28years Current Current position: position: Customer Customer Service ServiceManager Manager

Education Education,degrees degrees andand profesprosional fessional/volunteer / volunteer organizaorganizations: tions: I I have have attended attended numerous numerous training training and and development development programs programs and and seminars seminars fofocused cused on on my my personal personal and and professional professionaldevelopment. development.

ItIt all all starts with with my my family. family. I come I come from from generations generationsof ofhard hardworking working people, and and they theyinstilled instilledthat thatwork workethic ethinic me in me at at a avery veryyoung youngage. age. Since I have I have beenbeen withwith Imperial Imperial for most for most of my of my professionprofessional al career, career, andand I have I’ve have been been fortunate fortunate to work to work for for and and withwith manymany wonderful wonderful people people in myintime my time here.here. I feelI feel that that I’ve I’ve beenbeen able able to learn to learn from from eacheach one one of them, of them which which has has helped helped shape shape me me intointo the the perperson son that that I am. I am. Without Without them them I would I would not not be be here here today. today. They They have haveallall been great great mentors. mentors.

What Whatare are you most mostproud proudofinin your yourcareer careerachievements? achievements?Do Do you youhave haveaadefining definingmoment moment ofofyour yourcareer careertotodate? date? I Ilearned learnedvery veryearly earlythat thatImImperial perial Distributors Distributors isis very very customer customer focused. focused. Many Many companies companiessay saythat thatthey theyare are customer customer oriented, oriented, but but ImImperial periallives lives and and breathe breathesthat that every everyday. day.Therefore, Therefore,I Ifeel feel that thatI Iam amproudest proudestofofthe thecuscustomer tomerservice serviceteam teamthat thatI Iam am privileged privilegedtotolead. lead.I Ifeel feelmy my current currentstaff staffisisthe thestrongest strongest and andbest bestteam teamwe’ve we’veever everhad had

What Mentors are youand most how proud have of in they your assisted careeryou achievements? in your career: Do youNot have a defining moment applicable of your career to date? What are you most proud in I started out fishing on a boat Do your career achievements? andyou now am currently runhave a defining moment ning several departments at of your career to date?

atatImperial, Imperial,and andI Iam amsosovery very proud proud ofof them them and and the the job job they theydo. do.

Most Mostchallenging challengingpart partofofyour your job: job: The Themost mostchallenging challengingpart partofof my my job job isis managing managing all all the the many many different different facets facets and and ever ever-changing changing priorities prioritiesthat that vie vie for for my my attention attention each each day. day. I I try try toto be be well well orgaorganized nized,which whichreally reallyhelps helpsme me toprioritize prioritizetasks tasks and make make sure surethat thatall allour ourcustomer’s customers’ needs needsare aremet meteach eachand andevery every day. day.

Advice Advicefor forupcoming upcomingyounger younger executives: executives: My Mybest bestadvice advicewould wouldbe betoto work workhard, hard,be beable abletotoadapt adapt toto change, change, always always be be open open totolearn learnfrom fromothers, others,have haveaa passion passionfor forwhat whatyou youdo, doand and be bepatient. patient.Success Successdoes doesnot not happen happenovernight overnightnor norshould should it.it. IfIf you you continue continue toto work work hard hardeach eachday, day,keep keepan anopen open mind, mind and and continuously continuouslywork work toto improve improve your your personal personal and andprofessional professionalskills, skills,good good things thingswill willcome comeyour yourway. way.

RUTH RUTHA.A.LEVY LEVY

Stavis Stavis Seafoods, Seafoods, Inc. Inc. Years Years withwith company: company: 25 25 yearsposition: Chief BusiCurrent ness Officerposition: Chief BusiCurrent ness Officer Education, degrees and proEducation degreesorganizaand profesfessional/volunteer sional / volunteer organizations: BAtions: Economics and Linguis-

ticsBA Economics and Linguistics Women’s Foodservice Forum Women Foodservice Forum, National Fisheries Institute, National Fisheries Institute The Boston Club The Boston Club

Hobbies: Hobbies: Family, Family,Golf, golf,Tennis, tennis, spendspending ingtime timeatatthe thebeach. beach.

www.foodindustrywomen.com www.foodindustrywomen.com I NI N T H T E H EF O F O O D D I NI N D D U S U T S R T Y R Y

Advice Mostfor challenging upcomingpart younger of your executives: job: Maintain My biggest your sense challenge of hu- is mor working and dare with to do people and be who more settle than foryou mediocrity. expect.

Hobbies: Advice for upcoming younger executives: Fishing, boating, gardening,

Stavis Seafoods. My career Maintain your sense of huI started outfrom fishing on a to boat travel. path took me fishing mor and dare to do and be and now am currently runrunning a fishing boat. The more than you expect. ning departments next stepseveral was working in and at Stavis Seafoods. My procareer Hobbies: then running a seafood path took from fishing cessing plant.me The next step to Fishing, Boating, Gardening, running a fishing boat. Next was working for a broadline Travel step was working in and then distributor, buying and marrunning a seafood processing keting seafood. I ended up at plant.starting Next step was working Stavis, as sales manfor I awent broad line distributor ager. from sales manbuying marketing to seaager to VPand of marketing food. I ended upthe at span Stavis COO to now CBO in starting of 25 years. as sales manager. I went from sales manager Special accomplishment: to VP Marketing to COO to One of the first successfulnow CBO intothe span of 25 ly years. ship fresh wild salmon to European Special buyers. Accomplishment: Onechallenging of the first Most parttoofsuccessyour job:fully ship fresh wild salmon buyers. Myto European biggest challenge is working with people who settle for mediocrity.


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Women of Influence in the Food Industry

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

JULIE LIBBY Hannaford Supermarkets

Years with company: 10 Current position: Director of

Fresh Merchandising

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: B.S. in Business Administration. M.B.A., Founding Board of Directors member for Libra Future Fund, a non-profit organization that was created to capitalize upon the energy and creativity that Maine’s young people embody and to combat youth out-migration by supporting initiatives that increase the number of Maine-based professional opportunities.

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February 2014

Several mentors at Hannaford have been influential in my career. Three of the most important things they have taught me are: Focus your energy on being the best at what you’re doing right now Be genuine to who you are and never jeopardize your integrity Build strong relationships with mentors and sponsors who will give you constructive feedback and support that will truly help push you forward

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? My career path within the organization has allowed me to be involved in many aspects of the business, including supply chain, retail operations, category and merchandising. Having the opportunity to work within each of these areas gives me the opportunity to see the business through more filters and provides me with a deeper understanding of our overall operations.

Most challenging part of your job: Making trade-offs. There are a lot of great ideas and initiatives that you want to pursue, but if you don’t make thoughtful decisions and select areas of focus, the sum of your efforts won’t be as great as they would be if you chose the select few to do really well.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Find a mentor

and foster a meaningful relationship. Bring solutions to your supervisor instead of problems. Find ways to continue to grow – both personally and within the workplace. Strive for a work/life “balance.” Be genuine to who you are and purposeful about what you want your reputation to be and act on it accordingly. Value your associates – lead them, don’t just manage them.

Hobbies: I love the outdoors, enjoy reading, and I am an avid Boston sports fan. Most of all, I enjoy my family time with my husband and two small children.

Denny’s

Years with company: 6 Current position: Senior Di-

rector, Product Innovation

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Bachelor of Science, Food Science – University of Kentucky

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career: Barbara Timm-Brock challenged my technical skills and made me better. Jeff Spotz taught me supply chain

Crispy Green Inc. Years with company: 9 Current position: CEO &

Founder

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: B.S. & M.S. in Chemistry, Member of Institute of Food Technologists, Soroptimist International of America (NGO), volunteer of NJ Community Food Bank

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career: Coming from a pharmaceutical R&D background with no

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? I’m very proud that I was able to turn my passion into a business and made it work. Along the way, I learned a great deal about myself. Building a business from ground-up is not an easy feat, doing it without prior experience and outside funding requires a bit of madness

and chutzpah which I didn’t know I have.

Most challenging part of your job: The most challenging part of my job at the moment is to deal with the increasingly competitive environment and pricing pressure without compromising our own principles and product integrity. An equally challenging task is to educate our consumers not to judge the product and its quality simply by where it’s from. There’s a lot more to it than meets the eye.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Follow your passion, seize every opportunity and don’t be afraid to take some chances and make some changes once a while.

Hobbies: International travel, culture exchange, photography, glass blowing and sculpting.

www.foodindustrywomen.com I N

SHARON LYKINS

ANGELA LIU

food industry experience, to start a food company from a ground up took some courage and passion as well as naiveté. Fortunately, I have had good mentors along the way. Alan Levitan, former chief executive officer of Kings Supermarkets, has been the most valuable counsel on my side since the early days of the company. Through him, I learned a great deal about the food business, gained tremendous insight on how the retail channel works, which is vital to the success of our business, as well as important connections within the industry. Beyond that, Alan has been a good friend and a trusted advisor.

management. I learned about taking responsibility when plans don’t go perfectly from Chris Elliott. Tom Johnson gave me the opportunity to identify and set strategy. Now, I’m gaining a deeper understanding of leadership from Frances Allen. While several people have influenced my career in different ways, Stan Dorsey has been my mentor and friend my entire career. I’ve worked for Stan three times. He was always willing to set a goal, then let me figure out how to achieve it. These stretch assignments honed not only my technical skills, but taught me how to navigate the corporate structure to achieve the strategic objectives of the companies where I’ve worked.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? I don’t believe that I’ve had a career-defining moment yet. I’ve been fortunate to lead and be part of teams that have been able to put together successful programs and processes. My time at Den-

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ployee events. I coordinate teams and participate in 5K charity road races. I’m also involved with volunteering at The Friendly Kitchen in Concord, N.H., and Making Strides for Breast Cancer, as well as US FIRST Robotics over the past four years.

ny’s has been particularly rewarding. At Denny’s, I’ve been able to pull together all of the skills I’ve learned throughout my career as we’ve worked to revitalize the menu. The results have been good and continue to show tangible improvement. I’m proud of the results we’ve achieved.

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

Most challenging part of your job: The most challenging part of my job is balancing the expectations of each stakeholder group (senior management, franchisees, vendors, staff, etc.).

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Think of as many reasons as you can that might make a project fail then try to build solutions into the plan. Your work will speak for itself, but have a cheerleader in your corner that makes sure your work is noticed.

Hobbies: Tennis with the family, reading and cooking.

CHRISTINE LYLE

Associated Grocers of New England, Inc. Years with company: 24 Current position: Assistant Controller

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: I have a BA in Accounting from Southern New Hampshire University and am pursuing my MBA from Southern New Hampshire University. I’m very active in AG’s Activities Committee, helping to coordinate em-

Two people who have mentored me from the beginning of my career at AG are Steve Murphy, SVP/CFO, and Cindy Caldwell, controller. They have challenged me, encouraged me and expected more from me than I thought I was capable of doing. Because of their faith in me, I have been able to grow within the company.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? My most defining moment in my career was when I was promoted to assistant controller. My AGNE career began as an accounts payable clerk. Over the years I’ve had many opportunities and challenges which have allowed

me to grow personally and professionally and achieve positions with greater responsibilities.

Most challenging part of your job: The most challenging part of my position is to maintain a good work/life balance. Balancing family, extracurricular activities and the responsibilities of my position can create challenges.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: My advice to upcoming executives is to be passionate about what you do while not losing your sense of humor and being open to new ideas. Working hard to meet your goals will give you the greatest amount of personal satisfaction.

Hobbies: I have a wide range of hobbies, from stamping cards to outdoor activities. But what I like to do most is to challenge myself to do new things, such as glass blowing and learning to make candy.


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Women of Influence in the Food Industry

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

DONNA C. MAGLIO

Frozen & Refrigerated Association of the Northeast (FRANE) Years with company: 5 Current position: President/

Executive Director

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: MBA, Western New

England University. I currently work with Girls Incorporated of Southwestern Connecticut and volunteer at youth organizations in our areas as well as our local food banks.

My parents and sister were my early mentors and provided me the solid foundation, nurturing and support that has enabled me to be who I am today. Throughout my career, I have been fortunate to work with many individuals who each have given me something to take with me as I’ve grown. A good mentor isn’t about title or position, it’s the person who truly believes in what they do, takes chances and is passionate, and truly understands their impact on the bigger picture. I’ve been very fortunate to work with many people that have impacted me professionally. I know it sounds a bit crazy, but at this point in my life, my best mentors are my children. I have learned so much through them about what it means to really enjoy what I do, be kind, always sincere and a catalyst for positive change.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? I am

most proud of the opportunity to have worked with so many different individuals, both as part of my teams and as colleagues. I have seen many grow in their careers,

Over time I worked for three more florists and progressed into management roles.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

HOLLY MIGLIORE

C&S Wholesale Grocers Years with company: 19. Be-

fore that, 42 years in the floral industry.

Current position: Director of

Floral

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career: My personal mentor is my mother, who always believed in me and said I could do anything. I was first introduced to the floral world by my sister Suzanne who worked for a local flower shop. I joined her at 16 years old and immediately fell in love with the floral industry.

The Griffin Report of Food Marketing

February 2014

During my mid-20s the option to purchase a florist shop was offered to me. However, I decided instead to venture into the supermarket world. Floral business within a grocery store was just beginning and I was there in its infant stage. I can assure you this was an incredible change and a vastly different world from the flower shops I worked in. After working for two major supermarkets, I made the decision to start my own business and soon was selling to grocery chains, independent stores and wholesale distributors throughout New England. Then the opportunity arose to create floral programs for C&S Wholesale Grocers. And 19 years later, I am putting a lifetime of experiences to work. Having worked on all sides of the floral business, my love and passion for this industry is what has made me successful today.

Current position:

truly becoming leaders and really making a difference for our industry.

Division Vice President, North American Private Brand Development

Most challenging part of your job: The opportunity to be a part of an ever-changing Northeast marketplace, anticipating what our membership will want and keeping our association relevant to our members and industry, as it has been for the last 60 years, offers the most challenging and rewarding aspects of my position.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Stay true to

who you are, enjoy what you do. Don’t take positions because someone else thinks you “fit.” Be brave enough to take positions, roles and challenges that further your ability, allow you to take risks and to really impact the bigger picture.

Hobbies: Being with my chil-

dren is the most fun I have— Lego Robotics, playing outside–just being kids!

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: BA from Wellesley

College I serve on the board of directors for MusicWorks, a non-profit music therapy provider for children and adults in the Philadelphia suburbs.

KIMBERLEE ANDREWS MARSH

Daymon Worldwide Years with company: 1 Prior to joining Daymon, worked for Kellogg Co. for 10 years in sales and category management. Prior to that, she handled category management at Kraft Foods for seven years and spent seven years in sales with The Gillette Co.

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Brian Nohe at Gillette. He encouraged me to approach business issues by developing a plan, considering all potential outcomes and then to be open to new paths or ideas that I had not considered. He also reinforced how important it is to trust my own instincts. As a result of his advice, I have been fortunate enough to work with some of the best companies in the world and have developed relationships with customers, peers and associates who have broadened my business perspective in ways that I never would have considered possible.

I am most proud of the time in my career when I became responsible for a group of talented individuals who had not been performing as a team. After assessing the situation, we developed a plan to build professional and personal skill sets, create a cohesive team environment and encourage risk-taking. While they had been successful individually prior to my tenure, after learning to work better as a team we over-delivered every sales target, created partnerships with customers that remain to this day and had fun doing it.

Most challenging part of your job: Continually finding ways to stay ahead of trends that offer business-building opportunities for our retailer and supplier partners.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Be bold and open

to new adventures. Don’t be afraid to try new approaches.

Hobbies: Skiing, sailing and sports of all kinds.

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and career. My first would be my parents, who taught me to work hard and put your best foot forward and be kind to others. I have had many co-workers who have given their time, knowledge and experience as well as clear direction. I have learned over the many years in this business is learn to listen and appreciate the suggestions and opinions of others.

Most challenging part of your job: The biggest challenge now is to keep finding creative ways to succeed and grow the floral business for all. Lack of successors in the floral industry is our biggest challenge as we need to keep grooming and mentoring new associates for the future.

Advice for younger executives: I feel very fortunate today to have had a lifetime of mentors. My best advice is to do what you love and understand all sides of the business you work within, for this will enable you to make the best choices and succeed.

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

CYNTHIA MARTIN

Acosta Sales & Marketing Years with company: 30 Current position: Sr. Client Business Manager

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Associates Degree

and two years of a business course

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career: Over the span of my career I have had the benefit of many mentors that have influenced my personal life

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? The achievement that I am most proud of is my career growth. I started working with Food Enterprises at retail and have had the opportunity to work in various roles and functional positions. I am most proud of the ability to embrace change within the company and industry. I sincerely believe that careers are defined by many moments, both big and small. I am extremely honored that I have been selected as one of the Women of Influence in the Food Industry for 2014.

Most challenging part of your job: To understand all the aspects of this business. Adapting to different personalities and knowing how to get to the end results. Each day I strive to deliver a plan that will meet my clients’ goals and to align with the customer’s strategy. The most challenging has always been balancing time at work with time at home. I have been very lucky to have a supportive husband who has allowed me to pursue my career opportunities.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: My suggestion is to believe and trust in you. Be honest in dealing with people and you will gain more respect than people who just say what you think they want to hear. Take ownership of your decisions. Listen, keep an open mind and learn what you can from others. Believe in yourself and have goals.

Hobbies: Flower gardening,

and I spend much of my leisure time with my family and enjoying traveling in our motor home.


The Griffin Report of Food Marketing

February 2014

Women of Influence in the Food Industry

Dazzling Performance!

Congratulations To All 2014 Honorees. – From a Friend

THE ONLY FULL-SERVICE GLOBAL PRIVATE BRAND AND CONSUMER INTERACTIONS COMPANY

CONGRATULATIONS HONOREES! For more information, visit www.daymon.com.

ON BEHALF OF

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Women of Influence in the Food Industry

Stewardship Index for Specialty Crops Steering Committee and Coordinating Council member Prior volunteer leadership roles: St. Anne’s Episcopal Church Vestry, Produce for Better Health Foundation board, Associated Community Talent board, American Society of Association Executives Communications Committee.

KATHY MEANS Produce Marketing Association

Years with company: 24 Current position: VP of Gov-

ernment Relations and Public Affairs

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Masters in Nonprofit

Management: Regis University B.S. in Journalism: University of Kansas B.A. in Liberal Arts (French): University of Kansas Partnership for Food Safety Education board of directors

The Griffin Report of Food Marketing

February 2014

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

My partner, Rachel Mandes: She embodies the concept, “Doing the right thing, however hard it may be, is still the right thing to do.” My dad, Bill Means: From an early age he would say, “Are you going to be a leader or a follower?” And, as a top IBM salesman, he taught me to sell the sizzle, not the steak. Bob Carey, former PMA president: Bob was a master at working with others, building consensus and getting things done. His motto, “you can accomplish a lot if you don’t care who gets the credit,” became one of mine. An easygoing guy, he also helped me understand that

most problems aren’t as bad as they seem at first.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? I’m proud to have served an industry for more than 30 years that enriches people’s lives with good taste and good health. And I’m proud to have discovered I have an adaptive spirit – able to roll with the punches and explore new opportunities as they arise.

Most challenging part of your job: I am passionate about what I do, and that causes me to project a lot of drive, which can be off-putting. Taming my energy to be more effective is something I work on continually.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Discern your

priorities and your passions, and be true to yourself.

Hobbies: Entertaining (with produce, of course!), genealogy, reading, walking, photography.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements?

JAC MOSKALIK Brookshire Grocery Co.

Years with company: 3 Current position: Category Manager Deli/Food Service

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Junior Achievement volunteer

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career: I have worked with so many great individuals in the last 15 years, it’s hard to single out any one mentor. Anybody who can prosper in the

My entire career has been in the food industry. I became a buyer at 18 years old and progressed rather rapidly in the last 15 years. The struggles I encountered as a young female made me a stronger person and I am proud of the reputation I have built in the industry.

Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? There hasn’t been a particular moment or event per se, but in each position I have held in my career, there has been a sequence of events that are intangible that culminated in an unspoken confidence that leadership has in my performance.

Most challenging part of your job: The most challenging part of my job is explaining that change is a necessary catalyst to improvement and growth and no one has ever said that change is easy.

Albertsons

Years with company: 29 Current position: President, Albertsons Division

Intermountain

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Bachelor of Science

Colorado State University. Currently a board member of the Idaho Foodbank and the Boise Chamber of Commerce.

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

I am fortunate enough to

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food industry by adapting to change in a positive way is a mentor to me.

SUSAN MORRIS

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has lived everything he asks his team to do. Shane Dorcheus, currently president of Albertsons Southwest Division: Shane taught me to be even keeled, to listen to the facts and make objective decisions. I learned that emotion clouds reason and that listening, truly listening, will create a more productive outcome for everyone involved. Bob Butler, COO of Albertsons: Bob is an incredible people person. No matter who he meets, a courtesy clerk in a store, a customer, a CEO from a major company — they all feel as if they are the most important person in the world. And when he sees them again, he always remembers their name and usually some personal fact. People love him and want to work hard for him as he shows so much personal respect to everyone he meets!

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? I am most proud of making the decision back in 2010 to leave a big title and a large company behind to follow my heart and to rejoin the Albertsons LLC team.

I N D U S T R Y

Advice for upcoming younger executives:

Advisory. Former Mayor of Lincoln Park, N.J., Vice Chair N.J. Development Authority for Small Business Minorities & Women, Vice President N.J. Conference of Mayors

Never assume you know “everything” about the firm and/or industry that you are a part of, be a student of the business. In the food industry, positions come and go, companies come and go – regardless of circumstance, maintain your integrity, protect your name and do the right thing.

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

Hobbies: Spending time with family and friends, painting and cycling.

work once again with many of my former mentors. I have known each of them for several years and they taught me more than I could possibly say. Larry Hansen, currently the grocery sales manager at Albertsons Intermountain Division: Larry supported me in ways as a young woman in the business that I didn’t fully understand until later in life. He took me under his wing and taught me so much about the business.He empowered me to make decisions (large ones!) and held me accountable for the results. He gave me confidence by allowing me autonomy even when I was learning. And behind the scenes he got my back by making sure that the people I was dealing with knew that the buck stopped with me. Wayne Denningham, currently president of Albertsons Southern California Division: Wayne is one of the most passionate leaders I have ever worked for! He leads with energy, asks a great deal of his people, but that works as he was so successful in his own career that his high expectations come with credibility because he

LORELEI N. MOTTESE

Wakefern Food Corp. Years with company: 13 Current position: Director

Government Relations

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: B.A. William Paterson University, M.A. Fairleigh Dickinson University. Board member, NYFIA & DFIC State Food Associations. Chair of NGA, NYFIA & CFA GR Committees. Member, N.J. Child Labor Law

I am blessed to have had many. My mother was my first mentor. She was a strong believer in fending for yourself and taking responsibility for your actions. These have been guiding principles throughout my career. My most recent mentor at Wakefern is Natan Tabak, Sr. Vice President. He taught me the importance of challenging myself and would push me out of my comfort zone. I will always be eternally grateful.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? Strengthened Wakefern’s political presence, creating a leading force in shaping legislative/regulatory policies at the state and federal levels. Built a top-notch Goverrnment Relations (GR) Depart-

ment, PAC and GR team.

Most challenging part of the job: Keeping government out of our pockets.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Maintain an ongoing list of your achievements. Know the requirements of the job you want, and work to acquire the skills you need for the position.

Hobbies: Yoga and reading.


The Griffin Report of Food Marketing

February 2014

Women of Influence in the Food Industry

“We don’t accomplish anything in this world alone… and whatever happens is the result of the whole tapestry of one’s life and all the weavings of individual threads from one to another that creates something.” — SANDRA DAY O’CONNOR

Congratulations ON BEING RECOGNIZED AS

2014 Women of Influence IN THE FOOD INDUSTRY

Lorelei Mottese Director of Government Relations Wakefern Food Corp.

Your knowledge and experience in local, county, and federal government is an invaluable asset. Your friends and colleagues at Wakefern

©2014 Wakefern Food Corp. All Rights Reserved.

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Women of Influence in the Food Industry

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

CINDY MURPHY

Brookshire Grocery Co. Years with company: 31 Current position: Director of

Corporate Systems

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Served in the U.S. Marine Corps, North American SAP Retail SIG, Brookshire’s Women’s Leadership Forum, East Texas Food Bank.

The Griffin Report of Food Marketing

February 2014

Tim King, former chief financial officer of Brookshire Grocery Co.: Tim mentored me in many different ways. He encouraged and empowered me to take a leadership role on our enterprise resource planning system as a business owner. John D’Anna, CIO of Brookshire Grocery Co., is a visionary and has big-picture mentality. John challenges me with new opportunities and has provided guidance in my career path that has been invaluable. Both of these men valued diversity and inclusion and helped me progress in my career path.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? I’m most proud of moving from the business side of retail, from an accountant position, to the technical side of retail and excelling in the new role. I believe that, to date, a defining moment in my career would be when I participated on my first SAP

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

project. I was an accounting business lead on the project and successfully implemented a complex software solution. This fostered a love of technology and changed my career path from accounting to technology. The project challenged me with situations that honed my leadership skills and I became a much better leader.

Most challenging part of your job: Keeping updated on new software technology. It’s such a fast moving industry and it’s very challenging to keep up with advances across the retail space.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Never let fear keep you from taking on new challenges that are outside your current sphere of knowledge. This is true in your professional and personal lives.

Hobbies: My hobbies are reading, walking and traveling.

MARYBETH MURPHY

Coca-Cola Bottling Co. of Northern New England Years with company: 18 Current position: Key Ac-

count Executive

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Bachelor of Science – So. NH University Coca-Cola Women’s Link, Bedford (N.H.) Jaguars Cheer Association and St. Elizabeth Seton Church

I am lucky to say that I have had many people mentor me throughout my life. However, there are three people that stand out. The first is my mother, who taught me to be the strong, confident woman I am today. The second is Tom Bullock of Amoskeag Beverages, who taught me to never give up until the sale is final. And third, Andrew Marchesseault, who I have worked with at Coca-Cola for the past 15 years, who taught me the importance of how to make and work a plan to achieve the goals I set for myself. I am very grateful for all they have taught me.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

if not always perfect, mom.

Most challenging part of your job: The decision to continue my career and build a family has always been my most defining and challenging decision and the best decision I have ever made.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: My advice is that you can have it all — you just cannot have it all every day. Everything is a give-and-take. You need to find your balance and remember you are human and that each mistake is a learning opportunity to be a better person, both professionally and personally, tomorrow.

The proudest moment and the moment that thus far has defined my career is maintaining a grounded work/ life balance, which provides a positive example to my 14-year-old daughter of how a successful businesswoman can also be a truly successful,

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CONGRATULATIONS Marybeth Murphy

2014 Your commitment to our values, of Influence Honoree vision Women and action make us proud. We are proud of your commitment to our values and your focus on Customer Service.


The Griffin Report of Food Marketing Co-op Member, National Sizzler Franchise Association Member.

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

February 2014

Most challenging part of your job: The challenge we face

BMW Management, Inc. Sizzler Franchisee, Richie’s Real American Diner and joint venture with Texas Road House (Menifee, Calif.)

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? My

of great character, humility and grace. I would encourage them to develop heartfelt relationships, share their talents and pursue their passions.

SALLY A. MYERS

Years with company: 31. Founded the company with her husband in 1983. Current position: Partner/VP Marketing

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: B.S. in Communi-

cations, Pepperdine, Rotary Club, President / Sacramento Sizzler Advertising Coop, Founder Student of the Month Program, Inc., Los Angeles Sizzler Advertising

greatest career achievement has been the opportunity to lead the revitalization efforts of the Sizzler brand. My husband and I conceived what is now coined the “New Generation” Sizzler. We took the declining brand from tired and mundane to energetic and elevated the hospitality and service model. This was accomplished through a massive interior/exterior redesign, renovation and a heavy dose of innovation. We knew

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

KATHRYN O’BRIEN

Big Y Foods, Inc. Years with company: 35 Current position: Equipment Specialist

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Associates Degree in E-Commerce, Marketing Major, Certificate in Purchasing Fundamentals, Volunteer as a catechism teacher for our church, Girl Scout leader

The many mentors that have influenced my life and career have created the ongoing relationship of learning. My family members are my top mentors. Being from a large family, we learned to work together, respect others and keep the faith. Mentors have shown me that a positive attitude has the best impact on the people you deal with on a daily basis. This philosophy has helped me grow through many different roles within the organization. Several mentors I have worked with have a strong work ethic and value the opinions of others. They have taught me the needed skills to multitask, the importance of building lasting relationships and being a team player. They have also shown me that making a mistake is not the end of the world but an opportunity to learn.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? Over the last several years, I have had the opportuni-

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

it paid off when our guests said, “WOW, we’ve never experienced a Sizzler like this before. This is no longer our grandfather’s Sizzler.”

My parents, Jack and Linda Williams, were once the largest Sizzler franchisee. Their dedication, work ethic and passion for the Lord, people, hospitality and great food were instilled in me as a young child. It inspired me to follow in their footsteps. My husband is the wind beneath my wings and with a little elbow grease, passion and a “never give up” attitude, we have become the largest Sizzler franchisee and provide over 1,300 jobs in California.

today is to expeditiously complete the total overhaul of the final one-third of our restaurants in a cost-effective way. The New Generation Sizzler motivates and ignites our staff, energizes our core guest and sparks the interest and trial of our lapse users. The renovation of these final locations comes with great anticipation from our staff to our guests.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: To be a person

Hobbies: Besides loving on my grandchildren, my passion is to inspire high school students to make a difference. I am the founder/president of the Student of the Month Program, Inc. (SOM).

Women of Influence in the Food Industry

One of my first bosses in the broker industry that assisted and gave me the confidence to strive to “break the glass ceiling” in our company.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

LORRAINE NEALON

Kimberly Clark Years with company: 1 Current position: Customer Business Partner

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: B.S. Boston College, Network of Executive Women, (past) New England Food Foundation, Massachusetts Food Association

My biggest accomplishments have always centered around two areas: 1. Building good relationships with both my customers and associates. 2. A work ethic that enables me to make significant contributions and be recognized for them with varying achievement awards.

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ganizations both in and outside the workplace.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: I would say one of the most important things is to create your own network with mentors and sponsors. Be accountable and vocal. Remember where you came from and always give back.

Hobbies: Cooking, boating, travel, exercise.

Most challenging part of your job: The most challenging part of the job I have had in the CPG industry is to maintain a work/life balance in light of raising a family and being part of various volunteer or-

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teer for Rowayton Civic Association, Rowayton Library and Community Center, Rowayton Elementary School, St. Lukes School and Daymon Women’s Network.

ty to mentor several college interns within our organization. Watching these young adults grow and achieve the next level in their careers is extremely gratifying.

Most challenging part of the job:

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

Maintain the workload of this fast-paced environment which demands action and reaction on a minute-to-minute basis. Sustain a certain sense of urgency and the ability to multitask is needed to focus and organize the many details of equipment procurement.

I have had many informal mentors throughout my career who have mainly served as soundingboards regarding job changes, helping me navigate each of my upward moves carefully — and with my strengths and weaknesses as well as my ultimate goals in mind.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Believe in yourself, be better today than you were yesterday, never stop learning, and know that you can do anything you set your mind to.

Hobbies: Spending time with my family, traveling, reading, walking.

JANET OAK

Galileo Global Branding Group, A Daymon Worldwide Company Years with company: 1½ Current position: Senior Di-

rector, Global Consumer Strategy & Insights

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: I received my B.A. from Hobart and William Smith Colleges. Certificate of completion from Wharton School of Business, Finance For Non Financial Managers. Volun-

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? I am most proud of the people I have mentored, and each of the times they continue to re-connect with me for advice even after many, many years. The defining moment in my career was the epiphany I had when I was recruited to take a job on the client side of a marketing and manufacturing organization as a company officer and vice president of global strategy and planning.

I had previously served on the agency side and it was quite eye-opening, diverse, exciting and challenging. It let me prove to myself that I am highly adaptable and can seamlessly move between vertical industries and horizontal disciplines.

Most challenging part of your job: The most challenging part of my job today is getting beyond lip-service to truly giving consumers/shoppers a seat at the table, which then gives executives the courage to make important business decisions.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: My advice for younger executives in business today is to work smart, contribute to revenue generation and do the job you are hoping to get next.

Hobbies: I regularly run 5K races with my 12-year-old daughter, and have taken up tennis and paddle recently. I am an avid Words with Friends player and love to train my hunting dog on weekends.


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Women of Influence in the Food Industry

CHRIS ORNELAS Save-A-Lot

Years with company: 10 Current position: Director of

International Development & Wholesale

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: B.S. - University

of Houston, MBA Graduate Candidate –Our Lady of the Lake, Network of Executive Women, Produce Marketing Association, Make A Wish Foundation

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career: I

The Griffin Report of Food Marketing

February 2014

have been fortunate to have had very strong role models and several key mentors throughout my career. But, being a true “steel magnolia,” my grandmother became my earliest and most influential role model and mentor. Through her I learned early on how women in business can be a success. My grandmother grew up and lived in the Bible Belt in a time when few women worked outside the home and fewer still owned their own business. She taught me that women in business can be strong, independent and successful and do so with integrity, kindness and grace, without compromising their values or sacrificing their family.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

I am most proud of having been given the opportunity to lead and work with very talented individuals. Working and training associates that continue to develop and that I see advance in their career is personally rewarding. Those announcements and promotions are the private moments — celebrations in

which I know my contribution made a positive difference! My defining moment was when I began my assignment as director for international development. I met with several customers and in early conversations, it became readily apparent that beyond establishing our brand abroad, driving sales and expanding market share as Americans that export, international customers aspire to secure a piece of “America for themselves.” As an American exporter we have a significant responsibility to uphold and deliver upon our international customers’ expectations of “American products.” Delivering safe, high quality products that the consumer everywhere can trust is critical. However, what we are developing transcends our products — how we conduct business, how we operate becomes a reflection of how Americans in general operate.

of Governors.

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

PAM O’NEIL Garelick Farms

Years with company: 12 Current position: Regional

Merchandising Manager

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: I graduated from

Bridgewater State University with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Management. Past/Present volunteer organizations include: Network of Executive Women Regional Committee Member, Co-Chair of the NEW College Outreach and Mentoring Committee and Walpole Country Club Board

On a personal level, I was fortunate to be blessed with loving parents and a supportive family. They instilled in me a solid foundation with key values such as honesty, integrity, compassion, dedication, a strong work ethic and respect for oneself and others. I believe these core values have set the stage for my success. Another important mentor in my life is Allan, my best friend and partner, who has always believed in me and encouraged me throughout my life. Professionally, I have been extremely lucky to have had numerous people throughout my career who have guided and influenced me. The lessons and skills I have learned from them will be cherished forever.

dominated. I was the first female direct sales representative and later the first female regional sales manager for Spalding Sports Worldwide. I believe through my hard work and determination, as well as earning the confidence from the leadership team, these achievements were realized.

Most challenging part of your job: The most challenging

part of my job is practicing effective time management skills. There doesn’t seem to be enough hours in the day or the week. It is essential to continue to prioritize and re-evaluate the various demands of the competitive work environment on a daily basis. Successful time management is imperative.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Advice that I

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? Ear-

would have for a younger executive is to have passion for all that you do. Don’t be afraid to make a mistake but more importantly learn from it. Be organized, positive, enthusiastic, believe in yourself and learn something new every day.

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

Advice for upcoming younger executives:

David Novak, CEO Yum Brands, gave me my first opportunity in restaurants and taught me the power of inspiration. Dianne Kissel (retired), West Coast Group, developed my strategic creative skills and gave me my first joyous taste of innovation in new products.

Learn patience and pick your battles.

ly in my career I worked for Spalding Sports Worldwide. At that time, the sporting goods industry was male

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Women Impacting Store brand Excellence Advisory Board Enactus USA Advisory Board Institute for Corporate Productivity Advisory Board Michigan State University Management Advisory Board Western Michigan University Gary Fund Sponsor

TAMARA (TAMI) POLMANTEER

Daymon Worldwide Years with company: 3, after 17 years at Kellogg

Current position: Chief Human Resource Officer

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Bachelor’s degree

in Business Administration, Nazareth College Member, Society of Human Resource Management CEB Corporate Leadership Council Women in Foodservice World @ Work

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career: Early in my career I had a leader who believed in me, probably more than I believed in myself. He said, “One day, I will be working for you.” He assigned me projects and stretch assignments that I would have never have had the confidence to go after without his strong support.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? A key experience was when Kellogg sent me through Cornell’s CHRO Academy. Up to that point, I wasn’t sure if I wanted the pressure of the top HR job in an organization. That program really cleared away all my doubts

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and set me on the path to finding an opportunity where I could serve as chief HR officer. This ultimately led me to Daymon Worldwide, where I have worked now for three years.

Most challenging part of your job: The most challenging part of the role is balancing the multiple constituencies that I serve: the HR team, the executive team, individual business leaders, the CEO, the board of directors and all of our associates worldwide. Being a CHRO is more about emotional intelligence and political savvy than IQ. It also requires humility, a strong desire to solve problems, and once in awhile the courage to stand alone.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: To achieve break-

through performance and make the greatest possible contribution to your employer, you have to stay focused on three things: your own effectiveness in our current role, your contribution to the performance of others, and your use of others’ perspectives and ideas to improve on your work.

DENNY MARIE POST

Red Robin Gourmet Burgers, Inc. Years with company: 2½ Current position: Senior Vice

President, Chief Menu & Marketing Officer

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Bachelor of arts degree in journalism and social sciences, Trinity University

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? 1. Developing great teams and individuals who’ve gone on to success in their careers 2. Leading the Brand Transformation initiative at Red Robin

Most challenging part of your job: Driving the cultural and organizational change needed to grow

Hobbies: Cooking, watching cooking shows and hanging out with my family.


The Griffin Report of Food Marketing

February 2014

Women of Influence in the Food Industry

We Raise Our Glass to our own

Pam O’Neil, Merchandising Manager 2014 Women of Influence in the Food Industry Honoree

Congratulations to Pam and all the honorees!

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Women of Influence in the Food Industry

can be inspiring mentors. I work with Jayne Bozzuto, who inspires me to pursue my career and keep my family with me at all times. I have learned the most from my current supervisor. Paul Serrantino is very honest and hard working. He has inspired me with the best work ethics, and I strive to develop all of them.

WENDY RICE Acosta Sales & Marketing

Years with company: 9 Current position: Customer Business Manager

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career: I have had the privilege to work and learn from many great people. I would have to start with my husband, Mark. He is in the business and helps the work and home balance as we both respect each other’s career. The people you meet in this business

The Griffin Report of Food Marketing

February 2014

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

Advice for upcoming younger executives:

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

Some advice I could offer would be to build good relationships, be confident and honest, and always challenge yourself to do the best job you can.

Two incredible people, at two very different stages of my life and career, had a profound influence on me. Early in my career a most amazing woman became my mentor and consistently challenged me to think. Every time I thought I had the answer, she would ask, “So what?” She inspired me to reach. Much later in my career an inspiring and unique man became my champion and mentor. He elevated my confidence and appreciation of my own talents, giving me the platform and visibility to excel. Both of these individuals became my dear and lifelong friends.

Hobbies: Golf, photography and kayaking.

CATHY RIEGLER

Acosta Sales & Marketing has allowed me to grow within my career due to my determination, hard work and ability to develop strong customer relationships. Being recognized by the people in this industry for this nomination is definitely one of my defining moments.

Shopper Solutions – a division of Acosta Sales & Marketing Years with company: 26 Current position: Account Director

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations:

Most challenging part of your job: The most challenging part of my job is managing time in order to prioritize tasks as new and challenging ones arise.

B.S. in Business Management, Northeastern University

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

have enjoyed that diversity. My most personally rewarding moments are in mentoring others, however. There is great satisfaction in broadening someone’s viewpoint and giving him or her more to consider that may ultimately alter their direction.

Most challenging part of your job: To stay ahead of the curve.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: There is no en-

titlement. First, do your job well and then go beyond. It is about respecting and learning from those before you and then bringing your fresh insights to drive the business forward and in new directions. Search, learn, think and reach.

Hobbies: I enjoy hiking, photography and spending time with family.

Over my many years at Acosta I have held various positions in different areas of the business. It gives me a broader perspective and I

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Delta Delta Delta Alumnae Organization

Mentors and how they have assisted me in my career:

ROXANNE M. KANNE-ROUSH Fareway Stores, Inc.

Years with company: 11 Current position: Vice Presi-

dent – Training and Development

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: BA-Accounting-Simpson College, Indianola, Iowa Iowa Grocery Industry Association (IGIA) Bishop Drumm Retirement Center

I am a “cradle-grocer.” My father started as a carryout boy at 15 years old and retired from Fareway Stores over 51 years later. My father held the bar high — his strong work ethic, outstanding morals and perseverance to succeed are traits I learned early on, not only at home, but also while working for him. I strive to emulate these same characteristics every single day.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? I am most proud of my contributions in being able to recognize individual strengths, and combining those efforts to build successful teams who function together and make significant contributions to our organization, one of the most recent being the creation of our Retail Sales Team. I also am very grateful for the opportunities available to me in my position. I

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am extremely fortunate to be able to serve as a catalyst for our employees in reaching their long-term career goals within our company.

Most challenging part of my job: Much to do in a limited amount of time! I wish that I could spend much more time out in the retail environment, recognizing employees for a job well done, sharing opportunities with our employees and encouraging our employees to reach their full potential.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Find your passion, then LIVE IT!...Love what you do, work hard and believe in yourself!

Hobbies: Family activities, lake time, reading and cheering on the Iowa State Cyclones!

KIMBERLY SENTER Unilever

Years with company: 9 Current position: Sr. Director, Marketing to Shoppers

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: B.S., Business Administration, Florida A&M University, Network of Executive Women Co-chairperson, Unilever Women’s Interactive Network, Unilever African American Business Network

Mentors and how they have

Throughout my career, I’ve had mentors who have offered guidance and support, provided honest and constructive feedback and coached me through new and/or challenging situations. These relationships have contributed to my professional and personal success. I’ve had both formal and informal mentoring relationships, and the true value has come from being able to benefit from the wisdom, experience and insight of these trusted and respected advisors.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? I led a large team through a significant transformation that led to great results for our department and the organization. While the recognition was rewarding on many levels, I was prouder of the progress and success my team had made over the years we worked together to redefine the practice of category management within Unilever and the industry. That experience

solidified in my mind what was possible when the entire team worked together towards a common vision and with a commitment to winning.

Most challenging part of your job : Positive relationships are critical to our success. While I strive to satisfy my customer, partners and colleagues every day, in an increasingly competitive environment, I am often called to make tough decisions (that are sometimes unpopular choices) which will ultimately yield the greatest return for the business. Trade-offs are a necessary evil.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Have a vision and a plan for what you want in your career. Know where you are going, but always be open to the possibilities and opportunities that may lie outside of your plan.

Hobbies: I enjoy yoga, dancing and Zumba for physical activities. Traveling is also a passion of mine.


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respect and humility and, most importantly, having a sense of humor about it all. They had faith in my ability to get the job done and guided me toward a path of success in my job. I miss Bill Mello tremendously. He was a dedicated and kind man who tirelessly devoted his time and energy to the New England Food Foundation (NEFF).

MEGAN SERVELLO

Massachusetts Food Association Years with company: 20 Current position: Director of

Operations

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: BSBA Marketing,

Xavier University, Cincinnati, Ohio St. Jude’s Youth Group, Girls Scouts of Eastern MA

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

Chris Flynn and Bill Mello have both been wonderful mentors to me throughout my career. They both set great examples of leadership,

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

I am continually proud of the work and my involvement in MFA and NEFF. Both organizations work on behalf of others — MFA as a watchdog for the food industry in the state and NEFF for less fortunate children. Both organizations have had a wonderful influence on my career in that, as organizations, they put others’ needs before their own. Year after year, I witness the time and effort members of the food industry donate to the NEFF. Whether it is an hour or a day, their hard work and dedication aids less fortunate children. They are all an inspiration to me. My husband and I try to instill in our children the

need to always be thankful for the blessings we are given and to give back. Lend a hand when you are able and you will reap the rewards.

ation and Women’s Foodservice Forum. At Kettle Cuisine I’ve spearheaded our corporate involvement with hunger relief organizations including Community Cooks and The Food Project and am also involved with Project Bread and the Greater Boston Food Bank.

Most challenging part of your job: My father always taught us that if you are not challenged in your employment, it may be time to move on. I am currently working on taking MFA’s social media and website in a new and exciting direction. Truly challenging for me! I am in the market for a mentor younger than me at the moment.

COURTNEY JO

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Find a good men-

Kettle Cuisine

tor, male or female. They will prove to be an invaluable resource to you both in your current job and in the event you move on to another position. Trust your gut instinct and follow it through. I highly recommend Network of Executive Women for young women entering the food industry.

Hobbies: I enjoy spending

time with my family and friends in Maine, reading and channeling my creative side by interior decorating.

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

SCHOENBAECHLER Years with company: 3+ Current position: Brand Marketing Manager

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Bachelor of Arts from

University or South Carolina (Media Art/Photography) Currently working towards an MBA with an emphasis in Marketing and Entrepreneurship at Babson College Current member of the Network of Executive Women, American Marketing Associ-

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My previous manager, Jenny Badman, taught me how to think outside of the box in marketing and work with the materials at hand. She’s a brilliant writer and brand builder and she boosted my confidence as a graphic designer at the beginning of my career and then helped me grow into a marketer over several years of working together and watching her do what she does so well. She really helped foster a passion for the food/hospitality industry in me. My current manager, Levon Kurkjian, has become a mentor and good friend since I began working at Kettle Cuisine three years ago. Levon has been a champion for my professional development since I started, so he really pushed me to think at a higher level and get more

analytical with marketing. I’ve learned a lot about marketing strategy and the food industry from working with him, but more importantly I’ve learned how to manage and work with people. He builds relationships through trust, honesty, respect and a little bit of humor, and I strive to mimic his integrity in my own career. He also helped me with the decision to go back to school for my MBA, which I’m incredibly thankful for.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? My most proud accomplishment as a marketer has been the rebranding of Kettle Cuisine, which we completed this year. Although we are a B-to-B operation, I worked to infuse humanity and a sense of story about our ingredients, people and products that our customers can relate to. We were also able to identify our brand/company purpose through the process, which has had a great impact. Our new website is best-in-class and our customers have expressed their excitement with our story and new features that make their operations run more smoothly.

Honoring Excellence in the Food Industry Market Basket honors the contributions of integrity, hard work, and leadership from Megan Servello of the Massachusetts Food Association, and all other 2014 inductees.

Congratulations! Megan Servello

Massachusetts Food Association

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chair positions and currently serve as a deacon at the First Church of Christ, Wethersfield, Conn. Certified Public Accountant

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career: Len Rosinski taught me invaluable lessons in stretching beyond my comfort zone (accounting/finance/IT) and in building my confidence, giving me latitude to make decisions and take risks.

LISA SHATTUCK

Advantage Sales and Marketing Years with company: 20 Current position: SVP Opera-

tions, In-Store Opportunities division

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: B.S. Business Management, Boston College Member of NEW (Network of Executive Women) Held various committee

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What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? Overall, I’m proud to lead a team that provides consistently excellent promotion execution for our customers and clients. Two “defining moments” stand out. InStore Opportunities was purchased by Advantage Sales and Marketing in 2005. Going through the due diligence process in the months leading to the sale was incredibly challenging and an amazing learning experience. More recently, coordinating

the manufacture, logistics, installation and servicing of Superfridge coolers in over 2,000 Walmart stores in under six months was another milestone.

ally and personally. He gave me the opportunity to change career paths and I am sincerely grateful to him. His dedication to the industry, customers and employees’ success inspires me to this day.

Most challenging part of your job:

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

Managing what are often competing demands between our clients and customers.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Always focus on what is most important to your customers and clients. It is easy to become distracted by management demands, budgets, etc., but in the face of constant change and new constraints, get creative in keeping the clients and customers happy. Adaptation keeps the work interesting and the company sharp.

Hobbies: Enjoying time with my husband and sons, reading, puzzles and hiking.

KATHY SHEETS J. Polep Distribution Services

Years with company: 20 Current position: VP of Sales

and Administration

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Bridgewater State College

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career: I was fortunate to have had Kenny Morse as my manager and mentor for 32 years. Throughout my professional life Kenny has encouraged me to grow both profession-

The most defining moment was when I had the opportunity to become a sales representative. When making my first cold call I realized it wasn’t the scary and unpleasant experience I thought it might be. I learned to believe in myself. I am most proud of my longevity within the industry and the increased responsibilities that I have achieved. An added benefit that I am proud of is the long-term friendships with co-workers and industry peers that I have made over the years.

pact the company’s growth and success. The challenging part of my job is balancing the company’s, customers’ and employees’ goals in an ever-changing industry.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: My advice to young executives is to work hard and accept new opportunities and challenges and don’t let the fear of failure overcome you. You’ll be surprised where it might take you. I would encourage them to mentor others, “pay it forward.” I believe nothing can match the self-satisfaction you’ll feel from sharing your experiences helping others.

Hobbies: Cooking, golfing, dancing.

Most challenging part of your job: I feel fortunate to be in a position that allows me to influence decisions that im-

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RHONDA SILTMAN

Coborn’s, Inc. Years with company: 15 Current position: Category Manager, Natural Foods and Specialty/Ethnic Foods

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Studied Community Health and American Studies at St. Cloud State University. Graduate of the Cooperative Management Institute at University of Wisconsin-Madison

During my career at Borders, I had an amazing store manager, Curtis Corl. He taught me several important lessons through his words and actions. He once told me that the trepidation over something is always worse than the actual experience and I have found that to always be true. He also taught me how to push myself to the next level and have a great time doing it. Most importantly, he demonstrated a real respect for his team.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? I am most proud of transitioning from a store role to managing the category. That has earned me the respect of the people I work with at store level. Every day I am proud of our amazing natural foods growth. I also have a passion for locally sourced items and am proud to be able to help those companies grow along with us. My defining moment was certainly the day that our vice

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president of merchandising referred to me as one of the best natural foods category managers in the country!

Consumer Marketing Conf. Former Board Member, Women’s Food Service Forum

Most challenging part of your job:

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career?

Managing the day-to-day duties alongside large projects and store visits is very challenging. I also want to say “yes” to all the great new items but have to rein myself in!

Advice for upcoming younger executives: The best way to eat an elephant is one bite at a time!

Hobbies: Reading, hockey (watching, not playing!), cooking and travel.

Years with company: 6+ Current position: Executive

Women’s Foodservice Forum – This organization helped me realize my own potential and provided me with strategies for growing my career and managing work/ life balance. David Novak – He taught me the power of passion, building a talented team and strong communication. Rick Silva – He taught me how powerful deep and passionate engagement can be on the success of a business.

Education Degrees & Volunteer Organizations: University of

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? I am most

TERRI SNYDER Checkers Drive-In Restaurants, Inc.

Vice President & Chief Marketing Officer

Kansas: B.S., Advertising & Marketing Board of Directors, Checkers Drive-in Restaurants, Inc. Board of Directors, University of South Florida, School of Business and School of Communication Industry Advisory Board, NPD/Crest Advisory Board, Franchise

proud to have worked with the Checkers®/Rally’s® executive team to transform the business into a vibrant growth brand that leads the category in same-store sales growth. As EVP & CMO, I have led a talented internal marketing team and a robust network of respected agency partners to create strategic marketing programs that target and

grow the chain’s core consumer audience, drive restaurant traffic and generate increased sales and profits. Under my leadership, Checkers/Rally’s has dramatically grown its relevancy to consumers through several key initiatives, including: new product introductions that leverage the brand’s promise of bold, craveable flavor, strong value offerings (crazy good food for little cash) that meet the needs of today’s consumer and late night innovations. I am proud that my role at Checkers Drive-In Restaurants extends into every area of marketing, including national and regional advertising, field marketing, public relations, social media and new product development as well as franchise marketing and co-op leadership.

Most challenging part of your job? At Checkers, I have the

opportunity to work with a highly engaged, cross-functional executive team, dedicated franchisees who are passionate about our brand, and hardworking, enthusiastic employees across the country. I also have the excitement of connecting with our guests.


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Category Manager - Natural Foods Coborn’s Inc.

Thank You for your dedication, commitment and hard work. You make us proud!

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Shopping Center Committee Member – CoreNet Global and Board Member of its Pittsburgh, PA Chapter Member – Food Marketing Institute (FMI) Board Member – Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council

Mentors and how they have assisted in your career: Men-

M. MICHELE “SHELLY” SPONHOLZ Giant Eagle Inc.

Years with company: 18 Current position: Senior Vice

President, Real Estate & Development

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Allegheny College, BA in Political Science/Pre-Law Penn State University, AD in Paralegal Science Master of Corporate Real Estate (CoreNet Global) Member – International Council of Shopping Centers (ICSC) Member – ICSC Open Air

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tors, both formal and informal, have played a critical part in my career development. One of my first mentors was an amazing female executive who rose in the ranks of McDonald’s Corporation to become its president of U.S. operations. She challenged everyone around her but was also quick to acknowledge quality work and build confidence in those around her. Her mentorship inspired me to stay focused and strive to be effective no matter what obstacles I had to overcome. From the day I began my career at Giant Eagle, I was fortunate to have our now-president and chief operating officer as my mentor. He taught me the supermarket business, supported my growth within the organization, listened to my concerns and always pushed me to do more and be better. Last but not least are those that provide mentorship informally. Administrative staff, middle management as well as

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

peer group advice has helped me to understand the differing dynamics of how managers can improve and become more effective both personally and professionally.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? The excitement and satisfaction derived from supporting our company’s successful entry into new markets and its development of several new formats (Market District, GetGo, GEX, Market District Express and Good Cents) is a great source of pride. This achievement would not have been successful without the tireless efforts of my team members. It was having the honor and pleasure of leading their work that made these events extraordinary. When I was in my mid-20s, I made the decision to “climb the corporate” ladder.

Most challenging part of your job: Change management.

KIMBERLY TAYLOR

Delhaize America Years with company: 11 Current position: VP-Fresh

Category

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Bachelor of Science Business Administration from Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

Staying ahead of the curve in the supermarket business means new challenges and innovation.

Many people influenced me throughout my life and professional journey. My folks instilled a set of core values that are non-negotiable. They always told me I could do anything I set my mind to and I believed them! Early in my career, I worked for Terry Martz and she helped me to develop a strong understanding of category management and general business functions which provided me a firm foundation to build upon and fueled my success. I feel the best mentors I have had are those who provide specific guidance and ideas to achieve my desired goals. I have learned over the years that feedback is a gift and sometimes you have to ask for it.

am extremely proud of the work George Parmenter, Jen Levin and I did bringing to life the Delhaize America Seafood Sustainability Policy. This work enabled me to get very involved with the industry and make a difference to the environment, fish stocks and people working in underdeveloped countries.

Most challenging part of your job: The most challenging part of my job is time management and juggling priorities.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Enjoy your journey and appreciate each relationship you have. Learn to have productive conversations and listen a lot. Finally, ask for feedback and accept it as a gift.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? My favorite role so far has been managing the seafood category. It challenged my ability to make decisions where I did not have a lot of data or clear direction. I

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Kim Taylor for being recognized as a 2014


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LAURA B. TRUST

SJB Bagel Makers of Boston, Inc., Finagle a Bagel Years with company: 16 Current position: President Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: BA, Barnard College, Columbia University, MBA MIT Sloan School.

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Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

Advice for upcoming younger executives:

My father, who built an international business from nothing, and my mother, who built the business with my father while raising us. Patty Newburger, who taught me how to go after what was needed, Stephanie Bernier, who taught me how to be organized and strategic. My husband, Alan, who balances me out perfectly. Nobody moves through their careers without a lot of help, and it has been my daily goal to pay it forward.

Focus first, primarily and always on the quality of the product or service of you are providing. The rest comes from there.

ation of Investor Relations, active locally in Thomasville Member of Board of Trustees for Archbold Hospital and Thomas University

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career: George Deese, Executive Chairman of the Board (formerly CEO), and Amos McMullian, previous Chairman and CEO.

MARTA JONES TURNER

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

Flowers Foods, Inc.

Years with company: 35 Current position and your immediate supervisor: Executive

If your company can do well and do good, it is a great achievement. I am most proud when I know we’ve done well by our guests and associates.

Vice President of Corporate Relations, reports to President and CEO Allen Shiver

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations:

Most challenging part of your job:

BA Communications from University of Georgia 1976 Member of National Associ-

Avocados.

Most challenging part of your job: Investor relations

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Learn from every experience, every person at all levels of your organization.

Hobbies: Birdwatching, reading.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? Establishing Flowers Foods’ investor relations program, capturing evidences of Flowers Foods’ unique culture through the stories of our amazing team members around the company, launching Flowers’ first program to encourage continuation of culture in 1980s and recreating the program in 2013 for new generations of team members.

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Our congratulations to Jess and Jennie, representing the dedication and commitment of our supermarket management team.

Jennie Fotovich

Jess Winship


The Griffin Report of Food Marketing ry Group’s Young Executive Organization Board.

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career: My father has been my biggest mentor. He has taught me resiliency in business and commitment to going after what you want. He has been instrumental in helping me grow as a professional.

KATIE WAGNER MWS Enterprises, Inc.

Years with company: 9 Current position: Vice Presi-

dent

Education, degrees and professional/volunteer organizations: Bachelor of Science degree in Applied Psychology from Ithaca College Executive MBA from the State University of New York at Buffalo Serves on the State University of New York at Buffalo School of Management Alumni Association Board as well as the National Adviso-

February 2014 It will take time and you will make mistakes, and that is OK because you will be better for it in the end.

Hobbies: I enjoy reading, traveling, outdoor activities, exercising and spending time with my husband and daughter.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date?

JESSICA C. WINSHIP

I am most proud of the fact that I am at a position where I can see the impact my ideas and changes have throughout my organization. I am at the point that I can truly make a difference in the day-to-day work life of my people.

Roche Brothers Supermarkets Years with company: 25 Current position: Assistant Store Manager for Westborough Roche Brothers

Most challenging part of your job:

Mentors and how they have assisted you in your career:

The most challenging part of my job is finding balance with work and my home life now that I have a toddler.

I have had many mentors through the years. First and foremost my mother, who I can’t thank enough for making me the woman I am today. My father, who taught me to be humble, my brother who has taught me how to lead by

Advice for upcoming younger executives: My best advice is to be patient and persistent when going after what you want.

Women of Influence in the Food Industry

example and that hard work is noticed, my dear friend Yolanda who guided me as a young woman and still guides me today, Pat, Bud, Ed and Rick Roche who took me under their wings as a young woman and instilled in me family values, community and the true meaning of generosity, my colleagues Robin and Aimee who keep me sane and who push me to be the best I can be, my former boss Tom who exemplifies that family comes first and humor is needed to survive in this industry, my travel partner Clair who showed me that you always need to be true to yourself and never change who you are, and last but not least, my wife Dana, who believes in me and encourages me to stay true to my path.

What are you most proud of in your career achievements? Do you have a defining moment of your career to date? I am most proud of being asked to be a part of the startup team that will launch a series of small stores for Roche Brothers. I feel my defining moment is yet to come.

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A SPECIAL CONGRATULATIONS TO THESE 2014 WOMEN OF INFLUENCE HONOREES

Sarah Binney, J. Polep

We appreciate their many contributions to the Food Industry!

Kathy Sheets, J. Polep

Katie Wagner, MWS Enterprises

www.ssfoodbroker.net (518) 899-6592

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Most challenging part of your job: I am constantly surrounded by associates and customers, and it is challenging to be on my “A” game daily. However, it is that daily challenge that gives me the most joy. I have the ability to educate, support and build a team with my associates, coupled with the ability to make customers smile, laugh and truly enjoy their shopping experience at Roche Brothers.

Advice for upcoming younger executives: Always do the right thing no matter how hard it may be, take pride in everything you do, lead by example and walk with graceful confidence.

Hobbies: I love to cook and I love spending time with my family.


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Women of Influence inFood the Food Industry February Women of Influence in the Industry February 20142014

Advertisement Index Index Advertisement Acosta................................... ..................................13 13 Acosta

From A A Friend Friend #1 #1.................. From ................. 22

Promotion Board. ..................39 21 Market Basket ......................

AGNE/Mann 29 AGNE / MannAdvt................ Adv .............. 29

From A A Friend Friend #2 #2................ 31 From ............... 31

Bay State State Milling Milling.................. 12 Bay ................. 12

From A A Friend Friend #3 #3................ 46 From ............... 46

Oakhurst N.E. DairyDairy/Ethos............ 3 Promotion Board .................. 21 Pioneer Cold. ......................... 29

Boston Market Market......................... ........................88 Boston

Garelick................................. ................................37 37 Garelick

C&S Wholesale Wholesale Grocers Grocers.......... .........55 C&S

Giant Eagle Eagle........................... 43 Giant .......................... 43

Calise Bakery Bakery........................ 18 Calise ....................... 18

Griffin Connect Connect........................ .......................77 Griffin

Catania Spagna Spagna..................... 26 Catania .................... 26

Griffin Report Report........................ .......................48 48 Griffin

Coborn’s/KeHE.................... 41 Coborns/KeHE .................... 41

HP Hood Hood............................... 15 HP .............................. 15

Coca-Cola N.E. N.E...................... 34 Coca-Cola .................... 34

Imperial Distributors Distributors............. ............27 27 Imperial

Coca-Cola Refreshments Refreshments....... 25 Coca-Cola ...... 25

Polep(Binney) (Binney).................... JJ.Polep .................... 66

Dari Farms Farms........................... 47 Dari .......................... 47

Polep(Sheets) (Sheets).................... ..................41 41 JJ.Polep

Daymon Worldwide Worldwide.............. 31 Daymon ............. 31

Jacob Wirth Wirth Restaurant Restaurant........ .......19 19 Jacob

Delhaize/Food 42 Delhaize / FoodLion.............. Lion............ 42

Leavit Corporation Corporation.................. Leavit ................. 33

Dietz & & Watson Watson.................... 17 Dietz ................... 17

Market Basket....................... 39

Dunkin’Brands Brands..................... 23 Dunkin ..................... 23

New England Dairy

Oakhurst Dairy/Ethos............ 3 Roche Bros. ........................... 44 Pioneer Cold ......................... 29 S&S Food Brokers................ 45 Roche Bros ........................... 44 Safeway................................ 14 S&S Food Brokers ............... 45 Shaw’s.................................. 16 Safeway ............................... St. Joseph’s University.........14 10 Shaws .................................. 164 Tops Markets.......................... St Joseph’s University ......... 10 Unified Grocers..................... 24 Tops Markets University of ......................... 4 Massachusetts Unified GrocersAmherst.......... .................... 249 Wakefern.............................. 33 University of Massachusetts Amherst.......... 9 Wakefern ............................. 33

“Well done is better than well said.” – Ben Franklin We know it takes dedication, focus and vision to succeed in the food industry. Every woman in this issue exemplifies these qualities. We wish all 2014 honorees continued success!

– From A Grateful Friend


The Griffin Report of Food Marketing

We Salute the Cream of the Crop! Congratulations to all 2014 Women of Influence in the Food Industry Honorees. From your friends at Dari Farms Ice Cream Distributors

ICE CREAM DISTRIBUTORS

February 2014

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The Griffin Report of Food Marketing

The Griffin Report recognizes the monumental efforts of all 2014 honorees. We applaud the high standards of these women, because they improve the food industry as a whole.

Well Done, 2014 Women of Influence in the Food Industry Honorees!


2014 Women of Influence